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Sample records for brain metabotropic glutamate

  1. Imaging for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 in rat and monkey brains using PET with [18F]FITM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Maeda, Jun; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yui, Joji; Hatori, Akiko; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nagai, Yuji; Tokunaga, Masaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we evaluate the utility of 4-[(18)F]fluoro-N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methylbenzamide ([(18)F]FITM) as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for imaging of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) in rat and monkey brains. In vivo distribution of [(18)F]FITM in brains was evaluated by PET scans with or without the mGluR1-selective antagonist (JNJ16259685). Kinetic parameters of monkey PET data were obtained using the two-tissue compartment model with arterial blood sampling. In PET studies in rat and monkey brains, the highest uptake of radioactivity was in the cerebellum, followed by moderate uptake in the thalamus, hippocampus and striatum. The lowest uptake of radioactivity was detected in the pons. These uptakes in all brain regions were dramatically decreased by pre-administration of JNJ16259685. In kinetic analysis of monkey PET, the highest volume of distribution (V(T)) was detected in the cerebellum (V(T) = 11.5). [(18)F]FITM has an excellent profile as a PET ligand for mGluR1 imaging. PET with [(18)F]FITM may prove useful for determining the regional distribution and density of mGluR1 and the mGluR1 occupancy of drugs in human brains.

  2. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Julie Ladeby; Blaabjerg, Morten; Bogetofte Thomasen, Helle

    2015-01-01

    differentiated an immortalized, forebrain-derived stem cell line in the presence or absence of glutamate and with addition of either the group I mGluR agonist DHPG or the selective antagonists; MPEP (mGluR5) and LY367385 (mGluR1). Characterization of differentiated cells revealed that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 were...

  3. Altered expression patterns of group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J. J. G.; Wolswijk, G.; Bö, L.; van der Valk, P.; Polman, C. H.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for glutamate receptors in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we have focused specifically on the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. The expression of group I (mGluR1alpha and

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Chiriboga, A. Sebastian; Komorowski, Lars; Kümpfel, Tania; Probst, Christian; Hinson, Shannon R.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe retrospectively the clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1-IgG). Methods: Specimens of 9 patients evaluated on a service basis in the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory by tissue-based immunofluorescence assay (IFA) yielded a robust, synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with mGluR1-IgG (serum, 9; CSF, 2 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay (CBA) confirmed mGluR1 specificity in all 11 specimens. A further 2 patients were detected in Germany primarily by CBA. Results: The median symptom onset age for the 11 patients was 58 years (range 33–81 years); 6 were male. All 9 Mayo Clinic patients had subacute onset of cerebellar ataxia, 4 had dysgeusia, 1 had psychiatric symptoms, and 1 had cognitive impairment. All were evaluated for malignancy, but only 1 was affected (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma). One developed ataxia post–herpes zoster infection. Head MRIs were generally atrophic or normal-appearing, and CSF was inflammatory in just 1 of 5 tested, though mGluR1-IgG was detected in both specimens submitted. Five patients improved (attributable to immunotherapy in 4, spontaneously in 1), 3 stabilized (attributable to immunotherapy in 2, cancer therapy in 1), and 1 progressively declined (untreated). The 2 German patients had ataxia, but fulfilled multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria (1 relapsing-remitting, 1 progressive). However, both had histories of hematologic malignancy (acute lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma), and had mGluR1-IgG detected in serum by CBA (weakly positive on tissue-based IFA). Conclusions: mGluR1 autoimmunity represents a treatable form of cerebellar ataxia. Dysgeusia may be a diagnostic clue. Paraneoplastic, parainfectious, or idiopathic causes may occur. PMID:26888994

  5. The metabotropic glutamate receptors: structure, activation mechanism and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Jean-Philippe; Acher, Francine

    2002-06-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) involved in the regulation of many synapses, including most glutamatergic fast excitatory synapses. Eight subtypes have been identified that can be classified into three groups. The molecular characterization of these receptors revealed proteins much more complex than any other GPCRs. They are composed of a Venus Flytrap (VFT) module where glutamate binds, connected to a heptahelical domain responsible for G-protein coupling. Recent data including the structure of the VFT module determined with and without glutamate, indicate that these receptors function as dimers. Moreover a number of intracellular proteins can regulate their targeting and transduction mechanism. Such structural features of mGlu receptors offer multiple possibilities for synthetic compounds to modulate their activity. In addition to agonists and competitive antagonists acting at the glutamate binding site, a number of non-competitive antagonists with inverse agonist activity, and positive allosteric modulators have been discovered. These later compounds share specific properties that make them good candidates for therapeutic applications. First, their non-amino acid structure makes them pass more easily the blood brain barrier. Second, they are much more selective than any other compound identified so far, being the first subtype selective molecules. Third, for the negative modulators, their non competitive mechanism of action makes them relatively unaffected by high concentrations of glutamate that may be present in disease states (e.g. stroke, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, etc.). Fourth, like the benzodiazepines acting at the GABA(A) receptors, the positive modulators offer a new way to increase the activity of these receptors in vivo, with a low risk of inducing their desensitization. The present review article focuses on the specific structural features of these receptors and highlights the various possibilities these

  6. The change of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 expression level in rats with late-stage traumatic brain injury and the therapeutic effect of taurine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying CAI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the change of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 expression level in rats with late-stage (the 7th day traumatic brain injury (TBI and the role of taurine. Methods The left cerebral TBI rat models were made by using lateral fluid percussion method. A total of 30 specific pathogen free (SPF male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham operation group (control group, TBI model group (TBI group and taurine treatment group (taurine group. Wet and dry weight method was used to measure the brain water content. Real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the change of mRNA and protein expression of aquaporin 4 (AQP4 and mGluR5 in each group.  Results Compared with control group, the brain water content (t = 4.893, P = 0.002, AQP4 mRNA (t = 6.523, P = 0.000 and protein (t = 4.366, P = 0.008 expression were upregulated, while mGluR5 mRNA (t = 5.776, P = 0.001 and protein (t = 3.945, P = 0.014 expression were downregulated in TBI group. After taurine treatment, the brain water content (t = 2.151, P = 0.140, AQP4 mRNA (t = 1.144,P = 0.432 and protein (t = 0.367, P = 0.804 decreased to normal, while mGluR5 mRNA (t = 1.824, P = 0.216 and protein (t = 1.185, P = 0.414 increased to normal. Correlation analysis showed brain water content was negatively correlated with mGluR5 mRNA (r = -0.617, P = 0.014 and mGluR5 protein (r = -0.665, P = 0.007, while it was positively correlated with AQP4 protein (r = 0.658, P = 0.008.  Conclusions Taurine can significantly increase the mGluR5 expression level of brain issue in the late-stage (the 7th day of TBI and decline brain edema and brain water content. It may be a potential protective agent as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.08.008

  7. Evaluation in vitro and in animals of a new 11C-labeled PET radioligand for metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Clark, David T.; Morse, Cheryl; Pike, Victor W.; Barth, Vanessa N.; Rhoads, Emily; Siuda, Edward; Heinz, Beverly A.; Nisenbaum, Eric; Dressman, Bruce; Joshi, Elizabeth; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Fisher, Matthew J.; Masters, John J.; Goebl, Nancy; Kuklish, Steven L.; Tauscher, Johannes; Innis, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Two allosteric modulators of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) were evaluated as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for mGluR1. LY2428703, a full mGluR1 antagonist (IC 50 8.9 nM) and partial mGluR5 antagonist (IC 50 118 nM), and LSN2606428, a full mGluR1 and mGluR5 antagonist (IC 50 35.3 nM and 10.2 nM, respectively) were successfully labeled with 11 C and evaluated as radioligands for mGluR1. The pharmacology of LY2428703 was comprehensively assessed in vitro and in vivo, and its biodistribution was investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, and by PET imaging in the rat. In contrast, LSN2606428 was only evaluated in vitro; further evaluation was stopped due to its unfavorable pharmacological properties and binding affinity. 11 C-LY2428703 showed promising characteristics, including: (1) high potency for binding to human mGluR1 (IC 50 8.9 nM) with no significant affinity for other human mGlu receptors (mGluR2 through mGluR8); (2) binding to brain displaceable by administration of an mGluR1 antagonist; (3) only one major radiometabolite in both plasma and brain, with a negligible brain concentration (with 3.5 % of the total radioactivity in cerebellum) and no receptor affinity; (4) a large specific and displaceable signal in the mGluR1-rich cerebellum with no significant in vivo affinity for mGluR5, as shown by PET studies in rats; and (5) lack of substrate behavior for efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier, as shown by PET studies conducted in wild-type and knockout mice. 11 C-LY2428703, a new PET radioligand for mGluR1 quantification, displayed promising characteristics both in vitro and in vivo in rodents. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation in vitro and in animals of a new {sup 11}C-labeled PET radioligand for metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Clark, David T.; Morse, Cheryl; Pike, Victor W. [National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Barth, Vanessa N.; Rhoads, Emily; Siuda, Edward; Heinz, Beverly A.; Nisenbaum, Eric; Dressman, Bruce; Joshi, Elizabeth; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Fisher, Matthew J.; Masters, John J.; Goebl, Nancy; Kuklish, Steven L.; Tauscher, Johannes [Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Innis, Robert B. [National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Two allosteric modulators of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) were evaluated as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for mGluR1. LY2428703, a full mGluR1 antagonist (IC{sub 50} 8.9 nM) and partial mGluR5 antagonist (IC{sub 50} 118 nM), and LSN2606428, a full mGluR1 and mGluR5 antagonist (IC{sub 50} 35.3 nM and 10.2 nM, respectively) were successfully labeled with {sup 11}C and evaluated as radioligands for mGluR1. The pharmacology of LY2428703 was comprehensively assessed in vitro and in vivo, and its biodistribution was investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, and by PET imaging in the rat. In contrast, LSN2606428 was only evaluated in vitro; further evaluation was stopped due to its unfavorable pharmacological properties and binding affinity. {sup 11}C-LY2428703 showed promising characteristics, including: (1) high potency for binding to human mGluR1 (IC{sub 50} 8.9 nM) with no significant affinity for other human mGlu receptors (mGluR2 through mGluR8); (2) binding to brain displaceable by administration of an mGluR1 antagonist; (3) only one major radiometabolite in both plasma and brain, with a negligible brain concentration (with 3.5 % of the total radioactivity in cerebellum) and no receptor affinity; (4) a large specific and displaceable signal in the mGluR1-rich cerebellum with no significant in vivo affinity for mGluR5, as shown by PET studies in rats; and (5) lack of substrate behavior for efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier, as shown by PET studies conducted in wild-type and knockout mice. {sup 11}C-LY2428703, a new PET radioligand for mGluR1 quantification, displayed promising characteristics both in vitro and in vivo in rodents. (orig.)

  9. Molecular pharmacology of 4-substituted glutamic acid analogues at ionotropic and metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Nielsen, B; Stensbøl, T B

    1997-01-01

    (subtypes 1alpha and 2), respectively, whereas (S)-4-methyleneglutamic acid showed high but rather non-selective affinity for the (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA), kainic acid, NMDA and mGlu receptors (subtypes 1alpha and 2). Although none of the compounds were specific......The pharmacology of (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid, (2S,4S)-4-methylglutamic acid and (S)- and (R)-4-methyleneglutamic acids (obtained in high chemical and enantiomeric purity from racemic 4-methyleneglutamic acid by chiral HPLC using a Crownpak CR(+) column), was examined in binding experiments...... using rat brain ionotropic glutamate receptors, and in functional assays using cloned metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. As a notable result of these studies, (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid and (2S,4S)-4-methylglutamic acid were shown to be selective for kainic acid receptors and mGlu receptors...

  10. Synthesis and characterization in monkey of [{sup 11}C]SP203 as a radioligand for imaging brain metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeon, Fabrice G.; Liow, Jeih-San; Zhang, Yi; Hong, Jinsoo; Gladding, Robert L.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-12-15

    [{sup 18}F]SP203 (3-fluoro-5-(2-(2-([{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl)-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzonitrile) is an effective high-affinity and selective radioligand for imaging metabotropic 5 receptors (mGluR5) in human brain with PET. To provide a radioligand that may be used for more than one scanning session in the same subject in a single day, we set out to label SP203 with shorter-lived {sup 11}C (t{sub 1/2} = 20.4 min) and to characterize its behavior as a radioligand with PET in the monkey. Iodo and bromo precursors were obtained by cross-coupling 2-fluoromethyl-4-((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)-1,3-thiazole with 3,5-diiodofluorobenzene and 3,5-dibromofluorobenzene, respectively. Treatment of either precursor with [{sup 11}C]cyanide ion rapidly gave [{sup 11}C]SP203, which was purified with high-performance liquid chromatography. PET was used to measure the uptake of radioactivity in brain regions after injecting [{sup 11}C]SP203 intravenously into rhesus monkeys at baseline and under conditions in which mGluR5 were blocked with 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP). The emergence of radiometabolites in monkey blood in vitro and in vivo was assessed with radio-HPLC. The stability of [{sup 11}C]SP203 in human blood in vitro was also measured. The iodo precursor gave [{sup 11}C]SP203 in higher radiochemical yield (>98 %) than the bromo precursor (20-52 %). After intravenous administration of [{sup 11}C]SP203 into three rhesus monkeys, radioactivity peaked early in brain (average 12.5 min) with a regional distribution in rank order of expected mGluR5 density. Peak uptake was followed by a steady decline. No radioactivity accumulated in the skull. In monkeys pretreated with MTEP before [{sup 11}C]SP203 administration, radioactivity uptake in brain was again high but then declined more rapidly than in the baseline scan to a common low level. [{sup 11}C]SP203 was unstable in monkey blood in vitro and in vivo, and gave predominantly less lipophilic radiometabolites

  11. Novel expression patterns of metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 in the zebrafish nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yu Huang

    Full Text Available The metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (mGluR6 or GRM6 belongs to the class III of the metabotropic glutamate receptor family. It is the only known mGluR that mediates direct synaptic transmission in the nervous system and is thought to mediate the ON-response in the ON-pathway of the vertebrate retina. Phylogenetic and gene structure analysis indicated that the zebrafish genome harbours two mglur6 paralogs, mglur6a and mglur6b. Besides expression in the inner nuclear layer and distinct regions in the brain, both mglur6 paralogs are expressed in ganglion cells of the retina, an expression pattern which can also be observed in the downstream effector molecules gnaoa and gnaob. This unexpected expression pattern is consistent with immunohistological labeling using a peptide antibody specific for the mGluR6b paralog. These expression patterns contradict the existing view that mGluR6 is solely located on ON-bipolar cells where it functions in signal transmission. Consistent with expression in ON-bipolar cells, we report a decreased b-wave amplitude in the electroretinogram after morpholino-based downregulation of mGluR6b, showing a function in the ON response. Our data suggest more widespread functions of mGluR6 mediated signaling in the central nervous system, possibly including sign reversing synapses in the inner retina.

  12. Interactions between estrogen receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors and their impact on drug addiction in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonn Eisinger, Katherine R; Gross, Kellie S; Head, Brian P; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2018-03-10

    Estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ) have a unique relationship with metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the female rodent brain such that estradiol is able to recruit intracellular G-protein signaling cascades to influence neuronal physiology, structure, and ultimately behavior. While this association between ERs and mGluRs exists in many cell types and brain regions, its effects are perhaps most striking in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). This review will discuss the original characterization of ER/mGluR signaling and how estradiol activity in the NAc confers increased sensitivity to drugs of abuse in females through this mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce excitotoxic injury and may facilitate neurogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baskys, Andrius; Bayazitov, Ildar; Fang, Liwei

    2005-01-01

    neuroprotective activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors. Brain Research, Molecular Brain Research 117, 196-205.]. In the present study, we used organotypic hippocampal culture preparation to examine specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 effects on DHPG-induced neuroprotection, changes......-CA1 pathway. The fEPSP depression was not affected by the PLC inhibitor U73122. In contrast, prolonged (2-h) treatment of cultures with DHPG induced a significant protective effect that was blocked by a PLC inhibitor U73122 but not by its inactive analog U73343. Voltage-clamp measurements...... a PLC involvement. Since activation of PLC is thought to be associated with cell proliferation, we investigated whether group I mGluR agonist DHPG or subtype antagonists LY367385 and MPEP have an effect on dentate granule cells expressing immature neuronal marker TOAD-64. DHPG (100 microM, 72 h...

  14. Seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid and the associated brain damage are prevented by group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mares, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-04-01

    The present study has examined the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC) in the model of seizures induced in immature 12-day-old rats by bilateral intracerebroventricular infusion of dl-homocysteic acid (DL-HCA, 600 nmol/side). For biochemical analyses, rat pups were sacrificed during generalized clonic-tonic seizures, approximately 45-50 min after infusion. Comparable time intervals were used for sacrificing the pups which had received 2R,4R-APDC. Low doses of 2R,4R-APDC (0.05 nmol/side) provided a pronounced anticonvulsant effect which was abolished by pretreatment with a selective group II mGluR antagonist LY341495. Generalized clonic-tonic seizures were completely suppressed and cortical energy metabolite changes which normally accompany these seizures were either normalized (decrease of glucose and glycogen) or markedly reduced (an accumulation of lactate). EEG recordings support the marked anticonvulsant effect of 2R,4R-APDC, nevertheless, this was only partial. In spite of the absence of obvious motor phenomena, isolated spikes or even short periods of partial ictal activity could be observed. Isolated spikes could also be seen in some animals after application of 2R,4R-APDC alone, reflecting most likely subclinical proconvulsant activity of this agonist. The neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-APDC was evaluated after 24 h and 6 days of survival following DL-HCA-induced seizures. Massive neuronal degeneration, as revealed by Fluoro-Jade B staining, was observed in a number of brain regions following infusion of DL-HCA alone (seizure group), whereas 2R,4R-APDC pretreatment provided substantial neuroprotection. The present findings support the possibility that group II mGluRs are a promising target for a novel approach to treating epilepsy.

  15. Glutamate metabotropic receptors as targets for drug therapy in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldrich, Randal X; Chapman, Astrid G; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Meldrum, Brian S

    2003-08-22

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have multiple actions on neuronal excitability through G-protein-linked modifications of enzymes and ion channels. They act presynaptically to modify glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic transmission and can contribute to long-term changes in synaptic function. The recent identification of subtype-selective agonists and antagonists has permitted evaluation of mGlu receptors as potential targets in the treatment of epilepsy. Agonists acting on group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5) are convulsant. Antagonists acting on mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptors are anticonvulsant against 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced seizures and in mouse models of generalized motor seizures and absence seizures. The competitive, phenylglycine mGlu1/5 receptor antagonists generally require intracerebroventricular administration for potent anticonvulsant efficacy but noncompetitive antagonists, e.g., (3aS,6aS)-6a-naphthalen-2-ylmethyl-5-methyliden-hexahydrocyclopenta[c]furan-1-on (BAY36-7620), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), and 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) block generalized seizures with systemic administration. Agonists acting on group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2, mGlu3) to reduce glutamate release are anticonvulsant, e.g., 2R,4R-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC], (+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY354740), and (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylate (LY379268). The classical agonists acting on group III mGlu receptors such as L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, and L-serine-O-phosphate are acutely proconvulsant with some anticonvulsant activity. The more recently identified agonists (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine [(R,S)-PPG] and (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine [(S)-3,4-DCPG] and (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid [ACPT-1] are all anticonvulsant without proconvulsant effects. Studies in animal models of kindling

  16. New analogues of ACPD with selective activity for group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Madsen, U; Mikiciuk-Olasik, E

    1997-01-01

    In this study we have determined the pharmacology of a series of 1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1,3-ACPD) analogues at cloned metabotropic glutamic acid (mGlu) receptors. The new analogues comprise the four possible stereoisomers of 1-amino-1-carboxycyclopentane-3-acetic acid (1,3-hom...

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptors as a target for anticonvulsant and anxiolytic action in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Mikulecká, Anna; Tichá, Kateřina; Lojková-Janečková, Denisa; Kubová, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, Suppl.3 (2010), s. 24-26 ISSN 0013-9580 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : metabotropic glutamate receptors * pharmacology * development Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.955, year: 2010

  18. Antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors and cortical afterdischarges in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojková-Janečková, Denisa; Ng, Jessica; Mareš, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 9 (2009), s. 2123-2129 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/1188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cortical seizures * metabotropic glutamate receptors * development Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.052, year: 2009

  19. Age-dependent anticonvulsant action of antagonists of group I glutamate metabotropic receptors in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 83, 2-3 (2009), s. 215-223 ISSN 0920-1211 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/1188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : metabotropic glutamate receptors * anticonvulsan effect * ontogeny Subject RIV: FH - Neuro logy Impact factor: 2.479, year: 2009

  20. A new metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist with in vivo anti-allodynic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Nathan J; Hutchinson, Mark R; Kvist, Trine

    2010-01-01

    -substituted carboxycyclopropylglycines, utilizing novel synthetic chemistry. The reaction between substituted 1,2-dioxines and an aminophosphonate furnished the cyclopropane core in a single step with all required stereochemistry of pendant groups. In vitro binding assays at metabotropic glutamate receptors revealed selective activity...

  1. Selective Negative Allosteric Modulation Of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors - A Structural Perspective of Ligands and Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Isberg, Vignir; Tehan, Benjamin G

    2015-01-01

    modulators. In this analysis, we make the first comprehensive structural comparison of all metabotropic glutamate receptors, placing selective negative allosteric modulators and critical mutants into the detailed context of the receptor binding sites. A better understanding of how the different m......Glu allosteric modulator binding modes relates to selective pharmacological actions will be very valuable for rational design of safer drugs....

  2. Localization of metabotropic glutamate receptors in the outer plexiform layer of the goldfish retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joselevitch, Christina; Klooster, Jan; Kamermans, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    We studied the localization of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the goldfish outer plexiform layer by light-and electron-microscopical immunohistochemistry. The mGluR1alpha antibody labeled putative ON-type bipolar cell dendrites and horizontal cell processes in both rod spherules and

  3. Pu-erh Tea Protects the Nervous System by Inhibiting the Expression of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjie; Chai, Shaomeng; Ju, Yongzhi; Hou, Lu; Zhao, Hang; Ma, Wei; Li, Tian; Sheng, Jun; Shi, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitters of the CNS and is essential for numerous key neuronal functions. However, excess glutamate causes massive neuronal death and brain damage owing to excitotoxicity via the glutamate receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is one of the glutamate receptors and represents a promising target for studying neuroprotective agents of potential application in neurodegenerative diseases. Pu-erh tea, a fermented tea, mainly produced in Yunnan province, China, has beneficial effects, including the accommodation of the CNS. In this study, pu-erh tea markedly decreased the transcription and translation of mGluR5 compared to those by black and green teas. Pu-erh tea also inhibited the expression of Homer, one of the synaptic scaffolding proteins binding to mGluR5. Pu-erh tea protected neural cells from necrosis via blocked Ca 2+ influx and inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) activation induced by excess glutamate. Pu-erh tea relieved rat epilepsy induced by LiCl-pilocarpine in behavioural and physiological assays. Pu-erh tea also decreased the expression of mGluR5 in the hippocampus. These results show that the inhibition of mGluR5 plays a role in protecting neural cells from glutamate. The results also indicate that pu-erh tea contains biological compounds binding transcription factors and inhibiting the expression of mGluR5 and identify pu-erh tea as a novel natural neuroprotective agent.

  4. Age-dependent suppression of hippocampal epileptic afterdischarges by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist MTEP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecília; Kubová, Hana; Otáhal, Jakub; Tsenov, Grygoriy; Mareš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 5 (2014), s. 927-930 ISSN 1734-1140 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0846; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : epileptic afterdischarge * hippocampus * rat * ontogeny * metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.928, year: 2014

  5. Sequential inter- and intrasubunit rearrangements during activation of dimeric metabotropic glutamate receptor 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, Veronika; Zabel, U.; Franková, Daniela; Batz, J.; Hoffmann, C.; Prezeau, L.; Pin, J. P.; Blahoš, Jaroslav; Lohse, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 237 (2012), ra59 ISSN 1937-9145 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/08/1591; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA ČR GAP303/12/2408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : G-protein coupled receptor * metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 * class C GPCR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.648, year: 2012

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 as a potential target for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiamulera, Cristiano; Marzo, Claudio Marcello; Balfour, David J K

    2017-05-01

    Most habitual smokers find it difficult to quit smoking because they are dependent upon the nicotine present in tobacco smoke. Tobacco dependence is commonly treated pharmacologically using nicotine replacement therapy or drugs, such as varenicline, that target the nicotinic receptor. Relapse rates, however, remain high, and there remains a need to develop novel non-nicotinic pharmacotherapies for the dependence that are more effective than existing treatments. The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that drugs that antagonise the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the brain are likely to be efficacious as treatments for tobacco dependence. Imaging studies reveal that chronic exposure to tobacco smoke reduces the density of mGluR5s in human brain. Preclinical results demonstrate that negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) at mGluR5 attenuate both nicotine self-administration and the reinstatement of responding evoked by exposure to conditioned cues paired with nicotine delivery. They also attenuate the effects of nicotine on brain dopamine pathways implicated in addiction. Although mGluR5 NAMs attenuate most of the key facets of nicotine dependence, they potentiate the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. This may limit their value as smoking cessation aids. The NAMs that have been employed most widely in preclinical studies of nicotine dependence have too many "off-target" effects to be used clinically. However, newer mGluR5 NAMs have been developed for clinical use in other indications. Future studies will determine if these agents can also be used effectively and safely to treat tobacco dependence.

  7. A Temporally Distinct Role for Group I and Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in Object Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Malcolm Watson; Warburton, Elizabeth Clea; Barker, Gareth Robert Isaac; Bashir, Zafar Iqbal

    2006-01-01

    Recognition memory, involving the ability to discriminate between a novel and familiar object, depends on the integrity of the perirhinal cortex (PRH). Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the cortex, is essential for many types of memory processes. Of the subtypes of glutamate receptor, metabotropic receptors (mGluRs) have received…

  8. Task-specific enhancement of short-term, but not long-term, memory by class I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, G.R.J.; Christensen, Lone H.; Harrington, Nicholas R.

    1999-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors; Class I antagonist; 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid; spatial learning; contextual conditioning; rats......Metabotropic glutamate receptors; Class I antagonist; 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid; spatial learning; contextual conditioning; rats...

  9. Peri-adolescent drinking of ethanol and/or nicotine modulates astroglial glutamate transporters and metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 in female alcohol-preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Bell, Richard L; Rao, P S S; Hammad, Alaa M; Sari, Youssef

    2018-07-01

    Impairment in glutamate neurotransmission mediates the development of dependence upon nicotine (NIC) and ethanol (EtOH). Previous work indicates that continuous access to EtOH or phasic exposure to NIC reduces expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) but not the glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). Additionally, metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) expression was affected following exposure to EtOH or NIC. However, little is known about the effects of EtOH and NIC co-consumption on GLT-1, xCT, GLAST, and mGluR1 expression. In this study, peri-adolescent female alcohol preferring (P) rats were given binge-like access to water, sucrose (SUC), SUC-NIC, EtOH, or EtOH-NIC for four weeks. The present study determined the effects of these reinforcers on GLT-1, xCT, GLAST, and mGluR1 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), hippocampus (HIP) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). GLT-1 and xCT expression were decreased in the NAc following both SUC-NIC and EtOH-NIC. In addition, only xCT expression was downregulated in the HIP in both of these latter groups. Also, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the HIP was reduced following SUC, SUC-NIC, EtOH, and EtOH-NIC consumption. Similar to previous work, GLAST expression was not altered in any brain region by any of the reinforcers. However, mGluR1 expression was increased in the NAc in the SUC-NIC, EtOH, and EtOH-NIC groups. These results indicate that peri-adolescent binge-like drinking of EtOH or SUC with or without NIC may exert differential effects on astroglial glutamate transporters and receptors. Our data further parallel some of the previous findings observed in adult rats. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Role of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors 2/3 and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in developing rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2005-08-22

    In brainstem slices from developing rats, metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 play different inhibitory roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity of the medial vestibular nuclei. The mGluR2/3 block (LY341495) reduces the occurrence of long-term depression after vestibular afferent high frequency stimulation at P8-P10, and increases that of long-term potentiation, while the mGluR5 block prevents high frequency stimulation long-term depression. Later on, the receptor block does not influence high frequency stimulation effects. In addition, while mGluR2/3 agonist (APDC) always provokes a transient reduction of synaptic responses, that of mGluR5 (CHPG) induces long-term depression per se at P8-P10. These results show a key role of mGluR5 in inducing high frequency stimulation long-term depression in developing medial vestibular nuclei, while mGluR2/3 modulate synaptic transmission, probably through presynaptic control of glutamate release.

  11. 4-Alkylated homoibotenic acid (HIBO) analogues: versatile pharmacological agents with diverse selectivity profiles towards metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulf; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    4-Alkylated analogues of homoibotenic acid (HIBO) have previously shown high potency and selectivity at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamic acid receptor (iGluR and mGluR) subtypes. Compounds with different selectivity profiles are valuable pharmacological tools for neuropharmacological studies...

  12. Modulation of gene expression of adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat's neuronal cells exposed to L-glutamate and [60]fullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giust, Davide; Da Ros, Tatiana; Martín, Mairena; Albasanz, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    L-Glutamate (L-Glu) has been often associated not only to fundamental physiological roles, as learning and memory, but also to neuronal cell death and the genesis and development of important neurodegenerative diseases. Herein we studied the variation in the adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors expression induced by L-Glu treatment in rat's cortical neurons. The possibility to have structural alteration of the cells induced by L-Glu (100 nM, 1 and 10 microM) has been addressed, studying the modulation of microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP-2) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH), natively associated proteins to the dendritic shape maintenance. Results showed that the proposed treatments were not destabilizing the cells, so the L-Glu concentrations were acceptable to investigate fluctuation in receptors expression, which were studied by RT-PCR. Interestingly, C60 fullerene derivative t3ss elicited a protective effect against glutamate toxicity, as demonstrated by MTT assay. In addition, t3ss compound exerted a different effect on the adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors analyzed. Interestingly, A(2A) and mGlu1 mRNAs were significantly decreased in conditions were t3ss neuroprotected cortical neurons from L-Glu toxicity. In summary, t3ss protects neurons from glutamate toxicity in a process that appears to be associated with the modulation of the gene expression of adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  13. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor mGluR4 as a Novel Target for Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levey, Allan

    2001-01-01

    ...) as a novel target for the treatment of PD. We have localized mGluR4 in basal ganglia structures, and explored its role in mediating the electrophysiological effects of glutamate in rat brain slices...

  14. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 - a promising target in drug development and neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rajapillai L.I.; Tipre, Dnyanesh N. [Stony Brook University Health Science Center, Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This review summarizes the contributions by various teams of scientists in assessing the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders and diseases. Development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5 is reviewed, as is the development of PET radioligands that have the potential to measure mGluR5 receptor density in neurological disorders and during therapeutic interventions. PET imaging provides an effective tool to assess the specificity of new drugs, select dose regimens in clinical trials, and study drug mechanisms of action. We summarize and deliver comparative analyses of mGluR5-specific PET radiotracers and their applications in understanding the pathophysiology of mGluR5-related nervous system disorders and to speed up drug development. (orig.)

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 - a promising target in drug development and neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Rajapillai L.I.; Tipre, Dnyanesh N.

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the contributions by various teams of scientists in assessing the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders and diseases. Development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5 is reviewed, as is the development of PET radioligands that have the potential to measure mGluR5 receptor density in neurological disorders and during therapeutic interventions. PET imaging provides an effective tool to assess the specificity of new drugs, select dose regimens in clinical trials, and study drug mechanisms of action. We summarize and deliver comparative analyses of mGluR5-specific PET radiotracers and their applications in understanding the pathophysiology of mGluR5-related nervous system disorders and to speed up drug development. (orig.)

  17. Modulation of seizure activity in mice by metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, Nils Ole; Thomsen, C

    1996-01-01

    The anticonvulsant properties of ligands at metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were examined in different seizure models by use of intracerebroventricular infusion. The mGluR1a antagonist/mGluR2 agonist, (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-4C3HPG] dose-dependently antagonized...... pentylenetetrazol- and methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-2-carboxylate (DMCM)-induced clonic convulsions in mice with ED50 values of 400 and 180 nmol/mice, respectively. A modest increase in electrical seizure threshold was observed in mice injected with (S)-4C3HPG. No effect on seizures induced...... by systemic administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate was observed by prior intracerebroventricular infusion of (S)-4C3HPG. The more selective (but less potent) mGluR1a antagonist, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine, was a weak anticonvulsant in similar seizure models with the exception of convulsions induced...

  18. Selective Disruption of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5-Homer Interactions Mimics Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weirui; Molinaro, Gemma; Collins, Katie A; Hays, Seth A; Paylor, Richard; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K; Huber, Kimberly M

    2016-02-17

    Altered function of the Gq-coupled, Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, specifically mGlu5, is implicated in multiple mouse models of autism and intellectual disability. mGlu5 dysfunction has been most well characterized in the fragile X syndrome mouse model, the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mouse, where pharmacological and genetic reduction of mGlu5 reverses many phenotypes. mGlu5 is less associated with its scaffolding protein Homer in Fmr1 KO mice, and restoration of mGlu5-Homer interactions by genetic deletion of a short, dominant negative of Homer, H1a, rescues many phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggested that disruption of mGlu5-Homer leads to phenotypes of FXS. To test this idea, we examined mice with a knockin mutation of mGlu5 (F1128R; mGlu5(R/R)) that abrogates binding to Homer. Although FMRP levels were normal, mGlu5(R/R) mice mimicked multiple phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice, including reduced mGlu5 association with the postsynaptic density, enhanced constitutive mGlu5 signaling to protein synthesis, deficits in agonist-induced translational control, protein synthesis-independent LTD, neocortical hyperexcitability, audiogenic seizures, and altered behaviors, including anxiety and sensorimotor gating. These results reveal new roles for the Homer scaffolds in regulation of mGlu5 function and implicate a specific molecular mechanism in a complex brain disease. Abnormal function of the metabotropic, or Gq-coupled, glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including a genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism called fragile X syndrome. In brains of a mouse model of fragile X, mGlu5 is less associated with its binding partner Homer, a scaffolding protein that regulates mGlu5 localization to synapses and its ability to activate biochemical signaling pathways. Here we show that a mouse expressing a mutant mGlu5 that cannot bind to Homer is sufficient to mimic many of the biochemical, neurophysiological, and

  19. The role of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and addiction:Combining preclinical evidence with human Positron Emission Tomography (PET studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eTerbeck

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present review, we deliver an overview of the involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 activity and density in pathological anxiety, mood disorders and addiction. Specifically, we will describe mGluR5 studies in humans that employed Positron Emission Tomography (PET and combined the findings with preclinical animal research. This combined view of different methodological approaches — from basic neurobiological approaches to human studies — might give a more comprehensive and clinically relevant view of mGluR5 function in mental health than the view on preclinical data alone. We will also review the current research data on mGluR5 along the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC. Firstly, we found evidence of abnormal glutamate activity related to the positive and negative valence systems, which would suggest that antagonistic mGluR5 intervention has prominent anti-addictive, anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects. Secondly, there is evidence that mGluR5 plays in important role in systems for social functioning and the response to social stress. Finally, mGluR5’s important role in sleep homeostasis suggests that this glutamate receptor may play an important role in RDoC’s arousal and modulatory systems domain. Glutamate was previously mostly investigate in non-human studies, however initial human clinical PET research now also supports the hypothesis that, by mediating brain excitability, neuroplasticity and social cognition, abnormal metabotropic glutamate activity might predispose individuals to a broad range of psychiatric problems.

  20. Deletion of Type 2 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Decreases Sensitivity to Cocaine Reward in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Ju; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Bi, Guo-Hua; He, Yi; Gao, Jun-Tao; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2017-07-11

    Cocaine users show reduced expression of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2), but it is not clear whether this is a predisposing trait for addiction or a consequence of drug exposure. In this study, we found that a nonsense mutation at the mGluR2 gene decreased mGluR2 expression and altered the seeking and taking of cocaine. mGluR2 mutant rats show reduced sensitivity to cocaine reward, requiring more cocaine to reach satiation when it was freely available and ceasing their drug-seeking behavior sooner than controls when the response requirement was increased. mGluR2 mutant rats also show a lower propensity to relapse after a period of cocaine abstinence, an effect associated with reduced cocaine-induced dopamine and glutamate overflow in the nucleus accumbens. These findings suggest that mGluR2 polymorphisms or reduced availability of mGluR2 might be risk factors for the initial development of cocaine use but could actually protect against addiction by reducing sensitivity to cocaine reward. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Recent Advances in the Medicinal Chemistry of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 (mGlu1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This Review summarizes the medicinal chemistry found in publications on both orthosteric and allosteric modulators of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1) from 2005 to the present. The time period covered by the scope of this current review has been particularly rich in mGlu1-related publications with numbers quadrupling when compared to the preceding five year period of 2000−2005. Publications in the field peaked in 2007 with over 35 articles appearing in the peer reviewed literature in the course of that year. Given that glutamate is one of the primary excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), it is unsurprising that it acts upon several receptors that are considered to be of potential therapeutic interest for many indications. Orthosteric and allosteric modulation of the receptor is possible, with a logical extrapolation to the chemotypes used for each strategy. The last five years of publications have yielded many mGlu1 selective antagonist chemotypyes, most of which have shown efficacy in pain in vivo models. However, the primary impact of these compounds has been to highlight the mechanistic safety risks of mGlu1 antagonism, independent of chemotype. As a review in medicinal chemistry, the primary focus of this paper will be on the design and, to a lesser degree, synthetic strategies for the delivery of subtype selective, CNS penetrant, druglike compounds through a “medchem” program, targeting modulators of the mGlu1 receptor. PMID:22860168

  2. Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor block on the synaptic transmission and plasticity in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Malfagia, C; Pettorossi, V E

    1998-11-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the possible role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in modulating the synaptic transmission within the medial vestibular nuclei, under basal and plasticity inducing conditions. We analysed the effect of the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine on the amplitude of the field potentials and latency of unitary potentials evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation, and on the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, after high-frequency stimulation. Two effects were observed, consisting of a slight increase of the field potentials and reduction of unit latency during the drug infusion, and a further long-lasting development of these modifications after the drug wash-out. The long-term effect depended on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, as D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid prevented its development. We suggest that (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4carboxyphenylglycine enhances the vestibular responses and induces N-methyl-D-aspartate-dependent long-term potentiation by increasing glutamate release, through the block of presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors which actively inhibit it. The block of these receptors was indirectly supported by the fact that the agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid reduced the vestibular responses and blocked the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency stimulation. The simultaneous block of metabotropic glutamate receptors facilitating synaptic plasticity, impedes the full expression of the long-term effect throughout the (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The involvement of such a facilitatory mechanism in the potentiation is supported by its reversible reduction following a second (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The drug also reduced the expression of potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation

  3. Platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors interact for full development and maintenance of long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Francescangeli, E; Goracci, G; Pettorossi, V E

    1999-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the interaction between platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in mediating long-term potentiation within the medial vestibular nuclei. We analysed the N1 field potential wave evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation. The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid, prevented long-term potentiation induced by a platelet-activating factor analogue [1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-(methylcarbamyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine], as well as the full development of potentiation, induced by high-frequency stimulation under the blocking agent for synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors (ginkolide B), at drug washout. However, potentiation directly induced by the group I glutamate metabotropic receptor agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, was reduced by ginkolide B. These findings suggest that platelet-activating factor, whether exogenous or released following potentiation induction, exerts its effect through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, mediating the increase of glutamate release. In addition, we found that this mechanism, which led to full potentiation through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, was inactivated soon after application of potentiation-inducing stimulus. In fact, the long-lasting block of the platelet-activating factor and metabotropic glutamate receptors prevented the full potentiation development and the induced potentiation progressively declined to null. Moreover, ginkolide B, given when high-frequency-dependent potentiation was established, only reduced it within 5 min after potentiation induction. We conclude that to fully develop vestibular long-term potentiation requires presynaptic events. Platelet-activating factor, released after the activation of postsynaptic mechanisms which induce potentiation, is necessary

  4. Α-amino-β-fluorocyclopropanecarboxylic acids as a new tool for drug development: synthesis of glutamic acid analogs and agonist activity towards metabotropic glutamate receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonnier, Gérald; Lion, Cédric; Quirion, Jean-Charles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Goudet, Cyril; Jubault, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Herein we describe the diastereoselective synthesis of glutamic acid analogs and the evaluation of their agonist activity towards metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGluR4). These analogs are based on a monofluorinated cyclopropane core substituted with an α-aminoacid function. The potential of this new building block as a tool for the development of a novel class of drugs is demonstrated with racemic analog 11a that displayed the best agonist activity with an EC50 of 340 nM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Different metabotropic glutamate receptors play opposite roles in synaptic plasticity of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2002-09-15

    In the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) of rat brainstem slices, the role of group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and of the subtypes of group I mGluRs: mGluR1, mGluR5, was investigated in basal synaptic transmission and in the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). We used selective antagonists and agonists for mGluRs and we analysed the field potentials evoked by vestibular afferent stimulation before and after high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to induce LTP. The group II and III mGluR antagonist, (R,S)-alpha-2-methyl-4sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), induced LTP per se and caused a reduction of the paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) ratio indicating an enhancement of glutamate release. This suggests that group II and III mGluRs are activated under basal conditions to limit glutamate release. Both the group II and III mGluR selective antagonists, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoate (LY341495) and (R,S)-alpha-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP), induced LTP, and the selective agonists, (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC) and L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) depressed the field potentials and prevented HFS-LTP, with a prevailing contribution of group II mGluRs over that of group III mGluRs. The mGluR1 antagonist, 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) prevented the full development and maintenance of HFS-LTP. By contrast, the mGluR5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (MPEP) induced LTP per se, which was impeded by CPCCOEt, and it had no effect on LTP once induced by HFS. The PPF analysis showed an enhancement of glutamate release during MPEP potentiation. The group I mGluR agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) induced LTP per se, which was blocked by CPCCOEt. By contrast the mGluR5 agonist, (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxypheylglycine (CHPG) prevented LTP elicited by HFS and DHPG as well. In conclusion vestibular LTP is

  6. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eEnz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g. night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson´s disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors´ C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners.

  7. Molecular pharmacology of homologues of ibotenic acid at cloned metabotropic glutamic acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Nielsen, B; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the enantiomers of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid (homoibotenic acid, HIBO) and analogues substituted with a methyl, bromo or butyl group in the four position of the ring at cloned metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in Chinese hamster...... ovary (CHO) cells. In contrast to the parent compound ibotenic acid, which is a potent group I and II agonist, the (S)-forms of homoibotenic acid and its analogues are selective and potent group I antagonists whereas the (R)-forms are inactive both as agonists and antagonists at group I, II, and III m......Glu receptors. Interestingly, (S)-homoibotenic acid and the analogues display equal potency at both mGlu1alpha and mGlu5a with Ki values in the range of 97 to 490 microM, (S)-homoibotenic acid and (S)-2-amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid [(S)-4-butylhomoibotenic acid] displaying the lowest...

  8. The metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor modulates extinction and reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Chesworth

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant with no therapeutics registered to assist addicts in discontinuing use. Glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in the development and maintenance of addiction. We sought to assess the involvement of the metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGlu5 in behaviours relevant to METH addiction because this receptor has been implicated in the actions of other drugs of abuse, including alcohol, cocaine and opiates. mGlu5 knockout (KO mice were tested in intravenous self-administration, conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization. Self-administration of sucrose was used to assess the response of KO mice to a natural reward. Acquisition and maintenance of self-administration, as well as the motivation to self-administer METH was intact in mGlu5 KO mice. Importantly, mGlu5 KO mice required more extinction sessions to extinguish the operant response for METH, and exhibited an enhanced propensity to reinstate operant responding following exposure to drug-associated cues. This phenotype was not present when KO mice were tested in an equivalent paradigm assessing operant responding for sucrose. Development of conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization were intact in KO mice; however, conditioned hyperactivity to the context previously paired with drug was elevated in KO mice. These data demonstrate a role for mGlu5 in the extinction and reinstatement of METH-seeking, and suggests a role for mGlu5 in regulating contextual salience.

  9. Expression of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the reproductive system of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Marcin; Chruścicka, Barbara; Lech, Tomasz; Burnat, Grzegorz; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Although the presence of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors in the central nervous system is well documented, they have recently been found in peripheral and non-neuronal tissues. In the present study we investigated the expression of group III mGlu receptors in the reproductive system of male mice. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the presence of mGlu6, mGlu7 and mGlu8 (but not mGlu4) receptor transcripts in testes and epididymides from adult mice. In addition, expression of mGlu6 (Grm6) and mGlu8 receptor (Grm8) mRNA was detected in spermatozoa isolated from the vas deferens. The vas deferens was found to contain only mGlu7 receptor (Grm7) mRNA, which was particularly intense in 21-day-old male mice. In penile homogenates, only the mGlu7 receptor signal was detected. Genetic ablation of the mGlu7 receptor in males led to fertility disorders manifested by decreased insemination capability as well as deterioration of sperm parameters, particularly sperm motility, vitality, sperm membrane integrity and morphology, with a simultaneous increase in sperm concentration. These results indicate that constitutively expressed mGlu receptors in the male reproductive system may play an important role in ejaculation and/or erection processes, as well as in the formation and maturation of spermatozoa.

  10. Microscopic visualization of metabotropic glutamate receptors on the surface of living cells using bifunctional magnetic resonance imaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Mishra, Ritu; Gottschalk, Sven; Pal, Robert; Sim, Neil; Engelmann, Joern; Goldberg, Martin; Parker, David

    2014-02-19

    A series of bimodal metabotropic glutamate-receptor targeted MRI contrast agents has been developed and evaluated, based on established competitive metabotropic Glu receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) antagonists. In order to directly visualize mGluR5 binding of these agents on the surface of live astrocytes, variations in the core structure were made. A set of gadolinium conjugates containing either a cyanine dye or a fluorescein moiety was accordingly prepared, to allow visualization by optical microscopy in cellulo. In each case, surface receptor binding was compromised and cell internalization observed. Another approach, examining the location of a terbium analogue via sensitized emission, also exhibited nonspecific cell uptake in neuronal cell line models. Finally, biotin derivatives of two lead compounds were prepared, and the specificity of binding to the mGluR5 cell surface receptors was demonstrated with the aid of their fluorescently labeled avidin conjugates, using both total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and confocal microscopy.

  11. In vivo analysis of the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in the afferent regulation of chick cochlear nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzoli, Kathryn L; Hyson, Richard L

    2011-02-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of approximately 20-30% of neurons in the chick nucleus magnocellularis (NM). One early event in NM neuronal degradation is the disruption of their ribosomes. This can be visualized in the first few hours following cochlea removal using Y10B, an antibody that recognizes ribosomal RNA. Previous studies using a brain slice preparation suggest that maintenance of ribosomal integrity in NM neurons requires metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation. Isolating the brain slice in vitro, however, may eliminate other potential sources of trophic support and only allows for evaluation of the early changes that occur in NM neurons following deafferentation. Consequently, it is not known if mGluR activation is truly required for the maintenance of NM neurons in the intact system. The current experiments evaluated the importance of mGluRs in vivo. The effects of short-term receptor blockade were assessed through Y10B labeling and the effects of long-term blockade were assessed through stereological counting of NM neurons in Nissl-stained tissue. mGluR antagonists or vehicle were administered intracerebroventricularly following unilateral cochlea removal. Vehicle-treated subjects replicated the previously reported effects of cochlea removal, showing lighter Y10B labeling and fewer Nissl-stained NM neurons on the deafened side of the brain. Blockade of mGluRs prevented the rapid activity-dependent difference in Y10B labeling, and in some cases, had the reverse effect, yielding lighter labeling of NM neurons on the intact side of the brain. Similarly, mGluR blockade over longer survival periods resulted in a reduction in number of cells on both intact and deafferented sides of the brain, and in some cases, yielded a reverse effect of fewer neurons on the intact side versus deafened side. These data are consistent with in vitro findings and suggest that mGluR activation plays a vital role in the afferent maintenance of NM neurons

  12. Loss of dysbindin-1, a risk gene for schizophrenia, leads to impaired group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor function in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev K Bhardwaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of dysbindin-1, a protein coded by the risk gene dtnbp1, is reduced in the brains of schizophrenia patients. Evidence indicates a role of dysbindin-1 in dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission. Glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at excitatory synapses is critically regulated by G-protein coupled metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR family members, that have been implicated in schizophrenia. Here, we report a role of dysbindin-1 in hippocampal group 1 mGluR (mGluRI function in mice. In hippocampal synaptoneurosomal preparations from sandy (sdy mice, that have a loss of function mutation in dysbindin-1 gene, we observed a striking reduction in mGluRI agonist [(S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] (DHPG-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2. This mGluR-ERK1/2 deficit occurred in the absence of significant changes in protein levels of the two members of the mGluRI family (i.e., mGluR1 and mGluR5 or in another mGluRI signaling pathway, i.e., protein kinase C (PKC. Aberrant mGluRI-ERK1/2 signaling affected hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the sdy mutants as DHPG-induced long-term depression (LTD at CA1 excitatory synapses was significantly reduced. Behavioral data suggest that the mGluRI hypofunction may underlie some of the cognitive abnormalities described in sdy mice as the administration of CDPPB (3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl benzamide, a positive allosteric modulator of mGluR5, rescued short-term object recognition and spatial learning and memory deficits in these mice. Taken together, our data suggest a novel role of dysbindin-1 in regulating mGluRI functions.

  13. Double Dissociation of the Roles of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 and Oxytocin Receptor in Discrete Social Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesic, Ivana; Guzman, Yomayra F; Guedea, Anita L; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Corcoran, Kevin A; Leaderbrand, Katherine; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Contractor, Anis; Radulovic, Jelena

    2015-09-01

    Social interactions in vertebrates are complex phenomena based on affective and cognitive processes. Multiple brain regions and neurotransmitter systems are involved in the expression of social behaviors, but their individual roles in specific aspects of social interactions are not well understood. Here we investigated how Gq-protein-coupled metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) affect social affiliation and social memory. We used conditional genetic approaches in which the genes coding for these receptors were knocked out in the lateral septum by infusion of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing Cre recombinase (AAV-Cre). Social behavior was assessed 2 weeks later using a three-chamber paradigm for sociability and preference for social novelty. Septal deletion of mGluR5 abolished sociability while leaving preference for social novelty intact. In contrast, deletion of Oxtr did not affect sociability but significantly impaired preference for social novelty. Nonsocial behaviors or memories, including novel object recognition or fear conditioning, were not affected by these genetic manipulations. Immunohistochemical analyses of the distribution of mGluR5 and Oxtr revealed non-overlapping localization of these receptors within the lateral septum, suggesting that not only different neurotransmitters but also different neuronal types contribute to sociability versus preference for social novelty. Our findings identify highly specialized roles of lateral septal mGluR5 and Oxtr in the the regulation of discrete social behaviors, and suggest that deficits in social interactions, which accompany many mental illnesses, would benefit from comprehensive treatments targeting different components of social functioning.

  14. Environmental Enrichment Ameliorates Behavioral Impairments Modeling Schizophrenia in Mice Lacking Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Emma L; McOmish, Caitlin E; Buret, Laetitia S; Van den Buuse, Maarten; Hannan, Anthony J

    2015-07-01

    Schizophrenia arises from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Abnormalities in glutamatergic signaling have been proposed to underlie the emergence of symptoms, in light of various lines of evidence, including the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has also been implicated in the disorder, and has been shown to physically interact with NMDA receptors. To clarify the role of mGlu5-dependent behavioral expression by environmental factors, we assessed mGlu5 knockout (KO) mice after exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) or reared under standard conditions. The mGlu5 KO mice showed reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI), long-term memory deficits, and spontaneous locomotor hyperactivity, which were all attenuated by EE. Examining the cellular impact of genetic and environmental manipulation, we show that EE significantly increased pyramidal cell dendritic branching and BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus of wild-type mice; however, mGlu5 KO mice were resistant to these alterations, suggesting that mGlu5 is critical to these responses. A selective effect of EE on the behavioral response to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 in mGlu5 KO mice was seen. MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion was further potentiated in enriched mGlu5 KO mice and treatment with MK-801 reinstated PPI disruption in EE mGlu5 KO mice only, a response that is absent under standard housing conditions. Together, these results demonstrate an important role for mGlu5 in environmental modulation of schizophrenia-related behavioral impairments. Furthermore, this role of the mGlu5 receptor is mediated by interaction with NMDA receptor function, which may inform development of novel therapeutics.

  15. Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Subtype 5 in Addiction: a Therapeutic Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abundant evidence at the anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular levels implicates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in addiction. Consistently, the effects of a wide range of doses of different mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have been tested in various animal models of addiction. Here, these studies were subjected to a systematic review to find out if mGluR5 NAMs have a therapeutic potential that can be translated to the clinic. Methods: Literature on consumption/self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking as outcomes of interest published up to April 2015 was retrieved via PubMed. The review focused on the effects of systemic (i.p., i.v., s.c.) administration of the mGluR5 NAMs 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) and 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on paradigms with cocaine, ethanol, nicotine, and food in rats. Results: MTEP and MPEP were found to reduce self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine at doses ≥1mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Dose-response relationship resembled a sigmoidal curve, with low doses not reaching statistical significance and high doses reliably inhibiting self-administration of drugs of abuse. Importantly, self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine, but not food, was reduced by MTEP and MPEP in the dose range of 1 to 2mg/kg and 2.5 to 3.2mg/kg, respectively. This dose range corresponds to approximately 50% to 80% mGluR5 occupancy. Interestingly, the limited data found in mice and monkeys showed a similar therapeutic window. Conclusion: Altogether, this review suggests a therapeutic window for mGluR5 NAMs that can be translated to the treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders. PMID:26802568

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 autoimmunity: Clinical features and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Chiriboga, A Sebastian; Komorowski, Lars; Kümpfel, Tania; Probst, Christian; Hinson, Shannon R; Pittock, Sean J; McKeon, Andrew

    2016-03-15

    To describe retrospectively the clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1-IgG). Specimens of 9 patients evaluated on a service basis in the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory by tissue-based immunofluorescence assay (IFA) yielded a robust, synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with mGluR1-IgG (serum, 9; CSF, 2 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay (CBA) confirmed mGluR1 specificity in all 11 specimens. A further 2 patients were detected in Germany primarily by CBA. The median symptom onset age for the 11 patients was 58 years (range 33-81 years); 6 were male. All 9 Mayo Clinic patients had subacute onset of cerebellar ataxia, 4 had dysgeusia, 1 had psychiatric symptoms, and 1 had cognitive impairment. All were evaluated for malignancy, but only 1 was affected (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma). One developed ataxia post-herpes zoster infection. Head MRIs were generally atrophic or normal-appearing, and CSF was inflammatory in just 1 of 5 tested, though mGluR1-IgG was detected in both specimens submitted. Five patients improved (attributable to immunotherapy in 4, spontaneously in 1), 3 stabilized (attributable to immunotherapy in 2, cancer therapy in 1), and 1 progressively declined (untreated). The 2 German patients had ataxia, but fulfilled multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria (1 relapsing-remitting, 1 progressive). However, both had histories of hematologic malignancy (acute lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma), and had mGluR1-IgG detected in serum by CBA (weakly positive on tissue-based IFA). mGluR1 autoimmunity represents a treatable form of cerebellar ataxia. Dysgeusia may be a diagnostic clue. Paraneoplastic, parainfectious, or idiopathic causes may occur. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Selective antagonists at group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis and molecular pharmacology of 4-aryl-3-isoxazolol amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Hasse; Sløk, Frank A; Stensbøl, Tine B

    2002-01-01

    Homologation of (S)-glutamic acid (Glu, 1) and Glu analogues has previously provided ligands with activity at metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The homologue of ibotenic acid (7), 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (HIBO, 8), and the 4-phenyl derivative of 8, compound 9a, are bot...... antagonists at group I mGluRs. Here we report the synthesis and molecular pharmacology of HIBO analogues 9b-h containing different 4-aryl substituents. All of these compounds possess antagonist activity at group I mGluRs but are inactive at group II and III mGluRs....

  18. Genome-wide copy number variation study associates metabotropic glutamate receptor gene networks with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Josephine; Glessner, Joseph T; Wang, Kai; Takahashi, Nagahide; Shtir, Corina J; Hadley, Dexter; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Zhang, Haitao; Kim, Cecilia E; Robison, Reid; Lyon, Gholson J; Flory, James H; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Imielinski, Marcin; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward C; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Sakurai, Takeshi; Rabin, Cara; Middleton, Frank A; Thomas, Kelly A; Garris, Maria; Mentch, Frank; Freitag, Christine M; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Todorov, Alexandre A; Reif, Andreas; Rothenberger, Aribert; Franke, Barbara; Mick, Eric O; Roeyers, Herbert; Buitelaar, Jan; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Banaschewski, Tobias; Ebstein, Richard P; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Renner, Tobias J; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Meyer, Jobst; Pálmason, Haukur; Seitz, Christiane; Loo, Sandra K; Smalley, Susan L; Biederman, Joseph; Kent, Lindsey; Asherson, Philip; Anney, Richard J L; Gaynor, J William; Shaw, Philip; Devoto, Marcella; White, Peter S; Grant, Struan F A; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Rapoport, Judith L; Williams, Nigel M; Nelson, Stanley F; Faraone, Stephen V; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common, heritable neuropsychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. We performed a whole-genome copy number variation (CNV) study on 1,013 cases with ADHD and 4,105 healthy children of European ancestry using 550,000 SNPs. We evaluated statistically significant findings in multiple independent cohorts, with a total of 2,493 cases with ADHD and 9,222 controls of European ancestry, using matched platforms. CNVs affecting metabotropic glutamate receptor genes were enriched across all cohorts (P = 2.1 × 10−9). We saw GRM5 (encoding glutamate receptor, metabotropic 5) deletions in ten cases and one control (P = 1.36 × 10−6). We saw GRM7 deletions in six cases, and we saw GRM8 deletions in eight cases and no controls. GRM1 was duplicated in eight cases. We experimentally validated the observed variants using quantitative RT-PCR. A gene network analysis showed that genes interacting with the genes in the GRM family are enriched for CNVs in ~10% of the cases (P = 4.38 × 10−10) after correction for occurrence in the controls. We identified rare recurrent CNVs affecting glutamatergic neurotransmission genes that were overrepresented in multiple ADHD cohorts. PMID:22138692

  19. Gender-specific desensitization of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors after maternal l-glutamate intake during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Zapata, Antonio; León-Navarro, David Agustín; Crespo, María; Martín, Mairena

    2018-04-22

    In the present work we have studied the effect of maternal intake of l-Glutamate (l-Glu) (1 g/L) during lactation on group I mGluR transduction pathway in brain plasma membrane from 15 days-old neonates. Results obtained have shown that maternal l-glutamate intake did not significantly affect neither weights of pups nor negative geotaxis reflex, an index of neurobehavioral development, but increased l-Glu plasma level in both male and female neonates. In male neonates, maternal l-Glu intake evoked a loss of mGluR 1 whereas no variation on mGluR 5 was observed as revealed by Western-blotting assay. The loss of mGlu 1 R was accompanied by a decrease on l-Glu-stimulated phospholipase C activity suggesting, therefore, a loss of group I mGluR functionality. Concerning female neonates, no variations were detected neither mGluR 1 nor mGluR 5 and group I mGluR functionality was also preserved. Copyright © 2018 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 7 Modulates the Rewarding Effects of Cocaine in Rats: Involvement of a Ventral Pallidal GABAergic Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Li, Jie; Peng, Xiao-Qing; Spiller, Krista; Gardner, Eliot L; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) has received much attention as a potential target for the treatment of epilepsy, major depression, and anxiety. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of mGluR7 in cocaine reward in animal models of drug addiction. Pretreatment with the selective mGluR7 allosteric agonist N,N’-dibenzyhydryl-ethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride (AMN082; 1-20 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently inhibited cocaine-induced enhancement of electrical brain-stimulation reward and intravenous cocaine self-administration under both fixed-ratio and progressive-ratio reinforcement conditions, but failed to alter either basal or cocaine-enhanced locomotion or oral sucrose self-administration, suggesting a specific inhibition of cocaine reward. Microinjections of AMN082 (1–5 μg/μl per side) into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) or ventral pallidum (VP), but not dorsal striatum, also inhibited cocaine self-administration in a dose-dependent manner. Intra-NAc or intra-VP co-administration of 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP, 5 μg/μl per side), a selective mGluR7 allosteric antagonist, significantly blocked AMN082’s action, suggesting an effect mediated by mGluR7 in these brain regions. In vivo microdialysis demonstrated that cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) priming significantly elevated extracellular DA in the NAc or VP, while decreasing extracellular GABA in VP (but not in NAc). AMN082 pretreatment selectively blocked cocaine-induced changes in extracellular GABA, but not in DA, in both naive rats and cocaine self-administration rats. These data suggest: (1) mGluR7 is critically involved in cocaine’s acute reinforcement; (2) GABA-, but not DA-, dependent mechanisms in the ventral striatopallidal pathway appear to underlie AMN082’s actions; and (3) AMN082 or other mGluR7-selective agonists may be useful in the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:19158667

  1. Protective role for type-1 metabotropic glutamate receptors against spike and wave discharges in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngomba, R.T.; Santolini, I.; Biagioni, F.; Molinaro, G.; Simonyi, A.; Rijn, C.M. van; D'Amore, V.; Mastroiacovo, F.; Olivieri, G.; Gradini, R.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Nicoletti, F.

    2011-01-01

    Eight-month old WAG/Rij rats, which developed spontaneous occurring absence seizures, showed a reduced function of mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the thalamus, as assessed by in vivo measurements of DHPG-stimulated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis, in the presence of the mGlu5 antagonist

  2. MacMARCKS interacts with the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 7 and modulates G protein-mediated constitutive inhibition of calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bertaso, F.; Lill, Y.; Airas, J.M.; Espeut, J.; Blahoš, Jaroslav; Bockaert, J.; Fagni, L.; Betz, H.; Far, O.E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 99, - (2006), s. 288-298 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/0920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : calmodulin * metabotropic glutamate receptor * calcium channel Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.260, year: 2006

  3. VU0477573: Partial Negative Allosteric Modulator of the Subtype 5 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor with In Vivo Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Yuh, Joannes P; Gregory, Karen J; Morrison, Ryan D; Bates, Brittney S; Stauffer, Shaun R; Emmitte, Kyle A; Bubser, Michael; Peng, Weimin; Nedelcovych, Michael T; Thompson, Analisa; Lv, Xiaohui; Xiang, Zixiu; Daniels, J Scott; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Jones, Carrie K; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) have potential applications in the treatment of fragile X syndrome, levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, addiction, and anxiety; however, clinical and preclinical studies raise concerns that complete blockade of mGlu5 and inverse agonist activity of current mGlu5 NAMs contribute to adverse effects that limit the therapeutic use of these compounds. We report the discovery and characterization of a novel mGlu5 NAM, N,N-diethyl-5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)picolinamide (VU0477573) that binds to the same allosteric site as the prototypical mGlu5 NAM MPEP but displays weak negative cooperativity. Because of this weak cooperativity, VU0477573 acts as a "partial NAM" so that full occupancy of the MPEP site does not completely inhibit maximal effects of mGlu5 agonists on intracellular calcium mobilization, inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation, or inhibition of synaptic transmission at the hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse. Unlike previous mGlu5 NAMs, VU0477573 displays no inverse agonist activity assessed using measures of effects on basal [(3)H]inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation. VU0477573 acts as a full NAM when measuring effects on mGlu5-mediated extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2 phosphorylation, which may indicate functional bias. VU0477573 exhibits an excellent pharmacokinetic profile and good brain penetration in rodents and provides dose-dependent full mGlu5 occupancy in the central nervous system (CNS) with systemic administration. Interestingly, VU0477573 shows robust efficacy, comparable to the mGlu5 NAM MTEP, in models of anxiolytic activity at doses that provide full CNS occupancy of mGlu5 and demonstrate an excellent CNS occupancy-efficacy relationship. VU0477573 provides an exciting new tool to investigate the efficacy of partial NAMs in animal models. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and

  4. Targeting mGlu5 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Treatment of Cognitive Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Nardecchia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied group-I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu receptors in Pahenu2 (ENU2 mice, which mimic the genetics and neurobiology of human phenylketonuria (PKU, a metabolic disorder characterized, if untreated, by autism, and intellectual disability (ID. Male ENU2 mice showed increased mGlu5 receptor protein levels in the hippocampus and corpus striatum (but not in the prefrontal cortex whereas the transcript of the mGlu5 receptor was unchanged. No changes in mGlu1 receptor mRNA and protein levels were found in any of the three brain regions of ENU2 mice. We extended the analysis to Homer proteins, which act as scaffolds by linking mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptors to effector proteins. Expression of the long isoforms of Homer was significantly reduced in the hippocampus of ENU2 mice, whereas levels of the short Homer isoform (Homer 1a were unchanged. mGlu5 receptors were less associated to immunoprecipitated Homer in the hippocampus of ENU2 mice. The lack of mGlu5 receptor-mediated long-term depression (LTD in wild-type mice (of BTBR strain precluded the analysis of hippocampal synaptic plasticity in ENU2 mice. We therefore performed a behavioral analysis to examine whether pharmacological blockade of mGlu5 receptors could correct behavioral abnormalities in ENU2 mice. Using the same apparatus we sequentially assessed locomotor activity, object exploration, and spatial object recognition (spatial novelty test after displacing some of the objects from their original position in the arena. Systemic treatment with the mGlu5 receptor antagonist, MPEP (20 mg/kg, i.p., had a striking effect in the spatial novelty test by substantially increasing the time spent in exploring the displaced objects in ENU2 mice (but not in wild-type mice. These suggest a role for mGlu5 receptors in the pathophysiology of ID in PKU and suggest that, also in adult untreated animals, cognitive dysfunction may be improved by targeting these receptors with an appropriate therapy.

  5. Activity of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4 Suppresses Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis With Inhibition of Gli-1 in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most lethal glioma variant in the adult brain and among the deadliest of human cancers. Increasing evidence has shown that metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGluR4 expression may play roles in regulating the growth of neural stem cells as well as several cancer cell lines. Here, we investigated the effects of mGluR4 on the growth and apoptosis of the LN229 GBM cell line. Involvement of Gli-1, one of the key transcription factors in the sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway, was further explored. In this study, mGluR4 was activated using selective agonist VU0155041; and gene-targeted siRNAs were used to generate loss of function of mGluR4 and Gli-1 in LN229 cells. The results demonstrated that LN229 cells expressed mGluR4 and the agonist VU0155041 decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Activation of mGluR4 inhibited cyclin D1 expression, activated pro-caspase-8/9/3, and disrupted the balance of Bcl-2/Bax expression, which indicated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of LN229 cells, respectively. Furthermore, Gli-1 expression was reduced by mGluR4 activation in LN229 cells, and downregulation of Gli-1 expression by gene-targeted siRNA resulted in both inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis. Moreover, VU0155041 treatment substantially blocked SHH-induced cyclin D1 expression and cell proliferation, while increasing TUNEL-positive cells and the activation of apoptosis-related proteins. We concluded that activation of mGluR4 expressed in LN229 cells could inhibit GBM cell growth by decreasing cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. Further suppression of intracellular Gli-1 expression might be involved in the action of mGluR4 on cancer cells. Our study suggested a novel role of mGluR4, which might serve as a potential drug target for control of GBM cell growth.

  6. In Vitro Functional Characterization of GET73 as Possible Negative Allosteric Modulator of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggiato, Sarah; Borelli, Andrea C; Tomasini, Maria C; Castelli, M Paola; Pintori, Nicholas; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Loche, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca

    2018-01-01

    The present study was aimed to further characterize the pharmacological profile of N-[4-(trifluoromethyl) benzyl]-4-methoxybutyramide (GET73), a putative negative allosteric modulator (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptor (mGluR5) under development as a novel medication for the treatment of alcohol dependence. This aim has been accomplished by means of a series of in vitro functional assays. These assays include the measure of several down-stream signaling [intracellular Ca ++ levels, inositol phosphate (IP) formation and CREB phosphorylation (pCREB)] which are generally affected by mGluR5 ligands. In particular, GET73 (0.1 nM-10 μM) was explored for its ability to displace the concentration-response curve of some mGluR5 agonists/probes (glutamate, L-quisqualate, CHPG) in different native preparations. GET73 produced a rightward shift of concentration-response curves of glutamate- and CHPG-induced intracellular Ca ++ levels in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. The compound also induced a rightward shift of concentration response curve of glutamate- and L-quisqualate-induced increase in IP turnover in rat hippocampus slices, along with a reduction of CHPG (10 mM)-induced increase in IP formation. Moreover, GET73 produced a rightward shift of concentration-response curve of glutamate-, CHPG- and L-quisqualate-induced pCREB levels in rat cerebral cortex neurons. Although the engagement of other targets cannot be definitively ruled out, these data support the view that GET73 acts as an mGluR5 NAM and support the significance of further investigating the possible mechanism of action of the compound.

  7. Role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in pudendal inhibition of the nociceptive bladder reflex in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jeremy N; Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-04-15

    This study examined the role of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in the inhibtion of this reflex by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS). In α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after spinal cord transection at the T9/T10 level, intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid irritated the bladder, activated nociceptive C-fiber afferents, and induced spinal reflex bladder contractions of low amplitude (reflexes were responsible for a major component of the contractions. This study shows that spinal mGluR5 plays an important role in the nociceptive C-fiber afferent-mediated spinal bladder reflex and in pudendal inhibition of this spinal reflex. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Glutamate and Brain Glutaminases in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Javier; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Peñalver, Ana; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Blanco, Eduardo; Alonso, Francisco J; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and its actions are related to the behavioral effects of psychostimulant drugs. In the last two decades, basic neuroscience research and preclinical studies with animal models are suggesting a critical role for glutamate transmission in drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse. Although most of the interest has been centered in post-synaptic glutamate receptors, the presynaptic synthesis of glutamate through brain glutaminases may also contribute to imbalances in glutamate homeostasis, a key feature of the glutamatergic hypothesis of addiction. Glutaminases are the main glutamate-producing enzymes in brain and dysregulation of their function have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders; however, the possible implication of these enzymes in drug addiction remains largely unknown. This mini-review focuses on brain glutaminase isozymes and their alterations by in vivo exposure to drugs of abuse, which are discussed in the context of the glutamate homeostasis theory of addiction. Recent findings from mouse models have shown that drugs induce changes in the expression profiles of key glutamatergic transmission genes, although the molecular mechanisms that regulate drug-induced neuronal sensitization and behavioral plasticity are not clear.

  9. Cyclic ADP ribose-dependent Ca2+ release by group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Woo Sohn

    Full Text Available Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (group I mGluRs; mGluR1 and mGluR5 exert diverse effects on neuronal and synaptic functions, many of which are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+. In this study, we characterized the cellular mechanisms underlying Ca(2+ mobilization induced by (RS-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; a specific group I mGluR agonist in the somata of acutely dissociated rat hippocampal neurons using microfluorometry. We found that DHPG activates mGluR5 to mobilize intracellular Ca(2+ from ryanodine-sensitive stores via cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR, while the PLC/IP(3 signaling pathway was not involved in Ca(2+ mobilization. The application of glutamate, which depolarized the membrane potential by 28.5±4.9 mV (n = 4, led to transient Ca(2+ mobilization by mGluR5 and Ca(2+ influx through L-type Ca(2+ channels. We found no evidence that mGluR5-mediated Ca(2+ release and Ca(2+ influx through L-type Ca(2+ channels interact to generate supralinear Ca(2+ transients. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of intracellular Ca(2+ mobilization by mGluR5 in the somata of hippocampal neurons.

  10. The association of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 with the neuronal Ca2+-binding protein 2 modulates receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Albergaria, Catarina; Watanabe, Masahiko; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Luján, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2009-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors mediate in part the CNS effects of glutamate. These receptors interact with a large array of intracellular proteins in which the final role is to regulate receptor function. Here, using co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments we showed a close and specific interaction between mGlu(5) receptor and NECAB2 in both transfected human embryonic kidney cells and rat hippocampus. Interestingly, in pull-down experiments increasing concentrations of calcium drastically reduced the ability of these two proteins to interact, suggesting that NECAB2 binds to mGlu(5) receptor in a calcium-regulated manner. Immunoelectron microscopy detection of NECAB2 and mGlu(5) receptor in the rat hippocampal formation indicated that both proteins are codistributed in the same subcellular compartment of pyramidal cells. In addition, the NECAB2/mGlu(5) receptor interaction regulated mGlu(5b)-mediated activation of both inositol phosphate accumulation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Overall, these findings indicate that NECAB2 by its physical interaction with mGlu(5b) receptor modulates receptor function.

  11. Glutamate as a neurotransmitter in the brain: review of physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, B S

    2000-04-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in brain. Our knowledge of the glutamatergic synapse has advanced enormously in the last 10 years, primarily through application of molecular biological techniques to the study of glutamate receptors and transporters. There are three families of ionotropic receptors with intrinsic cation permeable channels [N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate]. There are three groups of metabotropic, G protein-coupled glutamate receptors (mGluR) that modify neuronal and glial excitability through G protein subunits acting on membrane ion channels and second messengers such as diacylglycerol and cAMP. There are also two glial glutamate transporters and three neuronal transporters in the brain. Glutamate is the most abundant amino acid in the diet. There is no evidence for brain damage in humans resulting from dietary glutamate. A kainate analog, domoate, is sometimes ingested accidentally in blue mussels; this potent toxin causes limbic seizures, which can lead to hippocampal and related pathology and amnesia. Endogenous glutamate, by activating NMDA, AMPA or mGluR1 receptors, may contribute to the brain damage occurring acutely after status epilepticus, cerebral ischemia or traumatic brain injury. It may also contribute to chronic neurodegeneration in such disorders as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's chorea. In animal models of cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury, NMDA and AMPA receptor antagonists protect against acute brain damage and delayed behavioral deficits. Such compounds are undergoing testing in humans, but therapeutic efficacy has yet to be established. Other clinical conditions that may respond to drugs acting on glutamatergic transmission include epilepsy, amnesia, anxiety, hyperalgesia and psychosis.

  12. Adenosine A2A Receptor in the Monkey Basal Ganglia: Ultrastructural Localization and Colocalization With the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 in the Striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Bogenpohl, James W.; Ritter, Stefanie L.; Hall, Randy A.; Smith, Yoland

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a potential drug target for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other neurological disorders. In rodents, the therapeutic efficacy of A2AR modulation is improved by concomitant modulation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). To elucidate the anatomical substrate(s) through which these therapeutic benefits could be mediated, pre-embedding electron microscopy immunohistochemistry was used to conduct a detailed, quantitative ultrastructural...

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 gene expression is differently regulated by BDNF in rat primary cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Klein, Anders B; El-Sayed, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and plasticity. Incorporation of matured receptor proteins is an integral part of synapse formation. However, whether BDNF increases synthesis and integration of receptors in functional synapses directly is unclear. We...... are particularly interested in the regulation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A (5-HT2A R). This receptor form a functional complex with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) and is recruited to the cell membrane by the corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF-R1). The effect of BDNF on gene...... expression for all these receptors, as well as a number of immediate-early genes, was pharmacologically characterized in primary neurons from rat frontal cortex. BDNF increased CRF-R1 mRNA levels up to fivefold, whereas mGluR2 mRNA levels were proportionally downregulated. No effect on 5-HT2A R mRNA was seen...

  14. Both neurons and astrocytes exhibited tetrodotoxin-resistant metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent spontaneous slow Ca2+ oscillations in striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Tamura

    Full Text Available The striatum plays an important role in linking cortical activity to basal ganglia outputs. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are densely expressed in the medium spiny projection neurons and may be a therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease. The group I mGluRs are known to modulate the intracellular Ca(2+ signaling. To characterize Ca(2+ signaling in striatal cells, spontaneous cytoplasmic Ca(2+ transients were examined in acute slice preparations from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP in the astrocytes. In both the GFP-negative cells (putative-neurons and astrocytes of the striatum, spontaneous slow and long-lasting intracellular Ca(2+ transients (referred to as slow Ca(2+ oscillations, which lasted up to approximately 200 s, were found. Neither the inhibition of action potentials nor ionotropic glutamate receptors blocked the slow Ca(2+ oscillation. Depletion of the intracellular Ca(2+ store and the blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors greatly reduced the transient rate of the slow Ca(2+ oscillation, and the application of an antagonist against mGluR5 also blocked the slow Ca(2+ oscillation in both putative-neurons and astrocytes. Thus, the mGluR5-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signal cascade is the primary contributor to the slow Ca(2+ oscillation in both putative-neurons and astrocytes. The slow Ca(2+ oscillation features multicellular synchrony, and both putative-neurons and astrocytes participate in the synchronous activity. Therefore, the mGluR5-dependent slow Ca(2+ oscillation may involve in the neuron-glia interaction in the striatum.

  15. Defense reaction induced by a metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist microinjected into the dorsal periaqueductal gray of rats

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    M.L. Molchanov

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral effects of trans-(±-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (t-ACPD, a metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR agonist, or 0.9% (w/v saline, injected into the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG, was investigated. Male Wistar rats showed defense reactions characterized by jumps toward the top edges of the cages (saline = 0 vs t-ACPD = 6.0, medians P<0.05 and gallops (saline = 0 vs t-ACPD = 10.0, medians P<0.05 during the 60-s period after the beginning of the injection. In another experiment animals were placed inside an open arena for 5 min immediately after injection. Their behavior was recorded by a video camera and a computer program analyzed the videotapes. Eleven of fifteen rats injected with t-ACPD showed a short-lasting (about 1 min flight reaction. No saline-treated animal showed this reaction (P<0.0005, chi-square test. The drug induced an increase in turning behavior (P = 0.002, MANOVA and a decrease in the number of rearings (P<0.001, MANOVA and grooming episodes (P<0.001, MANOVA. These results suggest that mGluRs play a role in the control of defense reactions in the DPAG.

  16. Membrane Estrogen Receptor-α Interacts with Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Type 1a to Mobilize Intracellular Calcium in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, John; Hariri, Omid R.; Bondar, Galyna; Ogi, Julie; Micevych, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Estradiol, acting on a membrane-associated estrogen receptor-α (mERα), induces an increase in free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) needed for progesterone synthesis in hypothalamic astrocytes. To determine whether rapid estradiol signaling involves an interaction of mERα with metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1a (mGluR1a), changes in [Ca2+]i were monitored with the calcium indicator, Fluo-4 AM, in primary cultures of female postpubertal hypothalamic astrocytes. 17β-Estradiol over a range of 1 nm to 100 nm induced a maximal increase in [Ca2+]i flux measured as a change in relative fluorescence [ΔF Ca2+ = 615 ± 36 to 641 ± 47 relative fluorescent units (RFU)], whereas 0.1 nm of estradiol stimulated a moderate [Ca2+]i increase (275 ± 16 RFU). The rapid estradiol-induced [Ca2+]i flux was blocked with 1 μm of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 (635 ± 24 vs. 102 ± 11 RFU, P estradiol-induced membrane signaling in astrocytes. PMID:18948402

  17. Synthesis and pharmacology of 3-isoxazolol amino acids as selective antagonists at group I metabotropic glutamic acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2001-01-01

    Using ibotenic acid (2) as a lead, two series of 3-isoxazolol amino acid ligands for (S)-glutamic acid (Glu, 1) receptors have been developed. Whereas analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [AMPA, (RS)-3] interact selectively with ionotropic Glu receptors (i......GluRs), the few analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [HIBO, (RS)-4] so far known typically interact with iGluRs as well as metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). We here report the synthesis and pharmacology of a series of 4-substituted analogues of HIBO. The hexyl analogue 9 was shown...... to originate in (S)-11 (EC(50) = 395 microM, K(b) = 86 and 90 microM, respectively). Compound 9, administered icv, but not sc, was shown to protect mice against convulsions induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). Compounds 9 and 11 were resolved using chiral HPLC, and the configurational assignments...

  18. (S)-homo-AMPA, a specific agonist at the mGlu6 subtype of metabotropic glutamic acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadian, H; Nielsen, B; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1997-01-01

    of the spectroscopic configurational assignments. The activities of 6 and 7 at ionotropic EAA (iGlu) receptors and at mGlu1-7 were studied. (S)-Homo-AMPA (6) was shown to be a specific agonist at mGlu6 (EC50 = 58 +/- 11 microM) comparable in potency with the endogenous mGlu agonist (S)-glutamic acid (EC50 = 20 +/- 3......Our previous publication (J. Med. Chem. 1996, 39, 3188-3194) described (RS)-2-amino-4-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)butyric acid (Homo-AMPA) as a highly selective agonist at the mGlu6 subtype of metabotropic excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors. Homo-AMPA has already become a standard agonist...... microM). Although Homo-AMPA did not show significant effects at iGlu receptors, (R)-Homo-AMPA (7), which was inactive at mGlu1-7, turned out to be a weak N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist (IC50 = 131 +/- 18 microM)....

  19. Glutamate Transporters in the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    concentration of L-glutamate causes excitotoxicity. A tight control of the brain interstitial fluid L-glutamate levels is therefore imperative, in order to maintain optimal neurotransmission and to avoid such excitotoxicity. The blood-brain barrier, i.e., the endothelial lining of the brain capillaries...... cells. The mechanisms underlying transendothelial L-glutamate transport are however still not well understood. The present chapter summarizes the current knowledge on blood-brain barrier L-glutamate transporters and the suggested pathways for the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux......., regulates the exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolic waste products between plasma and brain interstitial fluid. It has been suggested that brain capillary endothelial cells could play an important role in L-glutamate homeostasis by mediating brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux. Both in vitro and in vivo...

  20. Modulation of short-term plasticity in the corticothalamic circuit by group III metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyuyoung, Christine L; Huguenard, John R

    2014-01-08

    Recurrent connections in the corticothalamic circuit underlie oscillatory behavior in this network and range from normal sleep rhythms to the abnormal spike-wave discharges seen in absence epilepsy. The propensity of thalamic neurons to fire postinhibitory rebound bursts mediated by low-threshold calcium spikes renders the circuit vulnerable to both increased excitation and increased inhibition, such as excessive excitatory cortical drive to thalamic reticular (RT) neurons or heightened inhibition of thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons by RT. In this context, a protective role may be played by group III metabotropic receptors (mGluRs), which are uniquely located in the presynaptic active zone and typically act as autoreceptors or heteroceptors to depress synaptic release. Here, we report that these receptors regulate short-term plasticity at two loci in the corticothalamic circuit in rats: glutamatergic cortical synapses onto RT neurons and GABAergic synapses onto TC neurons in somatosensory ventrobasal thalamus. The net effect of group III mGluR activation at these synapses is to suppress thalamic oscillations as assayed in vitro. These findings suggest a functional role of these receptors to modulate corticothalamic transmission and protect against prolonged activity in the network.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and first successful monkey imaging studies of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) PET radiotracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Terence G; Krause, Stephen; Ryan, Christine; Bonnefous, Celine; Govek, Steve; Seiders, T Jon; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Roppe, Jeffrey; Kamenecka, Ted; Patel, Shil; Gibson, Raymond E; Sanabria, Sandra; Riffel, Kerry; Eng, Waisi; King, Christopher; Yang, Xiaoqing; Green, Mitchell D; O'Malley, Stacey S; Hargreaves, Richard; Burns, H Donald

    2005-06-15

    Three metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) PET tracers have been labeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18 and their in vitro and in vivo behavior in rhesus monkey has been characterized. Each of these tracers share the common features of high affinity for mGluR5 (0.08-0.23 nM vs. rat mGluR5) and moderate lipophilicity (log P 2.8-3.4). Compound 1b was synthesized using a Suzuki or Stille coupling reaction with [11C]MeI. Compounds 2b and 3b were synthesized by a SNAr reaction using a 3-chlorobenzonitrile precursor. Autoradiographic studies in rhesus monkey brain slices using 2b and 3b showed specific binding in cortex, caudate, putamen, amygdala, hippocampus, most thalamic nuclei, and lower binding in the cerebellum. PET imaging studies in monkey showed that all three tracers readily enter the brain and provide an mGluR5-specific signal in all gray matter regions, including the cerebellum. The specific signal observed in the cerebellum was confirmed by the autoradiographic studies and saturation binding experiments that showed tracer binding in the cerebellum of rhesus monkeys. In vitro metabolism studies using the unlabeled compounds showed that 1a, 2a, and 3a are metabolized slower by human liver microsomes than by monkey liver microsomes. In vivo metabolism studies showed 3b to be long-lived in rhesus plasma with only one other more polar metabolite observed. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. N-Acetyl-cysteine causes analgesia by reinforcing the endogenous activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabucci Matteo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2 receptors causes analgesia in experimental models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Presynaptic mGlu2 receptors are activated by the glutamate released from astrocytes by means of the cystine/glutamate antiporter (System xc- or Sxc-. We examined the analgesic activity of the Sxc- activator, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, in mice developing inflammatory or neuropathic pain. Results A single injection of NAC (100 mg/kg, i.p. reduced nocifensive behavior in the second phase of the formalin test. NAC-induced analgesia was abrogated by the Sxc- inhibitor, sulphasalazine (8 mg/kg, i.p. or by the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.. NAC still caused analgesia in mGlu3−/− mice, but was inactive in mGlu2−/− mice. In wild-type mice, NAC retained the analgesic activity in the formalin test when injected daily for 7 days, indicating the lack of tolerance. Both single and repeated injections of NAC also caused analgesia in the complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA model of chronic inflammatory pain, and, again, analgesia was abolished by LY341495. Data obtained in mice developing neuropathic pain in response to chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve were divergent. In this model, a single injection of NAC caused analgesia that was reversed by LY341495, whereas repeated injections of NAC were ineffective. Thus, tolerance to NAC-induced analgesia developed in the CCI model, but not in models of inflammatory pain. The CFA and CCI models differed with respect to the expression levels of xCT (the catalytic subunit of Sxc- and activator of G-protein signaling type-3 (AGS3 in the dorsal portion of the lumbar spinal cord. CFA-treated mice showed no change in either protein, whereas CCI mice showed an ipislateral reduction in xCT levels and a bilateral increase in AGS3 levels in the spinal cord. Conclusions These data demonstrate that

  3. Glutamate Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederberg-Helms, Hans Christian; Uhd-Nielsen, Carsten; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    is well known, however endothelial cells may also play an important role through mediating brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux. Expression of excitatory amino acid transporters has been demonstrated in brain endothelial cells of bovine, human, murine, rat and porcine origin. These can account for high...... affinity concentrative uptake of L-glutamate from the brain interstitial fluid into the capillary endothelial cells. The mechanisms in between L-glutamate uptake in the endothelial cells and L-glutamate appearing in the blood are still unclear and may involve a luminal transporter for L......-glutamate, metabolism of L-glutamate and transport of metabolites or a combination of the two. However, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated blood-to-brain transport of L-glutamate, at least during pathological events. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux...

  4. Preclinical and the first clinical studies on [11C]ITMM for mapping metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohara, Jun; Sakata, Muneyuki; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Oda, Keiichi; Ishii, Kenji; Zhang, Ming Rong; Moriguchi Jeckel, Cristina Maria; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Preclinical studies and first positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies were performed using N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-[ 11 C] methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ([ 11 C]ITMM) to map metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 (mGluR1) in the human brain. Methods: [ 11 C]ITMM was synthesized by O-methylation of the desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl triflate in the presence of NaOH at room temperature. In vitro selectivity and brain distributions of [ 11 C]ITMM in mice were characterized. Radiation absorbed-dose by [ 11 C]ITMM in humans was calculated from mouse distribution data. Acute toxicity of ITMM at 4.72 mg/kg body weight (> 74,000-fold clinical equivalent dose of [ 11 C]ITMM) was evaluated. Mutagenicity of ITMM was studied by the Ames test. Clinical PET imaging of mGluR1 with [ 11 C] ITMM was performed in a healthy volunteer. Results: ITMM had low activity for a 28-standard receptor binding profile. Regional brain uptake of [ 11 C]ITMM in mice was heterogeneous and consistent with known mGluR1 distributions. The radiation absorbed-dose by [ 11 C]ITMM in humans was sufficiently low for clinical use, and no acute toxicity or mutagenicity of ITMM occurred. A 90-min dynamic PET scan with [ 11 C]ITMM in a healthy volunteer showed a gradual increase of radioactivity in the cerebellum. Total distribution volume of [ 11 C]ITMM was highest in the cerebellum, followed by thalamus, cerebral cortex, and striatum; regional differences in brain radioactivity corresponded to the mGluR1 distribution in the brain. Peripherally, [ 11 C]ITMM was stable in humans: 60% of the plasma radioactivity remained in the unchanged form for 60 min. Conclusions: [ 11 C] ITMM is a suitable radioligand for imaging mGluR1 in the human brain providing acceptable dosimetry and pharmacological safety at the dose required for PET

  5. Inhibition of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Reverses Autistic-Like Phenotypes Caused by Deficiency of the Translation Repressor eIF4E Binding Protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Valles, Argel; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Gkogkas, Christos; Nader, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-08-05

    Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development has been linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Deletion of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 2 gene (Eif4ebp2), encoding the suppressor of mRNA translation initiation 4E-BP2, leads to an imbalance in excitatory-to-inhibitory neurotransmission and ASD-like behaviors. Inhibition of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) mGluR1 and mGluR5 reverses the autistic phenotypes in several ASD mouse models. Importantly, these receptors control synaptic physiology via activation of mRNA translation. We investigated the potential reversal of autistic-like phenotypes in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice by using antagonists of mGluR1 (JNJ16259685) or mGluR5 (fenobam). Augmented hippocampal mGluR-induced long-term depression (LTD; or chemically induced mGluR-LTD) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice was rescued by mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. While rescue by mGluR5 inhibition occurs through the blockade of a protein synthesis-dependent component of LTD, normalization by mGluR1 antagonists requires the activation of protein synthesis. Synaptically induced LTD was deficient in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice, and this deficit was not rescued by group I mGluR antagonists. Furthermore, a single dose of mGluR1 (0.3 mg/kg) or mGluR5 (3 mg/kg) antagonists in vivo reversed the deficits in social interaction and repetitive behaviors (marble burying) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice serve as a relevant model to test potential therapies for ASD symptoms. In addition, we provide substantive evidence that the inhibition of mGluR1/mGluR5 is an effective treatment for physiological and behavioral alterations caused by exacerbated mRNA translation initiation. Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development is associated with several autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We recently demonstrated that the deletion of a negative regulator of mRNA translation initiation, the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E

  6. Loss of object recognition memory produced by extended access to methamphetamine self-administration is reversed by positive allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Carmela M; Schwendt, Marek; McGinty, Jacqueline F; Olive, M Foster; See, Ronald E

    2011-03-01

    Chronic methamphetamine (meth) abuse can lead to persisting cognitive deficits. Here, we utilized a long-access meth self-administration (SA) protocol to assess recognition memory and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) expression, and the possible reversal of cognitive impairments with the mGluR5 allosteric modulator, 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl) benzamide (CDPPB). Male, Long-Evans rats self-administered i.v. meth (0.02 mg/infusion) on an FR1 schedule of reinforcement or received yoked-saline infusions. After seven daily 1-h sessions, rats were switched to 6-h daily sessions for 14 days, and then underwent drug abstinence. Rats were tested for object recognition memory at 1 week after meth SA at 90 min and 24 h retention intervals. In a separate experiment, rats underwent the same protocol, but received either vehicle or CDPPB (30 mg/kg) after familiarization. Rats were killed on day 8 or 14 post-SA and brain tissue was obtained. Meth intake escalated over the extended access period. Additionally, meth-experienced rats showed deficits in both short- and long-term recognition memory, demonstrated by a lack of novel object exploration. The deficit at 90 min was reversed by CDPPB treatment. On day 8, meth intake during SA negatively correlated with mGluR expression in the perirhinal and prefrontal cortex, and mGluR5 receptor expression was decreased 14 days after discontinuation of meth. This effect was specific to mGluR5 levels in the perirhinal cortex, as no differences were identified in the hippocampus or in mGluR2/3 receptors. These results from a clinically-relevant animal model of addiction suggest that mGluR5 receptor modulation may be a potential treatment of cognitive dysfunction in meth addiction.

  7. Pharmacology of basimglurant (RO4917523, RG7090), a unique metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 negative allosteric modulator in clinical development for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Lothar; Porter, Richard H; Scharf, Sebastian H; Kuennecke, Basil; Bruns, Andreas; von Kienlin, Markus; Harrison, Anthony C; Paehler, Axel; Funk, Christoph; Gloge, Andreas; Schneider, Manfred; Parrott, Neil J; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Niederhauser, Urs; Morairty, Stephen R; Kilduff, Thomas S; Vieira, Eric; Kolczewski, Sabine; Wichmann, Juergen; Hartung, Thomas; Honer, Michael; Borroni, Edilio; Moreau, Jean-Luc; Prinssen, Eric; Spooren, Will; Wettstein, Joseph G; Jaeschke, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious public health burden and a leading cause of disability. Its pharmacotherapy is currently limited to modulators of monoamine neurotransmitters and second-generation antipsychotics. Recently, glutamatergic approaches for the treatment of MDD have increasingly received attention, and preclinical research suggests that metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) inhibitors have antidepressant-like properties. Basimglurant (2-chloro-4-[1-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-4-ylethynyl]-pyridine) is a novel mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator currently in phase 2 clinical development for MDD and fragile X syndrome. Here, the comprehensive preclinical pharmacological profile of basimglurant is presented with a focus on its therapeutic potential for MDD and drug-like properties. Basimglurant is a potent, selective, and safe mGlu5 inhibitor with good oral bioavailability and long half-life supportive of once-daily administration, good brain penetration, and high in vivo potency. It has antidepressant properties that are corroborated by its functional magnetic imaging profile as well as anxiolytic-like and antinociceptive features. In electroencephalography recordings, basimglurant shows wake-promoting effects followed by increased delta power during subsequent non-rapid eye movement sleep. In microdialysis studies, basimglurant had no effect on monoamine transmitter levels in the frontal cortex or nucleus accumbens except for a moderate increase of accumbal dopamine, which is in line with its lack of pharmacological activity on monoamine reuptake transporters. These data taken together, basimglurant has favorable drug-like properties, a differentiated molecular mechanism of action, and antidepressant-like features that suggest the possibility of also addressing important comorbidities of MDD including anxiety and pain as well as daytime sleepiness and apathy or lethargy. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for

  8. Regulation of Akt and Wnt signaling by the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist LY341495 and agonist LY379268.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Laurie P; Rushlow, Walter J

    2011-06-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors 2/3 (mGlu(2/3)) have been implicated in schizophrenia and as a novel treatment target for schizophrenia. The current study examined whether mGlu(2/3) regulates Akt (protein kinase B) and Wnt (Wingless/Int-1) signaling, two cascades associated with schizophrenia and modified by antipsychotics. Western blotting revealed increases in phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3 (pGSK-3) following acute and repeated treatment of LY379268 (mGlu(2/3) agonist), whereas increases in dishevelled-2 (Dvl-2), dishevelled-3 (Dvl-3), GSK-3 and β-catenin were only observed following repeated treatment. LY341495 (mGlu(2/3) antagonist) induced the opposite response compared with LY379268. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed an association between the mGlu(2/3) complex and Dvl-2 providing a possible mechanism to explain how the mGlu(2/3) can mediate changes in Wnt signaling. However, there was no association between the mGlu(2/3) complex and Akt suggesting that changes in Akt signaling following LY341495 and LY379268 treatments may not be directly mediated by the mGlu(2/3) . Finally, an increase in locomotor activity induced by LY341495 treatment correlated with increased pAkt and pGSK-3 levels and was attenuated by the administration of the GSK-3 inhibitor, SB216763. Overall, the results suggest that mGlu(2/3) regulates Akt and Wnt signaling and LY379268 treatment has overlapping effects with D(2) dopamine receptor antagonists (antipsychotic drugs). © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor I (mGluR1) Antagonism Impairs Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference via Inhibition of Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fei; Zhong, Peng; Liu, Xiaojie; Sun, Dalong; Gao, Hai-qing; Liu, Qing-song

    2013-01-01

    Antagonism of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) reduces behavioral effects of drugs of abuse, including cocaine. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Activation of mGluR5 increases protein synthesis at synapses. Although mGluR5-induced excessive protein synthesis has been implicated in the pathology of fragile X syndrome, it remains unknown whether group I mGluR-mediated protein synthesis is involved in any behavioral effects of drugs of abus...

  10. Preclinical evaluation and test-retest studies of [{sup 18}F]PSS232, a novel radioligand for targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu{sub 5})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milicevic Sephton, Selena; Mueller Herde, Adrienne; Keller, Claudia; Ruedisuehli, Sonja; Schibli, Roger; Kraemer, Stefanie D.; Ametamey, Simon M. [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences of ETH, PSI and USZ, Zurich (Switzerland); Mu, Linjing [University Hospital Zuerich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zuerich (Switzerland); Auberson, Yves [Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    A novel, {sup 18}F-labelled metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu{sub 5}) derivative of [{sup 11}C]ABP688 ([{sup 11}C]1), [{sup 18}F]PSS232 ([{sup 18}F]5), was evaluated in vitro and in vivo for its potential as a PET agent and was used in test-retest reliability studies The radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]5 was accomplished via a one-step reaction using a mesylate precursor. In vitro stability was determined in PBS and plasma, and with liver microsomal enzymes. Metabolite studies were performed using rat brain extracts, blood and urine. In vitro autoradiography was performed on horizontal slices of rat brain using 1 and 8, antagonists for mGlu{sub 5} and mGlu{sub 1}, respectively. Small-animal PET, biodistribution, and test-retest studies were performed in Wistar rats. In vivo, dose-dependent displacement studies were performed using 6 and blocking studies with 7. [{sup 18}F]5 was obtained in decay-corrected maximal radiochemical yield of 37 % with a specific activity of 80 - 400 GBq/μmol. Treatment with rat and human microsomal enzymes in vitro for 60 min resulted in 20 % and 4 % of hydrophilic radiometabolites, respectively. No hydrophilic decomposition products or radiometabolites were found in PBS or plasma. In vitro autoradiography on rat brain slices showed a heterogeneous distribution consistent with the known distribution of mGlu{sub 5} with high binding to hippocampal and cortical regions, and negligible radioactivity in the cerebellum. Similar distribution of radioactivity was found in PET images. Under displacement conditions with 6, reduced [{sup 18}F]5 binding was found in all brain regions except the cerebellum. 7 reduced binding in the striatum by 84 % on average. Test-retest studies were reproducible with a variability ranging from 6.8 % to 8.2 %. An extended single-dose toxicity study in Wistar rats showed no compound-related adverse effects. The new mGlu{sub 5} radiotracer, [{sup 18}F]5, showed specific and selective in vitro and in vivo

  11. A first-in-man PET study of [18F]PSS232, a fluorinated ABP688 derivative for imaging metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Geoffrey; Sommerauer, Michael; Mu, Linjing; Pla Gonzalez, Gloria; Geistlich, Susanne; Treyer, Valerie; Schibli, Roger; Buck, Alfred; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2018-06-01

    Non-invasive imaging of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu 5 ) in the brain using PET is of interest in e.g., anxiety, depression, and Parkinson's disease. Widespread application of the most widely used mGlu 5 tracer, [ 11 C]ABP688, is limited by the short physical half-life of carbon-11. [ 18 F]PSS232 is a fluorinated analog with promising preclinical properties and high selectivity and specificity for mGlu 5 . In this first-in-man study, we evaluated the brain uptake pattern and kinetics of [ 18 F]PSS232 in healthy volunteers. [ 18 F]PSS232 PET was performed with ten healthy male volunteers aged 20-40 years. Seven of the subjects received a bolus injection and the remainder a bolus/infusion protocol. Cerebral blood flow was determined in seven subjects using [ 15 O]water PET. Arterial blood activity was measured using an online blood counter. Tracer kinetics were evaluated by compartment modeling and parametric maps were generated for both tracers. At 90 min post-injection, 59.2 ± 11.1% of total radioactivity in plasma corresponded to intact tracer. The regional first pass extraction fraction of [ 18 F]PSS232 ranged from 0.41 ± 0.06 to 0.55 ± 0.03 and brain distribution pattern matched that of [ 11 C]ABP688. Uptake kinetics followed a simple two-tissue compartment model. The volume of distribution of total tracer (V T , ml/cm 3 ) ranged from 1.18 ± 0.20 for white matter to 2.91 ± 0.51 for putamen. The respective mean distribution volume ratios (DVR) with cerebellum as the reference tissue were 0.88 ± 0.06 and 2.12 ± 0.10, respectively. The tissue/cerebellum ratios of a bolus/infusion protocol (30/70 dose ratio) were close to the DVR values. Brain uptake of [ 18 F]PSS232 matched the distribution of mGlu 5 and followed a two-tissue compartment model. The well-defined kinetics and the possibility to use reference tissue models, obviating the need for arterial blood sampling, make [ 18 F]PSS232 a promising fluorine-18 labeled

  12. Phenotypic characterization of Grm1crv4 mice reveals a functional role for the type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor in bone mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Ilaria; Mattinzoli, Deborah; Otescu, Lavinia Alexandra; Bossi, Simone; Ikehata, Masami; Gentili, Chiara; Cangemi, Giuliana; Gatti, Cinzia; Emionite, Laura; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Riccardi, Daniela; Puliti, Aldamaria

    2017-01-01

    Recent increasing evidence supports a role for neuronal type signaling in bone. Specifically glutamate receptors have been found in cells responsible for bone remodeling, namely the osteoblasts and the osteoclasts. While most studies have focused on ionotropic glutamate receptors, the relevance of the metabotropic glutamate signaling in bone is poorly understood. Specifically type 1 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1) receptors are expressed in bone, but the effect of its ablation on skeletal development has never been investigated. Here we report that Grm1 crv4/crv4 mice, homozygous for an inactivating mutation of the mGlu1 receptor, and mainly characterized by ataxia and renal dysfunction, exhibit decreased body weight, bone length and bone mineral density compared to wild type (WT) animals. Blood analyses of the affected mice demonstrate the absence of changes in circulating factors, such as vitamin D and PTH, suggesting renal damage is not the main culprit of the skeletal phenotype. Cultures of osteoblasts lacking functional mGlu1 receptors exhibit less homogeneous collagen deposition than WT cells, and present increased expression of osteocalcin, a marker of osteoblast maturation. These data suggest that the skeletal damage is directly linked to the absence of the receptor, which in turn leads to osteoblasts dysfunction and earlier maturation. Accordingly, skeletal histomorphology suggests that Grm1 crv4/crv4 mice exhibit enhanced bone maturation, resulting in premature fusion of the growth plate and shortened long bones, and further slowdown of bone apposition rate compared to the WT animals. In summary, this work reveals novel functions of mGlu1 receptors in the bone and indicates that in osteoblasts mGlu1 receptors are necessary for production of normal bone matrix, longitudinal bone growth, and normal skeletal development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 has critical roles in regulation of the endocrine system and social behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masugi-Tokita, M; Yoshida, T; Kageyama, S; Kawata, M; Kawauchi, A

    2018-03-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGluR7) is one of the group III mGluRs, which are negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase via Gi/Go proteins and localised to presynaptic active zones of the mammalian central nervous system. We previously reported that mGluR7 is essential for intermale aggression and amygdala-dependent fear learning. To elucidate the role of mGluR7 in the neuroendocrine system, we performed biochemical analyses and found a significant reduction of testosterone levels in mGluR7 knockout (KO) mice. Testosterone replacement restored intermale aggressive behaviour in castrated wild-type mice to the level of gonadally intact wild-type mice. However, given the same dosage of testosterone replacement, mGluR7 KO mice showed almost no aggressive behaviour. These results indicate that reduction of plasma testosterone is unrelated to the deficit in intermale aggression in mGluR7 KO mice. Social investigating behaviour of intact mGluR7 KO mice also differed from that of wild-type mice; e.g. the KO mice showing less frequent anogenital sniffing and more frequent grooming behaviour. Testosterone replacement increased anogenital sniffing and grooming behaviour in castrated mGluR7 KO mice, while the differences were still present between castrated wild-type mice and KO mice after both underwent testosterone replacement. These results imply that reduction of plasma testosterone may partially inhibit social investigating behaviours in intact mGluR7 KO mice. Furthermore, castrated mGluR7 KO mice have smaller seminal vesicles than those of castrated wild-type mice, although seminal vesicle weights were normal in intact mice. These observations suggest that, besides testicular testosterone, some other hormone levels may be dysregulated in mGluR7 KO mice, and indicate a critical role of mGluR7 in the endocrine system. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that mGluR7 is essential for the regulation of the endocrine system, in addition to innate behaviours

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 is associated with heroin dependence but not depression or schizophrenia in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jia

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGluR3, encoded by GRM3 plays important roles in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, depression, and drug dependence. GRM3 polymorphisms were reported to be associated with prefrontal activity, cognitive shifting, and memory capability in healthy subjects, as well as susceptibility to schizophrenia and depression. The goal of this study was to replicate the association of GRM3 with schizophrenia and depression and to explore GRM3's potential association with heroin dependence (HD in a Chinese population. Seventeen SNPs throughout the GRM3 gene were genotyped using MALDI-TOF within the MassARRAY system, and the allele and genotype distributions were compared between 619 healthy controls and 433 patients with schizophrenia, 409 patients with major depression, and 584 unrelated addicts. We found that GRM3 polymorphisms modulate the susceptibility to HD but do not significantly influence the risk for schizophrenia or depression. An increased risk of HD was significantly associated with the minor alleles of two GRM3 SNPs, including the T allele of rs274618 (Odds ratio (OR = 1.631, 95% confidence interval (95%CI: 1.317-2.005, the T allele of rs274622 (OR = 1.652, 95% CI: 1.336-2.036, compared with the major alleles. The addicts carrying the minor allele of rs274618 or rs274622 had a shortened duration for transition from first use to dependence (DTFUD in comparison to homozygote for major allele (P<0.0001 for each SNP using log rank test. Additionally, a 6-SNP haplotype within 5' region of the GRM3 including the minor alleles of the two aforementioned SNPs was significantly associated with an increased risk of HD (P = 0.00001, OR = 1.668, 95% CI: 1.335-2.084. Our data indicated that GRM3 polymorphisms do not contribute to genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia and depression, but they confer an increased risk of HD in a Chinese population.

  15. De-coupling of blood flow and metabolism in the rat brain induced by glutamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Shinichiro; Momosaki, Sotaro; Sasaki, Kazunari; Hosoi, Rie; Abe, Kohji; Inoue, Osamu; Gee, A.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate plays an essential role in neuronal cell death in many neurological disorders. In this study, we examined both glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow in the same rat following infusion of glutamate or ibotenic acid using the dual-tracer technique. The effects of MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-kainate receptor antagonist, on the changes in the glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow induced by glutamate were also examined. The rats were microinjected with glutamate (1 μmol/μl, 2 μl) or ibotenic acid (10 μg/μl, 1 μl) into the right striatum, and dual-tracer autoradiograms of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [ 14 C]iofetamine (IMP) were obtained. MK-801 and NBQX were injected intravenously about 45 and 30 min, respectively, after the infusion of glutamate. De-coupling of blood flow and metabolism was noted in the glutamate-infused hemisphere (as assessed by no alteration of [ 18 F]FDG uptake and significant decrease of [ 14 C]IMP uptake). Pretreatments with MK-801, NBQX, or combined use of MK-801 and NBQX did not affect the de-coupling of the blood flow and metabolism induced by glutamate. A histochemical study revealed that about 20% neuronal cell death had occurred in the striatum at 105 min after the infusion of glutamate. In addition, a significant increase of the [ 18 F]FDG uptake and decrease of [ 14 C]IMP uptake were also seen in the rat brain infused with ibotenic acid. These results indicate that glutamate and ibotenic acid caused a significant de-coupling of blood flow and glucose metabolism in the intact rat brain during the early phase of neurodegeneration. It is necessary to evaluate the relation between metabotropic glutamate receptors and de-coupling of blood flow and metabolism. (author)

  16. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 in Learning and Memory Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonyi, Agnes; Schachtman, Todd; Christoffersen, Gert Rene Juul

    2005-01-01

    )-pyridine (MPEP) has facilitated the understanding of the roles of mGluR5s in the central nervous system. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that the activation of mGluR5s is necessary for some forms of long-term potentiation and long-term depression in different brain regions. Investigations...... signaling mechanisms have also been revealed. MGluR5s are mainly localized postsynaptically on the periphery of synap-ses. MGluR5s have been implicated in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. The development of the highly potent and selective mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl...... and radial arm maze performance as well as in contextual fear conditioning, but not in cue conditioning. This review summarizes recent advances reported on mGluR5 function in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. The current development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5...

  17. Switch in the expression of mGlu1 and mGlu5 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the cerebellum of mice developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and in autoptic cerebellar samples from patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazio, F.; Notartomaso, S.; Aronica, E.; Storto, M.; Battaglia, G.; Vieira, E.; Gatti, S.; Bruno, V.; Biagioni, F.; Gradini, R.; Nicoletti, F.; Di Marco, R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that changes in the expression of membrane receptors/ion channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells contribute to the onset of cerebellar motor symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We examined the expression of group-I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1 and

  18. Long-term activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors increases functional TRPV1-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi eMasuoka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C, protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia.

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 ablation causes dysregulation of the HPA axis and increases hippocampal BDNF protein levels: implications for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Kayo; Mombereau, Cedric; Lötscher, Erika; Uzunov, Doncho P; van der Putten, Herman; Flor, Peter J; Cryan, John F

    2006-06-01

    Regulation of neurotransmission via group-III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR4, -6, -7, and -8) has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of affective disorders, such as major depression and anxiety. For instance, mice with a targeted deletion of the gene for mGluR7 (mGluR7-/-) showed antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects in a variety of stress-related paradigms, including the forced swim stress and the stress-induced hyperthermia tests. Deletion of mGluR7 reduces also amygdala- and hippocampus-dependent conditioned fear and aversion responses. Since the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulates the stress response we investigate whether parameters of the HPA axis at the levels of selected mRNA transcripts and endocrine hormones are altered in mGluR7-deficient mice. Over all, mGluR7-/- mice showed only moderately lower serum levels of corticosterone and ACTH compared with mGluR7+/+ mice. More strikingly however, we found strong evidence for upregulated glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent feedback suppression of the HPA axis in mice with mGluR7 deficiency: (i) mRNA transcripts of GR were significantly upregulated in the hippocampus of mGluR7-/- animals, (ii) similar increases were seen with 5-HT1A receptor transcripts, which are thought to be directly controlled by the transcription factor GR and finally (iii) mGluR7-/- mice showed elevated sensitivity to dexamethasone-induced suppression of serum corticosterone when compared with mGluR7+/+ animals. These results indicate that mGluR7 deficiency causes dysregulation of HPA axis parameters, which may account, at least in part, for the phenotype of mGluR7-/- mice in animal models for anxiety and depression. In addition, we present evidence that protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor are also elevated in the hippocampus of mGluR7-/- mice, which we discuss in the context of the antidepressant-like phenotype found in those animals. We conclude that genetic ablation of m

  20. Test-retest reproducibility of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 ligand [{sup 18}F]FPEB with bolus plus constant infusion in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eunkyung; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Lim, Keunpoong; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E. [Yale School of Medicine, PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, 801 Howard Avenue, PO Box 208048, New Haven, CT (United States); McCarthy, Timothy J. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ding, Yu-Shin [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Morris, Evan D.; Williams, Wendol A. [Yale School of Medicine, PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, 801 Howard Avenue, PO Box 208048, New Haven, CT (United States); Yale School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-09-15

    [{sup 18}F]FPEB is a promising PET radioligand for the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), a potential target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reproducibility of [{sup 18}F]FPEB in the human brain. Seven healthy male subjects were scanned twice, 3 - 11 weeks apart. Dynamic data were acquired using bolus plus infusion of 162 ± 32 MBq [{sup 18}F]FPEB. Four methods were used to estimate volume of distribution (V{sub T}): equilibrium analysis (EQ) using arterial (EQ{sub A}) or venous input data (EQ{sub V}), MA1, and a two-tissue compartment model (2 T). Binding potential (BP{sub ND}) was also estimated using cerebellar white matter (CWM) or gray matter (CGM) as the reference region using EQ, 2 T and MA1. Absolute test-retest variability (aTRV) of V{sub T} and BP{sub ND} were calculated for each method. Venous blood measurements (C{sub V}) were compared with arterial input (C{sub A}) to examine their usability in EQ analysis. Regional V{sub T} estimated by the four methods displayed a high degree of agreement (r{sup 2} ranging from 0.83 to 0.99 among the methods), although EQ{sub A} and EQ{sub V} overestimated V{sub T} by a mean of 9 % and 7 %, respectively, compared to 2 T. Mean values of aTRV of V{sub T} were 11 % by EQ{sub A}, 12 % by EQ{sub V}, 14 % by MA1 and 14 % by 2 T. Regional BP{sub ND} also agreed well among the methods and mean aTRV of BP{sub ND} was 8 - 12 % (CWM) and 7 - 9 % (CGM). Venous and arterial blood concentrations of [{sup 18}F]FPEB were well matched during equilibrium (C{sub V} = 1.01 . C{sub A}, r{sup 2} = 0.95). [{sup 18}F]FPEB binding shows good TRV with minor differences among analysis methods. Venous blood can be used as an alternative for input function measurement instead of arterial blood in EQ analysis. Thus, [{sup 18}F]FPEB is an excellent PET imaging tracer for mGluR5 in humans. (orig.)

  1. Test-retest reproducibility of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 ligand [18F]FPEB with bolus plus constant infusion in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eunkyung; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Lim, Keunpoong; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; McCarthy, Timothy J.; Ding, Yu-Shin; Morris, Evan D.; Williams, Wendol A.

    2015-01-01

    [ 18 F]FPEB is a promising PET radioligand for the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), a potential target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reproducibility of [ 18 F]FPEB in the human brain. Seven healthy male subjects were scanned twice, 3 - 11 weeks apart. Dynamic data were acquired using bolus plus infusion of 162 ± 32 MBq [ 18 F]FPEB. Four methods were used to estimate volume of distribution (V T ): equilibrium analysis (EQ) using arterial (EQ A ) or venous input data (EQ V ), MA1, and a two-tissue compartment model (2 T). Binding potential (BP ND ) was also estimated using cerebellar white matter (CWM) or gray matter (CGM) as the reference region using EQ, 2 T and MA1. Absolute test-retest variability (aTRV) of V T and BP ND were calculated for each method. Venous blood measurements (C V ) were compared with arterial input (C A ) to examine their usability in EQ analysis. Regional V T estimated by the four methods displayed a high degree of agreement (r 2 ranging from 0.83 to 0.99 among the methods), although EQ A and EQ V overestimated V T by a mean of 9 % and 7 %, respectively, compared to 2 T. Mean values of aTRV of V T were 11 % by EQ A , 12 % by EQ V , 14 % by MA1 and 14 % by 2 T. Regional BP ND also agreed well among the methods and mean aTRV of BP ND was 8 - 12 % (CWM) and 7 - 9 % (CGM). Venous and arterial blood concentrations of [ 18 F]FPEB were well matched during equilibrium (C V = 1.01 . C A , r 2 = 0.95). [ 18 F]FPEB binding shows good TRV with minor differences among analysis methods. Venous blood can be used as an alternative for input function measurement instead of arterial blood in EQ analysis. Thus, [ 18 F]FPEB is an excellent PET imaging tracer for mGluR5 in humans. (orig.)

  2. In vitro evidence for the brain glutamate efflux hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian; Madelung, Rasmus; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2012-01-01

    resistance values of 1014 ± 70 O cm(2) , and (14) C-D-mannitol permeability values of 0.88 ± 0.13 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) . Unidirectional flux studies showed that L-aspartate and L-glutamate, but not D-aspartate, displayed polarized transport in the brain-to-blood direction, however, all three amino acids......The concentration of the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate, in brain interstitial fluid is tightly regulated by uptake transporters and metabolism in astrocytes and neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the blood-brain barrier endothelium in brain L......-glutamate homeostasis. Transendothelial transport- and accumulation studies of (3) H-L-glutamate, (3) H-L-aspartate, and (3) H-D-aspartate in an electrically tight bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte blood-brain barrier coculture model were performed. After 6 days in culture, the endothelium displayed transendothelial...

  3. Pharmacology of (S)-homoquisqualic acid and (S)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid [(S)-AP5] at cloned metabotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1998-01-01

    1 In this study we have determined the pharmacological profile of (S)-quisqualic acid, (S)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid ((S)-AP4) and their higher homologues (S)-homoquisqualic acid, (S)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid ((S)-AP5), respectively, and (R)-AP5 at subtypes of metabotropic (S)-glutamic...... demonstrate that incorporation of an additional carbon atom into the backbone of (S)-glutamic acid and its analogues, to give the corresponding homologues, and replacement of the terminal carboxyl groups by isosteric acidic groups have profound effects on the pharmacological profiles at mGlu receptor subtypes...... acid (mGlu) receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. 2 (S)-Quisqualic acid was a potent mGlu1/mGlu5 agonist (EC50 values of 1.1 microM and 0.055 microM, respectively) showing no activity at mGlu2 and weak agonism at mGlu4 (EC50 approximately 1000 microM). 3 (S)-Homoquisqualic acid displayed...

  4. Immunochemical characterization of the brain glutamate binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A glutamate binding protein (GBP) was purified from bovine and rat brain to near homogeneity. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against this protein. An enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay was used to quantify and determine the specificity of the antibody response. The antibodies were shown to strongly react with bovine brain GBP and the analogous protein from rat brain. The antibodies did not show any crossreactivity with the glutamate metabolizing enzymes, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase and glutamyl transpeptidase, however it crossreacted moderately with glutamate decarboxylase. The antibodies were also used to define the possible physiologic activity of GBP in synaptic membranes. The antibodies were shown: (i) to inhibit the excitatory amino-acid stimulation of thiocyanate (SCN)flux, (ii) had no effect on transport of L-Glutamic acid across the synaptic membrane, and (iii) had no effect on the depolarization-induced release of L-glutamate. When the anti-GBP antibodies were used to localize and quantify the GBP distribution in various subcellular fractions and in brain tissue samples, it was found that the hippocampus had the highest immunoreactivity followed by the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and caudate-putamen. The distribution of immunoreactivity in the subcellular fraction were as follows: synaptic membranes > crude mitochondrial fraction > homogenate > myelin. In conclusion these studies suggest that: (a) the rat brain GBP and the bovine brain GBP are immunologically homologous protein, (b) there are no structural similarities between the GBP and the glutamate metabolizing enzymes with the exception of glutamate decarboxylase and (c) the subcellular and regional distribution of the GBP immunoreactivity followed a similar pattern as observed for L-[ 3 H]-binding

  5. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  6. Fear potentiated startle increases phospholipase D (PLD) expression/activity and PLD-linked metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated post-tetanic potentiation in rat amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Balaji; Scott, Michael T; Pollandt, Sebastian; Schroeder, Bradley; Kurosky, Alexander; Shinnick-Gallagher, Patricia

    2016-02-01

    Long-term memory (LTM) of fear stores activity dependent modifications that include changes in amygdala signaling. Previously, we identified an enhanced probability of release of glutamate mediated signaling to be important in rat fear potentiated startle (FPS), a well-established translational behavioral measure of fear. Here, we investigated short- and long-term synaptic plasticity in FPS involving metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and associated downstream proteomic changes in the thalamic-lateral amygdala pathway (Th-LA). Aldolase A, an inhibitor of phospholipase D (PLD), expression was reduced, concurrent with significantly elevated PLD protein expression. Blocking the PLD-mGluR signaling significantly reduced PLD activity. While transmitter release probability increased in FPS, PLD-mGluR agonist and antagonist actions were occluded. In the unpaired group (UNP), blocking the PLD-mGluR increased while activating the receptor decreased transmitter release probability, consistent with decreased synaptic potentials during tetanic stimulation. FPS Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) immediately following long-term potentiation (LTP) induction was significantly increased. Blocking PLD-mGluR signaling prevented PTP and reduced cumulative PTP probability but not LTP maintenance in both groups. These effects are similar to those mediated through mGluR7, which is co-immunoprecipitated with PLD in FPS. Lastly, blocking mGluR-PLD in the rat amygdala was sufficient to prevent behavioral expression of fear memory. Thus, our study in the Th-LA pathway provides the first evidence for PLD as an important target of mGluR signaling in amygdala fear-associated memory. Importantly, the PLD-mGluR provides a novel therapeutic target for treating maladaptive fear memories in posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron emission tomographic ligand, 18F-SP203, to image metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Simeon, Fabrice G.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro; Hatazawa, Jun; Mozley, P.D.

    2010-01-01

    A new PET ligand, 3-fluoro-5-(2-(2- 18 F-(fluoromethyl)-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzonitrile ( 18 F-SP203), is a positron emission tomographic radioligand selective for metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors. The purposes of this study were to estimate the radiation-absorbed doses of 18 F-SP203 in humans and to determine from the distribution of radioactivity in bone structures with various proportions of bone and red marrow whether 18 F-SP203 undergoes defluorination. Whole-body images were acquired for 5 h after injecting 18 F-SP203 in seven healthy humans. Urine was collected at various time points. Radiation-absorbed doses were estimated by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme. After injecting 18 F-SP203, the two organs with highest radiation exposure were urinary bladder wall and gallbladder wall, consistent with both urinary and fecal excretion. In the skeleton, most of the radioactivity was in bone structures that contain red marrow and not in those without red marrow. Although the dose to red marrow (30.9 μSv/MBq) was unusually high, the effective dose (17.8 μSv/MBq) of 18 F-SP203 was typical of that of other 18 F radiotracers. 18 F-SP203 causes an effective dose in humans typical of several other 18 F radioligands and undergoes little defluorination. (orig.)

  8. Mutation-induced quisqualic acid and ibotenic acid affinity at the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4: ligand selectivity results from a synergy of several amino acid residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are key modulators of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The eight mGluR subtypes are seven trans-membrane-spanning proteins that possess a large extracellular amino-terminal domain in which the endogenous ligand binding pocket...... resides. In this study, we have identified four non-conserved amino acid residues that are essential for differentiating mGluR1 from mGluR4. Our approach has been to increase the affinity of the classic mGluR1 agonists, quisqualic acid and ibotenic acid, at mGluR4 by making various point mutations......, the mutations K74Y and K317R induced dramatic triple-order-of-magnitude increases in the affinity of ibotenic acid at mGluR4, making the affinity equivalent to that of mGluR1. Furthermore, the affinity of quisqualic acid at mGluR4 was increased to the same level as mGluR1 by the two double mutations, K74Y/K317R...

  9. Pharmacological modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 and 7 impairs extinction of social fear in a time-point-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, David A; Neumann, Inga D; Flor, Peter J; Zoicas, Iulia

    2017-06-15

    Pharmacological modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) and 7 (mGluR7) was shown to attenuate the acquisition and to facilitate the extinction of cued and contextual, non-social, fear. Using the allosteric mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) and the allosteric mGluR7 agonist N,N'-dibenzyhydryl-ethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride (AMN082), we aimed to study how pharmacological blockade of mGluR5 and activation of mGluR7 influence acquisition and extinction of social fear in mice. We could show that when administered before social fear conditioning, neither MPEP nor AMN082 affected acquisition and extinction of social fear, suggesting that mGluR5 inactivation and mGluR7 activation do not alter social fear. However, when administered before social fear extinction, both MPEP and AMN082 impaired social fear extinction and extinction recall. These findings suggest that mGluR5 inactivation and mGluR7 activation are unlikely to prevent the formation of traumatic social memories. Furthermore, medication strategies aimed at augmenting exposure-based therapies for psychiatric disorders associated with social deficits via modulation of mGluR5 and mGluR7 must be pursued cautiously because of their potential to delay social fear extinction processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fragment Based Optimization of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 2 (mGluR2) Positive Allosteric Modulators in the Absence of Structural Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, György; Túrós, György I; Kolok, Sándor; Vastag, Mónika; Sánta, Zsuzsanna; Dékány, Miklós; Lévay, György I; Greiner, István; Natsumi, Minami; Tatsuya, Watanabe; Keserű, György M

    2018-03-14

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been implicated as potential pharmacotherapy for psychiatric conditions. Screening our corporate compound deck, we identified a benzotriazole fragment (4) that was rapidly optimized to a potent and metabolically stable early lead (16). The highly lipophilic character of 16, together with its limited solubility, permeability, and high protein binding, however, did not allow reaching of the proof of concept in vivo. Since further attempts on the optimization of druglike properties were unsuccessful, the original hit 4 has been revisited and was optimized following the principles of fragment based drug discovery (FBDD). Lacking structural information on the receptor-ligand complex, we implemented a group efficiency (GE) based strategy and identified a new fragment like lead (60) with more balanced profile. Significant improvement achieved on the druglike properties nominated the compound for in vivo proof of concept studies that revealed the chemotype being a promising PAM lead targeting mGluR2 receptors.

  11. Effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 positive allosteric modulator CDPPB on rats tested with the paired associates learning task in touchscreen-equipped operant conditioning chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Brittney R; Howland, John G

    2016-03-15

    Effective treatments for the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia are critically needed. Positive allosteric modulation (PAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is one strategy currently under investigation to improve these symptoms. Examining cognition using touchscreen-equipped operant chambers may increase translation between preclinical and clinical research through analogous behavioral testing paradigms in rodents and humans. We used acute CDPPB (1-30mg/kg) treatment to examine the effects of mGluR5 PAM in the touchscreen paired associates learning (PAL) task using well-trained rats with and without co-administration of acute MK-801 (0.15mg/kg). CDPPB had no consistent effects on task performance when administered alone and failed to reverse the MK-801 induced impairments at any of the examined doses. Overall, the disruptive effects of MK-801 on PAL were consistent with previous research but increasing mGluR5 signaling is not beneficial in the PAL task. Future research should test whether administration of CDPPB during PAL acquisition increases performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Administration of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 allosteric modulator GET 73 with alcohol: A translational study in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Goodyear, Kimberly; Loche, Antonella; Long, Victoria M; Lobina, Carla; Tran, Harrison H; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Swift, Robert M; Colombo, Giancarlo; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2018-02-01

    Preclinical work suggests that GET 73 (N-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-4-methoxybutyramide), a novel metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 negative allosteric modulator, may represent a novel pharmacological treatment for alcohol use disorder. Two independent experiments evaluated the effect of acutely administered GET 73 (0, 30, and 100 mg/kg, intragastrically) on alcohol-induced hypolocomotion ( n=72) and sedation/hypnosis ( n=36) in rats. In healthy male volunteers ( n=14), an open-label, randomised, crossover study was conducted to compare adverse events and pharmacokinetic parameters, in two experiments in which 300 mg GET 73 was administered, with and without alcohol, once and thrice. In rats, when administered with alcohol-vehicle, 100 mg/kg, but not 30 mg/kg, GET 73 reduced spontaneous locomotor activity. When administered with alcohol, no dose of GET 73 altered either alcohol-induced hypolocomotion or sedation/hypnosis. In humans, both single and thrice 300 mg GET 73 administration were well tolerated, in the presence and absence of alcohol, with no differences in adverse events. There were no significant differences in relative bioavailability between administering 300 mg GET 73 in the presence or absence of alcohol.

  13. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family.

  14. Knocking down metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 improves survival and disease progression in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Marco; Giribaldi, Francesco; Melone, Marcello; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Musante, Ilaria; Carminati, Enrico; Rossi, Pia I A; Vergani, Laura; Voci, Adriana; Conti, Fiorenzo; Puliti, Aldamaria; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2014-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset fatal neurodegenerative disease reflecting degeneration of upper and lower motoneurons (MNs). The cause of ALS and the mechanisms of neuronal death are still largely obscure, thus impairing the establishment of efficacious therapies. Glutamate (Glu)-mediated excitotoxicity plays a major role in MN degeneration in ALS. We recently demonstrated that the activation of Group I metabotropic Glu autoreceptors, belonging to both type 1 and type 5 receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5), at glutamatergic spinal cord nerve terminals, produces excessive Glu release in mice over-expressing human superoxide-dismutase carrying the G93A point mutation (SOD1(G93A)), a widely used animal model of human ALS. To establish whether these receptors are implicated in ALS, we generated mice expressing half dosage of mGluR1 in the SOD1(G93A) background (SOD1(G93A)Grm1(crv4/+)), by crossing the SOD1(G93A) mutant mouse with the Grm1(crv4/+) mouse, lacking mGluR1 because of a spontaneous recessive mutation. SOD1(G93A)Grm1(crv4/+) mice showed prolonged survival probability, delayed pathology onset, slower disease progression and improved motor performances compared to SOD1(G93A) mice. These effects were associated to reduction of mGluR5 expression, enhanced number of MNs, decreased astrocyte and microglia activation, normalization of metallothionein and catalase mRNA expression, reduced mitochondrial damage, and decrease of abnormal Glu release in spinal cord of SOD1(G93A)Grm1(crv4/+)compared to SOD1(G93A) mice. These results demonstrate that a lower constitutive level of mGluR1 has a significant positive impact on mice with experimental ALS, thus providing the rationale for future pharmacological approaches to ALS by selectively blocking Group I metabotropic Glu receptors. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Selectivity and evolutionary divergence of metabotropic glutamate receptors for endogenous ligands and G proteins coupled to phospholipase C or TRP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Menlove, Kit; Ma, Jianpeng; Wilkins, Angela; Lichtarge, Olivier; Wensel, Theodore G

    2014-10-24

    To define the upstream and downstream signaling specificities of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), we have examined the ability of representative mGluR of group I, II, and III to be activated by endogenous amino acids and catalyze activation of G proteins coupled to phospholipase C (PLC), or activation of G(i/o) proteins coupled to the ion channel TRPC4β. Fluorescence-based assays have allowed us to observe interactions not previously reported or clearly identified. We have found that the specificity for endogenous amino acids is remarkably stringent. Even at millimolar levels, structurally similar compounds do not elicit significant activation. As reported previously, the clear exception is L-serine-O-phosphate (L-SOP), which strongly activates group III mGluR, especially mGluR4,-6,-8 but not group I or II mGluR. Whereas L-SOP cannot activate mGluR1 or mGluR2, it acts as a weak antagonist for mGluR1 and a potent antagonist for mGluR2, suggesting that co-recognition of L-glutamate and L-SOP arose early in evolution, and was followed later by divergence of group I and group II mGluR versus group III in l-SOP responses. mGluR7 has low affinity and efficacy for activation by both L-glutamate and L-SOP. Molecular docking studies suggested that residue 74 corresponding to lysine in mGluR4 and asparagine in mGluR7 might play a key role, and, indeed, mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that mutating this residue to lysine in mGluR7 enhances the potency of L-SOP. Experiments with pertussis toxin and dominant-negative Gα(i/o) proteins revealed that mGluR1 couples strongly to TRPC4β through Gα(i/o), in addition to coupling to PLC through Gα(q/11). © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Selectivity and Evolutionary Divergence of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors for Endogenous Ligands and G Proteins Coupled to Phospholipase C or TRP Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Menlove, Kit; Ma, Jianpeng; Wilkins, Angela; Lichtarge, Olivier; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2014-01-01

    To define the upstream and downstream signaling specificities of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), we have examined the ability of representative mGluR of group I, II, and III to be activated by endogenous amino acids and catalyze activation of G proteins coupled to phospholipase C (PLC), or activation of Gi/o proteins coupled to the ion channel TRPC4β. Fluorescence-based assays have allowed us to observe interactions not previously reported or clearly identified. We have found that the specificity for endogenous amino acids is remarkably stringent. Even at millimolar levels, structurally similar compounds do not elicit significant activation. As reported previously, the clear exception is l-serine-O-phosphate (l-SOP), which strongly activates group III mGluR, especially mGluR4,-6,-8 but not group I or II mGluR. Whereas l-SOP cannot activate mGluR1 or mGluR2, it acts as a weak antagonist for mGluR1 and a potent antagonist for mGluR2, suggesting that co-recognition of l-glutamate and l-SOP arose early in evolution, and was followed later by divergence of group I and group II mGluR versus group III in l-SOP responses. mGluR7 has low affinity and efficacy for activation by both l-glutamate and l-SOP. Molecular docking studies suggested that residue 74 corresponding to lysine in mGluR4 and asparagine in mGluR7 might play a key role, and, indeed, mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that mutating this residue to lysine in mGluR7 enhances the potency of l-SOP. Experiments with pertussis toxin and dominant-negative Gαi/o proteins revealed that mGluR1 couples strongly to TRPC4β through Gαi/o, in addition to coupling to PLC through Gαq/11. PMID:25193666

  17. Inhibitors of glutamate dehydrogenase block sodium-dependent glutamate uptake in rat brain membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan S Whitelaw

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently found evidence for anatomic and physical linkages between the astroglial Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (GLT-1/EAAT2 and GLAST/EAAT1 and mitochondria. In these same studies, we found that the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH inhibitor, epigallocatechin-monogallate (EGCG, inhibits both glutamate oxidation and Na+-dependent glutamate uptake in astrocytes. In the present study, we extend this finding by exploring the effects of EGCG on Na+-dependent L-[3H]-glutamate (Glu uptake in crude membranes (P2 prepared from rat brain cortex. In this preparation, uptake is almost exclusively mediated by GLT-1. EGCG inhibited L-[3H]-Glu uptake in cortical membranes with an IC50 value of 230 µM. We also studied the effects of two additional inhibitors of GDH, hexachlorophene (HCP and bithionol (BTH. Both of these compounds also caused concentration-dependent inhibition of glutamate uptake in cortical membranes. Pre-incubating with HCP for up to 15 min had no greater effect than that observed with no pre-incubation, showing that the effects occur rapidly. HCP decreased the Vmax for glutamate uptake without changing the Km, consistent with a non-competitive mechanism of action. EGCG, HCP, and BTH also inhibited Na+-dependent transport of D-[3H]-aspartate (Asp, a non-metabolizable substrate, and [3H]-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. In contrast to the forebrain, glutamate uptake in crude cerebellar membranes (P2 is likely mediated by GLAST (EAAT1. Therefore, the effects of these compounds were examined in cerebellar membranes. In this region, none of these compounds had any effect on uptake of either L-[3H]-Glu or D-[3H]-Asp, but they all inhibited [3H]-GABA uptake. Together these studies suggest that GDH is preferentially required for glutamate uptake in forebrain as compared to cerebellum, and GDH may be required for GABA uptake as well. They also provide further evidence for a functional linkage between glutamate transport and mitochondria.

  18. Blood and Brain Glutamate Levels in Children with Autistic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tamer H.; Abdelrahman, Hadeel M.; Fattah, Nelly R. Abdel; El-Masry, Nagda M.; Hashim, Haitham M.; El-Gerby, Khaled M.; Fattah, Nermin R. Abdel

    2013-01-01

    Despite of the great efforts that move forward to clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms in autism, the cause of this disorder, however, remains largely unknown. There is an increasing body of literature concerning neurochemical contributions to the pathophysiology of autism. We aimed to determine blood and brain levels of glutamate in children…

  19. The metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5, is required for extinction learning that occurs in the absence of a context change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Marion Agnes Emma; Güntürkün, Onur; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-02-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors and, in particular, mGlu5 are crucially involved in multiple forms of synaptic plasticity that are believed to underlie explicit memory. MGlu5 is also required for information transfer through neuronal oscillations and for spatial memory. Furthermore, mGlu5 is involved in extinction of implicit forms of learning. This places this receptor in a unique position with regard to information encoding. Here, we explored the role of this receptor in context-dependent extinction learning under constant, or changed, contextual conditions. Animals were trained over 3 days to take a left turn under 25% reward probability in a T-maze with a distinct floor pattern (Context A). On Day 4, they experienced either a floor pattern change (Context B) or the same floor pattern (Context A) in the absence of reward. After acquisition of the task, the animals were returned to the maze once more on Day 5 (Context A, no reward). Treatment with the mGlu5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine, before maze exposure on Day 4 completely inhibited extinction learning in the AAA paradigm but had no effect in the ABA paradigm. A subsequent return to the original context (A, on Day 5) revealed successful extinction in the AAA paradigm, but impairment of extinction in the ABA paradigm. These data support that although extinction learning in a new context is unaffected by mGlu5 antagonism, extinction of the consolidated context is impaired. This suggests that mGlu5 is intrinsically involved in enabling learning that once-relevant information is no longer valid. © 2014 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Role of Aldehyde Oxidase and Xanthine Oxidase in the Biotransformation of a Novel Negative Allosteric Modulator of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ryan D.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Byers, Frank W.; Santomango, Tammy S.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Stec, Donald; Brewer, Katrina A.; Sanchez-Ponce, Raymundo; Corlew, Melany M.; Rush, Roger; Felts, Andrew S.; Manka, Jason; Bates, Brittney S.; Venable, Daryl F.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Emmitte, Kyle A.

    2012-01-01

    Negative allosteric modulation (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) represents a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of childhood developmental disorders, such as fragile X syndrome and autism. VU0409106 emerged as a lead compound within a biaryl ether series, displaying potent and selective inhibition of mGlu5. Despite its high clearance and short half-life, VU0409106 demonstrated efficacy in rodent models of anxiety after extravascular administration. However, lack of a consistent correlation in rat between in vitro hepatic clearance and in vivo plasma clearance for the biaryl ether series prompted an investigation into the biotransformation of VU0409106 using hepatic subcellular fractions. An in vitro appraisal in rat, monkey, and human liver S9 fractions indicated that the principal pathway was NADPH-independent oxidation to metabolite M1 (+16 Da). Both raloxifene (aldehyde oxidase inhibitor) and allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor) attenuated the formation of M1, thus implicating the contribution of both molybdenum hydroxylases in the biotransformation of VU0409106. The use of 18O-labeled water in the S9 experiments confirmed the hydroxylase mechanism proposed, because 18O was incorporated into M1 (+18 Da) as well as in a secondary metabolite (M2; +36 Da), the formation of which was exclusively xanthine oxidase-mediated. This unusual dual and sequential hydroxylase metabolism was confirmed in liver S9 and hepatocytes of multiple species and correlated with in vivo data because M1 and M2 were the principal metabolites detected in rats administered VU0409106. An in vitro-in vivo correlation of predicted hepatic and plasma clearance was subsequently established for VU0409106 in rats and nonhuman primates. PMID:22711749

  1. Blockade of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors produces hyper-locomotion in cocaine pre-exposed rats by interactions with dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung Shin; Jang, Ju Kyong; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    2008-09-01

    It was previously reported that blockade of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) produces hyper-locomotion in rats previously exposed to amphetamine, indicating that group II mGluRs are well positioned to modulate the expression of behavioral sensitization by amphetamine. The present study further examined the locomotor activating effects of specific blockade of these receptors after cocaine pre-exposures. First, rats were pre-exposed to seven daily injections of cocaine (15mg/kg, IP). When challenged the next day with an injection of either saline or the group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 (0.5, 1.0 or 2.5mg/kg, IP), they produced hyper-locomotor activity, measured by infrared beam interruptions, to LY341495 compared to saline in a dose-dependent manner. Second, rats were pre-exposed to either saline or seven daily injections of cocaine (15mg/kg, IP). Three weeks later, when they were challenged with an injection of either saline or LY341495 (1.0mg/kg, IP), only rats pre-exposed to cocaine produced hyper-locomotor activity to LY341495 compared to saline. These effects, however, were not present when dopamine D1 (SCH23390; 5 or 10microg/kg), but not D2 (eticlopride; 10 or 50microg/kg), receptor antagonist was pre-injected, indicating that this cocaine-induced hyper-locomotor activity to LY341495 may be mediated in dopamine D1 receptor-dependent manner. These results suggest that group II mGluRs may be adapted to interact with dopaminergic neuronal signaling in mediating the sensitized locomotor activity produced by repeated cocaine pre-exposures.

  2. The selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist mavoglurant (AFQ056) reduces the incidence of reflux episodes in dogs and patients with moderate to severe gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzade-Dominguez, M-L; Pezous, N; David, O J; Tutuian, R; Bruley des Varannes, S; Tack, J; Malfertheiner, P; Allescher, H-D; Ufer, M; Rühl, A

    2017-08-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) induced by gastric distension are modulated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) that influences the vagal reflex loop. We therefore aimed to examine the effects of the selective mGluR5 antagonist mavoglurant (AFQ056) on the number of TLESRs in dogs and reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In a dog model, the number of meal-induced TLESRs was determined after intravenous (0.03, 0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg kg -1 ) and oral (1, 3, and 10 mg kg -1 ) doses of mavoglurant with reference to vehicle. In a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-period crossover study, the incidence of meal-induced reflux episodes was assessed by esophageal impedance monitoring after single, oral doses of mavoglurant (50 and 400 mg) or baclofen (40 mg) in 30 patients with moderate to severe GERD. In dogs, mavoglurant reduced the number of TLESRs after intravenous and oral administration. In patients with GERD, the incidence of postprandial reflux episodes was significantly lower at a dose of 400 mg mavoglurant (-37.5% ; 90% confidence interval [CI]: -57.8, -17.2), whereas there was no significant difference at 50 mg of mavoglurant compared to placebo. A significantly lower incidence of reflux episodes was also noted with the active comparator baclofen (-50.3%; 90% CI: -66.2, -34.3), thereby validating this study. These data suggest a potential clinical benefit of mGluR5 antagonists such as mavoglurant in patients with GERD, particularly in those with persisting symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Methoxyphenylethynyl, methoxypyridylethynyl and phenylethynyl derivatives of pyridine: synthesis, radiolabeling and evaluation of new PET ligands for metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Meixiang; Tueckmantel, Werner; Wang, Xukui; Zhu Aijun; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2005-01-01

    We have synthesized three different PET ligands to investigate the physiological function of metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors (mGluR5) in vivo: 2-[ 11 C]methyl-6-(2-phenylethynyl)pyridine ([ 11 C]MPEP), 2-(2-(3-[ 11 C]methoxyphenyl)ethynyl)pyridine ([ 11 C]M-MPEP) and 2-(2-(5-[ 11 C]methoxypyridin-3-yl)ethynyl)pyridine ([ 11 C]M-PEPy). [ 11 C]Methyl iodide was used to label the compounds under basic conditions, and a Pd(0) catalyst was applied to label [ 11 C]MPEP in a Stille coupling reaction. In vivo microPET imaging studies of the functional accumulation of radiolabeled ligands were conducted in 35 rats (Sprague-Dawley, 8 weeks old male, weight of 300 g). Specific binding was tested using pre-administration of unlabeled mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) (10 mg/kg iv 5 min before radioactivity injection). In the radiolabeling of [ 11 C]MPEP, [ 11 C]M-MPEP and [ 11 C]M-PEPy, a specific radioactivity of 700-1200 mCi/μmol and over 97% radiochemical purity were obtained. The microPET studies showed these three radiolabeled mGluR5 antagonists having the highest binding in the olfactory bulb followed by striatum, hippocampus and cortex. Pre-administration of the mGluR5 antagonist MPEP induced a 45.1% decrease in [ 11 C]MPEP binding, a 59.7% decrease in [ 11 C]M-MPEP binding and an 84.6% decrease in [ 11 C]M-PEPy binding in the olfactory bulb at 5 min. The feasibility of synthesizing high-affinity and high-selectivity ligands for mGluR5 receptors and their suitability as PET imaging ligands for mGluR5 receptors in vivo are demonstrated

  4. Stimulation of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2 receptor attenuates the MK-801-induced increase in the immobility time in the forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Karasawa, Jun-Ichi; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2016-02-01

    Negative symptoms of schizophrenia are poorly managed using the currently available antipsychotics. Previous studies indicate that agonists of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptors may provide a novel approach for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the effects of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists or mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulators have not yet been clearly elucidated in animal models of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, we reported that the forced swimming test in rats treated with subchronic MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, may be regarded as a useful test to evaluate the activities of drugs against the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We evaluated the effects of LY379268, an mGlu2/3 receptor agonist, and BINA, an mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulator, on the hyperlocomotion induced by acute administration of MK-801 (0.15mg/kg, sc) and on the increase in the immobility time in the forced swimming test induced by subchronic treatment with MK-801 (0.5mg/kg, sc, twice a day for 7 days) in rats. Both LY379268 (3mg/kg, sc) and BINA (100mg/kg, ip) attenuated the increase in the immobility time induced by subchronic treatment with MK-801 at the same doses at which they attenuated the MK-801-induced increase in locomotor activity, but had no effect on the immobility time in saline-treated rats. The present results suggest that stimulation of the mGlu2 receptor attenuates the increase in the immobility time in the forced swimming test elicited by subchronic administration of MK-801, and may be potentially useful for treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. In-vivo effects of knocking-down metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacino, Tiziana; Cattaneo, Luca; Gallia, Elena; Puliti, Aldamaria; Melone, Marcello; Provenzano, Francesca; Bossi, Simone; Musante, Ilaria; Usai, Cesare; Conti, Fiorenzo; Bonanno, Giambattista; Milanese, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder due to loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs). The mechanisms of neuronal death are largely unknown, thus prejudicing the successful pharmacological treatment. One major cause for MN degeneration in ALS is represented by glutamate(Glu)-mediated excitotoxicity. We have previously reported that activation of Group I metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) at glutamatergic spinal cord nerve terminals produces abnormal Glu release in the widely studied SOD1 G93A mouse model of ALS. We also demonstrated that halving mGluR1 expression in the SOD1 G93A mouse had a positive impact on survival, disease onset, disease progression, and on a number of cellular and biochemical readouts of ALS. We generated here SOD1 G93A mice with reduced expression of mGluR5 (SOD1 G93A Grm5 -/+ ) by crossing the SOD1 G93A mutant mouse with the mGluR5 heterozigous Grm5 -/+ mouse. SOD1 G93A Grm5 -/+ mice showed prolonged survival probability and delayed pathology onset. These effects were associated to enhanced number of preserved MNs, decreased astrocyte and microglia activation, reduced cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration, and regularization of abnormal Glu release in the spinal cord of SOD1 G93A Grm5 -/+ mice. Unexpectedly, only male SOD1 G93A Grm5 -/+ mice showed improved motor skills during disease progression vs. SOD1 G93A mice, while SOD1 G93A Grm5 -/+ females did not. These results demonstrate that a lower constitutive level of mGluR5 has a significant positive impact in mice with ALS and support the idea that blocking Group I mGluRs may represent a potentially effective pharmacological approach to the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor I (mGluR1) antagonism impairs cocaine-induced conditioned place preference via inhibition of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Zhong, Peng; Liu, Xiaojie; Sun, Dalong; Gao, Hai-Qing; Liu, Qing-Song

    2013-06-01

    Antagonism of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) reduces behavioral effects of drugs of abuse, including cocaine. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Activation of mGluR5 increases protein synthesis at synapses. Although mGluR5-induced excessive protein synthesis has been implicated in the pathology of fragile X syndrome, it remains unknown whether group I mGluR-mediated protein synthesis is involved in any behavioral effects of drugs of abuse. We report that group I mGluR agonist DHPG induced more pronounced initial depression of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) followed by modest long-term depression (I-LTD) in dopamine neurons of rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) through the activation of mGluR1. The early component of DHPG-induced depression of IPSCs was mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptors, while DHPG-induced I-LTD was dependent on protein synthesis. Western blotting analysis indicates that mGluR1 was coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways to increase translation. We also show that cocaine conditioning activated translation machinery in the VTA via an mGluR1-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, intra-VTA microinjections of mGluR1 antagonist JNJ16259685 and protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide significantly attenuated or blocked the acquisition of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and activation of translation elongation factors. Taken together, these results suggest that mGluR1 antagonism inhibits de novo protein synthesis; this effect may block the formation of cocaine-cue associations and thus provide a mechanism for the reduction in CPP to cocaine.

  7. Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats causes a selective reduction in the expression of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaccione, Isabella; Iacovelli, Luisa; di Nuzzo, Luigi; Nardecchia, Francesca; Mauro, Gianluca; Janiri, Delfina; De Blasi, Antonio; Sani, Gabriele; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Orlando, Rosamaria

    2017-03-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats is considered as an experimental animal model of mania endowed with face, construct, and pharmacological validity. We induced paradoxical sleep deprivation by placing rats onto a small platform surrounded by water. This procedure caused the animal to fall in the water at the onset of REM phase of sleep. Control rats were either placed onto a larger platform (which allowed them to sleep) or maintained in their home cage. Sleep deprived rats showed a substantial reduction in type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex or corpus striatum, as compared to both groups of control rats. No changes in the expression of mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels or mGlu1α and mGlu5 receptor protein levels were found with exception of an increase in mGlu1α receptor levels in the striatum of SD rats. Moving from these findings we treated SD and control rats with the selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, BINA (30mg/kg, i.p.). SD rats were also treated with sodium valproate (300mg/kg, i.p.) as an active comparator. Both BINA and sodium valproate were effective in reversing the manic-like phenotype evaluated in an open field arena in SD rats. BINA treatment had no effect on motor activity in control rats, suggesting that our findings were not biased by a non-specific motor-lowering activity of BINA. These findings suggest that changes in the expression of mGlu2 receptors may be associated with the enhanced motor activity observed with mania. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo positron emission tomography imaging with [{sup 11}C]ABP688: binding variability and specificity for the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Brennan, Kathleen G. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Division of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, Department of Psychiatry, NYSPI Mail Unit 42, New York, NY (United States); Milak, Matthew S.; Parsey, Ramin V. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Division of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, Department of Psychiatry, NYSPI Mail Unit 42, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY (United States); Kumar, J.S.D.; Mann, J.J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Division of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, Department of Psychiatry, NYSPI Mail Unit 42, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) dysfunction has been implicated in several disorders. [{sup 11}C]ABP688, a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand targeting mGluR5, could be a valuable tool in the development of novel therapeutics for these disorders by establishing in vivo drug occupancy. Due to safety concerns in humans, these studies may be performed in nonhuman primates. Therefore, in vivo characterization of [{sup 11}C]ABP688 in nonhuman primates is essential. Test-retest studies were performed in baboons (Papio anubis) to compare modeling approaches and determine the optimal reference region. The mGluR5-specific antagonist 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) was then used in test-block studies, in which ligand binding was measured before and after MTEP administration. Test/block data were analyzed both by calculating changes in binding and using a graphical approach, which allowed estimation of both MTEP occupancy and nonspecific binding. Test-retest results, which have not been previously reported for [{sup 11}C]ABP688, indicated that [{sup 11}C]ABP688 variability is low using an unconstrained two-tissue compartment model. The most appropriate, though not ideal, reference region was found to be the gray matter of the cerebellum. Using these optimal modeling techniques on the test/block data, about 90% occupancy was estimated by the graphical approach. These studies are the first to demonstrate the specificity of [{sup 11}C]ABP688 for mGluR5 with in vivo PET in nonhuman primates. The results indicate that, in baboons, occupancy of mGluR5 is detectable by in vivo PET, a useful finding for proceeding to human studies, or performing further baboon studies, quantifying the in vivo occupancy of novel therapeutics targeting mGluR5. (orig.)

  9. Effects of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, DHPG, and injection stress on striatal cell signaling in food-restricted and ad libitum fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carr Kenneth D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic food restriction augments the rewarding effect of centrally administered psychostimulant drugs and this effect may involve a previously documented upregulation of D-1 dopamine receptor-mediated MAP kinase signaling in nucleus accumbens (NAc and caudate-putamen (CPu. Psychostimulants are known to induce striatal glutamate release, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR have been implicated in the cellular and behavioral responses to amphetamine. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether chronic food restriction increases striatal MAP kinase signaling in response to the group I mGluR agonist, DHPG. Results Western immunoblotting was used to demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of DHPG (500 nmol produces greater activation of ERK1/2 and CREB in CPu and NAc of food-restricted as compared to ad libitum fed rats. Fos-immunostaining induced by DHPG was also stronger in CPu and NAc core of food-restricted relative to ad libitum fed rats. However, i.c.v. injection of saline-vehicle produced greater activation of ERK1/2 and CREB in CPu and NAc of food-restricted relative to ad libitum fed rats, and this difference was not seen when subjects received no i.c.v. injection prior to sacrifice. In addition, although DHPG activated Akt, there was no difference in Akt activation between feeding groups. To probe whether the augmented ERK1/2 and CREB activation in vehicle-injected food-restricted rats are mediated by one or more GluR types, effects of an NMDA antagonist (MK-801, 100 nmol, AMPA antagonist (DNQX, 10 nmol, and group I mGluR antagonist (AIDA, 100 nmol were compared to saline-vehicle. Antagonist injections did not diminish activation of ERK1/2 or CREB. Conclusions These results indicate that a group I mGluR agonist induces phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2 and CREB in both CPu and NAc. However, group I mGluR-mediated signaling may not be upregulated in food-restricted rats

  10. Zinc and glutamate dehydrogenase in putative glutamatergic brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, G; Schmidt, W

    1983-01-01

    A certain topographic parallelism between the distribution of histochemically (TIMM staining) identified zinc and putative glutamatergic structures in the rat brain was demonstrated. Glutamate dehydrogenase as a zinc containing protein is in consideration to be an enzyme synthesizing transmitter glutamate. In a low concentration range externally added zinc ions (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) induced an increase in the activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) originating from rat hippocampal formation, neocortex, and cerebellum up to 142.4%. With rising molarity of Zn(II) in the incubation medium, the enzyme of hippocampal formation and cerebellum showed a biphasic course of activation. Zinc ions of a concentration higher than 10(-6) M caused a strong inhibition of GDH. The effect of Zn(II) on GDH originating from spinal ganglia and liver led only to a decrease of enzyme activity. These results are discussed in connection with a functional correlation between zinc and putatively glutamatergic system.

  11. Roles and regulation of brain glutamate transporters in normal and pathological brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. Synaptically released Glu acts on both ionotropic (iGluR) and metabotropic receptors, and excessive iGluR activation results in neuronal death (termed excitotoxicity). Removal of Glu from the synapse is thus critical for normal transmission and to prevent excitotoxicity, and is performed exclusively by a family of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs, also known as glutamate transporters). Disregulation of Glu transport may contribute to the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative conditions, and altered expression or function of EAATs has been identified in a number of these pathologies. These studies investigated the functional and pathological effects of EAAT inhibitors in vitro, and developed a novel screening assay for compounds with activity at EAATs. Astrocytic EAATs are responsible for the majority of Glu uptake in brain, so preparations containing both astrocytes and neurones are required to analyse the contribution of EAATs to neuroprotection. Organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs), which exhibit many of the features of the intact CNS, were prepared from 11-14 day old Sprague Dawley rats (anaesthetised with halothane). Hippocampal slices (350 μm thick) were maintained on culture well inserts in chemically defined medium. After 2 weeks, cultures were treated with EAAT inhibitors for 3-7 days in the presence or absence of 300 μM Glu. Treatment with most EAAT inhibitors resulted in cell death that was proportional to the Glu concentration in the medium. In contrast, (2S,3S,4R)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-III), a competitive substrate at EAATs (and possibly an antagonist at the kainate subtype of iGluR), appeared to be neuroprotective: increased Glu was not toxic in the presence of this drug. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of OHCs to inhibition of Glu uptake, highlighting the importance of EAATs in preventing excitotoxicity. Since modulation of

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 contributes to inflammatory tongue pain via extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis and upper cervical spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ming-Gang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the orofacial region, limited information is available concerning pathological tongue pain, such as inflammatory pain or neuropathic pain occurring in the tongue. Here, we tried for the first time to establish a novel animal model of inflammatory tongue pain in rats and to investigate the roles of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling in this process. Methods Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA was submucosally injected into the tongue to induce the inflammatory pain phenotype that was confirmed by behavioral testing. Expression of phosphorylated ERK (pERK and mGluR5 in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc and upper cervical spinal cord (C1-C2 were detected with immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. pERK inhibitor, a selective mGluR5 antagonist or agonist was continuously administered for 7 days via an intrathecal (i.t. route. Local inflammatory responses were verified by tongue histology. Results Submucosal injection of CFA into the tongue produced a long-lasting mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia at the inflamed site, concomitant with an increase in the pERK immunoreactivity in the Vc and C1-C2. The distribution of pERK-IR cells was laminar specific, ipsilaterally dominant, somatotopically relevant, and rostrocaudally restricted. Western blot analysis also showed an enhanced activation of ERK in the Vc and C1-C2 following CFA injection. Continuous i.t. administration of the pERK inhibitor and a selective mGluR5 antagonist significantly depressed the mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in the CFA-injected tongue. In addition, the number of pERK-IR cells in ipsilateral Vc and C1-C2 was also decreased by both drugs. Moreover, continuous i.t. administration of a selective mGluR5 agonist induced mechanical allodynia in naive rats. Conclusions The present study constructed a new animal model of inflammatory tongue pain in rodents, and

  13. Developmental shift from long-term depression to long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei: role of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyal, Julien; Grassi, Silvarosa; Dieni, Cristina; Frondaroli, Adele; Demêmes, Danielle; Raymond, Jaqueline; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2003-12-01

    The effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents on synaptic transmission in the ventral part of the medial vestibular nuclei (vMVN) were studied during postnatal development and compared with the changes in the expression of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtypes, mGluR1 and mGluR5. During the first stages of development, HFS always induced a mGluR5- and GABAA-dependent long-term depression (LTD) which did not require NMDA receptor and mGluR1 activation. The probability of inducing LTD decreased progressively throughout the development and it was zero at about the end of the second postnatal week. Conversely, long-term potentiation (LTP) appeared at the beginning of the second week and its occurrence increased to reach the adult value at the end of the third week. Of interest, the sudden change in the LTP frequency occurred at the time of eye opening, about the end of the second postnatal week. LTP depended on NMDA receptor and mGluR1 activation. In parallel with the modifications in synaptic plasticity, we observed that the expression patterns and localizations of mGluR5 and mGluR1 in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) changed during postnatal development. At the earlier stages the mGluR1 expression was minimal, then increased progressively. In contrast, mGluR5 expression was initially high, then decreased. While mGluR1 was exclusively localized in neuronal compartments and concentrated at the postsynaptic sites at all stages observed, mGluR5 was found mainly in neuronal compartments at immature stages, then preferentially in glial compartments at mature stages. These results provide the first evidence for a progressive change from LTD to LTP accompanied by a distinct maturation expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 during the development of the MVN.

  14. Anti-Cancer Effect of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 Inhibition in Human Glioma U87 Cells: Involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, and emerging evidence suggests a role of mGluRs in the biology of cancer. Previous studies showed that mGluR1 was a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer and melanoma, but its role in human glioma has not been determined. Methods: In the present study, we investigated the effects of mGluR1 inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA or selective antagonists Riluzole and BAY36-7620. The anti-cancer effects of mGluR1 inhibition were measured by cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, TUNEL staining, cell cycle assay, cell invasion and migration assays in vitro, and also examined in a U87 xenograft model in vivo. Results: Inhibition of mGluR1 significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a dose-dependent fashion in U87 cells. These effects were accompanied with the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In addition, the results of Matrigel invasion and cell tracking assays showed that inhibition of mGluR1 apparently attenuated cell invasion and migration in U87 cells. All these anti-cancer effects were ablated by the mGluR1 agonist L-quisqualic acid. The results of western blot analysis showed that mGluR1 inhibition overtly decreased the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, mTOR and P70S6K, indicating the mitigated activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, the anti-tumor activity of mGluR1 inhibition in vivo was also demonstrated in a U87 xenograft glioma model in athymic nude mice. Conclusion: The remarkable efficiency of mGluR1 inhibition to induce cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients.

  15. Pharmacological interference with metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 but not subtype 5 differentially affects within- and between-session extinction of Pavlovian conditioned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Iulia; Dietz, Monika; Peterlik, Daniel; Huber, Sabine E; Fendt, Markus; Neumann, Inga D; Flor, Peter J; Slattery, David A

    2012-03-01

    Fear extinction is defined as the attenuation of a conditioned-fear memory by re-exposing animals to the conditioned stimulus without the aversive stimulus. This process is known to be effectively enhanced via administration of D-cycloserine (DCS), a partial NMDA-receptor agonist. However, other glutamatergic mechanisms, such as interference with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtypes 5 and 7 in the extinction of aversive memories are insufficiently understood. Using the allosteric mGluR5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), the mGluR7 allosteric agonist N,N'-dibenzyhydryl-ethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride (AMN082), and DCS for comparison, we aimed to study how pharmacological blockade of mGluR5 and activation of mGluR7 influenced within- and between-session conditioned-fear extinction training and extinction retention in rats. We show that when injected before extinction training, mGluR7 activation with AMN082 enhanced freezing and thereby attenuated within-session fear extinction, whereas both DCS and the mGluR5 receptor antagonist MPEP had no effect on this process. However, these differential drug effects were not long lasting, as no difference in extinction retention were observed 24 h later. Therefore, we assessed whether the compounds affect 24 h consolidation of extinction training following incomplete extinction training (between-session extinction). Similar to DCS, AMN082- but not MPEP-treated rats showed facilitated extinction retention, as exhibited by decreased freezing. Finally, using fluoxetine, we provide evidence that the effect of AMN082 on between-session extinction retention is most likely not via increasing 5-HT transmission. These findings demonstrate that mGluR7 activation differentially modulates conditioned-fear extinction, in dependence on the protocol employed, and suggests drugs with AMN082-like mechanisms as potential add-on drugs following exposure-based psychotherapy for fear-related human

  16. Contribution of altered signal transduction associated to glutamate receptors in brain to the neurological alterations of hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vicente Felipo

    2006-01-01

    Patients with liver disease may present hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome covering a wide range of neurological alterations,including cognitive and motor disturbances. HE reduces the quality of life of the patients and is associated with poor prognosis. In the worse cases HE may lead to coma or death.The mechanisms leading to HE which are not well known are being studied using animal models. The neurological alterations in HE are a consequence of impaired cerebral function mainly due to alterations in neurotransmission. We review here some studies indicating that alterations in neurotransmission associated to different types of glutamate receptors are responsible for some of the cognitive and motor alterations present in HE.These studies show that the function of the signal transduction pathway glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP associated to the NMDA type of glutamate receptors is impaired in brain in vivo in HE animal models as well as in brain of patients died of HE. Activation of NMDA receptors in brain activates this pathway and increases cGMP. In animal models of HE this increase in cGMP induced by activation of NMDA receptors is reduced,which is responsible for the impairment in learning ability in these animal models. Increasing cGMP by pharmacological means restores learning ability in rats with HE and may be a new therapeutic approach to improve cognitive function in patients with HE.However, it is necessary to previously assess the possible secondary effects.Patients with HE may present psychomotor slowing,hypokinesia and bradykinesia. Animal models of HE also show hypolocomotion. It has been shown in rats with HE that hypolocomotion is due to excessive activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in substantia nigra pars reticulata. Blocking mGluR1 in this brain area normalizes motor activity in the rats, suggesting that a similar treatment for patients with HE could be useful to treat psychomotor slowing and

  17. Stereostructure-activity studies on agonists at the AMPA and kainate subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tommy N; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2003-01-01

    (S)-Glutamic acid (Glu), the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, operates through ionotropic as well as metabotropic receptors and is considered to be involved in certain neurological disorders and degenerative brain diseases that are currently without any satisfactory...

  18. In vitro evidence for the brain glutamate efflux hypothesis: brain endothelial cells cocultured with astrocytes display a polarized brain-to-blood transport of glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Hans Christian; Madelung, Rasmus; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2012-05-01

    The concentration of the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate, in brain interstitial fluid is tightly regulated by uptake transporters and metabolism in astrocytes and neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the blood-brain barrier endothelium in brain L-glutamate homeostasis. Transendothelial transport- and accumulation studies of (3) H-L-glutamate, (3) H-L-aspartate, and (3) H-D-aspartate in an electrically tight bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte blood-brain barrier coculture model were performed. After 6 days in culture, the endothelium displayed transendothelial resistance values of 1014 ± 70 Ω cm(2) , and (14) C-D-mannitol permeability values of 0.88 ± 0.13 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) . Unidirectional flux studies showed that L-aspartate and L-glutamate, but not D-aspartate, displayed polarized transport in the brain-to-blood direction, however, all three amino acids accumulated in the cocultures when applied from the abluminal side. The transcellular transport kinetics were characterized with a K(m) of 69 ± 15 μM and a J(max) of 44 ± 3.1 pmol min(-1) cm(-2) for L-aspartate and a K(m) of 138 ± 49 μM and J(max) of 28 ± 3.1 pmol min(-1) cm(-2) for L-glutamate. The EAAT inhibitor, DL-threo-ß-Benzyloxyaspartate, inhibited transendothelial brain-to-blood fluxes of L-glutamate and L-aspartate. Expression of EAAT-1 (Slc1a3), -2 (Slc1a2), and -3 (Slc1a1) mRNA in the endothelial cells was confirmed by conventional PCR and localization of EAAT-1 and -3 in endothelial cells was shown with immunofluorescence. Overall, the findings suggest that the blood-brain barrier itself may participate in regulating brain L-glutamate concentrations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Brain glutamine synthesis requires neuronal-born aspartate as amino donor for glial glutamate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Beatriz; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Contreras, Laura; Garzón, Miguel; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Kobayashi, Keiko; Saheki, Takeyori; Cerdan, Sebastian; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2011-01-01

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle faces a drain of glutamate by oxidation, which is balanced by the anaplerotic synthesis of glutamate and glutamine in astrocytes. De novo synthesis of glutamate by astrocytes requires an amino group whose origin is unknown. The deficiency in Aralar/AGC1, the main mitochondrial carrier for aspartate-glutamate expressed in brain, results in a drastic fall in brain glutamine production but a modest decrease in brain glutamate levels, which is not due to decreases in neuronal or synaptosomal glutamate content. In vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance labeling with (13)C(2)acetate or (1-(13)C) glucose showed that the drop in brain glutamine is due to a failure in glial glutamate synthesis. Aralar deficiency induces a decrease in aspartate content, an increase in lactate production, and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in cultured neurons but not in cultured astrocytes, indicating that Aralar is only functional in neurons. We find that aspartate, but not other amino acids, increases glutamate synthesis in both control and aralar-deficient astrocytes, mainly by serving as amino donor. These findings suggest the existence of a neuron-to-astrocyte aspartate transcellular pathway required for astrocyte glutamate synthesis and subsequent glutamine formation. This pathway may provide a mechanism to transfer neuronal-born redox equivalents to mitochondria in astrocytes.

  20. GDH-Dependent Glutamate Oxidation in the Brain Dictates Peripheral Energy Substrate Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaca, Melis; Frigerio, Francesca; Migrenne, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    in a central energy-deprivation state with increased ADP/ATP ratios and phospho-AMPK in the hypothalamus. This induced changes in the autonomous nervous system balance, with increased sympathetic activity promoting hepatic glucose production and mobilization of substrates reshaping peripheral energy stores...... glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity. Here, we investigated the significance of glutamate as energy substrate for the brain. Upon glutamate exposure, astrocytes generated ATP in a GDH-dependent way. The observed lack of glutamate oxidation in brain-specific GDH null CnsGlud1(-/-) mice resulted...

  1. Brain microdialysis of GABA and glutamate : What does it signify?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Microdialysis has become a frequently used method to study extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the central nervous system. However, the fact that the major part of GABA and glutamate as measured by microdialysis does not fulfill the classical criteria for exocytotic release questions the

  2. Plasticity of Signaling by Spinal Estrogen Receptor α, κ-Opioid Receptor, and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors over the Rat Reproductive Cycle Regulates Spinal Endomorphin 2 Antinociception: Relevance of Endogenous-Biased Agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Jiang; Murugaiyan, Vijaya; Storman, Emiliya M; Schnell, Stephen A; Kumar, Arjun; Wessendorf, Martin W; Gintzler, Alan R

    2017-11-15

    We previously showed that intrathecal application of endomorphin 2 [EM2; the highly specific endogenous μ-opioid receptor (MOR) ligand] induces antinociception that varies with stage of the rat estrous cycle: minimal during diestrus and prominent during proestrus. Earlier studies, however, did not identify proestrus-activated signaling strategies that enable spinal EM2 antinociception. We now report that in female rats, increased spinal dynorphin release and κ-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling, as well as the emergence of glutamate-activated metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR 1 ) signaling, are critical to the transition from an EM2 nonresponsive state (during diestrus) to an analgesically responsive state (during proestrus). Differential signaling by mGluR 1 , depending on its activation by membrane estrogen receptor α (mERα; during diestrus) versus glutamate (during proestrus), concomitant with the ebb and flow of spinal dynorphin/KOR signaling, functions as a switch, preventing or promoting, respectively, spinal EM2 antinociception. Importantly, EM2 and glutamate-containing varicosities appose spinal neurons that express MOR along with mGluRs and mERα, suggesting that signaling mechanisms regulating analgesic effectiveness of intrathecally applied EM2 also pertain to endogenous EM2. Regulation of spinal EM2 antinociception by both the nature of the endogenous mGluR 1 activator (i.e., endogenous biased agonism at mGluR 1 ) and changes in spinal dynorphin/KOR signaling represent a novel mechanism for modulating analgesic responsiveness to endogenous EM2 (and perhaps other opioids). This points the way for developing noncanonical pharmacological approaches to pain management by harnessing endogenous opioids for pain relief. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current prescription opioid abuse epidemic underscores the urgency to develop alternative pharmacotherapies for managing pain. We find that the magnitude of spinal endomorphin 2 (EM2) antinociception not only

  3. Chronic glutamate toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases-what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eMaher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Together with aspartate, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Glutamate binds and activates both ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic glutamate receptors and a class of G-protein coupled receptors (metabotropic glutamate receptors. Although the intracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is in the millimolar range, the extracellular glutamate concentration is kept in the low micromolar range by the action of excitatory amino acid transporters that import glutamate and aspartate into astrocytes and neurons. Excess extracellular glutamate may lead to excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo in acute insults like ischemic stroke via the overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. In addition, chronic excitotoxicity has been hypothesized to play a role in numerous neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Based on this hypothesis, a good deal of effort has been devoted to develop and test drugs that either inhibit glutamate receptors or decrease extracellular glutamate. In this review, we provide an overview of the different pathways that are thought to lead to an over-activation of the glutamatergic system and glutamate toxicity in neurodegeneration. In addition, we summarize the available experimental evidence for glutamate toxicity in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  5. Controversial action of positive modulator of subtype 7 of metabotropic glutamate receptors AMN082 on cortical epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szczurowska, Ewa; Mareš, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 623, 1-3 (2009), s. 37-40 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/1188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epileptic afterdischarges * glutamate receptors * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neuro logy Impact factor: 2.585, year: 2009

  6. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Selective agonists at group II metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis, stereochemistry, and molecular pharmacology of (S)- and (R)-2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2002-01-01

    Homologation of analogues of the central excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (Glu), in which the distal carboxy group has been bioisosterically replaced by acidic heterocyclic units, has previously provided subtype selective ligands for metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The (S......)-form of the 1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-ol Glu analogue, 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)propionic acid (TDPA, 6), is an 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist, which in addition stereospecifically activates group I mGluRs. We have now synthesized the (S)- and (R......)-forms of 2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid (homo-TDPA, 7) and shown that whereas neither enantiomer interacts with AMPA receptors, (S)- and (R)-7 appear to be selective and equipotent agonists at group II mGluRs as represented by the mGluR2 subtype. The activities of (S)- and (R)-7...

  8. Learning and memory deficits consequent to reduction of the fragile X mental retardation protein result from metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated inhibition of cAMP signaling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Alexandros K; Semelidou, Ourania; Kotini, Andriana G; Anezaki, Maria; Skoulakis, Efthimios M C

    2012-09-19

    Loss of the RNA-binding fragile X protein [fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)] results in a spectrum of cognitive deficits, the fragile X syndrome (FXS), while aging individuals with decreased protein levels present with a subset of these symptoms and tremor. The broad range of behavioral deficits likely reflects the ubiquitous distribution and multiple functions of the protein. FMRP loss is expected to affect multiple neuronal proteins and intracellular signaling pathways, whose identity and interactions are essential in understanding and ameliorating FXS symptoms. We used heterozygous mutants and targeted RNA interference-mediated abrogation in Drosophila to uncover molecular pathways affected by FMRP reduction. We present evidence that FMRP loss results in excess metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activity, attributable at least in part to elevation of the protein in affected neurons. Using high-resolution behavioral, genetic, and biochemical analyses, we present evidence that excess mGluR upon FMRP attenuation is linked to the cAMP decrement reported in patients and models, and underlies olfactory associative learning and memory deficits. Furthermore, our data indicate positive transcriptional regulation of the fly fmr1 gene by cAMP, via protein kinase A, likely through the transcription factor CREB. Because the human Fmr1 gene also contains CREB binding sites, the interaction of mGluR excess and cAMP signaling defects we present suggests novel combinatorial pharmaceutical approaches to symptom amelioration upon FMRP attenuation.

  9. Preparation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) PET tracer [18F]FPEB for human use: An automated radiosynthesis and a novel one-pot synthesis of its radiolabeling precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Keunpoong; Labaree, David; Li, Songye; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    The radiotracer 3-[ 18 F]fluoro-5-(2-pyridinylethynyl)benzonitrile, or [ 18 F]FPEB, is a promising PET imaging agent for the metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptor (mGluR5). In an effort to develop a routine production method of this radiotracer for use in clinical research we adapted its radiosynthesis to an automated chemistry module. In the meanwhile, we also developed a simplified “one-pot” method for the preparation of the nitrobenzonitrile radiolabeling precursor for [ 18 F]FPEB and its reference standard to replace the existing multi-step synthetic approach. - Highlights: • Radiosynthesis of [ 18 F]FPEB was performed in a Tracerlab FX-FN automated module. • The radiolabeling precursor was prepared from a “one-pot” Suzuki coupling method. • Total synthesis time from EOB to a final injectable dose was about 90 min. • The procedure was applied in the routine preparation of [ 18 F]FPEB for human use

  10. Transcriptional profiling of striatal neurons in response to single or concurrent activation of dopamine D2, adenosine A(2A) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors: focus on beta-synuclein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Selga, Elisabet; García-Martínez, Juan Manuel; Amaral, Olavo B; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Alberch, Jordi; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Noé, Véronique; Lluís, Carme; Ciudad, Carlos J; Ciruela, Francisco

    2012-10-25

    G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization is a concept which is changing the understanding of classical pharmacology. Both, oligomerization and functional interaction between adenosine A(2A,) dopamine D(2) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors have been demonstrated in the striatum. However, the transcriptional consequences of receptors co-activation are still unexplored. We aim here to determine the changes in gene expression of striatal primary cultured neurons upon isolated or simultaneous receptor activation. Interestingly, we found that 95 genes of the total analyzed (15,866 transcripts and variants) changed their expression in response to simultaneous stimulation of all three receptors. Among these genes, we focused on the β-synuclein (β-Syn) gene (SCNB). Quantitative PCR verified the magnitude and direction of change in expression of SCNB. Since β-Syn belongs to the homologous synuclein family and may be considered a natural regulator of α-synuclein (α-Syn), it has been proposed that β-Syn might act protectively against α-Syn neuropathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 and protein kinase C-epsilon increase in dorsal root ganglion neurons and spinal glial activation in an adolescent rat model of painful neck injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, Christine L; Dong, Ling; Bowman, Alex S; Perez, Federico M; Guarino, Benjamin B; Sweitzer, Sarah M; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2010-12-01

    There is growing evidence that neck pain is common in adolescence and is a risk factor for the development of chronic neck pain in adulthood. The cervical facet joint and its capsular ligament is a common source of pain in the neck in adults, but its role in adolescent pain remains unknown. The aim of this study was to define the biomechanics, behavioral sensitivity, and indicators of neuronal and glial activation in an adolescent model of mechanical facet joint injury. A bilateral C6-C7 facet joint distraction was imposed in an adolescent rat and biomechanical metrics were measured during injury. Following injury, forepaw mechanical hyperalgesia was measured, and protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCɛ) and metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 (mGluR5) expression in the dorsal root ganglion and markers of spinal glial activation were assessed. Joint distraction induced significant mechanical hyperalgesia during the 7 days post-injury (p capsule during injury were 32.8 ± 12.9%, which were consistent with the strains associated with comparable degrees of hypersensitivity in the adult rat. These results suggest that adolescents may have a lower tissue tolerance to induce pain and associated nociceptive response than do adults.

  12. Exogenous glutamate induces short and long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Pessia, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-08

    In rat brain stem slices, high concentrations of exogenous glutamate induce long-term potentiation (LTP) of the field potentials evoked in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. At low concentrations, glutamate can also induce short-term potentiation (STP), indicating that LTP and STP are separate events depending on the level of glutamatergic synapse activation. LTP and STP are prevented by blocking NMDA receptors and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Conversely, blocking platelet-activating factor (PAF) and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors only prevents the full development of LTP. Moreover, in the presence of blocking agents, glutamate causes transient inhibition, suggesting that when potentiation is impeded, exogenous glutamate can activate presynaptic mechanisms that reduce glutamate release.

  13. Surface expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b in transfected HEK293 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumpošt, Jiří; Syrová, Zdeňka; Kulihová, Lenka; Franková, Daniela; Bologna, J.C.; Hlaváčková, Veronika; Prezeau, L.; Králíková, Michaela; Hrušková, Bohdana; Pin, J. P.; Blahoš, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2008), s. 409-418 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/08/1591; GA AV ČR IAA500390701; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/0920 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : G-proteins * glutamate * receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.383, year: 2008

  14. Metabotropic glutamatergic receptors and their ligands in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Rup, Kinga; Pomierny, Bartosz; Niedzielska, Ewa; Kalivas, Peter W; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    Glutamatergic excitatory transmission is implicated in physiological and pathological conditions like learning, memory, neuronal plasticity and emotions, while glutamatergic abnormalities are reported in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, stroke, traumatic brain injury, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and pain. Also, several lines of evidence have accumulated indicating a pivotal role for glutamatergic neurotransmission in mediating addictive behaviors. Among the proteins regulating glutamatergic transmission, the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) are being developed as pharmacological targets for treating many neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. In this review we describe the molecular structure of mGluRs and their distribution, physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, as well as their use as targets in preclinical studies of drug addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency alters levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Jadavji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is an enzyme key regulator in folate metabolism. Deficiencies in MTHFR result in increased levels of homocysteine, which leads to reduced levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. In the brain, SAM donates methyl groups to catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, which is involved in neurotransmitter analysis. Using the MTHFR-deficient mouse model the purpose of this study was to investigate levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and amino acid levels in brain tissue. MTHFR deficiency affected levels of both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in within the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mthfr−/− mice had reduced levels of glutamate in the amygdala and γ-aminobutyric acid in the thalamus. The excitatory mechanisms of homocysteine through activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in brain tissue might alter levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2-4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input-output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Increases Proliferation but does not Influence Neuronal Differentiation of a Human Neural Stem Cell Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Anne; Blaabjerg, Morten; Kamand, Morad

    2018-01-01

    of pharmacological activation and inhibition of mGluR2/3 on proliferation, differentiation and viability of a human neural stem cell line. Immunofluorescence staining revealed the presence of mGluR2/3 receptors on both proliferating and differentiating stem cells, including cells differentiated into β-tubulin III....... Western blot analysis revealed that the active, dimeric form of mGluR2/3 was mainly present on the proliferating cells, which may explain our findings. The present study emphasises the importance of glutamate and mGluRs on regulation of human neural stem cells and suggests a significant role of mGluR2....../3 during cell proliferation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  18. The Group 2 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Agonist LY379268 Rescues Neuronal, Neurochemical and Motor Abnormalities in R6/2 Huntington’s Disease Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, A.; Lafferty, D.C.; Wang, H.B.; Del Mar, N.; Deng, Y.P.

    2012-01-01

    Excitotoxic injury to striatum by dysfunctional cortical input or aberrant glutamate uptake may contribute to Huntington’s Disease (HD) pathogenesis. Since corticostriatal terminals possess mGluR2/3 autoreceptors, whose activation dampens glutamate release, we tested the ability of the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to improve the phenotype in R6/2 HD mice with 120–125 CAG repeats. Daily subcutaneous injection of a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of LY379268 (20mg/kg) had no evident adverse effects in WT mice, and diverse benefits in R6/2 mice, both in a cohort of mice tested behaviorally until the end of R6/2 lifespan and in a cohort sacrificed at 10 weeks of age for blinded histological analysis. MTD LY379268 yielded a significant 11% increase in R6/2 survival, an improvement on rotarod, normalization and/or improvement in locomotor parameters measured in open field (activity, speed, acceleration, endurance, and gait), a rescue of a 15–20% cortical and striatal neuron loss, normalization of SP striatal neuron neurochemistry, and to a lesser extent enkephalinergic striatal neuron neurochemistry. Deficits were greater in male than female R6/2 mice, and drug benefit tended to be greater in males. The improvements in SP striatal neurons, which facilitate movement, are consistent with the improved movement in LY379268-treated R6/2 mice. Our data indicate that mGluR2/3 agonists may be particularly useful for ameliorating the morphological, neurochemical and motor defects observed in HD. PMID:22472187

  19. Risk-Conferring Glutamatergic Genes and Brain Glutamate Plus Glutamine in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan R. Bustillo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS signals from glutamate (or the combined glutamate and glutamine signal—Glx have been found to be greater in various brain regions in people with schizophrenia. Recently, the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium reported that several common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in glutamate-related genes confer increased risk of schizophrenia. Here, we examined the relationship between presence of these risk polymorphisms and brain Glx levels in schizophrenia.Methods1H-MRS imaging data from an axial, supraventricular tissue slab were acquired in 56 schizophrenia patients and 67 healthy subjects. Glx was measured in gray matter (GM and white matter (WM regions. The genetic data included six polymorphisms genotyped across an Illumina 5M SNP array. Only three of six glutamate as well as calcium-related SNPs were available for examination. These included three glutamate-related polymorphisms (rs10520163 in CLCN3, rs12704290 in GRM3, and rs12325245 in SLC38A7, and three calcium signaling polymorphisms (rs1339227 in RIMS1, rs7893279 in CACNB2, and rs2007044 in CACNA1C. Summary risk scores for the three glutamate and the three calcium polymorphisms were calculated.ResultsGlx levels in GM positively correlated with glutamate-related genetic risk score but only in younger (≤36 years schizophrenia patients (p = 0.01. Glx levels did not correlate with calcium risk scores. Glx was higher in the schizophrenia group compared to levels in controls in GM and WM regardless of age (p < 0.001.ConclusionElevations in brain Glx are in part, related to common allelic variants of glutamate-related genes known to increase the risk for schizophrenia. Since the glutamate risk scores did not differ between groups, some other genetic or environmental factors likely interact with the variability in glutamate-related risk SNPs to contribute to an increase in brain Glx early in the illness.

  20. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netopilova, M; Drsata, J [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Charles University, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Haugvicova, R; Kubova, H; Mares, P [Institute of Physiology, Czech Academy of Sciences, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)

    1998-07-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using {sup 14}C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  1. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netopilova, M.; Drsata, J.; Haugvicova, R.; Kubova, H.; Mares, P.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using 14 C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of 14 CO 2 radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  2. Deep brain stimulation results in local glutamate and adenosine release: investigation into the role of astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Vivianne L; Chang, Su-Youne; Hitti, Frederick L; Roberts, David W; Leiter, James C; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Lee, Kendall H

    2010-08-01

    Several neurological disorders are treated with deep brain stimulation; however, the mechanism underlying its ability to abolish oscillatory phenomena associated with diseases as diverse as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy remain largely unknown. To investigate the role of specific neurotransmitters in deep brain stimulation and determine the role of non-neuronal cells in its mechanism of action. We used the ferret thalamic slice preparation in vitro, which exhibits spontaneous spindle oscillations, to determine the effect of high-frequency stimulation on neurotransmitter release. We then performed experiments using an in vitro astrocyte culture to investigate the role of glial transmitter release in high-frequency stimulation-mediated abolishment of spindle oscillations. In this series of experiments, we demonstrated that glutamate and adenosine release in ferret slices was able to abolish spontaneous spindle oscillations. The glutamate release was still evoked in the presence of the Na channel blocker tetrodotoxin, but was eliminated with the vesicular H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the calcium chelator 2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of purified primary astrocytic cultures was able to evoke intracellular calcium transients and glutamate release, and bath application of 2-bis (2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester inhibited glutamate release in this setting. Vesicular astrocytic neurotransmitter release may be an important mechanism by which deep brain stimulation is able to achieve clinical benefits.

  3. Agmatine reduces extracellular glutamate during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rat brain: A potential mechanism for the anticonvulsive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yangzheng; LeBlanc, Michael H.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the initiation and spread of seizure activity. Agmatine, an endogenous neuromodulator, is an antagonist of NMDA receptors and has anticonvulsive effects. Whether agmatine regulate glutamate release, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, is not known. In this study, we used pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure model to determine the effect of agmatine on extracellular glutamate in rat brain. We also determined the time course and the amount of agmatine that...

  4. Neuroprotective effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor group II and III activators against MPP(+)-induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: the impact of cell differentiation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantas, D; Greda, A; Golda, S; Korostynski, M; Grygier, B; Roman, A; Pilc, A; Lason, W

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have documented that metabotropic glutamate receptors from group II and III (mGluR II/III) are a potential target in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, the neuroprotective effects of particular mGluR II/III subtypes in relation to PD pathology are recognized only partially. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various mGluR II/III activators in the in vitro model of PD using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line and mitochondrial neurotoxin MPP(+). We demonstrated that all tested mGluR ligands: mGluR II agonist - LY354740, mGluR III agonist - ACPT-I, mGluR4 PAM - VU0361737, mGluR8 agonist - (S)-3,4-DCPG, mGluR8 PAM - AZ12216052 and mGluR7 allosteric agonist - AMN082 were protective against MPP(+)-evoked cell damage in undifferentiated (UN-) SH-SY5Y cells with the highest neuroprotection mediated by mGluR8-specific agents. However, in retinoic acid- differentiated (RA-) SH-SY5Y cells we found protection mediated only by mGluR8 activators. We also demonstrated the cell proliferation stimulating effect for mGluR4 and mGluR8 PAMs. Next, we showed that the protection mediated by mGluR II/III activators in UN-SH-SY5Y was not accompanied by the modulation of caspase-3 activity, however, a decrease in the number of apoptotic nuclei was found. Finally, we showed that the inhibitor of necroptosis, necrostatin-1 blocked the mGluR III-mediated protection. Altogether our comparative in vitro data add a further proof to neuroprotective effects of mGluR agonists or PAMs and point to mGluR8 as a promising target for neuroprotective interventions in PD. The results also suggest the participation of necroptosis-related molecular pathways in neuroprotective effects of mGluR III activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain glutamate in anorexia nervosa: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy case control study at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Beata R; Pike, Alexandra; Sharpley, Ann L; Ayton, Agnes; Park, Rebecca J; Cowen, Philip J; Emir, Uzay E

    2017-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality. There are no established pharmacological treatments and the neurobiology of the condition is poorly understood. Previous studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have shown that AN may be associated with reductions in indices of brain glutamate; however, at conventional field strengths (≤3 T), it is difficult to separate glutamate from its precursor and metabolite, glutamine. The objective of the present study was to use high field (7 T) MRS to measure concentrations of glutamate, in three separate brain voxels, in women with AN. We studied 13 female participants with AN and 12 healthy female controls who underwent MRS scanning at 7 T with voxels placed in anterior cingulate cortex, occipital cortex and putamen. Neurometabolites were calculated using the unsuppressed water signal as a reference and corrected for individual cerebrospinal fluid concentration in the voxel. We found that participants with AN had significantly lower concentrations of glutamate in all three voxels (mean reduction 8%, p = 0.002) but glutamine levels were not altered. Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, creatine, GABA and glutathione were also unchanged. However, inositol was lower in AN participants in anterior cingulate (p = 0.022) and occipital cortex (p = 0.002). Women with AN apparently have widespread reductions in brain glutamate. Further work will be needed to assess if this change has pathophysiological relevance or whether it is a consequence of the many physical changes produced in AN by food restriction.

  6. Glutamate neurotransmission is affected in prenatally stressed offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrover, Ezequiela; Pallarés, Maria Eugenia; Baier, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that male adult offspring of stressed mothers exhibited higher levels of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors than control rats. These offspring also showed long-lasting astroglial hypertrophy and a reduced dendritic arborization with syn......Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that male adult offspring of stressed mothers exhibited higher levels of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors than control rats. These offspring also showed long-lasting astroglial hypertrophy and a reduced dendritic arborization...... with synaptic loss. Since metabolism of glutamate is dependent on interactions between neurons and surrounding astroglia, our results suggest that glutamate neurotransmitter pathways might be impaired in the brain of prenatally stressed rats. To study the effect of prenatal stress on the metabolism...... was not affected it was found that prenatal stress (PS) changed the expression of the transporters, thus, producing a higher level of vesicular vGluT-1 in the frontal cortex (FCx) and elevated levels of GLT1 protein and messenger RNA in the hippocampus (HPC) of adult male PS offspring. We also observed increased...

  7. Glutamate metabolism in the brain focusing on astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Scafidi, Susanna; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    , as well as in nitrogen trafficking and ammonia homeostasis in brain. The anatomical specialization of astrocytic endfeet enables these cells to rapidly and efficiently remove neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to maintain homeostasis, and to provide glutamine to replenish neurotransmitter pools...

  8. Solubilization, partial purification, and reconstitution of glutamate- and N-methyl-D-aspartate-activated cation channels from brain synaptic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ly, A.M.; Michaelis, E.K.

    1991-01-01

    L-Glutamate-activated cation channel proteins from rat brain synaptic membranes were solubilized, partially purified, and reconstituted into liposomes. Optimal conditions for solubilization and reconstitution included treatment of the membranes with nonionic detergents in the presence of neutral phospholipids plus glycerol. Quench-flow procedures were developed to characterize the rapid kinetics of ion flux induced by receptor agonists. [ 14 C]Methylamine, a cation that permeates through the open channel of both vertebrate and invertebrate glutamate receptors, was used to measure the activity of glutamate receptor-ion channel complexes in reconstituted liposomes. L-Glutamate caused an increase in the rate of [ 14 C]methylamine influx into liposomes reconstituted with either solubilized membrane proteins or partially purified glutamate-binding proteins. Of the major glutamate receptor agonists, only N-methyl-D-aspartate activated cation fluxes in liposomes reconstituted with glutamate-binding proteins. In liposomes reconstituted with glutamate-binding proteins, N-methyl-D-aspartate- or glutamate-induced influx of NA + led to a transient increase in the influx of the lipid-permeable anion probe S 14 CN - . These results indicate the functional reconstitution of N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive glutamate receptors and the role of the ∼69-kDa protein in the function of these ion channels

  9. Immune labeling and purification of a 71-kDa glutamate-binding protein from brain synaptic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.W.; Cunningham, M.D.; Galton, N.; Michaelis, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    Immunoblot studies of synaptic membranes isolated from rat brain using antibodies raised against a previously purified glutamate-binding protein (GBP) indicated labeling of an ∼ 70-kDa protein band. Since the antibodies used were raised against a 14-kDa GBP, the present studies were undertaken to explore the possibility that the 14-kDa protein may have been a proteolytic fragment of a larger M/sub r/ protein in synaptic membranes. The major protein enriched in the most highly purified fractions was a 71-kDa glycoprotein, but a 63-kDa protein was co-purified during most steps of the isolation procedure. The glutamate-binding characteristics of these isolated protein fractions were very similar to those previously described for the 14-kDa GBP, including estimated dissociation constants for L-glutamate binding of 0.25 and 1 + M, inhibition of glutamate binding by azide and cyanide, and a selectivity of the ligand binding site for L-glutamate and L-aspartate. The neuroexcitatory analogs of L-glutamate and L-aspartate, ibotenate, quisqualate, and D-glutamate, inhibited L[ 3 H]glutamate binding to the isolated proteins, as did the antagonist of L-glutamate-induced neuronal excitation, L-glutamate diethylester. On the basis of the lack of any detectable glutamate-related enzyme activity associated with the isolated proteins and the presence of distinguishing sensitivities to analogs that inhibit glutamate transport carriers in synaptic membranes, it is proposed that the 71-kDa protein may be a component of a physiologic glutamate receptor complex in neuronal membranes

  10. High resolution mapping of modafinil induced changes in glutamate level in rat brain.

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    Mohammad Haris

    Full Text Available Modafinil is marketed in the United States for the treatment of narcolepsy and daytime somnolence due to shift-work or sleep apnea. Investigations of this drug in the treatment of cocaine and nicotine dependence in addition to disorders of executive function are also underway. Modafinil has been known to increase glutamate levels in rat brain models. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS has been commonly used to detect the glutamate (Glu changes in vivo. In this study, we used a recently described glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer (GluCEST imaging technique to measure Modafinil induced regional Glu changes in rat brain and compared the results with Glu concentration measured by single voxel 1HMRS. No increases in either GluCEST maps or 1HMRS were observed after Modafinil injection over a period of 5 hours. However, a significant increase in GluCEST (19 ± 4.4% was observed 24 hours post Modafinil administration, which is consistent with results from previous biochemical studies. This change was not consistently seen with 1HMRS. GluCEST mapping allows regional cerebral Glu changes to be measured and may provide a useful clinical biomarker of Modafinil effects for the management of patients with sleep disorders and addiction.

  11. Glutamate excitoxicity is the key molecular mechanism which is influenced by body temperature during the acute phase of brain stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco; Pérez-Mato, María; Agulla, Jesús; Blanco, Miguel; Barral, David; Almeida, Angeles; Brea, David; Waeber, Christian; Castillo, José; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, metabolic rate and inflammatory response have been associated to the deleterious effects of temperature during the acute phase of stroke. So far, the association of temperature with these mechanisms has been studied individually. However, the simultaneous study of the influence of temperature on these mechanisms is necessary to clarify their contributions to temperature-mediated ischemic damage. We used non-invasive Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to simultaneously measure temperature, glutamate excitotoxicity and metabolic rate in the brain in animal models of ischemia. The immune response to ischemia was measured through molecular serum markers in peripheral blood. We submitted groups of animals to different experimental conditions (hypothermia at 33°C, normothermia at 37°C and hyperthermia at 39°C), and combined these conditions with pharmacological modulation of glutamate levels in the brain through systemic injections of glutamate and oxaloacetate. We show that pharmacological modulation of glutamate levels can neutralize the deleterious effects of hyperthermia and the beneficial effects of hypothermia, however the analysis of the inflammatory response and metabolic rate, demonstrated that their effects on ischemic damage are less critical than glutamate excitotoxity. We conclude that glutamate excitotoxicity is the key molecular mechanism which is influenced by body temperature during the acute phase of brain stroke.

  12. Region-specific changes in presynaptic agmatine and glutamate levels in the aged rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Y; Liu, P; Leitch, B

    2016-01-15

    During the normal aging process, the brain undergoes a range of biochemical and structural alterations, which may contribute to deterioration of sensory and cognitive functions. Age-related deficits are associated with altered efficacy of synaptic neurotransmission. Emerging evidence indicates that levels of agmatine, a putative neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, are altered in a region-specific manner during the aging process. The gross tissue content of agmatine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of aged rat brains is decreased whereas levels in the temporal cortex (TE) are increased. However, it is not known whether these changes in gross tissue levels are also mirrored by changes in agmatine levels at synapses and thus could potentially contribute to altered synaptic function with age. In the present study, agmatine levels in presynaptic terminals in the PFC and TE regions (300 terminals/region) of young (3month; n=3) and aged (24month; n=3) brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats were compared using quantitative post-embedding immunogold electron-microscopy. Presynaptic levels of agmatine were significantly increased in the TE region (60%; pagmatine and glutamate were co-localized in the same synaptic terminals, and quantitative analyses revealed significantly reduced glutamate levels in agmatine-immunopositive synaptic terminals in both regions in aged rats compared to young animals. This study, for the first time, demonstrates differential effects of aging on agmatine and glutamate in the presynaptic terminals of PFC and TE. Future research is required to understand the functional significance of these changes and the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An ultra­high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy study of post exercise brain lactate, glutamate and glutamine change in the human brain.

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    Andrea eDennis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolise lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise and, (b to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally-derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise.

  14. Glutamate mediated astrocytic filtering of neuronal activity.

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    Gilad Wallach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity.

  15. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  16. Chitosan Glutamate-Coated Niosomes: A Proposal for Nose-to-Brain Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Rinaldi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study is to prepare and characterize drug free and pentamidine loaded chitosan glutamate coated niosomes for intranasal drug delivery to reach the brain through intranasal delivery. Mucoadhesive properties and stability testing in various environments were evaluated to examine the potential of these formulations to be effective drug delivery vehicles for intranasal delivery to the brain. Samples were prepared using thin film hydration method. Changes in size and ζ-potential of coated and uncoated niosomes with and without loading of pentamidine in various conditions were assessed by dynamic light scattering (DLS, while size and morphology were also studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM. Bilayer properties and mucoadhesive behavior were investigated by fluorescence studies and DLS analyses, respectively. Changes in vesicle size and ζ-potential values were shown after addition of chitosan glutamate to niosomes, and when in contact with mucin solution. In particular, interactions with mucin were observed in both drug free and pentamidine loaded niosomes regardless of the presence of the coating. The characteristics of the proposed systems, such as pentamidine entrapment and mucin interaction, show promising results to deliver pentamidine or other possible drugs to the brain via nasal administration.

  17. Modulation of brain glutamate dehydrogenase as a tool for controlling seizures

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    Rasgado Lourdes A. Vega

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate (Glu is a major excitatory neurotransmitter involved in epilepsy. Glu is synthesized by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, E.C. 1.4.1.3 and dysfunction of the enzymatic activity of GDH is associated with brain pathologies. The main goal of this work is to establish the role of GDH in the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs such as valproate (VALP, diazepam (DIAZ and diphenylhydantoin (DPH and its repercussions on oxygen consumption. Oxidative deamination of Glu and reductive amination of aketoglutarate (αK in mice brain were investigated. Our results show that AEDs decrease GDH activity and oxygen consumption in vitro. In ex vivo experiments, AEDs increased GDH activity but decreased oxygen consumption during Glu oxidative deamination. VALP and DPH reversed the increase in reductive amination of αK caused by the chemoconvulsant pentylenetetrazol. These results suggest that AEDs act by modulating brain GDH activity, which in turn decreased oxygen consumption. GDH represents an important regulation point of neuronal excitability, and modulation of its activity represents a potential target for metabolic treatment of epilepsy and for the development of new AEDs.

  18. Mice lacking glutamate carboxypeptidase II develop normally, but are less susceptible to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Xu, Siyi; Cui, Zhenwen; Zhang, Mingkun; Lin, Yingying; Cai, Lei; Wang, Zhugang; Luo, Xingguang; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Yong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao; Neale, Joseph H; Zhong, Chunlong

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase found mainly in the nervous system, prostate and small intestine. In the nervous system, glia-bound GCPII mediates the hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetylaspartate. Inhibition of GCPII has been shown to attenuate excitotoxicity associated with enhanced glutamate transmission under pathological conditions. However, different strains of mice lacking the GCPII gene are reported to exhibit striking phenotypic differences. In this study, a GCPII gene knockout (KO) strategy involved removing exons 3-5 of GCPII. This generated a new GCPII KO mice line with no overt differences in standard neurological behavior compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. However, GCPII KO mice were significantly less susceptible to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). GCPII gene KO significantly lessened neuronal degeneration and astrocyte damage in the CA2 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus 24 h after moderate TBI. In addition, GCPII gene KO reduced TBI-induced deficits in long-term spatial learning/memory tested in the Morris water maze and motor balance tested via beam walking. Knockout of the GCPII gene is not embryonic lethal and affords histopathological protection with improved long-term behavioral outcomes after TBI, a result that further validates GCPII as a target for drug development consistent with results from studies using GCPII peptidase inhibitors. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. The effect of nucleotides and adenosine on stimulus-evoked glutamate release from rat brain cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G C; Boarder, M R

    2000-10-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that P1 receptors for adenosine, and P2 receptors for nucleotides such as ATP, regulate stimulus-evoked release of biogenic amines from nerve terminals in the brain. Here we investigated whether adenosine and nucleotides exert presynaptic control over depolarisation-elicited glutamate release. Slices of rat brain cortex were perfused and stimulated with pulses of 46 mM K(+) in the presence of the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (0.2 mM). High K(+) substantially increased efflux of glutamate from the slices. Basal glutamate release was unchanged by the presence of nucleotides or adenosine at concentrations of 300 microM. Adenosine, ATP, ADP and adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphoshate) at 300 microM attenuated depolarisation-evoked release of glutamate. However UTP, 2-methylthio ATP, 2-methylthio ADP, and alpha,beta-methylene ATP at 300 microM had no effect on stimulated glutamate efflux. Adenosine deaminase blocked the effect of adenosine, but left the response to ATP unchanged. The A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine antagonised the inhibitory effect of both adenosine and ATP. Cibacron blue 3GA inhibited stimulus-evoked glutamate release when applied alone. When cibacron blue 3GA was present with ATP, stimulus-evoked glutamate release was almost eliminated. However, this P2 antagonist had no effect on the inhibition by adenosine. These results show that the release of glutamate from depolarised nerve terminals of the rat cerebral cortex is inhibited by adenosine and ATP. ATP appears to act directly and not through conversion to adenosine.

  20. The effect of nucleotides and adenosine on stimulus-evoked glutamate release from rat brain cortical slices

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Gillian C; Boarder, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that P1 receptors for adenosine, and P2 receptors for nucleotides such as ATP, regulate stimulus-evoked release of biogenic amines from nerve terminals in the brain. Here we investigated whether adenosine and nucleotides exert presynaptic control over depolarisation-elicited glutamate release.Slices of rat brain cortex were perfused and stimulated with pulses of 46 mM K+ in the presence of the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxyl...

  1. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  2. Brain glycogen and its role in supporting glutamate and GABA homeostasis in a type 2 diabetes rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    -(13)C]glucose was used to monitor metabolism. Brain levels of (13)C labeling in glucose, lactate, alanine, glutamate, GABA, glutamine and aspartate were determined. Our results show that inhibition of brain glycogen metabolism reduced the amounts of glutamate in both the control and type 2 diabetes......The number of people suffering from diabetes is hastily increasing and the condition is associated with altered brain glucose homeostasis. Brain glycogen is located in astrocytes and being a carbohydrate reservoir it contributes to glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, glycogen has been indicated...... to be important for proper neurotransmission under normal conditions. Previous findings from our laboratory suggested that glucose metabolism was reduced in type 2 diabetes, and thus we wanted to investigate more specifically how brain glycogen metabolism contributes to maintain energy status in the type 2...

  3. Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Ranu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases during aging in extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, may be linked to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the molecular responses of neurons to chronic, moderate increases in Glu levels. Genome-wide gene expression in brain hippocampus was examined in a unique transgenic (Tg mouse model that exhibits moderate Glu hyperactivity throughout the lifespan, the neuronal Glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1 mouse, and littermate 9 month-old wild type mice. Results Integrated bioinformatic analyses on transcriptomic data were used to identify bio-functions, pathways and gene networks underlying neuronal responses to increased Glu synaptic release. Bio-functions and pathways up-regulated in Tg mice were those associated with oxidative stress, cell injury, inflammation, nervous system development, neuronal growth, and synaptic transmission. Increased gene expression in these functions and pathways indicated apparent compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg mice as was the activated (phosphorylated form of the protein. In addition to genes related to neurite growth and synaptic development, those associated with neuronal vesicle trafficking in the Huntington's disease signalling pathway, were also up-regulated. Conclusions This is the first study attempting to define neuronal gene expression patterns in response to chronic, endogenous Glu hyperactivity at brain synapses. The patterns observed were characterized by a combination of responses to stress and stimulation of nerve growth, intracellular transport and recovery.

  4. Brain infection with Staphylococcus aureus leads to high extracellular levels of glutamate, aspartate, γ-aminobutyric acid, and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Dahlberg, Daniel; Mariussen, Espen; Goverud, Ingeborg Løstegaard; Antal, Ellen-Ann; Tønjum, Tone; Maehlen, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcal brain infections may cause mental deterioration and epileptic seizures, suggesting interference with normal neurotransmission in the brain. We injected Staphylococcus aureus into rat striatum and found an initial 76% reduction in the extracellular level of glutamate as detected by microdialysis at 2 hr after staphylococcal infection. At 8 hr after staphylococcal infection, however, the extracellular level of glutamate had increased 12-fold, and at 20 hr it had increased >30-fold. The extracellular level of aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) also increased greatly. Extracellular Zn(2+) , which was estimated at ∼2.6 µmol/liter in the control situation, was increased by 330% 1-2.5 hr after staphylococcal infection and by 100% at 8 and 20 hr. The increase in extracellular glutamate, aspartate, and GABA appeared to reflect the degree of tissue damage. The area of tissue damage greatly exceeded the area of staphylococcal infiltration, pointing to soluble factors being responsible for cell death. However, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 ameliorated neither tissue damage nor the increase in extracellular neuroactive amino acids, suggesting the presence of neurotoxic factors other than glutamate and aspartate. In vitro staphylococci incubated with glutamine and glucose formed glutamate, so bacteria could be an additional source of infection-related glutamate. We conclude that the dramatic increase in the extracellular concentration of neuroactive amino acids and zinc could interfere with neurotransmission in the surrounding brain tissue, contributing to mental deterioration and a predisposition to epileptic seizures, which are often seen in brain abscess patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training for Prevention of Ischemic Brain Injury via Regulation of Glutamate and Its Transporter GLT-1

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    Jingchun Guo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate.

  6. Biochemical evidence for glutamate as a transmitter in hippocampal efferents to the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaas, I; Fonnum, F

    1980-01-01

    The effects of bilateral transection of the fornix bundle on the high affinity uptake of glutamate and on the amino acid content in several nuclei of rat forebrain and hypothalamus were studied in order to investigate the possible role of glutamate as a transmitter of these fibres. This lesion decreased the high affinity uptake of L-glutamate by 60 to 70% in the mammillary body and lateral septum, and by 40 to 50% in the anterior diagonal band nucleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediobasal hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens. The content of endogenous glutamate in samples dissected from freeze-dried tissue also decreased significantly in these regions. Endogenous aspartate was slightly decreased in the anterior diagonal band nucleus and the mammillary body, but unchanged in the other regions. No significant changes were seen in the levels of serine, ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid, glutamine and taurine, except for an increase in glutamine and taurine in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The high affinity uptake of ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid, tested in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediobasal hypothalamus and the mammillary body, was unchanged after the lesion. The results indicate that allocortical efferents innervating subcortial nuclei through the fornix might use glutamate as a transmitter. The study further supports the concept that glutamate plays an important role as transmitter of several different corticofugal fibre systems in mammalian brain.

  7. Biochemical evidence for overlapping neocortical and allocortical glutamate projections to the nucleus accumbens and rostral caudatoputamen in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaas, I

    1981-01-01

    The high affinity uptake of L-glutamate has been used to investigate the origin and distribution of putative glutamate fibers in restricted parts of the rostral caudatoputamen and the nucleus accumbens of the rat brain. Ablation of the frontal cortex reduced the glutamate uptake heavily (-77%) in the dorsal part of the ipsilateral caudatoputamen, but also led to significant decreases in the ventral parts of the ipsilateral caudatoputamen (-62% and -53%) in the ipsilateral nucleus accumbens (-25% and -18%) and in the contralateral dorsal part of the caudatoputamen (-21%). Lesion of the caudal neocortex reduced the glutamate uptake in the dorsal part of the ipsilateral caudatoputamen only (-23%). Lesions of the fimbria/fornix reduced the glutamate uptake in both parts of the ipsilateral nucleus accumbens (-46% and -34%) and by approximately 20% in the whole dorsoventral extent of the anterior caudatoputamen. The results indicate that the frontal neocortex distributes fibers which may use glutamate as neurotransmitter both to the whole ipsilateral caudatoputamen and to the nucleus accumbens, and also to the dorsal parts of the contralateral caudatoputamen. The caudal neocortex probably sends such fibers to the dorsal ipsilateral caudatoputamen and the caudal allocortex sends such fibers through the fimbria/fornix to the nucleus accumbens and the ventral part of the ipsilateral caudatoputamen. The results thus corroborate previous suggestions of close similarities between the nucleus accumbens and the ventral caudatoputamen.

  8. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klin, Yael; Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Blood glutamate has a half-life time of 2-3 min. → Blood glutamate is submitted to rapid decarboxylation. → Blood glutamate and its metabolites are mainly absorbed in skeletal muscle and liver. → The skeletal muscle and liver are now targets for potential drugs affording brain neuroprotection. -- Abstract: Excess L-glutamate (glutamate) levels in brain interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids (ISF and CSF, respectively) are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As in previous studies, we have established the role of blood glutamate levels in brain neuroprotection, we have now investigated the contribution of the peripheral organs to the homeostasis of glutamate in blood. We have administered naive rats with intravenous injections of either L-[1- 14 C] Glutamic acid (L-[1- 14 C] Glu), L-[G- 3 H] Glutamic acid (L-[G- 3 H] Glu) or D-[2,3- 3 H] Aspartic acid (D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp), a non-metabolized analog of glutamate, and have followed their distribution into peripheral organs. We have observed that the decay of the radioactivity associated with L-[1- 14 C] Glu and L-[G- 3 H] Glu was faster than that associated with glutamate non-metabolized analog, D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp. L-[1- 14 C] Glu was subjected in blood to a rapid decarboxylation with the loss of 14 CO 2 . The three major sequestrating organs, serving as depots for the eliminated glutamate and/or its metabolites were skeletal muscle, liver and gut, contributing together 92% or 87% of total L-[U- 14 C] Glu or D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp radioactivity capture. L-[U- 14 C] Glu and D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp showed a different organ sequestration pattern. We conclude that glutamate is rapidly eliminated from the blood into peripheral tissues, mainly in non-metabolized form. The liver plays a central role in glutamate metabolism

  9. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klin, Yael [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram [The Division of Anesthesiology, Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Teichberg, Vivian I., E-mail: Vivian.teichberg@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Blood glutamate has a half-life time of 2-3 min. {yields} Blood glutamate is submitted to rapid decarboxylation. {yields} Blood glutamate and its metabolites are mainly absorbed in skeletal muscle and liver. {yields} The skeletal muscle and liver are now targets for potential drugs affording brain neuroprotection. -- Abstract: Excess L-glutamate (glutamate) levels in brain interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids (ISF and CSF, respectively) are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As in previous studies, we have established the role of blood glutamate levels in brain neuroprotection, we have now investigated the contribution of the peripheral organs to the homeostasis of glutamate in blood. We have administered naive rats with intravenous injections of either L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glutamic acid (L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu), L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glutamic acid (L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu) or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Aspartic acid (D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp), a non-metabolized analog of glutamate, and have followed their distribution into peripheral organs. We have observed that the decay of the radioactivity associated with L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu and L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu was faster than that associated with glutamate non-metabolized analog, D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp. L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu was subjected in blood to a rapid decarboxylation with the loss of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The three major sequestrating organs, serving as depots for the eliminated glutamate and/or its metabolites were skeletal muscle, liver and gut, contributing together 92% or 87% of total L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp radioactivity capture. L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu and D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp showed a different organ sequestration pattern. We conclude that glutamate is rapidly eliminated from the blood into peripheral tissues

  10. Agmatine reduces extracellular glutamate during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rat brain: A potential mechanism for the anticonvulsive effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yangzheng; LeBlanc, Michael H.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the initiation and spread of seizure activity. Agmatine, an endogenous neuromodulator, is an antagonist of NMDA receptors and has anticonvulsive effects. Whether agmatine regulate glutamate release, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, is not known. In this study, we used pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure model to determine the effect of agmatine on extracellular glutamate in rat brain. We also determined the time course and the amount of agmatine that reached brain after peripheral injection. After i.p. injection of agmatine (50 mg/kg), increase of agmatine in rat cortex and hippocampus was observed in 15 min with levels returning to baseline in one hour. Rats, naïve and implanted with microdialysis cannula into the cortex, were administered PTZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) with prior injection of agmatine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Seizure grades were recorded and microdialysis samples were collected every 15 min for 75 min. Agmatine pre-treatment significantly reduced the seizure grade and increased the onset time. The levels of extracellular glutamate in frontal cortex rose two- to three-fold after PTZ injection and agmatine significantly inhibited this increase. In conclusion, the present data suggest that the anticonvulsant activity of agmatine, in part, could be related to the inhibition glutamate release. PMID:16125317

  11. Glutamic Acid as Enhancer of Protein Synthesis Kinetics in Hepatocytes from Old Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, V Y; Malchenko, L A; Butorina, N N; Lazarev Konchenko, D S; Zvezdina, N D; Dubovaya, T K

    2017-08-01

    Dense cultures of hepatocytes from old rats (~2 years old, body weight 530-610 g) are different from similar cultures of hepatocytes from young rats by the low amplitude of protein synthesis rhythm. Addition of glutamic acid (0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 mg/ml) into the culture medium with hepatocytes of old rats resulted in increase in the oscillation amplitudes of the protein synthesis rhythm to the level of young rats. A similar action of glutamic acid on the protein synthesis kinetics was observed in vivo after feeding old rats with glutamic acid. Inhibition of metabotropic receptors of glutamic acid with α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (0.01 mg/ml) abolished the effect of glutamic acid. The amplitude of oscillation of the protein synthesis rhythm in a cell population characterizes synchronization of individual oscillations caused by direct cell-cell communications. Hence, glutamic acid, acting as a receptor-dependent transmitter, enhanced direct cell-cell communications of hepatocytes that were decreased with aging. As differentiated from other known membrane signaling factors (gangliosides, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine), glutamic acid can penetrate into the brain and thus influence the communications and protein synthesis kinetics that are disturbed with aging not only in hepatocytes, but also in neurons.

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 splice variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b combine in mGluR1a/b dimers in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Techlovská, Šárka; Chambers, Jayne Nicole; Dvořáková, Michaela; Petralia, R.S.; Wang, Y.X.; Hájková, Alena; Franková, Daniela; Prezeau, L.; Blahoš, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, November (2014), s. 329-326 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/2408 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Glutamate receptors * GPCR * alternative splicing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.106, year: 2014

  13. Characterization of the L-glutamate clearance pathways across the blood-brain barrier and the effect of astrocytes in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans CC; Aldana, Blanca I; Groth, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to characterize the clearance pathways for L-glutamate from the brain interstitial fluid across the blood-brain barrier using a primary in vitro bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte co-culture. Transporter profiling was performed using uptake studies of radiolabeled L-glutamate with co...... brain to blood via the concerted action of abluminal and luminal transport proteins, but the total brain clearance is highly dependent on metabolism in astrocytes and endothelial cells followed by transport of metabolites....

  14. Blood Glutamate Scavenging: Insight into Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zlotnik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain’s extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from brain interstitial fluids by making use of the naturally occurring brain-to-blood glutamate efflux has been shown to be effective in various animal studies. This is facilitated by gradient driven transport across brain capillary endothelial glutamate transporters. Blood glutamate scavengers enhance this naturally occurring mechanism by reducing the blood glutamate concentration, thus increasing the rate at which excess glutamate is cleared. Blood glutamate scavenging is achieved by several mechanisms including: catalyzation of the enzymatic process involved in glutamate metabolism, redistribution of glutamate into tissue, and acute stress response. Regardless of the mechanism involved, decreased blood glutamate concentration is associated with improved neurological outcome. This review focuses on the physiological, mechanistic and clinical roles of blood glutamate scavenging, particularly in the context of acute and chronic CNS injury. We discuss the details of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux, auto-regulation mechanisms of blood glutamate, natural and exogenous blood glutamate scavenging systems, and redistribution of glutamate. We then propose different applied methodologies to reduce blood and brain glutamate concentrations and discuss the neuroprotective role of blood glutamate scavenging.

  15. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the Central Nervous System (CNS), and it is crucially needed for numerous key neuronal functions. Yet, excess glutamate causes massive neuronal death and brain damage by excitotoxicity--detrimental over activation of glutamate receptors. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is the main pathological process taking place in many types of acute and chronic CNS diseases and injuries. In recent years, it became clear that not only excess glutamate can cause massive brain damage, but that several types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies, that are present in the serum and CSF of subpopulations of patients with a kaleidoscope of human neurological diseases, can undoubtedly do so too, by inducing several very potent pathological effects in the CNS. Collectively, the family of anti-glutamate receptor autoimmune antibodies seem to be the most widespread, potent, dangerous and interesting anti-brain autoimmune antibodies discovered up to now. This impression stems from taking together the presence of various types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies in a kaleidoscope of human neurological and autoimmune diseases, their high levels in the CNS due to intrathecal production, their multiple pathological effects in the brain, and the unique and diverse mechanisms of action by which they can affect glutamate receptors, signaling and effects, and subsequently impair neuronal signaling and induce brain damage. The two main families of autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies that were already found in patients with neurological and/or autoimmune diseases, and that were already shown to be detrimental to the CNS, include the antibodies directed against ionotorpic glutamate receptors: the anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies and anti-NMDA-NR2 antibodies, and the antibodies directed against Metabotropic glutamate receptors: the anti-mGluR1 antibodies and the anti-mGluR5 antibodies. Each type of these anti-glutamate

  16. Combined glutamate and glutamine levels in pain-processing brain regions are associated with individual pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Schweizer, Lauren M; Witte, Vanessa; Harris, Richard E; Bingel, Ulrike; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the living human brain and pain sensitivity is unknown. Combined glutamine/glutamate (Glx), as well as GABA levels can be measured in vivo with single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed at determining whether Glx and/or GABA levels in pain-related brain regions are associated with individual differences in pain sensitivity. Experimental heat, cold, and mechanical pain thresholds were obtained from 39 healthy, drug-free individuals (25 men) according to the quantitative sensory testing protocol and summarized into 1 composite measure of pain sensitivity. The Glx levels were measured using point-resolved spectroscopy at 3 T, within a network of pain-associated brain regions comprising the insula, the anterior cingulate cortex, the mid-cingulate cortex, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and the thalamus. GABA levels were measured using GABA-edited spectroscopy (Mescher-Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy) within the insula, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the mid-cingulate cortex. Glx and/or GABA levels correlated positively across all brain regions. Gender, weekly alcohol consumption, and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with Glx and/or GABA levels. A linear regression analysis including all these factors indicated that Glx levels pooled across pain-related brain regions were positively associated with pain sensitivity, whereas no appreciable relationship with GABA was found. In sum, we show that the levels of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and its precursor glutamine across pain-related brain regions are positively correlated with individual pain sensitivity. Future studies will have to determine whether our findings also apply to clinical populations.

  17. [Effect of a new derivative of glutamic and apovincaminic acids on brain metabolism in post-ischemic period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L M; Prikhod'ko, M A; Pogorelyĭ, V E; Skachilova, S Ia; Mirzoian, R S

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprotective properties of the new derivative of glutamic and apovincaminic acids, ethyl -(3-alpha,16-alpha)-eburnamenin-14-carbopxylate of 2-aminopentadionic acid (LHT 1-02) were studied on a model of acute brain ischemia in cats. LHT 1-02 has proved to be more effective than the reference drugs vinpocetin and glycine in preventing the reperfusive damage, which was manifested by decreased postischemic hyperglycemia, activated utilization of oxygen in the brain, and suppressed postischemic metabolic lactate acidosis. Thus, the results of this comparative study show expediency of further investigations of LHT 1 - 02 as a potential neuroprotective drug.

  18. Physiological Fluctuations in Brain Temperature as a Factor Affecting Electrochemical Evaluations of Extracellular Glutamate and Glucose in Behavioral Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The rate of any chemical reaction or process occurring in the brain depends on temperature. While it is commonly believed that brain temperature is a stable, tightly regulated homeostatic parameter, it fluctuates within 1–4 °C following exposure to salient arousing stimuli and neuroactive drugs, and during different behaviors. These temperature fluctuations should affect neural activity and neural functions, but the extent of this influence on neurochemical measurements in brain tissue of freely moving animals remains unclear. In this Review, we present the results of amperometric evaluations of extracellular glutamate and glucose in awake, behaving rats and discuss how naturally occurring fluctuations in brain temperature affect these measurements. While this temperature contribution appears to be insignificant for glucose because its extracellular concentrations are large, it is a serious factor for electrochemical evaluations of glutamate, which is present in brain tissue at much lower levels, showing smaller phasic fluctuations. We further discuss experimental strategies for controlling the nonspecific chemical and physical contributions to electrochemical currents detected by enzyme-based biosensors to provide greater selectivity and reliability of neurochemical measurements in behaving animals. PMID:23448428

  19. The effect of chronic ethanol on glutamate binding in human and rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.T.; Sack, M.; von Hungen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic techniques demonstrate that chronic alcohol administration causes a decrease in [ 3 H]-glutamate binding to hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. A 14% decrease in [ 3 H]-glutamate binding in the hippocampal CA 1 region is seen both in the rat after five days of ethanol administration and in postmortem hippocampal tissues from alcoholics. In the rat, 24 hr ethanol withdrawal values are intermediate between control and alcohol binding levels. There was no significant effect of ethanol on [ 3 H]-glutamate binding in the cortex or caudate

  20. Glutamate-glutamine and GABA in brain of normal aged and patients with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dandan; Liu, Dan; Yin, Jianzhong; Qian, Tianyi; Shrestha, Susan; Ni, Hongyan

    2017-07-01

    To explore the changes of glutamate-glutamine (Glx) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain in normal old age and cognitive impairment using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Seventeen normal young controls (NYC), 15 normal elderly controls (NEC), 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 17 with Alzheimer disease (AD) patients were included in this study. Glx and GABA+ levels in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and right hippocampus (rHP) were measured by using a MEGA-PRESS sequence. Glx/Cr and GABA+/Cr ratios were compared between NYC and NEC and between the three elderly groups using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA); the tissue fractions of voxels were used as covariates. The relationships between metabolite ratios and cognitive performance were analysed using Spearman correlation coefficients. For NEC and NYC groups, Glx/Cr and GABA+/Cr ratios were lower in NEC in ACC and rHP. For the three elderly groups, Glx/Cr ratio was lower in AD in ACC compared to NEC and MCI; Glx/Cr ratio was lower in AD in rHP compared to NEC. There was no significant decrease for GABA+/Cr ratio. Glx and GABA levels may decrease simultaneously in normal aged, and Glx level decreased predominantly in AD, and it is helpful in the early diagnosis of AD. • Glx and GABA levels may decrease simultaneously in normal aged. • Glx level may decrease predominantly in Alzheimer disease. • The balance in excitatory-inhibitory systems may be broken in AD. • Decreased Glx level may be helpful in early diagnosis of AD.

  1. Preclinical Models of Traumatic Brain Injury: Emerging Role of Glutamate in the Pathophysiology of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darik A. O’Neil

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 10 million people worldwide incur a traumatic brain injury (TBI each year, with two million cases occurring in the United States. TBI survivors exhibit long-lasting cognitive and affective sequelae that are associated with reduced quality of life and work productivity, as well as mental and emotional disturbances. While TBI-related disabilities often manifest physically and conspicuously, TBI has been linked with a “silent epidemic” of psychological disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD. The prevalence of MDD post-insult is approximately 50% within the 1st year. Furthermore, given they are often under-reported when mild, TBIs could be a significant overall cause of MDD in the United States. The emergence of MDD post-TBI may be rooted in widespread disturbances in the modulatory role of glutamate, such that glutamatergic signaling becomes excessive and deleterious to neuronal integrity, as reported in both clinical and preclinical studies. Following this acute glutamatergic storm, regulators of glutamatergic function undergo various manipulations, which include, but are not limited to, alterations in glutamatergic subunit composition, release, and reuptake. This review will characterize the glutamatergic functional and signaling changes that emerge and persist following experimental TBI, utilizing evidence from clinical, molecular, and rodent behavioral investigations. Special care will be taken to speculate on how these manipulations may correlate with the development of MDD following injury in the clinic, as well as pharmacotherapies to date. Indisputably, TBI is a significant healthcare issue that warrants discovery and subsequent refinement of therapeutic strategies to improve neurobehavioral recovery and mental health.

  2. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) mediates L-glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release via swelling-activated anion channels in cultured neonatal rodent astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Lawen, Alfons

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory roles in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are crucially involved in brain ascorbate homeostasis and may assist in regenerating extracellular ascorbate from its oxidised forms. Ascorbate accumulated by astrocytes can be released rapidly by a process that is stimulated by the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate. This process is thought to be neuroprotective against excitotoxicity. Although of potential clinical interest, the mechanism of this stimulated ascorbate-release remains unknown. Here, we report that primary cultures of mouse and rat astrocytes release ascorbate following initial uptake of dehydroascorbate and accumulation of intracellular ascorbate. Ascorbate-release was not due to cellular lysis, as assessed by cellular release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, and was stimulated by L-glutamate and L-aspartate, but not the non-excitatory amino acid L-glutamine. This stimulation was due to glutamate-induced cellular swelling, as it was both attenuated by hypertonic and emulated by hypotonic media. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was also sensitive to inhibitors of volume-sensitive anion channels, suggesting that the latter may provide the conduit for ascorbate efflux. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was not recapitulated by selective agonists of either ionotropic or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, but was completely blocked by either of two compounds, TFB-TBOA and UCPH-101, which non-selectively and selectively inhibit the glial Na(+)-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter, GLAST, respectively. These results suggest that an impairment of astrocytic ascorbate-release may exacerbate neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and acute brain injury in which excitotoxicity and/or GLAST deregulation have been implicated.

  3. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation...

  4. Cerebral ischemic injury decreases α-synuclein expression in brain tissue and glutamate-exposed HT22 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2017-09-01

    α-Synuclein is abundantly expressed in neuronal tissue, plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, and exerts a neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress. Cerebral ischemia causes severe neurological disorders and neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we examined α-synuclein expression in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemic injury and neuronal cells damaged by glutamate treatment. MCAO surgical operation was performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats, and brain samples were isolated 24 hours after MCAO. We confirmed neurological behavior deficit, infarction area, and histopathological changes following MCAO injury. A proteomic approach and Western blot analysis demonstrated a decrease in α-synuclein in the cerebral cortices after MCAO injury. Moreover, glutamate treatment induced neuronal cell death and decreased α-synuclein expression in a hippocampal-derived cell line in a dose-dependent manner. It is known that α-synuclein regulates neuronal survival, and low levels of α-synuclein expression result in cytotoxicity. Thus, these results suggest that cerebral ischemic injury leads to a reduction in α-synuclein and consequently causes serious brain damage.

  5. Effect of Low Level Laser Irradiation at Wavelengths 488 and 515 nm on Glutamate Neurotransmitter in Mitochondria of Visual Brain Cortex in Albino Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, M.F.; El-Ahdal, M.A.; El-Kady, M.H.; Yousri, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of glutamate in the visual cortex and mitochondria could be used as a measure for the argon laser effect having wavelengths 488 and 515 nm, on the mitochondria. A comparative response for the bound and free glutamate was found. Irradiation with different energies 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 J for both wavelengths were accomplished. This study makes us to recommend the advantage of using argon laser having wavelength 515 nm to enhance the blocking of glutamate and hence the reduction of brain toxicity. Most of the energy required for cellular functions comes from mitochondria (Shepherd, 1994). Glutamate, which is present in central nervous system at very high level is essential for brain intermediary metabolism (Frazer et al., 1994; Meldrum et al., 2000 and Blumcke et al., 2000). Glutamate is enriched in synaptic vesicles, the subcellular organelles, which are associated with the storage and release of neurotransmitters. Also, biochemical evidence for glutamate as neurotransmitter in fibers from the visual cortex to the subcortical visual relay nuclei has been indicated (Fose and Fonnum, 1987 and George, 1998)

  6. Regional alterations of brain biogenic amines and GABA/glutamate levels in rats following chronic lead exposure during neonatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shailesh Kumar, M V; Desiraju, T [National Inst. of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Neurophysiology

    1990-06-01

    Wistar rat pups were administered either a high dose of lead acetate (400 {mu}g lead-g body weight/day) or a low dose (100 {mu}g lead/g body weight/day) by gastric intubation, from 2 days through 60 days of age. The rats on both these doses exhibited statistically significant decreases in body and brain weights throughout the lead treatment period. A group of rats on high dose was also rehabilitated by discontinuing the lead from 60 days of age. In these rats, at 160 days of age, the body weight but not the brain weight recovered to normal levels. During the lead intake, the rats on high dose revealed significant elevations in the levels of noradrenaline (NA) in the hippocampus (HI), cerebellum (CE), hypothalamus (HY), brainstem (BS), and accumbens-striatum (SA). The elevated levels in all the above regions except in the HY persisted even after rehabilitation. The dopamine (DA) levels changed significantly in opposite directions in HY (elevation) and BS (reduction) during the lead treatment, and the HY recovered after rehabilitation. Under lead, the serotonin (5HT) levels were elevated significantly in the HI, BS and MC (motor cortex), while after rehabilitation the abnormality persisted only in the MC. Low dose lead treatment was also effective on the same areas of brain. In the low dose group, estimation of the levels of GABA and glutamate were also done, and a significant decrease of GABA in CE and glutamate in MC was observed. The differences observed in the neurotoxic effects (none or significant) of lead in the different regions for each of the transmitters (NA, DA, 5HT) supports the interesting conclusion that the vulnerability of the axon terminals of any given type is dependent on some regional factors, although the projections of the different regions originate from an apparently similar category of neurons in the brain stem. (orig.).

  7. Brain mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction and glutamate level reduction in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeland, Olav B; Hadera, Mussie G; McDonald, Tanya S; Sonnewald, Ursula; Borges, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Although certain metabolic characteristics such as interictal glucose hypometabolism are well established for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), its pathogenesis still remains unclear. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of brain metabolism in a mouse model of TLE, induced by pilocarpine–status epilepticus (SE). To investigate glucose metabolism, we injected mice 3.5–4 weeks after SE with [1,2-13C]glucose before microwave fixation of the head. Using 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography—mass spectrometry and high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantified metabolites and 13C labeling in extracts of cortex and hippocampal formation (HF). Hippocampal levels of glutamate, glutathione and alanine were decreased in pilocarpine–SE mice compared with controls. Moreover, the contents of N-acetyl aspartate, succinate and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) NAD(P)H were decreased in HF indicating impairment of mitochondrial function. In addition, the reduction in 13C enrichment of hippocampal citrate and malate suggests decreased tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle turnover in this region. In cortex, we found reduced 13C labeling of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate via the pyruvate carboxylation and pyruvate dehydrogenation pathways, suggesting slower turnover of these amino acids and/or the TCA cycle. In conclusion, mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction and altered amino-acid metabolism is found in both cortex and HF in this epilepsy model. PMID:23611869

  8. Energy metabolism and glutamate-glutamine cycle in the brain: a stoichiometric modeling perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massucci, Francesco A; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Castillo, Isaac Perez; Marinari, Enzo; De Martino, Andrea

    2013-10-10

    The energetics of cerebral activity critically relies on the functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. Important open questions include the relation between neuronal versus astrocytic energy demand, glucose uptake and intercellular lactate transfer, as well as their dependence on the level of activity. We have developed a large-scale, constraint-based network model of the metabolic partnership between astrocytes and glutamatergic neurons that allows for a quantitative appraisal of the extent to which stoichiometry alone drives the energetics of the system. We find that the velocity of the glutamate-glutamine cycle (Vcyc) explains part of the uncoupling between glucose and oxygen utilization at increasing Vcyc levels. Thus, we are able to characterize different activation states in terms of the tissue oxygen-glucose index (OGI). Calculations show that glucose is taken up and metabolized according to cellular energy requirements, and that partitioning of the sugar between different cell types is not significantly affected by Vcyc. Furthermore, both the direction and magnitude of the lactate shuttle between neurons and astrocytes turn out to depend on the relative cell glucose uptake while being roughly independent of Vcyc. These findings suggest that, in absence of ad hoc activity-related constraints on neuronal and astrocytic metabolism, the glutamate-glutamine cycle does not control the relative energy demand of neurons and astrocytes, and hence their glucose uptake and lactate exchange.

  9. Energy metabolism and glutamate-glutamine cycle in the brain: a stoichiometric modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The energetics of cerebral activity critically relies on the functional and metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes. Important open questions include the relation between neuronal versus astrocytic energy demand, glucose uptake and intercellular lactate transfer, as well as their dependence on the level of activity. Results We have developed a large-scale, constraint-based network model of the metabolic partnership between astrocytes and glutamatergic neurons that allows for a quantitative appraisal of the extent to which stoichiometry alone drives the energetics of the system. We find that the velocity of the glutamate-glutamine cycle (Vcyc) explains part of the uncoupling between glucose and oxygen utilization at increasing Vcyc levels. Thus, we are able to characterize different activation states in terms of the tissue oxygen-glucose index (OGI). Calculations show that glucose is taken up and metabolized according to cellular energy requirements, and that partitioning of the sugar between different cell types is not significantly affected by Vcyc. Furthermore, both the direction and magnitude of the lactate shuttle between neurons and astrocytes turn out to depend on the relative cell glucose uptake while being roughly independent of Vcyc. Conclusions These findings suggest that, in absence of ad hoc activity-related constraints on neuronal and astrocytic metabolism, the glutamate-glutamine cycle does not control the relative energy demand of neurons and astrocytes, and hence their glucose uptake and lactate exchange. PMID:24112710

  10. In SilicoModel-driven Assessment of the Effects of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency on Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: Implications for Understanding Schizophrenia Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rimjhim; Kalmady, Sunil Vasu; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2017-05-31

    Deficient brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the important mechanisms underlying the neuroplasticity abnormalities in schizophrenia. Aberration in BDNF signaling pathways directly or circuitously influences neurotransmitters like glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). For the first time, this study attempts to construct and simulate the BDNF-neurotransmitter network in order to assess the effects of BDNF deficiency on glutamate and GABA. Using CellDesigner, we modeled BDNF interactions with calcium influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)- Calmodulin activation; synthesis of GABA via cell cycle regulators protein kinase B, glycogen synthase kinase and β-catenin; transportation of glutamate and GABA. Steady state stability, perturbation time-course simulation and sensitivity analysis were performed in COPASI after assigning the kinetic functions, optimizing the unknown parameters using random search and genetic algorithm. Study observations suggest that increased glutamate in hippocampus, similar to that seen in schizophrenia, could potentially be contributed by indirect pathway originated from BDNF. Deficient BDNF could suppress Glutamate decarboxylase 67-mediated GABA synthesis. Further, deficient BDNF corresponded to impaired transport via vesicular glutamate transporter, thereby further increasing the intracellular glutamate in GABAergic and glutamatergic cells. BDNF also altered calcium dependent neuroplasticity via NMDAR modulation. Sensitivity analysis showed that Calmodulin, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB regulated transcription coactivator-1 played significant role in this network. The study presents in silico quantitative model of biochemical network constituting the key signaling molecules implicated in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It provides mechanistic insights into putative contribution of deficient BNDF towards alterations in neurotransmitters and neuroplasticity that are consistent with current

  11. Changes in medium radioactivity and composition accompany high-affinity uptake of glutamate and aspartate by mouse brain slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latzkovits, L.; Neidle, A.; Lajtha, A.

    1984-01-01

    In measurements of high affinity transport in tissue slices, the incubation medium is often treated as an ''infinitely large pool''. External substrate concentrations, even at the micromolar level, are assumed to be constant and metabolic interactions between tissue and medium are neglected. In the present report we describe experiments in which glutamic and aspartic acid uptake by mouse brain slices were studied using techniques that could test these assumptions. Cerebral hemispheres were cut into 0.1 mm sections and about 90 mg of tissue incubated in 10 ml of oxygenated medium. After 45 minutes of equilibration, radioactive substrates were added and the concentrations and specific activities of the amino acids and their metabolites in the medium were determined. During the first 10 min following substrate addition, rapid decreases in glutamic and aspartic acid concentrations in the medium were accompanied by large decreases in specific activity caused by the continuous release of these amino acids from the tissue. In addition, extensive conversion of both substrates to glutamine and the preferential accumulation of this metabolite, in the medium, was found. These results demonstrate that metabolism and release occur simultaneously with uptake during transport experiments in vitro and that these processes can take place in specific tissue compartments. It is therefore necessary to measure the tissue and medium concentration levels of amino acids along with their radioactivity in such experiments, since all three processes (transport, metabolism, and compartmentation) are interrelated in the clearance of amino acids from the incubation medium and probably from the extracellular spaces in vivo as well

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and sup 13 C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portais, J.C.; Pianet, I.; Merle, M.; Raffard, G.; Biran, M.; Labouesse, J.; Canioni, P. (Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 (FR)); Allard, M.; Kien, P.; Caille, J.M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 33 Bordeaux (FR))

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR (1-{sup 13}C) glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3}. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the controlateral unaffected side.

  13. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    The brain is reportedly sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) toxicity via oxidative stress. Sida acuta leaf ethanolic .... wherein the right hemisphere, was preserved for histology and fixed in 10% ... Biochemical Assays: The left hemisphere of the brain samples was ...... development in male and female rats. Exp Physiol.

  14. Synthesis of novel N1-substituted bicyclic pyrazole amino acids and evaluation of their interaction with glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; Grazioso, Giovanni; di Ventimiglia, Samuele Joppolo

    2005-01-01

    N1-substituted bicyclic pyrazole amino acids (S)-9a-9c and (R)-9a-9c, which are conformationally constrained analogues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested for activity at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors...

  15. Glutamate oxidation in astrocytes: Roles of glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Mary C; Stridh, Malin H; McNair, Laura Frendrup

    2016-01-01

    to the presynaptic neurons as the nonexcitatory amino acid glutamine. The cycle was initially thought to function with a 1:1 ratio between glutamate released and glutamine taken up by neurons. However, studies of glutamate metabolism in astrocytes have shown that a considerable proportion of glutamate undergoes...... the enzymes that mediate this conversion. Methods include pharmacological tools such as the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid, studies using GDH knockout mice, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GDH in astrocytes. Studies in brain slices incubated with [15N]glutamate demonstrated activity of GDH......The cellular distribution of transporters and enzymes related to glutamate metabolism led to the concept of the glutamate–glutamine cycle. Glutamate is released as a neurotransmitter and taken up primarily by astrocytes ensheathing the synapses. The glutamate carbon skeleton is transferred back...

  16. Glutamate plasticity woven through the progression to alcohol use disorder: a multi-circuit perspective [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Hwa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate signaling in the brain is one of the most studied targets in the alcohol research field. Here, we report the current understanding of how the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, its receptors, and its transporters are involved in low, episodic, and heavy alcohol use. Specific animal behavior protocols can be used to assess these different drinking levels, including two-bottle choice, operant self-administration, drinking in the dark, the alcohol deprivation effect, intermittent access to alcohol, and chronic intermittent ethanol vapor inhalation. Importantly, these methods are not limited to a specific category, since they can be interchanged to assess different states in the development from low to heavy drinking. We encourage a circuit-based perspective beyond the classic mesolimbic-centric view, as multiple structures are dynamically engaged during the transition from positive- to negative-related reinforcement to drive alcohol drinking. During this shift from lower-level alcohol drinking to heavy alcohol use, there appears to be a shift from metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent behaviors to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-related processes. Despite high efficacy of the glutamate-related pharmaceutical acamprosate in animal models of drinking, it is ineffective as treatment in the clinic. Therefore, research needs to focus on other promising glutamatergic compounds to reduce heavy drinking or mediate withdrawal symptoms or both.

  17. Changes in glutamate concentration, glucose metabolism, and cerebral blood flow during focal brain cooling of the epileptogenic cortex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujii, Masami; Inoue, Takao; He, Yeting; Maruta, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Suehiro, Eiichi; Imoto, Hirochika; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Oka, Fumiaki; Matsumoto, Mishiya; Owada, Yuji; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2014-05-01

    Recently, focal brain cooling (FBC) was proposed as a method for treating refractory epilepsy. However, the precise influence of cooling on the molecular basis of epilepsy has not been elucidated. Thus the aim of this study was to assess the effect of FBC on glutamate (Glu) concentration, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and glucose metabolism in patients with intractable epilepsy. Nine patients underwent FBC at 15°C for 30 min prior to cortical resection (n = 6) or hippocampectomy (n = 3). Measurement of metabolites and CBF, as well as electrocorticography (ECoG), was performed. Epileptic discharge (ED), as observed by ECoG, disappeared in the cooling period and reappeared in the rewarming period. Glu concentrations were high during the precooling period and were reduced to 51.2% during the cooling period (p = 0.025). Glycerol levels showed a similar decrease (p = 0.028). Lactate concentration was high during the precooling period and was reduced during the cooling period (21.3% decrease; p = 0.005). Glucose and pyruvate levels were maintained throughout the procedure. Changes in CBF were parallel to those observed by ECoG. FBC reduced EDs and concentrations of Glu and glycerol. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of FBC. Our findings confirm that FBC is a reasonable and optimal treatment option for patients with intractable epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Changes in Glutamate/NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 Expression in Rat Brain after Acute and Subacute Exposure to Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walailuk Kerdsan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a psychostimulant drug of abuse that produces long-term behavioral changes including behavioral sensitization, tolerance, and dependence. METH has been reported to induce neurotoxic effects in several areas of the brain via the dopaminergic system. Changes of dopamine function can induce malfunction of the glutamatergic system. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of METH administration on the expression of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1 in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampal formation after acute and subacute exposure to METH by western blotting. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of 8 mg/kg METH, 4 mg/kg/day METH for 14 days and saline in acute, subacute, and control groups, respectively. A significant increase in NMDAR1 immunoreactive protein was found in frontal cortex in the subacute group (P=.036 but not in the acute group (P=.580. Moreover, a significant increase in NMDAR1 was also observed in striatum in both acute (P=.025 and subacute groups (P=.023. However, no significant differences in NMDAR1 in hippocampal formation were observed in either acute or subacute group. The results suggest that an upregulation of NMDA receptor expression may be a consequence of glutamatergic dysfunction induced by METH.

  19. Brain GABA and Glutamate Concentrations Following Chronic Gabapentin Administration: A Convenience Sample Studied During Early Abstinence From Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter J. Meyerhoff

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin (GBP, a GABA analog that may also affect glutamate (Glu production, can normalize GABA and Glu tone during early abstinence from alcohol, effectively treating withdrawal symptoms and facilitating recovery. Using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we tested the degree to which daily GBP alters regional brain GABA and Glu levels in short-term abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals. Regional metabolite levels were compared between 13 recently abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals who had received daily GBP for at least 1 week (GBP+ and 25 matched alcohol-dependent individuals who had not received GBP (GBP−. Magnetic resonance spectra from up to five different brain regions were analyzed to yield absolute GABA and Glu concentrations. GABA and Glu concentrations in the parieto-occipital cortex were not different between GBP− and GBP+. Glu levels in anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and basal ganglia did not differ between GBP− and GBP+. However, in a subgroup of individuals matched on age, sex, and abstinence duration, GBP+ had markedly lower Glu in the frontal white matter (WM than GBP−, comparable to concentrations found in light/non-drinking controls. Furthermore, lower frontal WM Glu in GBP+ correlated with a higher daily GBP dose. Daily GBP treatment at an average of 1,600 mg/day for at least 1 week was not associated with altered cortical GABA and Glu concentrations during short-term abstinence from alcohol, but with lower Glu in frontal WM. GBP for the treatment of alcohol dependence may work through reducing Glu in WM rather than increasing cortical GABA.

  20. Curcumin Protects against Monosodium Glutamate Neurotoxicity and Decreasing NMDA2B and mGluR5 Expression in Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Khalil

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG is a flavor enhancer used in food industries. MSG is well documented to induce neurotoxicity. Curcumin (CUR reportedly possesses beneficial effects against various neurotoxic insults. Hence, this present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of curcumin on MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Methods: Thirty-two male Wister rats were divided into four groups (n=8: Control group, MSG group, CUR group and MSG + CUR group. CUR (Curcumin 150 mg/kg, orally was given day after day for four weeks along with MSG (4 mg/kg, orally. After 4 weeks, rats were sacrificed and brain hippocampus was isolated immediately on ice. Inflammatory marker TNFα and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity (marker for cholinergic function were estimated. Gene expressions of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NMDA2B along with glutamate concentration were assessed. Results: Treatment with CUR significantly attenuated AChE activity and TNFα in MSG-treated animals. The anti-inflammatory properties of CUR may be responsible for this observed neuroprotective action. A possible role of CUR to attenuate both glutamate level and gene expression of NMDA2B and mGLUR5 in brain hippocampus was established when compared to MSG group. Conclusion: We concluded that CUR as flavor enhancer protects against MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

  1. Prolonged continuous intravenous infusion of the dipeptide L-alanine- L-glutamine significantly increases plasma glutamine and alanine without elevating brain glutamate in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nägeli, Mirjam; Fasshauer, Mario; Sommerfeld, Jutta; Fendel, Angela; Brandi, Giovanna; Stover, John F

    2014-07-02

    Low plasma glutamine levels are associated with worse clinical outcome. Intravenous glutamine infusion dose- dependently increases plasma glutamine levels, thereby correcting hypoglutaminemia. Glutamine may be transformed to glutamate which might limit its application at a higher dose in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). To date, the optimal glutamine dose required to normalize plasma glutamine levels without increasing plasma and cerebral glutamate has not yet been defined. Changes in plasma and cerebral glutamine, alanine, and glutamate as well as indirect signs of metabolic impairment reflected by increased intracranial pressure (ICP), lactate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, electroencephalogram (EEG) activity were determined before, during, and after continuous intravenous infusion of 0.75 g L-alanine-L-glutamine which was given either for 24 hours (group 1, n = 6) or 5 days (group 2, n = 6) in addition to regular enteral nutrition. Lab values including nitrogen balance, urea and ammonia were determined daily. Continuous L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion significantly increased plasma and cerebral glutamine as well as alanine levels, being mostly sustained during the 5 day infusion phase (plasma glutamine: from 295 ± 62 to 500 ± 145 μmol/ l; brain glutamine: from 183 ± 188 to 549 ± 120 μmol/ l; plasma alanine: from 327 ± 91 to 622 ± 182 μmol/ l; brain alanine: from 48 ± 55 to 89 ± 129 μmol/ l; p alanine-L-glutamine infusion (0.75 g/ kg/ d up to 5 days) increased plasma and brain glutamine and alanine levels. This was not associated with elevated glutamate or signs of potential glutamate-mediated cerebral injury. The increased nitrogen load should be considered in patients with renal and hepatic dysfunction. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02130674. Registered 5 April 2014.

  2. Glutamate mechanisms underlying opiate memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.; de Vries, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, glutamate plays an undisputable integral role in opiate addiction. This relates, in part, to the fact that addiction is a disorder of learning and memory, and glutamate is required for most types of memory formation. As opiate addiction

  3. Development and Validation of a HPTLC Method for Simultaneous Estimation of L-Glutamic Acid and γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Mice Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancheti, J S; Shaikh, M F; Khatwani, P F; Kulkarni, Savita R; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2013-11-01

    A new robust, simple and economic high performance thin layer chromatographic method was developed for simultaneous estimation of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid in brain homogenate. The high performance thin layer chromatographic separation of these amino acid was achieved using n-butanol:glacial acetic acid:water (22:3:5 v/v/v) as mobile phase and ninhydrin as a derivatising agent. Quantitation of the method was achieved by densitometric method at 550 nm over the concentration range of 10-100 ng/spot. This method showed good separation of amino acids in the brain homogenate with Rf value of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid as 21.67±0.58 and 33.67±0.58, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for L-glutamic acid was found to be 10 and 20 ng and for γ-amino butyric acid it was 4 and 10 ng, respectively. The method was also validated in terms of accuracy, precision and repeatability. The developed method was found to be precise and accurate with good reproducibility and shows promising applicability for studying pathological status of disease and therapeutic significance of drug treatment.

  4. Increased cerebral (R-[11C]PK11195 uptake and glutamate release in a rat model of traumatic brain injury: a longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammertsma Adriaan A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to investigate microglia activation over time following traumatic brain injury (TBI and to relate these findings to glutamate release. Procedures Sequential dynamic (R-[11C]PK11195 PET scans were performed in rats 24 hours before (baseline, and one and ten days after TBI using controlled cortical impact, or a sham procedure. Extracellular fluid (ECF glutamate concentrations were measured using cerebral microdialysis. Brains were processed for histopathology and (immuno-histochemistry. Results Ten days after TBI, (R-[11C]PK11195 binding was significantly increased in TBI rats compared with both baseline values and sham controls (p -1 as compared with the sham procedure (6.4 ± 3.6 μmol·L-1. Significant differences were found between TBI and sham for ED-1, OX-6, GFAP, Perl's, and Fluoro-Jade B. Conclusions Increased cerebral uptake of (R-[11C]PK11195 ten days after TBI points to prolonged and ongoing activation of microglia. This activation followed a significant acute posttraumatic increase in ECF glutamate levels.

  5. Comparison of Glutamate Turnover in Nerve Terminals and Brain Tissue During [1,6-13C2]Glucose Metabolism in Anesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anant B; Lai, James C K; Chowdhury, Golam I M; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2017-01-01

    The 13 C turnover of neurotransmitter amino acids (glutamate, GABA and aspartate) were determined from extracts of forebrain nerve terminals and brain homogenate, and fronto-parietal cortex from anesthetized rats undergoing timed infusions of [1,6- 13 C 2 ]glucose or [2- 13 C]acetate. Nerve terminal 13 C fractional labeling of glutamate and aspartate was lower than those in whole cortical tissue at all times measured (up to 120 min), suggesting either the presence of a constant dilution flux from an unlabeled substrate or an unlabeled (effectively non-communicating on the measurement timescale) glutamate pool in the nerve terminals. Half times of 13 C labeling from [1,6- 13 C 2 ]glucose, as estimated by least squares exponential fitting to the time course data, were longer for nerve terminals (Glu C4 , 21.8 min; GABA C2 21.0 min) compared to cortical tissue (Glu C4 , 12.4 min; GABA C2 , 14.5 min), except for Asp C3 , which was similar (26.5 vs. 27.0 min). The slower turnover of glutamate in the nerve terminals (but not GABA) compared to the cortex may reflect selective effects of anesthesia on activity-dependent glucose use, which might be more pronounced in the terminals. The 13 C labeling ratio for glutamate-C4 from [2- 13 C]acetate over that of 13 C-glucose was twice as large in nerve terminals compared to cortex, suggesting that astroglial glutamine under the 13 C glucose infusion was the likely source of much of the nerve terminal dilution. The net replenishment of most of the nerve terminal amino acid pools occurs directly via trafficking of astroglial glutamine.

  6. Differences between seizure-prone and non-seizure-prone mice with regard to glutamate and GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus and other regions of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, A; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    Quisqualate-preferring glutamate receptors were determined in membranes from frontal cortex, occipital cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, from seizure-prone DBA/2J BOM and seizure-resistant C57/BL mice. The animals were studied 21, 27 and 40 days postnatally, i.e., before, during and after the age...... at which DBA mice are most susceptible to seizures. Radio-binding assays were performed using [3H]AMPA in the presence of 100 nM glutamate. Except for the occipital cortex, where no significant differences between the two strains were observed, all areas of the brain of DBA mice exhibited significantly (P...... less than 0.001, t test) higher AMPA binding than the corresponding areas of C57/BL mice at 27 days of age. At pre- and post-susceptible ages, the two strains showed no significant differences in the hippocampus and occipital cortex. A significant difference was observed, however, in the frontal cortex...

  7. Region specific regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression by dopamine neurons in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindefors, N; Brene, S; Herrera-Marschitz, M; Persson, H

    1989-01-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry and RNA blots were used to study the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) mRNA in rats with or without a unilateral lesion of midbrain dopamine neurons. Two populations of GAD mRNA positive neurons were found in the intact caudate-putamen, substantia nigra and fronto-parietal cortex. In caudate-putamen, only one out of ten of the GAD mRNA positive neurons expressed high levels, while in substantia nigra every second of the positive neurons expressed high levels of GAD mRNA. Relatively few, but intensively labelled neurons were found in the intact fronto-parietal cerebral cortex. In addition, one out of six of the GAD mRNA positive neurons in the fronto-parietal cortex showed a low labeling. On the ipsilateral side, the forebrain dopamine deafferentation induced an increase in the number of neurons expressing high levels of GAD mRNA in caudate-putamen, and a decrease in fronto-parietal cortex. A smaller decrease was also seen in substantia nigra. However, the total number of GAD mRNA positive neurons were not significantly changed in any of these brain regions. The changes in the levels of GAD mRNA after the dopamine lesion were confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Hence, midbrain dopamine neurons appear to control neuronal expression of GAD mRNA by a tonic down-regulation in a fraction of GAD mRNA positive neurons in caudate-putamen, and a tonic up-regulation in a fraction of GAD mRNA positive neurons in fronto-parietal cortex and substantia nigra.

  8. Differential regulation of glutamate receptors in trigeminal ganglia following masseter inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jongseok; Ro, Jin Y.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined whether N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and 5-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunits and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are constitutively expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG) using Western blot analysis in male Sprague Dawley rats. We then investigated whether experimental induction of masseter inflammation influences glutamate receptor expressions by comparing the protein levels from naïve rats to th...

  9. Binge Toluene Exposure Alters Glutamate, Glutamine and GABA in the Adolescent Rat Brain as Measured by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Shane A.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Hannigan, John H.; Bowen, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of toluene abuse in adolescents, little is known regarding the effect of binge exposure on neurochemical profiles during this developmental stage. In the current study, the effects of binge toluene exposure during adolescence on neurotransmitter levels were determined using high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo at 11.7 T. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to toluene (0, 8,000 , or 12,000 ppm) for 15 min twice daily from postnatal day 28 (P28) through P34 and then euthanized either one or seven days later (on P35 or P42) to assess glutamate, glutamine, and GABA levels in intact tissue punches from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior striatum and hippocampus. In the mPFC, toluene reduced glutamate one day after exposure, with no effect on GABA, while after seven days, glutamate was no longer affected but there was an increase in GABA levels. In the hippocampus, neither GABA nor glutamate was altered one day after exposure, whereas seven days after exposure, increases were observed in GABA and glutamate. Striatal glutamate and GABA levels measured after either one or seven days were not altered after toluene exposure. These findings show that one week of binge toluene inhalation selectively alters these neurotransmitters in the mPFC and hippocampus in adolescent rats, and that some of these effects endure at least one week after the exposure. The results suggest that age-dependent, differential neurochemical responses to toluene may contribute to the unique behavioral patterns associated with drug abuse among older children and young teens. PMID:21126832

  10. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI): [3,4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, D L

    1999-12-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with (13)C-(1)H J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo spectroscopic imaging of (13)C turnover, from D-[1,6-(13)C]glucose to glutamate and glutamine, in the brain. At a static magnetic field strength of 7 T, both in vitro and in vivo chemical shift imaging data are presented with a spatial resolution of 8 microL (i.e., 1.25 x 1.25 x 5.00 mm(3)) and a maximum spectral bandwidth of 5.2 ppm in (1)H. Chemical shift imaging data acquired every 11 minutes allowed detection of regional [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover in rat brain. The [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover curves, which can be converted to tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes, showed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (V(TCA)) in pure gray and white matter can range from 1.2 +/- 0.2 to 0.5 +/- 0.1 micromol/g/min, respectively, for morphine-anesthetized rats. The mean cortical V(TCA) from 32 voxels of 1.0 +/- 0.3 micromol/g/min (N = 3) is in excellent agreement with previous localized measurements that have demonstrated that V(TCA) can range from 0.9-1.1 micromol/g/min under identical anesthetized conditions. Magn Reson Med 42:997-1003, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Distribution of the branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex E1α subunit and glutamate dehydrogenase in the human brain and their role in neuro-metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Jonathon; Usmari Moraes, Marcela; Brookes, Emma; Love, Seth; Conway, Myra E

    2018-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system, with the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) acting as key nitrogen donors for de novo glutamate synthesis. Despite the importance of these major metabolites, their metabolic pathway in the human brain is still not well characterised. The metabolic pathways that influence the metabolism of BCAAs have been well characterised in rat models. However, the expression of key proteins such as the branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex and glutamate dehydrogenase isozymes (GDH) in the human brain is still not well characterised. We have used specific antibodies to these proteins to analyse their distribution within the human brain and report, for the first time, that the E1α subunit of the BCKD is located in both neurons and vascular endothelial cells. We also demonstrate that GDH is localised to astrocytes, although vascular immunolabelling does occur. The labelling of GDH was most intense in astrocytes adjacent to the hippocampus, in keeping with glutamatergic neurotransmission in this region. GDH was also present in astrocyte processes abutting vascular endothelial cells. Previously, we demonstrated that the branched-chain aminotransferase (hBCAT) proteins were most abundant in vascular cells (hBCATm) and neurons (hBCATc). Present findings are further evidence that BCAAs are metabolised within both the vasculature and neurons in the human brain. We suggest that GDH, hBCAT and the BCKD proteins operate in conjunction with astrocytic glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase to regulate the availability of glutamate. This has important implications given that the dysregulation of glutamate metabolism, leading to glutamate excitotoxicity, is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coupled ion binding and structural transitions along the transport cycle of glutamate transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Verdon, Grégory; Oh, SeCheol; Serio, Ryan N; Boudker, Olga

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Molecules of glutamate can carry messages between cells in the brain, and these signals are essential for thought and memory. Glutamate molecules can also act as signals to build new connections between brain cells and to prune away unnecessary ones. However, too much glutamate outside of the cells kills the brain tissue and can lead to devastating brain diseases. In a healthy brain, special pumps called glutamate transporters move these molecules back into the brain cells, where...

  13. Effects of surface functionalization of hydrophilic NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ on glutamate and GABA transport in brain synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Kociołek, Daria; Banski, Mateusz; Borisova, Tatiana; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Borysov, Arsenii; Dudarenko, Marina; Podhorodecki, Artur

    2017-08-01

    Specific rare earth doped nanocrystals (NCs), a recent class of nanoparticles with fluorescent features, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport process in nerve terminals isolated from rat brain (synaptosomes). Two types of hydrophilic NCs were examined in this work: (i) coated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and (ii) with OH groups at the surface. It was found that NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH within the concentration range of 0.5-3.5 and 0.5-1.5 mg/ml, respectively, did not influence Na+-dependent transporter-dependent l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA uptake and the ambient level of the neurotransmitters in the synaptosomes. An increase in NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH concentrations up to 7.5 and 3.5 mg/ml, respectively, led to the (1) attenuation of the initial velocity of uptake of l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA and (2) elevation of ambient neurotransmitters in the suspension of nerve terminals. In the mentioned concentrations, nanocrystals did not influence acidification of synaptic vesicles that was shown with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, however, decreased the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. In comparison with other nanoparticles studied with similar methodological approach, NCs start to exhibit their effects on neurotransmitter transport at concentrations several times higher than those shown for carbon dots, detonation nanodiamonds and an iron storage protein ferritin, whose activity can be registered at 0.08, 0.5 and 0.08 mg/ml, respectively. Therefore, NCs can be considered lesser neurotoxic as compared to above nanoparticles.

  14. Extensive neuroadaptive changes in cortical gene-transcript expressions of the glutamate system in response to repeated intermittent MDMA administration in adolescent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malki Rana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have focused on the implication of the serotonin and dopamine systems in neuroadaptive responses to the recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxy-metamphetamine (MDMA. Less attention has been given to the major excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate known to be implicated in schizophrenia and drug addiction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of repeated intermittent MDMA administration upon gene-transcript expression of the glutamate transporters (EAAT1, EAAT2-1, EAAT2-2, the glutamate receptor subunits of AMPA (GluR1, GluR2, GluR3, the glutamate receptor subunits of NMDA (NR1, NR2A and NR2B, as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1, mGluR2, mGluR3, mGluR5 in six different brain regions. Adolescent male Sprague Dawley rats received MDMA at the doses of 3 × 1 and 3 × 5 mg/kg/day, or 3× vehicle 3 hours apart, every 7th day for 4 weeks. The gene-transcript levels were assessed using real-time PCR validated with a range of housekeeping genes. Results The findings showed pronounced enhancements in gene-transcript expression of GluR2, mGluR1, mGluR5, NR1, NR2A, NR2B, EAAT1, and EAAT2-2 in the cortex at bregma +1.6. In the caudate putamen, mRNA levels of GluR3, NR2A, and NR2B receptor subunits were significantly increased. In contrast, the gene-transcript expression of GluR1 was reduced in the hippocampus. In the hypothalamus, there was a significant increase of GluR1, GluR3, mGluR1, and mGluR3 gene-transcript expressions. Conclusion Repeated intermittent MDMA administration induces neuroadaptive changes in gene-transcript expressions of glutamatergic NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits, metabotropic receptors and transporters in regions of the brain regulating reward-related associative learning, cognition, and memory and neuro-endocrine functions.

  15. Inhibitory mechanism of l-glutamic acid on spawning of the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    l-Glutamic acid was previously identified as an inhibitor of spawning in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera; this study examined how l-glutamic acid works. Oocyte release from ovaries of P. pectinifera occurred after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and follicular envelope breakdown (FEBD) when gonads were incubated ex vivo with either relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) or 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde). l-Glutamic acid blocked this spawning phenotype, causing the mature oocytes to remain within the ovaries. Neither RGP-induced 1-MeAde production in ovarian follicle cells nor 1-MeAde-induced GVBD and FEBD was affected by l-glutamic acid. l-Glutamic acid may act through metabotropic receptors in the ovaries to inhibit spawning, as l-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, an agonist for metabotropic glutamate receptors, also inhibited spawning induced by 1-MeAde. Application of acetylcholine (ACH) to ovaries under inhibitory conditions with l-glutamic acid, however, brought about spawning, possibly by inducing contraction of the ovarian wall to discharge mature oocytes from the ovaries concurrently with GVBD and FEBD. Thus, l-glutamic acid may inhibit ACH secretion from gonadal nerve cells in the ovary. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 246-256, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Synthesis and pharmacology of 3-hydroxy-delta2-isoxazoline-cyclopentane analogues of glutamic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, P; De Amici, M; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2002-01-01

    The synthesis and pharmacology of two potential glutamic acid receptor ligands are described. Preparation of the bicyclic 3-hydroxy-delta2-isoxazoline-cyclopentane derivatives (+/-)-7 and (+/-)-8 was accomplished via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of bromonitrile oxide to suitably protected 1-amino......-cyclopent-3-enecarboxylic acids. Their structure was established using a combination of 1H NMR spectroscopy and molecular mechanics calculations carried out on the intermediate cycloadducts (+/-)-11 and (+/-)-12. Amino acid derivatives (+/-)-7 and (+/-)-8 were assayed at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamic...... acid receptor subtypes and their activity compared with that of trans-ACPD and cis-ACPD. The results show that the replacement of the omega-carboxylic group of the model compounds with the 3-hydroxy-delta2-isoxazoline moiety abolishes or reduces drastically the activity at the metabotropic glutamate...

  17. Neuromodulatory properties of fluorescent carbon dots: effect on exocytotic release, uptake and ambient level of glutamate and GABA in brain nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Nazarova, Anastasia; Dekaliuk, Mariia; Krisanova, Natalia; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Borysov, Arsenii; Sivko, Roman; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2015-02-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots), a recently discovered class of fluorescent nano-sized particles with pure carbon core, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of fluorescent C-dots obtained from β-alanine by microwave heating were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on the key characteristics of GABA- and glutamatergic neurotransmission in isolated rat brain nerve terminals. It was found that C-dots (40-800 μg/ml) in dose-dependent manner: (1) decreased exocytotic release of [(3)H]GABA and L-[(14)C]glutamate; (2) reduced acidification of synaptic vesicles; (3) attenuated the initial velocity of Na(+)-dependent transporter-mediated uptake of [(3)H]GABA and L-[(14)C]glutamate; (4) increased the ambient level of the neurotransmitters, nevertheless (5) did not change significantly the potential of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals. Almost complete suppression of exocytotic release of the neurotransmitters was caused by C-dots at a concentration of 800 μg/ml. Fluorescent and neuromodulatory features combined in C-dots create base for their potential usage for labeling and visualization of key processes in nerve terminals, and also in theranostics. In addition, natural presence of carbon-containing nanoparticles in the human food chain and in the air may provoke the development of neurologic consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Partial Loss of the Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Alters Brain Akt and Insulin Signaling in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Kole D; Meabon, James S; Cook, David G

    2015-01-01

    The glutamate transporter GLT-1 (also called EAAT2 in humans) plays a critical role in regulating extracellular glutamate levels in the central nervous system (CNS). In Alzheimer's disease (AD), EAAT2 loss is associated with neuropathology and cognitive impairment. In keeping with this, we have reported that partial GLT-1 loss (GLT-1+/-) causes early-occurring cognitive deficits in mice harboring familial AD AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 mutations. GLT-1 plays important roles in several molecular pathways that regulate brain metabolism, including Akt and insulin signaling in astrocytes. Significantly, AD pathogenesis also involves chronic Akt activation and reduced insulin signaling in the CNS. In this report we tested the hypothesis that GLT-1 heterozygosity (which reduces GLT-1 to levels that are comparable to losses in AD patients) in AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice would induce sustained activation of Akt and disturb components of the CNS insulin signaling cascade. We found that partial GLT-1 loss chronically increased Akt activation (reflected by increased phosphorylation at serine 473), impaired insulin signaling (reflected by decreased IRβ phosphorylation of tyrosines 1150/1151 and increased IRS-1 phosphorylation at serines 632/635 - denoted as 636/639 in humans), and reduced insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) activity in brains of mice expressing familial AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 AD mutations. GLT-1 loss also caused an apparent compensatory increase in IDE activity in the liver, an organ that has been shown to regulate peripheral amyloid-β levels and expresses GLT-1. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that partial GLT-1 loss can cause insulin/Akt signaling abnormalities that are in keeping with those observed in AD.

  19. Seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid and the associated brain damage are prevented by group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 192, č. 2 (2005), s. 420-436 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1238 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : immature rats * neuronal degeneration * energy metabolites Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2005

  20. Circadian Regulation of Glutamate Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donají Chi-Castañeda

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available L-glutamate is the major excitatory amino acid in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. This neurotransmitter is essential for higher brain functions such as learning, cognition and memory. A tight regulation of extra-synaptic glutamate levels is needed to prevent a neurotoxic insult. Glutamate removal from the synaptic cleft is carried out by a family of sodium-dependent high-affinity transporters, collectively known as excitatory amino acid transporters. Dysfunction of glutamate transporters is generally involved in acute neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases, so characterizing and understanding the mechanisms that lead to the development of these disorders is an important goal in the design of novel treatments for the neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence indicates glutamate transporters are controlled by the circadian system in direct and indirect manners, so in this contribution we focus on the mechanisms of circadian regulation (transcriptional, translational, post-translational and post-transcriptional regulation of glutamate transport in neuronal and glial cells, and their consequence in brain function.

  1. Posttranslational Modification Biology of Glutamate Receptors and Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min eMao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational covalent modifications of glutamate receptors remain a hot topic. Early studies have established that this family of receptors, including almost all ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, undergoes active phosphorylation at serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues on their intracellular domains. Recent evidence identifies several glutamate receptor subtypes to be direct substrates for palmitoylation at cysteine residues. Other modifications such as ubiquitination and sumoylation at lysine residues also occur to certain glutamate receptors. These modifications are dynamic and reversible in nature and are regulatable by changing synaptic inputs. The regulated modifications significantly impact the receptor in many ways, including interrelated changes in biochemistry (synthesis, subunit assembling and protein-protein interactions, subcellular redistribution (trafficking, endocytosis, synaptic delivery and clustering, and physiology, usually associated with changes in synaptic plasticity. Glutamate receptors are enriched in the striatum and cooperate closely with dopamine to regulate striatal signaling. Emerging evidence shows that modification processes of striatal glutamate receptors are sensitive to addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamines. Altered modifications are believed to be directly linked to enduring receptor/synaptic plasticity and drug-seeking. This review summarizes several major types of modifications of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of these modifications in striatal signaling and in the pathogenesis of psychostimulant addiction.

  2. Glutamate decarboxylase and. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transaminase activity in brain structures during action of high concentrated sulfide gas on a background of hypo- and hypercalcemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadyrov, G.K.; Aliyev, A.M.

    Activity of the following enzymes was studied on the background of hypo- and hypercalcemia and exposure to high concentration of sulfide gas: glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T). These enzymes regulate metabolism of GABA. The results showed that a 3.5 hr exposure to sulfide gas at a concentration of 0.3 mg/1 led to significantly increased activity of GDC in cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and in brain stem. Activity of GABA-T dropped correspondingly. On the background of hypercalcemia induced by im. injection of 10% calcium gluconate (0.6 m1/200 g body weight of experimental rats) the negative effect caused by the exposure to sulfide gas was diminished. Under conditions of hypocalcemia (im. injection of 10 mg/200 g body weight of sodium oxalate), exposure to sulfide gas led to a significantly decreased activity of GDC and GABA-T in the hemispheres and in the brain stem, but in the cerebellum the activity of GDC increased sharply while that of GABA-T decreased correspondingly. 8 refs.

  3. Antiepileptic activity of total triterpenes isolated from Poria cocos is mediated by suppression of aspartic and glutamic acids in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanqiong; Yan, Hua; Jin, Ruirui; Lei, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Triterpenes from Poria cocos Wolf (Polyporaceae) have been used to treat various diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the antiepileptic effects and mechanism are not fully understood. The objective of this study is to investigate the antiepileptic properties of total triterpenes (TTP) from the whole P. cocos. The ethanol extract TTP was identified by HPLC fingerprint analysis. Male ICR mice were gavaged (i.g.) with TTP (5, 20, 80 or 160 mg/kg) or reference drugs twice a day for 7 d. Antiepileptic activities of TTP were evaluated by maximal electroshock (MES)- and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Locomotor activity and Rota-rod tests were performed for 60 min and 5 min, respectively. The levels of glutamic acid (Glu), aspartic acid (Asp), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine (Gly) in convulsive mice were estimated. The chronic epileptic model of Wistar rats was built to measure expressions of glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and GABA A in rat brain after TTP treatment. The LC 50 of TTP (i.g.) was above 6 g/kg. TTP (5-160 mg/kg) protected mice against MES- and PTZ-induced convulsions at 65.0% and 62.5%, respectively, but have no effect on rota-rod treadmill; TTP (20-160 mg/kg) significantly reduced the locomotor activities, shortened the onset of pentobarbital sodium-induced sleep; TTP decreased Glu and Asp levels in convulsive mice, but increased the GAD65 and GABA A expressions in chronic epileptic rats at doses usage. TTP extracted from P. cocos possessed potential antiepileptic properties and is a candidate for further antiepileptic drug development.

  4. Synaptically released zinc triggers metabotropic signaling via a zinc-sensing receptor in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Limor; Chorin, Ehud; Sekler, Israel; Silverman, William F; Atkin, Stan; Russell, James T; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2009-03-04

    Zn(2+) is coreleased with glutamate from mossy fiber terminals and can influence synaptic function. Here, we demonstrate that synaptically released Zn(2+) activates a selective postsynaptic Zn(2+)-sensing receptor (ZnR) in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. ZnR activation induced intracellular release of Ca(2+), as well as phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase and Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II. Blockade of synaptic transmission by tetrodotoxin or CdCl inhibited the ZnR-mediated Ca(2+) rises. The responses mediated by ZnR were largely attenuated by the extracellular Zn(2+) chelator, CaEDTA, and in slices from mice lacking vesicular Zn(2+), suggesting that synaptically released Zn(2+) triggers the metabotropic activity. Knockdown of the expression of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 39 (GPR39) attenuated ZnR activity in a neuronal cell line. Importantly, we observed widespread GPR39 labeling in CA3 neurons, suggesting a role for this receptor in mediating ZnR signaling in the hippocampus. Our results describe a unique role for synaptic Zn(2+) acting as the physiological ligand of a metabotropic receptor and provide a novel pathway by which synaptic Zn(2+) can regulate neuronal function.

  5. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    . This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate......The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  6. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion......The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor....... This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate...

  7. 4,4-Dimethyl- and diastereomeric 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-(2S)-glutamate analogues display distinct pharmacological profiles at ionotropic glutamate receptors and excitatory amino acid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Pickering, Darryl S; Gefflaut, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    this approach has provided important insight into the structure-activity relationships (SAR) for ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs), as well as the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). In this work, three 4,4-disubstituted Glu analogues 1-3, which are hybrid structures......Subtype-selective ligands are of great interest to the scientific community, as they provide a tool for investigating the function of one receptor or transporter subtype when functioning in its native environment. Several 4-substituted (S)-glutamate (Glu) analogues were synthesized, and altogether...

  8. Heritability of brain structure and glutamate levels in the anterior cingulate and left thalamus assessed with MR: A twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Brian Villumsen; Legind, Christian Stefan; Mandl, Rene C W

    included without their siblings. A 3D-T1W structural image and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (PRESS) was obtained from each subject using a 3 Tesla Philips MRI system. Total brain (TB), Gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), peripheral GM (pGM), ventricular CSF (vCSF) volumes were calculated using...

  9. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Transplantation of N-Acetyl Aspartyl-Glutamate Synthetase-Activated Neural Stem Cells after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Significantly Improves Neurological Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfeng Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Neural stem cells (NSCs hold considerable potential as a therapeutic tool for repair of the damaged nervous system. In the current study, we examined whether transplanted N-acetyl aspartyl-glutamate synthetase (NAAGS-activated NSCs (NAAGS/NSCs further improve neurological recovery following traumatic brain injury (TBI in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: Animals received TBI and stereotactic injection of NSCs, NAAGS/NSCs or phosphate buffered saline without cells (control into the injured cortex. NAAGS protein expression was detected through western blot analysis. Dialysate NAAG levels were analyzed with radioimmunoassay. Cell apoptosis was detected via TUNEL staining. The expression levels of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Groups with transplanted NSCs and NAAGS/NSCs displayed significant recovery of the motor behavior, compared to the control group. At 14 and 21 days post-transplantation, the motor behavior in NAAGS/NSC group was significantly improved than that in NSC group (pConclusion: Our results collectively demonstrate that NAAGS/NSCs provide a more powerful autoplastic therapy for the injured nervous system.

  11. Specificity of exogenous acetate and glutamate as astrocyte substrates examined in acute brain slices from female mice using methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Velde; McNair, Laura Frendrup; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Removal of endogenously released glutamate is mediated primarily by astrocytes and exogenous (13) C-labeled glutamate has been applied to study glutamate metabolism in astrocytes. Likewise, studies have clearly established the relevance of (13) C-labeled acetate as an astrocyte specific metabolic...... cortical slices from female NMRI mice were incubated in media containing [1,2-(13) C]acetate or [U-(13) C]glutamate, with or without methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthetase (GS). Tissue extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Blocking GS abolished the majority...... of glutamine (13) C-labeling from [1,2-(13) C]acetate as intended. However, (13) C-labeling of GABA was only 40-50% reduced by MSO, suggesting considerable neuronal uptake of acetate. Moreover, labeling of glutamate from [1,2-(13) C]acetate in the presence of MSO exceeded the level probable from exclusive...

  12. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Glud1) in the central nervous system affects glutamate handling without altering synaptic transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, Francesca; Karaca, Melis; De Roo, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), encoded by GLUD1, participates in the breakdown and synthesis of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter. In the CNS, besides its primary signaling function, glutamate is also at the crossroad of metabolic and neurotransmitter pathways. Importance of brain GDH...... was questioned here by generation of CNS-specific GDH-null mice (CnsGlud1(-/-)); which were viable, fertile and without apparent behavioral problems. GDH immunoreactivity as well as enzymatic activity were absent in Cns-Glud1(-/-) brains. Immunohistochemical analyses on brain sections revealed that the pyramidal...... oxidative catabolism of glutamate in astrocytes, showing that GDH is required for Krebs cycle pathway. As revealed by NMR studies, brain glutamate levels remained unchanged, whereas glutamine levels were increased. This pattern was favored by up-regulation of astrocyte-type glutamate and glutamine...

  13. Targeting Glia with N-Acetylcysteine Modulates Brain Glutamate and Behaviors Relevant to Neurodevelopmental Disorders in C57BL/6J Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieux, Alice M. S.; Fernandes, Cathy; Murphy, Declan; Labouesse, Marie Anais; Giovanoli, Sandra; Meyer, Urs; Li, Qi; So, Po-Wah; McAlonan, Grainne

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance between excitatory (E) glutamate and inhibitory (I) GABA transmission may underlie neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. This may be direct, through alterations in synaptic genes, but there is increasing evidence for the importance of indirect modulation of E/I balance through glial mechanisms. Here, we used C57BL/6J mice to test the hypothesis that striatal glutamate levels can be shifted by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which acts at the cystine-glutamate antiporter of glial cells. Striatal glutamate was quantified in vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The effect of NAC on behaviors relevant to ASD was examined in a separate cohort. NAC induced a time-dependent decrease in striatal glutamate, which recapitulated findings of lower striatal glutamate reported in ASD. NAC-treated animals were significantly less active and more anxious in the open field test; and NAC-treated females had significantly impaired prepulse inhibition of startle response. This at least partly mimics greater anxiety and impaired sensorimotor gating reported in neurodevelopmental disorders. Thus glial mechanisms regulate glutamate acutely and have functional consequences even in adulthood. Glial cells may be a potential drug target for the development of new therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders across the life-span. PMID:26696857

  14. Targeting glia with N-Acetylcysteine modulates brain glutamate and behaviours relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders in C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Marie Sybille Durieux

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An imbalance between excitatory (E glutamate and inhibitory (I GABA transmission may underlie neurodevelopmental conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD and schizophrenia. This may be direct, through alterations in synaptic genes, but there is increasing evidence for the importance of indirect modulation of E/I balance through glial mechanisms. Here we used C57BL/6J mice to test the hypothesis that striatal glutamate levels can be shifted by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, which acts at the cystine-glutamate antiporter of glial cells. Striatal glutamate was quantified in-vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The effect of NAC on behaviours relevant to ASD was examined in a separate cohort. NAC induced a time-dependent decrease in striatal glutamate, which recapitulated findings of lower striatal glutamate reported in ASD. NAC-treated animals were significantly less active and more anxious in the open field test; and NAC-treated females had significantly impaired prepulse inhibition of startle response. This at least partly mimics greater anxiety and impaired sensorimotor gating reported in neurodevelopmental disorders. Thus glial mechanisms regulate glutamate acutely and have functional consequences even in adulthood. Glial cells may be a potential drug target for the development of new therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders across the life-span.

  15. Generation of a High Resistance in vitro Blood-Brain-Barrier Model and Investigations of Brain-to-Blood Glutamate Efflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian

    Blod-hjernebarrieren (blood-brain barrier, BBB) opretholder den generelle homeostase i hjernens væsker. BBB kan også spille en rolle i homeostasen for den eksitatoriske aminosyre, L-glutamat. In vitro modeller kan være effektive værktøjer til at få mekanistiske informationer om transcellulær...

  16. Enriched environment influences hormonal status and hippocampal brain derived neurotrophic factor in a sex dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, J; Hlavacova, N; Rajman, M; Ondicova, K; Koros, C; Kitraki, E; Steinbusch, H W M; Jezova, D

    2009-12-01

    The present study is aimed at testing the hypothesis that an enriched environment (EE) induces sex-dependent changes in stress hormone release and in markers of increased brain plasticity. The focus was on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity, plasma levels of stress hormones, gene expression of glutamate receptor subunits and concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in selected brain regions. Rats exposed to EE were housed in groups of 12 in large cages with various objects, which were frequently changed, for 6 weeks. Control animals were housed four per cage under standard conditions. In females the EE-induced rise in hippocampal BDNF, a neurotrophic factor associated with increased neural plasticity, was more pronounced than in males. Similar sex-specific changes were observed in BDNF concentrations in the hypothalamus. EE also significantly attenuated oxytocin and aldosterone levels only in female but not male rats. Plasma testosterone positively correlated with hippocampal BDNF in female but not male rats housed in EE. In male rats housing in EE led to enhanced levels of testosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), this was not seen in females. Hippocampal glucocorticoid but not mineralocorticoid receptor levels decreased in rats housed in EE irrespective of sex. Housing conditions failed to modify mRNA levels of glutamate receptor type 1 (Glur1) and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlur5) subunits of glutamate receptors in the forebrain. Moreover, a negative association between corticosterone and BDNF was observed in both sexes. The results demonstrate that the association between hormones and changes in brain plasticity is sex related. In particular, testosterone seems to be involved in the regulatory processes related to neuroplasticity in females.

  17. Effects of γ-Aminobutyric acid transporter 1 inhibition by tiagabine on brain glutamate and γ-Aminobutyric acid metabolism in the anesthetized rat In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anant B; de Graaf, Robin A; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2015-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) clearance from the extracellular space after release from neurons involves reuptake into terminals and astrocytes through GABA transporters (GATs). The relative flows through these two pathways for GABA released from neurons remains unclear. This study determines the effect of tiagabine, a selective inhibitor of neuronal GAT-1, on the rates of glutamate (Glu) and GABA metabolism and GABA resynthesis via the GABA-glutamine (Gln) cycle. Halothane-anesthetized rats were administered tiagabine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and 45 min later received an intravenous infusion of either [1,6-(13)C2]glucose (in vivo) or [2-(13)C]acetate (ex vivo). Nontreated rats served as controls. Metabolites and (13)C enrichments were measured with (1)H-[(13)C]-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and referenced to their corresponding endpoint values measured in extracts from in situ frozen brain. Metabolic flux estimates of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were determined by fitting a metabolic model to the (13)C turnover data measured in vivo during [1,6-(13)C2]glucose infusion. Tiagabine-treated rats were indistinguishable (P > 0.05) from controls in tissue amino acid levels and in (13)C enrichments from [2-(13)C]acetate. Tiagabine reduced average rates of glucose oxidation and neurotransmitter cycling in both glutamatergic neurons (↓18%, CMR(glc(ox)Glu): control, 0.27 ± 0.05 vs. tiagabine, 0.22 ± 0.04 µmol/g/min; ↓11%, V(cyc(Glu-Gln)): control 0.23 ± 0.05 vs. tiagabine 0.21 ± 0.04 µmol/g/min and GABAergic neurons (↓18-25%, CMR(glc(ox)GABA): control 0.09 ± 0.02 vs. tiagabine 0.07 ± 0.03 µmol/g/min; V(cyc(GABA-Gln)): control 0.08 ± 0.02 vs. tiagabine 0.07 ± 0.03 µmol/g/min), but the changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic fluxes were not significant (P > 0.10). The results suggest that any reduction in GABA metabolism by tiagabine might be an indirect response to reduced glutamatergic drive rather than direct compensatory effects. © 2015 Wiley

  18. Is glutamate involved in transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate is an important excitatory amino acid and plays a major role in brain stem neurotransmission. Although the effect of glutamate on esophaoreal motility is well studied, its role in the triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) remains to be determined.

  19. Soluble ectodomain of neuroligin 1 decreases synaptic activity by activating metabotropic glutamate receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørlund, Michelle D.; Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier; Kønig, Andreas Bay

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic cell adhesion molecules represent important targets for neuronal activity-dependent proteolysis. Postsynaptic neuroligins (NLs) form trans-synaptic complexes with presynaptic neurexins (NXs). Both NXs and NLs are cleaved from the cell surface by metalloproteases in an activity-dependent ...

  20. Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist MPEP on learning in developing rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulecká, Anna; Mareš, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, Suppl. 1 (2007), S48-S48 ISSN 0955-8810. [Biennial Meeting of the European Behavioural Pharmacology Society /12./. 31.08.2007-03.09.2007, Tübingen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : MPEP * developing rats * behavioral parameters Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  1. Asymetric functioning of dimeric metabotropic glutamate receptors disclosed by positive allosteric modulators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goudet, C.; Kniazeff, J.; Hlaváčková, Veronika; Malhaire, F.; Maurel, D.; Acher, F.; Blahoš, Jaroslav; Prézeau, L.; Pin, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 26 (2005), s. 24380-24385 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/03/1183; GA AV ČR KJB5039402; GA ČR(CZ) GD309/03/H095 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : GPCR dimer Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  2. Effect of O-methyl-.beta.-cyclodextrin-modified magnetic nanoparticles on the uptake and extracellular level of L-glutamate in brain nerve terminals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Daniel; Beneš, Milan J.; Procházková, Zuzana; Trchová, Miroslava; Borysov, A.; Pastukhov, A.; Paliienko, K.; Borisova, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 149, 1 January (2017), s. 64-71 ISSN 0927-7765 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC16-01128J; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : glutamate * cholesterol * O-methyl-beta-cyclodextrin Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.887, year: 2016

  3. 50 Hz hippocampal stimulation in refractory epilepsy: Higher level of basal glutamate predicts greater release of glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Idil; Widi, Gabriel A; Duckrow, Robert B; Zaveri, Hitten; Kennard, Jeremy T; Krystal, John; Spencer, Dennis D

    2016-02-01

    The effect of electrical stimulation on brain glutamate release in humans is unknown. Glutamate is elevated at baseline in the epileptogenic hippocampus of patients with refractory epilepsy, and increases during spontaneous seizures. We examined the effect of 50 Hz stimulation on glutamate release and its relationship to interictal levels in the hippocampus of patients with epilepsy. In addition, we measured basal and stimulated glutamate levels in a subset of these patients where stimulation elicited a seizure. Subjects (n = 10) were patients with medically refractory epilepsy who were undergoing intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) evaluation in an epilepsy monitoring unit. Electrical stimulation (50 Hz) was delivered through implanted hippocampal electrodes (n = 11), and microdialysate samples were collected every 2 min. Basal glutamate, changes in glutamate efflux with stimulation, and the relationships between peak stimulation-associated glutamate concentrations, basal zero-flow levels, and stimulated seizures were examined. Stimulation of epileptic hippocampi in patients with refractory epilepsy caused increases in glutamate efflux (p = 0.005, n = 10), and 4 of ten patients experienced brief stimulated seizures. Stimulation-induced increases in glutamate were not observed during the evoked seizures, but rather were related to the elevation in interictal basal glutamate (R(2) = 0.81, p = 0.001). The evoked-seizure group had lower basal glutamate levels than the no-seizure group (p = 0.04), with no stimulation-induced change in glutamate efflux (p = 0.47, n = 4). Conversely, increased glutamate was observed following stimulation in the no-seizure group (p = 0.005, n = 7). Subjects with an atrophic hippocampus had higher basal glutamate levels (p = 0.03, n = 7) and higher stimulation-induced glutamate efflux. Electrical stimulation of the epileptic hippocampus either increased extracellular glutamate efflux or induced seizures. The magnitude of stimulated

  4. Glutamate metabolism is down-regulated in astrocytes during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardin-Pouzet, H; Krakowski, M; Bourbonnière, L

    1997-01-01

    dehydrogenase (GDH) expression were dramatically reduced. These two astrocytic enzymes are responsible for degradation of glutamate, the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Since elevated levels of glutamate may be neurotoxic, we propose that the decreased capacity of astrocytes...... to metabolize glutamate may contribute to EAE pathology....

  5. Glutamate modulation of GABA transport in retinal horizontal cells of the skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Matthew A; Andersen, Kristen A; Malchow, Robert Paul

    2003-01-01

    Transport of the amino acid GABA into neurons and glia plays a key role in regulating the effects of GABA in the vertebrate retina. We have examined the modulation of GABA-elicited transport currents of retinal horizontal cells by glutamate, the likely neurotransmitter of vertebrate photoreceptors. Enzymatically isolated external horizontal cells of skate were examined using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. GABA (1 mm) elicited an inward current that was completely suppressed by the GABA transport inhibitors tiagabine (10 μm) and SKF89976-A (100 μm), but was unaffected by 100 μm picrotoxin. Prior application of 100 μm glutamate significantly reduced the GABA-elicited current. Glutamate depressed the GABA dose-response curve without shifting the curve laterally or altering the voltage dependence of the current. The ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists kainate and AMPA also reduced the GABA-elicited current, and the effects of glutamate and kainate were abolished by the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline. NMDA neither elicited a current nor modified the GABA-induced current, and metabotropic glutamate analogues were also without effect. Inhibition of the GABA-elicited current by glutamate and kainate was reduced when extracellular calcium was removed and when recording pipettes contained high concentrations of the calcium chelator BAPTA. Caffeine (5 mm) and thapsigargin (2 nm), agents known to alter intracellular calcium levels, also reduced the GABA-elicited current, but increases in calcium induced by depolarization alone did not. Our data suggest that glutamate regulates GABA transport in retinal horizontal cells through a calcium-dependent process, and imply a close physical relationship between calcium-permeable glutamate receptors and GABA transporters in these cells. PMID:12562999

  6. Manipulation of isolated brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nano-sized particles and assessment of their effects on glutamate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Borуsov, Arsenii; Sivko, Roman; Ostapchenko, Ludmila; Babic, Michal; Horak, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field promises breakthroughs in nano-neurotechnology. D-Mannose-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts followed by oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and addition of D-mannose. Effects of D-mannose-coated superparamagnetic maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles on key characteristics of the glutamatergic neurotransmission were analysed. Using radiolabeled L-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not affect high-affinity Na(+)-dependent uptake, tonic release and the extracellular level of L-[(14)C]glutamate in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Also, the membrane potential of synaptosomes and acidification of synaptic vesicles was not changed as a result of the application of D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was demonstrated with the potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the pH-sensitive dye acridine orange. The study also focused on the analysis of the potential use of these nanoparticles for manipulation of nerve terminals by an external magnetic field. It was shown that more than 84.3 ± 5.0% of L-[(14)C]glutamate-loaded synaptosomes (1 mg of protein/mL) incubated for 5 min with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (250 µg/mL) moved to an area, in which the magnet (250 mT, gradient 5.5 Т/m) was applied compared to 33.5 ± 3.0% of the control and 48.6 ± 3.0% of samples that were treated with uncoated nanoparticles. Therefore, isolated brain nerve terminals can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, while the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission are not affected. In other words, functionally active synaptosomes labeled with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were obtained.

  7. Chronic restraint stress causes anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, downregulates glucocorticoid receptor expression, and attenuates glutamate release induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuichi; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Ninomiya, Midori; Richards, Misty C; Wakabayashi, Chisato; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    Stress and the resulting increase in glucocorticoid levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. We investigated the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS: 6 hours × 28 days) on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats and on the possible changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent neural function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We observed significant reductions in body weight gain, food intake and sucrose preference from 1 week after the onset of CRS. In the 5th week of CRS, we conducted open-field (OFT), elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced swim tests (FST). We observed a decrease in the number of entries into open arms during the EPM (anxiety-like behavior) and increased immobility during the FST (depression-like behavior). When the PFC was removed after CRS and subject to western blot analysis, the GR expression reduced compared with control, while the levels of BDNF and its receptors remained unchanged. Basal glutamate concentrations in PFC acute slice which were measured by high performance liquid chromatography were not influenced by CRS. However, BDNF-induced glutamate release was attenuated after CRS. These results suggest that reduced GR expression and altered BDNF function may be involved in chronic stress-induced anxiety--and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. 3-pyrazolone analogues of the 3-isoxazolol metabotropic excitatory amino acid receptor agonist homo-AMPA. Synthesis and pharmacological testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, D.; Janin, Y.L.; Brehm, L.

    1999-01-01

    the terminal carboxyl group has been replaced by various bioisosteric groups, such as phosphonic acid or 3-isoxazolol groups, have been shown to interact selectively with different subtypes of mGlu receptors. In this paper we report the synthesis of the 3-pyrazolone bioisosteres of a-AA, compounds (RS)-2-amino......-4-(1,2-dihydro-5-methyl-3-oxo-3H-pyrazol-4-yl)butyric acid (1) and (RS)-2-amino-4-(1,2-dihydro-1,5-dimethyl-3-oxo-3H-pyrazol-4-yl)butyric acid (2). At a number of steps in the reaction sequences used, the reactions took unexpected courses and provided products which could not be transformed......We have previously shown that the higher homologue of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu], (S)-a-aminoadipic acid [(S)-a-AA] is selectively recognized by the mGlu and mGlu subtypes of the family of metabotropic glutamic acid (mGlu) receptors. Furthermore, a number of analogues of (S)-a-AA, in which...

  10. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain 14 C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor. This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion but more recent research has seriously questioned this.This volume of Advances in Neurobiology is intended to provide a detailed discussion of recent developments in research aimed at delineating the functional roles of the cycle taking into account that in order for this system to work there must be a tight coupling between metabolism of glutamate in astrocytes, transfer of glutamine to neurons and de novo synthesis of glutamine in astrocytes. To understand this, knowledge about the activity and regulation of the enzymes and transporters involved in these processes is required and as can be seen from the table of contents these issues will be dealt with in detail in the individual chapters of the book.

  11. Orphan receptor GPR179 forms macromolecular complexes with components of metabotropic signaling cascade in retina ON-bipolar neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Cesare; Cao, Yan; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2013-10-29

    In the mammalian retina, synaptic transmission between light-excited rod photoreceptors and downstream ON-bipolar neurons is indispensable for dim vision, and disruption of this process leads to congenital stationary night blindness in human patients. The ON-bipolar neurons use the metabotropic signaling cascade, initiated by the mGluR6 receptor, to generate depolarizing responses to light-induced changes in neurotransmitter glutamate release from the photoreceptor axonal terminals. Evidence for the identity of the components involved in transducing these signals is growing rapidly. Recently, the orphan receptor, GPR179, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, has been shown to be indispensable for the synaptic responses of ON-bipolar cells. In our study, we investigated the interaction of GPR179 with principle components of the signal transduction cascade. We used immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays in transfected cells and native retinas to characterize the protein-protein interactions involving GPR179. The influence of cascade components on GPR179 localization was examined through immunohistochemical staining of the retinas from genetic mouse models. We demonstrated that, in mouse retinas, GPR179 forms physical complexes with the main components of the metabotropic cascade, recruiting mGluR6, TRPM1, and the RGS proteins. Elimination of mGluR6 or RGS proteins, but not TRPM1, detrimentally affects postsynaptic targeting or GPR179 expression. These observations suggest that the mGluR6 signaling cascade is scaffolded as a macromolecular complex in which the interactions between the components ensure the optimal spatiotemporal characteristics of signal transduction.

  12. Expression of the human isoform of glutamate dehydrogenase, hGDH2, augments TCA cycle capacity and oxidative metabolism of glutamate during glucose deprivation in astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Lykke, Kasper; Bryk, Jaroslaw

    2017-01-01

    A key enzyme in brain glutamate homeostasis is glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) which links carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism mediating glutamate degradation to CO2 and expanding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle capacity with intermediates, i.e. anaplerosis. Humans express two GDH isoforms, GDH1...... and 2, whereas most other mammals express only GDH1. hGDH1 is widely expressed in human brain while hGDH2 is confined to astrocytes. The two isoforms display different enzymatic properties and the nature of these supports that hGDH2 expression in astrocytes potentially increases glutamate oxidation...

  13. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of glutamate and its receptors in autism and the use of glutamate receptor antagonists in treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and may be a key neurotransmitter involved in autism. Literature pertaining to glutamate and autism or related disorders (e.g., Fragile X syndrome) is reviewed in this article. Interest in glutamatergic dysfunction in autism is high due to increasing convergent evidence implicating the system in the disorder from peripheral biomarkers, neuroimaging, protein expression, genetics and animal models. Currently, there are no pharmaceutical interventions approved for autism that address glutamate deficits in the disorder. New treatments related to glutamatergic neurotransmission, however, are emerging. In addition, older glutamate-modulating medications with approved indications for use in other disorders are being investigated for re-tasking as treatments for autism. This review presents evidence in support of glutamate abnormalities in autism and the potential for translation into new treatments for the disorder. PMID:24752754

  15. Synthesis, binding affinity at glutamic acid receptors, neuroprotective effects, and molecular modeling investigation of novel dihydroisoxazole amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    stereoisomers of the bicyclic analogue 5-amino-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-cyclopenta[d]isoxazole-3,5-dicarboxylic acid (+)-2, (-)-2, (+)-3, and (-)-3 were tested at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes. The most potent NMDA receptor antagonists [(+)-2, (-)-4, and (+)-5] showed a significant......The four stereoisomers of 5-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-4,5-dihydroisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid(+)-4, (-)-4, (+)-5, and (-)-5 were prepared by stereoselective synthesis of two pairs of enantiomers, which were subsequently resolved by enzymatic procedures. These four stereoisomers and the four...

  16. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...

  17. Relationship between Glutamate Dysfunction and Symptoms and Cognitive Function in Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Merritt, Kate; McGuire, Philip; Egerton, Alice

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia, proposed over two decades ago, originated following the observation that administration of drugs that block NMDA glutamate receptors, such as ketamine, could induce schizophrenia-like symptoms. Since then, this hypothesis has been extended to describe how glutamate abnormalities may disturb brain function and underpin psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairments. The glutamatergic system is now a major focus for the development of new compounds in sc...

  18. Gene cloning and mRNA expression of glutamate dehydrogenase in the liver, brain and intestine of the swamp eel, Monopterus albus, exposed to freshwater, terrestrial conditions, environmental ammonia or salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Y Toh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The swamp eel, Monopterus albus, is an obligatory air-breathing teleost which can survive long period of emersion, has high environmental and tissue ammonia tolerance, and acclimate from fresh to brackish water. This study was undertaken to clone and sequence gdh expressed in the liver, intestine and brain of M. albus, to verify whether more than one form of gdh were expressed, and to examine the gdh mRNA expressions in these three organs in fish exposed to various adverse conditions using quantitative real-time PCR. Only one gdh gene sequence, consisted of a 133 bp 5’ UTR, a CDS region spanning 1629 bp and a 3’ UTR of approximately 717 bp, was obtained from the liver, intestine and brain of M. albus. The translated Gdh amino acid sequence from the liver of M. albus had 542 residues and was confirmed to be Gdh1a. It had sequence identity of >90% with Oncorhynchus mykiss Gdh1a, Salmo salar Gdh1a1, Bostrychus sinensis Gdh1a and Tribolodon hakonensis Gdh1a, and formed a monophyletic clade with B. sinensis Gdh1a, Tetraodon nigroviridis Gdh1a, Chaenocephalus aceratus Gdh1a, Salmo salar Gdh1a1 and Gdh1a2 and O. mykiss Gdh1a. An increase in mRNA expression of gdh1a could be essential for increased glutamate production in support of increases in glutamine synthesis under certain environmental condition. Indeed, exposure of M. albus to 1 day of terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l-1 NH4Cl, but not brackish water, resulted in a significant increase in gdh1a mRNA expression in the liver. However, exposure to brackish water, but not terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l-1 NH4Cl, lead to a significant increase in the intestinal mRNA expression of gdh1a. By contrast, all the three experimental conditions had no significant effects on the mRNA expression of gdh1a in the brain of M. albus. Our results indicate for the first time that gdh mRNA expression was differentially up-regulated in the liver and intestine of M. albus, in responses to ammonia toxicity and

  19. Metabolic control of vesicular glutamate transport and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H; Nicoll, Roger A; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-10-06

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl(-). Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl(-) acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl(-) at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fabrication of Implantable, Enzyme-Immobilized Glutamate Sensors for the Monitoring of Glutamate Concentration Changes in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina T.-C. Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate sensors based on the immobilization of glutamate oxidase (GlutOx were prepared by adsorption on electrodeposited chitosan (Method 1 and by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (Method 2 on micromachined platinum microelectrodes. It was observed that glutamate sensors prepared by Method 1 have faster response time (<2 s and lower detection limit (2.5 ± 1.1 μM compared to that prepared by Method 2 (response time: <5 sec and detection limit: 6.5 ± 1.7 μM; glutamate sensors prepared by Method 2 have a larger linear detection range (20–352 μM and higher sensitivity (86.8 ± 8.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 12 compared to those prepared by Method 1 (linear detection range: 20–217 μM and sensitivity: 34.9 ± 4.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 8. The applicability of the glutamate sensors in vivo was also demonstrated. The glutamate sensors were implanted into the rat brain to monitor the stress-induced extracellular glutamate release in the hypothalamus of the awake, freely moving rat.

  1. A computational study of astrocytic glutamate influence on post-synaptic neuronal excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronac Flanagan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of astrocytes to rapidly clear synaptic glutamate and purposefully release the excitatory transmitter is critical in the functioning of synapses and neuronal circuits. Dysfunctions of these homeostatic functions have been implicated in the pathology of brain disorders such as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. However, the reasons for these dysfunctions are not clear from experimental data and computational models have been developed to provide further understanding of the implications of glutamate clearance from the extracellular space, as a result of EAAT2 downregulation: although they only partially account for the glutamate clearance process. In this work, we develop an explicit model of the astrocytic glutamate transporters, providing a more complete description of the glutamate chemical potential across the astrocytic membrane and its contribution to glutamate transporter driving force based on thermodynamic principles and experimental data. Analysis of our model demonstrates that increased astrocytic glutamate content due to glutamine synthetase downregulation also results in increased postsynaptic quantal size due to gliotransmission. Moreover, the proposed model demonstrates that increased astrocytic glutamate could prolong the time course of glutamate in the synaptic cleft and enhances astrocyte-induced slow inward currents, causing a disruption to the clarity of synaptic signalling and the occurrence of intervals of higher frequency postsynaptic firing. Overall, our work distilled the necessity of a low astrocytic glutamate concentration for reliable synaptic transmission of information and the possible implications of enhanced glutamate levels as in epilepsy.

  2. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  3. Laser-scanning astrocyte mapping reveals increased glutamate-responsive domain size and disrupted maturation of glutamate uptake following neonatal cortical freeze-lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortiz eArmbruster

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytic uptake of glutamate shapes extracellular neurotransmitter dynamics, receptor activation, and synaptogenesis. During development, glutamate transport becomes more robust. How neonatal brain insult affects the functional maturation of glutamate transport remains unanswered. Neonatal brain insult can lead to developmental delays, cognitive losses, and epilepsy; the disruption of glutamate transport is known to cause changes in synaptogenesis, receptor activation, and seizure. Using the neonatal freeze-lesion (FL model, we have investigated how insult affects the maturation of astrocytic glutamate transport. As lesioning occurs on the day of birth, a time when astrocytes are still functionally immature, this model is ideal for identifying changes in astrocyte maturation following insult. Reactive astrocytosis, astrocyte proliferation, and in vitro hyperexcitability are known to occur in this model. To probe astrocyte glutamate transport with better spatial precision we have developed a novel technique, Laser Scanning Astrocyte Mapping (LSAM, which combines glutamate transport current (TC recording from astrocytes with laser scanning glutamate photolysis. LSAM allows us to identify the area from which a single astrocyte can transport glutamate and to quantify spatial heterogeneity in the rate of glutamate clearance kinetics within that domain. Using LSAM, we report that cortical astrocytes have an increased glutamate-responsive area following FL and that TCs have faster decay times in distal, as compared to proximal processes. Furthermore, the developmental shift from GLAST- to GLT-1-dominated clearance is disrupted following FL. These findings introduce a novel method to probe astrocyte glutamate uptake and show that neonatal cortical FL disrupts the functional maturation of cortical astrocytes.

  4. Protective effect of c-fos antisense oligonucleotides on brain damage induced by glutamate%c-fos反义寡核苷酸对谷氨酸神经毒性鼠脑损伤的防护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳少杰; 陶永光; 罗自强; 冯德云; 伍赶球

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relation between glutamate neurotoxicity and c-fos gene expression. Methods c-fos antisense oligonucleotides (AS ODN) was injected into the right lateral ventricles of 9 SD rats to block the c-fos gene expression in brain tissue. c-fos sense oligonucleotides (S ODN)was used a control. The numbers and morphology of neurons in both cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 were detected by MIAS-300 image analysing instrument. c-fos gene expression in brain was observed by immunohistochemical method. The content of water and electrolytes in the brain tissue and Ca2+ in the synapse were measured. Results The c-fos AS ODN blocked the c-fos gene expression and reduced the content of both water and sodium in brain tissue and Ca2+ in symptosome, thus alleviating the morphological damage in neuron. S ODN did not have such effect. Conclusion c-fos gene expression plays an important role in mediating the effect of glutamate neurotoxicity. Blocking the c-fos gene expression could antagonize glutamate neurotoxicity.%目的 探讨c-fos基因的表达在谷氨酸神经毒性中的作用。方法 在9只SD大鼠侧脑室注射c-fos反义寡核苷酸以阻断脑组织c-fos基因的表达,并用c-fos正义寡核苷酸为对照。观察脑组织中水、电解质含量和突触体内Ca2+浓度的变化,并采用细胞形态计量分析及免疫组织化学方法,观察大脑皮质、海马CA1区神经细胞数目、形态的变化及c-fos基因的表达。结果 c-fos反义寡核苷酸可有效地阻断脑组织c-fos基因的表达,降低脑组织c-fos阳性细胞率(9.4%±2.8%和74%±3%,P<0.01),抑制谷氨酸神经毒性所致的脑组织含水量(79.9%±0.4%和82.3%±0.8%,P<0.01)、钠(5.05 mg/g干重±0.39 mg/g干重和5.98 mg/g干重±0.50 mg/g干重,P<0.01)及细胞内Ca2+(176 nmol/L±35 nmol/L和344.12±50.13,P<0.01)含量的增加,抑制谷氨酸所致大脑皮质(157±10和145±7,P<0

  5. Glutamate-induced glutamate release: A proposed mechanism for calcium bursting in astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larter, Raima; Craig, Melissa Glendening

    2005-12-01

    Here we present a new model for the generation of complex calcium-bursting patterns in astrocytes, a type of brain cell recently implicated in a variety of neural functions including memory formation. The model involves two positive feedback processes, in which the key feedback species are calcium ion and glutamate. The latter is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to be involved in bidirectional communication between astrocytes and nearby neurons. The glutamate feedback process considered here is shown to be critical for the generation of complex bursting oscillations in the astrocytes and to, perhaps, code for information which may be passed from neuron to neuron via the astrocyte. These processes may be involved in memory storage and formation as well as in mechanisms which lead to dynamical diseases such as epilepsy.

  6. Glutamic Acid - Amino Acid, Neurotransmitter, and Drug - Is Responsible for Protein Synthesis Rhythm in Hepatocyte Populations in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, V Y; Malchenko, L A; Konchenko, D S; Zvezdina, N D; Dubovaya, T K

    2016-08-01

    Primary cultures of rat hepatocytes were studied in serum-free media. Ultradian protein synthesis rhythm was used as a marker of cell synchronization in the population. Addition of glutamic acid (0.2 mg/ml) to the medium of nonsynchronous sparse cultures resulted in detection of a common protein synthesis rhythm, hence in synchronization of the cells. The antagonist of glutamic acid metabotropic receptors MCPG (0.01 mg/ml) added together with glutamic acid abolished the synchronization effect; in sparse cultures, no rhythm was detected. Feeding rats with glutamic acid (30 mg with food) resulted in protein synthesis rhythm in sparse cultures obtained from the rats. After feeding without glutamic acid, linear kinetics of protein synthesis was revealed. Thus, glutamic acid, a component of blood as a non-neural transmitter, can synchronize the activity of hepatocytes and can form common rhythm of protein synthesis in vitro and in vivo. This effect is realized via receptors. Mechanisms of cell-cell communication are discussed on analyzing effects of non-neural functions of neurotransmitters. Glutamic acid is used clinically in humans. Hence, a previously unknown function of this drug is revealed.

  7. Progesterone increases brain-derived neuroptrophic factor expression and protects against glutamate toxicity in a mitogen-activated protein kinase- and phosphoinositide-3 kinase-dependent manner in cerebral cortical explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Jodhka, Parmeet K; Underwood, Wendy A; Bowles, Courtney A; de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M; Singh, Meharvan

    2007-08-15

    The higher prevalence and risk for Alzheimer's disease in women relative to men has been partially attributed to the precipitous decline in gonadal hormone levels that occurs in women following the menopause. Although considerable attention has been focused on the consequence of estrogen loss, and thus estrogen's neuroprotective potential, it is important to recognize that the menopause results in a precipitous decline in progesterone levels as well. In fact, progesterone is neuroprotective, although the precise mechanisms involved remain unclear. Based on our previous observation that progesterone elicits the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, key effectors of the neuroprotective mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3-K) pathways, respectively, we determined whether activation of either of these pathways was necessary for progesterone-induced protection. With organotypic explants (slice culture) of the cerebral cortex, we found that progesterone protected against glutamate-induced toxicity. Furthermore, these protective effects were inhibited by either the MEK1/2 inhibitor UO126 or the PI3-K inhibitor LY294002, supporting the requirement for both the MAPK and PI3-K pathways in progesterone-induced protection. In addition, at a concentration and duration of treatment consistent with our neuroprotection data, progesterone also increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), at the level of both protein and mRNA. This induction of BDNF may be relevant to the protective effects of progesterone, in that inhibition of Trk signaling, with K252a, inhibited the protective effects of progesterone. Collectively, these data suggest that progesterone is protective via multiple and potentially related mechanisms. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Genetic association studies of glutamate, GABA and related genes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a decade of advance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherlyn, Suat Ying Tan; Woon, Puay San; Liu, Jian Jun; Ong, Wei Yi; Tsai, Guo Chuan; Sim, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are debilitating neurobehavioural disorders likely influenced by genetic and non-genetic factors and which can be seen as complex disorders of synaptic neurotransmission. The glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission systems have been implicated in both diseases and we have reviewed extensive literature over a decade for evidence to support the association of glutamate and GABA genes in SZ and BD. Candidate-gene based population and family association studies have implicated some ionotrophic glutamate receptor genes (GRIN1, GRIN2A, GRIN2B and GRIK3), metabotropic glutamate receptor genes (such as GRM3), the G72/G30 locus and GABAergic genes (e.g. GAD1 and GABRB2) in both illnesses to varying degrees, but further replication studies are needed to validate these results. There is at present no consensus on specific single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes associated with the particular candidate gene loci in these illnesses. The genetic architecture of glutamate systems in bipolar disorder need to be better studied in view of recent data suggesting an overlap in the genetic aetiology of SZ and BD. There is a pressing need to integrate research platforms in genomics, epistatic models, proteomics, metabolomics, neuroimaging technology and translational studies in order to allow a more integrated understanding of glutamate and GABAergic signalling processes and aberrations in SZ and BD as well as their relationships with clinical presentations and treatment progress over time. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) mRNA in the preoptic region of the brain during the estrous cycle of the ewe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompolo, S.; Clarke, I.J.; Scott, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is thought to regulate gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones located in the preoptic area (POA). GABA neurons in this region,express estrogen receptors, and synapse with GnRH cells. Reduced levels of GABA are thought to be permissive of the preovulatory LH surge. We aimed to determine whether the function of GABA changes across the ovine estrous cycle. GAD is an enzyme that synthesises GABA. We measured mRNA levels for the GAD-65 transcript in the diagonal band of Broca (dbB), POA and bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BnST) of ewes (4/group) that were killed (overdose of Pentobarbital) during the luteal (L), follicular (F) or estrous (E) phase of the estrous cycle. Brains were perfused and processed for in situ hybridisation.Sections (20 μm) were hybridised with an 35 S-labelled GAD-65 probe and the number of silver grains/cell was counted. Grains/cell were similar across the cycle in dbB and the ventral BnST. In the dorsal and lateral BnST, GAD expression was greater (P<0.05) in the L (65 ± 3;SEM) than in F (56 ± 30), with a return to luteal phase levels at estrus (70 ± 3). Expression in the POA was lower (P<0.05) during estrus (54 ± 3) than during the luteal phase (70 ± 4). These data show that expression of GAD-65 is lower in some regions of BnST at the time of the cycle (follicular) when estrogen initiates events that lead to the preovulatory LH surge. Expression in the POA is lower at estrus (during the GnRH/LH surge) than during the luteal phase:this could be permissive of the surge. Higher GAD-65 expression in the luteal phase could be due to high progesterone levels at this time of the cycle. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  10. Evaluation of permselective membranes for optimization of intracerebral amperometric glutamate biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahono, N.; Qin, S.; Oomen, P.; Cremers, T. I. F.; de Vries, M. G.; Westerink, B. H. C.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of extracellular brain glutamate concentrations by intracerebral biosensors is a promising approach to further investigate the role of this important neurotransmitter. However, amperometric biosensors are typically hampered by Faradaic interference caused by the presence of other

  11. Metabotrobic Glutamate Receptor mGluR4 as a Novel Target for Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levey, Alan

    2000-01-01

    ...) as a novel target for the treatment of PD. We have localized mGluP4 in basal ganglia structures, and explored its role in mediating the electrophysiological effects of glutamate in rat brain slices...

  12. Monosodium glutamate toxicity: Sida acuta leaf extract ameliorated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The brain is reportedly sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) toxicity via oxidative stress. Sida acuta leaf ethanolic extract (SALEE) possesses antioxidant activity which can mitigate this neurotoxicity. The present study investigated the possible protective effect of SALEE on MSG-induced toxicity in rats. Twenty-six ...

  13. Anaplerosis for Glutamate Synthesis in the Neonate and in Adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Walls, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    A central task of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA, Krebs, citric acid) cycle in brain is to provide precursors for biosynthesis of glutamate, GABA, aspartate and glutamine. Three of these amino acids are the partners in the intricate interaction between astrocytes and neurons and form the so-called g...

  14. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Glutamate Carrier SLC25A22 in Astrocytes Leads to Intracellular Glutamate Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Goubert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The solute carrier family 25 (SLC25 drives the import of a large diversity of metabolites into mitochondria, a key cellular structure involved in many metabolic functions. Mutations of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier SLC25A22 (also named GC1 have been identified in early epileptic encephalopathy (EEE and migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI but the pathophysiological mechanism of GC1 deficiency is still unknown, hampered by the absence of an in vivo model. This carrier is mainly expressed in astrocytes and is the principal gate for glutamate entry into mitochondria. A sufficient supply of energy is essential for the proper function of the brain and mitochondria have a pivotal role in maintaining energy homeostasis. In this work, we wanted to study the consequences of GC1 absence in an in vitro model in order to understand if glutamate catabolism and/or mitochondrial function could be affected. First, short hairpin RNA (shRNA designed to specifically silence GC1 were validated in rat C6 glioma cells. Silencing GC1 in C6 resulted in a reduction of the GC1 mRNA combined with a decrease of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier activity. Then, primary astrocyte cultures were prepared and transfected with shRNA-GC1 or mismatch-RNA (mmRNA constructs using the Neon® Transfection System in order to target a high number of primary astrocytes, more than 64%. Silencing GC1 in primary astrocytes resulted in a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (Phosphate (NAD(PH formation upon glutamate stimulation. We also observed that the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC was functional after glucose stimulation but not activated by glutamate, resulting in a lower level of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP in silenced astrocytes compared to control cells. Moreover, GC1 inactivation resulted in an intracellular glutamate accumulation. Our results show that mitochondrial glutamate transport via GC1 is important in sustaining glutamate homeostasis in

  15. A Glutamic Acid-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Malaysian Fermented Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound. PMID:22754309

  16. Relationship between glutamate, GOT and GPT levels in maternal and fetal blood: a potential mechanism for fetal neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Tsesis, Svetlana; Gruenbaum, Benjamin Fredrick; Ohayon, Sharon; Gruenbaum, Shaun Evan; Boyko, Matthew; Sheiner, Eyal; Brotfain, Evgeny; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian Itzhak

    2012-09-01

    Excess glutamate in the brain is thought to be implicated in the pathophysiology of fetal anoxic brain injury, yet little is known about the mechanisms by which glutamate is regulated in the fetal brain. This study examines whether there are differences between maternal and fetal glutamate concentrations, and whether a correlation between them exists. 10 ml of venous blood was extracted from 87 full-term (>37 weeks gestation) pregnant women in active labor. Immediately after delivery of the neonate, 10 ml of blood from the umbilical artery and vein was extracted. Samples were analyzed for levels of glutamate, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT). Fetal blood glutamate concentrations in both the umbilical artery and vein were found to be significantly higher than maternal blood (pGOT levels in the umbilical artery and vein were found to be significantly higher than maternal GOT levels (pGOT or GPT between the umbilical artery and vein. There was an association observed between glutamate levels in maternal blood and glutamate levels in both venous (R=0.32, pGOT, but not GPT levels. An association was observed between maternal and fetal blood glutamate levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. I...

  18. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerui Gong

    Full Text Available Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (30 µm were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA and kainic acid (KA, or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR agonist (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG, induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  19. Corticolimbic expression of TRPC4 and TRPC5 channels in the rodent brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Fowler

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC channels are a family of non-selective cation channels that are activated by increases in intracellular Ca(2+ and G(q/phospholipase C-coupled receptors. We used quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunoblots and patch-clamp recording from several brain regions to examine the expression of the predominant TRPC channels in the rodent brain. Quantitative real-time PCR of the seven TRPC channels in the rodent brain revealed that TRPC4 and TRPC5 channels were the predominant TRPC subtypes in the adult rat brain. In situ hybridization histochemistry and immunoblotting further resolved a dense corticolimbic expression of the TRPC4 and TRPC5 channels. Total protein expression of HIP TRPC4 and 5 proteins increased throughout development and peaked late in adulthood (6-9 weeks. In adults, TRPC4 expression was high throughout the frontal cortex, lateral septum (LS, pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus (HIP, dentate gyrus (DG, and ventral subiculum (vSUB. TRPC5 was highly expressed in the frontal cortex, pyramidal cell layer of the HIP, DG, and hypothalamus. Detailed examination of frontal cortical layer mRNA expression indicated TRPC4 mRNA is distributed throughout layers 2-6 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, motor cortex (MCx, and somatosensory cortex (SCx. TRPC5 mRNA expression was concentrated specifically in the deep layers 5/6 and superficial layers 2/3 of the PFC and anterior cingulate. Patch-clamp recording indicated a strong metabotropic glutamate-activated cation current-mediated depolarization that was dependent on intracellular Ca(2+and inhibited by protein kinase C in brain regions associated with dense TRPC4 or 5 expression and absent in regions lacking TRPC4 and 5 expression. Overall, the dense corticolimbic expression pattern suggests that these Gq/PLC coupled nonselective cation channels may be involved in learning, memory, and goal-directed behaviors.

  20. On the potential role of glutamate transport in mental fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Elisabeth

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mental fatigue, with decreased concentration capacity, is common in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, often appearing prior to other major mental or physical neurological symptoms. Mental fatigue also makes rehabilitation more difficult after a stroke, brain trauma, meningitis or encephalitis. As increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines are reported in these disorders, we wanted to explore whether or not proinflammatory cytokines could induce mental fatigue, and if so, by what mechanisms. It is well known that proinflammatory cytokines are increased in major depression, "sickness behavior" and sleep deprivation, which are all disorders associated with mental fatigue. Furthermore, an influence by specific proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1, on learning and memory capacities has been observed in several experimental systems. As glutamate signaling is crucial for information intake and processing within the brain, and due to the pivotal role for glutamate in brain metabolism, dynamic alterations in glutamate transmission could be of pathophysiological importance in mental fatigue. Based on this literature and observations from our own laboratory and others on the role of astroglial cells in the fine-tuning of glutamate neurotransmission we present the hypothesis that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 could be involved in the pathophysiology of mental fatigue through their ability to attenuate the astroglial clearance of extracellular glutamate, their disintegration of the blood brain barrier, and effects on astroglial metabolism and metabolic supply for the neurons, thereby attenuating glutamate transmission. To test whether our hypothesis is valid or not, brain imaging techniques should be applied with the ability to register, over time and with increasing cognitive loading, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and potassium (K+ in humans suffering from

  1. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist may reduce behavioural deficit induced by early status epilepticus in adult rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Kaminskij, Julij; Haugvicová, Renata; Folbergrová, Jaroslava

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S6 (2005), s. 203-203 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /26./. 28.08.2005-01.09.2005, Paris] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1238 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : APDC * memory * cognitive functions Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  2. Positive allosteric modulation of the human metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (hmGluR4) by SIB-1893 and MPEP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Svendsen, Nannette; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2003-01-01

    We have identified 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) and 2-methyl-6-phenylethynyl pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) as positive allosteric modulators for the hmGluR4. SIB-1893 and MPEP enhanced the potency and efficacy of L-2-amino-4-phophonobutyrate (L-AP4) in guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S...

  3. Construction of a high affinity zinc binding site in the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O; Jensen, L B

    2001-01-01

    a molecular model of the ATD of mGluR1 based on a weak amino acid sequence similarity with a bacterial periplasmic binding protein. The ATD consists of two globular lobes, which are speculated to contract from an "open" to a "closed" conformation following agonist binding. In the present study, we have...... created a Zn(2+) binding site in mGluR1b by mutating the residue Lys(260) to a histidine. Zinc acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of agonist-induced IP accumulation on the K260H mutant with an IC(50) value of 2 microm. Alanine mutations of three potential "zinc coligands" in proximity to the introduced...

  4. Anticonvulsant action of an antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR5 MPEP in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojková, Denisa; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, Suppl. 1 (2005), s. 219-229 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00B122; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/03/0770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : seizures * ontogeny * MPEP Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2005

  5. Allelic association, DNA resequencing and copy number variation at the metabotropic glutamate receptor GRM7 gene locus in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Radhika; McQuillin, Andrew; Curtis, David; Gurling, Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Genetic markers at the GRM7 gene have shown allelic association with bipolar disorder (BP) in several case-control samples including our own sample. In this report, we present results of resequencing the GRM7 gene in 32 bipolar samples and 32 random controls selected from 553 bipolar cases and 547 control samples (UCL1). Novel and potential etiological base pair changes discovered by resequencing were genotyped in the entire UCL case-control sample. We also report on the association between GRM7 and BP in a second sample of 593 patients and 642 controls (UCL2). The three most significantly associated SNPs in the original UCL1 BP GWAS sample were genotyped in the UCL2 sample, of which none were associated. After combining the genotype data for the two samples only two (rs1508724 and rs6769814) of the original three SNP markers remained significantly associated with BP. DNA sequencing revealed mutations in three cases which were absent in control subjects. A 3'-UTR SNP rs56173829 was found to be significantly associated with BP in the whole UCL sample (P = 0.035; OR = 0.482), the rare allele being less common in cases compared to controls. Bioinformatic analyses predicted a change in the centroid secondary structure of RNA and alterations in the miRNA binding sites for the mutated base of rs56173829. We also validated two deletions and a duplication within GRM7 using quantitative-PCR which provides further support for the pre-existing evidence that copy number variants at GRM7 may have a role in the etiology of BP. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Intercellular signal communication among odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion neurons via glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, A; Sato, M; Kimura, M; Katakura, A; Tazaki, M; Shibukawa, Y

    2016-11-01

    Various stimuli to the exposed surface of dentin induce changes in the hydrodynamic force inside the dentinal tubules resulting in dentinal pain. Recent evidences indicate that mechano-sensor channels, such as the transient receptor potential channels, in odontoblasts receive these hydrodynamic forces and trigger the release of ATP to the pulpal neurons, to generate dentinal pain. A recent study, however, has shown that odontoblasts also express glutamate receptors (GluRs). This implies that cells in the dental pulp tissue have the ability to release glutamate, which acts as a functional intercellular mediator to establish inter-odontoblast and odontoblast-trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron signal communication. To investigate the intercellular signal communication, we applied mechanical stimulation to odontoblasts and measured the intracellular free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). During mechanical stimulation in the presence of extracellular Ca 2+ , we observed a transient [Ca 2+ ] i increase not only in single stimulated odontoblasts, but also in adjacent odontoblasts. We could not observe these responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ . [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring odontoblasts during mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts were inhibited by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) as well as glutamate-permeable anion channels. In the odontoblast-TG neuron coculture, we observed an increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in the stimulated odontoblasts and TG neurons, in response to direct mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts. These [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring TG neurons were inhibited by antagonists for mGluRs. The [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the stimulated odontoblasts were also inhibited by mGluRs antagonists. We further confirmed that the odontoblasts express group I, II, and III mGluRs. However, we could not record any currents evoked from odontoblasts near the mechanically stimulated odontoblast, with or without

  7. Effect of parenteral glutamate treatment on the localization of neurotransmitters in the mediobasal hypothalamus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaas, I; Fonnum, F

    1978-01-01

    The localization of cholinergic, aminergic and amino acid-ergic neurones in the mediobasal hypothalamus has been studied in normal rat brain and in brains where neurones in nucleus arcuatus were destroyed by repeated administration of 2 mg/g body weight monosodium glutamate to newborn animals. In normal animals acetylcholinesterase staining, choline acetyltransferase and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase were concentrated in the median eminence and the arcuate nucleus. Glutamate decarboxylase was concentrated at the boundary between the ventromedial and the arcuate nuclei, with lower activity in the arcuate nucleus and very low activity in the median eminence. Nucleus arcuatus contained an intermediate level of high affinity glutamate uptake. In the lesioned animals, there were significant decreases in choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase staining and glutamate decarboxylase in the median eminence, whereas choline acetyltransferase activity and acetylcholinesterase staining, but not glutamate decarboxylase activity, were decreased in nucleus arcuatus. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase was unchanged in all regions studied. The high affinity uptakes of glutamate, dopamine and noradrenaline, and the endogenous amino acid levels were also unchanged in the treated animals. The results indicate the existence of acetylcholine- and GABA-containing elements in the tuberoinfundibular tract. They further indicate that the dopamine cells in the arcuate nucleus are less sensitive to the toxic effect of glutamate than other cell types, possibly because they contain less glutamate receptors.

  8. Glutamate Concentration in the Superior Temporal Sulcus Relates to Neuroticism in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Balz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies suggest aberrant neurotransmitter concentrations in the brains of patients with schizophrenia (SCZ. Numerous studies have indicated deviant glutamate concentrations in SCZ, although the findings are inconsistent. Moreover, alterations in glutamate concentrations could be linked to personality traits in SCZ. Here, we examined the relationships between personality dimensions and glutamate concentrations in a voxel encompassing the occipital cortex (OCC and another voxel encompassing the left superior temporal sulcus (STS. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine glutamate concentrations in the OCC and the STS in 19 SCZ and 21 non-psychiatric healthy control (HC participants. Personality dimensions neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness were assessed using the NEO-FFI questionnaire. SCZ compared to HC showed higher glutamate concentrations in the STS, reduced extraversion scores, and enhanced neuroticism scores. No group differences were observed for the other personality traits and for glutamate concentrations in the OCC. For the SCZ group, glutamate concentrations in STS were negatively correlated with the neuroticism scores [r = -0.537, p = 0.018] but this was not found in HC [r(19 = 0.011, p = 0.962]. No other significant correlations were found. Our study showed an inverse relationship between glutamate concentrations in the STS and neuroticism scores in SCZ. Elevated glutamate in the STS might serve as a compensatory mechanism that enables patients with enhanced concentrations to control and prevent the expression of neuroticism.

  9. A Genome Wide Association Study Links Glutamate Receptor Pathway to Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Bishop, Matthew T.; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Calero, Miguel; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Ladogana, Anna; Boyd, Alison; Lewis, Victoria; Ponto, Claudia; Calero, Olga; Poleggi, Anna; Carracedo, Ángel; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ströbel, Thomas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Haïk, Stéphane; Combarros, Onofre; Berciano, José; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Collins, Steven J.; Budka, Herbert; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean Louis; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Zerr, Inga; Knight, Richard S. G.; Will, Robert G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9) a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP); and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8) tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8). Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967). The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8) and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5) remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis. PMID:25918841

  10. Prenatal chronic mild stress induces depression-like behavior and sex-specific changes in regional glutamate receptor expression patterns in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Ma, Y; Hu, J; Cheng, W; Jiang, H; Zhang, X; Li, M; Ren, J; Li, X

    2015-08-20

    Chronic stress during critical periods of human fetal brain development is associated with cognitive, behavioral, and mood disorders in later life. Altered glutamate receptor (GluR) expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of stress-dependent disorders. To test whether prenatal chronic mild stress (PCMS) enhances offspring's vulnerability to stress-induced behavioral and neurobiological abnormalities and if this enhanced vulnerability is sex-dependent, we measured depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test (FST) and regional changes in GluR subunit expression in PCMS-exposed adult male and female rats. Both male and female PCMS-exposed rats exhibited stronger depression-like behavior than controls. Males and females exhibited unique regional changes in GluR expression in response to PCMS alone, FST alone (CON-FST), and PCMS with FST (PCMS-FST). In females, PCMS alone did not alter N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) or metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) expression, while in PCMS males, higher mGluR2/3, mGluR5, and NR1 expression levels were observed in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, PCMS altered the change in GluR expression induced by acute stress (the FST test), and this too was sex-specific. Male PCMS-FST rats expressed significantly lower mGluR5 levels in the hippocampus, lower mGluR5, NR1, postsynaptic density protein (PSD)95, and higher mGluR2/3 in the prefrontal cortex, and higher mGluR5 and PSD95 in the amygdala than male CON-FST rats. Female PCMS-FST rats expressed lower NR1 in the hippocampus, lower NR2B and PSD95 in the prefrontal cortex, lower mGluR2/3 in the amygdala, and higher PSD95 in the amygdala than female CON-FST rats. PCMS may increase the offspring's vulnerability to depression by altering sex-specific stress-induced changes in glutamatergic signaling. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. [Molecular organization of glutamate-sensitive chemoexcitatory membranes of nerve cells. Comparative analysis of glutamate-binding membrane proteins from the cerebral cortex of rats and humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambinova, S A; Gorodinskiĭ, A I; Lekomtseva, T M; Koreshonkov, O N

    1987-10-01

    The kinetics of 3H-L-glutamate binding to human brain synaptic membranes revealed the existence of one type of binding sites with Kd and Vmax comparable with those for freshly isolated rat brain membranes. The fraction of glutamate-binding proteins (GBP) was shown to contain three components with Mr of 14, 60 and 280 kD whose stoichiometry is specific for human and rat brain. All fractions were found to bind the radiolabeled neurotransmitter and to dissociate into subunits with Mr of 14 kD after treatment with-potent detergents (with the exception of the 56-60 kD component). Study of association-dissociation of GBP protein subunits by high performance liquid chromatography confirmed the hypothesis on the oligomeric structure of glutamate receptors which are made up of low molecular weight glycoprotein-lipid subunits and which form ionic channels by way of repeated association. Despite the similarity of antigen determinants in the active center of glutamate receptors from human and rat brain, it was assumed that the stoichiometry of structural organization of receptor subunits isolated from different sources is different. The functional role of structural complexity of human brain glutamate receptors is discussed.

  12. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  13. Synaptic plasticity in the medial vestibular nuclei: role of glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers in rat brainstem slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-01

    The analysis of cellular-molecular events mediating synaptic plasticity within vestibular nuclei is an attempt to explain the mechanisms underlying vestibular plasticity phenomena. The present review is meant to illustrate the main results, obtained in vitro, on the mechanisms underlying long-term changes in synaptic strength within the medial vestibular nuclei. The synaptic plasticity phenomena taking place at the level of vestibular nuclei could be useful for adapting and consolidating the efficacy of vestibular neuron responsiveness to environmental requirements, as during visuo-vestibular recalibration and vestibular compensation. Following a general introduction on the most salient features of vestibular compensation and visuo-vestibular adaptation, which are two plastic events involving neuronal circuitry within the medial vestibular nuclei, the second and third sections describe the results from rat brainstem slice studies, demonstrating the possibility to induce long-term potentiation and depression in the medial vestibular nuclei, following high frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. In particular the mechanisms sustaining the induction and expression of vestibular long-term potentiation and depression, such as the role of various glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers have been described. The relevant role of the interaction between the platelet-activating factor, acting as a retrograde messenger, and the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors, in determining the full expression of vestibular long-term potentiation is also underlined. In addition, the mechanisms involved in vestibular long-term potentiation have been compared with those leading to long-term potentiation in the hippocampus to emphasize the most significant differences emerging from vestibular studies. The fourth part, describes recent results demonstrating the essential role of nitric oxide, another retrograde messenger, in the induction of vestibular

  14. Frontal glutamate and reward processing in adolescence and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, Tobias; Lorenz, Robert C; Pöhland, Lydia; Raufelder, Diana; Deserno, Lorenz; Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas; Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The fronto-limbic network interaction, driven by glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, represents a core mechanism of motivated behavior and personality traits. Reward seeking behavior undergoes tremendous changes in adolescence paralleled by neurobiological changes of this network including the prefrontal cortex, striatum and amygdala. Since fronto-limbic dysfunctions also underlie major psychiatric diseases beginning in adolescence, this investigation focuses on network characteristics separating adolescents from adults. To investigate differences in network interactions, the brain reward system activity (slot machine task) together with frontal glutamate concentration (anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) was measured in 28 adolescents and 26 adults employing functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. An inverse coupling of glutamate concentrations in the ACC and activation of the ventral striatum was observed in adolescents. Further, amygdala response in adolescents was negatively correlated with the personality trait impulsivity. For adults, no significant associations of network components or correlations with impulsivity were found. The inverse association between frontal glutamate concentration and striatal activation in adolescents is in line with the triadic model of motivated behavior stressing the important role of frontal top-down inhibition on limbic structures. Our data identified glutamate as the mediating neurotransmitter of this inhibitory process and demonstrates the relevance of glutamate on the reward system and related behavioral traits like impulsivity. This fronto-limbic coupling may represent a vulnerability factor for psychiatric disorders starting in adolescence but not in adulthood.

  15. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    -500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP...... regardless of the expression level of GDH and the incubation condition, indicating a high degree of flexibility with regard to regulatory mechanisms involved in maintaining an adequate energy level in the cells. Glutamate uptake was found to be increased in these cells when exposed to increasing levels...

  16. Simultaneous recording of fluorescence and electrical signals by photometric patch electrode in deep brain regions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yasuharu; Nishino, Eri; Ohmori, Harunori

    2015-06-01

    Despite its widespread use, high-resolution imaging with multiphoton microscopy to record neuronal signals in vivo is limited to the surface of brain tissue because of limited light penetration. Moreover, most imaging studies do not simultaneously record electrical neural activity, which is, however, crucial to understanding brain function. Accordingly, we developed a photometric patch electrode (PME) to overcome the depth limitation of optical measurements and also enable the simultaneous recording of neural electrical responses in deep brain regions. The PME recoding system uses a patch electrode to excite a fluorescent dye and to measure the fluorescence signal as a light guide, to record electrical signal, and to apply chemicals to the recorded cells locally. The optical signal was analyzed by either a spectrometer of high light sensitivity or a photomultiplier tube depending on the kinetics of the responses. We used the PME in Oregon Green BAPTA-1 AM-loaded avian auditory nuclei in vivo to monitor calcium signals and electrical responses. We demonstrated distinct response patterns in three different nuclei of the ascending auditory pathway. On acoustic stimulation, a robust calcium fluorescence response occurred in auditory cortex (field L) neurons that outlasted the electrical response. In the auditory midbrain (inferior colliculus), both responses were transient. In the brain-stem cochlear nucleus magnocellularis, calcium response seemed to be effectively suppressed by the activity of metabotropic glutamate receptors. In conclusion, the PME provides a powerful tool to study brain function in vivo at a tissue depth inaccessible to conventional imaging devices. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Glutamate system, amyloid β peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revett, Timothy J.; Baker, Glen B.; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid β and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid β production, but also amyloid β can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness. PMID:22894822

  18. Expression of the human isoform of glutamate dehydrogenase, hGDH2, augments TCA cycle capacity and oxidative metabolism of glutamate during glucose deprivation in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Lykke, Kasper; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Stridh, Malin H; Zaganas, Ioannis; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse K; Enard, Wolfgang; Pääbo, Svante; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    A key enzyme in brain glutamate homeostasis is glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) which links carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism mediating glutamate degradation to CO 2 and expanding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle capacity with intermediates, i.e. anaplerosis. Humans express two GDH isoforms, GDH1 and 2, whereas most other mammals express only GDH1. hGDH1 is widely expressed in human brain while hGDH2 is confined to astrocytes. The two isoforms display different enzymatic properties and the nature of these supports that hGDH2 expression in astrocytes potentially increases glutamate oxidation and supports the TCA cycle during energy-demanding processes such as high intensity glutamatergic signaling. However, little is known about how expression of hGDH2 affects the handling of glutamate and TCA cycle metabolism in astrocytes. Therefore, we cultured astrocytes from cerebral cortical tissue of hGDH2-expressing transgenic mice. We measured glutamate uptake and metabolism using [ 3 H]glutamate, while the effect on metabolic pathways of glutamate and glucose was evaluated by use of 13 C and 14 C substrates and analysis by mass spectrometry and determination of radioactively labeled metabolites including CO 2 , respectively. We conclude that hGDH2 expression increases capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamate, particularly during increased workload and aglycemia. Additionally, hGDH2 expression increased utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) during aglycemia and caused a general decrease in oxidative glucose metabolism. We speculate, that expression of hGDH2 allows astrocytes to spare glucose and utilize BCAAs during substrate shortages. These findings support the proposed role of hGDH2 in astrocytes as an important fail-safe during situations of intense glutamatergic activity. GLIA 2017;65:474-488. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Parabrachial complex glutamate receptors modulate the cardiorespiratory response evoked from hypothalamic defense area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Casares, A; López-González, M V; Peinado-Aragonés, C A; González-Barón, S; Dawid-Milner, M S

    2012-08-16

    To characterize the possible role of glutamate in the interaction between Hypothalamic Defense Area (HDA) and Parabrachial complex (PBc) nuclei, cardiorespiratory changes were analyzed in response to electrical stimulation of the HDA (1 ms pulses, 30-50 μA given at 100 Hz for 5s) before and after the microinjection of the nonspecific glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (50 nl, 5 nmol), NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (50 nl, 50 nmol), non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX (50 nl, 50 nmol) or metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist MCPG (50 nl, 5 nmol) within the PBc. HDA stimulation evoked an inspiratory facilitatory response, consisting of an increase in respiratory rate (pHDA stimulation. Similarly, the magnitude of the tachycardia and the pressor response was decreased after the microinjection of MK-801 (pHDA stimulation but the respiratory response persisted unchanged after MK-801 or CNQX microinjection into the lPB. Kynurenic acid within the medial parabrachial region (mPB) abolished the tachycardia (pHDA stimulation. MK-801 and CNQX microinjection in this region decreased the magnitude of the tachycardia (pHDA stimulation was not changed after the microinjection of kynurenic acid, MK-801 or CNQX within the mPB. No changes were observed in the cardiorespiratory response evoked to HDA stimulation after MCPG microinjection within lPB and mPB. These results indicate that glutamate PBc receptors are involved in the cardiorespiratory response evoked from the HDA. The possible mechanisms involved in these interactions are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduced expression of glutamate transporter EAAT2 and impaired glutamate transport in human primary astrocytes exposed to HIV-1 or gp120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuying; Pekarskaya, Olga; Bencheikh, Meryem; Chao Wei; Gelbard, Harris A.; Ghorpade, Anuja; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Volsky, David J.

    2003-01-01

    L-Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Astrocytes maintain low levels of synaptic glutamate by high-affinity uptake and defects in this function may lead to neuronal cell death by excitotoxicity. We tested the effects of HIV-1 and its envelope glycoprotein gp120 upon glutamate uptake and expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 in fetal human astrocytes in vitro. Astrocytes isolated from fetal tissues between 16 and 19 weeks of gestation expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2 RNA and proteins as detected by Northern blot analysis and immunoblotting, respectively, and the cells were capable of specific glutamate uptake. Exposure of astrocytes to HIV-1 or gp120 significantly impaired glutamate uptake by the cells, with maximum inhibition within 6 h, followed by gradual decline during 3 days of observation. HIV-1-infected cells showed a 59% reduction in V max for glutamate transport, indicating a reduction in the number of active transporter sites on the cell surface. Impaired glutamate transport after HIV-1 infection or gp120 exposure correlated with a 40-70% decline in steady-state levels of EAAT2 RNA and protein. EAAT1 RNA and protein levels were less affected. Treatment of astrocytes with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreased the expression of both EAAT1 and EAAT2, but neither HIV-1 nor gp120 were found to induce TNF-α production by astrocytes. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 and gp120 induce transcriptional downmodulation of the EAAT2 transporter gene in human astrocytes and coordinately attenuate glutamate transport by the cells. Reduction of the ability of HIV-1-infected astrocytes to take up glutamate may contribute to the development of neurological disease

  1. Manipulation of isolated brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated .gamma.-Fe2O3 nano-sized particles and assessment of their effects on glutamate transport

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Borysov, A.; Sivko, R.; Ostapchenko, L.; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, 4 June (2014), s. 778-788 ISSN 2190-4286 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : extracellular level * γ-Fe2O3 * glutamate uptake and release Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.670, year: 2014

  2. Relationship between glutamate dysfunction and symptoms and cognitive function in psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate eMerritt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia, proposed over two decades ago, originated following the observation that administration of drugs that block NMDA glutamate receptors, such as ketamine, could induce schizophrenia–like symptoms. Since then, this hypothesis has been extended to describe how glutamate abnormalities may disturb brain function and underpin psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairments. The glutamatergic system is now a major focus for the development of new compounds in schizophrenia. Relationships between regional brain glutamate function and symptom severity can be investigated using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS to estimate levels of glutamatergic metabolites in vivo. Here we briefly review the 1H-MRS studies that have explored relationships between glutamatergic metabolites, symptoms and cognitive function in clinical samples. While some of these studies suggest that more severe symptoms may be associated with elevated glutamatergic function in the anterior cingulate, studies in larger patient samples selected on the basis of symptom severity are required.

  3. Availability of neurotransmitter glutamate is diminished when beta-hydroxybutyrate replaces glucose in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Trine M; Risa, Oystein; Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2009-07-01

    Ketone bodies serve as alternative energy substrates for the brain in cases of low glucose availability such as during starvation or in patients treated with a ketogenic diet. The ketone bodies are metabolized via a distinct pathway confined to the mitochondria. We have compared metabolism of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate to that of [1,6-(13)C]glucose in cultured glutamatergic neurons and investigated the effect of neuronal activity focusing on the aspartate-glutamate homeostasis, an essential component of the excitatory activity in the brain. The amount of (13)C incorporation and cellular content was lower for glutamate and higher for aspartate in the presence of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate as opposed to [1,6-(13)C]glucose. Our results suggest that the change in aspartate-glutamate homeostasis is due to a decreased availability of NADH for cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and thus reduced malate-aspartate shuttle activity in neurons using beta-hydroxybutyrate. In the presence of glucose, the glutamate content decreased significantly upon activation of neurotransmitter release, whereas in the presence of only beta-hydroxybutyrate, no decrease in the glutamate content was observed. Thus, the fraction of the glutamate pool available for transmitter release was diminished when metabolizing beta-hydroxybutyrate, which is in line with the hypothesis of formation of transmitter glutamate via an obligatory involvement of the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  4. Protective Effect of Edaravone on Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity in Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is an important excitatory neurotransmitter in mammalian brains, but excessive amount of glutamate can cause “excitotoxicity” and lead to neuronal death. As bipolar neurons, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs function as a “bridge” in transmitting auditory information from the ear to the brain and can be damaged by excessive glutamate which results in sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, edaravone, a free radical scavenger, elicited both preventative and therapeutic effects on SGNs against glutamate-induced cell damage that was tested by MTT assay and trypan blue staining. Ho.33342 and PI double staining revealed that apoptosis as well as necrosis took place during glutamate treatment, and apoptosis was the main type of cell death. Oxidative stress played an important role in glutamate-induced cell damage but pretreatment with edaravone alleviated cell death. Results of western blot demonstrated that mechanisms underlying the toxicity of glutamate and the protection of edaravone were related to the PI3K pathway and Bcl-2 protein family.

  5. Protective Effect of Edaravone on Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity in Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaohui; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Aiping; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Sun, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is an important excitatory neurotransmitter in mammalian brains, but excessive amount of glutamate can cause “excitotoxicity” and lead to neuronal death. As bipolar neurons, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) function as a “bridge” in transmitting auditory information from the ear to the brain and can be damaged by excessive glutamate which results in sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, edaravone, a free radical scavenger, elicited both preventative and therapeutic effects on SGNs against glutamate-induced cell damage that was tested by MTT assay and trypan blue staining. Ho.33342 and PI double staining revealed that apoptosis as well as necrosis took place during glutamate treatment, and apoptosis was the main type of cell death. Oxidative stress played an important role in glutamate-induced cell damage but pretreatment with edaravone alleviated cell death. Results of western blot demonstrated that mechanisms underlying the toxicity of glutamate and the protection of edaravone were related to the PI3K pathway and Bcl-2 protein family. PMID:27957345

  6. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  7. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Vitamin D is associated with metabotropic but not neurotrophic effects of exercise in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Babaei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Here, we studied the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on metabolic syndrome components, cognitive performance, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and irisin in ovariectomized rats with different serum vitamin D (Vit D status. Methods Eighty female wistar rats were divided into 2 groups of sham operated (sham, n = 8, and ovariectomized (OVX, n = 72. Then OVX were divided into 9 groups of receiving combination of exercise protocol with low dose of Vit D (OVX + EXE + LD, high dose of Vit D (OVX + EXE + HD, Vit D deficiency (OVX + EXE − D, and (OVX + EXE + Veh. Also non exercised groups of OVX receiving high dose of Vit D (OVX + HD, low dose of Vit D (OVX + LD, Vit D deficiency (OVX − D, and Veh (OVX + Veh were included. After 2 months of related interventions, spatial memory was assessed using Morris water maze (MWM, and then metabolic syndrome components were measured. Results High dose of Vit D supplementation showed significant reduction in weight (p = 0.001, lipid profiles (p = 0.001, visceral fat (p = 0.001 and waist circumference (p = 0.001 regardless of exercising or not, with no change in cognitiive function. Serum BDNF level was significantly higher in Vit D deficient group (p = 0.001, and was decreased in the OVX + HD. In contrary, irisin did not show any significant relationship with serum concentration of Vit D, while it was significantly elevated in the exercised groups compared with non-exercised counterparts. Conclusion Vit D insufficiency deteriorates metabolic syndrome components, and elevates serum BDNF as a compensatory metabotropic factor, and further supplementation significantly attenuates these components parallel with reduction in BDNF. In addition, aerobic exercise successfully induces various metabolic benefits, provided optimum serum level of Vit D.

  9. The role of glutamate in neuronal ion homeostasis: A case study of spreading depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Hübel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous changes in ion concentrations, glutamate, and cell volume together with exchange of matter between cell network and vasculature are ubiquitous in numerous brain pathologies. A complete understanding of pathological conditions as well as normal brain function, therefore, hinges on elucidating the molecular and cellular pathways involved in these mostly interdependent variations. In this paper, we develop the first computational framework that combines the Hodgkin-Huxley type spiking dynamics, dynamic ion concentrations and glutamate homeostasis, neuronal and astroglial volume changes, and ion exchange with vasculature into a comprehensive model to elucidate the role of glutamate uptake in the dynamics of spreading depolarization (SD-the electrophysiological event underlying numerous pathologies including migraine, ischemic stroke, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hematoma, and trauma. We are particularly interested in investigating the role of glutamate in the duration and termination of SD caused by K+ perfusion and oxygen-glucose deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glutamate signaling plays a key role in the dynamics of SD, and that impaired glutamate uptake leads to recovery failure of neurons from SD. We confirm predictions from our model experimentally by showing that inhibiting astrocytic glutamate uptake using TFB-TBOA nearly quadruples the duration of SD in layers 2-3 of visual cortical slices from juvenile rats. The model equations are either derived purely from first physical principles of electroneutrality, osmosis, and conservation of particles or a combination of these principles and known physiological facts. Accordingly, we claim that our approach can be used as a future guide to investigate the role of glutamate, ion concentrations, and dynamics cell volume in other brain pathologies and normal brain function.

  10. The role of glutamate in neuronal ion homeostasis: A case study of spreading depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübel, Niklas; Hosseini-Zare, Mahshid S; Žiburkus, Jokūbas; Ullah, Ghanim

    2017-10-01

    Simultaneous changes in ion concentrations, glutamate, and cell volume together with exchange of matter between cell network and vasculature are ubiquitous in numerous brain pathologies. A complete understanding of pathological conditions as well as normal brain function, therefore, hinges on elucidating the molecular and cellular pathways involved in these mostly interdependent variations. In this paper, we develop the first computational framework that combines the Hodgkin-Huxley type spiking dynamics, dynamic ion concentrations and glutamate homeostasis, neuronal and astroglial volume changes, and ion exchange with vasculature into a comprehensive model to elucidate the role of glutamate uptake in the dynamics of spreading depolarization (SD)-the electrophysiological event underlying numerous pathologies including migraine, ischemic stroke, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hematoma, and trauma. We are particularly interested in investigating the role of glutamate in the duration and termination of SD caused by K+ perfusion and oxygen-glucose deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glutamate signaling plays a key role in the dynamics of SD, and that impaired glutamate uptake leads to recovery failure of neurons from SD. We confirm predictions from our model experimentally by showing that inhibiting astrocytic glutamate uptake using TFB-TBOA nearly quadruples the duration of SD in layers 2-3 of visual cortical slices from juvenile rats. The model equations are either derived purely from first physical principles of electroneutrality, osmosis, and conservation of particles or a combination of these principles and known physiological facts. Accordingly, we claim that our approach can be used as a future guide to investigate the role of glutamate, ion concentrations, and dynamics cell volume in other brain pathologies and normal brain function.

  11. Exposure to high glutamate concentration activates aerobic glycolysis but inhibits ATP-linked respiration in cultured cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Shi, Xiaojie; Yang, Jianbo; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in removing the synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space and maintaining the glutamate below neurotoxic level in the brain. However, high concentration of glutamate leads to toxicity in astrocytes, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether energy metabolism disorder, especially impairment of mitochondrial respiration, is involved in the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. Exposure to 10-mM glutamate for 48 h stimulated glycolysis and respiration in astrocytes. However, the increased oxygen consumption was used for proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration, but not for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. When the exposure time extended to 72 h, glycolysis was still activated for ATP generation, but the mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration of astrocytes was reduced. The glutamate-induced astrocyte damage can be mimicked by the non-metabolized substrate d-aspartate but reversed by the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA. In addition, the glutamate toxicity can be partially reversed by vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that changes of bioenergetic profile occur in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to high concentration of glutamate and highlight the role of mitochondria respiration in glutamate-induced gliotoxicity in cortical astrocytes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Re-engineering therapeutic antibodies for Alzheimer's disease as blood-brain barrier penetrating bi-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, drug development of therapeutic antibodies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires that these molecules be re-engineered to enable BBB delivery. This is possible by joining the therapeutic antibody with a transporter antibody, resulting in the engineering of a BBB-penetrating bispecific antibody (BSA). Areas covered: The manuscript covers transporter antibodies that cross the BBB via receptor-mediated transport systems on the BBB, such as the insulin receptor or transferrin receptor. Furthermore, it highlights therapeutic antibodies for AD that target the Abeta amyloid peptide, beta secretase-1, or the metabotropic glutamate receptor-1. BSAs are comprised of both the transporter antibody and the therapeutic antibody, as well as IgG constant region, which can induce immune tolerance or trigger transport via Fc receptors. Expert opinion: Multiple types of BSA molecular designs have been used to engineer BBB-penetrating BSAs, which differ in valency and spatial orientation of the transporter and therapeutic domains of the BSA. The plasma pharmacokinetics and dosing regimens of BSAs differ from that of conventional therapeutic antibodies. BBB-penetrating BSAs may be engineered in the future as new treatments of AD, as well as other neural disorders.

  13. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  14. The glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycle: importance of late postnatal development and potential reciprocal interactions between biosynthesis and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for studies of glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR, showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g. immunohistochemistry, brain slices, cultured brain cells and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding i the enzyme(s responsible for the initial conversion of -ketoglutarate to glutamate; ii the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and iii the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine-glutamate(GABA cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10-12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later development.

  15. Increase of extracellular glutamate concentration increases its oxidation and diminishes glucose oxidation in isolated mouse hippocampus: reversible by TFB-TBOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Hansen, Fernanda; Locks-Coelho, Lucas Doridio

    2013-08-01

    Glutamate concentration at the synaptic level must be kept low in order to prevent excitotoxicity. Astrocytes play a key role in brain energetics, and also astrocytic glutamate transporters are responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in CNS. Experiments with primary astrocytic cultures suggest that increased influx of glutamate cotransported with sodium at astrocytes favors its flux to the tricarboxylic acid cycle instead of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Although metabolic coupling can be considered an emergent field of research with important recent discoveries, some basic aspects of glutamate metabolism still have not been characterized in brain tissue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of extracellular glutamate is able to modulate the use of glutamate and glucose as energetic substrates. For this purpose, isolated hippocampi of mice were incubated with radiolabeled substrates, and CO2 radioactivity and extracellular lactate were measured. Our results point to a diminished oxidation of glucose with increasing extracellular glutamate concentration, glutamate presumably being the fuel, and might suggest that oxidation of glutamate could buffer excitotoxic conditions by high glutamate concentrations. In addition, these findings were reversed when glutamate uptake by astrocytes was impaired by the presence of (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-L-aspartic acid (TFB-TBOA). Taken together, our findings argue against the lactate shuttle theory, because glutamate did not cause any detectable increase in extracellular lactate content (or, presumably, in glycolysis), because the glutamate is being used as fuel instead of going to glutamine and back to neurons. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Detailed Model of Electroenzymatic Glutamate Biosensors To Aid in Sensor Optimization and in Applications in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Mackenzie; Monbouquette, Harold G

    2018-02-21

    Simulations conducted with a detailed model of glutamate biosensor performance describe the observed sensor performance well, illustrate the limits of sensor performance, and suggest a path toward sensor optimization. Glutamate is the most important excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, and electroenzymatic sensors have emerged as a useful tool for the monitoring of glutamate signaling in vivo. However, the utility of these sensors currently is limited by their sensitivity and response time. A mathematical model of a typical glutamate biosensor consisting of a Pt electrode coated with a permselective polymer film and a top layer of cross-linked glutamate oxidase has been constructed in terms of differential material balances on glutamate, H 2 O 2 , and O 2 in one spatial dimension. Simulations suggest that reducing thicknesses of the permselective polymer and enzyme layers can increase sensitivity ∼6-fold and reduce response time ∼7-fold, and thereby improve resolution of transient glutamate signals. At currently employed enzyme layer thicknesses, both intrinsic enzyme kinetics and enzyme deactivation likely are masked by mass transfer. However, O 2 -dependence studies show essentially no reduction in signal at the lowest anticipated O 2 concentrations for expected glutamate concentrations in the brain and that O 2 transport limitations in vitro are anticipated only at glutamate concentrations in the mM range. Finally, the limitations of current biosensors in monitoring glutamate transients is simulated and used to illustrate the need for optimized biosensors to report glutamate signaling accurately on a subsecond time scale. This work demonstrates how a detailed model can be used to guide optimization of electroenzymatic sensors similar to that for glutamate and to ensure appropriate interpretation of data gathered using such biosensors.

  17. Modeling of glutamate-induced dynamical patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurby-Bentzen, Christian Krefeld; Zhabotinsky, A.M.; Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2009-01-01

    Based on established physiological mechanisms, the paper presents a detailed computer model, which supports the hypothesis that temporal lobe epilepsy may be caused by failure of glutamate reuptake from the extracellular space. The elevated glutamate concentration causes an increased activation...

  18. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    Neurons are metabolically handicapped in the sense that they are not able to perform de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from glucose. A metabolite shuttle known as the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle describes the release of neurotransmitter glutamate...... or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism...... of intercellular transfer of ammonia produced in neurons (when glutamine is deamidated to glutamate) and utilized in astrocytes (for amidation of glutamate) when the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle is operating. A main objective of this review is to endorse the view that the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle must...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations, restrictions, or...

  20. The respective N-hydroxypyrazole analogues of the classical glutamate receptor ligands ibotenic acid and (RS)-2-amino-2-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)acetic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Hansen, Kasper B; Calí, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the pharmacological activity of N-hydroxypyrazole analogues (3a and 4a) of the classical glutamate receptor ligands ibotenic acid and (RS)-2-amino-2-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)acetic acid (AMAA), as well as substituted derivatives of these two compounds. The pharmacological...... partial agonism to antagonism with increasing substituent size, substitution abolishes affinity for mglu1 and mglu4 receptors. Ligand- and receptor-based modelling approaches assist in explaining these pharmacological trends among the metabotropic receptors and suggest a mechanism of partial agonism...

  1. Biochemical characterization of an autoradiographic method for studying excitatory amino acid receptors using L-[3H]glutamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cincotta, M.; Summers, R.J.; Beart, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed for radiolabeling excitatory amino acid receptors of rat brain with L-[ 3 H]glutamate. Effective labeling of glutamate receptors in slide-mounted 10-microns sections was obtained using a low incubation volume (0.15 ml) and rapid washing: a procedure where high ligand concentrations were achieved with minimal waste. Saturation experiments using [ 3 H]glutamate revealed a single binding site of micromolar affinity. The Bmax was trebled in the presence of Ca2+ (2.5 mM) and Cl- (20 mM) with no change in the Kd. Binding was rapid, saturable, stereospecific, and sensitive to glutamate receptor agonists. The proportions of [ 3 H]glutamate binding sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) were 34, 54, and 51%, respectively. NMDA inhibited binding at a distinct subset of L-[ 3 H]glutamate sites, whereas AMPA and kainate competed for some common sites. Labeling of sections with L-[ 3 H]glutamate in the presence of the selective agonists allowed autoradiographic visualization of glutamate receptor subtypes in brain tissue

  2. Markers of glutamate signaling in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pålsson, Erik; Jakobsson, Joel; Södersten, Kristoffer; Fujita, Yuko; Sellgren, Carl; Ekman, Carl-Johan; Ågren, Hans; Hashimoto, Kenji; Landén, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Aberrations in glutamate signaling have been linked to the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Increased plasma levels of glutamate as well as higher glutamine+glutamate levels in the brain have been demonstrated in patients with bipolar disorder as compared to healthy controls. In this study, we explored the glutamate hypothesis of bipolar disorder by examining peripheral and central levels of amino acids related to glutamate signaling. A total of 215 patients with bipolar disorder and 112 healthy controls from the Swedish St. Göran bipolar project were included in this study. Glutamate, glutamine, glycine, L-serine and D-serine levels were determined in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Serum levels of glutamine, glycine and D-serine were significantly higher whereas L-serine levels were lower in patients with bipolar disorder as compared to controls. No differences between the patient and control group in amino acid levels were observed in cerebrospinal fluid. The observed differences in serum amino acid levels may be interpreted as a systemic aberration in amino acid metabolism that affects several amino acids related to glutamate signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluorescence imaging of glutamate release in neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ziqiang; Yeung, Edward S.

    1999-01-01

    A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging is down to μM levels of glutamate with reasonable response time (∼30 s). The standard glutamate test shows a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude, from μM to 0.1 mM range. The in vitro monitoring of glutamate release from cultured neuron cells demonstrated excellent spatial and temporal resolution. (c) 1999 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  4. Quantitative autoradiographic distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in rat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenamyre, J.T.; Young, A.B.; Penney, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to determine the distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in the rat central nervous system. Autoradiography was carried out in the presence of Cl- and Ca2+ ions. Scatchard plots and Hill coefficients of glutamate binding suggested that glutamate was interacting with a single population of sites having a K-D of about 300 nM and a capacity of 14.5 pmol/mg of protein. In displacement studies, ibotenate also appeared to bind to a single class of non-interacting sites with a KI of 28 microM. However, quisqualate displacement of [3H]glutamate binding revealed two well-resolved sites with KIS of 12 nM and 114 microM in striatum. These sites were unevenly distributed, representing different proportions of specific glutamate binding in different brain regions. The distribution of glutamate-binding sites correlated very well with the projection areas of putative glutamatergic pathways. This technique provides an extremely sensitive assay which can be used to gather detailed pharmacological and anatomical information about L-[3H]glutamate binding in the central nervous system

  5. Elevated glutamine/glutamate ratio in cerebrospinal fluid of first episode and drug naive schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindström Leif H

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies report that glutamine is altered in the brains of schizophrenic patients. There were also conflicting findings on glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of schizophrenic patients, and absent for glutamine. This study aims to clarify the question of glutamine and glutamate in CSF of first episode and drug naive schizophrenic patients. Method Levels of glutamine and glutamate in CSF of 25 first episode and drug-naive male schizophrenic patients and 17 age-matched male healthy controls were measured by a high performance liquid chromatography. Results The ratio (126.1 (median, 117.7 ± 27.4 (mean ± S.D. of glutamine to glutamate in the CSF of patients was significantly (z = -3.29, p = 0.001 higher than that (81.01 (median, 89.1 ± 22.5 (mean ± S.D. of normal controls although each level of glutamine and glutamate in patients was not different from that of normal controls. Conclusion Our data suggests that a disfunction in glutamate-glutamine cycle in the brain may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  6. Astrocytic control of biosynthesis and turnover of the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate and GABA are the quantitatively major neurotransmitters in the brain mediating excitatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively. These amino acids are metabolically interrelated and at the same time they are tightly coupled to the intermediary metabolism including energy homeostasis....... Astrocytes play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA since only these cells express pyruvate carboxylase, the enzyme required for de novo synthesis of the two amino acids. Such de novo synthesis is obligatory to compensate for catabolism of glutamate and GABA...... related to oxidative metabolism when the amino acids are used as energy substrates. This, in turn, is influenced by the extent to which the cycling of the amino acids between neurons and astrocytes may occur. This cycling is brought about by the glutamate/GABA - glutamine cycle the operation of which...

  7. VGLUTs and Glutamate Synthesis—Focus on DRG Neurons and Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Malet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid glutamate is the principal excitatory transmitter in the nervous system, including in sensory neurons that convey pain sensation from the periphery to the brain. It is now well established that a family of membrane proteins, termed vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs, serve a critical function in these neurons: they incorporate glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUTs have a central role both under normal neurotransmission and pathological conditions, such as neuropathic or inflammatory pain. In the present short review, we will address VGLUTs in the context of primary afferent neurons. We will focus on the role of VGLUTs in pain triggered by noxious stimuli, peripheral nerve injury, and tissue inflammation, as mostly explored in transgenic mice. The possible interplay between glutamate biosynthesis and VGLUT-dependent packaging in synaptic vesicles, and its potential impact in various pain states will be presented.

  8. Glutamate and GABA in appetite regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cardoso Delgado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms.Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using 13C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdán group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-13C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-13C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the

  9. Sexual attraction enhances glutamate transmission in mammalian anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional human brain imaging studies have indicated the essential role of cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in romantic love and sex. However, the neurobiological basis of how the ACC neurons are activated and engaged in sexual attraction remains unknown. Using transgenic mice in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP is controlled by the promoter of the activity-dependent gene c-fos, we found that ACC pyramidal neurons are activated by sexual attraction. The presynaptic glutamate release to the activated neurons is increased and pharmacological inhibition of neuronal activities in the ACC reduced the interest of male mice to female mice. Our results present direct evidence of the critical role of the ACC in sexual attraction, and long-term increases in glutamate mediated excitatory transmission may contribute to sexual attraction between male and female mice.

  10. Chronic postnatal stress induces voluntary alcohol intake and modifies glutamate transporters in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeon, María Mercedes; Andreu, Marcela; Yamauchi, Laura; Grosman, Mauricio; Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal stress alters stress responses for life, with serious consequences on the central nervous system (CNS), involving glutamatergic neurotransmission and development of voluntary alcohol intake. Several drugs of abuse, including alcohol and cocaine, alter glutamate transport (GluT). Here, we evaluated effects of chronic postnatal stress (CPS) on alcohol intake and brain glutamate uptake and transporters in male adolescent Wistar rats. For CPS from postnatal day (PD) 7, pups were separated from their mothers and exposed to cold stress (4 °C) for 1 h daily for 20 days; controls remained with their mothers. Then they were exposed to either voluntary ethanol (6%) or dextrose (1%) intake for 7 days (5-7 rats per group), then killed. CPS: (1) increased voluntary ethanol intake, (2) did not affect body weight gain or produce signs of toxicity with alcohol exposure, (3) increased glutamate uptake by hippocampal synaptosomes in vitro and (4) reduced protein levels (Western measurements) in hippocampus and frontal cortex of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and excitatory amino-acid transporter-3 (EAAT-3) but increased glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) levels. We propose that CPS-induced decrements in GLT-1 and EAAT-3 expression levels are opposed by activation of a compensatory mechanism to prevent excitotoxicity. A greater role for GLAST in total glutamate uptake to prevent enlarged extracellular glutamate levels is inferred. Although CPS strongly increased intake of ethanol, this had little impact on effects of CPS on brain glutamate uptake or transporters. However, the impact of early life adverse events on glutamatergic neurotransmission may underlie increased alcohol consumption in adulthood.

  11. Group I mGlu receptors potentiate synaptosomal [3H]glutamate release independently of exogenously applied arachidonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M.E.; Toms, N.J.; Bedingfield, J.S.; Roberts, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    In the current study, we have characterized group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor enhancement of 4-aminopyridine (4AP)-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The broad spectrum mGlu receptor agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD, 10 μM) increased 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (143.32±2.73% control) only in the presence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid; an effect reversed by the inclusion of bovine serum albumin (BSA, fatty acid free). In contrast, the selective group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) potentiated (EC 50 =1.60±0.25 μM; E max =147.61±10.96% control) 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release, in the absence of arachidonic acid. This potentiation could be abolished by either the selective mGlu 1 receptor antagonist (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, 1 mM) or the selective PKC inhibitor (Ro 31-8220, 10 μM) and was BSA-insensitive. The selective mGlu 5 receptor agonist (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG, 300μM) was without effect. DHPG (100 μM) also potentiated both 30 mM and 50 mM K + -evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (121.60±12.77% and 121.50±4.45% control, respectively). DHPG (100 μM) failed to influence both 4AP-stimulated 45 Ca 2+ influx and 50 mM K + -induced changes in synaptosomal membrane potential. Possible group I mGlu receptor suppression of tonic adenosine A 1 receptor, group II/III mGlu receptors or GABA B receptor activity is unlikely since 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release was insensitive to the selective inhibitory receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine, (R,S)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine or CGP55845A, respectively. These data suggest an 'mGlu 1 receptor-like' receptor potentiates [ 3 H]glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes in the absence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid. This PKC dependent effect is unlikely to be via modulation of synaptosomal membrane

  12. AMPK Activation Affects Glutamate Metabolism in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Caroline Marie; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    acid (TCA) cycle was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis supplemented with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technology. It was found that AMPK activation had profound effects on the pathways involved in glutamate metabolism since the entrance of the glutamate carbon...... on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes was studied using primary cultures of these cells from mouse cerebral cortex during incubation in media containing 2.5 mM glucose and 100 µM [U-(13)C]glutamate. The metabolism of glutamate including a detailed analysis of its metabolic pathways involving the tricarboxylic...... skeleton into the TCA cycle was reduced. On the other hand, glutamate uptake into the astrocytes as well as its conversion to glutamine catalyzed by glutamine synthetase was not affected by AMPK activation. Interestingly, synthesis and release of citrate, which are hallmarks of astrocytic function, were...

  13. Elevated baseline serum glutamate as a pharmacometabolomic biomarker for acamprosate treatment outcome in alcohol-dependent subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, H W; Karpyak, V M; Hinton, D J; Geske, J R; Ho, A M C; Prieto, M L; Biernacka, J M; Frye, M A; Weinshilboum, R M; Choi, D-S

    2015-01-01

    Acamprosate has been widely used since the Food and Drug Administration approved the medication for treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in 2004. Although the detailed molecular mechanism of acamprosate remains unclear, it has been largely known that acamprosate inhibits glutamate action in the brain. However, AUD is a complex and heterogeneous disorder. Thus, biomarkers are required to prescribe this medication to patients who will have the highest likelihood of responding positively. To identify pharmacometabolomic biomarkers of acamprosate response, we utilized serum samples from 120 alcohol-dependent subjects, including 71 responders (maintained continuous abstinence) and 49 non-responders (any alcohol use) during 12 weeks of acamprosate treatment. Notably, baseline serum glutamate levels were significantly higher in responders compared with non-responders. Importantly, serum glutamate levels of responders are normalized after acamprosate treatment, whereas there was no significant glutamate change in non-responders. Subsequent functional studies in animal models revealed that, in the absence of alcohol, acamprosate activates glutamine synthetase, which synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. These results suggest that acamprosate reduces serum glutamate levels for those who have elevated baseline serum glutamate levels among responders. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that elevated baseline serum glutamate levels are a potential biomarker associated with positive acamprosate response, which is an important step towards development of a personalized approach to treatment for AUD. PMID:26285131

  14. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration after Traumatic Brain Injury...Purpose: The purpose of this project is to develop a radically different strategy to reduce brain glutamate excitotoxicity and treat TBI. We will...objective of reducing blood levels of glutamate. This will produce a brain -to-blood gradient of glutamate which will enhance the removal of excess

  15. Impaired Hippocampal Glutamate and Glutamine Metabolism in the db/db Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Velde; Nissen, Jakob Dahl; Christensen, Sofie Kjellerup

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, and changes in brain energy metabolism have been suggested as a causative mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebral metabolism of the important amino acids glutamate and glutamine...... significantly reduced 13C labeling in glutamate, glutamine, GABA, citrate, and aspartate from metabolism of [U-13C]glutamate. Additionally, reduced 13C labeling were observed in GABA, citrate, and aspartate from [U-13C]glutamine metabolism in hippocampal slices of db/db mice when compared to controls. None...

  16. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Verwer, R.W.H.; van Wamelen, D.J.; Qi, X.R.; Gao, S.F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the

  17. Lentiviral Delivery of a Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 1 (VGLUT1)-Targeting Short Hairpin RNA Vector Into the Mouse Hippocampus Impairs Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, Madeleine V.; Kurian, Nisha; Qin, Si; Papadopoulou, Nektaria; Westerink, Ben H. C.; Cremers, Thomas I.; Epping-Jordan, Mark P.; Le Poul, Emmanuel; Ray, David E.; Fone, Kevin C. F.; Kendall, David A.; Marsden, Charles A.; Sharp, Tyson V.

    Glutamate is the principle excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, and dysregulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission is implicated in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric and neurological diseases. This study utilized novel lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) vectors to target

  18. Glutamate dehydrogenase is essential to sustain neuronal oxidative energy metabolism during stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Andersen, Jens V

    2017-01-01

    by glutamate was significantly lower in brain mitochondria from GDH KO mice and synaptosomes were not able to increase their respiration upon an elevated energy demand. The role of GDH for metabolism of glutamine and the respiratory capacity underscore the importance of GDH for neurons particularly during...

  19. Vulnerability to glutamate toxicity of dopaminergic neurons is dependent on endogenous dopamine and MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Matsuo, Takaaki; Wakita, Seiko; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kume, Toshiaki; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki; Akaike, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    Dopaminergic neurons are more vulnerable than other types of neurons in cases of Parkinson disease and ischemic brain disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that endogenous dopamine plays a role in the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons. Although glutamate toxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders, the sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to glutamate toxicity has not been clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that dopaminergic neurons were preferentially affected by glutamate toxicity in rat mesencephalic cultures. Glutamate toxicity in dopaminergic neurons was blocked by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK. Furthermore, depletion of dopamine by alpha-methyl-dl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (alpha-MT), an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), protected dopaminergic neurons from the neurotoxicity. Exposure to glutamate facilitated phosphoryration of TH at Ser31 by ERK, which contributes to the increased TH activity. Inhibition of ERK had no additive effect on the protection offered by alpha-MT, whereas alpha-MT and c-jun N-terminal kinase or p38 MAPK inhibitors had additive effects and yielded full protection. These data suggest that endogenous dopamine is responsible for the vulnerability to glutamate toxicity of dopaminergic neurons and one of the mechanisms may be an enhancement of dopamine synthesis mediated by ERK.

  20. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions. PMID:25749299

  1. Glucose, Lactate, β-Hydroxybutyrate, Acetate, GABA, and Succinate as Substrates for Synthesis of Glutamate and GABA in the Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2016-01-01

    The glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle is an astrocytic-neuronal pathway transferring precursors for transmitter glutamate and GABA from astrocytes to neurons. In addition, the cycle carries released transmitter back to astrocytes, where a minor fraction (~25 %) is degraded (requiring a similar amount of resynthesis) and the remainder returned to the neurons for reuse. The flux in the cycle is intense, amounting to the same value as neuronal glucose utilization rate or 75-80 % of total cortical glucose consumption. This glucose:glutamate ratio is reduced when high amounts of β-hydroxybutyrate are present, but β-hydroxybutyrate can at most replace 60 % of glucose during awake brain function. The cycle is initiated by α-ketoglutarate production in astrocytes and its conversion via glutamate to glutamine which is released. A crucial reaction in the cycle is metabolism of glutamine after its accumulation in neurons. In glutamatergic neurons all generated glutamate enters the mitochondria and its exit to the cytosol occurs in a process resembling the malate-aspartate shuttle and therefore requiring concomitant pyruvate metabolism. In GABAergic neurons one half enters the mitochondria, whereas the other one half is released directly from the cytosol. A revised concept is proposed for the synthesis and metabolism of vesicular and nonvesicular GABA. It includes the well-established neuronal GABA reuptake, its metabolism, and use for resynthesis of vesicular GABA. In contrast, mitochondrial glutamate is by transamination to α-ketoglutarate and subsequent retransamination to releasable glutamate essential for the transaminations occurring during metabolism of accumulated GABA and subsequent resynthesis of vesicular GABA.

  2. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pss; Yallapu, Murali M; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B; Kumar, Santosh

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described.

  3. Pharmacological or genetic orexin 1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah eAluisio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors. The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C. which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient or genetic (permanent inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states.

  4. Regulation of neuronal pH by the metabotropic Zn(2+)-sensing Gq-coupled receptor, mZnR/GPR39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganay, Thibault; Asraf, Hila; Aizenman, Elias; Bogdanovic, Milos; Sekler, Israel; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Synaptically released Zn(2+) acts as a neurotransmitter, in part, by activating the postsynaptic metabotropic Zn(2+)-sensing Gq protein-coupled receptor (mZnR/GPR39). In previous work using epithelial cells, we described crosstalk between Zn(2+) signaling and changes in intracellular pH and/or extracellular pH (pHe). As pH changes accompany neuronal activity under physiological and pathological conditions, we tested whether Zn(2+) signaling is involved in regulation of neuronal pH. Here, we report that up-regulation of a major H(+) extrusion pathway, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), is induced by mZnR/GPR39 activation in an extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons in vitro. We also observed that changes in pHe can modulate neuronal mZnR/GPR39-dependent signaling, resulting in reduced activity at pHe 8 or 6.5. Similarly, Zn(2+)-dependent extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and up-regulation of NHE activity were absent at acidic pHe. Thus, our results suggest that when pHe is maintained within the physiological range, mZnR/GPR39 activation can up-regulate NHE-dependent recovery from intracellular acidification. During acidosis, as pHe drops, mZnR/GPR39-dependent NHE activation is inhibited, thereby attenuating further H(+) extrusion. This mechanism may serve to protect neurons from excessive decreases in pHe. Thus, mZnR/GPR39 signaling provides a homeostatic adaptive process for regulation of intracellular and extracellular pH changes in the brain. We show that the postsynaptic metabotropic Zn(2+)-sensing Gq protein-coupled receptor (mZnR/GPR39) activation induces up-regulation of a major neuronal H(+) extrusion pathway, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), thereby enhancing neuronal recovery from intracellular acidification. Changes in extracellular pH (pHe), however, modulate neuronal mZnR/GPR39-dependent signaling, resulting in reduced activity at pHe 8 or 6.5. This mechanism may serve to protect neurons from excessive

  5. Taurine activates delayed rectifier KV channels via a metabotropic pathway in retinal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulley, Simon; Liu, Yufei; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Taurine is one of the most abundant amino acids in the retina, throughout the CNS, and in heart and muscle cells. In keeping with its broad tissue distribution, taurine serves as a modulator of numerous basic processes, such as enzyme activity, cell development, myocardial function and cytoprotection. Despite this multitude of functional roles, the precise mechanism underlying taurine's actions has not yet been identified. In this study we report findings that indicate a novel role for taurine in the regulation of voltage-gated delayed rectifier potassium (KV) channels in retinal neurons by means of a metabotropic receptor pathway. The metabotropic taurine response was insensitive to the Cl− channel blockers, picrotoxin and strychnine, but it was inhibited by a specific serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, MDL11939. Moreover, we found that taurine enhanced KV channels via intracellular protein kinase C-mediated pathways. When 5-HT2A receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney cells, taurine and AL34662, a non-specific 5-HT2 receptor activator, produced a similar regulation of KIR channels. In sum, this study provides new evidence that taurine activates a serotonin system, apparently via 5-HT2A receptors and related intracellular pathways. PMID:23045337

  6. Resolution, configurational assignment, and enantiopharmacology at glutamate receptors of 2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) and demethyl-ACPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Stensbøl, T B; Nielsen, B

    2001-01-01

    We have previously described (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) as a potent agonist at the (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subtype of (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) receptors. We now report the chromatographic resolution...... of ACPA and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (demethyl-ACPA) using a Sumichiral OA-5000 column. The configuration of the enantiomers of both compounds have been assigned based on X-ray crystallographic analyses, supported by circular dichroism spectra and elution orders on chiral HPLC...... columns. Furthermore, the enantiopharmacology of ACPA and demethyl-ACPA was investigated using radioligand binding and cortical wedge electrophysiological assay systems and cloned metabotropic Glu receptors. (S)-ACPA showed high affinity in AMPA binding (IC(50) = 0.025 microM), low affinity in kainic acid...

  7. Central transport and distribution of labelled glutamic and aspartic acids to the cochlear nucleus in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, E.S.

    1979-01-01

    Tritiated L-glutamic acid or L-aspartic acid was injected unilaterally into the cochleas of adult cats, and 4 h-7 days later the localization of label was studied by light-microscopic autoradiography in sections of the brain stem. Consistent differences in labelling after glutamate and after aspartate suggest differences in their uptake, metabolic conversion and/or transport to the cochlear nucleus by cochlear fibers. The morphological differences shown here agree with the distribution of those two amino acids in the cat cochlear nucleus as shown by microchemical analyses. (author)

  8. Downregulation of the Glial GLT1 Glutamate Transporter and Purkinje Cell Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Sicot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain function is compromised in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To gain insight into the cellular and molecular pathways primarily affected, we studied a mouse model of DM1 and brains of adult patients. We found pronounced RNA toxicity in the Bergmann glia of the cerebellum, in association with abnormal Purkinje cell firing and fine motor incoordination in DM1 mice. A global proteomics approach revealed downregulation of the GLT1 glutamate transporter in DM1 mice and human patients, which we found to be the result of MBNL1 inactivation. GLT1 downregulation in DM1 astrocytes increases glutamate neurotoxicity and is detrimental to neurons. Finally, we demonstrated that the upregulation of GLT1 corrected Purkinje cell firing and motor incoordination in DM1 mice. Our findings show that glial defects are critical in DM1 brain pathophysiology and open promising therapeutic perspectives through the modulation of glutamate levels.

  9. A radiometric microassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maderdrut, J.L.; North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill

    1979-01-01

    A simple method for purifying L-[ 3 H] glutamic acid and incubation conditions suitable for estimating L-glutamic acid decarboxylase activity are described. Routine and recycled cation-exchange procedure for separating γ-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamate are outlined and compared. Recycling increases the sensitivity of the cation-exchange method by 6-7 fold. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity can be measured reliably in samples of embryonic neural tissue having wet-weights of approximately 1 μg. The cation-exchange method is compared with the anion-exchange and CO 2 -trapping methods. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in the lumbar spinal cord of the chick embryo at Day 21/4 (stage 14) using the cation-exchange method. This is 5-6 days earlier than L-glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in embryonic neural tissue by previous investigators. L-Glutamate decarboxylase is present in the lumbar spinal cord at least as early as the birth of the first lumbar spinal cord neurons and at least 1-2 days before the initiation of synaptogenesis. (author)

  10. Radiometric microassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maderdrut, J L [North Carolina Dept. of Mental Health, Raleigh (USA); North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill (USA). School of Medicine)

    1979-01-01

    A simple method for purifying L-(/sup 3/H) glutamic acid and incubation conditions suitable for estimating L-glutamic acid decarboxylase activity are described. Routine and recycled cation-exchange procedure for separating ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamate are outlined and compared. Recycling increases the sensitivity of the cation-exchange method by 6-7 fold. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity can be measured reliably in samples of embryonic neural tissue having wet-weights of approximately 1 ..mu..g. The cation-exchange method is compared with the anion-exchange and CO/sub 2/-trapping methods. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in the lumbar spinal cord of the chick embryo at Day 21/4 (stage 14) using the cation-exchange method. This is 5-6 days earlier than L-glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in embryonic neural tissue by previous investigators. L-Glutamate decarboxylase is present in the lumbar spinal cord at least as early as the birth of the first lumbar spinal cord neurons and at least 1-2 days before the initiation of synaptogenesis.

  11. Synaptosomal transport of radiolabel from N-acetyl-aspartyl-(/sup 3/H)glutamate suggests a mechanism of inactivation of an excitatory neuropeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, R D; Ory-Lavollee, L; Thompson, R C; Coyle, J T

    1986-10-01

    This study was undertaken to explore in synaptosomal preparations the disposition of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), an endogenous acidic dipeptide neurotransmitter candidate. Radiolabel from N-acetyl-aspartyl(/sup 3/H)glutamate was taken up rapidly into an osmotically sensitive compartment by rat brain synaptosomal preparations in a sodium-, temperature-, and time-dependent manner. HPLC analysis of the accumulated radiolabel indicated that the bulk of the tritium cochromatographed with glutamic acid and not with NAAG. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)NAAG, labeled on the N-terminal acetate, was not taken up by the synaptosomal preparation. All effective inhibitors of synaptosomal, Na+-dependent (/sup 3/H)glutamate uptake were found to exhibit similar potency in inhibiting uptake of tritium derived from (/sup 3/H)NAAG. However, certain alpha-linked acidic dipeptides, structurally similar to NAAG, as well as the potent convulsant quisqualic acid inhibited synaptosomal transport of (/sup 3/H)NAAG but were ineffective as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)glutamate transport. Together with a demonstration of disparities between the regional accumulation of radiolabel from (/sup 3/H)NAAG and high-affinity (/sup 3/H)glutamate uptake, these data suggest the presence in brain of a specific peptidase targeting carboxy-terminal glutamate-containing dipeptides that may be coupled to the Na+-dependent glutamate transporter. These findings provide a possible mechanism for NAAG inactivation subsequent to its release from nerve endings.

  12. Effects of 17beta-estradiol on glutamate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Scarduzio, M; Dutia, M B; Dieni, C; Pettorossi, V E

    2010-02-17

    We investigated the effects of the neurosteroid 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) on the evoked and spontaneous activity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in brainstem slices. E(2) enhances the synaptic response to vestibular nerve stimulation in type B neurons and depresses the spontaneous discharge in both type A and B neurons. The amplitude of the field potential, as well as the excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP) and current (EPSC), in type B neurons, are enhanced by E(2). Both effects are long-term phenomena since they outlast the drug washout. The enhancement of synaptic response is mainly due to facilitation of glutamate release mediated by pre-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), since the reduction of paired pulse ratio (PPR) and the increase of miniature EPSC frequency after E(2) are abolished under D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). E(2) also facilitates post-synaptic NMDARs, but it does not affect directly alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) and group I-metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs-I). In contrast, the depression of the spontaneous discharge of type A and type B neurons appears to depend on E(2) modulation of intrinsic ion conductances, as the effect remains after blockade of glutamate, GABA and glycine receptors (GlyRs). The net effect of E(2) is to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the synaptic response in type B neurons, relative to resting activity of all MVN neurons. These findings provide evidence for a novel potential mechanism to modulate the responsiveness of vestibular neurons to afferent inputs, and so regulate vestibular function in vivo.

  13. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  14. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K + channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca 2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] C ), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na + /Ca 2+ exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. ► This action did

  15. Altered astrocyte glutamate transporter regulation of hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapenko, Evgeniy S; Biancardi, Vinicia C; Zhou, Yiqiang; Stern, Javier E

    2012-08-01

    Neurohumoral activation, which includes augmented plasma levels of the neurohormone vasopressin (VP), is a common finding in heart failure (HF) that contributes to morbidity and mortality in this disease. While an increased activation of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) and enhanced glutamate function in HF is well documented, the precise underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we combined electrophysiology and protein measurements to determine whether altered glial glutamate transporter function and/or expression occurs in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus (SON) during HF. Patch-clamp recordings obtained from MNCs in brain slices show that pharmacological blockade of astrocyte glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) function [500 μM dihydrokainate (DHK)], resulted in a persistent N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated inward current (tonic I(NMDA)) in sham rats, an effect that was significantly smaller in MNCs from HF rats. In addition, we found a diminished GLT1 protein content in plasma membrane (but not cytosolic) fractions of SON punches in HF rats. Conversely, astrocyte GLAST expression was significantly higher in the SON of HF rats, while nonselective blockade of glutamate transport activity (100 μM TBOA) evoked an enhanced tonic I(NMDA) activation in HF rats. Steady-state activation of NMDARs by extracellular glutamate levels was diminished during HF. Taken together, these results support a shift in the relative expression and function of two major glial glutamate transporters (from GLT1 to GLAST predominance) during HF. This shift may act as a compensatory mechanism to preserve an adequate basal glutamate uptake level in the face of an enhanced glutamatergic afferent activity in HF rats.

  16. Towards a glutamate hypothesis of depression: an emerging frontier of neuropsychopharmacology for mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanacora, Gerard; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Half a century after the first formulation of the monoamine hypothesis, compelling evidence implies that long-term changes in an array of brain areas and circuits mediating complex cognitive-emotional behaviors represent the biological underpinnings of mood/anxiety disorders. A large number of clinical studies suggest that pathophysiology is associated with dysfunction of the predominant glutamatergic system, malfunction in the mechanisms regulating clearance and metabolism of glutamate, and cytoarchitectural/morphological maladaptive changes in a number of brain areas mediating cognitive-emotional behaviors. Concurrently, a wealth of data from animal models have shown that different types of environmental stress enhance glutamate release/transmission in limbic/cortical areas and exert powerful structural effects, inducing dendritic remodeling, reduction of synapses and possibly volumetric reductions resembling those observed in depressed patients. Because a vast majority of neurons and synapses in these areas and circuits use glutamate as neurotransmitter, it would be limiting to maintain that glutamate is in some way 'involved' in mood/anxiety disorders; rather it should be recognized that the glutamatergic system is a primary mediator of psychiatric pathology and, potentially, also a final common pathway for the therapeutic action of antidepressant agents. A paradigm shift from a monoamine hypothesis of depression to a neuroplasticity hypothesis focused on glutamate may represent a substantial advancement in the working hypothesis that drives research for new drugs and therapies. Importantly, despite the availability of multiple classes of drugs with monoamine-based mechanisms of action, there remains a large percentage of patients who fail to achieve a sustained remission of depressive symptoms. The unmet need for improved pharmacotherapies for treatment-resistant depression means there is a large space for the development of new compounds with novel mechanisms

  17. Atorvastatin and Fluoxetine Prevent Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Evoked by Glutamate Toxicity in Hippocampal Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludka, Fabiana K; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Binder, Luisa Bandeira; Constantino, Leandra Celso; Massari, Caio; Tasca, Carla I

    2017-07-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to exert a neuroprotective action by counteracting glutamatergic toxicity. Recently, we have shown atorvastatin also exerts an antidepressant-like effect that depends on both glutamatergic and serotonergic systems modulation. Excitotoxicity is involved in several brain disorders including depression; thus, it is suggested that antidepressants may target glutamatergic system as a final common pathway. In this study, a comparison of the mechanisms involved in the putative neuroprotective effect of a repetitive atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal slices was performed. Adult Swiss mice were treated with atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, p.o.), once a day during seven consecutive days. On the eighth day, animals were killed and hippocampal slices were obtained and subjected to an in vitro protocol of glutamate toxicity. An acute treatment of atorvastatin or fluoxetine was not neuroprotective; however, the repeated atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment prevented the decrease in cellular viability induced by glutamate in hippocampal slices. The loss of cellular viability induced by glutamate was accompanied by increased D-aspartate release, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine repeated treatment also presented an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment was effective in protecting mice hippocampal slices from glutamate toxicity by preventing the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Lateral Preoptic Control of the Lateral Habenula through Convergent Glutamate and GABA Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Barker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The lateral habenula (LHb is a brain structure that participates in cognitive and emotional processing and has been implicated in several mental disorders. Although one of the largest inputs to the LHb originates in the lateral preoptic area (LPO, little is known about how the LPO participates in the regulation of LHb function. Here, we provide evidence that the LPO exerts bivalent control over the LHb through the convergent transmission of LPO glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo, both LPO-glutamatergic and LPO-GABAergic inputs to the LHb are activated by aversive stimuli, and their predictive cues yet produce opposing behaviors when stimulated independently. These results support a model wherein the balanced response of converging LPO-glutamate and LPO-GABA are necessary for a normal response to noxious stimuli, and an imbalance in LPO→LHb glutamate or GABA results in the type of aberrant processing that may underlie mental disorders. : Barker et al. show that distinct populations of lateral preoptic area glutamate and GABA neurons synapse together on single lateral habenula neurons and find that this “convergent neurotransmission” allows preoptic area neurons to exert bivalent control over single lateral habenula neurons and drive opposing motivational states. Keywords: preoptic, habenula, reward, aversion, synapse, glutamate, GABA, stress, calcium imaging, optogenetics, electron microscopy

  19. The Effects of NAD+ on Apoptotic Neuronal Death and Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function after Glutamate Excitotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2014-01-01

    NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke. PMID:25387075

  20. Biobased synthesis of acrylonitrile from glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notre, le J.E.L.; Scott, E.L.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamic acid was transformed into acrylonitrile in a two step procedure involving an oxidative decarboxylation in water to 3-cyanopropanoic acid followed by a decarbonylation-elimination reaction using a palladium catalyst

  1. Functional Comparison of the Two Bacillus anthracis Glutamate Racemases▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Dylan; Reese, Joseph G.; Louer, Craig R.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Spies, M. Ashley; Blanke, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate racemase activity in Bacillus anthracis is of significant interest with respect to chemotherapeutic drug design, because l-glutamate stereoisomerization to d-glutamate is predicted to be closely associated with peptidoglycan and capsule biosynthesis, which are important for growth and virulence, respectively. In contrast to most bacteria, which harbor a single glutamate racemase gene, the genomic sequence of B. anthracis predicts two genes encoding glutamate racemases, racE1 and rac...

  2. Role of Na,K-ATPase α1 and α2 isoforms in the support of astrocyte glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina B Illarionova

    Full Text Available Glutamate released during neuronal activity is cleared from the synaptic space via the astrocytic glutamate/Na(+ co-transporters. This transport is driven by the transmembrane Na(+ gradient mediated by Na,K-ATPase. Astrocytes express two isoforms of the catalytic Na,K-ATPase α subunits; the ubiquitously expressed α1 subunit and the α2 subunit that has a more specific expression profile. In the brain α2 is predominantly expressed in astrocytes. The isoforms differ with regard to Na+ affinity, which is lower for α2. The relative roles of the α1 and α2 isoforms in astrocytes are not well understood. Here we present evidence that the presence of the α2 isoform may contribute to a more efficient restoration of glutamate triggered increases in intracellular sodium concentration [Na(+]i. Studies were performed on primary astrocytes derived from E17 rat striatum expressing Na,K-ATPase α1 and α2 and the glutamate/Na(+ co-transporter GLAST. Selective inhibition of α2 resulted in a modest increase of [Na(+]i accompanied by a disproportionately large decrease in uptake of aspartate, an indicator of glutamate uptake. To compare the capacity of α1 and α2 to handle increases in [Na(+]i triggered by glutamate, primary astrocytes overexpressing either α1 or α2 were used. Exposure to glutamate 200 µM caused a significantly larger increase in [Na(+]i in α1 than in α2 overexpressing cells, and as a consequence restoration of [Na(+]i, after glutamate exposure was discontinued, took longer time in α1 than in α2 overexpressing cells. Both α1 and α2 interacted with astrocyte glutamate/Na(+ co-transporters via the 1st intracellular loop.

  3. Cellular Origin of [18F]FDG-PET Imaging Signals During Ceftriaxone-Stimulated Glutamate Uptake: Astrocytes and Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A; Behar, Kevin L; Rothman, Douglas L

    2017-12-01

    Ceftriaxone stimulates astrocytic uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, and it is used to treat glutamatergic excitotoxicity that becomes manifest during many brain diseases. Ceftriaxone-stimulated glutamate transport was reported to drive signals underlying [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomographic ([ 18 F]FDG-PET) metabolic images of brain glucose utilization and interpreted as supportive of the notion of lactate shuttling from astrocytes to neurons. This study draws attention to critical roles of astrocytes in the energetics and imaging of brain activity, but the results are provocative because (1) the method does not have cellular resolution or provide information about downstream pathways of glucose metabolism, (2) neuronal and astrocytic [ 18 F]FDG uptake were not separately measured, and (3) strong evidence against lactate shuttling was not discussed. Evaluation of potential metabolic responses to ceftriaxone suggests lack of astrocytic specificity and significant contributions by pre- and postsynaptic neuronal compartments. Indeed, astrocytic glycolysis may not make a strong contribution to the [ 18 F]FDG-PET signal because partial or complete oxidation of one glutamate molecule on its uptake generates enough ATP to fuel uptake of 3 to 10 more glutamate molecules, diminishing reliance on glycolysis. The influence of ceftriaxone on energetics of glutamate-glutamine cycling must be determined in astrocytes and neurons to elucidate its roles in excitotoxicity treatment.

  4. Intracellular synthesis of glutamic acid in Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001, a glutamate-independent poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingyun; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Wanmeng; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001 is a glutamate-independent strain that produces poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a polymer of D- and L-glutamic acids that possesses applications in food, the environment, agriculture, etc. This study was undertaken to explore the synthetic pathway of intracellular L- and D-glutamic acid in SK19.001 by investigating the effects of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and different amino acids as metabolic precursors on the production of γ-PGA and analyzing the activities of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of L- and D-glutamate. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids could participate in the synthesis of γ-PGA via independent pathways in SK19.001. L-Aspartate aminotransferase, L-glutaminase and L-glutamate synthase were the enzymatic sources of L-glutamate. Glutamate racemase was responsible for the formation of D-glutamate for the synthesis of γ-PGA, and the synthetase had stereoselectivity for glutamate substrate. The enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were investigated for the first time in the glutamate-independent γ-PGA-producing strain, and multiple enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were verified in SK19.001, which will benefit efforts to improve production of γ-PGA with metabolic engineering strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Deep brain stimulation, histone deacetylase inhibitors and glutamatergic drugs rescue resistance to fear extinction in a genetic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Nigel; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Gunduz Cinar, Ozge; Hauschild, Markus; Ferraguti, Francesco; Holmes, Andrew; Singewald, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are characterized by persistent, excessive fear. Therapeutic interventions that reverse deficits in fear extinction represent a tractable approach to treating these disorders. We previously reported that 129S1/SvImJ (S1) mice show no extinction learning following normal fear conditioning. We now demonstrate that weak fear conditioning does permit fear reduction during massed extinction training in S1 mice, but reveals specific deficiency in extinction memory consolidation/retrieval. Rescue of this impaired extinction consolidation/retrieval was achieved with d-cycloserine (N-methly-d-aspartate partial agonist) or MS-275 (histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor), applied after extinction training. We next examined the ability of different drugs and non-pharmacological manipulations to rescue the extreme fear extinction deficit in S1 following normal fear conditioning with the ultimate aim to produce low fear levels in extinction retrieval tests. Results showed that deep brain stimulation (DBS) by applying high frequency stimulation to the nucleus accumbens (ventral striatum) during extinction training, indeed significantly reduced fear during extinction retrieval compared to sham stimulation controls. Rescue of both impaired extinction acquisition and deficient extinction consolidation/retrieval was achieved with prior extinction training administration of valproic acid (a GABAergic enhancer and HDAC inhibitor) or AMN082 [metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGlu7) agonist], while MS-275 or PEPA (AMPA receptor potentiator) failed to affect extinction acquisition in S1 mice. Collectively, these data identify potential beneficial effects of DBS and various drug treatments, including those with HDAC inhibiting or mGlu7 agonism properties, as adjuncts to overcome treatment resistance in exposure-based therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Cognitive Enhancers’. PMID:22722028

  6. Repeated potentiation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates behavioural and GABAergic deficits induced by early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP) treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Fejgin, Kim

    2013-01-01

    GluR5), ADX47273, and the partial agonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR), SSR180711. Adolescent rats (4-5 weeks) subjected to PCP treatment during the second postnatal week displayed a consistent deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI), which was reversed by a one-week treatment...

  7. Pharmacological characterization and modeling of the binding sites of novel 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)benzenes as metabotropic glutamate receptor 5-selective negative allosteric modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølck, Christina; Harpsøe, Kasper; Gloriam, David E

    2012-01-01

    )pyridine (MPEP)-derived negative allosteric modulators, 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB, have been characterized. 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB are 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)-benzenes and differ only by the position of the nitrogen atoms in the pyridine rings. Despite their high structural similarity, 2-BisPEB [1,3-bis(pyridin-2......-ylethynyl)-benzene, nitrogen atoms in ortho positions], with an IC(50) value in the nanomolar range, is significantly more potent than the 3- and 4-pyridyl analogs. Mutational analysis, directed by a previously published mGluR5 homology model, was used to determine key residues for the ligand...... that the higher potency of 2-BisPEB is due to hydrogen bonding to Ser809 because the S809A mutation made 2-BisPEB equipotent to 3- and 4-BisPEB (IC(50), 1-2.5 µM). The potency of MPEP was also greatly affected by S809A (52-fold), suggesting that a Ser809-mediated hydrogen bond is also a key interaction between...

  8. Posttreatment with group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate is only weakly effective on seizures in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Tsenov, Grygoriy; Haugvicová, Renata; Otáhal, Jakub

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1273, - (2009), s. 144-154 ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR GA309/08/0292; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/07/1137 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : DL-homocysteic acid-induced seizures * posttreatment with 2R * 4R-APDC * partial protection Subject RIV: FH - Neuro logy Impact factor: 2.463, year: 2009

  9. Metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors as neurobiological targets in anxiety and stress-related disorders: focus on pharmacology and preclinical translational models

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Brian H.; Shahid, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are amongst the most common and disabling of psychiatric illnesses and have severe health and socio-economic implications. Despite the availability of a number of treatment options there is still a strong medical need for novel and improved pharmacological approaches in treating these disorders. New developments at the forefront of preclinical research have begun to identify the therapeutic potential of molecular entities integral to the biological response to ad...

  10. Seizures induced by homocysteic acid in immature rats are prevented by group III metabotropic glutamate receptoragonist (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 180, č. 1 (2003), s. 46-54 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1238 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : immature rats * seizures * energy metabolites Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.676, year: 2003

  11. The metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 1S,3R-ACPD stimulates and modulates NMDA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, M; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Bonde, C

    2001-01-01

    the PI uptake in both CA1 and CA3, compared to cultures exposed to 10 microM NMDA only. Adding the 300 microM ACPD as pretreatment for 30 min followed by a 30 min wash in normal medium before the ACPD/NMDA co-exposure, eliminated the potentiation of NMDA toxicity. The potentiation was also blocked...

  12. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  13. The application of glutamic acid alpha-decarboxylase for the valorization of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Biase, De Daniela; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of nitrogen containing bulk chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. On the pathway from glutamic acid to a range of molecules, the

  14. Glutamate and GABA in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by a loss of brain tissue, which may represent an ongoing pathophysiological process. Possible mechanisms that may be involved are the glutamatergic and GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) systems. Particularly hypofunction of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of

  15. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses between the BTBR mice with low level sociability and B6 mice with high level sociability. The results revealed that the number of excitatory synapse colocalized with pre- and post-synaptic marker was not different between aged BTBR and B6 mice. The aged BTBR mice had a normal structure of dendritic spine and the expression of Shank3 protein in the brain as well as that in B6 mice. The baseline and KCl-evoked glutamate release from the cortical synaptoneurosome in aged BTBR mice was lower than that in aged B6 mice. Overall, the data indicate that there is a link between disturbances of the glutamate transmission and autism. These findings provide new evidences for the hypothesis of excitation/inhibition imbalance in autism. Further work is required to determine the cause of this putative abnormality.

  16. In vivo measurements of glutamate, GABA, and NAAG in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Laura M; Kontson, Kimberly; West, Jeffrey; Edden, Richard A; Zhu, He; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Holcomb, Henry H; Barker, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    The major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively, are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide that modulates the Glu system, may also be altered in schizophrenia. This study investigated GABA, Glu + glutamine (Glx), and NAAG levels in younger and older subjects with schizophrenia. Forty-one subjects, 21 with chronic schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls, participated in this study. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to measure GABA, Glx, and NAAG levels in the anterior cingulate (AC) and centrum semiovale (CSO) regions. NAAG in the CSO was higher in younger schizophrenia subjects compared with younger control subjects. The opposite pattern was observed in the older groups. Glx was reduced in the schizophrenia group irrespective of age group and brain region. There was a trend for reduced AC GABA in older schizophrenia subjects compared with older control subjects. Poor attention performance was correlated to lower AC GABA levels in both groups. Higher levels of CSO NAAG were associated with greater negative symptom severity in schizophrenia. These results provide support for altered glutamatergic and GABAergic function associated with illness course and cognitive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The study also highlights the importance of studies that combine MRS measurements of NAAG, GABA, and Glu for a more comprehensive neurochemical characterization of schizophrenia.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs of the delta family (GluD1 and GluD2 and synaptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zahid Khan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate delta-1 (GluD1 and glutamate delta-2 (GluD2 form the delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and are distinct from other (iGluRs in that they do not exhibit typical agonist-induced ion channel currents. Recent studies have demonstrated a crucial role of the delta receptors in synapse formation by interacting with presynaptic proteins such as Neurexin1. This review presents current knowledge regarding the expression, structure and function of Glu delta receptors (GluD1, GluD2 in brain, focusing on synapse formation, function and dysfunction.

  19. The N-Methyl d-Aspartate Glutamate Receptor Antagonist Ketamine Disrupts the Functional State of the Corticothalamic Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, P.M.; Jones, N.C.; O'Brien, T.J.; Pinault, D.

    2017-01-01

    The non-competitive N-methyl d-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine elicits a brain state resembling high-risk states for developing psychosis and early stages of schizophrenia characterized by sensory and cognitive deficits and aberrant ongoing gamma (30-80 Hz) oscillations in

  20. Functional modulation of the glutamate transporter variant GLT1b by the PDZ domain protein PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Borre, Lars; Braunstein, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    The dominant glutamate transporter isoform in the mammalian brain, GLT1, exists as at least three splice variants, GLT1a, GLT1b, and GLT1c. GLT1b interacts with the scaffold protein PICK1 (protein interacting with kinase C1), which is implicated in glutamatergic neurotransmission via its regulato...

  1. N-Acetylcysteine Normalizes Glutamate Levels in Cocaine-Dependent Patients: A Randomized Crossover Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, Lianne; Veltman, Dick J.; Nederveen, Aart; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) normalizes glutamate (Glu) homeostasis and prevents relapse in drug-dependent animals. However, the effect of NAC on brain Glu levels in substance-dependent humans has not yet been investigated. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-1 MRS) was used to

  2. N-Acetylcysteine Normalizes Glutamate Levels in Cocaine-Dependent Patients: A Randomized Crossover Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Veltman, D.J.; Nederveen, A.; van den Brink, W.; Goudriaan, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) normalizes glutamate (Glu) homeostasis and prevents relapse in drug-dependent animals. However, the effect of NAC on brain Glu levels in substance-dependent humans has not yet been investigated. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1 H MRS) was used to

  3. A neuroprotective role for microRNA miR-1000 mediated by limiting glutamate excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Pushpa; Augustine, George J; Ammar, Mohamed-Raafet

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has begun to emerge for microRNAs as regulators of synaptic signaling, specifically acting to control postsynaptic responsiveness during synaptic transmission. In this report, we provide evidence that Drosophila melanogaster miR-1000 acts presynaptically to regulate glutamate release at ...... a neuroprotective function in the brains of flies and mice. Drosophila miR-1000 showed activity-dependent expression, which might serve as a mechanism to allow neuronal activity to fine-tune the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission....

  4. Working Memory Modulates Glutamate Levels in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex during 1H fMRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Woodcock

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is involved in excitatory neurotransmission and metabolic processes related to brain function. Previous studies using proton functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H fMRS have demonstrated elevated cortical glutamate levels by 2–4% during visual and motor stimulation, relative to periods of no stimulation. Here, we extended this approach to working memory cognitive task performance, which has been consistently associated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC activation. Sixteen healthy adult volunteers completed a continuous visual fixation “rest” task followed by a letter 2-back working memory task during 1H fMRS acquisition of the left dlPFC, which encompassed Brodmann areas 45 and 46 over a 4.5-cm3 volume. Using a 100% automated fitting procedure integrated with LCModel, raw spectra were eddy current-, phase-, and shift-corrected prior to quantification resulting in a 32s temporal resolution or 8 averages per spectra. Task compliance was high (95 ± 11% correct and the mean Cramer-Rao Lower Bound of glutamate was 6.9 ± 0.9%. Relative to continuous passive visual fixation, left dlPFC glutamate levels were significantly higher by 2.7% (0.32 mmol/kg wet weight during letter 2-back performance. Elevated dlPFC glutamate levels reflect increased metabolic activity and excitatory neurotransmission driven by working memory-related cognitive demands. These results provide the first in vivo demonstration of elevated dlPFC glutamate levels during working memory.

  5. GLT-1-Dependent Disruption of CNS Glutamate Homeostasis and Neuronal Function by the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément N David

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The immune privileged nature of the CNS can make it vulnerable to chronic and latent infections. Little is known about the effects of lifelong brain infections, and thus inflammation, on the neurological health of the host. Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that can infect any mammalian nucleated cell with average worldwide seroprevalence rates of 30%. Infection by Toxoplasma is characterized by the lifelong presence of parasitic cysts within neurons in the brain, requiring a competent immune system to prevent parasite reactivation and encephalitis. In the immunocompetent individual, Toxoplasma infection is largely asymptomatic, however many recent studies suggest a strong correlation with certain neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a significant reduction in the primary astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, following infection with Toxoplasma. Using microdialysis of the murine frontal cortex over the course of infection, a significant increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate is observed. Consistent with glutamate dysregulation, analysis of neurons reveal changes in morphology including a reduction in dendritic spines, VGlut1 and NeuN immunoreactivity. Furthermore, behavioral testing and EEG recordings point to significant changes in neuronal output. Finally, these changes in neuronal connectivity are dependent on infection-induced downregulation of GLT-1 as treatment with the ß-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone, rescues extracellular glutamate concentrations, neuronal pathology and function. Altogether, these data demonstrate that following an infection with T. gondii, the delicate regulation of glutamate by astrocytes is disrupted and accounts for a range of deficits observed in chronic infection.

  6. Glutamate and GABA in autism spectrum disorder-a translational magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in man and rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horder, Jamie; Petrinovic, Marija M; Mendez, Maria A; Bruns, Andreas; Takumi, Toru; Spooren, Will; Barker, Gareth J; Künnecke, Basil; Murphy, Declan G

    2018-05-25

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental syndrome with a high human and economic burden. The pathophysiology of ASD is largely unclear, thus hampering development of pharmacological treatments for the core symptoms of the disorder. Abnormalities in glutamate and GABA signaling have been hypothesized to underlie ASD symptoms, and may form a therapeutic target, but it is not known whether these abnormalities are recapitulated in humans with ASD, as well as in rodent models of the disorder. We used translational proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS) to compare glutamate and GABA levels in adult humans with ASD and in a panel of six diverse rodent ASD models, encompassing genetic and environmental etiologies. [1H]MRS was performed in the striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex, of the humans, mice, and rats in order to allow for direct cross-species comparisons in specific cortical and subcortical brain regions implicated in ASD. In humans with ASD, glutamate concentration was reduced in the striatum and this was correlated with the severity of social symptoms. GABA levels were not altered in either brain region. The reduction in striatal glutamate was recapitulated in mice prenatally exposed to valproate, and in mice and rats carrying Nlgn3 mutations, but not in rodent ASD models with other etiologies. Our findings suggest that glutamate/GABA abnormalities in the corticostriatal circuitry may be a key pathological mechanism in ASD; and may be linked to alterations in the neuroligin-neurexin signaling complex.

  7. GABA and glutamate in schizophrenia: a 7 T ¹H-MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Anouk; Mandl, René C W; Klomp, Dennis W J; Bohlken, Marc M; Boer, Vincent O; Andreychenko, Anna; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Luijten, Peter R; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by loss of brain volume, which may represent an ongoing pathophysiological process. This loss of brain volume may be explained by reduced neuropil rather than neuronal loss, suggesting abnormal synaptic plasticity and cortical microcircuitry. A possible mechanism is hypofunction of the NMDA-type of glutamate receptor, which reduces the excitation of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, resulting in a disinhibition of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons. Disinhibition of pyramidal cells may result in excessive stimulation by glutamate, which in turn could cause neuronal damage or death through excitotoxicity. In this study, GABA/creatine ratios, and glutamate, NAA, creatine and choline concentrations in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices were measured in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 23 healthy controls using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at an ultra-high magnetic field strength of 7 T. Significantly lower GABA/Cr ratios were found in patients with schizophrenia in the prefrontal cortex as compared to healthy controls, with GABA/Cr ratios inversely correlated with cognitive functioning in the patients. No significant change in the GABA/Cr ratio was found between patients and controls in the parieto-occipital cortex, nor were levels of glutamate, NAA, creatine, and choline differed in patients and controls in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices. Our findings support a mechanism involving altered GABA levels distinguished from glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, particularly in high functioning patients. A (compensatory) role for GABA through altered inhibitory neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex may be ongoing in (higher functioning) patients with schizophrenia.

  8. Teratogenicity and brain aromatase-induction of monosodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teratogenicity and brain aromatase-induction of monosodium glutamate in estrogen-responsive mosaic transgenic zebra fish Danio rerio. Tamer Said Abdelkader, Chang Seo-Na, Kim Tae-Hyun, Song Juha, Kim Dongso, Jae-Hak Park ...

  9. Ionotropic and Metabotropic Proton-Sensing Receptors Involved in Airway Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Aoki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An acidic microenvironment has been shown to evoke a variety of airway responses, including cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lung, and stimulation of mucus hyperproduction. Except for the participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs in severe acidic pH (of less than 6.0-induced cough and bronchoconstriction through sensory neurons, the molecular mechanisms underlying extracellular acidic pH-induced actions in the airways have not been fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors, which sense pH of more than 6.0, are expressed in structural cells, such as airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, and in inflammatory and immune cells, such as eosinophils and dendritic cells. They function in a variety of airway responses related to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including allergic asthma. In the present review, we discuss the roles of ionotropic TRPV1 and ASICs and metabotropic OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors in the airway inflammation and AHR in asthma and respiratory diseases.

  10. Fluctuations in nucleus accumbens extracellular glutamate and glucose during motivated glucose-drinking behavior: dissecting the neurochemistry of reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ken T; Myal, Stephanie E; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2015-02-01

    While motivated behavior involves multiple neurochemical systems, few studies have focused on the role of glutamate, the brain's excitatory neurotransmitter, and glucose, the energetic substrate of neural activity in reward-related neural processes. Here, we used high-speed amperometry with enzyme-based substrate-sensitive and control, enzyme-free biosensors to examine second-scale fluctuations in the extracellular levels of these substances in the nucleus accumbens shell during glucose-drinking behavior in trained rats. Glutamate rose rapidly after the presentation of a glucose-containing cup and before the initiation of drinking (reward seeking), decreased more slowly to levels below baseline during consumption (sensory reward), and returned to baseline when the ingested glucose reached the brain (metabolic reward). When water was substituted for glucose, glutamate rapidly increased with cup presentation and in contrast to glucose drinking, increased above baseline after rats tasted the water and refused to drink further. Therefore, extracellular glutamate show distinct changes associated with key events of motivated drinking behavior and opposite dynamics during sensory and metabolic components of reward. In contrast to glutamate, glucose increased at each stimulus and behavioral event, showing a sustained elevation during the entire behavior and a robust post-ingestion rise that correlated with the gradual return of glutamate levels to their baseline. By comparing active drinking with passive intra-gastric glucose delivery, we revealed that fluctuations in extracellular glucose are highly dynamic, reflecting a balance between rapid delivery because of neural activity, intense metabolism, and the influence of ingested glucose reaching the brain. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. The HIV-1 viral protein Tat increases glutamate and decreases GABA exocytosis from human and mouse neocortical nerve endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Veronica; Summa, Maria; Neri, Elisa; Puliti, Aldamaria; Godowicz, Tomasz T; Severi, Paolo; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Raiteri, Maurizio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2010-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-encoded transactivator of transcription (Tat) potentiated the depolarization-evoked exocytosis of [(3)H]D-aspartate ([(3)H]D-ASP) from human neocortical terminals. The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 1 receptor antagonist 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) prevented this effect, whereas the mGlu5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) was ineffective. Western blot analysis showed that human neocortex synaptosomes possess mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptors. Tat potentiated the K(+)-evoked release of [(3)H]D-ASP or of endogenous glutamate from mouse neocortical synaptosomes in a CPCCOEt-sensitive and MPEP-insensitive manner. Deletion of mGlu1 receptors (crv4/crv4 mice) or mGlu5 receptors (mGlu5(-/-)mouse) silenced Tat effects. Tat enhanced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in human and mouse neocortical synaptosomes, consistent with the involvement of group I mGlu receptors. Tat inhibited the K(+)-evoked release of [(3)H]gamma-aminobutyric acid ([(3)H]GABA) from human synaptosomes and that of endogenous GABA or [(3)H]GABA from mouse nerve terminals; the inhibition was insensitive to CPCCOEt or MPEP. Tat-induced effects were retained by Tat(37-72) but not by Tat(48-85). In mouse neocortical slices, Tat facilitated the K(+)- and the veratridine-induced release of [(3)H]D-ASP in a CPCCOEt-sensitive manner and was ineffective in crv4/crv4 mouse slices. These observations are relevant to the comprehension of the pathophysiological effects of Tat in central nervous system and may suggest new potential therapeutic approaches to the cure of HIV-1-associated dementia.

  12. Water transport in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, N; Hamann, S; Zeuthen, T

    2004-01-01

    the number of cotransporters per cell and the unit water permeability are high. For example, the Na(+)-glutamate cotransporter (EAAT1) has a unit water permeability one tenth of that of aquaporin (AQP) 1. Cotransporters are widely distributed in the brain and participate in several vital functions: inorganic...

  13. Control of Amygdala Circuits by 5-HT Neurons via 5-HT and Glutamate Cotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ayesha; Bocchio, Marco; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The serotonin (5-HT) system and the amygdala are key regulators of emotional behavior. Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT transmission in the amygdala is implicated in the susceptibility and drug treatment of mood disorders. Therefore, elucidating the physiological mechanisms through which midbrain 5-HT neurons modulate amygdala circuits could be pivotal in understanding emotional regulation in health and disease. To shed light on these mechanisms, we performed patch-clamp recordings from basal amygdala (BA) neurons in brain slices from mice with channelrhodopsin genetically targeted to 5-HT neurons. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at low frequencies (≤1 Hz) evoked a short-latency excitation of BA interneurons (INs) that was depressed at higher frequencies. Pharmacological analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by glutamate and not 5-HT because it was abolished by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at higher frequencies (10-20 Hz) evoked both slow excitation and slow inhibition of INs. These effects were mediated by 5-HT because they were blocked by antagonists of 5-HT 2A and 5-HT 1A receptors, respectively. These fast glutamate- and slow 5-HT-mediated responses often coexisted in the same neuron. Interestingly, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking INs displayed differential modulation by glutamate and 5-HT. Furthermore, optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals did not evoke glutamate release onto BA principal neurons, but inhibited these cells directly via activation of 5-HT 1A receptors and indirectly via enhanced GABA release. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-HT neurons exert a frequency-dependent, cell-type-specific control over BA circuitry via 5-HT and glutamate co-release to inhibit the BA output. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The modulation of the amygdala by serotonin (5-HT) is important for emotional regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of affective disorders

  14. Sex Differences in Psychiatric Disease: A Focus on the Glutamate System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M. Wickens

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, are implicated in several psychiatric diseases. Many of these psychiatric diseases display epidemiological sex differences, with either males or females exhibiting different symptoms or disease prevalence. However, little work has considered the interaction of disrupted glutamatergic transmission and sex on disease states. This review describes the clinical and preclinical evidence for these sex differences with a focus on two conditions that are more prevalent in women: Alzheimer's disease and major depressive disorder, and three conditions that are more prevalent in men: schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. These studies reveal sex differences at multiple levels in the glutamate system including metabolic markers, receptor levels, genetic interactions, and therapeutic responses to glutamatergic drugs. Our survey of the current literature revealed a considerable need for more evaluations of sex differences in future studies examining the role of the glutamate system in psychiatric disease. Gaining a more thorough understanding of how sex differences in the glutamate system contribute to psychiatric disease could provide novel avenues for the development of sex-specific pharmacotherapies.

  15. Microglia PACAP and glutamate: Friends or foes in seizure-induced autonomic dysfunction and SUDEP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandare, Amol M; Kapoor, Komal; Farnham, Melissa M J; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Seizure-induced cardiorespiratory autonomic dysfunction is a major cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Seizures lead to increased synthesis, and release of glutamate, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), and other neurotransmitters, and cause extensive activation of microglia at multiple regions in the brain including central autonomic cardiorespiratory brainstem nuclei. Glutamate contributes to neurodegeneration, and inflammation in epilepsy. PACAP has neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties, whereas microglia are key players in inflammatory responses in CNS. Seizure-induced increase in PACAP is neuroprotective. PACAP produces neuroprotective effects acting on microglial PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Microglia also express glutamate transporters, and their expression can be increased by PACAP in response to harmful or stressful situations such as seizures. Here we discuss the mechanism of autonomic cardiorespiratory dysfunction in seizure, and the role of PACAP, glutamate and microglia in regulating cardiorespiratory brainstem neurons in their physiological state that could provide future therapeutic options for SUDEP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuromodulatory Effect of Thymoquinone in Attenuating Glutamate-Mediated Neurotoxicity Targeting the Amyloidogenic and Apoptotic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibram Amin Fouad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Overexposure of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor to the excitatory neurotransmitter l-glutamic acid leads to neuronal cell death by excitotoxicity as a result of increased intracellular Ca2+, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis. Moreover, it was previously reported that prolonged activation of the NMDA receptor increased beta-amyloid (Aβ levels in the brain. Thymoquinone (TQ, the active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, has been shown to have potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects. The aim of the present study was to explore the neuromodulatory effects of different doses of TQ (2.5 and 10 mg/kg against apoptotic cell death and Aβ formation resulting from glutamate administration in rats using vitamin E as a positive control. Behavioral changes were assessed using Y-maze and Morris water maze tests for evaluating spatial memory and cognitive functions. Caspase-3, Lactate dehydrogenase, Aβ-42, and cytochrome c gene expression were determined. TQ-treated groups showed significant decreases in the levels of all tested biochemical and behavioral parameters compared with the glutamate-treated group. These findings demonstrated that TQ has a promising neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity and this effect is mediated through its anti-amyloidogenic, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic activities.

  17. Lipoic acid effects on glutamate and taurine concentrations in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced seizures can be mediated by increases in oxidative stress and by cerebral amino acid changes. The present research suggests that antioxidant compounds may afford some level of neuroprotection against the neurotoxicity of seizures in cellular level. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the lipoic acid (LA effects in glutamate and taurine contents in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally (i.p. with 0.9% saline (Control, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, Pilocarpine, LA (10 mg/kg, LA, and the association of LA (10 mg/kg plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, that was injected 30 min before of administration of LA (LA plus pilocarpine. Animals were observed during 24 h. The amino acid concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC. In pilocarpine group, it was observed a significant increase in glutamate content (37% and a decrease in taurine level (18% in rat hippocampus, when compared to control group. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly reduced the glutamate level (28% and augmented taurine content (32% in rat hippocampus, when compared to pilocarpine group. Our findings strongly support amino acid changes in hippocampus during seizures induced by pilocarpine, and suggest that glutamate-induced brain damage plays a crucial role in pathogenic consequences of seizures, and imply that strong protective effect could be achieved using lipoic acid through the release or decrease in metabolization rate of taurine amino acid during seizures.

  18. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  19. Pharmacological Treatment of Glutamate Excitotoxicity Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-14

    schizophrenia -like psychosis. TBI patients are also a higher risk for developing psychological problem many years post-injury. Cognitive symptoms of...promoting the propagation of action potentials. On the other hand, inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA , causes the hyperpolarization of the...transporter contributes to neurotransmitter GABA synthesis and epilepsy. J Neurosci. 2002 Aug 1;22(15):6372-9. Shen M, Piser TM, Seybold VS, Thayer SA

  20. Expression of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in human brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šácha, Pavel; Zámečník, J.; Bařinka, C.; Hlouchová, Klára; Vícha, A.; Mlčochová, Petra; Hilgert, Ivan; Eckschlager, T.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 144, č. 4 (2007), s. 1361-1372 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA301/03/0784 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : PSMA * metallopeptidase * immunohistochemistry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.352, year: 2007

  1. Central transport and distribution of labelled glutamic and aspartic acids to the cochlear nucleus in cats. An autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, E S [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (USA). Dept. of Anatomy

    1979-01-01

    Tritiated L-glutamic acid or L-aspartic acid was injected unilaterally into the cochleas of adult cats, and 4 h-7 days later the localization of label was studied by light-microscopic autoradiography in sections of the brain stem. Consistent differences in labelling after glutamate and after aspartate suggest differences in their uptake, metabolic conversion and/or transport to the cochlear nucleus by cochlear fibers. The morphological differences shown here agree with the distribution of those two amino acids in the cat cochlear nucleus as shown by microchemical analyses.

  2. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Properties of Poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate Bioelastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifu Dong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to further improve the biocompatibility of xylitol based poly(xylitol sebacate (PXS bioelastomer, a novel kind of amino acid based poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate (PXGS has been successfully prepared in this work by melt polycondensation of xylitol, N-Boc glutamic acid and sebacic acid. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results indicated the glass-transition temperatures could be decreased by feeding N-Boc glutamic acid. In comparison to PXS, PXGS exhibited comparable tensile strength and much higher elongation at break at the same ratio of acid/xylitol. The introduction of glutamic acid increased the hydrophilicity and in vitro degradation rate of the bioelastomer. It was found that PXGS exhibited excellent properties, such as tensile properties, biodegradability and hydrophilicity, which could be easily tuned by altering the feeding monomer ratios. The amino groups in the PXGS polyester side chains are readily functionalized, thus the biomelastomers can be considered as potential biomaterials for biomedical application.

  3. GABA and glutamate levels correlate with MTR and clinical disability: Insights from multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantes, Julia C; Proulx, Sébastien; Zhong, Jidan; Holmes, Scott A; Narayanan, Sridar; Brown, Robert A; Hoge, Richard D; Koski, Lisa

    2017-08-15

    Converging areas of research have implicated glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as key players in neuronal signalling and other central functions. Further research is needed, however, to identify microstructural and behavioral links to regional variability in levels of these neurometabolites, particularly in the presence of demyelinating disease. Thus, we sought to investigate the extent to which regional glutamate and GABA levels are related to a neuroimaging marker of microstructural damage and to motor and cognitive performance. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 47 people with multiple sclerosis (all right-handed) participated in this study. Motor and cognitive abilities were assessed with standard tests used in the study of multiple sclerosis. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy data were acquired from sensorimotor and parietal regions of the brains' left cerebral hemisphere using a MEGA-PRESS sequence. Our analysis protocol for the spectroscopy data was designed to account for confounding factors that could contaminate the measurement of neurometabolite levels due to disease, such as the macromolecule signal, partial volume effects, and relaxation effects. Glutamate levels in both regions of interest were lower in people with multiple sclerosis. In the sensorimotor (though not the parietal) region, GABA concentration was higher in the multiple sclerosis group compared to controls. Lower magnetization transfer ratio within grey and white matter regions from which spectroscopy data were acquired was linked to neurometabolite levels. When adjusting for age, normalized brain volume, MTR, total N-acetylaspartate level, and glutamate level, significant relationships were found between lower sensorimotor GABA level and worse performance on several tests, including one of upper limb motor function. This work highlights important methodological considerations relevant to analysis of spectroscopy data, particularly in the afflicted human brain. These findings

  4. Group I mGlu receptors potentiate synaptosomal [{sup 3}H]glutamate release independently of exogenously applied arachidonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, M.E.; Toms, N.J.; Bedingfield, J.S.; Roberts, P.J. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 1TD (United Kingdom)

    1999-04-01

    In the current study, we have characterized group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor enhancement of 4-aminopyridine (4AP)-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The broad spectrum mGlu receptor agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD, 10 {mu}M) increased 4AP-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release (143.32{+-}2.73% control) only in the presence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid; an effect reversed by the inclusion of bovine serum albumin (BSA, fatty acid free). In contrast, the selective group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) potentiated (EC{sub 50}=1.60{+-}0.25 {mu}M; E{sub max}=147.61{+-}10.96% control) 4AP-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release, in the absence of arachidonic acid. This potentiation could be abolished by either the selective mGlu{sub 1} receptor antagonist (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, 1 mM) or the selective PKC inhibitor (Ro 31-8220, 10 {mu}M) and was BSA-insensitive. The selective mGlu{sub 5} receptor agonist (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG, 300{mu}M) was without effect. DHPG (100 {mu}M) also potentiated both 30 mM and 50 mM K{sup +}-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release (121.60{+-}12.77% and 121.50{+-}4.45% control, respectively). DHPG (100 {mu}M) failed to influence both 4AP-stimulated {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} influx and 50 mM K{sup +}-induced changes in synaptosomal membrane potential. Possible group I mGlu receptor suppression of tonic adenosine A{sub 1} receptor, group II/III mGlu receptors or GABA{sub B} receptor activity is unlikely since 4AP-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release was insensitive to the selective inhibitory receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine, (R,S)-{alpha}-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine or CGP55845A, respectively. These data suggest an 'mGlu{sub 1} receptor-like' receptor potentiates [{sup 3}H]glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes in the absence of

  5. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  6. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shu [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lang, Qiaolin [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Aihua, E-mail: liuah@qibebt.ac.cn [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP{sup +}-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP{sup +} involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  7. Strontium D-Glutamate Hexahydrate and Strontium Di(hydrogen L-glutamate) Pentahydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, Stephan; Odderhede, Jette; Stahl, Kenny

    2005-01-01

    Sr(C5H7NO4)] center dot 6H(2)O, ( I), and [Sr(C5H8NO4)(2)] center dot 5H(2)O, (II), both crystallize with similar strontium - glutamate - water layers. In ( I), the neutral layers are connected through hydrogen bonds by water molecules, while in ( II), the positively charged layers are connected...... through hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions by interleaving layers of hydrogen glutamate anions and water molecules....

  8. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Microbial production of poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Cao, Mingfeng; Kongklom, Nuttawut; Chuensangjun, Chaniga; Shi, Zhongping; Chisti, Yusuf

    2017-09-05

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a natural, biodegradable and water-soluble biopolymer of glutamic acid. This review is focused on nonrecombinant microbial production of γ-PGA via fermentation processes. In view of its commercial importance, the emphasis is on L-glutamic acid independent producers (i.e. microorganisms that do not require feeding with the relatively expensive amino acid L-glutamic acid to produce γ-PGA), but glutamic acid dependent production is discussed for comparison. Strategies for improving production, reducing costs and using renewable feedstocks are discussed.

  10. Monosodium glutamate-associated alterations in open field, anxiety-related and conditioned place preference behaviours in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaolapo, Olakunle James; Aremu, Olaleye Samuel; Onaolapo, Adejoke Yetunde

    2017-07-01

    The present study investigated changes in behaviour associated with oral monosodium glutamate (a flavouring agent), using the open field, elevated plus maze and conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigms, respectively. Mice were assigned to two groups for CPP [monosodium glutamate (MSG)-naïve (n = 40) and MSG-pretreated (n = 40)] and two groups for open field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests [n = 40 each], respectively. Animals in respective groups were then divided into four subgroups (n = 10) (vehicle or MSG (80, 160 and 320 mg/kg)). MSG-naïve mice were observed in the CPP box in three phases (pre-conditioning, conditioning and post-conditioning). Mice were conditioned to MSG or an equivalent volume of saline. The MSG pretreatment group received vehicle or respective doses of MSG daily for 21 days, prior to conditioning. Mice in the OF or EPM groups received vehicle or doses of MSG (orally) for 21 days, at 10 ml/kg. Open field or EPM behaviours were assessed on days 1 and 21. At the end of the experiments, mice in the OF groups were sacrificed and brain homogenates used to assay glutamate and glutamine. Results showed that administration of MSG was associated with a decrease in rearing, dose-related mixed horizontal locomotor, grooming and anxiety-related response and an increase in brain glutamate/glutamine levels. Following exposure to the CPP paradigm, MSG-naïve and MSG-pretreated mice both showed 'drug-paired' chamber preference. The study concluded that MSG (at the administered doses) was associated with changes in open field activities, anxiety-related behaviours and brain glutamate/glutamine levels; its ingestion also probably leads to a stimulation of the brain reward system.

  11. Vitamin E-Mediated Modulation of Glutamate Receptor Expression in an Oxidative Stress Model of Neural Cells Derived from Embryonic Stem Cell Cultures

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    Afifah Abd Jalil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Excessive concentrations of glutamate in the brain can be excitotoxic and cause oxidative stress, which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease. In the present study, the effects of vitamin E in the form of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF and alpha-tocopherol (α-TCP in modulating the glutamate receptor and neuron injury markers in an in vitro model of oxidative stress in neural-derived embryonic stem (ES cell cultures were elucidated. A transgenic mouse ES cell line (46C was differentiated into a neural lineage in vitro via induction with retinoic acid. These cells were then subjected to oxidative stress with a significantly high concentration of glutamate. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS was performed after inducing glutamate excitotoxicity, and recovery from this toxicity in response to vitamin E was determined. The gene expression levels of glutamate receptors and neuron-specific enolase were elucidated using real-time PCR. The results reveal that neural cells derived from 46C cells and subjected to oxidative stress exhibit downregulation of NMDA, kainate receptor, and NSE after posttreatment with different concentrations of TRF and α-TCP, a sign of neurorecovery. Treatment of either TRF or α-TCP reduced the levels of ROS in neural cells subjected to glutamate-induced oxidative stress; these results indicated that vitamin E is a potent antioxidant.

  12. Protection of cortical cells by equine estrogens against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is mediated through a calcium independent mechanism

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    Perrella Joel

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High concentrations of glutamate can accumulate in the brain and may be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. This form of neurotoxicity involves changes in the regulation of cellular calcium (Ca2+ and generation of free radicals such as peroxynitrite (ONOO-. Estrogen may protect against glutamate-induced cell death by reducing the excitotoxic Ca2+ influx associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. In this study, the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and nitric oxide synthase (NOS along with the effect of 17β-estradiol (17β-E2 and a more potent antioxidant Δ8, 17β-estradiol (Δ8, 17β-E2 on cell viability and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i, following treatment of rat cortical cells with glutamate, was investigated. Results Primary rat cortical cells were cultured for 7–12 days in Neurobasal medium containing B27 supplements. Addition of glutamate (200 μM decreased cell viability to 51.3 ± 0.7% compared to control. Treatment with the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, and the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, completely prevented cell death. Pretreatment (24 hrs with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 (0.01 to 10 μM significantly reduced cell death. 17β-E2 was more potent than Δ8, 17β-E2. Glutamate caused a rapid 2.5 fold increase in [Ca2+]i. Treatment with 0.001 to 10 μM MK-801 reduced the initial Ca2+ influx by 14–41% and increased cell viability significantly. Pretreatment with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 had no effect on Ca2+ influx but protected the cortical cells against glutamate-induced cell death. Conclusion Glutamate-induced cell death in cortical cultures can occur through NMDAR and NOS-linked mechanisms by increasing nitric oxide and ONOO-. Equine estrogens: 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2, significantly protected cortical cells against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by a mechanism that appears to be independent of Ca2+ influx. To our knowledge, this is a first

  13. ASTROCYTIC CONTROL OF BIOSYNTHESIS AND TURNOVER OF THE NEUROTRANSMITTERS GLUTAMATE AND GABA

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    Arne eSchousboe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate and GABA are the quantitatively major neurotransmitters in the brain mediating excitatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively. These amino acids are metabolically interrelated and at the same time they are tightly coupled to the intermediary metabolism including energy homeostasis. Astrocytes play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA since only these cells express pyruvate carboxylase (PC, the enzyme required for de novo synthesis of the two amino acids. Such de novo synthesis is obligatory to compensate for catabolism of glutamate and GABA related to oxidative metabolism when the amino acids are used as energy substrates. This, in turn, is influenced by the extent to which the cycling of the amino acids between neurons and astrocytes may occur. This cycling is brought about by the glutamate/GABA – glutamine cycle the operation of which involves the enzymes glutamine synthetase (GS and glutaminase (PAG together with the plasma membrane transporters for glutamate, GABA and glutamine. The distribution of these proteins between neurons and astrocytes determines the efficacy of the cycle and it is of particular importance that GS is exclusively expressed in astrocytes. It should be kept in mind that the operation of the cycle is associated with movement of ammonia nitrogen between the two cell types and different mechanisms which can mediate this have been proposed.This review is intended to delineate the above mentioned processes and to discuss quantitatively their relative importance in the homeostatic mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of optimal conditions for the respective neurotransmission processes to operate.

  14. Identification of Bax-Interacting Proteins in Oligodendrocyte Progenitors during Glutamate Excitotoxicity and Perinatal Hypoxia–Ischemia

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    Sopio Simonishvili

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OPC (oligodendrocyte progenitor cell death contributes significantly to the pathology and functional deficits following hypoxic-ischemic injury in the immature brain and to deficits resulting from demyelinating diseases, trauma and degenerative disorders in the adult CNS. Glutamate toxicity is a major cause of oligodendroglial death in diverse CNS disorders, and previous studies have demonstrated that AMPA/kainate receptors require the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in OPCs undergoing apoptosis. The goal of the present study was to define the pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic effectors that regulate Bax in healthy OPCs and after exposure to excess glutamate in vitro and following H–I (hypoxia–ischemia in the immature rat brain. We show that Bax associates with a truncated form of Bid, a BH3-only domain protein, subsequent to glutamate treatment. Furthermore, glutamate exposure reduces Bax association with the anti-apoptotic Bcl family member, Bcl-xL. Cell fractionation studies demonstrated that both Bax and Bid translocate from the cytoplasm to mitochondria during the early stages of cell death consistent with a role for Bid as an activator, whereas Bcl-xL, which normally complexes with both Bax and Bid, disassociates from these complexes when OPCs are exposed to excess glutamate. Bax remained unactivated in the presence of insulin-like growth factor-1, and the Bcl-xL complexes were protected. Our data similarly demonstrate loss of Bcl-xL–Bax association in white matter following H–I and implicate active Bad in Bax-mediated OPC death. To identify other Bax-binding partners, we used proteomics and identified cofilin as a Bax-associated protein in OPCs. Cofilin and Bax associated in healthy OPCs, whereas the Bax–cofilin association was disrupted during glutamate-induced OPC apoptosis.

  15. Glutamate monitoring in vitro and in vivo: recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieben, Nathalie Ines; Rose, Nadia Cherouati; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2009-01-01

    is currently the most common method for in vivo glutamate sampling. However, the recent development and improvement of enzyme-based amperometric glutamate biosensors makes them a promising alternative to microdialysis for in vivo applications, as well as valuable devices for in vitro applications in basic......, and different techniques have been developed to this end. This review presents and discusses these techniques, especially the recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors, as well as the great potential of nanotechnology in glutamate sensing. Microdialysis coupled to analytical detection techniques...... neurobiological research. Another interesting group of biosensors for glutamate are fluorescence-based glutamate biosensors, which have unsurpassed spatio-temporal resolution and are therefore important tools for investigating glutamate dynamics during signaling. Adding to this list are biosensors based on nano...

  16. Influences of dopamine and glutamate in the medial preoptic area on male sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Ryan G; Hull, Elaine M; Dominguez, Juan M

    2014-06-01

    Several brain nuclei interact to orchestrate the appetitive and consummatory aspects of male sexual behavior. Of these structures, the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the hypothalamus is of particular interest, as it receives input from all sensory modalities, and damage to this region disrupts copulation in a wide variety of taxa. Furthermore, the mPOA is both responsive to gonadal hormones and involved in endocrine regulation. Neurochemical studies have demonstrated that both dopamine and glutamate levels rise in the mPOA in response to sexual activity, while antagonism of these neurotransmitters impairs male sexual response. Here we review how dopamine and glutamate act in the mPOA to modulate male sexual behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn contributes to calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein-mediated spinal sensitization and behavioral hypersensitivity

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    Dickenson Anthony H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nerve injury-induced expression of the spinal calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ1 has been shown to mediate behavioral hypersensitivity through a yet identified mechanism. We examined if this neuroplasticity modulates behavioral hypersensitivity by regulating spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission in injury-free transgenic mice overexpressing the Cavα2δ1 proteins in neuronal tissues. The transgenic mice exhibited hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia similar to the spinal nerve ligation injury model. Intrathecally delivered antagonists for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA/kainate receptors, but not for the metabotropic glutamate receptors, caused a dose-dependent allodynia reversal in the transgenic mice without changing the behavioral sensitivity in wild-type mice. This suggests that elevated spinal Cavα2δ1 mediates allodynia through a pathway involving activation of selective glutamate receptors. To determine if this is mediated by enhanced spinal neuronal excitability or pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn, we examined wide-dynamic-range (WDR neuron excitability with extracellular recording and glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents with whole-cell patch recording in deep-dorsal horn of the Cavα2δ1 transgenic mice. Our data indicated that overexpression of Cavα2δ1 in neuronal tissues led to increased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory post synaptic currents mediated mainly by AMPA/kainate receptors at physiological membrane potentials, and also by NMDA receptors upon depolarization, without changing the excitability of WDR neurons to high intensity stimulation. Together, these findings support a mechanism of Cavα2δ1-mediated spinal sensitization in which elevated Cavα2δ1 causes increased pre-synaptic glutamate release that leads to reduced excitation thresholds of post-synaptic dorsal

  18. Enhanced pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn contributes to calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein-mediated spinal sensitization and behavioral hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, David; Deng, Ping; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Kim, Doo-Sik; Feng, Guoping; Dickenson, Anthony H; Xu, Zao C; Luo, Z David

    2009-01-01

    Nerve injury-induced expression of the spinal calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ1) has been shown to mediate behavioral hypersensitivity through a yet identified mechanism. We examined if this neuroplasticity modulates behavioral hypersensitivity by regulating spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission in injury-free transgenic mice overexpressing the Cavα2δ1 proteins in neuronal tissues. The transgenic mice exhibited hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia) similar to the spinal nerve ligation injury model. Intrathecally delivered antagonists for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors, but not for the metabotropic glutamate receptors, caused a dose-dependent allodynia reversal in the transgenic mice without changing the behavioral sensitivity in wild-type mice. This suggests that elevated spinal Cavα2δ1 mediates allodynia through a pathway involving activation of selective glutamate receptors. To determine if this is mediated by enhanced spinal neuronal excitability or pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn, we examined wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neuron excitability with extracellular recording and glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents with whole-cell patch recording in deep-dorsal horn of the Cavα2δ1 transgenic mice. Our data indicated that overexpression of Cavα2δ1 in neuronal tissues led to increased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory post synaptic currents mediated mainly by AMPA/kainate receptors at physiological membrane potentials, and also by NMDA receptors upon depolarization, without changing the excitability of WDR neurons to high intensity stimulation. Together, these findings support a mechanism of Cavα2δ1-mediated spinal sensitization in which elevated Cavα2δ1 causes increased pre-synaptic glutamate release that leads to reduced excitation thresholds of post-synaptic dorsal horn neurons to innocuous

  19. Glutamate in schizophrenia: clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, D C; Wine, L

    1997-10-30

    The excitatory amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, are of interest to schizophrenia research because of their roles in neurodevelopment, neurotoxicity and neurotransmission. Recent evidence suggests that densities of glutamatergic receptors and the ratios of subunits composing these receptors may be altered in schizophrenia, although it is unclear whether these changes are primary or compensatory. Agents acting at the phencyclidine binding site of the NMDA receptor produce symptoms of schizophrenia in normal subjects, and precipitate relapse in patients with schizophrenia. The improvement of negative symptoms with agents acting at the glycine modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, as well as preliminary evidence that clozapine may differ from conventional neuroleptic agents in its effects on glutamatergic systems, suggest that clinical implications may follow from this model. While geriatric patients may be at increased risk for glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, very little is known about the specific relevance of this model to geriatric patients with schizophrenia.

  20. Microbial methodological artifacts in [3H]glutamate receptor binding assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.

    1989-01-01

    Incubation of radiolabeled L-glutamic acid, a putative central excitatory neurotransmitter, in 50 mM Tris-acetate buffer (pH 7.4) at 30 degrees C in the absence of brain synaptic membranes resulted in a significant adsorption of the radioactivity to glass fiber filters routinely employed to trap the bound ligand in receptor binding assays. The adsorption was not only eliminated by the inclusion of L-isomers of structurally related amino acids, but also inhibited by that of most presumed agonists and antagonists for the brain glutamate receptors. This displaceable adsorption was a temperature-dependent nonreversible, and saturable phenomenon. Scatchard analysis of these data revealed that the adsorption consisted of a single component with an apparent dissociation constant of 73 nM. The displaceable adsorption was significantly attenuated by a concurrent incubation with papain, pronase E, and phospholipase C. A significant amount of the radioactivity was detected in the pass-through fraction of the Dowex column following an application of the reaction mixture incubated with purified [ 3 H]glutamate at 30 degree C for 60 min in the absence of membranous proteins added. Complete abolition of the displaceable adsorption resulted from the use of incubation buffer boiled at 100 degrees C as well as filtered through a nitrocellulose membrane filter with a pore size of 0.45 micron immediately before use. These results suggest that the displaceable adsorption may be attributable to the radioactive metabolite of [ 3 H]glutamate by microorganisms contaminating the Tris-acetate buffer. This might in part contribute to some of the controversial results with regard to receptor binding studies on acidic amino acids

  1. Distribution of AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the chick visual system

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    Pires R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Several glutamate receptor (GluR subunits have been characterized during the past few years. In the present study, subunit-specific antisera were used to determine the distribution of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits GluR1-4 in retinorecipient areas of the chick brain. Six white leghorn chicks (Gallus gallus, 7-15 days old, unknown sex were deeply anesthetized and perfused with 4% buffered paraformaldehyde and brain sections were stained using immunoperoxidase techniques. The AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits GluR1, GluR2/3 and GluR4 were present in several retinorecipient areas, with varying degrees of colocalization. For example, perikarya in layers 2, 3, and 5 of the optic tectum contained GluR1, whereas GluR2/3 subunits appeared mainly in neurons of layer 13. The GluR4 subunit was only detected in a few cells of the tectal layer 13. GluR1 and GluR2/3 were observed in neurons of the nucleus geniculatus lateralis ventralis, whereas GluR4 was only present in its neuropil. Somata in the accessory optic nucleus appeared to contain GluR2/3 and GluR4, whereas GluR1 was the dominant subunit in the neuropil of this nucleus. These results suggest that different subpopulations of visual neurons might express different combinations of AMPA-type GluR subunits, which in turn might generate different synaptic responses to glutamate derived from retinal ganglion cell axons

  2. Glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: Enzymatic properties and specific functions in glutamic acid synthesis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guangming; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), a natural biopolymer, is widely used in cosmetics, medicine, food, water treatment, and agriculture owing to its features of moisture sequestration, cation chelation, non-toxicity and biodegradability. Intracellular glutamic acid, the substrate of γ-PGA, is a limiting factor for high yield in γ-PGA production. Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis are both important γ-PGA producing strains, and B. subtilis synthesizes glutamic acid in vivo using the unique GOGAT/GS pathway. However, little is known about the glutamate synthesis pathway in B. licheniformis. The aim of this work was to characterize the glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in glutamic acid synthesis from B. licheniformis with both in vivo and in vitro experiments. By re-directing the carbon flux distribution, the rocG gene deletion mutant WX-02ΔrocG produced intracellular glutamic acid with a concentration of 90ng/log(CFU), which was only 23.7% that of the wild-type WX-02 (380ng/log(CFU)). Furthermore, the γ-PGA yield of mutant WX-02ΔrocG was 5.37g/L, a decrease of 45.3% compared to the wild type (9.82g/L). In vitro enzymatic assays of RocG showed that RocG has higher affinity for 2-oxoglutarate than glutamate, and the glutamate synthesis rate was far above degradation. This is probably the first study to reveal the glutamic acid synthesis pathway and the specific functions of RocG in B. licheniformis. The results indicate that γ-PGA production can be enhanced through improving intracellular glutamic acid synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

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    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  4. Glutamine and glutamate as vital metabolites

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    Newsholme P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is widely accepted as the primary nutrient for the maintenance and promotion of cell function. This metabolite leads to production of ATP, NADPH and precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules such as nucleic acids and phospholipids. We propose that, in addition to glucose, the 5-carbon amino acids glutamine and glutamate should be considered to be equally important for maintenance and promotion of cell function. The functions of glutamine/glutamate are many, i.e., they are substrates for protein synthesis, anabolic precursors for muscle growth, they regulate acid-base balance in the kidney, they are substrates for ureagenesis in the liver and for hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis, they act as an oxidative fuel for the intestine and cells of the immune system, provide inter-organ nitrogen transport, and act as precursors of neurotransmitter synthesis, of nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis and of glutathione production. Many of these functions are interrelated with glucose metabolism. The specialized aspects of glutamine/glutamate metabolism of different glutamine-utilizing cells are discussed in the context of glucose requirements and cell function.

  5. Characterization of age/sex and the regional distribution of mGluR5 availability in the healthy human brain measured by high-resolution [{sup 11}C]ABP688 PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, Jonathan M.; Porras-Betancourt, Manuel; Massarweh, Gassan; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Kobayashi, Eliane [McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rousset, Olivier G. [Johns Hopkins University, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rowley, Jared [McGill University, Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory, McGill Center for Studies in Aging, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal (Canada); Reader, Andrew J. [McGill University, PET Unit, McConnell Brain Imaging Center, Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal (Canada); King' s College London, St. Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Labbe, Aurelie [McGill University, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational health, Montreal (Canada); Douglas Mental Health University Institute / Douglas Institut Universitaire en Sante Mentale, Department of Psychiatry, Montreal (Canada); Rosa-Neto, Pedro [McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); McGill University, Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory, McGill Center for Studies in Aging, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) is a G protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in several psychiatric and neurological diseases. The radiopharmaceutical [{sup 11}C]ABP688 allows for in vivo quantification of mGluR5 availability using positron emission tomography (PET). In this study, we aimed to detail the regional distribution of [{sup 11}C]ABP688 binding potential (BP{sub ND}) and the existence of age/sex effects in healthy individuals. Thirty-one healthy individuals aged 20 to 77 years (men, n = 18, 45.3 ± 18.2 years; females, n = 13, 41.5 ± 19.6 years) underwent imaging with [{sup 11}C]ABP688 using the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT). We developed an advanced partial volume correction (PVC) method using surface-based analysis in order to accurately estimate the regional variation of radioactivity. BP{sub ND} was calculated using the simplified reference tissue model, with the cerebellum as the reference region. Surface-based and volume-based analyses were performed for 39 cortical and subcortical regions of interest per hemisphere. We found the highest [{sup 11}C]ABP688 BP{sub ND} in the lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. The lowest [{sup 11}C]ABP688 BP{sub ND} was observed in the pre- and post-central gyri as well as the occipital lobes and the thalami. No sex effect was observed. Associations between age and [{sup 11}C]ABP688 BP{sub ND} without PVC were observed in the right amygdala and left putamen, but were not significant after multiple comparisons correction. The present results highlight complexities underlying brain adaptations during the aging process, and support the notion that certain aspects of neurotransmission remain stable during the adult life span. (orig.)

  6. Characterization of age/sex and the regional distribution of mGluR5 availability in the healthy human brain measured by high-resolution [11C]ABP688 PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBois, Jonathan M.; Porras-Betancourt, Manuel; Massarweh, Gassan; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Kobayashi, Eliane; Rousset, Olivier G.; Rowley, Jared; Reader, Andrew J.; Labbe, Aurelie; Rosa-Neto, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) is a G protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in several psychiatric and neurological diseases. The radiopharmaceutical [ 11 C]ABP688 allows for in vivo quantification of mGluR5 availability using positron emission tomography (PET). In this study, we aimed to detail the regional distribution of [ 11 C]ABP688 binding potential (BP ND ) and the existence of age/sex effects in healthy individuals. Thirty-one healthy individuals aged 20 to 77 years (men, n = 18, 45.3 ± 18.2 years; females, n = 13, 41.5 ± 19.6 years) underwent imaging with [ 11 C]ABP688 using the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT). We developed an advanced partial volume correction (PVC) method using surface-based analysis in order to accurately estimate the regional variation of radioactivity. BP ND was calculated using the simplified reference tissue model, with the cerebellum as the reference region. Surface-based and volume-based analyses were performed for 39 cortical and subcortical regions of interest per hemisphere. We found the highest [ 11 C]ABP688 BP ND in the lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. The lowest [ 11 C]ABP688 BP ND was observed in the pre- and post-central gyri as well as the occipital lobes and the thalami. No sex effect was observed. Associations between age and [ 11 C]ABP688 BP ND without PVC were observed in the right amygdala and left putamen, but were not significant after multiple comparisons correction. The present results highlight complexities underlying brain adaptations during the aging process, and support the notion that certain aspects of neurotransmission remain stable during the adult life span. (orig.)

  7. Amperometric Microsensors Monitoring Glutamate-Evoked In Situ Responses of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide from Live Human Neuroblastoma Cells

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    Yejin Ha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO are important signaling gases which have multifaceted roles, such as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and vasodilators. Even though it is difficult to measure NO and CO in a living system due to their high diffusibility and extremely low release levels, electrochemical sensors are promising tools to measure in vivo and in vitro NO and CO gases. In this paper, using amperometric dual and septuple NO/CO microsensors, real-time NO and CO changes evoked by glutamate were monitored simultaneously for human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cells. In cultures, the cells were differentiated and matured into functional neurons by retinoic acid and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. When glutamate was administrated to the cells, both NO and CO increases and subsequent decreases returning to the basal levels were observed with a dual NO/CO microsensor. In order to facilitate sensor’s measurement, a flower-type septuple NO/CO microsensor was newly developed and confirmed in terms of the sensitivity and selectivity. The septuple microsensor was employed for the measurements of NO and CO changes as a function of distances from the position of glutamate injection. Our sensor measurements revealed that only functionally differentiated cells responded to glutamate and released NO and CO.

  8. [Determination of glutamic acid in biological material by capillary electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narezhnaya, E; Krukier, I; Avrutskaya, V; Degtyareva, A; Igumnova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the identification and determination of Glutamic acid by capillary zone electrophoresis without their preliminary derivatization have been optimized. The effect of concentration of buffer electrolyte and pH on determination of Glutamic acid has been investigated. It is shown that the 5 Mm borate buffer concentration and a pH 9.15 are optimal. Quantitative determination of glutamic acid has been carried out using a linear dependence between the concentration of the analyte and the area of the peak. The accuracy and reproducibility of the determination are confirmed by the method "introduced - found". Glutamic acid has been determined in the placenta homogenate. The duration of analysis doesn't exceed 30 minutes. The results showed a decrease in the level of glutamic acid in cases of pregnancy complicated by placental insufficiency compared with the physiological, and this fact allows to consider the level of glutamic acid as a possible marker of complicated pregnancy.

  9. Alleviation of glutamate mediated neuronal insult by piroxicam in rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia: a possible mechanism of GABA agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2014-12-01

    Neurotransmitter imbalance is an inevitable outcome in cerebral ischemia that leads to neuronal death. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on extracellular brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, survival time, and neuronal cell death. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Charles Foster rat led to neuronal infarction and compromised intrinsic antioxidant status. Thirty-minute preadministration of piroxicam (10 mg/kg b.w.) showed a significant (P piroxicam administration in stroke rat significantly reduced (P piroxicam attenuates extracellular glutamate release and also reduces neuronal cell death due to reduction in oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia. Our results also indicate a consequent increase of extracellular GABA in brain regions administered with piroxicam, which hints that piroxicam alleviates glutamate excitotoxicity possibly by GABA agonism.

  10. Glutamate. Its applications in food and contribution to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinap, S; Hajeb, P

    2010-08-01

    This article reviews application of glutamate in food and its benefits and role as one of the common food ingredients used. Monosodium glutamate is one of the most abundant naturally occurring amino acids which frequently added as a flavor enhancer. It produced a unique taste that cannot be provided by other basic taste (saltiness, sourness, sweetness and bitterness), referred to as a fifth taste (umami). Glutamate serves some functions in the body as well, serving as an energy source for certain tissues and as a substrate for glutathione synthesis. Glutamate has the potential to enhance food intake in older individuals and dietary free glutamate evoked a visceral sensation from the stomach, intestine and portal vein. Small quantities of glutamate used in combination with a reduced amount of table salt during food preparation allow for far less salt to be used during and after cooking. Because glutamate is one of the most intensely studied food ingredients in the food supply and has been found safe, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization placed it in the safest category for food additives. Despite a widespread belief that glutamate can elicit asthma, migraine headache and Chinese Restaurant Syndrome (CRS), there are no consistent clinical data to support this claim. In addition, findings from the literature indicate that there is no consistent evidence to suggest that individuals may be uniquely sensitive to glutamate. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cocaine serves as a peripheral interoceptive conditioned stimulus for central glutamate and dopamine release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy A Wise

    Full Text Available Intravenous injections of cocaine HCl are habit-forming because, among their many actions, they elevate extracellular dopamine levels in the terminal fields of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. This action, thought to be very important for cocaine's strong addiction liability, is believed to have very short latency and is assumed to reflect rapid brain entry and pharmacokinetics of the drug. However, while intravenous cocaine HCl has almost immediate effects on behavior and extracellular dopamine levels, recent evidence suggests that its central pharmacological effects are not evident until 10 or more seconds after IV injection. Thus the immediate effects of a given intravenous cocaine injection on extracellular dopamine concentration and behavior appear to occur before there is sufficient time for cocaine to act centrally as a dopamine uptake inhibitor. To explore the contribution of peripheral effects of cocaine to the early activation of the dopamine system, we used brain microdialysis to measure the effects of cocaine methiodide (MI--a cocaine analogue that does not cross the blood brain barrier--on glutamate (excitatory input to the dopamine cells. IP injections of cocaine MI were ineffective in cocaine-naïve animals but stimulated ventral tegmental glutamate release in rats previously trained to lever-press for cocaine HCl. This peripherally triggered glutamate input was sufficient to reinstate cocaine-seeking in previously trained animals that had undergone extinction of the habit. These findings offer an explanation for short-latency behavioral responses and immediate dopamine elevations seen following cocaine injections in cocaine-experienced but not cocaine-naïve animals.

  12. The low binding affinity of D-serine at the ionotropic glutamate receptor GluD2 can be attributed to the hinge region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapken, Daniel; Steffensen, Thomas Bielefeldt; Leth, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are responsible for most of the fast excitatory communication between neurons in our brain. The GluD2 receptor is a puzzling member of the iGluR family: It is involved in synaptic plasticity, plays a role in human diseases, e.g. ataxia, binds glycine and D...

  13. Lycopene depresses glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and protein kinase C in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Hung, Chi-Feng; Jean, Wei-Horng; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2018-05-01

    Lycopene is a natural dietary carotenoid that was reported to exhibit a neuroprotective profile. Considering that excitotoxicity and cell death induced by glutamate are involved in many brain disorders, the effect of lycopene on glutamate release in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals and the possible mechanism involved in such effect was investigated. We observed here that lycopene inhibited 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate release and intrasynaptosomal Ca 2+ concentration elevation. The inhibitory effect of lycopene on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was markedly reduced in the presence of the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was insensitive to the intracellular Ca 2+ -release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, in the presence of the protein kinase C inhibitors GF109203X and Go6976, the action of lycopene on evoked glutamate release was prevented. These results are the first to suggest that lycopene inhibits glutamate release from rat cortical synaptosomes by suppressing presynaptic Ca 2+ entry and protein kinase C activity.

  14. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Simon Glerup; Gesslein, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments...... sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2....

  15. Influence of the glutamic acid content of the diet on the catabolic rate of labelled glutamic acid in rats. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, A.; Simon, O.; Bergner, H.

    1984-01-01

    40 rats with a body weight of 100 g received 7 semisynthetic diets with different contents of glutamic acid and one diet contained whole-egg. A L-amino acid mixture corresponding to the pattern of egg protein was the protein source of the semisynthetic diets. Glutamic acid was supplemented succesively from 0 to 58 mol-% of the total amino acid content. On the 8th day of the experimental feeding the animals were labelled by subcutaneous injection of 14 C-glutamic acid. Subsequently the CO 2 and the 14 CO 2 excretion were measured for 24 hours. In this period 64 to 68 % of the injected radioactivity were recovered as 14 CO 2 . The curve pattern of 14 CO 2 excretion indicates two different processes of 14 CO 2 formation. One characterizing the direct degradation of glutamic acid to CO 2 with a high rate constant and a second one with a lower rate constant characterizing the 14 CO 2 formation via metabolites of glutamic acid. 77 % of the total 14 CO 2 excretion in 24 hours resulted from the direct oxidation of glutamic acid and 23 % from the oxidation of intermediates. When 14 CO 2 formation was measured 10 to 24 hours after injection of 14 C-glutamic acid a positive correlation to the content of glutamic acid in the diet was observed. The intestinal tissue contributes considerably to the catabolization of glutamic acid, however, there seems to exist an upper limit for this capacity. (author)

  16. Low dose of L-glutamic acid attenuated the neurological dysfunctions and excitotoxicity in bilateral common carotid artery occluded mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Muthiah; Abdul, Khadar K; Justin, Antony

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, produces excitotoxicity through its agonistic action on postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, resulting in neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that the administration of low doses of glutamate in cerebral ischemia could attenuate the excitotoxicity in neurons through its autoreceptor regulatory mechanism, and thereby control neurodegeneration. To test the hypothesis, the effect of L-glutamic acid (L-GA) 400 μmol/l/kg was evaluated in a bilateral common carotid artery occlusion-induced global ischemic mouse model. Memantine was used as a positive control. Global ischemia in mice was induced by occlusion of both the common carotid artery (bilateral common carotid artery occlusion) for 20 min, followed by reperfusion injury. L-GA was infused slowly through the tail vein 30 min before the surgery and every 24 h thereafter until the end of the experiment. The time-dependent change in cerebral blood flow was monitored using a laser Doppler image analyzer. The neurotransmitters glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the neurobiochemicals ATP, glutathione, and nitric oxide were measured in the different regions of brain at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after reperfusion injury. L-GA increased locomotor activity, muscle coordination, and cerebral blood flow in ischemic mice at 72 h after ischemic insult. L-GA reduced glutamate levels in the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus at 72 h, whereas GABA levels were elevated in all three brain regions studied. Further, L-GA elevated glutathione levels and attenuated nitric oxide levels, but failed to restore ATP levels 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion. We conclude that the gradual reduction of glutamate along with elevation of GABA in different brain regions could have contributed toward the neuroprotective effect of L-GA. Hence, a slow infusion of a low dose of L-GA could be beneficial in controlling excitotoxicity-induced neurodegeneration following ischemia.

  17. The Glutamate Dehydrogenase Pathway and Its Roles in Cell and Tissue Biology in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Plaitakis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH is a hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD(P+ to NAD(PH. It is found in all living organisms serving both catabolic and anabolic reactions. In mammalian tissues, oxidative deamination of glutamate via GDH generates α-ketoglutarate, which is metabolized by the Krebs cycle, leading to the synthesis of ATP. In addition, the GDH pathway is linked to diverse cellular processes, including ammonia metabolism, acid-base equilibrium, redox homeostasis (via formation of fumarate, lipid biosynthesis (via oxidative generation of citrate, and lactate production. While most mammals possess a single GDH1 protein (hGDH1 in the human that is highly expressed in the liver, humans and other primates have acquired, via duplication, an hGDH2 isoenzyme with distinct functional properties and tissue expression profile. The novel hGDH2 underwent rapid evolutionary adaptation, acquiring unique properties that enable enhanced enzyme function under conditions inhibitory to its ancestor hGDH1. These are thought to provide a biological advantage to humans with hGDH2 evolution occurring concomitantly with human brain development. hGDH2 is co-expressed with hGDH1 in human brain, kidney, testis and steroidogenic organs, but not in the liver. In human cerebral cortex, hGDH1 and hGDH2 are expressed in astrocytes, the cells responsible for removing and metabolizing transmitter glutamate, and for supplying neurons with glutamine and lactate. In human testis, hGDH2 (but not hGDH1 is densely expressed in the Sertoli cells, known to provide the spermatids with lactate and other nutrients. In steroid producing cells, hGDH1/2 is thought to generate reducing equivalents (NADPH in the mitochondria for the biosynthesis of steroidal hormones. Lastly, up-regulation of hGDH1/2 expression occurs in cancer, permitting neoplastic cells to utilize glutamine/glutamate for their growth

  18. Reelin secreted by GABAergic neurons regulates glutamate receptor homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Gonzalez Campo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reelin is a large secreted protein of the extracellular matrix that has been proposed to participate to the etiology of schizophrenia. During development, reelin is crucial for the correct cytoarchitecture of laminated brain structures and is produced by a subset of neurons named Cajal-Retzius. After birth, most of these cells degenerate and reelin expression persists in postnatal and adult brain. The phenotype of neurons that bind secreted reelin and whether the continuous secretion of reelin is required for physiological functions at postnatal stages remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Combining immunocytochemical and pharmacological approaches, we first report that two distinct patterns of reelin expression are present in cultured hippocampal neurons. We show that in hippocampal cultures, reelin is secreted by GABAergic neurons displaying an intense reelin immunoreactivity (IR. We demonstrate that secreted reelin binds to receptors of the lipoprotein family on neurons with a punctate reelin IR. Secondly, using calcium imaging techniques, we examined the physiological consequences of reelin secretion blockade. Blocking protein secretion rapidly and reversibly changes the subunit composition of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs to a predominance of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Addition of recombinant or endogenously secreted reelin rescues the effects of protein secretion blockade and reverts the fraction of NR2B-containing NMDARs to control levels. Therefore, the continuous secretion of reelin is necessary to control the subunit composition of NMDARs in hippocampal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the heterogeneity of reelin immunoreactivity correlates with distinct functional populations: neurons synthesizing and secreting reelin and/or neurons binding reelin. Furthermore, we show that continuous reelin secretion is a strict requirement to maintain the composition of NMDARs. We propose

  19. Gating characteristics control glutamate receptor distribution and trafficking in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzoldt, Astrid G; Lee, Yü-Hien; Khorramshahi, Omid; Reynolds, Eric; Plested, Andrew J R; Herzel, Hanspeter; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2014-09-08

    Glutamate-releasing synapses dominate excitatory release in the brain. Mechanisms governing their assembly are of major importance for circuit development and long-term plasticity underlying learning and memory. AMPA/Kainate-type glutamate receptors (GluRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that open their ion-conducting pores in response to binding of the neurotransmitter. Changes in subunit composition of postsynaptic GluRs are highly relevant for plasticity and development of glutamatergic synapses [1-4]. To date, posttranslational modifications, mostly operating via the intracellular C-terminal domains (CTDs) of GluRs, are presumed to be the major regulator of trafficking [5]. In recent years, structural and electrophysiological analyses have improved our understanding of GluR gating mechanism [6-11]. However, whether conformational changes subsequent to glutamate binding may per se be able to influence GluR trafficking has remained an unaddressed question. Using a Drosophila system allowing for extended visualization of GluR trafficking in vivo, we here provide evidence that mutations changing the gating behavior alter GluR distribution and trafficking. GluR mutants associated with reduced charge transfer segregated from coexpressed wild-type GluRs on the level of individual postsynaptic densities. Segregation was lost upon blocking of evoked glutamate release. Photobleaching experiments suggested increased mobility of mutants with reduced charge transfer, which accumulated prematurely during early steps of synapse assembly, but failed to further increase their level in accordance with assembly of the presynaptic scaffold. In summary, gating characteristics seem to be a new variable for the understanding of GluR trafficking relevant to both development and plasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Computational Model to Investigate Astrocytic Glutamate Uptake Influence on Synaptic Transmission and Neuronal Spiking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Lakshmi Allam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, our view of astrocytes has switched from passive support cells to active processing elements in the brain. The current view is that astrocytes shape neuronal communication and also play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases. Despite the growing awareness of the importance of astrocytes, the exact mechanisms underlying neuron-astrocyte communication and the physiological consequences of astrocytic-neuronal interactions remain largely unclear. In this work, we define a modeling framework that will permit to address unanswered questions regarding the role of astrocytes. Our computational model of a detailed glutamatergic synapse facilitates the analysis of neural system responses to various stimuli and conditions that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, in particular the readouts at the sub-cellular level. In this paper, we extend a detailed glutamatergic synaptic model, to include astrocytic glutamate transporters. We demonstrate how these glial transporters, responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake, modulate synaptic transmission mediated by ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors at glutamatergic synapses. Furthermore, we investigate how these local signaling effects at the synaptic level are translated into varying spatio-temporal patterns of neuron firing. Paired pulse stimulation results reveal that the effect of astrocytic glutamate uptake is more apparent when the input inter-spike interval is sufficiently long to allow the receptors to recover from desensitization. These results suggest an important functional role of astrocytes in spike timing dependent processes and demand further investigation of the molecular basis of certain neurological diseases specifically related to alterations in astrocytic glutamate uptake, such as epilepsy.

  1. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production.

  2. Influence of the glutamic acid content of the diet on the catabolic rate of labelled glutamic acid in rats. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, O.; Wilke, A.; Bergner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Mal rats received during a 8 days experimental feeding period diets with different contents in glutamic acid. The daily feed intake was restricted to the energy maintenance level of 460 kJ/kg/sup 0.75/. The diet contained a mixture of L-amino acids corresponding to the pattern of egg protein except glutamic acid. Glutamic acid was added successively at 10 levels (0 to 14.8 % of dry matter) and the resulting diets were fed to groups of 4 animals each. At the end of the experimental feeding period 14 C- and 15 N-labelled glutamic acid were applied by intragastric infusion. CO 2 and 14 CO 2 excretion was measured during the following 4 hours and the urinary N and 15 N excretion during the following 24 hours. The CO 2 excretion decreased from 53 to 44 mmol CO 2 /100g body weight with increasing levels of dietary glutamic acid. This change seems to result from the increasing proportion of amino acids as an energetic fuel. While the amount of oxidized glutamic acid increased with increasing supplements of glutamic acid the relative 14 CO 2 excretion decreased from 57 to 48 % of the applied radioactivity. The urinary 15 N excretion during 24 hours was 31 % of the given amount of 15 N if no glutamic acid was included in the diet. This proportion increased successively up to 52 % in the case of the highest supply of glutamic acid. Because the total N excretion increased at the same extent as the 15 N excretion a complete mixing of the NH 2 groups resulting from glutamic acid due to desamination with the ammonia pool was assumed. No correlation between glutamic acid content of the diet and specific radioactivity of CO 2 or atom-% 15 N excess of urinary N was observed. (author)

  3. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... (Preliminary)] Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in subheading... United States at less than fair value (LTFV) and subsidized by the Governments of China and Indonesia. \\1...

  4. Surface grafting of poly(L-glutamates). 3. Block copolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, RH; Siesling, EA; Werkman, PJ; Vorenkamp, EJ; Schouten, AJ

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the synthesis of surface-grafted AB-block copolypeptides, consisting of poly(gamma -benzyl L-glutamate) (PBLG) as the A-block and poly(gamma -methyl L-glutamate) (PMLG) as the B-block. Immobilized primary amine groups of (,gamma -aminopropyl)triethoxysilane

  5. Microscopic picture of the aqueous solvation of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, E.J.M.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Meijer, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of glutamic acid and glutamate solvated in water, using both density functional theory (DFT) and the Gromos96 force field. We focus on the microscopic aspects of the solvation−particularly on the hydrogen bond structures and dynamics−and investigate the

  6. probing the cob(ii)alamin conductor hypothesis with glutamate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Glutamate mutase activity was also demonstrated upon incubation of GlmS and E with 3',5'- ... overproduced in E.coli (Huhta et al. 2001,. Huhta et ..... Biochemistry. 37: 9704-9715. Buckel W 2001 Unusual enzymes involved in five pathways of glutamate fermentation. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 57: 263-273. Buckel W and ...

  7. Some Properties of Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: ammonia assimilation, glutamate dehydrogenase, GDH, Gracilaria sordida, red alga, enzyme activity. Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH, EC ... Anabolic functions could be assimilation of ammonia released during photorespiration and synthesis of N-rich transport compounds. Western Indian Ocean Journal of ...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... (CONTINUED)