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Sample records for brain metabolite markers

  1. [Markers of brain tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, R; Pezzotta, S; Bernini, F; Racagni, G

    1984-05-19

    Biological markers of tumors are compounds or enzymatic activities measurable in body fluids. Their presence or concentration must be linked to tumoral growth. The markers of the central nervous system tumors are detected in CSF. Alpha-feto-protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, human chorionic gonadotropin, adenohypophyseal peptide hormones, enzymes, etc., have found some application in the early diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis. Other applications involve the early detection and recurrency of primary brain tumors, as well as the evaluation of efficacy of their therapy. The tests based on the CSF content of desmosterol and polyamines have been studied extensively. Their rationale is discussed and specificity, sensitivity, efficiency and predictive value are considered. Experimental results concerning a new possible biochemical marker, based on CSF concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, are reported.

  2. Markers for blood-brain barrier integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    known when first introduced, but seem to have been forgotten since. Understanding these limitations is important because Evans blue is still the most commonly used marker of brain barrier integrity and those using it seem oblivious to problems arising from its in vivo application. The introduction......In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in brain barriers and various roles their intrinsic mechanisms may play in neurological disorders. Such studies require suitable models and markers to demonstrate integrity and functional changes at the interfaces between blood, brain......, and cerebrospinal fluid. Studies of brain barrier mechanisms and measurements of plasma volume using dyes have a long-standing history, dating back to the late nineteenth-century. Their use in blood-brain barrier studies continues in spite of their known serious limitations in in vivo applications. These were well...

  3. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  4. Glyoxylate, a New Marker Metabolite of Type 2 Diabetes

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    Victoria J. Nikiforova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is characterized by a variety of metabolic impairments that are closely linked to nonenzymatic glycation reactions of proteins and peptides resulting in advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. Reactive aldehydes derived from sugars play an important role in the generation of AGEs. Using metabolite profiling to characterize human plasma from diabetic versus nondiabetic subjects we observed in a recent study that the reactive aldehyde glyoxylate was increased before high levels of plasma glucose, typical for a diabetic condition, could be measured. Following this observation, we explored the relevance of increased glyoxylate in diabetic subjects and in diabetic C57BLKS/J-Leprdb/db-/- mice in the pathophysiology of diabetes. A retrospective study using samples of long-term blood donors revealed that glyoxylate levels unlike glucose levels became significantly elevated up to 3 years prior to diabetes diagnosis (difference to control P=0.034. Elevated glyoxylate levels impact on newly identified mechanisms linking hyperglycemia and AGE production with diabetes-associated complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Glyoxylate in its metabolic network may serve as an early marker in diabetes diagnosis with predictive qualities for associated complications and as potential to guide the development of new antidiabetic therapies.

  5. Brain metabolite values in children with breath-holding spells

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    Calik M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mustafa Calik,1 Dilek Sen Dokumaci,2 Suna Sarikaya,3 Mahmut Demir,4 Ilhan Isik,5 Halil Kazanasmaz,4 Cemil Kaya,4 Hasan Kandemir6 1Department of Pediatric Neurology, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Neurology, 4Department of Pediatrics, Harran University School of Medicine, 5Department of Pediatric Neurology, Eyyubiye Training and Research Hospital, 6Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Harran University School of Medicine, Sanliurfa, Turkey Abstract: Breath-holding spells are benign, paroxysmal events with apnea and postural tone changes after a crying episode in infants. The objective of this study was to investigate the pathologies in brain metabolite values in the absence of seizure in children with breath-holding spells by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Brain MRS examination was performed on 18 children with breath-holding spells and 13 neurologically normal children who were included as the control group. There was no significant difference in terms of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, choline (Cho, creatine (Cr, and myoinositol (mI levels and also in terms of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr ratios between the patients and the control group (all P>0.05. Our study suggested that there is no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells. This result confirms the previous studies, which reported no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells. Keywords: brain metabolite, children, breath holding, magnetic resonance spectroscopy 

  6. Approaches, Challenges, and Advances in Metabolism of New Synthetic Cannabinoids and Identification of Optimal Urinary Marker Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, X; Huestis, M A

    2017-02-01

    We review approaches for determining metabolism of new synthetic cannabinoids (SCs), and challenges and advances in identifying optimal urinary marker metabolites of SC intake. Metabolic patterns of different SC generations are evaluated, and a practical strategy offered for selecting SC urinary marker metabolites. Novel SCs are incubated with human hepatocytes, the most abundant and characteristic metabolites are identified with high-resolution mass spectrometry, and proposed hepatocyte marker metabolites are confirmed in authentic positive urine samples. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Brain metabolite values in children with breath-holding spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Mustafa; Sen Dokumaci, Dilek; Sarikaya, Suna; Demir, Mahmut; Isik, Ilhan; Kazanasmaz, Halil; Kaya, Cemil; Kandemir, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Breath-holding spells are benign, paroxysmal events with apnea and postural tone changes after a crying episode in infants. The objective of this study was to investigate the pathologies in brain metabolite values in the absence of seizure in children with breath-holding spells by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Brain MRS examination was performed on 18 children with breath-holding spells and 13 neurologically normal children who were included as the control group. There was no significant difference in terms of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and myoinositol (mI) levels and also in terms of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr ratios between the patients and the control group (all P>0.05). Our study suggested that there is no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells. This result confirms the previous studies, which reported no permanent neuronal damage in patients with breath-holding spells.

  8. Human Serum Metabolites Associate With Severity and Patient Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Matej Orešič

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, especially in children and young adults. TBI is an example of a medical condition where there are still major lacks in diagnostics and outcome prediction. Here we apply comprehensive metabolic profiling of serum samples from TBI patients and controls in two independent cohorts. The discovery study included 144 TBI patients, with the samples taken at the time of hospitalization. The patients were diagnosed as severe (sTBI; n = 22, moderate (moTBI; n = 14 or mild TBI (mTBI; n = 108 according to Glasgow Coma Scale. The control group (n = 28 comprised of acute orthopedic non-brain injuries. The validation study included sTBI (n = 23, moTBI (n = 7, mTBI (n = 37 patients and controls (n = 27. We show that two medium-chain fatty acids (decanoic and octanoic acids and sugar derivatives including 2,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid are strongly associated with severity of TBI, and most of them are also detected at high concentrations in brain microdialysates of TBI patients. Based on metabolite concentrations from TBI patients at the time of hospitalization, an algorithm was developed that accurately predicted the patient outcomes (AUC = 0.84 in validation cohort. Addition of the metabolites to the established clinical model (CRASH, comprising clinical and computed tomography data, significantly improved prediction of patient outcomes. The identified ‘TBI metabotype’ in serum, that may be indicative of disrupted blood-brain barrier, of protective physiological response and altered metabolism due to head trauma, offers a new avenue for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers of broad spectrum of TBIs.

  9. Identification of metabolites, clinical chemistry markers and transcripts associated with hepatotoxicity.

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    Andreas Buness

    Full Text Available Early and accurate pre-clinical and clinical biomarkers of hepatotoxicity facilitate the drug development process and the safety monitoring in clinical studies. We selected eight known model compounds to be administered to male Wistar rats to identify biomarkers of drug induced liver injury (DILI using transcriptomics, metabolite profiling (metabolomics and conventional endpoints. We specifically explored early biomarkers in serum and liver tissue associated with histopathologically evident acute hepatotoxicity. A tailored data analysis strategy was implemented to better differentiate animals with no treatment-related findings in the liver from animals showing evident hepatotoxicity as assessed by histopathological analysis. From the large number of assessed parameters, our data analysis strategy allowed us to identify five metabolites in serum and five in liver tissue, 58 transcripts in liver tissue and seven clinical chemistry markers in serum that were significantly associated with acute hepatotoxicity. The identified markers comprised metabolites such as taurocholic acid and putrescine (measured as sum parameter together with agmatine, classical clinical chemistry markers like AST (aspartate aminotransferase, ALT (alanine aminotransferase, and bilirubin, as well as gene transcripts like Igfbp1 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 and Egr1 (early growth response protein 1. The response pattern of the identified biomarkers was concordant across all types of parameters and sample matrices. Our results suggest that a combination of several of these biomarkers could significantly improve the robustness and accuracy of an early diagnosis of hepatotoxicity.

  10. Identification of metabolites, clinical chemistry markers and transcripts associated with hepatotoxicity.

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    Buness, Andreas; Roth, Adrian; Herrmann, Annika; Schmitz, Oliver; Kamp, Hennicke; Busch, Kristina; Suter, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate pre-clinical and clinical biomarkers of hepatotoxicity facilitate the drug development process and the safety monitoring in clinical studies. We selected eight known model compounds to be administered to male Wistar rats to identify biomarkers of drug induced liver injury (DILI) using transcriptomics, metabolite profiling (metabolomics) and conventional endpoints. We specifically explored early biomarkers in serum and liver tissue associated with histopathologically evident acute hepatotoxicity. A tailored data analysis strategy was implemented to better differentiate animals with no treatment-related findings in the liver from animals showing evident hepatotoxicity as assessed by histopathological analysis. From the large number of assessed parameters, our data analysis strategy allowed us to identify five metabolites in serum and five in liver tissue, 58 transcripts in liver tissue and seven clinical chemistry markers in serum that were significantly associated with acute hepatotoxicity. The identified markers comprised metabolites such as taurocholic acid and putrescine (measured as sum parameter together with agmatine), classical clinical chemistry markers like AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT (alanine aminotransferase), and bilirubin, as well as gene transcripts like Igfbp1 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1) and Egr1 (early growth response protein 1). The response pattern of the identified biomarkers was concordant across all types of parameters and sample matrices. Our results suggest that a combination of several of these biomarkers could significantly improve the robustness and accuracy of an early diagnosis of hepatotoxicity.

  11. Evaluation of ensemble Monte Carlo variable selection for identification of metabolite markers on NMR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerre, C A; Gowen, A A; O'Gorman, A; Downey, G; O'Donnell, C P

    2017-04-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of the recently developed ensemble Monte Carlo Variable Selection (EMCVS) method to identify the relevant portions of high resolution 1H NMR spectra as a metabolite fingerprinting tool and compare to a widely used method (Variable importance on projection (VIP)) and recently proposed variable selected methods i.e. selectivity ratio (SR) and significance multivariate correlation (sMC). As case studies two quantitative publicly available datasets: wine samples, urine samples of rats, and an experiment on mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) were examined. EMCVS outperformed the three other variable selection methods in most cases, selecting fewer chemical shifts and leading to improved classification of mushrooms and prediction of onion by-products intake and wine components. These fewer chemical shift regions facilitate the interpretation of the NMR spectra, fingerprinting and identification of metabolite markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cigarette smoking exacerbates chronic alcohol-induced brain damage: a preliminary metabolite imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Banys, Peter; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2004-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is common among alcohol-dependent individuals. Nevertheless, previous research has typically not accounted for the potential independent or compounding effects of cigarette smoking on alcohol-induced brain injury and neurocognition. Twenty-four 1-week-abstinent recovering alcoholics (RAs; 14 smokers and 10 nonsmokers) in treatment and 26 light-drinking controls (7 smokers and 19 nonsmokers) were compared on measures of common brain metabolites in gray matter and white matter of the major lobes, basal ganglia, midbrain, and cerebellar vermis, obtained via multislice short-echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Smoking and nonsmoking RAs were also contrasted on measures of neurocognitive functioning, as well as laboratory markers of drinking severity and nutritional status. Chronic alcohol dependence, independent of smoking, was associated with lower concentrations of frontal N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and frontal choline-containing compounds, as well as lower parietal and thalamic choline. Smoking RAs had lower NAA concentrations in frontal white matter and midbrain and lower midbrain choline than nonsmoking RAs. A four-group analysis of covariance also demonstrated that chronic cigarette smoking was associated with lower midbrain NAA and choline and with lower vermian choline. In smoking RAs, heavier drinking was associated with heavier smoking, which correlated with numerous subcortical metabolite abnormalities. The 1-week-abstinent smoking and nonsmoking RAs did not differ significantly on a brief neurocognitive battery. In smoking RAs, lower cerebellar vermis NAA was associated with poorer visuomotor scanning speed and incidental learning, and in nonsmoking RAs lower vermis NAA was related to poorer visuospatial learning and memory. These human in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging findings indicate that chronic cigarette smoking exacerbates chronic alcohol-induced neuronal injury and cell membrane damage in

  13. In Vivo Detection of Perinatal Brain Metabolite Changes in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR.

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    Rui V Simões

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is a risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. We studied a rabbit model of IUGR by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and spectroscopy (MRS, to assess in vivo brain structural and metabolic consequences, and identify potential metabolic biomarkers for clinical translation.IUGR was induced in 3 pregnant rabbits at gestational day 25, by 40-50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn; the contralateral horn was used as control. Fetuses were delivered at day 30 and weighted. A total of 6 controls and 5 IUGR pups underwent T2-w MRI and localized proton MRS within the first 8 hours of life, at 7T. Changes in brain tissue volumes and respective contributions to each MRS voxel were estimated by semi-automated registration of MRI images with a digital atlas of the rabbit brain. MRS data were used for: (i absolute metabolite quantifications, using linear fitting; (ii local temperature estimations, based on the water chemical shift; and (iii classification, using spectral pattern analysis.Lower birth weight was associated with (i smaller brain sizes, (ii slightly lower brain temperatures, and (iii differential metabolite profile changes in specific regions of the brain parenchyma. Specifically, we found estimated lower levels of aspartate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus (suggesting neuronal impairment, and higher glycine levels in the striatum (possible marker of brain injury. Our results also suggest that the metabolic changes in cortical regions are more prevalent than those detected in hippocampus and striatum.IUGR was associated with brain metabolic changes in vivo, which correlate well with the neurostructural changes and neurodevelopment problems described in IUGR. Metabolic parameters could constitute non invasive biomarkers for the diagnosis and abnormal neurodevelopment of perinatal origin.

  14. In Vivo Detection of Perinatal Brain Metabolite Changes in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Rui V; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Carbajo, Rodrigo J; González-Tendero, Anna; Illa, Miriam; Sanz-Cortés, Magdalena; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Gratacós, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. We studied a rabbit model of IUGR by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), to assess in vivo brain structural and metabolic consequences, and identify potential metabolic biomarkers for clinical translation. IUGR was induced in 3 pregnant rabbits at gestational day 25, by 40-50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn; the contralateral horn was used as control. Fetuses were delivered at day 30 and weighted. A total of 6 controls and 5 IUGR pups underwent T2-w MRI and localized proton MRS within the first 8 hours of life, at 7T. Changes in brain tissue volumes and respective contributions to each MRS voxel were estimated by semi-automated registration of MRI images with a digital atlas of the rabbit brain. MRS data were used for: (i) absolute metabolite quantifications, using linear fitting; (ii) local temperature estimations, based on the water chemical shift; and (iii) classification, using spectral pattern analysis. Lower birth weight was associated with (i) smaller brain sizes, (ii) slightly lower brain temperatures, and (iii) differential metabolite profile changes in specific regions of the brain parenchyma. Specifically, we found estimated lower levels of aspartate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus (suggesting neuronal impairment), and higher glycine levels in the striatum (possible marker of brain injury). Our results also suggest that the metabolic changes in cortical regions are more prevalent than those detected in hippocampus and striatum. IUGR was associated with brain metabolic changes in vivo, which correlate well with the neurostructural changes and neurodevelopment problems described in IUGR. Metabolic parameters could constitute non invasive biomarkers for the diagnosis and abnormal neurodevelopment of perinatal origin.

  15. Pathology of perinatal brain damage: background and oxidative stress markers.

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    Tonni, Gabriele; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Ciccoli, Lucia; De Felice, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    To review historical scientific background and new perspective on the pathology of perinatal brain damage. The relationship between birth asphyxia and subsequent cerebral palsy has been extensively investigated. The role of new and promising clinical markers of oxidative stress (OS) is presented. Electronic search of PubMed-Medline/EMBASE database has been performed. Laboratory and clinical data involving case series from the research group are reported. The neuropathology of birth asphyxia and subsequent perinatal brain damage as well as the role of electronic fetal monitoring are reported following a review of the medical literature. This review focuses on OS mechanisms underlying the neonatal brain damage and provides different perspective on the most reliable OS markers during the perinatal period. In particular, prior research work on neurodevelopmental diseases, such as Rett syndrome, suggests the measurement of oxidized fatty acid molecules (i.e., F4-Neuroprostanes and F2-Dihomo-Isoprostanes) closely related to brain white and gray matter oxidative damage.

  16. Changes of brain metabolite concentrations during maturation in different brain regions measured by chemical shift imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueltmann, Eva; Lanfermann, Heinrich [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); Naegele, Thomas [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Radiological University Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Klose, Uwe [University of Tuebingen, Section of Experimental MR of the CNS, Department of Neuroradiology, Radiological University Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    We examined the effect of maturation on the regional distribution of brain metabolite concentrations using multivoxel chemical shift imaging. From our pool of pediatric MRI examinations, we retrospectively selected patients showing a normal cerebral MRI scan or no pathologic signal abnormalities at the level of the two-dimensional 1H MRS-CSI sequence and an age-appropriate global neurological development, except for focal neurological deficits. Seventy-one patients (4.5 months-20 years) were identified. Using LC Model, spectra were evaluated from voxels in the white matter, caudate head, and corpus callosum. The concentration of total N-acetylaspartate increased in all regions during infancy and childhood except in the right caudate head where it remained constant. The concentration of total creatine decreased in the caudate nucleus and splenium and minimally in the frontal white matter and genu. It remained largely constant in the parietal white matter. The concentration of choline-containing compounds had the tendency to decrease in all regions except in the parietal white matter where it remained constant. The concentration of myoinositol decreased slightly in the splenium and right frontal white matter, remained constant on the left side and in the caudate nucleus, and rose slightly in the parietal white matter and genu. CSI determined metabolite concentrations in multiple cerebral regions during routine MRI. The obtained data will be helpful in future pediatric CSI measurements deciding whether the ratios of the main metabolites are within the range of normal values or have to be considered as probably pathologic. (orig.)

  17. Migrainomics - identifying brain and genetic markers of migraine.

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    Nyholt, Dale R; Borsook, David; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is one of the world's most prevalent and disabling disorders and imposes an enormous socioeconomic burden. The exact causes of migraine are unknown, and no recognizable diagnostic pathological changes have been identified. Specific identifiable markers of migraine would aid diagnosis and could provide insight into the pathogenesis of the condition, with the potential to direct development of new therapeutics. In the past few years, advances in neuroimaging and genetic studies have provided the most substantial progress towards the identification of markers. A growing number of brain imaging studies have provided important insights into the brain mechanisms that underlie migraine symptoms during and between migraine attacks. Similarly, large-scale genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with the common forms of migraine - migraine with aura and migraine without aura. In total, 44 independent single-nucleotide polymorphism loci have been robustly associated with the risk of migraine and provide new evidence for the involvement of vascular mechanisms. Both imaging and genetics, therefore, have excellent potential as markers of migraine. In this Review, we provide a summary of results regarding current and potential neuroimaging and genetic markers of migraine, consider what conclusions can be drawn from these markers about migraine mechanisms and discuss the potential of combining imaging and genetics.

  18. Acute Ethanol-Induced Changes in Edema and Metabolite Concentrations in Rat Brain

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    Huimin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to describe the acute effects of EtOH on brain edema and cerebral metabolites, using diffusion weight imaging (DWI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS at a 7.0T MR and to define changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values and the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain after acute EtOH intoxication. ADC values in each ROI decreased significantly at 1 h and 3 h after ethanol administration. ADC values in frontal lobe were decreased significantly compared with other regions at 3 h. For EtOH/Cr+PCr and cerebral metabolites (Cho, Tau, and Glu differing over time, no significant differences for Ins, NAA, and Cr were observed in frontal lobes. Regression analysis revealed a significant association between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, TSGlu, and TSADC. The changes of ADC values in different brain regions reflect the process of the cytotoxic edema in vivo. The characterization of frontal lobes metabolites changes and the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, and TSGlu provide a better understanding for the biological mechanisms in neurotoxic effects of EtOH on the brain. In addition, the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSADC will help us to understand development of the ethanol-induced brain cytotoxic edema.

  19. Associations of anthropometric markers with serum metabolites using a targeted metabolomics approach: results of the EPIC-potsdam study.

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    Bachlechner, U; Floegel, A; Steffen, A; Prehn, C; Adamski, J; Pischon, T; Boeing, H

    2016-06-27

    The metabolic consequences of type of body shape need further exploration. Whereas accumulation of body mass in the abdominal area is a well-established metabolic risk factor, accumulation in the gluteofemoral area is controversially debated. We evaluated the associations of anthropometric markers of overall body mass and body shape with 127 serum metabolites within a sub-sample of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam cohort. The cross-sectional analysis was conducted in 2270 participants, randomly drawn from the EPIC-Potsdam cohort. Metabolites were measured by targeted metabolomics. To select metabolites related with both waist circumference (WC) (abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat) and hip circumference (HC) (gluteofemoral fat, muscles and bone structure) correlations (r) with body mass index (BMI) as aggregating marker of body mass (lean and fat mass) were calculated. Relations with body shape were assessed by median metabolite concentrations across tertiles of WC and HC, mutually adjusted to each other. Correlations revealed 23 metabolites related to BMI (r⩾I0.20 I). Metabolites showing relations with BMI were showing similar relations with HC adjusted WC (WCHC). In contrast, relations with WC adjusted HC (HCWC) were less concordant with relations of BMI and WCHC. In both sexes, metabolites with concordant relations regarding WCHC and HCWC included tyrosine, diacyl-phosphatidylcholine C38:3, C38:4, lyso-phosphatidylcholine C18:1, C18:2 and sphingomyelin C18:1; metabolites with opposite relations included isoleucine, diacyl-phosphatidylcholine C42:0, acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholine C34:3, C42:4, C42:5, C44:4 and C44:6. Metabolites specifically related to HCWC included acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholine C34:2, C36:2, C38:2 and C40:4, and were solely observed in men. Other metabolites were related to WCHC only. The study revealed specific metabolic profiles for HCWC as marker of gluteofemoral body mass differing from

  20. Metabolite concentrations in the developing brain estimated with proton MR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P B; Leth, H; Lou, H C

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate absolute concentrations and relaxation time constants of metabolites that were detectable with proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy in the healthy preterm, term, and infant brain. Five MR spectra were recorded for each infant by using STEAM ...... concentration. The concentration of PCr+Cr increased rapidly and reached adolescent values at approximately 4 months of age....

  1. Body mass index and magnetic resonance markers of brain integrity in adults.

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    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Kornak, John; Weiner, Michael W; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2008-05-01

    Obesity and being overweight during adulthood have been consistently linked to increased risk for development of dementia later in life, especially Alzheimer's disease. They have also been associated with cognitive dysfunction and brain structural alterations in otherwise healthy adults. Although proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may distinguish between neuronal and glial components of the brain and may point to neurobiological mechanisms underlying brain atrophy and cognitive changes, no spectroscopic studies have yet assessed the relationships between adiposity and brain metabolites. We have utilized magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data from 50 healthy middle-aged participants (mean age, 41.7 +/- 8.5 years; 17 women), who were scanned as control subjects for another study. After adjustment for age and sex, greater body mass indices (BMIs) correlated with: (1) lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (spectroscopic marker of neuronal viability) in frontal (p = 0.001), parietal (p = 0.006), and temporal (p = 0.008) white matter; (2) lower N-acetylaspartate in frontal gray matter (p = 0.01); and (3) lower concentrations of choline-containing metabolites (associated with membrane metabolism) in frontal white matter (p = 0.05). These results suggest that increased BMI at midlife is associated with neuronal and/or myelin abnormalities, primarily in the frontal lobe. Because white matter in the frontal lobes is more prone to the effects of aging than in other lobes, our results may reflect accelerated aging in individuals with high levels of adiposity. Thus, greater BMI may increase the odds of developing an age-related disease, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Regional brain volumes, diffusivity, and metabolite changes after electroconvulsive therapy for severe depression

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    Jørgensen, A.; Magnusson, P.; Hanson, Lars G.

    2016-01-01

    , and metabolite changes in 19 patients receiving ECT for severe depression. Other regions of interest included the amygdala, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), orbitofrontal cortex, and hypothalamus. Patients received a 3T MR scan before ECT (TP1), 1 week (TP2), and 4 weeks (TP3) after ECT. Results......: Hippocampal and amygdala volume increased significantly at TP2 and continued to be increased at TP3. DLPFC exhibited a transient volume reduction at TP2. DTI revealed a reduced anisotropy and diffusivity of the hippocampus at TP2. We found no significant post-ECT changes in brain metabolite concentrations...

  3. Faster metabolite (1H transverse relaxation in the elder human brain.

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    Małgorzata Marjańska

    Full Text Available (1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is unique among imaging modalities because signals from several metabolites are measured during a single examination period. Each metabolite reflects a distinct intracellular process. Furthermore transverse (T2 relaxation times probe the viability of the cell microenvironment, e.g., the viscosity of the cellular fluids, the microscopic susceptibility distribution within the cells, and the iron content. In this study, T2s of brain metabolites were measured in the occipital lobe of eighteen young and fourteen elderly subjects at a field strength of 4 tesla. The T2s of N-acetylaspartate, total creatine, and total choline were 23%, 16% and 10% shorter in elderly than in young subjects. The findings of this study suggest that noninvasive detection of T2 provides useful biological information on changes in the cellular microenvironment that take place during aging.

  4. Effects of chronic clozapine administration on markers of arachidonic acid cascade and synaptic integrity in rat brain

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    Cheon, Yewon; Modi, Hiren R.; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Rao, Jagadeesh S.

    2012-01-01

    The mode of action of clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic approved for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) mania, remains unclear. We tested for overlap with the actions of the mood stabilizers, lithium, carbamazepine and valproate, which downregulate arachidonic acid (AA) cascade markers in rat brain and upregulate BDNF. AA cascade markers are upregulated in the postmortem BD brain in association with neuroinflammation and synaptic loss, while BDNF is decreased. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with a therapeutically relevant dose of clozapine (10 mg/kg/day) or with saline for 30 days, and AA cascade and synaptic markers and BDNF were measured in the brain. Compared with saline-injected rats, chronic clozapine increased brain activity, mRNA and protein levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-selective calcium-independent phospholipase A2 type VIA (iPLA2), mRNA and protein levels of BDNF and of the postsynaptic marker, drebrin, while decreasing cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a proinflammatory AA metabolite. Activity and expression of AA-selective calcium-dependent cytosolic cPLA2 type IVA and of secretory sPLA2 Type II were unchanged. These results show overlap with effects of mood stabilizers with regard to downregulation of COX activity and PGE2 and to increased BDNF, and suggest a common action against the reported neuropathology of BD. Additionally, the increased iPLA2 expression following clozapine suggests increased production of anti-inflammatory DHA metabolites, consistent with reports that dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation is beneficial in BD. PMID:22414961

  5. Reproducibility of brain metabolite concentration measurements in lesion free white matter at 1.5 T.

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    Busch, Martin H J; Vollmann, Wolfgang; Mateiescu, Serban; Stolze, Manuel; Deli, Martin; Garmer, Marietta; Grönemeyer, Dietrich H W

    2015-09-29

    Post processing for brain spectra has a great influence on the fit quality of individual spectra, as well as on the reproducibility of results from comparable spectra. This investigation used pairs of spectra, identical in system parameters, position and time assumed to differ only in noise. The metabolite amplitudes of fitted time domain spectroscopic data were tested on reproducibility for the main brain metabolites. Proton spectra of white matter brain tissue were acquired with a short spin echo time of 30 ms and a moderate repetition time of 1500 ms at 1.5 T. The pairs were investigated with one time domain post-processing algorithm using different parameters. The number of metabolites, the use of prior knowledge, base line parameters and common or individual damping were varied to evaluate the best reproducibility. The protocols with most reproducible amplitudes for N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol and the combined Glx line of glutamate and glutamine in lesion free white matter have the following common features: common damping of the main metabolites, a baseline using only the points of the first 10 ms, no additional lipid/macromolecule lines and Glx is taken as the sum of separately fitted glutamate and glutamine. This parameter set is different to the one delivering the best individual fit results. All spectra were acquired in "lesion free" (no lesion signs found in MR imaging) white matter. Spectra of brain lesions, for example tumors, can be drastically different. Thus the results are limited to lesion free brain tissue. Nevertheless the application to studies is broad, because small alterations in brain biochemistry of lesion free areas had been detected nearby tumors, in patients with multiple sclerosis, drug abuse or psychiatric disorders. Main metabolite amplitudes inside healthy brain can be quantified with a normalized root mean square deviation around 5 % using CH3 of creatine as reference. Only the reproducibility of myo

  6. Secondary and Primary Plant Metabolites as Chemical Markers for Resistance of Bitter Candytuft (Iberis amara) Plant against Insect Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman Mohamed KAMEL; Soad Esawey EL-GENGAIHI

    2008-01-01

    A correlation between the levels of secondary and primary plant metabolites and food coefficient parameters with the population density of infested broccoli plants was studied. Cucurbitacins and glucosinolates compounds were good signs of resistance in bitter candytuft plants. On the other hand, lower values or the absence of these markers rendered broccoli susceptible to the pests under study, not during all stages of growth but whenever these values were much lower throughout growth stages....

  7. Multiple Brain Markers are Linked to Age-Related Variation in Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P.; Rieckmann, Anna; Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related alterations in brain structure and function have been challenging to link to cognition due to potential overlapping influences of multiple neurobiological cascades. We examined multiple brain markers associated with age-related variation in cognition. Clinically normal older humans aged 65–90 from the Harvard Aging Brain Study (N = 186) were characterized on a priori magnetic resonance imaging markers of gray matter thickness and volume, white matter hyperintensities, fractional anisotropy (FA), resting-state functional connectivity, positron emission tomography markers of glucose metabolism and amyloid burden, and cognitive factors of processing speed, executive function, and episodic memory. Partial correlation and mediation analyses estimated age-related variance in cognition shared with individual brain markers and unique to each marker. The largest relationships linked FA and striatum volume to processing speed and executive function, and hippocampal volume to episodic memory. Of the age-related variance in cognition, 70–80% was accounted for by combining all brain markers (but only ∼20% of total variance). Age had significant indirect effects on cognition via brain markers, with significant markers varying across cognitive domains. These results suggest that most age-related variation in cognition is shared among multiple brain markers, but potential specificity between some brain markers and cognitive domains motivates additional study of age-related markers of neural health. PMID:25316342

  8. Metabolite profiling identifies candidate markers reflecting the clinical adaptations associated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Mutch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery is associated with weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis, and a reduction in co-morbidities such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. To generate further insight into the numerous metabolic adaptations associated with RYGB surgery, we profiled serum metabolites before and after gastric bypass surgery and integrated metabolite changes with clinical data. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum metabolites were detected by gas and liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry before, and 3 and 6 months after RYGB in morbidly obese female subjects (n = 14; BMI = 46.2+/-1.7. Subjects showed decreases in weight-related parameters and improvements in insulin sensitivity post surgery. The abundance of 48% (83 of 172 of the measured metabolites changed significantly within the first 3 months post RYGB (p<0.05, including sphingosines, unsaturated fatty acids, and branched chain amino acids. Dividing subjects into obese (n = 9 and obese/diabetic (n = 5 groups identified 8 metabolites that differed consistently at all time points and whose serum levels changed following RYGB: asparagine, lysophosphatidylcholine (C18:2, nervonic (C24:1 acid, p-Cresol sulfate, lactate, lycopene, glucose, and mannose. Changes in the aforementioned metabolites were integrated with clinical data for body mass index (BMI and estimates for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Of these, nervonic acid was significantly and negatively correlated with HOMA-IR (p = 0.001, R = -0.55. CONCLUSIONS: Global metabolite profiling in morbidly obese subjects after RYGB has provided new information regarding the considerable metabolic alterations associated with this surgical procedure. Integrating clinical measurements with metabolomics data is capable of identifying markers that reflect the metabolic adaptations following RYGB.

  9. MR spectroscopy-based brain metabolite profiling in propionic acidaemia: metabolic changes in the basal ganglia during acute decompensation and effect of liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKiernan Patrick J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propionic acidaemia (PA results from deficiency of Propionyl CoA carboxylase, the commonest form presenting in the neonatal period. Despite best current management, PA is associated with severe neurological sequelae, in particular movement disorders resulting from basal ganglia infarction, although the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. The role of liver transplantation remains controversial but may confer some neuro-protection. The present study utilises quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS to investigate brain metabolite alterations in propionic acidaemia during metabolic stability and acute encephalopathic episodes. Methods Quantitative MRS was used to evaluate brain metabolites in eight children with neonatal onset propionic acidaemia, with six elective studies acquired during metabolic stability and five studies during acute encephalopathic episodes. MRS studies were acquired concurrently with clinically indicated MR imaging studies at 1.5 Tesla. LCModel software was used to provide metabolite quantification. Comparison was made with a dataset of MRS metabolite concentrations from a cohort of children with normal appearing MR imaging. Results MRI findings confirm the vulnerability of basal ganglia to infarction during acute encephalopathy. We identified statistically significant decreases in basal ganglia glutamate+glutamine and N-Acetylaspartate, and increase in lactate, during encephalopathic episodes. In white matter lactate was significantly elevated but other metabolites not significantly altered. Metabolite data from two children who had received liver transplantation were not significantly different from the comparator group. Conclusions The metabolite alterations seen in propionic acidaemia in the basal ganglia during acute encephalopathy reflect loss of viable neurons, and a switch to anaerobic respiration. The decrease in glutamine + glutamate supports the hypothesis that they are consumed to

  10. Brain extraction using the watershed transform from markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eBeare

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of the brain from other tissue types in magnetic resonance(MR images is an important step in many types of neuro-imagingresearch using both humans and animal subjects. The importance ofbrain extraction is well appreciated - numerous approaches have beenpublished and the benefits of good extraction methods to subsequentprocessing are well known.We describe a tool - the marker based watershed scalper (MBWSS- for isolating the brain in T1-weighted MR images built usingfiltering and segmentation components from the Insight Toolkit (ITKframework. The key elements of MBWSS - the watershed transform frommarkers and aggressive filtering with large kernels - are techniquesthat have rarely been used in neuroimaging segmentation applications. MBWSSis able to reliably isolate the brain without expensive preprocessingsteps, such as registration to an atlas, and is therefore useful asthe first stage of processing pipelines. It is an informative exampleof the level of accuracy achievable without using priors in the formof atlases, shape models or libraries of examples.We validate the MBWSS using a publicly available dataset, a paediatriccohort, an adolescent cohort, intra-surgical scans and demonstrateflexibility of the approach by modifying the method to extract macaquebrains.

  11. Amiodarone biokinetics, the formation of its major oxidative metabolite and neurotoxicity after acute and repeated exposure of brain cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomponio, Giuliana; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Schultz, Luise; Weiss, Dieter G; Romanelli, Luca; Gramowski-Voss, Alexandra; Di Consiglio, Emma; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The difficulty in mimicking nervous system complexity and cell-cell interactions as well as the lack of kinetics information has limited the use of in vitro neurotoxicity data. Here, we assessed the biokinetic profile as well as the neurotoxicity of Amiodarone after acute and repeated exposure in two advanced rodent brain cell culture models, consisting of both neurons and glial cells organized in 2 or 3 dimensions to mimic the brain histiotypic structure and function. A strategy was applied to evidence the abiotic processes possibly affecting Amiodarone in vitro bioavailability, showing its ability to adsorb to the plastic devices. At clinically relevant Amiodarone concentrations, known to induce neurotoxicity in some patients during therapeutic treatment, a complete uptake was observed in both models in 24 h, after single exposure. After repeated treatments, bioaccumulation was observed, especially in the 3D cell model, together with a greater alteration of neurotoxicity markers. After 14 days, Amiodarone major oxidative metabolite (mono-N-desethylamiodarone) was detected at limited levels, indicating the presence of active drug metabolism enzymes (i.e. cytochrome P450) in both models. The assessment of biokinetics provides useful information on the relevance of in vitro toxicity data and should be considered in the design of an Integrated Testing Strategy aimed to identify specific neurotoxic alerts, and to improve the neurotoxicity assay predictivity for human acute and repeated exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Prognostic Value of Brain Extracellular Fluid Nitric Oxide Metabolites After Traumatic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tisdall, M.M.; Rejdak, K.; Kitchen, N.D.; Smith, M.; Petzold, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide (NO) is a compound with both protective and damaging effects on neurons. Quantification of NO metabolites in humans is limited by sample contamination with blood. In vivo cerebral microdialysis may offer an alternative approach as sampling of extracellular fluid (ECF)

  13. Microbial-Host Co-metabolites Are Prodromal Markers Predicting Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Behavior, Obesity, and Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Emmanuel Dumas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the gut microbiome on metabolic and behavioral traits is widely accepted, though the microbiome-derived metabolites involved remain unclear. We carried out untargeted urine 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolic phenotyping in an isogenic C57BL/6J mouse population (n = 50 and show that microbial-host co-metabolites are prodromal (i.e., early markers predicting future divergence in metabolic (obesity and glucose homeostasis and behavioral (anxiety and activity outcomes with 94%–100% accuracy. Some of these metabolites also modulate disease phenotypes, best illustrated by trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO, a product of microbial-host co-metabolism predicting future obesity, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, and behavior while reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress and lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Chronic in vivo TMAO treatment limits IGT in HFD-fed mice and isolated pancreatic islets by increasing insulin secretion. We highlight the prodromal potential of microbial metabolites to predict disease outcomes and their potential in shaping mammalian phenotypic heterogeneity.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of thioridazine and its metabolites in blood plasma and the brain of rats after acute and chronic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, W A; Syrek, M; Mach, A; Wójcikowski, J; Boksa, J

    1997-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigation of the pharmacokinetics of thioridazine and its metabolites after a single and repeated administrations. Male Wistar rats received thioridazine as a single dose (10 mg/kg i.p.) or they were treated chronically with the neuroleptic (10 mg/kg i.p., twice a day for two weeks). Plasma and brain concentrations of thioridazine and its metabolites (N-desmethylthioridazine, mesoridazine, sulforidazine, and the ring sulfoxide) were determined using the HPLC method. The obtained data showed that sulfoxidation in position 2 of the thiomethyl substituent and in the thiazine ring are main metabolic pathways of thioridazine, and showed that, in contrast to humans, in the rat N-desmethylthioridazine is formed in appreciable amount. The biotransformation of thioridazine was rather fast yielding plasma peak concentrations of metabolites lower than that of the parent compound. The maximum concentrations of thioridazine and its metabolites in the brain appeared later than in plasma. The peak concentrations and AUC values of thioridazine and its metabolites were higher in the brain than in plasma and this corresponded well with their longer half-lives in the brain as compared to plasma. The drug was not taken up by the brain as efficiently as other phenothiazines. Chronic treatment with thioridazine produced significant increases (with the exception of thioridazine ring sulfoxide) in the plasma concentrations of the parent compound and its metabolites which was accompanied with the prolongation of their plasma half-lives. The observed plasma levels of thioridazine were within 'therapeutic range' while the concentrations of its metabolites were relatively lower as compared to those observed in psychiatric patients. The increased plasma concentrations of thioridazine and its metabolites observed in plasma after chronic treatment were not followed by parallel changes in the brain.

  15. Simultaneous determination of monoamine transmitters, precursors and metabolites in a single mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K; McGaugh, J L

    1982-04-16

    A simple and sensitive procedure for simultaneous determination of monoamine transmitters and related substances including precursors and metabolites has been developed for a single mouse brain. The proposed procedure involves (1) primary butanol extraction, (2) separation of the substances into either acid or alkaline aqueous layers according to their physicochemical properties, and (3) determination by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Three transmitters (noradrenaline, dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine) and their precursors (tyrosine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and tryptophan) and major metabolites (normethanephrine, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol, 3-methoxytyramine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) were selectively separated and sensitively detected in mouse whole brain sample. Although 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid was also separated from other substances by authentic chromatography, the substance was not detected in mouse brain. Changes in levels of these substances were examined for drugs whose effects had been previously confirmed. These changes reflected putative effects of the drugs and confirmed that the procedure is effective for neurochemical research into the transmitter system.

  16. Postmortem Brain and Blood Reference Concentrations of Alprazolam, Bromazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Diazepam, and their Metabolites and a Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Louise; Holm, Karen Marie Dollerup; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2016-01-01

    , the brain, might be considered. Here we present reference concentrations of femoral blood and brain tissue of selected benzodiazepines (BZDs). Using LC-MS/MS, we quantified alprazolam, bromazepam, chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, and the metabolites desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam and temazepam in postmortem femoral...

  17. Effects of a high-caloric diet and physical exercise on brain metabolite levels: a combined proton MRS and histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Matthias K; Sack, Markus; Lenz, Jenny N; Jakovcevski, Mira; Biedermann, Sarah V; Falfán-Melgoza, Claudia; Deussing, Jan; Steinle, Jörg; Bielohuby, Maximilian; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Pfister, Frederik; Stalla, Günter K; Ende, Gabriele; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Fuss, Johannes; Gass, Peter

    2015-03-31

    Excessive intake of high-caloric diets as well as subsequent development of obesity and diabetes mellitus may exert a wide range of unfavorable effects on the central nervous system (CNS). It has been suggested that one mechanism in this context is the promotion of neuroinflammation. The potentially harmful effects of such diets were suggested to be mitigated by physical exercise. Here, we conducted a study investigating the effects of physical exercise in a cafeteria-diet mouse model on CNS metabolites by means of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)HMRS). In addition postmortem histologic and real-time (RT)-PCR analyses for inflammatory markers were performed. Cafeteria diet induced obesity and hyperglycemia, which was only partially moderated by exercise. It also induced several changes in CNS metabolites such as reduced hippocampal glutamate (Glu), choline-containing compounds (tCho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)+N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamic acid (NAAG) (tNAA) levels, whereas opposite effects were seen for running. No association of these effects with markers of central inflammation could be observed. These findings suggest that while voluntary wheel running alone is insufficient to prevent the unfavorable peripheral sequelae of the diet, it counteracted many changes in brain metabolites. The observed effects seem to be independent of neuroinflammation.

  18. Quantification of brain metabolites in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, O; Rosenbaum, S; Topp, S

    1997-01-01

    20-mm3 voxel placed in the motor cortex and in the cerebellum from seven patients with clinically probable or definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) according to the El Escorial criteria, from three patients with suspected ALS (progressive muscular atrophy), and from eight normal control...... subjects. We estimated the concentrations of the metabolites using the water signal as an internal standard. The concentrations of Cho and Cr/PCr in both brain regions, as well as the concentration of NAA in the cerebellum, were unaltered in the MND patients compared with the controls. Only MND patients...

  19. Neural, cognitive, and neuroimaging markers of the suicidal brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobanski T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Sobanski,1 Karl-Jürgen Bär,2 Gerd Wagner2 1Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, Thüringen-Kliniken "Georgius Agricola" GmbH, Saalfeld, Germany; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Psychiatric Brain and Body Research Group Jena, Jena University Hospital, Jena, GermanyAbstract: Suicidal behavior (SB is characterized by the occurrence of suicide attempts with substantial intent to die. SB is a major health problem worldwide. In the great majority of cases, SB occurs in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, mainly from affective disorders or schizophrenia. Despite this high association, there is growing evidence from genetic studies that SB might represent a psychiatric condition on its own. This review provides an overview of the most significant neurobiological and neurocognitive findings in SB. We provide evidence for specific dysfunctions within the serotonergic system, for distinct morphological abnormalities in the gray and white matter composition as well as for neurofunctional alterations in the fronto-striatal network. Additionally, the putative role of impulsivity and hopelessness as trait-like risk factors for SB is outlined. Both the personality traits are associated with altered prefrontal cortex function and deficits in cognitive and affective control similar to the findings in SB. Given the difficulties of clinical risk assessment, there is a need to identify specific markers that can predict SB more reliably. Some recent neurocognitive and functional/structural neuroimaging findings might be appropriate to use as SB indicators in the close future.Keywords: suicidal behavior, biological markers, serotonin, hopelessness, impulsivity, major depressive disorder, fMRI, PET, SPECT

  20. Metabolite concentrations in the developing brain estimated with proton MR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P B; Leth, H; Lou, H C

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate absolute concentrations and relaxation time constants of metabolites that were detectable with proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy in the healthy preterm, term, and infant brain. Five MR spectra were recorded for each infant by using STEAM...... of a relatively larger signal overlap with glutamate in the most immature brains. The concentration of NAA almost doubled, whereas the Cho concentration showed only a nonsignificant tendency to decrease; therefore, the well-known increase in the ratio of NAA to Cho appears to be due mostly to an increase in NAA...... concentration. The concentration of PCr+Cr increased rapidly and reached adolescent values at approximately 4 months of age....

  1. Melanin-related metabolites as markers of the skin pigmentary system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, W.; Pavel, S.; Kammeyer, A.; Beusenberg, F. D.; Cormane, R.

    1987-01-01

    Three different groups of chemical intermediates are known to be formed during the synthesis of melanin in melanocytes: phenolic compounds, phenolic thio-conjugates, and indolic compounds. All these substances and their metabolites can be detected in urine. We measured the urinary excretion of

  2. Protection of Brain Injury by Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Secreted Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischiutta, Francesca; Brunelli, Laura; Romele, Pietro; Silini, Antonietta; Sammali, Eliana; Paracchini, Lara; Marchini, Sergio; Talamini, Laura; Bigini, Paolo; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Pastorelli, Roberta; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Parolini, Ornella; Zanier, Elisa R

    2016-11-01

    To define the features of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell secretome and its protective properties in experimental models of acute brain injury. Prospective experimental study. Laboratory research. C57Bl/6 mice. Mice subjected to sham or traumatic brain injury by controlled cortical impact received human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or phosphate-buffered saline infused intracerebroventricularly or intravenously 24 hours after injury. Organotypic cortical brain slices exposed to ischemic injury by oxygen-glucose deprivation were treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or with their secretome (conditioned medium) in a transwell system. Traumatic brain injured mice receiving human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells intravenously or intracerebroventricularly showed early and lasting functional and anatomical brain protection. cortical slices injured by oxigen-glucose deprivation and treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or conditioned medium showed comparable protective effects (neuronal rescue, promotion of M2 microglia polarization, induction of trophic factors) indicating that the exposure of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells to the injured tissue is not necessary for the release of bioactive factors. Using sequential size-exclusion and gel-filtration chromatography, we identified a conditioned medium subfraction, which specifically displays these highly protective properties and we found that this fraction was rich in bioactive molecules with molecular weight smaller than 700 Da. Quantitative RNA analysis and mass spectrometry-based peptidomics showed that the active factors are not proteins or RNAs. The metabolomic profiling of six metabolic classes identified a list of molecules whose abundance was selectively elevated in the active conditioned medium fraction. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted factors protect the brain after acute injury. Importantly, a fraction rich in metabolites, and

  3. GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  4. Pre-analytical sample quality: metabolite ratios as an intrinsic marker for prolonged room temperature exposure of serum samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Anton

    Full Text Available Advances in the "omics" field bring about the need for a high number of good quality samples. Many omics studies take advantage of biobanked samples to meet this need. Most of the laboratory errors occur in the pre-analytical phase. Therefore evidence-based standard operating procedures for the pre-analytical phase as well as markers to distinguish between 'good' and 'bad' quality samples taking into account the desired downstream analysis are urgently needed. We studied concentration changes of metabolites in serum samples due to pre-storage handling conditions as well as due to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. We collected fasting serum samples and subjected aliquots to up to four freeze-thaw cycles and to pre-storage handling delays of 12, 24 and 36 hours at room temperature (RT and on wet and dry ice. For each treated aliquot, we quantified 127 metabolites through a targeted metabolomics approach. We found a clear signature of degradation in samples kept at RT. Storage on wet ice led to less pronounced concentration changes. 24 metabolites showed significant concentration changes at RT. In 22 of these, changes were already visible after only 12 hours of storage delay. Especially pronounced were increases in lysophosphatidylcholines and decreases in phosphatidylcholines. We showed that the ratio between the concentrations of these molecule classes could serve as a measure to distinguish between 'good' and 'bad' quality samples in our study. In contrast, we found quite stable metabolite concentrations during up to four freeze-thaw cycles. We concluded that pre-analytical RT handling of serum samples should be strictly avoided and serum samples should always be handled on wet ice or in cooling devices after centrifugation. Moreover, serum samples should be frozen at or below -80°C as soon as possible after centrifugation.

  5. Pre-analytical sample quality: metabolite ratios as an intrinsic marker for prolonged room temperature exposure of serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Gabriele; Wilson, Rory; Yu, Zhong-Hao; Prehn, Cornelia; Zukunft, Sven; Adamski, Jerzy; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Hveem, Kristian; Wolfenbuttel, Bruce; Peters, Annette; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Waldenberger, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the "omics" field bring about the need for a high number of good quality samples. Many omics studies take advantage of biobanked samples to meet this need. Most of the laboratory errors occur in the pre-analytical phase. Therefore evidence-based standard operating procedures for the pre-analytical phase as well as markers to distinguish between 'good' and 'bad' quality samples taking into account the desired downstream analysis are urgently needed. We studied concentration changes of metabolites in serum samples due to pre-storage handling conditions as well as due to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. We collected fasting serum samples and subjected aliquots to up to four freeze-thaw cycles and to pre-storage handling delays of 12, 24 and 36 hours at room temperature (RT) and on wet and dry ice. For each treated aliquot, we quantified 127 metabolites through a targeted metabolomics approach. We found a clear signature of degradation in samples kept at RT. Storage on wet ice led to less pronounced concentration changes. 24 metabolites showed significant concentration changes at RT. In 22 of these, changes were already visible after only 12 hours of storage delay. Especially pronounced were increases in lysophosphatidylcholines and decreases in phosphatidylcholines. We showed that the ratio between the concentrations of these molecule classes could serve as a measure to distinguish between 'good' and 'bad' quality samples in our study. In contrast, we found quite stable metabolite concentrations during up to four freeze-thaw cycles. We concluded that pre-analytical RT handling of serum samples should be strictly avoided and serum samples should always be handled on wet ice or in cooling devices after centrifugation. Moreover, serum samples should be frozen at or below -80°C as soon as possible after centrifugation.

  6. Neurotransmitter and their metabolite concentrations in different areas of the HPRT knockout mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirner, Sarah K; Gutzki, Frank; Schneider, Erich H; Seifert, Roland; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-06-15

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is characterized by uric acid overproduction and severe neurobehavioral symptoms, such as recurrent self-mutilative behavior. To learn more about the pathophysiology of the disease, we quantified neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the cerebral hemisphere, cerebellum and the medulla oblongata of HPRT knockout mice, an animal model for LNS, in comparison to the corresponding wild-type. Our analyses included l-glutamate, 4-aminobutanoic acid (GABA), acetylcholine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), norepinephrine, l-normetanephrine, epinephrine and l-metanephrine and were conducted via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Among these neurotransmitter systems, we did not find any abnormalities in the HPRT knockout mouse brains. On one side, this might indicate that HPRT deficiency most severely affects dopamine signaling, while brain functioning based on other neurotransmitters is more or less spared. On the other hand, our findings may reflect a compensating mechanism for impaired purine salvage that protects the brain in HPRT-deficient mice but not in LNS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Direct metabolites of ethanol as biological markers of alcohol use: basic aspects and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, N; Weinmann, W; Yegles, M; Preuss, U; Wurst, F M

    2013-09-01

    In addition to self reports and questionnaires, biomarkers are of relevance in the diagnosis of and therapy for alcohol use disorders. Traditional biomarkers such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase or mean corpuscular volume are indirect biomarkers and are subject to the influence of age, gender and non-alcohol related diseases, among others. Direct metabolites of ethanol such as ethyl glucuronide (EtG), ethyl sulphate (EtS) and phosphatidylethanol (PEth) are direct metabolites of ethanol, that are positive after intake of ethyl alcohol. They represent useful diagnostic tools for identifying alcohol use even more accurately than traditional biomarkers. Each of these drinking indicators remains positive in serum and urine for a characteristic time spectrum after the cessation of ethanol intake - EtG and EtS in urine up to 7 days, EtG in hair for months after ethanol has left the body. Applications include clinical routine use, emergency room settings, proof of abstinence in alcohol rehabilitation programmes, driving under influence offenders, workplace testing, assessment of alcohol intake in the context of liver transplantation and foetal alcohol syndrome. Due to their properties, they open up new perspectives for prevention, interdisciplinary cooperation, diagnosis of and therapy for alcohol-related problems. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. [What ethanol metabolites as biological markers tell us about alcohol use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Thon, Natasha; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Yegles, Michel; Preuss, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and tobacco related disorders are the two leading and most expensive causes of illness in central Europe. In addition to self reports and questionnaires, biomarkers are of relevance in diagnosis and therapy of alcohol use disorders. Traditional biomarkers such as gamma glutamyl transpeptidase or mean corpuscular volume are indirect biomarkers and are subject to influence of age, gender and non alcohol related diseases, among others.Direct ethanol metabolites such as ethyl glucuronide (EtG), ethyl sulphate (EtS) and phosphatidylethanol (PEth) are direct metabolites of ethanol, that are positive after intake of ethyl alcohol. They represent useful diagnostic tools for identifying alcohol use even more accurately than traditional biomarkers. Each of these drinking indicators remains positive in serum and urine for a characteristic time spectrum after the cessation of ethanol intake--EtG and EtS in urine up to 7 days, EtG in hair for months after ethanol has left the body. Applications include clinical routine use, emergency room settings, proof of abstinence in alcohol rehabilitation programs, driving under influence offenders, workplace testing, assessment of alcohol intake in the context of liver transplantation and fetal alcohol syndrome.

  9. Brain metabolism and Alzheimer's disease: the prospect of a metabolite-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S C; Alhasawi, A; Appanna, V P; Auger, C; Appanna, V D

    2015-01-01

    The brain is one of the most energy-demanding organs in the body. It has evolved intricate metabolic networks to fulfill this need and utilizes a variety of substrates to generate ATP, the universal energy currency. Any disruption in the supply of energy results in various abnormalities including Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition with markedly diminished cognitive ability. Astrocytes are an important participant in maintaining the cerebral ATP budget. However, under oxidative stress induced by numerous factors including aluminum toxicity, the ability of astroctyes to generate ATP is impaired due to dysfunctional mitochondria. This leads to globular, glycolytic, lipogenic and ATP-deficient astrocytes, cerebral characteristics common in AD patients. The reversal of these perturbations by such natural metabolites as pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, acetoacetate and L-carnitine provides valuable therapeutic cues against AD.

  10. Brain and blood metabolite signatures of pathology and progression in Alzheimer disease: A targeted metabolomics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Anup M.; Varma, Sudhir; Casanova, Ramon; An, Yang; O’Brien, Richard; Pletnikova, Olga; Kastenmueller, Gabi; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2018-01-01

    Background The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is poorly understood, and the relationships between systemic abnormalities in metabolism and AD pathogenesis are unclear. Understanding how global perturbations in metabolism are related to severity of AD neuropathology and the eventual expression of AD symptoms in at-risk individuals is critical to developing effective disease-modifying treatments. In this study, we undertook parallel metabolomics analyses in both the brain and blood to identify systemic correlates of neuropathology and their associations with prodromal and preclinical measures of AD progression. Methods and findings Quantitative and targeted metabolomics (Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ [identification and quantification] p180) assays were performed on brain tissue samples from the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) (N = 44, mean age = 81.33, % female = 36.36) from AD (N = 15), control (CN; N = 14), and “asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease” (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD pathology but no cognitive impairment during life; N = 15) participants. Using machine-learning methods, we identified a panel of 26 metabolites from two main classes—sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids—that discriminated AD and CN samples with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 83.33%, 86.67%, and 80%, respectively. We then assayed these 26 metabolites in serum samples from two well-characterized longitudinal cohorts representing prodromal (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [ADNI], N = 767, mean age = 75.19, % female = 42.63) and preclinical (BLSA) (N = 207, mean age = 78.68, % female = 42.63) AD, in which we tested their associations with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of AD-related brain atrophy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology, risk of conversion to incident AD, and trajectories of cognitive performance. We developed an integrated blood and brain endophenotype score that

  11. Vitamin D metabolites as clinical markers in autoimmune and chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Greg P; Albert, Paul J; Proal, Amy D

    2009-09-01

    Recent research has implicated vitamin D deficiency (serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D osteoarthritis, metabolic syndrome, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. It has been assumed that low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-D) accurately indicate vitamin D storage and vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated control of calcium metabolism and innate immunity. To evaluate this assumption, 25-D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D) levels were measured in 100 Canadian patients with these conditions. Additionally, other inflammatory markers (CK, CRP) were measured. Results showed a strong positive association between these autoimmune conditions and levels of 1,25-D >110 pmol/L. However, there was little association with vitamin D deficiency or the other inflammatory markers, meaning that the results challenge the assumption that serum levels of 25-D are a sensitive measure of the autoimmune disease state. Rather, these findings support the use of 1,25-D as a clinical marker in autoimmune conditions. High levels of 1,25-D may result when dysregulation of the VDR by bacterial ligands prevents the receptor from expressing enzymes necessary to keep 1,25-D in a normal range.

  12. Drug metabolism in human brain: high levels of cytochrome P4503A43 in brain and metabolism of anti-anxiety drug alprazolam to its active metabolite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Agarwal

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (P450 is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP in brain and liver, relatively more alpha-hydroxy alprazolam (alpha-OHALP is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both alpha-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of alpha-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of alpha-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action.

  13. The effect of ethanol on human brain metabolites longitudinally characterized by proton MR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Armin; Bartsch, Andreas J; Homola, György; Solymosi, László; Bendszus, Martin

    2009-05-01

    The effect ethanol exerts on the human brain has not yet been addressed by longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic experiments. Therefore, we longitudinally characterized cerebral metabolite changes in 15 healthy individuals by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) subsequent to the ingestion of a standard beverage (mean peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC): 51.43 +/- 10.27 mg/dL). Each participant was examined before, over 93.71 +/- 11.17 mins immediately after and 726.36 +/- 94.96 mins (12.11 +/ -1.58 h) past per os alcohol exposure. Fronto-mesial and cerebellar ethanol concentrations over time were similar as determined by the LCModel analysis of spectral data. Alcohol-induced changes of fronto-mesial creatine, choline, glucose, inositol and aspartate levels at 5.79 +/- 2.94 [corrected] mins upon ingestion as well as cerebellar choline and inositol levels at 8.64 +/- 2.98 [corrected] mins past exposure. Closely associated with ethanol concentrations, supratentorial creatine, choline, inositol and aspartate levels decreased after ethanol administration, whereas glucose levels increased. Similarly, infratentorial choline and inositol concentrations were negatively correlated with ethanol levels over time. There were no changes in N-acetyl-aspartate levels upon alcohol exposure. Furthermore, no influence of ethanol on brain water integrals was detected. Ethanol consumption may directly increase oxidative stress and the neuronal vulnerability to it. In addition, our results are compatible with ethanol-induced cell membrane modifications and alternative energy substrate usage upon alcohol exposure.

  14. Brain metabolites in definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A longitudinal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrath, Alexander; Ludolph, Albert C; Kassubek, Jan

    2007-08-01

    Biomarkers beyond clinical assessment are needed in patients who suffer from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) of the gray matter of the motor cortex and the white matter including the pyramidal tracts was used to investigate concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), myoinositol, glutamate, and glutamine in patients with definite ALS in a longitudinal design (three measurements at study inclusion, after 3 and 6 months). A volume-corrected analysis of gray and white matter fractions within the volumes of interest (VOI) was performed for the identification of the absolute metabolite concentrations. The patient group showed a significant decline of the compound NAA over time in the motor cortex areas both of the clinically more and less affected hemisphere between first measurement and month 6 and for the less affected side additionally between first measurement and month 3. For the NAA/(Cr + Cho) ratio, significant decline in the less affected hemisphere was observed from the first measurement to month 3 and to month 6 as well as from month 3 to month 6. In contrast, neither NAA nor the NAA/(Cr + Cho) ratios in the white matter areas showed any significant alterations. All other compounds showed no significant changes over time. In summary, the longitudinal changes of cortical metabolite concentrations in the course of ALS could be assessed by optimized (1)H MRS techniques at group level, so that (1)H MRS parameters, in particular volume-corrected values of NAA in the clinically less affected hemisphere, seem to have the potential to serve as a surrogate marker for monitoring ALS disease progression.

  15. Biochemical Markers of Brain Injury: Applications to Combat Casualty Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayes, Ronald L; Wang, Kevin K; Tortella, Frank C; Dave, Jitendra R; Lu, X. M

    2004-01-01

    ...) that have resulted in negative findings with a cost of over $200 million. Many investigators have pointed out that the absence of biochemical markers of injury could have contributed to these failures...

  16. Monolithic silica rod liquid chromatography with ultraviolet or fluorescence detection for metabolite analysis of cytochrome P450 marker reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, E S M; Markling, M E; Masimirembwa, C M

    2002-11-25

    In vitro cytochrome P450 assays are used in metabolism studies in support of early phases of drug discovery to investigate, e.g., metabolic stability, enzyme inhibition and induction by new chemical entities. LC-UV and LC-fluorescence are traditional analytical tools in support of such studies. However, these tools typically comprise different methods of relatively low throughput for the various metabolites of probe reactions. In recent years, LC-MS methods have been developed to increase throughput. Increased throughput can also be achieved by means of modern chromatographic tools in combination with UV and fluorescence detection. This approach is especially suitable when cytochrome P450 isoforms are investigated by means of single probe incubations. Here, an LC-UV/fluorescence system based on a monolithic porous silica column is described for the analysis of metabolites of nine cytochrome P450 marker reactions [phenacetin to paracetamol (CYP1A2), coumarin to 7-hydroxycoumarin (CYP2A6), paclitaxel to 6alpha-hydroxypaclitaxel (CYP2C8), diclofenac to 4-hydroxydiclofenac (CYP2C9), mephenytoin to 4-hydroxymephenytoin (CYP2C19), bufuralol to 1-hydroxybufuralol (CYP2D6), chlorzoxazone to 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone (CYP2E1), midazolam to 1-hydroxymidazolam (CYP3A4), and testosteron to 6beta-hydroxytestosteron (CYP3A4)]. While offering sensitivities and linear ranges comparable to previously reported methods, the set-up described here provides ease of use and increased throughput with maximum cycle times of 4.5 min. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. [Effects of amitriptyline, fluoxetine, and tianeptine on the content of monoamines and their metabolites in Wistar rat brain structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, V S; Mosin, V M; Klodt, P M; Narkevich, V B; Molodavkin, G M; Voronina, T A

    2010-03-01

    The effects of antidepressant drugs belonging to different pharmacological groups--amitriptyline, fluoxetine (prozac), and tianeptine (coaxyl)--on the content of monoamines and their metabolites in Wistar rat brain structures (frontal cortex, hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, striatum, and hippocamp) has been studied using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) was found to produce a moderate increase in the DOPAC/dopamine turnover index in nucleus accumbens, but did not influence the levels of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and its metabolites (5-HIAA, DOPAC, and HVA) in other brain structures studied (frontal cortex, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocamp). Fluoxetine (Prozac) (20 mg/kg) decreased both the 5-HIAA content and the 5-HIAA/5-HT (5-HT turnover index) in all brain structures of Wistar rats. In contrast, the effects of Prozac on the level of catecholamines and their metabolites in various brain regions was more complex. Tianeptine (Coaxyl) was demonstrated to increase both the 5-HIAA content and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in all the structures studied (except for nucleus accumbens), in good agreement with the hypothesis concerning a two-phase mode of tianeptine action with enhanced 5-HT secretion in the synaptic gap in the first stage of pharmacological response.

  18. Comparison of LCModel and SAGE in Analysis of Brain Metabolite Concentrations-A study of Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Jui-Jen; Chang, Chin-Ching; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Jaw, Twei-Shiun; Hsu, Jui-Sheng; Li, Chun-Wei

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare brain metabolite concentration ratios determined by LCModel and Spectroscopy Analysis by General Electric (SAGE) quantitative methods to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of each method. A total of 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were recruited in this study. A point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence was used to obtain the brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) spectra of the volunteers and patients, as well as the General Electric (GE) MRS-HD-sphere phantom. The brain metabolite concentration ratios were estimated based on the peak area obtained from both LCModel and SAGE software. Three brain regions were sampled for each volunteer or patient, and 20 replicates were acquired at different times for the phantom analysis. The metabolite ratios of the GE phantom were estimated to be myo-inositol (mI)/creatine (Cr): 0.70 ± 0.01, choline (Cho)/Cr: 0.37 ± 0.00, N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cr: 1.26 ± 0.02, and NAA/mI: 1.81 ± 0.04 by LCModel, and mI/Cr: 0.88 ± 0.15, Cho/Cr: 0.35 ± 0.01, NAA/Cr: 1.33 ± 0.03, and NAA/mI: 1.55 ± 0.26 by SAGE. In the healthy volunteers and MCI patients, the ratios of mI/Cr and Cho/Cr estimated by LCModel were higher than those estimated by SAGE. In contrast, the ratio of NAA/Cr estimated by LCModel was lower than that estimated by SAGE. Both methods were acceptable in estimating brain metabolite concentration ratios. However, LCModel was marginally more accurate than SAGE because of its full automation, basis set, and user independency.

  19. Sleep facilitates clearance of metabolites from the brain: glymphatic function in aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2013-12-01

    Decline of cognition and increasing risk of neurodegenerative diseases are major problems associated with aging in humans. Of particular importance is how the brain removes potentially toxic biomolecules that accumulate with normal neuronal function. Recently, a biomolecule clearance system using convective flow between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) to remove toxic metabolites in the brain was described. Xie and colleagues now report that in mice the clearance activity of this so-called "glymphatic system" is strongly stimulated by sleep and is associated with an increase in interstitial volume, possibly by shrinkage of astroglial cells. Moreover, anesthesia and attenuation of adrenergic signaling can activate the glymphatic system to clear potentially toxic proteins known to contribute to the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) such as beta-amyloid (Abeta). Clearance during sleep is as much as two-fold faster than during waking hours. These results support a new hypothesis to answer the age-old question of why sleep is necessary. Glymphatic dysfunction may pay a hitherto unsuspected role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases as well as maintenance of cognition. Furthermore, clinical studies suggest that quality and duration of sleep may be predictive of the onset of AD, and that quality sleep may significantly reduce the risk of AD for apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ɛ4 carriers, who have significantly greater chances of developing AD. Further characterization of the glymphatic system in humans may lead to new therapies and methods of prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. A public health initiative to ensure adequate sleep among middle-aged and older people may prove useful in preventing AD, especially in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ɛ4 carriers.

  20. Comparison of human brain metabolite levels using 1H MRS at 1.5T and 3.0T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernandes Paiva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS of the human brain has proven to be a useful technique in several neurological and psychiatric disorders and benefits from higher field scanners as signal intensity and spectral resolution are proportional to the magnetic field strength. Objective: To investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the measurement of brain metabolites in a typical routine clinical setting. Methods: Single voxel spectra were acquired from the posterior cingulate cortex in 26 healthy subjects. Each subject was scanned consecutively at 1.5T and 3.0T in a randomly distributed order. Results: SNR and peak width improvements were observed at higher fields. However, SNR improvement was lower than the theoretical two-fold improvement. Other than the values obtained for creatine (Cre and myo-Inositol (mI, which were both higher at 3.0T, all metabolite concentrations obtained were roughly the same at both field strengths. All the metabolite concentrations were estimated with a Cramer Rao lower bounds (CRLB lower than 15% of the calculated concentrations. Conclusions: Even though the present study supports the expected benefits of higher field strength for MRS, there are several factors that can lead to different quantitative results when comparing 1.5T to 3.0T MRS. Future comparative studies are necessary to refine the metabolite thresholds for early detection and quantification of distinct neurological and psychiatric disorders using 3.0T MRS.

  1. Urinary profile of catecholamines and metabolites in Parkinson patients with deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, J; Vieira-Coelho, M A; Moura, E; Afonso, J; Rosas, M J; Vaz, R; Garrett, C

    2014-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS-STN) is thought to continuously alter the activity of STN neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). A chronic decrease in the levodopa dose with continuous STN stimulation may induce plastic neuronal changes. The objective of this work was to study urinary excretion of catecholamines in patients with PD before and after DBS-STN. Twenty-three patients were submitted to DBS-STN, and evaluated before and after surgery with respect to catecholamines and metabolites in 24-h urine measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Of the 23 patients evaluated, a significant decrease of about 60% in the urinary excretion of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA; in nmol/mg creatinine/24 h) was observed 1 week after DBS-STN. Moreover, in 17 patients with a follow-up of 8 weeks after surgery, there was a further 50% decrease in urinary L-DOPA levels, dropping to about 75% of the values before surgery. There was also a significant decrease in dopamine (DA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels 1 week after DBS-STN that was no longer present 8 weeks after. A significant increase in the DA/l-DOPA ratio was observed 1 week after surgery, with a further increase 8 weeks after surgery. After DBS-STN, the DA/l-DOPA ratio, an indirect measure of DA synthesis, increased. These results show that DBS-STN may improve the efficacy of oral levodopa. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  2. Coagulopathy as prognostic marker in acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Chhabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Coagulopathy frequently occurs following traumatic brain injury (TBI and usually occurs 6-72 hour post-trauma. The incidence and the probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and poor outcome following TBI are largely unknown and vary considerably. Aims: To assess the incidence and probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and to identify the risk factors for poor outcome in terms of median survival time following TBI. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study over two years, patients of isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (GCS≤12 admitted to trauma center had coagulation profile (PT, APTT, thrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer, arterial lactate and ABG analysis done on day of admission and on day three. Coagulopathy was defined as prothrombin time (PT or/and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT more than 1.5 times the normal control. Incidence of in-hospital mortality was assessed in all cases. Statistical Analysis: A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for coagulopathy and mortality in these patients. Results: A total of 208 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 32 ± 12 years and mean GCS was 7.1 ± 2.8. Coagulopathy was present in 46% ( n = 96 of patients. Risk factors for development of coagulopathy were found out to be severity of head injury (OR: 2.81, elevated D-dimer (OR: 3.43, low hemoglobin (OR: 3.13, and effaced cisterns in the CT scan (OR: 2.72. Presence of coagulopathy (OR: 2.97 and severity of head injury (OR: 5.70 strongly predicted poor outcome, and were associated with a decreased median survival time. Conclusions: There is a high incidence of coagulopathy following TBI. The presence of coagulopathy as well as of severity of TBI are strong predictors of in-hospital mortality in these patients.

  3. [BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (BDNF): NEUROBIOLOGY AND MARKER VALUE IN NEUROPSYCHIATRY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levada, O A; Cherednichenko, N V

    2015-01-01

    In this review current publications about neurobiology and marker value of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neuropsychiatry are analyzed. It is shown that BDNF is an important member of the family of neurotrophins which widely represented in various structures of the CNS. In prenatal period BDNF is involved in all stages of neuronal networks formation, and in the postnatal period its main role is maintaining the normal brain architectonics, involvement in the processes of neurogenesis and realization of neuroprotective functions. BDNF plays an important role in learning and memory organization, food and motor behavior. BDNF brain expression decreases with age, as well as in degenerative and vascular dementias, affective, anxiety, and behavioral disorders. The reducing of BDNF serum, level reflects the decreasing of its cerebral expression and could be used as a neurobiological marker of these pathological processes but the rising of its concentration could indicate the therapy effectiveness.

  4. Brain region's relative proximity as marker for Alzheimer's disease based on structural MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark; Sørensen, Lauge Emil; Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    2014-01-01

    brain structures like hippocampus, this paper investigates the relationship and proximity between regions in the brain and uses this information as a novel way of classifying normal control (NC), mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and AD subjects.METHODS:A longitudinal cohort of 528 subjects (170 NC, 240......BACKGROUND:Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, incurable neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia. It cannot be prevented, cured or drastically slowed, even though AD research has increased in the past 5-10 years. Instead of focusing on the brain volume or on the single...... MCI, and 114 AD) from ADNI at baseline and month 12 was studied. We investigated a marker based on Procrustes aligned center of masses and the percentile surface connectivity between regions. These markers were classified using a linear discriminant analysis in a cross validation setting and compared...

  5. Brain metabolites in the hippocampus-amygdala region and cerebellum in autism: an {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, H.; Harada, M.; Hisaoka, S.; Nishitani, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima City (Japan); Mori, K. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Tokushima (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Histological abnormalities of the brain in autism have been investigated extensively. We studied metabolites in the hippocampusamygdala (HA) region and cerebellum. We examined the right HA region and left cerebellar hemisphere of 27 autistic patients 2-18 years old, 21 boys and 6 girls and 10 normal children 6-14 years old, 4 boys and 6 girls, using the STEAM sequence. This sequence was used to minimise the influence of relaxation times. The N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentration was significantly lower (P=0.042) in autistic patients than in normal children (9.37 and 10.95 mM, respectively). There was no significant difference in other metabolites. The correlation coefficient (r value) of NAA between the HA region and cerebellum was 0.616. The decreased NAA concentration may be due to neuronal hypofunction or immature neurons. The NAA concentration in the HA region and cerebellum may be related, because of neuronal circuits or networks. (orig.)

  6. Plasma based markers of [11C] PiB-PET brain amyloid burden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven John Kiddle

    Full Text Available Changes in brain amyloid burden have been shown to relate to Alzheimer's disease pathology, and are believed to precede the development of cognitive decline. There is thus a need for inexpensive and non-invasive screening methods that are able to accurately estimate brain amyloid burden as a marker of Alzheimer's disease. One potential method would involve using demographic information and measurements on plasma samples to establish biomarkers of brain amyloid burden; in this study data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative was used to explore this possibility. Sixteen of the analytes on the Rules Based Medicine Human Discovery Multi-Analyte Profile 1.0 panel were found to associate with [(11C]-PiB PET measurements. Some of these markers of brain amyloid burden were also found to associate with other AD related phenotypes. Thirteen of these markers of brain amyloid burden--c-peptide, fibrinogen, alpha-1-antitrypsin, pancreatic polypeptide, complement C3, vitronectin, cortisol, AXL receptor kinase, interleukin-3, interleukin-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9 total, apolipoprotein E and immunoglobulin E--were used along with co-variates in multiple linear regression, and were shown by cross-validation to explain >30% of the variance of brain amyloid burden. When a threshold was used to classify subjects as PiB positive, the regression model was found to predict actual PiB positive individuals with a sensitivity of 0.918 and a specificity of 0.545. The number of APOE [Symbol: see text] 4 alleles and plasma apolipoprotein E level were found to contribute most to this model, and the relationship between these variables and brain amyloid burden was explored.

  7. Influence of liver pathology on markers of postmortem brain tissue quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheedy, Donna; Say, Meichien; Stevens, Julia; Harper, Clive G; Kril, Jillian J

    2012-01-01

    Postmortem brain tissue provides an important resource to investigate various brain disorders, including those resulting from the effects of alcohol abuse. Unlike the traditionally recognized confounders to tissue quality (e.g., coma, hypoxia), our understanding of the effects of liver disease is incomplete. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of liver pathology, and in particular cirrhosis resulting in hepatic encephalopathy (HE), on 2 postmortem brain tissue quality markers, brain pH and RNA integrity. We measured tissue quality markers in a cohort of alcohol abuse and control cases collected by the NSW Tissue Resource Centre. Cerebellar tissue was used to evaluate both brain pH and RNA quality (as indicated by the RNA integrity number: RIN). A histological assessment was performed on each case to exclude coexisting pathologies (e.g., cerebrovascular disease, hypoxic encephalopathy, neurodegenerative disease) and to assess the presence or absence of HE. Autopsy reports were reviewed for liver pathology and toxicology. Analysis revealed that cases of alcohol abuse had a lower mean (±SD) brain pH, 6.46 (±0.3) as compared with the control mean 6.64 (±0.2). The mean RIN for the alcohol abuse group was 6.97 (±1.3) and controls 7.66 (±0.5). The severity of liver pathology affected both brain pH (p brain pH (p = 0.0019). The results show that the presence of cirrhosis and, more so, HE reduces the pH and RIN of postmortem brain tissue. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Brain metabolite levels assessed by lactate-edited MR spectroscopy in premature neonates with and without pentobarbital sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z J; Vigneron, D B; Miller, S P; Mukherjee, P; Charlton, N N; Lu, Y; Barkovich, A J

    2008-04-01

    Pentobarbital is known to affect cerebral metabolism; pentobarbital sedation is, however, frequently used for MR imaging and MR spectroscopy, especially in children. Accurate assessment of the brain metabolite levels is important, particularly in neonates with suspected brain injury. We investigated whether pentobarbital sedation has any effect on the ratios of spectral metabolites lactate, N-acetylaspartate, or choline in a group of premature neonates. MR spectroscopy was performed in 43 premature neonates, all with normal concurrent MR imaging and normal neurodevelopmental outcome at 12 months of age. Of those neonates, 14 (33%) required pentobarbital (Nembutal 1 mg/kg) sedation during MR spectroscopy; the remaining 29 neonates did not receive any sedation. Ratios of lactate, choline, and N-acetylaspartate were calculated in the basal ganglia, thalami, and corticospinal tracts and compared between those neonates with and without sedation. Small amounts of brain lactate were detected in all of the premature neonates. The basal ganglia lactate/choline and lactate/N-acetylaspartate ratios were significantly lower, by 17% and 25% respectively, in the neonates with pentobarbital sedation compared with the age-matched neonates without sedation (P Sedation did not affect the lactate level in the thalami or the corticospinal tracts. The N-acetylaspartate/choline ratios were unaffected by pentobarbital sedation. Pentobarbital sedation is associated with lower lactate/choline and lactate/N-acetylaspartate ratios in the basal ganglia of premature neonates, as determined by proton MR spectroscopy. Investigators should be aware of this phenomenon for accurate interpretation of their MR spectroscopy results.

  9. Lack of Correlation between Benign Brain Tumors and Markers of Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2015-04-01

    Case control studies implicating dental X-rays in the genesis of intracranial meningiomas have yielded conflicting results. To further evaluate what risk, if any, that intracranial meningioma might be associated with dental X-rays, we examined the association of benign brain tumor incidence with the number of dentists and other correlates of oral health in U.S. states and the District of Columbia. We compared these correlations to the association of the same markers of oral health with Alzheimer's death rates. Poor oral health, especially periodontal disease, is a well-established risk factor for dementia. Pearson correlations, number of cases (49, no data from Kansas or Maryland) and significance (2 tailed p values) of benign brain tumor incidence and parameters of oral health are presented. None of the correlations approached statistical significance. In contrast, Alzheimer's deaths by state were negatively correlated with number of dentists and other markers of oral health. Our finding of a total lack of correlation between benign brain tumors and markers of oral health and, by implication, dental X-rays, suggests there may be no relationship between dental X-rays and meningioma or other benign brain tumors. This conclusion is strengthened by our demonstration of the known negative correlation between Alzheimer's and dental care.

  10. Structural, Functional, and Metabolic Brain Markers Differentiate Collision versus Contact and Non-Contact Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan W. Churchill

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing concern about how participation in contact sports affects the brain. Retrospective evidence suggests that contact sports are associated with long-term negative health outcomes. However, much of the research to date has focused on former athletes with significant health problems. Less is known about the health of current athletes in contact and collision sports who have not reported significant medical issues. In this cross-sectional study, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was used to evaluate multiple aspects of brain physiology in three groups of athletes participating in non-contact sports (N = 20, contact sports (N = 22, and collision sports (N = 23. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to assess white matter microstructure based on measures of fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD; resting-state functional MRI was used to evaluate global functional connectivity; single-voxel spectroscopy was used to compare ratios of neural metabolites, including N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, creatine (Cr, choline, and myo-inositol. Multivariate analysis revealed structural, functional, and metabolic measures that reliably differentiated between sport groups. The collision group had significantly elevated FA and reduced MD in white matter, compared to both contact and non-contact groups. In contrast, the collision group showed significant reductions in functional connectivity and the NAA/Cr metabolite ratio, relative to only the non-contact group, while the contact group overlapped with both non-contact and collision groups. For brain regions associated with contact sport participation, athletes with a history of concussion also showed greater alterations in FA and functional connectivity, indicating a potential cumulative effect of both contact exposure and concussion history on brain physiology. These findings indicate persistent differences in brain physiology for athletes participating in contact and collision

  11. RsmA regulates Aspergillus fumigatus gliotoxin cluster metabolites including cyclo(L-Phe-L-Ser, a potential new diagnostic marker for invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relebohile Sekonyela

    Full Text Available Dimeric basic leucine zipper (bZIP proteins are conserved transcriptional enhancers found in all eukaryotes. A recently reported and novel function for bZIPs is association of these proteins with secondary metabolite production in filamentous fungi. In particular a Yap-like bZIP termed RsmA (restorer of secondary metabolism A was identified in Aspergillus nidulans that positively regulates the carcinogen sterigmatocystin. To assess for conserved function for RsmA, we examined a role of this protein in secondary metabolism in the pathogen A. fumigatus. RsmA was found to positively regulate gliotoxin where overexpression (OE of rsmA led to 2-100 fold increases of twelve gli cluster metabolites in culture medium including the newly identified gli metabolite cyclo(L-Phe-L-Ser. Lungs from both wild type and OErsmA infected mice contained gliotoxin (2.3 fold higher in OErsmA treatment as well as the gliotoxin precursor cyclo(L-Phe-L-Ser (3.2 fold higher in OErsmA treatment. The data here presents a conserved role for RsmA in secondary metabolite cluster activation and suggests cyclo(L-Phe-L-Ser may serve as an alternative marker for diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis.

  12. [Increase of brain serotonin and its metabolite in rats caused by meclofenoxate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, T

    1976-05-01

    Influence of meclofenoxate (MF) on the 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents in the cortex, diencephalon and brain stem of the rat was studied with the following results. MF caused a dose-dependent elevation of 5-HIAA level in the three different brain regions and particularly in the brain stem. An increase of 5-HT was also noted in the brain stem, whereas 5-HT in the diencephalon tended to decrease. The increase of 5-HT after pargyline was accelerated and the pargyline-induced decrease of 5-HIAA was equally inhibited by MF and probenecid, which suggests that MF blocks the efflux of 5-HIAA from the brain. The effects of MF on the brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents were identical with those of its hydrolysate, p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid.

  13. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  14. Fatty acid amide hydrolase-dependent generation of antinociceptive drug metabolites acting on TRPV1 in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Barrière

    Full Text Available The discovery that paracetamol is metabolized to the potent TRPV1 activator N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide (AM404 and that this metabolite contributes to paracetamol's antinociceptive effect in rodents via activation of TRPV1 in the central nervous system (CNS has provided a potential strategy for developing novel analgesics. Here we validated this strategy by examining the metabolism and antinociceptive activity of the de-acetylated paracetamol metabolite 4-aminophenol and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine (HMBA, both of which may undergo a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH-dependent biotransformation to potent TRPV1 activators in the brain. Systemic administration of 4-aminophenol and HMBA led to a dose-dependent formation of AM404 plus N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-9Z-octadecenamide (HPODA and arvanil plus olvanil in the mouse brain, respectively. The order of potency of these lipid metabolites as TRPV1 activators was arvanil = olvanil>>AM404> HPODA. Both 4-aminophenol and HMBA displayed antinociceptive activity in various rodent pain tests. The formation of AM404, arvanil and olvanil, but not HPODA, and the antinociceptive effects of 4-aminophenol and HMBA were substantially reduced or disappeared in FAAH null mice. The activity of 4-aminophenol in the mouse formalin, von Frey and tail immersion tests was also lost in TRPV1 null mice. Intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV1 blocker capsazepine eliminated the antinociceptive effects of 4-aminophenol and HMBA in the mouse formalin test. In the rat, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, cannabinoid CB1 receptors and spinal 5-HT3 or 5-HT1A receptors, and chemical deletion of bulbospinal serotonergic pathways prevented the antinociceptive action of 4-aminophenol. Thus, the pharmacological profile of 4-aminophenol was identical to that previously reported for paracetamol, supporting our suggestion that this drug metabolite contributes to paracetamol's analgesic activity via

  15. Corpus callosum thickness on mid-sagittal MRI as a marker of brain volume: a pilot study in children with HIV-related brain disease and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Ackermann, Christelle [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Laughton, Barbara; Cotton, Mark [Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Children' s Hospital, Children' s Infectious Diseases Research Unit, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Tomazos, Nicollette [University of Cape Town, Faculty of Commerce, Department of Management Studies, Cape Town (South Africa); Spottiswoode, Bruce [University of Cape Town, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, Department of Human Biology, Cape Town (South Africa); Mauff, Katya [University of Cape Town, Department of Statistical Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Pettifor, John M. [University of the Witwatersrand, MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2015-07-15

    Corpus callosum thickness measurement on mid-sagittal MRI may be a surrogate marker of brain volume. This is important for evaluation of diseases causing brain volume gain or loss, such as HIV-related brain disease and HIV encephalopathy. To determine if thickness of the corpus callosum on mid-sagittal MRI is a surrogate marker of brain volume in children with HIV-related brain disease and in controls without HIV. A retrospective MRI analysis in children (<5 years old) with HIV-related brain disease and controls used a custom-developed semi-automated tool, which divided the midline corpus callosum and measured its thickness in multiple locations. Brain volume was determined using volumetric analysis. Overall corpus callosum thickness and thickness of segments of the corpus callosum were correlated with overall and segmented (grey and white matter) brain volume. Forty-four children (33 HIV-infected patients and 11 controls) were included. Significant correlations included overall corpus callosum (mean) and total brain volume (P = 0.05); prefrontal corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02); premotor corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.04) and white matter volume (P = 0.02), premotor corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02) and sensory corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.02). Corpus callosum thickness correlates with brain volume both in HIV-infected patients and controls. (orig.)

  16. The effects of training and detraining on memory, neurotrophins and oxidative stress markers in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Zsolt; Toldy, Anna; Szabo, Zsofia; Siamilis, Savvas; Nyakas, Csaba; Silye, Gabriella; Jakus, Judit; Goto, Sataro

    2006-09-01

    In the current investigation we tested how swimming training (T) (8 week, 5 times/week, 2 h/day), and detraining (DT) affects brain functions and oxidative stress markers in rat brain. The free radical concentration, measured by electron paramagnetic resonance, decreased in brain of T and DT rats compared to controls (C). The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increased as a result of training, but decreased below the control level after 6 weeks of detraining. In addition, the concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) also declined with DT. The passive avoidance test was used to assess the memory of rats, and training-induced improvement was observed but the enhancement disappeared with detraining. When the content of mitochondrial electron transport complexes, as a potent free radical generator, was evaluated by the blue native gel method, no significant alterations were observed. The repair of nuclear and mitochondrial 8-oxodeoxyguanosine, as measured by the activity of OGG1, showed no significant difference. Therefore, the results suggest that regular exercise training improves memory, decreases the level of reactive oxygen species, and increase the production of BDNF and NGF. On the other hand, it appears that the beneficial effects of training are reversible in the brain, since detraining down-regulates the neurotrophin level, and memory. It is suggested that exercise training is more likely to beneficially effect the production of reactive oxygen species and the related oxidative damage.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers of Neurodegeneration and Rates of Brain Atrophy in Early Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Head, Denise; Allison, Samantha; Buckles, Virginia; Fagan, Anne M; Ladenson, Jack H; Morris, John C; Holtzman, David M

    2015-06-01

    Measures of neuronal loss are likely good surrogates for clinical and radiological disease progression in Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuronal injury or neurodegeneration may offer usefulness in predicting disease progression and guiding outcome assessments and prognostic decisions in clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. Visinin-like protein 1 (VILIP-1) has demonstrated potential usefulness as a marker of neuronal injury in AD. To investigate the usefulness of CSF VILIP-1, tau, p-tau181, and Aβ42 levels in predicting rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in early AD and cognitively normal control subjects over time. Longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy in participants with early AD and cognitively normal controls. Study participants had baseline CSF biomarker measurements and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging assessments for a mean follow-up period of 2 to 3 years. Mixed linear models assessed the ability of standardized baseline CSF biomarker measures to predict rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy over the follow-up period. The setting was The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. Participants (mean age, 72.6 years) were individuals with a clinical diagnosis of very mild AD (n = 23) and cognitively normal controls (n = 64) who were enrolled in longitudinal studies of healthy aging and dementia. The study dates were 2000 to 2010. Correlations between baseline CSF biomarker measures and rates of whole-brain or regional atrophy in the AD and control cohorts over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1, tau, and p-tau181 levels (but not Aβ42 levels) predicted rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in AD over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1 levels predicted whole-brain (P = .006), hippocampal (P = .01), and entorhinal (P = .001) atrophy rates at least as well as tau and p-tau181 in early AD

  18. Reversal of glial and neurovascular markers of unhealthy brain aging by exercise in middle-aged female mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin S Latimer

    Full Text Available Healthy brain aging and cognitive function are promoted by exercise. The benefits of exercise are attributed to several mechanisms, many which highlight its neuroprotective role via actions that enhance neurogenesis, neuronal morphology and/or neurotrophin release. However, the brain is also composed of glial and vascular elements, and comparatively less is known regarding the effects of exercise on these components in the aging brain. Here, we show that aerobic exercise at mid-age decreased markers of unhealthy brain aging including astrocyte hypertrophy, a hallmark of brain aging. Middle-aged female mice were assigned to a sedentary group or provided a running wheel for six weeks. Exercise decreased hippocampal astrocyte and myelin markers of aging but increased VEGF, a marker of angiogenesis. Brain vascular casts revealed exercise-induced structural modifications associated with improved endothelial function in the periphery. Our results suggest that age-related astrocyte hypertrophy/reactivity and myelin dysregulation are aggravated by a sedentary lifestyle and accompanying reductions in vascular function. However, these effects appear reversible with exercise initiated at mid-age. As this period of the lifespan coincides with the appearance of multiple markers of brain aging, including initial signs of cognitive decline, it may represent a window of opportunity for intervention as the brain appears to still possess significant vascular plasticity. These results may also have particular implications for aging females who are more susceptible than males to certain risk factors which contribute to vascular aging.

  19. Transient Changes in Brain Metabolites after Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvichayapat, Paradee; Aree-Uea, Benchaporn; Auvichayapat, Narong; Phuttharak, Warinthorn; Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Tunkamnerdthai, Orathai; Boonphongsathian, Wuttisak; Ngernyam, Niran; Keeratitanont, Keattichai

    2017-01-01

    Muscle spasticity is a disability caused by damage to the pyramidal system. Standard treatments for spasticity include muscle stretching, antispastic medications, and tendon release surgeries, but treatment outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with muscle spasticity is known to result in significant improvement in spastic tone (p spasticity remains unclear. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effect of anodal tDCS upon brain metabolites in the left basal ganglia and ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). This study consisted of three steps: a baseline evaluation, a treatment period, and a follow-up period. During the treatment period, patients were given 20 min of 1 mA anodal tDCS over the left M1 for five consecutive days. Outcomes were compared between pre- and immediate posttreatment in terms of brain metabolites, Tardieu scales, and the quality of upper extremity skills test. Ten patients with spastic CP were enrolled. Following tDCS, there were significant increases in the ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) (p = 0.030), choline (Cho)/Cr (p = 0.043), and myoinositol (mI)/Cr (p = 0.035) in the basal ganglia. Moreover, increased glutamine-glutamate (Glx)/Cr ratio in the left M1 (p = 0.008) was found. In addition, we also observed improvements in the extent of spasticity and hand function (p = 0.028). Five consecutive days of anodal tDCS over the left M1 appeared statistically to reduce the degree of spasticity and increase NAA, Cho, mI, and Glx. Future research studies, involving a larger sample size of spastic CP patients undergoing tDCS is now warranted.

  20. Brain metabolite changes on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarac, K.; Alkan, A.; Baysal, T. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Malatya (Turkey); Akinci, A.; Aslan, M. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Malatya (Turkey); Oezcan, C. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Malatya (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    The metabolite changes in the brains of children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) were investigated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). A total of 30 subjects and 14 age-matched healthy volunteers underwent single-voxel MRS (TE: 136). The duration of disease, medication, presence of hypoglycaemia episodes and the level of haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) in the patients were noted. Voxels were placed in the pons, left basal ganglion (LBG) and left posterior parietal white matter (PPWM). N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatinine (Cr) and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were calculated. The average HbA1c level was 11.9{+-}3.4 (8.2-19.4). The average number of keto-acidosis episodes was 1.9{+-}2.2 (0-9) and the average number of daily insulin injections was 2.8{+-}0.97 (2-4). MRS revealed lower NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios in the pons and lower NAA/Cr ratio in the PPWM of patients with DM than in control subjects. No significant correlation was observed between the number of hypoglycaemia episodes and metabolite ratios. Metabolic abnormalities have been observed by MRS in the brain of poorly controlled type 1 DM children. These metabolic changes, in particular in the pons region, include a decrease in NAA, indicating neuronal loss or functional impairment, and likely explanations for a decrease in Cho may be dynamic changes in membrane lipids and/or decreased membrane turnover. (orig.)

  1. Understanding the protective effects of wine components and their metabolites in the brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban-Fernández A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate wine consumption has been suggested to exert a positive effect in prevention of neurodegenerative process and cognitive impairment. With the ultimate aim of achieving a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind this benefit, we have investigated the role of certain wine- derived phenolic metabolites and aroma compounds in the MAPK cascade (including ERK1/2, p38, one of the routes directly related to inflammation in neuronal cells. Some of the tested phenolic compounds, especially in the case of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, showed a significant neuroprotective effect against SIN-1-induced neuronal death. Regarding their effect over MAPK phosphorylation, inmunoblotting technique revealed a beneficial and significant decrease on the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 kinases after incubation with wine constituents. In addition, activity of caspase3-like protease, an executor of neuronal apoptosis and a downstream signal of MAPK, was significantly diminished by 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl propionic acid and linalool, counterbalancing the increase produced by SIN-1. Altogether, these results suggest that wine aroma, phenolic compounds and their gut metabolites could exert neuroprotective actions by modulating MAPK signalling and caspase-3 proteases activation, which are known to play a key role in oxidative/ nitrosative stress-induced response.

  2. Brain marker protein changes after short- and long-term ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmesen, L; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Hemmingsen, R

    1987-01-01

    The brain marker proteins, D1, D2, and D3, localised to neuronal membranes, and mitochondrial and cytoplasmic marker proteins (MM and CM), were studied during 1-6 days (short term) intragastrically-induced severe ethanol intoxication and during 1 month (long-term) ethanol intoxication established...... by a liquid diet regimen. The concentrations of the same brain proteins were also measured during withdrawal from the ethanol intoxication periods. Three categories of effect were encountered: decreased concentration of brain marker proteins during severe short-term intoxication the effect being most marked...... for D3, possibly indicating degradation of mature synapses; increased concentration of proteins D2 and MM during withdrawal, the D2 changes possibly indicating formation of new synapses; increased concentration of D1 protein and MM during long-term intoxication. We suggest that the changes in brain...

  3. Serum after traumatic brain injury increases proliferation and supports expression of osteoblast markers in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadosch, Dieter; Toffoli, Andrew M; Gautschi, Oliver P; Frey, Sönke P; Zellweger, René; Skirving, Allan P; Filgueira, Luis

    2010-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury is associated with an increased rate of heterotopic ossification within skeletal muscle, possibly as a result of humoral factors. In this study, we investigated whether cells from skeletal muscle adopt an osteoblastic phenotype in response to serum from patients with traumatic brain injury. Serum was collected from thirteen patients with severe traumatic brain injury, fourteen patients with a long-bone fracture, and ten control subjects. Primary cultures of skeletal muscle cells isolated from patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery were performed and characterized with use of immunofluorescence microscopy, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis. Proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation were assessed with use of commercial cell assays, Western blot analysis (for Osterix protein), and the Villanueva bone stain. All serum-treated cell populations expressed the osteoblast marker Osterix after one week in culture. Cells treated with serum from all study groups in mineralization medium had increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodules within the mesenchymal cell subpopulation after three weeks in culture. Serum from patients with traumatic brain injury induced a significant increase (p = 0.02) in the rate of proliferation of primary skeletal muscle cells (1.87 [95% confidence interval, 1.66 to 2.09]) compared with the rate induced by serum from patients with a fracture (1.42 [95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 1.58]) or by serum from controls (1.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 1.54]). Human serum supports the osteoblastic differentiation of cells derived from human skeletal muscle, and serum from patients with severe traumatic brain injury accelerates proliferation of these cells. These findings suggest the early presence of humoral factors following traumatic brain injury that stimulate the expansion of mesenchymal cells and osteoprogenitors within skeletal muscle.

  4. Metabolite profiling using liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the identification of a suitable marker and target matrix of griseofulvin use in bovines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbin, J A; Fussell, R J

    2013-06-30

    Griseofulvin is an antifungal agent with potential for misuse in food-producing animals. Little is known about its metabolism in ruminants and hence what are suitable marker residues and target matrices for monitoring purposes. Tissues harvested from cattle treated with the antifungal agent griseofulvin were screened using liquid chromatography coupled to positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI) quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (qToFMS) operated in ToF mode. Twenty-five possible metabolites were detected across all tissue types, but two isomeric compounds with accurate masses corresponding to loss of a methyl group from parent griseofulvin were considered to be the best candidate markers. Data from fragmentation experiments enabled a tentative assignment of the structures of the two compounds as 4-demethylgriseofulvin and 6-demethylgriseofulvin. These assignments were confirmed by matching the product ion spectra of incurred residues to those of custom synthesized reference standards. 4-Demethyl- and 6-demethylgriseofulvin have been identified as potential marker compounds of griseofulvin use in cattle. Liver was identified as the target matrix. Hair was shown to have potential for non-invasive testing. © Crown copyright 2013. Reproduced with the permission of Her Majesty's Stationery Office. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Human Serum Metabolites Associate With Severity and Patient Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Oresic (Matej); Posti, J.P. (Jussi P.); Kamstrup-Nielsen, M.H. (Maja H.); Takala, R.S.K. (Riikka S.K.); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); Mattila, I. (Ismo); Jäntti, S. (Sirkku); A. Katila (Ari); K.L.H. Carpenter (Keri L.H.); Ala-Seppälä, H. (Henna); Kyllönen, A. (Anna); Maanpää, H.-R. (Henna-Riikka); Tallus, J. (Jussi); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Heino, I. (Iiro); J. Frantzén (Janek); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); D.K. Menon (David ); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Hyötyläinen, T. (Tuulia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide, especially in children and young adults. TBI is an example of a medical condition where there are still major lacks in diagnostics and outcome prediction. Here we apply comprehensive metabolic profiling of

  6. Quantitative EEG markers in severe post-resuscitation brain injury with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ruoxian; Young, Leanne M; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been regarded as one of the most effective post-cardiac arrest (CA) treatments to improve survival and functional recovery. However, many clinical prognostic markers after resuscitation have become less reliable under hypothermia. In this study, we applied and compared two developed quantitative measures - information quantity (IQ) and sub-band IQ (SIQ) - to evaluate the accuracy of EEG markers on predicting cortical recovery under therapeutic hypothermia. A total of 14 rats under 9-min asphyxial-CA, leading to severe brain injury, were randomly divided into two groups: hypothermia (32°C-34°C) and normothermia (36.5-37.5°C) (n=7 per group). For each rat, EEG and temperature were continuously recorded for the first 15 hrs. EEG was then recorded for serial 30 mins at 24, 48 and 72 hrs. The neurologic deficit score was evaluated daily to assess the neurologic recovery. Early SIQ and IQ were both significantly correlated with the 72-hr NDS, when the rats remained comatose. Both IQ and SIQ were able to discriminate the animals with good and bad functional outcomes starting from 1 hr after resuscitation. There was no significant difference in 72-hr NDS results (hypothermia (median (25th, 75th), 65 (52, 67)) versus normothermia (53.5 (52.25, 66.75))) (p>0.05) due to the high mortality rate (5/14) with severe brain injury. Contrary to IQ recovery but similarly to NDS scores, the SIQ recovery was not significantly different between the hypothermia (0.66±0.04) and normothermia (0.64±0.04) groups (p>0.05). IQ could identify the presence of high-frequency oscillations during the recovery from severe brain injury. We demonstrated that while SIQ was able to provide additional sub-band EEG information related to the recovery of different brain functions, both early IQ and SIQ markers are able to accurately predict neurologic outcome after CA.

  7. Somatic transposition in the brain has the potential to influence the biosynthesis of metabolites involved in Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrusán György

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been recently discovered that transposable elements show high activity in the brain of mammals, however, the magnitude of their influence on its functioning is unclear so far. In this paper, I use flux balance analysis to examine the influence of somatic retrotransposition on brain metabolism, and the biosynthesis of its key metabolites, including neurotransmitters. The analysis shows that somatic transposition in the human brain can influence the biosynthesis of more than 250 metabolites, including dopamine, serotonin and glutamate, shows large inter-individual variability in metabolic effects, and may contribute to the development of Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Kenji Kojima (nominated by Dr Jerzy Jurka and Dr Eugene Koonin.

  8. Sex differences in the effects of adolescent stress on adult brain inflammatory markers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyter, Leah M; Kelly, Sean D; Harrell, Constance S; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2013-05-01

    Both basic and clinical research indicates that females are more susceptible to stress-related affective disorders than males. One of the mechanisms by which stress induces depression is via inflammatory signaling in the brain. Stress during adolescence, in particular, can also disrupt the activation and continued development of both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and -gonadal (HPG) axes, both of which modulate inflammatory pathways and brain regions involved in affective behavior. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that adolescent stress differentially alters brain inflammatory mechanisms associated with affective-like behavior into adulthood based on sex. Male and female Wistar rats underwent mixed-modality stress during adolescence (PND 37-48) and were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 250μg/kg, i.p.) or saline 4.5weeks later (in adulthood). Hippocampal inflammatory marker gene expression and circulating HPA and HPG axes hormone concentrations were then determined. Despite previous studies indicating that adolescent stress induces affective-like behaviors in female rats only, this study demonstrated that adolescent stress increased hippocampal inflammatory responses to LPS in males only, suggesting that differences in neuroinflammatory signaling do not drive the divergent affective-like behaviors. The sex differences in inflammatory markers were not associated with differences in corticosterone. In females that experienced adolescent stress, LPS increased circulating estradiol. Estradiol positively correlated with hippocampal microglial gene expression in control female rats, whereas adolescent stress negated this relationship. Thus, estradiol in females may potentially protect against stress-induced increases in neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative multivoxel proton MR spectroscopy study of brain metabolites in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhong-Xian; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Xu, Zhi-Feng; Cao, Zhen; Xiao, Ye-Yu; You, Ke-Zeng; Liu, Yan-Yan [Medical College of Shantou University, Department of Medical Imaging, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Shantou (China); Huo, Shan-Shan [Science College of Shantou University, Department of Physics, Shantou (China); Zeng, Jie-Xia; Chen, Wei [Medical College of Shantou University, Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Shantou (China); Wu, Ren-Hua [Medical College of Shantou University, Department of Medical Imaging, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Shantou (China); Medical College of Shantou University, Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging, Guangdong, Shantou (China)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate brain metabolic changes in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using multivoxel proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MVS). Fourteen aMCI patients and fifteen healthy control subjects participated in this experiment. All MR measurements were acquired using a 1.5-T GE scanner. {sup 1}H-MVS point resolved spectroscopy (2D PROBE-CSI PRESS) pulse sequence (TE = 35 ms; TR = 1,500 ms; phase x frequency, 18 x 18) was used for acquiring MRS data. All data were post-processed using Spectroscopy Analysis by General Electric software and linear combination of model (LCModel). The absolute concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myoinositol (MI), creatine (Cr), and the metabolite ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, MI/Cr, and NAA/MI were measured bilaterally in the posterior cingulate gyrus (PCG), inferior precuneus (Pr), paratrigonal white matter (PWM), dorsal thalamus (DT), and lentiform nucleus (LN). Patients with aMCI displayed significantly lower NAA levels in the bilateral PCG (p < 0.01), PWM (p < 0.05), and left inferior Pr (p < 0.05). The metabolite ratio of NAA/MI was decreased in the bilateral PCG (p < 0.01) and PWM (p < 0.05) and in the left DT (p < 0.01). NAA/Cr was decreased in the left PCG (p < 0.01), DT (p < 0.05), right PWM (p < 0.05), and LN (p < 0.05). However, MI/Cr was elevated in the right PCG (p < 0.01) and left PWM (p < 0.05). Significantly increased Cho level was also evident in the left PWM (p < 0.05). Our observations of decreased NAA, NAA/Cr, and NAA/MI, in parallel with increased Cho and MI/Cr might be characteristic of aMCI patients. (orig.)

  10. Shared Immune and Repair Markers During Experimental Toxoplasma Chronic Brain Infection and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Jakub; Schultz, Tracey L; Kluge, Wolfgang; Yolken, Robert H; Bahn, Sabine; Carruthers, Vern B

    2016-03-01

    Chronic neurologic infection with Toxoplasma gondii is relatively common in humans and is one of the strongest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Nevertheless, the exact neuropathological mechanisms linking T gondii infection and schizophrenia remain unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of chronic T gondii infection to identify protein biomarkers that are altered in serum and brain samples at 2 time points during chronic infection. Furthermore, we compare the identified biomarkers to those differing between "postmortem" brain samples from 35 schizophrenia patients and 33 healthy controls. Our findings suggest that T gondii infection causes substantial and widespread immune activation indicative of neural damage and reactive tissue repair in the animal model that partly overlaps with changes observed in the brains of schizophrenia patients. The overlapping changes include increases in C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interferon gamma (IFNγ), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Potential roles of these factors in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and toxoplasmosis are discussed. Identifying a defined set of markers shared within the pathophysiological landscape of these diseases could be a key step towards understanding their specific contributions to pathogenesis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Will Posttranslational Modifications of Brain Proteins Provide Novel Serological Markers for Dementias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development for dementias is significantly hampered by the lack of easily accessible biomarkers. Fluid biomarkers of dementias provide indications of disease stage, but have little prognostic value, cannot detect early pathological changes, and can only be measured in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid which significantly limits their applicability. In contrast, imaging based biomarkers can provide indications of probability of disease progression, yet are limited in applicability due to cost, radiation and radio-tracers. These aspects highlight the need for other approaches to the development of biomarkers of dementia, which should focus on not only providing information about pathological changes, but also on being measured easily and reproducibly. For other diseases, focus on development of assays monitoring highly specific protease-generated cleavage fragments of proteins has provided assays, which in serum or plasma have the ability to predict early pathological changes. Proteolytic processing of brain proteins, such as tau, APP, and α-synuclein, is a key pathological event in dementias. Here, we speculate that aiming biomarker development for dementias at detecting small brain protein degradation fragments of generated by brain-derived proteases specifically in blood samples could lead to the development of novel markers of disease progression, stage and importantly of treatment efficacy.

  12. Aerobic Glycolysis as a Marker of Tumor Aggressiveness: Preliminary Data in High Grade Human Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Vlassenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose metabolism outside of oxidative phosphorylation, or aerobic glycolysis (AG, is a hallmark of active cancer cells that is not directly measured with standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET. In this study, we characterized tumor regions with elevated AG defined based on PET measurements of glucose and oxygen metabolism. Methods. Fourteen individuals with high-grade brain tumors underwent structural MR scans and PET measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF, oxygen (CMRO2 and glucose (CMRGlu metabolism, and AG, using 15O-labeled CO, O2 and H2O, and FDG, and were compared to a normative cohort of 20 age-matched individuals. Results. Elevated AG was observed in most high-grade brain tumors and it was associated with decreased CMRO2 and CBF, but not with significant changes in CMRGlu. Elevated AG was a dramatic and early sign of tumor growth associated with decreased survival. AG changes associated with tumor growth were differentiated from the effects of nonneoplastic processes such as epileptic seizures. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that high-grade brain tumors exhibit elevated AG as a marker of tumor growth and aggressiveness. AG may detect areas of active tumor growth that are not evident on conventional FDG PET.

  13. c-Fos immunoreactivity in prefrontal, basal ganglia and limbic areas of the rat brain after central and peripheral administration of ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N. Segovia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence indicates that the metabolite of ethanol (EtOH, acetaldehyde, is biologically active. Acetaldehyde can be formed from EtOH peripherally mainly by alcohol dehydrogenase, and also centrally by catalase. EtOH and acetaldehyde show differences in their behavioral effects depending upon the route of administration. In terms of their effects on motor activity and motivated behaviors, when administered peripherally acetaldehyde tends to be more potent than EtOH but shows very similar potency administered centrally. Since dopamine (DA rich areas have an important role in regulating both motor activity and motivation, the present studies were undertaken to compare the effects of central (intraventricular, ICV and peripheral (intraperitoneal, IP administration of EtOH and acetaldehyde on a cellular marker of brain activity, c-Fos immunoreactivity, in DA innervated areas. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received an IP injection of vehicle, EtOH (0.5 or 2.5 g/kg or acetaldehyde (0.1 or 0.5 g/kg or an ICV injection of vehicle, EtOH or acetaldehyde (2.8 or 14.0 µmoles. IP administration of EtOH minimally induced c-Fos in some regions of the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia, mainly at the low dose (0.5 g/kg, while IP acetaldehyde induced c-Fos in virtually all the structures studied at both doses. Acetaldehyde administered centrally increased c-Fos in all areas studied, a pattern that was very similar to EtOH. Thus, IP administered acetaldehyde was more efficacious than EtOH at inducing c-Fos expression. However, the general pattern of c-Fos induction promoted by ICV EtOH and acetaldehyde was similar. These results are consistent with the pattern observed in behavioral studies in which both substances produced the same magnitude of effect when injected centrally, and produced differences in potency after peripheral administration.

  14. In vivo quantitation of metabolite concentrations in the brain by means of proton MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1995-01-01

    MRS offers unique possibilities for non-invasive studies of biochemistry in the human brain in vivo. A growing body of evidence suggests that proton MRS may contribute to the clinical evaluation of a number of pathologies including ischaemia, tumours, epilepsy, metabolic and neuropaediatric......, selection efficiency, outer volume depression and signal contamination is essential for validation of the measurements. Furthermore, corrections for the influence of relaxation behavior are necessary. The results published so far indicate that the concentrations of NAA, total creatine, Cho and Ins in mmoles...

  15. Brain metabolite changes in alcoholism: Localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of the occipital lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modi, Shilpi; Bhattacharya, Manisha; Kumar, Pawan [NMR Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (DRDO), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 (India); Deshpande, Smita N. [Department of Psychiatry, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi (India); Tripathi, Rajendra Prasad [NMR Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (DRDO), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 (India); Khushu, Subash, E-mail: skhushu@yahoo.com [NMR Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (DRDO), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with altered brain metabolism, morphology and cognitive abilities. Besides deficits in higher order cognitive functions, alcoholics also show a deficit in the processing of basic sensory information viz. visual stimulation. To assess the metabolic changes associated with this deficit, {sup 1}H MRS was carried out in the occipital lobe of alcohol dependents. A significant increase in Cho/Cr ratio (p < 0.015) was observed in occipital lobe in the alcoholic group indicating altered cell membrane metabolism, which may probably be associated with the alterations in the cognitive abilities associated with vision.

  16. The association of specific metabolites of lipid metabolism with markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and arterial stiffness in men with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Chang Young; Kim, Ji Young; Paik, Jean Kyung; Kim, Oh Yoen; Paik, Yong-Han; Lee, Eun Jig; Lee, Jong Ho

    2012-05-01

    To determine whether circulating metabolic intermediates are associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and arterial stiffness in men with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and investigate the circulating metabolic intermediates that may predict the risk of developing diabetes. Men with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 26) and age- and body mass index-matched nondiabetic men (n = 27) were included. We measured inflammatory and oxidative markers and arterial stiffness by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). Metabolomic profiling was analysed with ultra performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Diabetic men showed higher circulating levels of glucose, triglyceride, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2α) (8-epi-PGF(2α)) and ba-PWV than nondiabetic men. In plasma, 19 metabolites including three amino acids, eight acylcarnitines, six lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs), and two lysophosphatidylethanolamines (lysoPEs; C18:2 and C22:6) significantly increased in diabetes men, whereas serine and lysoPE (C18:1) decreased. Decanoyl carnitine, lysoPCs (C14:0, C16:1, C18:1 and C22:6) and lysoPE (C18:1) with variable importance in the projection values >1·0 were major plasma metabolites that distinguished nondiabetic and diabetic men. Decanoyl carnitine positively correlated with oxidized LDL, 8-epi-PGF(2α), IL-6, TNF-α and ba-PWV. ba-PWV correlated positively with lysoPCs C14:0 and C16:1, and negatively with lysoPE C18:1. 8-epi-PGF(2α) correlated positively with lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2), ba-PWV and lysoPCs (C14:0 and C16:1). The receiver operating characteristic curve estimation suggested that decanoyl carnitine and lysoPC (C14:0) are the best metabolites for predicting the risk of developing diabetes. Circulating lipid

  17. Transient Changes in Brain Metabolites after Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradee Auvichayapat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMuscle spasticity is a disability caused by damage to the pyramidal system. Standard treatments for spasticity include muscle stretching, antispastic medications, and tendon release surgeries, but treatment outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS in patients with muscle spasticity is known to result in significant improvement in spastic tone (p < 0.001. However, the mechanism of action by which tDCS treatment affects spasticity remains unclear. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effect of anodal tDCS upon brain metabolites in the left basal ganglia and ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1 in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP.Materials and methodsThis study consisted of three steps: a baseline evaluation, a treatment period, and a follow-up period. During the treatment period, patients were given 20 min of 1 mA anodal tDCS over the left M1 for five consecutive days. Outcomes were compared between pre- and immediate posttreatment in terms of brain metabolites, Tardieu scales, and the quality of upper extremity skills test.ResultsTen patients with spastic CP were enrolled. Following tDCS, there were significant increases in the ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA/creatine (Cr (p = 0.030, choline (Cho/Cr (p = 0.043, and myoinositol (mI/Cr (p = 0.035 in the basal ganglia. Moreover, increased glutamine–glutamate (Glx/Cr ratio in the left M1 (p = 0.008 was found. In addition, we also observed improvements in the extent of spasticity and hand function (p = 0.028.ConclusionFive consecutive days of anodal tDCS over the left M1 appeared statistically to reduce the degree of spasticity and increase NAA, Cho, mI, and Glx. Future research studies, involving a larger sample size of spastic CP patients undergoing tDCS is now warranted.

  18. Acute and subchronic toxicity of inhaled toluene in male Long Evans rats: oxidative stress markers in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research interested in oxidative stress markers following exposure to VOCsThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Kodavanti , P., J. Royland , D.A. Moore-Smith, J. Beas, J. Richards , T. Beasley , P. Evansky , and P.J. Bushnell. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity of Inhaled Toluene in Male Long-Evans Rats: Oxidative Stress Markers in Brain. NEUROTOXICOLOGY. Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS, 51: 10-19, (2015).

  19. Region-specific effects on brain metabolites of hypoxia and hyperoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia in young and old rats: a quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both hypoxia and hyperoxia, deregulating the oxidative balance, may play a role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders underlain by cerebral ischemia. In the present study, quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate regional metabolic alterations, following a 24-hour hypoxic or hyperoxic exposure on the background of ischemic brain insult, in two contrasting age-groups of rats: young - 3 months old and aged - 24 months old. Methods Cerebral ischemia was induced by ligation of the right common carotid artery. Concentrations of eight metabolites (alanine, choline-containing compounds, total creatine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, lactate, myo-inositol and N-acetylaspartate were quantified from extracts in three different brain regions (fronto-parietal and occipital cortices and the hippocampus from both hemispheres. Results In the control normoxic condition, there were significant increases in lactate and myo-inositol concentrations in the hippocampus of the aged rats, compared with the respective values in the young ones. In the ischemia-hypoxia condition, the most prevalent changes in the brain metabolites were found in the hippocampal regions of both young and aged rats; but the effects were more evident in the aged animals. The ischemia-hyperoxia procedure caused less dedicated changes in the brain metabolites, which may reflect more limited tissue damage. Conclusions We conclude that the hippocampus turns out to be particularly susceptible to hypoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia and that old age further increases this susceptibility.

  20. The prognostic value of multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy determined metabolite levels in white and grey matter brain tissue for adverse outcome in term newborns following perinatal asphyxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doormaal, Pieter Jan van [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Groningen (Netherlands); Meander Medical Center Amersfoort, Department of Radiology, PO Box 1502, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Meiners, Linda C.; Sijens, Paul E. [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Horst, Hendrik J. ter; Veere, Christa N. van der [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can identify brain metabolic changes in perinatal asphyxia by providing ratios of metabolites, such as choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and lactate (Lact) [Cho/Cr, Lact/NAA, etc.]. The purpose of this study was to quantify the separate white and grey matter metabolites in a slab cranial to the ventricles and relate these to the outcome. A standard 2D-chemical shift imaging protocol was used for measuring a transverse volume of interest located cranial to the ventricles allowing for direct comparison of the metabolites in white and grey matter brain tissue in 24 term asphyxiated newborns aged 3 to 16 days. Cho, NAA and Lact showed significant differences between four subgroups of asphyxiated infants with more and less favourable outcomes. High levels of Cho and Lact in the grey matter differentiated non-survivors from survivors (P = 0.003 and P = 0.017, respectively). In perinatal asphyxia the levels of Cho, NAA and Lact in both white and grey matter brain tissue are affected. The levels of Cho and Lact measured in the grey matter are the most indicative of survival. It is therefore advised to include grey matter brain tissue in the region of interest examined by multivoxel MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  1. Inflammatory and Innate Immune Markers of Neuroprogression in Depressed and Teenage Suicide Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2017-01-01

    Several studies suggest that major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD) are neuroprogressive illnesses. Besides clinical features, neurobiological mechanisms have been suggested to contribute to the neuroprogression of mood disorders. Biological factors that have been shown to contribute significantly toward the neuroprogressive course of these disorders are inflammatory markers, such as cytokines. Cytokines have been extensively investigated, primarily in the serum of MDD and BPD patients, and these studies show cytokine abnormalities in both adolescent and adult patients with mood disorders. However, cytokine abnormalities in the brain may also contribute toward neuroprogression, but brain cytokines have not been adequately investigated. To examine the role of cytokines in neuroprogression, we have studied the markers of adaptive and innate immunity in postmortem brain obtained from teenage and adult suicide victims and gene expression of cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors in lymphocytes of MDD and BPD patients. Cytokines and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were studied in 24 teenage suicide victims and 24 normal control (NC) subjects, and also in 22 adult depressed suicide victims and 20 adult NC subjects. We found that the protein and mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 were significantly higher in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We also found that the protein and mRNA expression of TLRs, which are major mediators of innate immunity, is increased in the PFC of adult depressed suicide victims and NC subjects. In patients, mRNA and protein expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 was significantly increased in both MDD and BPD patients. Similarly, mRNA expression of some specific membrane-bound receptors, such as IL1R1, TNFR1, IL1RA, were significantly increased in lymphocytes of MDD and BPD patients. These studies indicate the existence of abnormal cytokines and TLRs in

  2. Morphine metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring

    1997-01-01

    Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic widely used for the treatment of acute pain and for long-term treatment of severe pain. Morphine is a member of the morphinan-framed alkaloids, which are present in the poppy plant. The drug is soluble in water, but its solubility in lipids is poor. In man...... are considered as highly polar metabolites unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although morphine glucuronidation has been demonstrated in human brain tissue, the capacity is very low compared to that of the liver, indicating that the M3G and M6G concentrations observed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after...... systemic administration reflect hepatic metabolism of morphine and that the morphine glucuronides, despite their high polarity, can penetrate into the brain. Like morphine, M6G has been shown to be relatively more selective for mu-receptors than for delta- and kappa-receptors while M3G does not appear...

  3. Multi-slice echo-planar spectroscopic MR imaging provides both global and local metabolite measures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Henrik Kahr; Tscherning, Thomas; Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2005-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about neuronal loss or dysfunction by measuring decreases in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a metabolite widely believed to be a marker of neuronal viability. In multiple sclerosis (MS), whole-brain NAA (WBNAA) has been suggested as a marker of disease progre...

  4. Mouse brain distribution of a carbon-11 labeled vesamicol derivative: presynaptic marker of cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourn, M R; Jung, Y W; Haka, M S; Gildersleeve, D L; Kuhl, D E; Wieland, D M

    1990-01-01

    The regional mouse brain distribution of a new carbon-11 labeled derivative of vesamicol, [11C]-5-(N-methylamino)benzovesamicol [( 11C]MABV) is reported. Radiotracer concentrations in vivo are in the rank order of striatum greater than cortex greater than hippocampus greater than hypothalamus greater than cerebellum, consistent with reported distributions of other presynaptic cholinergic neuronal markers. In time course studies, striatum/cerebellum and cortex/cerebellum ratios for (-)-[11C]MABV continue to increase to values of 13 and 5, respectively, 75 min after i.v. injection of [11C]MABV. The specific binding in striatum and cortex is lowered by pretreatment with (+/-)-vesamicol, and shows stereoselectivity with lower uptake and lower ratios for the (+)-enantiomer. (-)-enantiomer. (-)-[11C]MABV is proposed as a positron-emitting radioligand for the in vivo study of presynaptic cholinergic neurons.

  5. Association of white-matter lesions with brain atrophy markers: the three-city Dijon MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, O.; Alperovitch, A.; Tzourio, Ch.; Dufouil, C. [Inserm U708 ' Neuroepidemiology' , Paris (France); Godin, O.; Alperovitch, A.; Tzourio, Ch.; Dufouil, C. [UPMC University Paris 6 (France); Mazoyer, B. [Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [CNRS, CI-NAPS UMR6232 (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [CEA, DSV/I2BM/CI-NAPS (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [Universite de Caen Basse-Normande (France); Mazoyer, B. [Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Caen, Caen (France)

    2009-07-01

    Background: Brain atrophy and white-matter lesions (WML) are common features at cerebral MRI of both normal and demented elderly people. In a population-based study of 1, 792 elderly subjects aged 65-80 years, free of dementia, who had a cerebral MRI at entry, we investigated the relationship between WML volume and brain atrophy markers estimated by hippocampal, gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. Methods: An automated algorithm of detection and quantification of WML was developed, and voxel-based morphometry methods were used to estimate GM, CSF and hippocampal volumes. To evaluate the relation between those volumes and WML load, we used analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression models adjusting for potential confounders and total intracranial volumes. Results: Age was highly correlated with WML load and all brain atrophy markers. Total WML volume was negatively associated with both GM ({beta} = -0.03, p {<=} 0.0001) and hippocampal volumes ({beta} = -0.75, p = 0.0009) and positively with CSF volumes (beta 0.008, p = 0.02) after controlling for sex, age, education level, hypertension and apolipoprotein E genotype. Evidence for a relationship between brain atrophy markers and WML was stronger for periventricular WML. We found that the relationship between WML and hippocampal volumes was independent of other brain tissue volumes. Conclusion: These results suggest that, in the brain of non demented elderly subjects, degenerative processes and vascular changes co-occur and are related independently of vascular risk factors. (authors)

  6. Early-life exercise may promote lasting brain and metabolic health through gut bacterial metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Agnieszka; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-02-01

    The 100 trillion microorganisms residing within our intestines contribute roughly 5 million additional genes to our genetic gestalt, thus posing the potential to influence many aspects of our physiology. Microbial colonization of the gut shortly after birth is vital for the proper development of immune, neural and metabolic systems, while sustaining a balanced, diverse gut flora populated with beneficial bacteria is necessary for maintaining optimal function of these systems. Although symbiotic host-microbial interactions are important throughout the lifespan, these interactions can have greater and longer lasting impacts during certain critical developmental periods. A better understanding of these sensitive periods is necessary to improve the impact and effectiveness of health-promoting interventions that target the microbial ecosystem. We have recently reported that exercise initiated in early life increases gut bacterial species involved in promoting psychological and metabolic health. In this review, we emphasize the ability of exercise during this developmentally receptive time to promote optimal brain and metabolic function across the lifespan through microbial signals.

  7. Brain basis of childhood speech and language disorders: are we closer to clinically meaningful MRI markers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Angela; Bonthrone, Alexandra; Liégeois, Frédérique J

    2016-12-01

    Developmental speech and language disorders are common, seen in one in 20 preschool children, in the absence of frank neurological deficits or intellectual impairment. They are a key reason parents seek help from paediatricians. Complex neurogenetic and environmental contributions underpin the disorders, yet few specific causes are known. With the advent of quantitative brain imaging, a growing number of studies have investigated neural contributions. Here, we discuss current MRI approaches and recent findings (January 2014-June 2016) in the field. Five relevant studies were identified (n = 3 - speech disorder and n = 2 - language disorder). Significant variability in MRI approaches and heterogeneity of participant phenotypes was seen. Children with speech disorder had structural and functional anomalies in the left supramarginal gyrus and functional anomalies in the posterior cerebellum bilaterally - regions critical for sensory-motor integration or feedback. Children with language disorder showed increased mean and radial diffusivity of the left arcuate fasciculus, although a widespread cortical and subcortical network of regions was implicated. Limited evidence exists for specific regional brain anomalies in this population. MRI prognostic markers of speech and language ability are not currently available at an individual level. Further work is required to disentangle neurobiological contributions to speech and language disorders for affected children.

  8. Association between brain natriuretic peptide, markers of inflammation and the objective and subjective response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Versteeg, Henneke; Meine, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can induce a decrease in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and systemic inflammation, which may be associated with CRT-response. However, the evidence is inconclusive. We examined levels of BNP and inflammatory markers from...

  9. The Teaching and the Learning Brain: A Cortical Hemodynamic Marker of Teacher-Student Interactions in the Socratic Dialog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holper, Lisa; Goldin, Andrea P.; Shalom, Diego E.; Battro, Antonio M.; Wolf, Martin; Sigman, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to step into two-person (teacher-student) educational neuroscience. We describe a physiological marker of cortical hemodynamic correlates involved in teacher-student interactions during performance of a classical teaching model, the Socratic dialog. We recorded prefrontal brain activity during dialog execution simultaneously in…

  10. Systematic review of prediction of poor outcome in anoxic-ischaemic coma with biochemical markers of brain damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, E. G.; de Haan, R. J.; Hijdra, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether accurate prognostic rules can be derived from the combined results of studies concerning prediction of poor prognosis in anoxic-ischaemic coma with biochemical markers of brain damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or serum. DESIGN: A meta-analysis of prognostic

  11. Diabetes, markers of brain pathology and cognitive function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chengxuan; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Zhang, Qian; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Kjartansson, Olafur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E; Harris, Tamara B; van Buchem, Mark A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether, and the extent to which, vascular and degenerative lesions in the brain mediate the association of diabetes with poor cognitive performance. This cross-sectional study included 4,206 participants (age > 65 years; 57.8% women) of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. Data were collected through interview, clinical examination, psychological testing, and laboratory tests. The composite scores on memory, information-processing speed, and executive function were derived from a cognitive test battery. Markers of cerebral macrovascular (cortical infarcts), microvascular (subcortical infarcts, cerebral microbleeds, and higher white matter lesion volume), and neurodegenerative (lower gray matter, normal white matter, and total brain tissue volumes) processes were assessed on magnetic resonance images. Mediation models were employed to test the mediating effect of brain lesions on the association of diabetes with cognitive performance controlling for potential confounders. There were 462 (11.0%) persons with diabetes. Diabetes was significantly associated with lower scores on processing speed and executive function, but not with memory function. Diabetes was significantly associated with all markers of brain pathology. All of these markers were significantly associated with lower scores on memory, processing speed, and executive function. Formal mediation tests suggested that markers of cerebrovascular and degenerative pathology significantly mediated the associations of diabetes with processing speed and executive function. Diabetes is associated with poor performance on cognitive tests of information-processing speed and executive function. The association is largely mediated by markers of both neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease. Older people with diabetes should be monitored for cognitive problems and brain lesions. © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  12. Long-term multi-species Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium dietary supplement enhances memory and changes regional brain metabolites in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Caroline; Li, Jia V; Marchesi, Julian R; Plummer, Sue; Garaiova, Iveta; Good, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    Ageing is associated with changes in the gut microbiome that may contribute to age-related changes in cognition. Previous work has shown that dietary supplements with multi-species live microorganisms can influence brain function, including induction of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and production of brain derived neurotrophic factor, in both young and aged rodents. However, the effect of such dietary supplements on memory processes has been less well documented, particularly in the context of aging. The main aim of the present study was to examine the impact of a long-term dietary supplement with a multi-species live Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria mixture (Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60, L. acidophilus CUL21, Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20 and B. lactis CUL34) on tests of memory and behavioural flexibility in 15-17-month-old male rats. Following behavioural testing, the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex was extracted and analysed ex vivo using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy to examine brain metabolites. The results showed a small beneficial effect of the dietary supplement on watermaze spatial navigation and robust improvements in long-term object recognition memory and short-term memory for object-in-place associations. Short-term object novelty and object temporal order memory was not influenced by the dietary supplement in aging rats. (1)H NMR analysis revealed diet-related regional-specific changes in brain metabolites; which indicated changes in several pathways contributing to modulation of neural signaling. These data suggest that chronic dietary supplement with multi-species live microorganisms can alter brain metabolites in aging rats and have beneficial effects on memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Schizophrenia: from the brain to peripheral markers. A consensus paper of the WFSBP task force on biological markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stober, Gerald; Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Cardon, M

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The phenotypic complexity, together with the multifarious nature of the so-called "schizophrenic psychoses", limits our ability to form a simple and logical biologically based hypothesis for the disease group. Biological markers are defined as biochemical, physiological or anatomical...

  14. Extended findings of Brain Metabolite Normalization in MA-Dependent Subjects Across Sustained Abstinence: A Proton MRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Ruth; Buonocore, Michael H.; Leamon, Martin; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Waters, Christy; Moore, Charles D.; Galloway, Gantt P.; Nordahl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The goal of the present study was to extend our previous findings on long-term methamphetamine (MA) use and drug abstinence on brain metabolite levels in an expanded group of MA-dependent individuals. Methods Seventeen MA abusers with sustained drug abstinence (1 year to 5 years), 30 MA abusers with short-term drug abstinence (1 month to 6 months) and 24 non-substance using controls were studied using MR spectroscopy (MRS). MRS measures of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA were obtained in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and in the primary visual cortex (PVC). Results ACC-Cho/NAA values were abnormally high in the short-term abstinent group compared to controls [F(1,52)=18.76, p<0.0001]. No differences were observed between controls and the long-term abstinent group [F(1,39)=0.97, p=0.97]. New evidence of lower ACC-NAA/Cr levels were observed in the short-term abstinent MA abusers compared to controls [F(1,52)=23.05, p<0.0001] and long-term abstinent MA abusers [F(1,45)=7.06, p=0.01]. No differences were observed between long-term abstinent MA abusers and controls [F(1,39)=0.48, p=0.49]. Conclusions The new findings of relative NAA/Cr normalization across periods of abstinence suggest that adaptive changes following cessation of MA abuse may be broader than initially thought. These changes may contribute to some degree of normalization of neuronal function in the ACC. PMID:20739127

  15. Trajectory of inflammatory and microglial activation markers in the postnatal rabbit brain following intrauterine endotoxin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Jyoti, Amar; Balakrishnan, Bindu; Williams, Monica; Singh, Sarabdeep; Chugani, Diane C; Kannan, Sujatha

    2018-03-01

    Maternal infection is a risk factor for periventricular leukomalacia and cerebral palsy (CP) in neonates. We have previously demonstrated hypomyelination and motor deficits in newborn rabbits, as seen in patients with cerebral palsy, following maternal intrauterine endotoxin administration. This was associated with increased microglial activation, primarily involving the periventricular region (PVR). In this study we hypothesized that maternal intrauterine inflammation leads to a pro-inflammatory environment in the PVR that is associated with microglial activation in the first 2 postnatal weeks. Timed pregnant New Zealand white rabbits underwent laparotomy on gestational day 28 (G28). They were randomly divided to receive lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20μg/kg in 1mL saline) (Endotoxin group) or saline (1mL) (control saline, CS group), administrated along the wall of the uterus. The PVR from the CS and Endotoxin kits were harvested at G29 (1day post-injury), postnatal day1 (PND1, 3day post-injury) and PND5 (7days post-injury) for real-time PCR, ELISA and immunohistochemistry. Kits from CS and Endotoxin groups underwent longitudinal MicroPET imaging, with [ 11 C]PK11195, a tracer for microglial activation. We found that intrauterine endotoxin exposure resulted in pro-inflammatory microglial activation in the PVR of rabbits in the first postnatal week. This was evidenced by increased TSPO (translocator protein) expression co-localized with microglia/macrophages in the PVR, and changes in the microglial morphology (ameboid soma and retracted processes). In addition, CD11b level significantly increased with a concomitant decline in the CD45 level in the PVR at G29 and PND1. There was a significant elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS, and decreased anti-inflammatory markers in the Endotoxin kits at G29, PND1 and PND5. Increased [ 11 C]PK11195 binding to the TSPO measured in vivo by PET imaging in the brain of Endotoxin kits was present up to PND14-17. Our

  16. Transient postnatal fluoxetine decreases brain concentrations of 20-HETE and 15-epi-LXA4, arachidonic acid metabolites in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhi-Xin; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-10-01

    Transient postnatal exposure of rodents to the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine alters behavior and brain 5-HT neurotransmission during adulthood, and also reduces brain arachidonic (ARA) metabolic consumption and protein level of the ARA metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P4504A (CYP4A). Brain 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), converted by CYP4A from ARA, will be reduced in adult mice treated transiently and postnatally with fluoxetine. Male mice pups were injected i.p. daily with fluoxetine (10mg/kg) or saline during P4-P21. At P90 their brain was high-energy microwaved and analyzed for 20-HETE and six other ARA metabolites by enzyme immunoassay. Postnatal fluoxetine vs. saline significantly decreased brain concentrations of 20-HETE (-70.3%) and 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (-60%) in adult mice, but did not change other eicosanoid concentrations. Behavioral changes in adult mice treated postnatally with fluoxetine may be related to reduced brain ARA metabolism involving CYP4A and 20-HETE formation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Role of Phosphorylated Neurofilament H as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Omar Ghonemi

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Phosphorylated Neurofilament H can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with TBI as seen by the presence of significant correlations between the marker levels and different clinical and radiological tools.

  18. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Stine N; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-08-15

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical detection provided limits of quantifications (LOQs) between 3.6 and 12nM. Within the linear range, obtained recoveries were from 90.9±9.9 to 120±14% and intra-day and inter-day precisions found to be less than 5.5% and 12%, respectively. The analytical method was applicable for quantification of intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only the biogenic metabolites could be detected extracellularly. Distinct differences in monoamine concentrations were observed when comparing concentrations in guinea pig frontal cortex and cerebellum tissue with higher amounts of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in frontal cortex, as compared to cerebellum. The chemical turnover in frontal cortex tissue of guinea pig was for serotonin successfully predicted from the turnover observed in the frontal cortex cell culture. In conclusion, the present analytical method shows high precision, accuracy and sensitivity and is broadly applicable to monoamine measurements in cell cultures as well as brain biopsies from animal models used in preclinical neurochemistry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Brain Changes in Responders versus Non-Responders in Chronic Migraine: Markers of Disease Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S Hubbard

    2016-10-01

    in responders, whereas non-responders showed increased connectivity between the pars opercularis seed and LOC. Overall, our findings revealed distinct morphometric and functional brain changes in CM patients that reverted to episodic migraine following prophylactic treatment compared to CM patients that showed no change in disease status. Elucidating the CNS changes involved in disease reversal may be critical to discovering interventions that prevent or slow the progression of CM. Such changes may aid in the evaluation of treatments as well as provide markers for disease ‘de-chronification’.

  20. Physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics and alters apoptotic, dynamic and auto(mito)phagy markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Rizo-Roca, D; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2015-08-20

    We here investigate the effects of two exercise modalities (endurance treadmill training-TM and voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) on the brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, permeability transition pore (mPTP), oxidative stress, as well as on proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis, and quality control. Eighteen male rats were assigned to sedentary-SED, TM and FW groups. Behavioral alterations and ex vivo brain mitochondrial function endpoints were assessed. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, including the adenine nucleotide translocator), oxidative stress markers and regulatory proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α, TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was measured through quantifying caspase 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1/2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin, p62)-related proteins were also measured by Western blotting. Only the TM exercise group showed increased spontaneous alternation and exploratory activity. Both exercise regimens improved mitochondrial respiratory activity, increased OXPHOS complexes I, III and V subunits in both brain subareas and decreased oxidative stress markers. Increased resistance to mPTP and decreased apoptotic signaling were observed in the brain cortex from TM and in the cerebellum from TM and FW groups. Also, exercise increased the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and fusion, simultaneous with decreased expression of mitochondrial fission-related protein DRP1. In conclusion, physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial function, decreasing oxidative stress and apoptotic related markers. It is also possible that favorable alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy signaling induced by exercise

  1. Dentate gyrus abnormalities in sudden unexplained death in infants: morphological marker of underlying brain vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Hannah C; Cryan, Jane B; Haynes, Robin L; Paterson, David S; Haas, Elisabeth A; Mena, Othon J; Minter, Megan; Journey, Kelley W; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Goldstein, Richard D; Armstrong, Dawna D

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in infants, including the sudden infant death syndrome, is likely due to heterogeneous causes that involve different intrinsic vulnerabilities and/or environmental factors. Neuropathologic research focuses upon the role of brain regions, particularly the brainstem, that regulate or modulate autonomic and respiratory control during sleep or transitions to waking. The hippocampus is a key component of the forebrain-limbic network that modulates autonomic/respiratory control via brainstem connections, but its role in sudden infant death has received little attention. We tested the hypothesis that a well-established marker of hippocampal pathology in temporal lobe epilepsy-focal granule cell bilamination in the dentate, a variant of granule cell dispersion-is associated with sudden unexplained death in infants. In a blinded study of hippocampal morphology in 153 infants with sudden and unexpected death autopsied in the San Diego County medical examiner's office, deaths were classified as unexplained or explained based upon autopsy and scene investigation. Focal granule cell bilamination was present in 41.2% (47/114) of the unexplained group compared to 7.7% (3/39) of the explained (control) group (p infants with sudden unexplained death may represent a developmental vulnerability that leads to autonomic/respiratory instability or autonomic seizures, and sleep-related death when the infants are challenged with homeostatic stressors. Importantly, these lesions can be recognized in microscopic sections prepared in current forensic practice. Future research is needed to determine the relationship between hippocampal and previously reported brainstem pathology in sudden infant death.

  2. Toward an in Vivo Neurochemical Profile: Quantification of 18 Metabolites in Short-Echo-Time 1H NMR Spectra of the Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Tkáč , Ivan; Provencher, Stephen W.; Gruetter, Rolf

    1999-11-01

    Localized in vivo1H NMR spectroscopy was performed with 2-ms echo time in the rat brain at 9.4 T. Frequency domain analysis with LCModel showed that the in vivo spectra can be explained by 18 metabolite model solution spectra and a highly structured background, which was attributed to resonances with fivefold shorter in vivo T1 than metabolites. The high spectral resolution (full width at half maximum approximately 0.025 ppm) and sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio approximately 45 from a 63-μL volume, 512 scans) was used for the simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of metabolites previously difficult to quantify in 1H spectra. The strongly represented signals of N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, taurine, myo-inositol, creatine, phosphocreatine, glutamine, and lactate were quantified with Cramér-Rao lower bounds below 4%. Choline groups, phosphorylethanolamine, glucose, glutathione, γ-aminobutyric acid, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, and alanine were below 13%, whereas aspartate and scyllo-inositol were below 22%. Intra-assay variation was assessed from a time series of 3-min spectra, and the coefficient of variation was similar to the calculated Cramér-Rao lower bounds. Interassay variation was determined from 31 pooled spectra, and the coefficient of variation for total creatine was 7%. Tissue concentrations were found to be in very good agreement with neurochemical data from the literature.

  3. Effect of raloxifene and hormone therapy on serum markers of brain and whole-body cholesterol metabolism in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelvang, Tatjana E; Mijatovic, Velja; van der Mooren, Marius J; Pinsdorf, Ursula; von Bergmann, Klaus; Netelenbos, J Coen; Lütjohann, Dieter

    2005-04-11

    To compare the 2-year effects of raloxifene (Rlx) with oral postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on serum markers of brain and whole-body cholesterol metabolism. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 95 healthy, non-hysterectomized, early postmenopausal women received either daily Rlx 60 mg (n = 24), Rlx 150 mg (n = 23), HT (conjugated equine estrogens 0.625 mg/medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5 mg; n = 24), or placebo (n = 24). Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline and after 6, 12, and 24 months of treatment for measurement of serum concentrations of cholesterol by means of gas-liquid chromatography; 24S-hydroxycholesterol (cerebrosterol), lathosterol, and the plant sterol campesterol by means of gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analyses were performed retrospectively from serum samples stored at -70 degrees C for 5 years. Twenty-four months of treatment with raloxifene 150 mg was associated with a significant reduction in serum cholesterol concentrations (-10%, P = 0.007). The ratio of 24S-hydroxycholesterol to cholesterol, a serum marker of brain cholesterol metabolism, showed a significant increase after 6 and 12 months with raloxifene 150 mg but not after 24 months (P = 0.001). The ratio of lathosterol to cholesterol, a marker of whole-body cholesterol synthesis, increased with raloxifene 60 mg (P = 0.163), raloxifene 150 mg (P cholesterol, a marker of cholesterol absorption rate, was significantly reduced with HT (P = 0.002). Two-year treatment with raloxifene or HT had no influence on brain cholesterol metabolism, while whole-body cholesterol synthesis, assessed by the ratio of lathosterol to cholesterol, increased during raloxifene and HT.

  4. Data supporting the rat brain sample preparation and validation assays for simultaneous determination of 8 neurotransmitters and their metabolites using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wojnicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article supports the rat brain sample preparation procedure previous to its injection into the liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS system to monitor levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, glutamic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol. In addition, we describe the method validation assays (such as calibration curve, lower limit of quantification, precision and accuracy intra- and inter-day, selectivity, extraction recovery and matrix effect, stability, and carry-over effect according to the United States Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency to measure in one step different neurotransmitters and their metabolites. The data supplied in this article is related to the research study entitled: “Simultaneous determination of 8 neurotransmitters and their metabolite levels in rat brain using liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry: application to the murine Nrf2 model of depression” (Wojnicz et al. 2016 [1].

  5. Comparison between Short and Long Echo Time Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3T and 7T for Evaluating Brain Metabolites in Patients with Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Lafontaine, Marisa; Chang, Susan; Nelson, Sarah J

    2018-01-17

    Three-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is a powerful non-invasive tool for characterizing spatial variations in metabolic profiles for patients with glioma. Metabolic parameters obtained using this technique have been shown to predict treatment response, disease progression, and transformation to a more malignant phenotype. The availability of ultra-high-field MR systems has the potential to improve the characterization of metabolites. The purpose of this study was to compare the metabolite profiles acquired with conventional long echo time (TE) MRSI at 3T with those obtained with short TE MRSI at 3T and 7T in patients with glioma. The data acquisition parameters were optimized separately for each echo time and field strength to obtain volumetric coverage within clinically feasible data acquisition times of 5-10 min. While a higher field strength did provide better detection of metabolites with overlapping peaks, spatial coverage was reduced and the use of inversion recovery to reduce lipid precluded the detection of lipid in regions of necrosis. For serial evaluation of large, heterogeneous lesions, the use of 3T short TE MRSI may thus be preferred. Despite the limited number of metabolites that it is able to detect, the use of 3T long TE MRSI gives the best contrast in choline/N-acetyl aspartate between normal appearing brain and tumor and also allows the separate detection of lactate and lipid. It may therefore be preferred for serial evaluation of patients with high-grade glioma and for detection of malignant transformation in patients with low-grade glioma.

  6. In vivo quantification of brain metabolites by 1H-MRS using water as an internal standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Henriksen, O; Stubgaard, M

    1993-01-01

    in quantification of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentration was about 1-2 mM (6-12%). Also in vivo a good linearity between water signal and selected voxel size was seen. The same was true for the studied metabolites, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr), and choline (Cho). Calculated average...

  7. Development and validation of a high performance liquid chromatography quantification method of levo-tetrahydropalmatine and its metabolites in plasma and brain tissues: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Inas A; Huang, Peng; Liu, Jing; Lee, David Y; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Hassan, Hazem E

    2017-04-01

    Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid isolated from Chinese medicinal herbs of the Corydalis and Stephania genera. It has been used in China for more than 40 years mainly as an analgesic with sedative/hypnotic effects. Despite its extensive use, its metabolism has not been quantitatively studied, nor there a sensitive reliable bioanalytical method for its quantification simultaneously with its metabolites. As such, the objective of this study was to develop and validate a sensitive and selective HPLC method for simultaneous quantification of l-THP and its desmethyl metabolites l-corydalmine (l-CD) and l-corypalmine (l-CP) in rat plasma and brain tissues. Rat plasma and brain samples were processed by liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase Symmetry® C18 column (4.6 × 150 mm, 5 μm) at 25°C. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-methanol-10 mm ammonium phosphate (pH 3) (10:30:60, v/v) and was used at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The column eluent was monitored at excitation and emission wavelengths of 230 and 315 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 1-10,000 ng/mL. The intra- and interday reproducibility studies demonstrated accuracy and precision within the acceptance criteria of bioanalytical guidelines. The validated HPLC method was successfully applied to analyze samples from a pharmacokinetic study of l-THP in rats. Taken together, the developed method can be applied for bioanalysis of l-THP and its metabolites in rodents and potentially can be transferred for bioanalysis of human samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Preventive brain radio-chemotherapy alters plasticity associated metabolite profile in the hippocampus but seems to not affect spatial memory in young leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Moritz D; Brandt, Kalina; Werner, Annett; Schönfeld, Robby; Loewenbrück, Kai; Donix, Markus; Schaich, Markus; Bornhäuser, Martin; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Leplow, Bernd; Storch, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal plasticity leading to evolving reorganization of the neuronal network during entire lifespan plays an important role for brain function especially memory performance. Adult neurogenesis occurring in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus represents the maximal way of network reorganization. Brain radio-chemotherapy strongly inhibits adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice leading to impaired spatial memory. To elucidate the effects of CNS radio-chemotherapy on hippocampal plasticity and function in humans, we performed a longitudinal pilot study using 3T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and virtual water-maze-tests in 10 de-novo patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia undergoing preventive whole brain radio-chemotherapy. Patients were examined before, during and after treatment. CNS radio-chemotherapy did neither affect recall performance in probe trails nor flexible (reversal) relearning of a new target position over a time frame of 10 weeks measured by longitudinal virtual water-maze-testing, but provoked hippocampus-specific decrease in choline as a metabolite associated with cellular plasticity in (1)H-MRS. Albeit this pilot study needs to be followed up to definitely resolve the question about the functional role of adult human neurogenesis, the presented data suggest that (1)H-MRS allows the detection of neurogenesis-associated plasticity in the human brain.

  9. Implementation of a computer-aided detection tool for quantification of intracranial radiologic markers on brain CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Ross, Stephen R.; Wang, Yunzhi; Wu, Dee H.; Cornwell, Benjamin O.; Ray, Bappaditya; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a form of hemorrhagic stroke that affects middle-aged individuals and associated with significant morbidity and/or mortality especially those presenting with higher clinical and radiologic grades at the time of admission. Previous studies suggested that blood extravasated after aneurysmal rupture was a potentially clinical prognosis factor. But all such studies used qualitative scales to predict prognosis. The purpose of this study is to develop and test a new interactive computer-aided detection (CAD) tool to detect, segment and quantify brain hemorrhage and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid on non-contrasted brain CT images. First, CAD segments brain skull using a multilayer region growing algorithm with adaptively adjusted thresholds. Second, CAD assigns pixels inside the segmented brain region into one of three classes namely, normal brain tissue, blood and fluid. Third, to avoid "black-box" approach and increase accuracy in quantification of these two image markers using CT images with large noise variation in different cases, a graphic User Interface (GUI) was implemented and allows users to visually examine segmentation results. If a user likes to correct any errors (i.e., deleting clinically irrelevant blood or fluid regions, or fill in the holes inside the relevant blood or fluid regions), he/she can manually define the region and select a corresponding correction function. CAD will automatically perform correction and update the computed data. The new CAD tool is now being used in clinical and research settings to estimate various quantitatively radiological parameters/markers to determine radiological severity of aSAH at presentation and correlate the estimations with various homeostatic/metabolic derangements and predict clinical outcome.

  10. Platelet oxygen consumption as a peripheral blood marker of brain energetics in a mouse model of severe neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Martins, Roberta; Glaser, Viviane; da Luz Scheffer, Débora; de Paula Ferreira, Priscila Maximiliana; Wannmacher, Clóvis Milton Duval; Farina, Marcelo; de Oliveira, Paulo Alexandre; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Latini, Alexandra

    2013-10-01

    Interactions of chemicals with cerebral cellular systems are often accompanied by similar changes involving components in non-neural tissues. On this basis, indirect strategies have been developed to investigate neural cell function parameters by methods using accessible cells, including platelets and/or peripheral blood lymphocytes. Therefore, here it was investigated whether peripheral blood markers may be useful for assessing the central toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg). For this purpose, we investigated platelet mitochondrial physiology in a well-established mouse model of MeHg-induced neurotoxicity, and correlated this peripheral activity with behavioural and central biochemical parameters. In order to characterize the cortical toxicity induced by MeHg (20 and 40 mg/L in drinking water, 21 days), the behavioral parameter namely, short-term object recognition, and the central mitochondrial impairment assessed by measuring respiratory complexes I-IV enzyme activities were determined in MeHg-poisoned animals. Neurotoxicity induced by MeHg exposure provoked compromised cortical activity (memory impairment) and reduced NADH dehydrogenase, complex II and II-III activities in the cerebral cortex. These alterations correlated with impaired systemic platelet oxygen consumption of intoxicated mice, which was characterized by reduced electron transfer activity and uncoupled mitochondria. The data brought here demonstrated that impaired systemic platelet oxygen consumption is a sensitive and non-invasive marker of the brain energy deficits induced by MeHg poisoning. Finally, brain and platelets biochemical alterations significantly correlated with cognitive behavior in poisoned mice. Therefore, it could be proposed the use of platelet oxygen consumption as a peripheral blood marker of brain function in a mouse model MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  11. Environmental Enrichment Improves Behavior, Cognition, and Brain Functional Markers in Young Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice (SAMP8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Pérez-Cáceres, David; Gutiérrez-Zetina, Sofía Martínez; Camins, Antoni; Palomera-Avalos, Verónica; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Rodrigo, M Teresa; Pallàs, M

    2016-05-01

    The environment in which organisms live can greatly influence their development. Consequently, environmental enrichment (EE) is progressively recognized as an important component in the improvement of brain function and development. It has been demonstrated that rodents raised under EE conditions exhibit favorable neuroanatomical effects that improve their learning, spatial memory, and behavioral performance. Here, by using senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8) and these as a model of adverse genetic conditions for brain development, we determined the effect of EE by raising these mice during early life under favorable conditions. We found a better generalized performance of SAMP8 under EE in the results of four behavioral and learning tests. In addition, we demonstrated broad molecular correlation in the hippocampus by an increase in NeuN and Ki67 expression, as well as an increase in the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as pleiotrophin (PTN) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), with a parallel decrease in neurodegenerative markers such as GSK3, amyloid-beta precursor protein, and phosphorylated beta-catenin, and a reduction of SBDP120, Bax, GFAP, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), resulting in a neuroprotective panorama. Globally, it can be concluded that EE applied to SAMP8 at young ages resulted in epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that give rise to significant beneficial effects at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels during brain development, particularly in the hippocampus.

  12. The enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid alters brain and plasma phospholipid molecular species: further development of a rodent model of autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Raymond H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal symptoms and altered blood phospholipid profiles have been reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Most of the phospholipid analyses have been conducted on the fatty acid composition of isolated phospholipid classes following hydrolysis. A paucity of information exists on how the intact phospholipid molecular species are altered in ASD. We applied ESI/MS to determine how brain and blood intact phospholipid species were altered during the induction of ASD-like behaviors in rats following intraventricular infusions with the enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid. Animals were infused daily for 8 days, locomotor activity assessed, and animals killed during the induced behaviors. Propionic acid infusions increased locomotor activity. Lipid analysis revealed treatment altered 21 brain and 30 blood phospholipid molecular species. Notable alterations were observed in the composition of brain SM, diacyl mono and polyunsaturated PC, PI, PS, PE, and plasmalogen PC and PE molecular species. These alterations suggest that the propionic acid rat model is a useful tool to study aberrations in lipid metabolism known to affect membrane fluidity, peroxisomal function, gap junction coupling capacity, signaling, and neuroinflammation, all of which may be associated with the pathogenesis of ASD.

  13. Determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in a mouse brain microdialysate by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with gold nanoparticle-initiated chemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Na; Guo Jizhao; Liu Bo; Yu Yuqi [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Cui Hua, E-mail: hcui@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Mao Lanqun; Lin Yuqing [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 100080 Beijing (China)

    2009-07-10

    Our previous work showed that gold nanoparticles could trigger chemiluminescence (CL) between luminol and AgNO{sub 3}. In the present work, the effect of some biologically important reductive compounds, including monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites, reductive amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and glutathione, on the novel CL reaction were investigated for analytical purpose. It was found that all of them could inhibit the CL from the luminol-AgNO{sub 3}-Au colloid system. Among them, monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites exhibited strong inhibition effect. Taking dopamine as a model compound, the CL mechanism was studied by measuring absorption spectra during the CL reaction and the reaction kinetics via stopped-flow technique. The CL inhibition mechanism is proposed to be due to that these tested compounds competed with luminol for AgNO{sub 3} to inhibit the formation of luminol radicals and to accelerate deposition of Ag atoms on surface of gold nanoparticles, leading to a decrease in CL intensity. Based on the inhibited CL, a novel method for simultaneous determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites was developed by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with this CL reaction. The new method was successfully applied to determine the compounds in a mouse brain microdialysate. Compared with the reported HPLC-CL methods, the proposed method is simple, fast, and could determine more analytes. Moreover, the limits of linear ranges for NE, E, and DA using the proposed method were one order of magnitude lower than the luminol system without gold nanoparticles.

  14. The interference of ethanol with heroin-stimulated psychomotor activation in mice is not related to changed brain concentrations of the active metabolites 6MAM or morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jannike M; Haugen, Karianne S; Ripel, Ase; Mørland, Jørg

    2014-02-01

    It has been suggested that the potentiating effect observed in human beings when combining alcohol and heroin may be due to an interference of ethanol with the pharmacokinetics of heroin, leading to accumulation of the biologically active metabolites, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM) and morphine. However, experimental evidence for this hypothesis is lacking. In this study, we used mice and examined the effect of ethanol on the metabolism of heroin by combining a locomotor activity test, which is a behaviour model representative of psychomotor stimulation, with pharmacokinetic studies in blood and brain tissue. Pre-treatment with ethanol (1 and 2.5 g/kg, po) affected heroin-stimulated (2.5 and 15 μmol/kg, sc) locomotor activation significantly, resulting in a dose-dependent reduction in run distance. However, the change in the activity profiles did not indicate any increase in the concentration of active metabolites. Pharmacokinetic studies in blood and brain supported the behavioural findings, showing no change in the time-versus-concentration curves of either 6MAM or morphine after administration of heroin (15 μmol/kg, sc) to mice pre-treated with ethanol (2.5 g/kg, po). The concentration of heroin itself was elevated, but is probably of minor importance because heroin has low biological activity by itself. The in vivo pharmacokinetic findings were supported by experiments in vitro. In conclusion, studies in mice do not support the hypothesis from epidemiological studies of a pharmacokinetic interaction between alcohol and heroin. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Absolute metabolite quantification by in vivo NMR spectroscopy: II. A multicentre trial of protocols for in vivo localised proton studies of human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevil, S F; Barbiroli, B; Brooks, J C; Cady, E B; Canese, R; Carlier, P; Collins, D J; Gilligan, P; Gobbi, G; Hennig, J; Kügel, H; Leach, M O; Metzler, D; Mlynárik, V; Moser, E; Newbold, M C; Payne, G S; Ring, P; Roberts, J N; Rowland, I J; Thiel, T; Tkác, I; Topp, S; Wittsack, H J; Podo, F

    1998-11-01

    We have performed a multicentre trial to assess the performance of three techniques for absolute quantification of cerebral metabolites using in vivo proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The techniques included were 1) an internal water standard method, 2) an external standard method based on phantom replacement, and 3) a more sophisticated method incorporating elements of both the internal and external standard approaches, together with compartmental analysis of brain water. Only the internal water standard technique could be readily implemented at all participating sites and gave acceptable precision and interlaboratory reproducibility. This method was insensitive to many of the experimental factors affecting the performance of the alternative techniques, including effects related to loading, standing waves and B1 inhomogeneities; and practical issues of phantom positioning, user expertise and examination duration. However, the internal water standard method assumes a value for the concentration of NMR-visible water within the spectroscopic volume of interest. In general, it is necessary to modify this assumed concentration on the basis of the grey matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content of the volume, and the NMR-visible water content of the grey and white matter fractions. Combining data from 11 sites, the concentrations of the principal NMR-visible metabolites in the brains of healthy subjects (age range 20-35 years) determined using the internal water standard method were (mean+/-SD): [NAA]=10.0+/-3.4 mM (n=53), [tCho]=1.9+/-1.0 mM (n=51), [Cr + PCr]=6.5+/-3.7 mM (n=51). Evidence of system instability and other sources of error at some participating sites reinforces the need for rigorous quality assurance in quantitative spectroscopy.

  16. Oxidative stress and genetic markers of suboptimal antioxidant defense in the aging brain: a theoretical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Lauren E; Paul, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Normal aging involves a gradual breakdown of physiological processes that leads to a decline in cognitive functions and brain integrity, yet the onset and progression of decline are variable among older individuals. While many biological changes may contribute to this degree of variability, oxidative stress is a key mechanism of the aging process that can cause direct damage to cellular architecture within the brain. Oligodendrocytes are at a high risk for oxidative damage due to their role in myelin maintenance and production and limited repair mechanisms, suggesting that white matter may be particularly vulnerable to oxidative activity. Antioxidant defense enzymes within the brain, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), are crucial for breaking down the harmful end products of oxidative phosphorylation. Previous studies have revealed that allele variations of polymorphisms that encode these antioxidants are associated with abnormalities in SOD, CAT, GPx, and GST activity in the central nervous system. This review will focus on the role of oxidative stress in the aging brain and the impact of decreased antioxidant defense on brain integrity and cognitive function. Directions for future research investigations of antioxidant defense genes will also be discussed.

  17. Traveling Slow Oscillations During Sleep: A Marker of Brain Connectivity in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Salome; Riedner, Brady A; Dean, Douglas C; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Huber, Reto; Jenni, Oskar G; Deoni, Sean C L; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2017-09-01

    Slow oscillations, a defining characteristic of the nonrapid eye movement sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), proliferate across the scalp in highly reproducible patterns. In adults, the propagation of slow oscillations is a recognized fingerprint of brain connectivity and excitability. In this study, we (1) describe for the first time maturational features of sleep slow oscillation propagation in children (n = 23; 2-13 years) using high-density (hd) EEG and (2) examine associations between sleep slow oscillatory propagation characteristics (ie, distance, traveling speed, cortical involvement) and white matter myelin microstructure as measured with multicomponent Driven Equilibrium Single Pulse Observation of T1 and T2-magnetic resonance imaging (mcDESPOT-MRI). Results showed that with increasing age, slow oscillations propagated across longer distances (average growth of 0.2 cm per year; R(21) = 0.50, p brain (R(21) = 0.46, p brain activity during sleep and the anatomical connectivity of white matter microstructure. Our findings make an important contribution to knowledge of the brain connectome using a noninvasive and novel analytic approach. These data also have implications for understanding the emergence of neurodevelopmental disorders and the role of sleep in brain maturation trajectories. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Changes in markers of brain serotonin activity in response to chronic exercise in senior men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancon, Michel O; Lorrain, Dominique; Dionne, Isabelle J

    2014-11-01

    Aging is associated with noticeable impairments in brain serotonin transmission, which might contribute to increased vulnerability to developing depression in later life. Animal and human studies have shown that aerobic exercise can stimulate brain serotonin activity and trigger parallel elevations in tryptophan (TRP, the serotonin precursor) availability in blood plasma. However, the influence of chronic exercise on serotonergic activity in older adults is not yet known. Sixteen men aged 64 ± 3 years exercised for 1 h (67%-70% peak oxygen consumption) at baseline and following 16 weeks of aerobic training. The main outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), TRP, prolactin, lactate, and free fatty acids (FFA). Changes in plasma free-TRP/BCAA and prolactin served as surrogates for TRP availability and serotonin activity, respectively. Chronic exercise decreased body mass (P brain at rest, both pre- and post-training exercise challenges markedly increased TRP availability (P exercise that was lower following training (P exercise elicits consistent transient elevations in plasma TRP availability to the brain in older men; the elevations were independent from physical training, although less pronounced following training. The data support the contention that repeated elevations in brain serotonin activity might be involved in the antidepressant effect of exercise training in older adults.

  19. MicroRNAs as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Peplow, Philip V

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by primary damage to the brain from the external mechanical force and by subsequent secondary injury due to various molecular and pathophysiological responses that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Secondary brain injury events may occur minutes, hours, or even days after the trauma, and provide valuable therapeutic targets to prevent further neuronal degeneration. At the present time, there is no effective treatment for TBI due, in part, to the widespread impact of numerous complex secondary biochemical and pathophysiological events occurring at different time points following the initial injury. MicroRNAs control a range of physiological and pathological functions such as development, differentiation, apoptosis and metabolism, and may serve as potential targets for progress assessment and intervention against TBI to mitigate secondary damage to the brain. This has implications regarding improving the diagnostic accuracy of brain impairment and long-term outcomes as well as potential novel treatments. Recent human studies have identified specific microRNAs in serum/plasma (miR-425-p, -21, -93, -191 and -499) and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) (miR-328, -362-3p, -451, -486a) as possible indicators of the diagnosis, severity, and prognosis of TBI. Experimental animal studies have examined specific microRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for moderate and mild TBI (e.g., miR-21, miR-23b). MicroRNA profiling was altered by voluntary exercise. Differences in basal microRNA expression in the brain of adult and aged animals and alterations in response to TBI (e.g., miR-21) have also been reported. Further large-scale studies with TBI patients are needed to provide more information on the changes in microRNA profiles in different age groups (children, adults, and elderly).

  20. MicroRNAs as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Martinez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is characterized by primary damage to the brain from the external mechanical force and by subsequent secondary injury due to various molecular and pathophysiological responses that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Secondary brain injury events may occur minutes, hours, or even days after the trauma, and provide valuable therapeutic targets to prevent further neuronal degeneration. At the present time, there is no effective treatment for TBI due, in part, to the widespread impact of numerous complex secondary biochemical and pathophysiological events occurring at different time points following the initial injury. MicroRNAs control a range of physiological and pathological functions such as development, differentiation, apoptosis and metabolism, and may serve as potential targets for progress assessment and intervention against TBI to mitigate secondary damage to the brain. This has implications regarding improving the diagnostic accuracy of brain impairment and long-term outcomes as well as potential novel treatments. Recent human studies have identified specific microRNAs in serum/plasma (miR-425-p, -21, -93, -191 and -499 and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF (miR-328, -362-3p, -451, -486a as possible indicators of the diagnosis, severity, and prognosis of TBI. Experimental animal studies have examined specific microRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for moderate and mild TBI (e.g., miR-21, miR-23b. MicroRNA profiling was altered by voluntary exercise. Differences in basal microRNA expression in the brain of adult and aged animals and alterations in response to TBI (e.g., miR-21 have also been reported. Further large-scale studies with TBI patients are needed to provide more information on the changes in microRNA profiles in different age groups (children, adults, and elderly.

  1. Serum metabolites from walnut-fed aged rats attenuate stress-induced neurotoxicity in brain cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    The shift in equilibrium towards excess reactive oxygen or nitrogen species production from innate antioxidant defense in brain is a critical factor in the declining neural functions and cognitive deficits accompanying age. In aging, there are noticeable alterations in the membrane microenvironment,...

  2. Structural, Functional, and Metabolic Brain Markers Differentiate Collision versus Contact and Non-Contact Athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nathan W. Churchill; Michael G. Hutchison; Alex P. Di Battista; Simon J. Graham; Tom A. Schweizer

    2017-01-01

    .... In this cross-sectional study, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate multiple aspects of brain physiology in three groups of athletes participating in non-contact sports (N = 20), contact sports (N = 22...

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strózik-Kotlorz, D.

    2014-01-01

    I give a brief description of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the human brain examinations. MRS allows a noninvasive chemical analysis of the brain using a standard high field MR system. Nowadays, the dominant form of MR brain spectroscopy is proton spectroscopy. Two main techniques of MRS, which utilize the chemical shift of metabolites in the external magnetic field, are SVS (single voxel) and CSI (single slice). The major peaks in the spectrum of a normal brain include NAA, Cr, Cho and m-Ins, which are neuronal, energetic, membrane turnover and glial markers, respectively. In disease, two pathological metabolites can be found in the brain spectra: Lac, which is end product of anaerobic glycolysis and Lip, which is a marker of membrane breakdown, occurring in necrosis. The common way to analyze clinical spectra is to determine metabolite ratios, e.g. NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA. This analysis permits a safe and noninvasive examination of the brain tissue as each disease state has its own characteristic spectroscopic image. MRS is a valuable diagnostic tool in such clinical applications as detecting brain tumors and differentiating tumors from inflammatory and infectious processes. Proton MRS is also very helpful in diagnostic of ischemic lesions, Alzheimer's disease and hepatic encephalopathy. The MRS brain spectra should always be correlated with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results and alone cannot make neurological diagnosis.

  4. Corallocins A-C, Nerve Growth and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inducing Metabolites from the Mushroom Hericium coralloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittstein, Kathrin; Rascher, Monique; Rupcic, Zeljka; Löwen, Eduard; Winter, Barbara; Köster, Reinhard W; Stadler, Marc

    2016-09-23

    Three new natural products, corallocins A-C (1-3), along with two known compounds were isolated from the mushroom Hericium coralloides. Their benzofuranone and isoindolinone structures were elucidated by spectral methods. All corallocins induced nerve growth factor and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in human 1321N1 astrocytes. Furthermore, corallocin B showed antiproliferative activity against HUVEC and human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and KB-3-1.

  5. Brain Functional Network in Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnostic Markers for Diagnosis and Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common type of dementia that is clinically characterized by the presence of memory impairment and later by impairment in other cognitive domains. The clinical diagnosis is based on interviews with the patient and his/her relatives and on neuropsychological assessment, which are also used to monitor cognitive decline over time. Several biomarkers have been proposed for detecting AD in its earliest stages, that is, in the predementia stage. In an attempt to find noninvasive biomarkers, researchers have investigated the feasibility of neuroimaging tools, such as MR, SPECT, and FDG-PET imaging, as well as neurophysiological measurements using EEG. In this paper, we investigate the brain functional networks in AD, focusing on main neurophysiological techniques, integrating with most relevant functional brain imaging findings.

  6. Biochemical Markers of Brain Injury: An Integrated Proteomics-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    thapsigargin ( T24 )-treated PC12 cells compared with PC12 cells pre-treated with the Z-D-DCB pan- caspase inhibitor (Inh) before thapsigargin treatment or with...neuroproteomics analysis of traumatic brain injury in rats. Mol. Cell Proteom. web published in 2006. Abstracts 1. Ronald L. Hayes. An integrated...Electrophoresis 1997, 18, 533-537. (4) Gygi, S. P.; Rochon, Y.; Franza, B. R.; Aebersold, R. Mol. Cell . Biol. 1999, 19, 1720-1730. (5) Hanash, S. Nature

  7. Effect of prolonged exposure to diesel engine exhaust on proinflammatory markers in different regions of the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kate

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiology and progression of neurodegenerative disorders depends on the interactions between a variety of factors including: aging, environmental exposures, and genetic susceptibility factors. Enhancement of proinflammatory events appears to be a common link in different neurological impairments, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. Studies have shown a link between exposure to particulate matter (PM, present in air pollution, and enhancement of central nervous system proinflammatory markers. In the present study, the association between exposure to air pollution (AP, derived from a specific source (diesel engine, and neuroinflammation was investigated. To elucidate whether specific regions of the brain are more susceptible to exposure to diesel-derived AP, various loci of the brain were separately analyzed. Rats were exposed for 6 hrs a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks to diesel engine exhaust (DEE using a nose-only exposure chamber. The day after the final exposure, the brain was dissected into the following regions: cerebellum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and tubercles, and the striatum. Results Baseline levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α were dependent on the region analyzed and increased in the striatum after exposure to DEE. In addition, baseline level of activation of the transcription factors (NF-κB and (AP-1 was also region dependent but the levels were not significantly altered after exposure to DEE. A similar, though not significant, trend was seen with the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and TNF Receptor-subtype I (TNF-RI. Conclusions Our results indicate that different brain regions may be uniquely responsive to changes induced by exposure to DEE. This study once more underscores the role of neuroinflammation in response to ambient air pollution

  8. Frontal Lobe Hemodynamic Responses to Painful Stimulation: A Potential Brain Marker of Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasted, Christopher M; Yücel, Meryem A; Steele, Sarah C; Peng, Ke; Boas, David A; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to examine patterns of both activation and deactivation that occur in the frontal lobe in response to noxious stimuli. The frontal lobe was selected because it has been shown to be activated by noxious stimuli in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. The brain region is located behind the forehead which is devoid of hair, providing a relative ease of placement for fNIRS probes on this area of the head. Based on functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showing blood-oxygenation-level dependent changes in the frontal lobes, we evaluated functional near-infrared spectroscopy measures in response to two levels of electrical pain in awake, healthy human subjects (n = 10; male = 10). Each subject underwent two recording sessions separated by a 30-minute resting period. Data collected from 7 subjects were analyzed, containing a total of 38/36 low/high intensity pain stimuli for the first recording session and 27/31 pain stimuli for the second session. Our results show that there is a robust and significant deactivation in sections of the frontal cortices. Further development and definition of the specificity and sensitivity of the approach may provide an objective measure of nociceptive activity in the brain that can be easily applied in the surgical setting.

  9. Tackling the ‘dyslexia paradox’: reading brain and behavior for early markers of developmental dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozernov-Palchik, Ola; Gaab, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is an unexplained inability to acquire accurate or fluent reading that affects approximately 5–17% of children. Dyslexia is associated with structural and functional alterations in various brain regions that support reading. Neuroimaging studies in infants and pre-reading children suggest that these alterations predate reading instruction and reading failure, supporting the hypothesis that variant function in dyslexia susceptibility genes lead to atypical neural migration and/or axonal growth during early, most likely in utero, brain development. Yet, dyslexia is typically not diagnosed until a child has failed to learn to read as expected (usually in second grade or later). There is emerging evidence that neuroimaging measures, when combined with key behavioral measures, can enhance the accuracy of identification of dyslexia risk in prereading children but its sensitivity, specificity, and cost-efficiency is still unclear. Early identification of dyslexia risk carries important implications for dyslexia remediation and the amelioration of the psychosocial consequences commonly associated with reading failure. PMID:26836227

  10. Microbiota-dependent metabolite and cardiovascular disease marker trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is associated with monocyte activation but not platelet function in untreated HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haissman, Judith M; Haugaard, Anna K; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV infection is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease beyond that explained by traditional risk factors. Altered gut microbiota, microbial translocation, and immune activation have been proposed as potential triggers. The microbiota-dependent metabolite trimethylam......BACKGROUND: HIV infection is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease beyond that explained by traditional risk factors. Altered gut microbiota, microbial translocation, and immune activation have been proposed as potential triggers. The microbiota-dependent metabolite...... and combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) HIV infection. METHODS: TMAO and the pre-cursors betaine, choline, and carnitine were quantified by mass-spectrometry in plasma samples from a previously established cross-sectional cohort of 50 untreated and 50 cART treated HIV-infected individuals. Whole......-blood impedance aggregometry, C-reactive protein, sCD14, and lipopolysaccharide were assessed as measures of platelet function, inflammation, monocyte activation, and microbial translocation, respectively. RESULTS: TMAO was not associated with platelet aggregation response after stimulation with four different...

  11. Linear discriminant analysis of brain tumour (1)H MR spectra: a comparison of classification using whole spectra versus metabolite quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opstad, K S; Ladroue, C; Bell, B A; Griffiths, J R; Howe, F A

    2007-12-01

    (1)H MRS is an attractive choice for non-invasively diagnosing brain tumours. Many studies have been performed to create an objective decision support system, but there is not yet a consensus as to the best techniques of MRS acquisition or data processing to be used for optimum classification. In this study, we investigate whether LCModel analysis of short-TE (30 ms), single-voxel tumour spectra provide a better input for classification than the use of the original spectra. A total of 145 histologically diagnosed brain tumour spectra were acquired [14 astrocytoma grade II (AS2), 15 astrocytoma grade III (AS3), 42 glioblastoma (GBM), 41 metastases (MET) and 33 meningioma (MNG)], and linear discriminant analyses (LDA) were performed on the LCModel analysis of the spectra and the original spectra. The results consistently suggest improvement in classification when the LCModel concentrations are used. LDA of AS2, MNG and high-grade tumours (HG, comprising GBM and MET) correctly classified 94% using the LCModel dataset compared with 93% using the spectral dataset. The inclusion of AS3 reduced the accuracy to 82% and 78% for LCModel analysis and the original spectra, respectively, and further separating HG into GBM and MET gave 70% compared with 60%. Generally MNG spectra have profiles that are visually distinct from those of the other tumour types, but the classification accuracy was typically about 80%, with MNG with substantial lipid/macromolecule signals being classified as HG. Omission of the lipid/macromolecule concentrations in the LCModel dataset provided an improvement in classification of MNG (91% compared with 76%). In conclusion, there appears to be an advantage to performing pattern recognition on the quantitative analysis of tumour spectra rather than using the whole spectra. However, the results suggest that a two-step LDA process may help in classifying the five tumour groups to provide optimum classification of MNG with high lipid

  12. Brain stem audiometry may supply markers for diagnostic and therapeutic control in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielzén, Sören; Holmberg, Jens; Sköld, Mia; Nehlstedt, Sara

    2016-10-06

    The purpose of the present study is to try an alternative way of analyzing the ABR (Auditory Brainstem Response). The stimuli were complex sounds (c-ABR) as used in earlier studies. It was further aimed at corroborating earlier findings that this method can discriminate several neuropsychiatric states. Forty healthy control subjects, 26 subjects with the diagnosis schizophrenia (Sz) and 33 with ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) were recruited for the study. The ABRs were recorded. The analysis was based on calculation of areas of significantly group different time spans in the waves. Both latency and amplitude were thereby influential. The spans of differences were quantified for each subject in relation to the total area of the curve which made comparisons balanced. The results showed highly significant differences between the study groups. The results are important for future work on identifying markers for neuropsychiatric clinical use. To reach that goal calls for more extensive studies than this preliminary one. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of fluoxetine and its metabolite norfluoxetine in serum and brain areas using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J C; Bothua, D; Collignon, I; Advenier, C; Spreux-Varoquaux, O

    1998-04-10

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using only 0.1 ml of serum or homogenate from brain areas has been developed for the determination of fluoxetine (FLU) and its metabolite, norfluoxetine (N-FLU), with ultraviolet detection at 227 nm. The small volume of sample required in this method allows studies in small animals, such as mouse. The method provides recoveries of up to 90% for both compounds. Acceptable coefficients of variation were found for both within-run and day-to-day assays. The limit of detection was 5.0 ng/ml. No interferences were found with tricyclic antidepressant drugs and benzodiazepines, which allows this method to be used in clinical studies, Pharmacokinetic parameters for the two compounds are reported in mouse serum, frontal cortex and caudate nucleus. We also report the values of FLU and N-FLU in serum from humans who were treated once daily with 20 mg of FLU, obtained after 1, 14 and 28 days of treatment.

  14. Measuring levels of biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min-Jung; Jeon, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Myung Sook; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method to detect biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatography and a photodiode array detection. Measurements were made using a Hypersil Gold C-18 column (250 × 2.1 mm, 5 µm). The mobile phase was 5 mM perchloric acid containing 5 % acetonitrile. The correlation coefficient was 0.9995-0.9999. LODs (S/N = 3) and LOQs (S/N = 10) were as follows: dopamine 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg, serotonin 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid 3.4 and 11.3 pg, and homovanillic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg. This method does not require derivatization steps, and is more sensitive than the widely used HPLC-UV method.

  15. Target-based metabolomics for the quantitative measurement of 37 pathway metabolites in rat brain and serum using hydrophilic interaction ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiahui; Hou, Waner; Han, Bo; Liu, Guanghui; Gong, Jin; Li, Yemeng; Zhong, Danmin; Liao, Qiongfeng; Xie, Zhiyong

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids, neurotransmitters, purines, and pyrimidines are bioactive molecules that play fundamental roles in maintaining various physiological functions. Their metabolism is closely related to the health, growth, development, reproduction, and homeostasis of organisms. Most recently, comprehensive measurements of these metabolites have shown their potential as innovative approaches in disease surveillance or drug intervention. However, simultaneous measurement of these metabolites presents great difficulties. Here, we report a novel quantitative method that uses hydrophilic interaction ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-UPLC-MS/MS), which is highly selective, high throughput, and exhibits better chromatographic behavior than existing methods. The developed method enabled the rapid quantification of 37 metabolites, spanning amino acids, neurotransmitters, purines, and pyrimidines pathways, within 6.5 min. The compounds were separated on an ACQUITY UPLC® BEH Amide column. Serum and brain homogenate were extracted by protein precipitation. The intra- and interday precision of all of the analytes was less than 11.34 %, and the accuracy was between -11.74 and 11.51 % for all quality control (QC) levels. The extraction recoveries of serum ranged from 84.58 % to 116.43 % and those of brain samples from 80.80 % to 119.39 %, while the RSD was 14.61 % or less for all recoveries. This method was used to successfully characterize alterations in the rat brain and, in particular, their dynamics in serum. The following study was performed to simultaneously test global changes of these metabolites in a serotonin antagonist p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)-induced anxiety and insomnia rat model to understand the effect and mechanism of PCPA. Taken together, these results show that the method is able to simultaneously monitor a large panel of metabolites and that this protocol may represent a metabolomic method to diagnose toxicological and

  16. Microemboli from Cardiopulmonary Bypass are Associated with a Serum Marker of Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Robert C.; Quinn, Reed D.; Lennon, Paul; Welch, Janine; Kramer, Robert S.; Ross, Cathy S.; Beaulieu, Peter A.; Brown, Jeremiah R.; Malenka, David J.; O’Connor, Gerald T.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: An increasing number of reports surrounding neurologic injury in the setting of cardiac surgery has focused on utilizing biomarkers as intermediate outcomes. Previous research has associated cerebral microemboli and neurobehavioral deficits with biomarkers. A leading source of cerebral microemboli is the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit. This present study seeks to identify a relationship between microemboli leaving the CPB circuit and a biomarker of neurologic injury. We enrolled 71 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at a single institution from October 14, 2004 through December 5, 2007. Microemboli were monitored using Power-M-Mode Doppler in the inflow and outflow of the CPB circuit. Blood was sampled before and within 48 hours after surgery. Neurologic injury was measured using S100β (microg/L). Significant differences in post-operative S100β relative to microemboli leaving the circuit were tested with analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis. Most patients had increased serum levels of S100β (mean .25 microg/L, median .15 microg/L) following surgery. Terciles of microemboli measured in the outflow (indexed to the duration of time spent on CPB) were associated with elevated levels of S100β (p = .03). Microemboli leaving the CPB circuit were associated with increases in postoperative S100β levels. Efforts aimed at reducing microembolic load leaving the CPB circuit should be adopted to reduce brain injury. PMID:20437790

  17. N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP as a noninvasive marker for restrictive syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mady

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Constrictive pericarditis (CP and restrictive cardiomyopathy share many similarities in both their clinical and hemodynamic characteristics and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is a sensitive marker of cardiac diastolic dysfunction. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether serum NT-proBNP was high in patients with endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF and CP, and to investigate how this relates to diastolic dysfunction. Thirty-three patients were divided into two groups: CP (16 patients and EMF (17 patients. The control group consisted of 30 healthy individuals. Patients were evaluated by bidimensional echocardiography, with restriction syndrome evaluated by pulsed Doppler of the mitral flow and serum NT-proBNP measured by immunoassay and detected by electrochemiluminescence. Spearman correlation coefficient was used to analyze the association between log NT-proBNP and echocardiographic parameters. Log NT-proBNP was significantly higher (P < 0.05 in CP patients (log mean: 2.67 pg/mL; 95%CI: 2.43-2.92 log pg/mL and in EMF patients (log mean: 2.91 pg/mL; 95%CI: 2.70-3.12 log pg/mL compared with the control group (log mean: 1.45; 95%CI: 1.32-1.60 log pg/mL. There were no statistical differences between EMF and CP patients (P = 0.689 in terms of NT-proBNP. The NT-proBNP log tended to correlate with peak velocity of the E wave (r = 0.439; P = 0.060, but not with A wave (r = -0.399; P = 0.112. Serum NT-proBNP concentration can be used as a marker to detect the presence of diastolic dysfunction in patients with restrictive syndrome; however, serum NT-proBNP levels cannot be used to differentiate restrictive cardiomyopathy from CP.

  18. Chromium modulates expressions of neuronal plasticity markers and glial fibrillary acidic proteins in hypoglycemia-induced brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Kazim; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Orhan, Cemal; Ali, Shakir; Sahin, Nurhan; Gencoglu, Hasan; Ozkan, Yusuf; Hayirli, Armagan; Gozel, Nevzat; Komorowski, James R

    2013-12-18

    This experiment investigated if chromium (Cr) as Cr-histidinate (CrHis) and Cr29 picolinate (CrPic) have a protective role in rats with hypoglycemia-induced brain injury, assessed by neuronal plasticity and regeneration potential. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were prospectively divided into 2 groups: control and hypoglycemic (induced by insulin administration, 15U/kg, i.p., n=56). Hypoglycemic rats were then received randomly 1) none, 2) dextrose (on the day of sampling), 3) CrHis, or 4) CrPic. Cr-chelates were delivered via drinking water (providing 8μg elemental Cr per day) for one week prior to the hypoglycemia induction. The expressions of neuroplasticity markers [neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)], glucose transporters (GLUT), and nuclear transcription proteins [nuclear factor-kappa (NF-κB), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and 4-hydroxyl nonenal (HNE)] were determined using Western blot. Hypoglycemia caused increases in the expressions of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, GFAP, NF-κB and HNE and decreases in the expression of NCAM's, GAP-43 and Nrf2 in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and cortex. Cr-chelates suppressed expressions of GLUTs, GFAP, NF-κB and HNE expressions and enhanced expressions of NCAM, GAP-43 and Nrf2, which were more notable for CrHis than for CrPic. In conclusion, hypoglycemia leads to cerebral injury and Cr-chelates, particularly CrHis have protective and regeneration potential in cerebral tissues through modulating neuroplasticity markers and nuclear transcription proteins as well as facilitating glucose transporters. © 2013.

  19. Effects of Fat and Sugar, Either Consumed or Infused toward the Brain, on Hypothalamic ER Stress Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evita Belegri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-folding stress at the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER occurs in the hypothalamus during diet-induced obesity (DIO and is linked to metabolic disease development. ER stress is buffered by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR, a controlled network of pathways inducing a set of genes that recovers ER function. However, it is unclear whether hypothalamic ER stress during DIO results from obesity related changes or from direct nutrient effects in the brain. We here investigated mRNA expression of UPR markers in the hypothalamus of rats that were exposed to a free choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS diet for 1 week and then overnight fed ad libitum, or fasted, or fat/sugar deprived (i.e., switched from obesogenic diet to chow. In addition, we determined the direct effects of fat/sugar on mRNA expression of hypothalamus UPR markers by intracarotic infusions of intralipids and/or glucose in chow-fed rats that were fasted overnight. Short term (1 week exposure to fcHFHS diet increased adiposity compared to chow-feeding. Short term exposure to a fcHFHS diet, followed by mild food restriction overnight, induced hypothalamic ER stress in rats as characterized by an increase in spliced to unspliced X-box binding protein 1 mRNA ratio in hypothalamus of fcHFHS fed rats compared to chow fed rats. Moreover, infused lipids toward the brain of overnight fasted rats, were able to induce a similar response. Non-restricted ad libitum fcHFHS-diet fed or totally fasted rats did not show altered ratios. We also observed a clear increase in hypothalamic activating transcription factor 4 mRNA in rats on the fcHFHS diet while being ad libitum fed or when infused with intralipid via the carotic artery compared to vehicle infusions. However, we did not observe induction of downstream targets implying that this effect is a more general stress response and not related to ER stress. Overall, we conclude that the hypothalamic stress response might be a sensitive

  20. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Is a Marker of Fluid Overload in Incident Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazot, Charles; Rozes, Margaux; Vo-Van, Cyril; Deleaval, Patrik; Hurot, Jean-Marc; Lorriaux, Christie; Mayor, Brice; Zaoui, Eric; Jean, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is secreted by cardiomyocytes under stretch condition. High blood levels are associated with decreased patient survival in heart failure patients and in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report the monthly BNP change in the first months of HD therapy in incident patients and its relationship with fluid removal and cardiac history (CH). All patients starting HD therapy in our unit from May 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Every month (M1 to M6), BNP was assessed before a midweek dialysis session. CH, monthly pre- and postdialysis blood pressure, and postdialysis body weight were collected. A total of 236 patients were included in the analysis. The median BNP at HD start was 593 (175-1,433) pg/mL, with a significant difference between CH- and CH+ patients (291 vs. 731 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). Mortality was significantly higher in patients in the higher BNP tertile. BNP decreased significantly between M1 and M2 and then plateaued. The BNP change between M1 and M2 and between M1 and M6 was significantly correlated with the initial fluid removal. Applying stepwise multiple regression, the BNP change between M1 and M2 was significantly and independently related to fluid removal. The BNP level at M6 was also related to patient survival. We confirm that in incident HD patients, BNP level is related to fluid excess and cardiac status. The BNP decrease in the first months of HD therapy is related to fluid excess correction. BNP appears as an important tool to evaluate hydration status correction after HD onset.

  1. Regional brain response to visual food cues is a marker of satiety that predicts food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonya; Melhorn, Susan J; Smeraglio, Anne; Tyagi, Vidhi; Grabowski, Thomas; Schwartz, Michael W; Schur, Ellen A

    2012-11-01

    Neuronal processes that underlie the subjective experience of satiety after a meal are not well defined. We investigated how satiety alters the perception of and neural response to visual food cues. Normal-weight participants (10 men, 13 women) underwent 2 fMRI scans while viewing images of high-calorie food that was previously rated as incompatible with weight loss and "fattening" and low-calorie, "nonfattening" food. After a fasting fMRI scan, participants ate a standardized breakfast and underwent reimaging at a randomly assigned time 15-300 min after breakfast to vary the degree of satiety. Measures of subjective appetite, food appeal, and ad libitum food intake (measured after the second fMRI scan) were correlated with activation by "fattening" (compared with "nonfattening") food cues in a priori regions of interest. Greater hunger correlated with higher appeal ratings of "fattening" (r = 0.46, P = 0.03) but not "nonfattening" (r = -0.20, P = 0.37) foods. Fasting amygdalar activation was negatively associated with fullness (left: r = -0.52; right: r = -0.58; both P ≤ 0.01), whereas postbreakfast fullness was positively correlated with activation in the dorsal striatum (right: r = 0.44; left: r = 0.45; both P foods with higher fat content. Postmeal satiety is shown in regional brain activation by images of high-calorie foods. Regions including the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and dorsal striatum may alter perception of, and reduce motivation to consume, energy-rich foods, ultimately driving food choice. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01631045.

  2. Air pollution & the brain: Subchronic diesel exhaust exposure causes neuroinflammation and elevates early markers of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Shannon; Surace, Michael J; McDonald, Jacob; Block, Michelle L

    2011-08-24

    Increasing evidence links diverse forms of air pollution to neuroinflammation and neuropathology in both human and animal models, but the effects of long-term exposures are poorly understood. We explored the central nervous system consequences of subchronic exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and addressed the minimum levels necessary to elicit neuroinflammation and markers of early neuropathology. Male Fischer 344 rats were exposed to DE (992, 311, 100, 35 and 0 μg PM/m³) by inhalation over 6 months. DE exposure resulted in elevated levels of TNFα at high concentrations in all regions tested, with the exception of the cerebellum. The midbrain region was the most sensitive, where exposures as low as 100 μg PM/m³ significantly increased brain TNFα levels. However, this sensitivity to DE was not conferred to all markers of neuroinflammation, as the midbrain showed no increase in IL-6 expression at any concentration tested, an increase in IL-1β at only high concentrations, and a decrease in MIP-1α expression, supporting that compensatory mechanisms may occur with subchronic exposure. Aβ42 levels were the highest in the frontal lobe of mice exposed to 992 μg PM/m³ and tau [pS199] levels were elevated at the higher DE concentrations (992 and 311 μg PM/m³) in both the temporal lobe and frontal lobe, indicating that proteins linked to preclinical Alzheimer's disease were affected. α Synuclein levels were elevated in the midbrain in response to the 992 μg PM/m³ exposure, supporting that air pollution may be associated with early Parkinson's disease-like pathology. Together, the data support that the midbrain may be more sensitive to the neuroinflammatory effects of subchronic air pollution exposure. However, the DE-induced elevation of proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases was limited to only the higher exposures, suggesting that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation may precede preclinical markers of neurodegenerative disease in the midbrain.

  3. Air pollution & the brain: Subchronic diesel exhaust exposure causes neuroinflammation and elevates early markers of neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald Jacob

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing evidence links diverse forms of air pollution to neuroinflammation and neuropathology in both human and animal models, but the effects of long-term exposures are poorly understood. Objective We explored the central nervous system consequences of subchronic exposure to diesel exhaust (DE and addressed the minimum levels necessary to elicit neuroinflammation and markers of early neuropathology. Methods Male Fischer 344 rats were exposed to DE (992, 311, 100, 35 and 0 μg PM/m3 by inhalation over 6 months. Results DE exposure resulted in elevated levels of TNFα at high concentrations in all regions tested, with the exception of the cerebellum. The midbrain region was the most sensitive, where exposures as low as 100 μg PM/m3 significantly increased brain TNFα levels. However, this sensitivity to DE was not conferred to all markers of neuroinflammation, as the midbrain showed no increase in IL-6 expression at any concentration tested, an increase in IL-1β at only high concentrations, and a decrease in MIP-1α expression, supporting that compensatory mechanisms may occur with subchronic exposure. Aβ42 levels were the highest in the frontal lobe of mice exposed to 992 μg PM/m3 and tau [pS199] levels were elevated at the higher DE concentrations (992 and 311 μg PM/m3 in both the temporal lobe and frontal lobe, indicating that proteins linked to preclinical Alzheimer's disease were affected. α Synuclein levels were elevated in the midbrain in response to the 992 μg PM/m3 exposure, supporting that air pollution may be associated with early Parkinson's disease-like pathology. Conclusions Together, the data support that the midbrain may be more sensitive to the neuroinflammatory effects of subchronic air pollution exposure. However, the DE-induced elevation of proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases was limited to only the higher exposures, suggesting that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation may

  4. Pharmacokinetic investigations of the marker active metabolites 4-methylamino-antipyrine and 4-amino-antipyrine after intramuscular injection of metamizole in healthy piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmańczuk, A; Kowalski, C; Giorgi, M; Owen, H; Grabowski, T

    2016-12-01

    Metamizole (MT) is a pyrazolone nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug labelled for humans and animals. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of its active metabolites 4-methylamino-antipyrine (MAA) and 4-amino-antipyrine (AA) in male piglets after a single intramuscular injection of MT. Eight healthy male piglets were administered MT (100 mg/kg) intramuscularly. Blood was sampled at scheduled time intervals, and drug plasma concentrations evaluated by a validated HPLC method. MAA and AA plasma concentrations were quantitatively detectable from 0.25 to 48 h and 0.50 to 72 h, respectively, in 6 of 8 and 7 of 8 animals. The average maximum concentrations of MAA and AA were of 47.59 and 4.94 mg/mL, respectively. The average half-lives were 8.57 and 13.3 h for MAA and AA, respectively. This study showed that the amount of MAA and AA produced in piglets is different to that in the animal species previously investigated. Further studies are necessary to understand whether these differences in MAA and AA plasma concentrations between animal species necessitate diverse therapeutic drug dosing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Concentrations of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Are Not Associated with Senescence Marker p16INK4a or Predictive of Intracellular Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Metabolite and Endogenous Nucleotide Exposures in Adults with HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Maas

    Full Text Available As the HIV-infected population ages, the role of cellular senescence and inflammation on co-morbid conditions and pharmacotherapy is increasingly of interest. p16INK4a expression, a marker for aging and senescence in T-cells, is associated with lower intracellular concentrations of endogenous nucleotides (EN and nucleos(tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs. This study expands on these findings by determining whether inflammation is contributing to the association of p16INK4a expression with intracellular metabolite (IM exposure and endogenous nucleotide concentrations.Samples from 73 HIV-infected adults receiving daily tenofovir/emtricitabine (TFV/FTC with either efavirenz (EFV or atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r were tested for p16INK4a expression, and plasma cytokine and intracellular drug concentrations. Associations between p16INK4a expression and cytokine concentrations were assessed using maximum likelihood methods, and elastic net regression was applied to assess whether cytokines were predictive of intracellular metabolite/endogenous nucleotide exposures.Enrolled participants had a median age of 48 years (range 23-73. There were no significant associations between p16INK4a expression and cytokines. Results of the elastic net regression showed weak relationships between IL-1Ra and FTC-triphosphate and deoxyadenosine triphosphate exposures, and MIP-1β, age and TFV-diphosphate exposures.In this clinical evaluation, we found no relationships between p16INK4a expression and cytokines, or cytokines and intracellular nucleotide concentrations. While inflammation is known to play a role in this population, it is not a major contributor to the p16INK4a association with decreased IM/EN exposures in these HIV-infected participants.

  6. Concentrations of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Are Not Associated with Senescence Marker p16INK4a or Predictive of Intracellular Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Metabolite and Endogenous Nucleotide Exposures in Adults with HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Brian M; Francis, Owen; Mollan, Katie R; Lee, Cynthia; Cottrell, Mackenzie L; Prince, Heather M A; Sykes, Craig; Trezza, Christine; Torrice, Chad; White, Nicole; Malone, Stephanie; Hudgens, Michael G; Sharpless, Norman E; Dumond, Julie B

    2016-01-01

    As the HIV-infected population ages, the role of cellular senescence and inflammation on co-morbid conditions and pharmacotherapy is increasingly of interest. p16INK4a expression, a marker for aging and senescence in T-cells, is associated with lower intracellular concentrations of endogenous nucleotides (EN) and nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). This study expands on these findings by determining whether inflammation is contributing to the association of p16INK4a expression with intracellular metabolite (IM) exposure and endogenous nucleotide concentrations. Samples from 73 HIV-infected adults receiving daily tenofovir/emtricitabine (TFV/FTC) with either efavirenz (EFV) or atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r) were tested for p16INK4a expression, and plasma cytokine and intracellular drug concentrations. Associations between p16INK4a expression and cytokine concentrations were assessed using maximum likelihood methods, and elastic net regression was applied to assess whether cytokines were predictive of intracellular metabolite/endogenous nucleotide exposures. Enrolled participants had a median age of 48 years (range 23-73). There were no significant associations between p16INK4a expression and cytokines. Results of the elastic net regression showed weak relationships between IL-1Ra and FTC-triphosphate and deoxyadenosine triphosphate exposures, and MIP-1β, age and TFV-diphosphate exposures. In this clinical evaluation, we found no relationships between p16INK4a expression and cytokines, or cytokines and intracellular nucleotide concentrations. While inflammation is known to play a role in this population, it is not a major contributor to the p16INK4a association with decreased IM/EN exposures in these HIV-infected participants.

  7. A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection assay for the quantitative determination of monoamines and respective metabolites in six discrete brain regions of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Serena A; Rednour, Stephanie; Shepard, Samantha; Pond, Brooks Barnes

    2017-11-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and reproducible assay is described for the quantitative determination of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, their metabolites, and the internal standard 3,4-dihydroxybenzlyamine hydro-bromide in mouse brain homogenate using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The method was validated in the following brain areas: frontal cortex, striatum, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area. Biogenic amines and relevant metabolites were extracted from discrete brain regions using a simple protein precipitation procedure, and the chromatography was achieved using a C18 column. The method was accurate over the linear range of 0.300-30 ng/mL (r = 0.999) for dopamine and 0.300-15 ng/mL (r = 0.999) for norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxybenzlyamine hydro-bromide, homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, with detection limits of ~0.125 ng/mL (5 pg on column) for each of these analytes. Accuracy and linearity for serotonin were observed throughout the concentration range of 0.625-30 ng/mL (r = 0.998) with an analytical detection limit of ~0.300 ng/mL (12 pg on column). Relative recoveries for all analytes were approximately ≥90% and the analytical run time was analysis in small, discrete brain tissue samples. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Determination of monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters and their metabolites in rat brain samples by UFLC-MS/MS for the study of the sedative-hypnotic effects observed during treatment with S. chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Binbin; Li, Qing; Fan, Ronghua; Su, Dan; Chen, Xiaohui; Jia, Ying; Bi, Kaishun

    2014-01-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. has been used as a sedative and hypnotic agent in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of insomnia on the levels of the neurotransmitters: glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites (5-HIAA, DOPAC and HVA), and to study the role of S. chinensis in the treatment of insomnia. To achieve this goal, an efficient, sensitive and selective method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of these five neurotransmitters and their metabolites in rat brain samples using ultra fast liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS). The analysis was performed on a Synergi Fusion-RP 80A ODS column (150mm×2.0mm, 4.0μm) using gradient elution, with the mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.05% formic acid in water. The method was validated using rat brain homogenate samples and showed a good linearity over a wide concentration range (r(2)>0.99) with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) at 4-16ngmL(-1). The intra and inter-day assay variability was less than 15% for all analytes. The results indicated that the condition of insomnia elevated GABA, NE, DA, DOPAC and HVA, and reduced 5-HT, 5-HIAA levels in rat brain. The oral administration of S. chinensis (7.5gkg(-1)day(-1), eight days) influenced insomnia by significantly increasing or reducing the levels of the neurotransmitters parameters mentioned above. These results suggested that S. chinensis could alter the levels of these brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites through its sedative-hypnotic effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Circulating oxysterol metabolites as potential new surrogate markers in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: Results of the OXYTAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenc, Florence; Iuliano, Luiggi; Filleron, Thomas; Zerbinati, Chiara; Voisin, Maud; Arellano, Cécile; Chatelut, Etienne; Marquet, Pierre; Samadi, Mohammad; Roché, Henri; Poirot, Marc; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine

    2017-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cholesterol oxygenation products, also known as oxysterols (OS), are involved in breast cancer (BC) promotion. The impact of Tam, as well as aromatase inhibitors (AI), an alternative BC endocrine therapy (ET), on OS metabolism in patients is currently unknown. We conducted a prospective clinical study in BC patients receiving Tam (n=15) or AI (n=14) in adjuvant or in metastatic settings. The primary end point was the feasibility of detecting and quantifying 11 different OS in the circulation of patients before and after 28days of treatment with Tam or AI. Key secondary end points were the measurements of variations in the concentrations of OS according to differences between patients and treatments. OS profiling in the serum of patients was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. OS profiling was conducted in all patients both at baseline and during treatment regimens. An important inter-individual variability was observed for each OS. Interestingly 5,6β-epoxycholesterol relative concentrations significantly increased in the entire population (p=0.0109), while no increase in Cholestane-triol (CT) levels was measured. Interestingly, we found that, in contrast to AI, Tam therapy significantly decreased blood levels of 24-hydroxycholesterol (24-HC), 7α-HC and 25-HC (a tumor promoter) (p=0.0007, p=0.0231 and p=0.0231, respectively), whereas 4β-HC levels increased (p=0.0010). Interestingly, levels of 27-HC (a tumor promoter) significantly increased in response to AI (p=0.0342), but not Tam treatment. According to these results, specific OS are promising candidate markers of Tam and AI efficacy. Thus, further clinical investigations are needed to confirm the use of oxysterols as biomarkers of both prognosis and/or the efficacy of ET. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Decrease of Brain MicroRNA-122 Level Is an Early Marker of Cerebrovascular Disease in the Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Stanzione

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on preliminary evidence that highlights microRNA-122 as a contributing factor to stroke pathogenesis, we aimed at assessing its expression level, along with the presence of early signs of cerebrovascular disease, in the brain of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP, a suitable model of human disease that accelerates stroke occurrence under a high sodium/low potassium (Japanese-style diet (JD. After one month of JD, before stroke occurrence, brain microRNA-122 level was significantly decreased in SHRSP as compared to the stroke-resistant SHR (SHRSR. At this time, levels of markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as of endothelial integrity and function, apoptosis and necrosis were differently modulated in the brains of JD-fed SHRSP as compared to SHRSR, pointing to a significant activation of all deleterious mechanisms underlying subsequent stroke development in SHRSP. We also showed that miR-122 improved survival of rat endothelial cerebral cells upon stress stimuli (excess NaCl, hydrogen peroxide. Our data suggest that a decrease of brain microRNA-122 level is deleterious and can be considered as an early marker of stroke in the SHRSP. Understanding the mechanisms by which microRNA-122 protects vascular cells from stress stimuli may provide a useful approach to improve preventive and treatment strategies against stroke.

  11. Method for simultaneous imaging of endogenous low molecular weight metabolites in mouse brain using TiO2 nanoparticles in nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Sugiura, Yuki; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2011-10-01

    We report the detection of a group of endogenous low molecular weight metabolites (LMWM) in mouse brain (80-500 Da) using TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) in nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry (Nano-PALDI-IMS) without any washing and separation step prior to MS analysis. The identification of metabolites using TiO(2) NPs was compared with a conventional organic matrix 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) where signals of 179 molecules were specific to TiO(2) NPs, 4 were specific to DHB, and 21 were common to both TiO(2) NPs and DHB. The use of TiO(2) NPs enabled the detection of a higher number of LMWM as compared to DHB and gold NPs as a matrix. This approach is a simple, inexpensive, washing, and separation free for imaging and identification of LMWM in mouse brain. We believe that the biochemical information from distinct regions of the brain using a Nano-PALDI-IMS will be helpful in elucidating the imbalances linked with diseases in biomedical samples.

  12. Characterization of the Pathological and Biochemical Markers that Correlate to the Clinical Features of Autism: The Neuropathological Markers of Abnormal Brain Development and Aging in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    autism brain may contribute to defi cits in expres- sion of emotions , processing of social stimuli, learning of social behaviors, verbal and nonverbal...Feineis-Matthews, D. Prvulovic, T. Dierks, and F. Poustka (2006). Facial affect recognition training in autism : Can we animate the fusiform gyrus...Topography, and Sequelae of Neuropathological Changes 27 Howlin, P., L. Wing, and J. Gould. 1995. The recognition of autism in children with Down syndrome

  13. Andrastin A and barceloneic acid metabolites, protein farnesyl transferase inhibitors from Penicillium alborcoremium: chemotaxonomic significance and pathological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overy, David Patrick; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Dalsgaard, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    A survey of Penicillium albocoremium was undertaken to identify potential taxonomic metabolite markers. One major and four minor metabolites were consistently produced by the 19 strains surveyed on three different media. Following purification and spectral studies, the metabolites were identified...

  14. Further evaluation of [11C]MP-10 as a radiotracer for phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A): PET imaging study in rhesus monkeys and brain tissue metabolite analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-fei; Labaree, David; Chen, Ming-Kai; Holden, Daniel; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Kapinos, Michael; Teng, Jo-Ku; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Plisson, Christophe; Rabiner, Eugenii A.; Gunn, Roger N.; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    [11C]MP-10 is a potent and specific PET tracer previously shown to be suitable for imaging the PDE10A in baboons with reversible kinetics and high specific binding. However, another report indicated that [11C]MP-10 displayed seemingly irreversible kinetics in rhesus monkeys, potentially due to the presence of a radiolabeled metabolite capable of penetrating the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into the brain. This study was designed to address the discrepancies between the species by re-evaluating [11C]MP-10 in vivo in rhesus monkey with baseline scans to assess tissue uptake kinetics and self-blocking scans with unlabeled MP-10 to determine binding specificity. Ex vivo studies with one rhesus monkey and 4 Sprague-Dawley rats were also performed to investigate the presence of radiolabeled metabolites in the brain. Our results indicated that [11C]MP-10 displayed reversible uptake kinetics in rhesus monkeys, albeit slower than in baboons. Administration of unlabeled MP-10 reduced the binding of [11C]MP-10 in a dose-dependent manner in all brain regions including the cerebellum. Consequently, the cerebellum appeared not to be a suitable reference tissue in rhesus monkeys. Regional volume of distribution (VT) was mostly reliably derived with the multilinear analysis (MA1) method. In ex vivo studies in the monkey and rats only negligible (< 2.7%) amount of radiometabolites was seen in the brain of either species. In summary, results from the present study strongly support the suitability of [11C]MP-10 as a radiotracer for PET imaging and quantification of PDE10A in non-human primates. PMID:25450608

  15. Labeled Putrescine as a Probe in Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora; Goldman, Stephen S.; Flamm, Eugene S.; Cravioto, Humberto; Wolf, Alfred P.; Brodie, Jonathan D.

    1983-08-01

    The polyamine metabolism of transplanted N-nitrosomethylurea-derived rat glioma was determined with radiolabeled putrescine used as a marker for malignancy. The uptake of putrescine in vivo was complete within 5 minutes and was specific for tumor tissue. The conversion of putrescine to spermine and other metabolites by the tumor was rapid, in contrast to the case for adjacent normal brain. These results suggest that putrescine labeled with carbon-11 may be used as a positron-emission tomographic tracer for the selective metabolic imaging of brain tumor and may be used in an appropriate model as a marker for tumor growth rate.

  16. Predictive value of S-100B protein and neuron specific-enolase as markers of traumatic brain damage in clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Zahra S; Weinhofer, Alexandra; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Heinz, Thomas; Vécsei, Vilmos

    2006-05-01

    S-100B and NSE proteins are considered to be neurobiochemical markers for the brain damage. The aim of this study was to consider the diagnostic and prognostic validity of the initial serum levels of S-100B and NSE in clinical use. Forty-five patients with traumatic brain injury were included in this prospective study. Neurologic examination and CCT-scan were performed. S-100B and NSE were analysed. Patients were divided in two groups depending on the severity of injury. The results showed a significant difference between the S-100B serum concentration and the two groups-minor head injuries and severe head injuries. A statistically significant correlation was observed between an increase of S-100B and NSE serum values and a cerebral pathological finding in CT scans. The clear correlation between S-100B and NSE serum concentrations and CCT findings does not validate both markers as an independent predictor of diagnosis and prognosis of brain injury.

  17. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt; Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    of intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7 pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only...... the biogenic metabolites could be detected extracellularly. Distinct differences in monoamine concentrations were observed when comparing concentrations in guinea pig frontal cortex and cerebellum tissue with higher amounts of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid...... in frontal cortex, as compared to cerebellum. The chemical turnover in frontal cortex tissue of guinea pig was for serotonin successfully predicted from the turnover observed in the frontal cortex cell culture. In conclusion, the present analytical method shows high precision, accuracy and sensitivity...

  18. BDNF Val66met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms predict a human in vivo marker for brain serotonin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick M; Holst, Klaus K; Adamsen, Dea

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in multiple aspects of brain function including regulation of serotonin signaling. The BDNF val66met polymorphism (rs6265) has been linked to aspects of serotonin signaling in humans but its effects are not well understood. To address t...

  19. Acute and subchronic toxicity of inhaled toluene in male Long Evans rats: oxidative stress markers in brain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Research interested in oxidative stress markers following exposure to VOCs. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Kodavanti , P., J. Royland ,...

  20. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide can be an adjunctive diagnostic marker of hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksool; Lee, Jin Hee; Jung, Jae Yun; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Jung, Jin Hee; Chang, Ikwan; Kim, Kyuseok

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level could be a useful marker for Kawasaki disease in the pediatric emergency department (PED) and in the presence of fever duration of 4 days or less (hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease). Medical records of patients who were 1 month to 15 years old of age and presented at the PED with suspected Kawasaki disease from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014, were collected retrospectively. Two hundred thirty-nine patients with a history of fever for 4 days or less were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease, as well as 111 patients with other febrile diseases, and were enrolled. The NT-proBNP level was significantly higher in patients with Kawasaki disease (Kawasaki disease vs. other febrile disease group, 444.8 (189.7-951.5) vs. 153.4 (68.9-287.6) pg/mL; p marker for hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease in the PED. What is Known: • N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level has been reported as a useful marker for diagnosis in patients with the acute phase of Kawasaki disease. • But, in the cases of less than 5 days of fever, the appropriate level of NT-proBNP for differentiating Kawasaki disease in PED has not been yet evaluated. What is New: • NT-proBNP might be an adjunctive laboratory marker for hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease.

  1. FTIR Imaging of Brain Tissue Reveals Crystalline Creatine Deposits Are an ex Vivo Marker of Localized Ischemia during Murine Cerebral Malaria: General Implications for Disease Neurochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Phosphocreatine is a major cellular source of high energy phosphates, which is crucial to maintain cell viability under conditions of impaired metabolic states, such as decreased oxygen and energy availability (i.e., ischemia). Many methods exist for the bulk analysis of phosphocreatine and its dephosphorylated product creatine; however, no method exists to image the distribution of creatine or phosphocreatine at the cellular level. In this study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging has revealed the ex vivo development of creatine microdeposits in situ in the brain region most affected by the disease, the cerebellum of cerebral malaria (CM) diseased mice; however, such deposits were also observed at significantly lower levels in the brains of control mice and mice with severe malaria. In addition, the number of deposits was observed to increase in a time-dependent manner during dehydration post tissue cutting. This challenges the hypotheses in recent reports of FTIR spectroscopic imaging where creatine microdeposits found in situ within thin sections from epileptic, Alzheimer’s (AD), and amlyoid lateral sclerosis (ALS) diseased brains were proposed to be disease specific markers and/or postulated to contribute to the brain pathogenesis. As such, a detailed investigation was undertaken, which has established that the creatine microdeposits exist as the highly soluble HCl salt or zwitterion and are an ex-vivo tissue processing artifact and, hence, have no effect on disease pathogenesis. They occur as a result of creatine crystallization during dehydration (i.e., air-drying) of thin sections of brain tissue. As ischemia and decreased aerobic (oxidative metabolism) are common to many brain disorders, regions of elevated creatine-to-phosphocreatine ratio are likely to promote crystal formation during tissue dehydration (due to the lower water solubility of creatine relative to phosphocreatine). The results of this study have demonstrated that

  2. Simultaneous determination of 8 neurotransmitters and their metabolite levels in rat brain using liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry: Application to the murine Nrf2 model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnicz, Aneta; Avendaño Ortiz, José; Casas, Ana I; Freitas, Andiara E; G López, Manuela; Ruiz-Nuño, Ana

    2016-01-30

    Analysis of neurotransmitters and their metabolites is useful for the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with protein precipitation was developed to monitor levels of adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), glutamic acid (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) in rat brain tissue. Isoprenaline was used as an internal standard (IS). Neurotransmitters and metabolites were eluted with a reverse phase column under gradient conditions through a mobile phase consisting of 0.2% formic acid water solution/acetonitrile. The compounds were detected and quantified by LC-MS/MS with positive or negative electrospray ionization, which operates in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The method was linear or polynomial (R(2)>0.99) for AD, NA, Glu, GABA, DA, 5-HT, 5-HIAA, and MHPG in the range of 0.25-200, 0.5-200, 250-20,000, 250-20,000, 0.25-200, 10-3000, 1-50, and 1-50ng/mL, respectively. The validation assays for accuracy and precision, matrix effect, extraction recovery, stability and carry-over of the samples for neurotransmitters and metabolites were consistent with the requirements of regulatory agencies. The method enables rapid quantification of neurotransmitters and their metabolites and has been applied in the nuclear factor (erythroid 2-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) knockout mouse model of depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Absolute quantitative proton NMR spectroscopy based on the amplitude of the local water suppression pulse. Quantification of brain water and metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E R; Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    volunteers. Localized proton NMR spectra were obtained from a region of primarily white matter in the occipital lobe. The observable water content in the NMR spectra was 0.685 +/- 0.025. The absolute metabolite concentrations were: [total choline] = 1.25 +/- 0.21 nM, [total creatine] = 6.71 +/- 0.59 n...

  4. Markers of immune-mediated inflammation in the brains of young adults and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and fatal diabetic ketoacidosis. Is there a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, William H; Artlett, Carol M; Boodhoo, Dallas; Gilliland, Mary G F; Ortiz, Luis; Mulder, Dries; Tjan, David H T; Martin, Alvaro; Tatomir, Alexandru; Rus, Horea

    2017-06-01

    Due to the limited data on diabetic ketoacidosis and brain edema (DKA/BE) in children/adolescents and the lack of recent data on adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), we addressed the question of whether neuroinflammation was present in the fatal DKA of adults. We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) studies on the brains of two young adults with T1D and fatal DKA and compared them with two teenagers with poorly controlled diabetes and fatal DKA. C5b-9, the membrane attack complex (MAC) had significantly greater deposits in the grey and white matter of the teenagers than the young adults (p=0.03). CD59, a MAC assembly inhibitory protein was absent, possibly suppressed by the hyperglycemia in the teenagers but was expressed in the young adults despite comparable average levels of hyperglycemia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) had an average expression in the young adults significantly greater than in the teenagers (p=0.02). The autophagy marker Light Chain 3 (LC3) A/B was the predominant form of programmed cell death (PCD) in the teenage brains. The young adults had high expressions of both LC3A/B and TUNEL, an apoptotic cell marker for DNA fragmentation. BE was present in the newly diagnosed young adult with hyperglycemic hyperosmolar DKA and also in the two teenagers. Our data indicate that significant differences in neuroinflammatory components, initiated by the dysregulation of DKA and interrelated metabolic and immunologic milieu, are likely present in the brains of fatal DKA of teenagers when compared with young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of cocoa supplementation, caloric restriction, and regular exercise, on oxidative stress markers of brain and memory in the rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radák, Zsolt; Silye, Gabriella; Bartha, Csaba; Jakus, Judit; Stefanovits-Bányai, Eva; Atalay, Mustafa; Marton, Orsolya; Koltai, Erika

    2013-11-01

    The effects of treadmill running (8 weeks, 5 times/week, 1h/day at 27 m/min), caloric restriction, and cocoa supplementation on brain function and oxidative stress markers were tested. The Morris maze test was used to appraise rat memory. Regular exercise significantly improved spatial learning performance. The level of oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of carbonylated proteins. The free radical concentration increased in brain of the training groups but not the controls. The content of reactive carbonyl derivates did not change with exercise, suggesting that the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were well tolerated in this experimental model. Caloric restriction (CR) decreased the accumulation of free radicals in the frontal lobe. The protein content of brain-derived neutrophic factors (BDNFs) was evaluated and changes did not occur either with exercise or cocoa supplementation treatments. These data did not show significant effects of the administration of cocoa (2% w/w) on the concentration of ROS, BDNF or on spatial memory. Conversely, exercise and CR can play a role in ROS generation and brain function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcriptomics of the late gestation ovine fetal brain: modeling the co-expression of immune marker genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaglino, Maria B; Keller-Wood, Maureen; Wood, Charles E

    2014-11-19

    Major changes in gene expression occur in the fetal brain to modulate the function of this organ postnatally. Thus, factors can alter the genomics of the fetal brain, predisposing to neurological disorders later in life. We hypothesized that the physiological dynamics of the immune system transcriptome of the fetal brain during the last stage of gestation will reveal patterns of immune function and development in the developing brain. In this study we applied weighted gene co-expression analysis of microarrays performed on ovine fetal brain samples, to model the changes in gene expression throughout the second half of gestation. Clusters of co-expressed genes that strongly increase in expression toward the first day of extra-uterine life are related to the hematopoietic lineage, while activation of immune pathways is induced after birth. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression suggests induction of tolerance mechanisms, probably necessary to protect highly produced proteins--such as myelin basic protein--from an autoimmune attack. This study provides insight into the dramatic changes in gene expression that take place in the brain during the fetal life, especially during the last stage of gestation, and suggests that the immune system may have an important role in maturation of the fetal brain, which if disrupted or altered, could have negative consequences in postnatal life.

  7. Evaluation and metabolite studies of {sup 125}I- and {sup 123}I-labelled E-(R,R)-IQNP: potential radioligands for visualization of M{sub 1} muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Kim A.; Halldin, Christer; Hiltunen, Jukka; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Ito, Hiroshi; Ginovart, Nathalie; Hall, Haakan; McPherson, Daniel W.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ); Larsson, Stig; Schnell, Per-Olof; Farde, Lars

    1998-04-01

    A new ligand for the M{sub 1} muscarinic receptor subtype, E-(R,R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (E-IQNP), was labelled with {sup 125}I and {sup 123}I for autoradiographic studies on human whole-brain cryosections and SPET studies, respectively, in Cynomolgus monkey. Autoradiography demonstrated E-[{sup 125}I]IQNP binding in M{sub 1} receptor-rich regions such as the neocortex and the striatum. The binding was displaceable by the selective M{sub 1} antagonist biperiden. In vivo single photon emission tomography (SPET) studies with E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP demonstrated a high accumulation of radioactivity in the monkey neocortex. Rapid hydrolysis of the quinuclidinyl ester to the free acid was found to be a major biotransformation route for E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP. The free acid of E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP does not pass the blood-brain barrier, but the plasma concentration was high as compared to the total radioactivity in brain. It is thus necessary to correct for the high concentration of radioactive metabolites in parenchymal blood (CBV) to obtain accurate values for E-[{sup 123}I]IQNP binding in brain.

  8. N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide in arterial hypertension--a marker for left ventricular dimensions and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Per; Boesen, Mikael; Olsen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In arterial hypertension risk factor evaluation, including LV mass measurements, and risk stratification using risk charts or programs, is generally recommended. In heart failure NT-proBNP has been shown to be a marker of LV dimensions and of prognosis. If the same diagnostic and prognostic value...... and preserved LV function demonstrated that NT-proBNP was a very strong prognostic marker, especially combined with a history of cardiovascular disease. Patients with high NT-proBNP and known cardiovascular disease had a seven-fold increase in CV events compared to patients with low NT-proBNP and no CV disease......, while patients with either high NT-proBNP or CV disease had a three-four-fold increased risk. In conclusion NT-proBNP predicts LV mass in hypertensive patients and is a very strong prognostic marker in these patients. This could indicate a use of NT-proBNP in the future for risk stratification...

  9. Coordinated Gene Expression of Neuroinflammatory and Cell Signaling Markers in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex during Human Brain Development and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiani, Christopher T.; Ryan, Veronica H.; Rao, Jagadeesh S.; Cam, Margaret C.; Ahn, Kwangmi; Modi, Hiren R.; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Age changes in expression of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes are not well characterized during human brain development and senescence. Knowing these changes may elucidate structural, metabolic, and functional brain processes over the lifespan, as well vulnerability to neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative diseases. Hypothesis Expression levels of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes in the human brain are coordinated over the lifespan and underlie changes in phenotypic networks or cascades. Methods We used a large-scale microarray dataset from human prefrontal cortex, BrainCloud, to quantify age changes over the lifespan, divided into Development (0 to 21 years, 87 brains) and Aging (22 to 78 years, 144 brains) intervals, in transcription levels of 39 genes. Results Gene expression levels followed different trajectories over the lifespan. Many changes were intercorrelated within three similar groups or clusters of genes during both Development and Aging, despite different roles of the gene products in the two intervals. During Development, changes were related to reported neuronal loss, dendritic growth and pruning, and microglial events; TLR4, IL1R1, NFKB1, MOBP, PLA2G4A, and PTGS2 expression increased in the first years of life, while expression of synaptic genes GAP43 and DBN1 decreased, before reaching plateaus. During Aging, expression was upregulated for potentially pro-inflammatory genes such as NFKB1, TRAF6, TLR4, IL1R1, TSPO, and GFAP, but downregulated for neurotrophic and synaptic integrity genes such as BDNF, NGF, PDGFA, SYN, and DBN1. Conclusions Coordinated changes in gene transcription cascades underlie changes in synaptic, neurotrophic, and inflammatory phenotypic networks during brain Development and Aging. Early postnatal expression changes relate to neuronal, glial, and myelin growth and synaptic pruning events, while late Aging is associated with pro-inflammatory and synaptic loss changes. Thus, comparable

  10. Chiral Analysis of Methadone and its Main Metabolite, EDDP, in Postmorten Brain and Blood by Automated SPE and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Karen Marie Dollerup; Linnet, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Vi udviklede en metode baseret på væskekromatografi med tandem-massespektrometri til kvantificering af de individuelle enantiomer af metadon og dets primære metabolit, R/S-2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl- 3,3-diphenylpyrrolinium (EDDP), i postmortem blod og hjernevæv. Prøvebehandlingen blev udført på et Tec...

  11. Serum concentrations of two biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S‐100B and neurone specific enolase are increased in elite female soccer players after a competitive game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålnacke, B‐M; Ohlsson, A; Tegner, Y; Sojka, P

    2006-01-01

    Background It is a matter of debate whether or not ordinary heading of the ball in soccer causes injury to brain tissue. Objective To analyse concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain tissue damage S‐100B and neurone specific enolase (NSE) in serum of female elite soccer players in association with a competitive game. Methods Venous blood samples were obtained from 44 female soccer players before and after a competitive game for analysis. The number of headers and trauma events (falls, collisions, etc) was assessed from videotape recordings for each player. Results Concentrations of both brain damage markers were increased after the game (S‐100B, 0.18 (0.11) v 0.11 (0.05) μg/l (p  =  0.000); NSE, 10.14 (1.74) v 9.05 (1.59) μg/l (p  =  0.001)). There was a significant correlation between changes in S‐100B concentrations and both the number of headers (r  =  0.430, p  =  0.004) and the number of other trauma events (r  =  0.517, p<0.001). Conclusion The concentrations of both S‐100B and NSE were increased by game associated activities and events. The increases in S‐100B concentration were significantly related to the number of headers and other trauma events, which indicates that both these factors may have contributed to these increases. PMID:16556784

  12. The effects of moderate-, strenuous- and over-training on oxidative stress markers, DNA repair, and memory, in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonovszky, Helga; Berkes, István; Kumagai, Shuzo; Kaneko, Takao; Tahara, Shoichi; Goto, Sataro; Radák, Zsolt

    2005-06-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that training with moderate- (MT), strenuous- (ST), or over- (OT) load can cause alterations in memory, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, DNA damage, activity of 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in rat brain. Rat memory was assessed by a passive avoidance test and the ST and OT group demonstrated improved memory. The content of BDNF was increased only in the OT group. The oxidative damage of lipids and DNA, as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), did not change significantly with exercise. Similarly, the activity of DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), was not altered with exercise training. On the other hand, the content of reactive carbonyl derivatives (RCDs) decreased in all groups and the decrease reached significance levels in the ST and OT groups. The activity of the proteasome complex increased in the brain of OT. The findings of this study imply that over-training does not induce oxidative stress in the brain and does not cause loss of memory. The improved memory was associated with enhanced BDNF content.

  13. Hippocampal kindling alters the concentration of glial fibrillary acidic protein and other marker proteins in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Bolwig, T G

    1990-01-01

    The effect of hippocampal kindling on neuronal and glial marker proteins was studied in the rat by immunochemical methods. In hippocampus, pyriform cortex and amygdala there was an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), indicating reactive gliosis, and an increase in the glycolytic...... enzyme NSE, suggesting increased anaerobic metabolism. Neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) decreased in pyriform cortex and amygdala of kindled rats, indicating neuronal degeneration....

  14. Subacute administration of fluoxetine prevents short-term brain hypometabolism and reduces brain damage markers induced by the lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiha, Ahmed Anis; de Cristóbal, Javier; Delgado, Mercedes; Fernández de la Rosa, Rubén; Bascuñana, Pablo; Pozo, Miguel A; García-García, Luis

    2015-02-01

    The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in epileptogenesis still remains controversial. In this regard, it has been reported that serotonergic drugs can alter epileptogenesis in opposite ways. The main objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the selective 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine administered subacutely (10mg/kg/day×7 days) on the eventual metabolic impairment induced by the lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy in rats. In vivo 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose ([(18)F] FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) was performed to assess the brain glucose metabolic activity on days 3 and 30 after the insult. In addition, at the end of the experiment (day 33), several histochemical and neurochemical assessments were performed for checking the neuronal functioning and integrity. Three days after the insult, a marked reduction of [(18)F] FDG uptake (about 30% according to the brain region) was found in all brain areas studied. When evaluated on day 30, although a hypometabolism tendency was observed, no statistically significant reduction was present in any region analyzed. In addition, lithium-pilocarpine administration was associated with medium-term hippocampal and cortical damage, since it induced neurodegeneration, glial activation and augmented caspase-9 expression. Regarding the effect of fluoxetine, subacute treatment with this SSRI did not significantly reduce the mortality rate observed after pilocarpine-induced seizures. However, fluoxetine did prevent not only the short-term metabolic impairment, but also the aforementioned signs of neuronal damage in surviving animals to lithium-pilocarpine protocol. Finally, fluoxetine increased the density of GABAA receptor both at the level of the dentate gyrus and CA1-CA2 regions in pilocarpine-treated animals. Overall, our data suggest a protective role for fluoxetine against pilocarpine-induced brain damage. Moreover, this action may be associated with an increase of

  15. Effect of a polyphenol-rich wild blueberry extract on cognitive performance of mice, brain antioxidant markers and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandreou, Magdalini A; Dimakopoulou, Andriana; Linardaki, Zacharoula I; Cordopatis, Paul; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Margarity, Marigoula; Lamari, Fotini N

    2009-03-17

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a polyphenol-rich extract (PrB) of Vaccinium angustifolium (wild blueberries) introduced intraperitoneally (i.p.) at 30 (PrB30) and 60 (PrB60) mg/kg body weight for 7 days, on cognitive performance, brain oxidative status and acetylcholinesterase activity in adult, male, 3-4-month-old Balb-c mice. Evaluation of rodent learning and memory was assessed by a step-through test on day 6 after a double training and an initial acquisition trial on day 5. Antioxidant status was determined by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), ascorbic acid concentration (FRASC), malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels in whole brain homogenates. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was determined by Ellman's colorimetric method. Results showed that the PrB60-treated mice exhibited a significant improvement in learning and memory (step-through latency time of 228+/-38 s compared to 101+/-32 s of the control group). PrB extract administration also resulted in reduced lipid peroxidation products (38 and 79%) and higher brain ascorbic acid levels (21 and 64%) in both PrB30 and PrB60-treated groups, respectively, and higher glutathione levels (28%) in the PrB60-treated group. Furthermore, salt- and detergent soluble AChE activity significantly decreased in both PrB-treated groups. Thus, the significant cognitive enhancement observed in adult mice after short-term i.p. supplementation with the blueberry extract concentrated in polyphenols, is closely related to higher brain antioxidant properties and inhibition of AChE activity. These findings stress the critical impact of wild blueberry bioactive components on brain function.

  16. Sleep Apnea, Sleep Duration and Brain MRI Markers of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Alzheimer's Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela L Lutsey

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and habitual short sleep duration are linked to poor cognitive function. Neuroimaging studies may provide insight into this relation.We tested the hypotheses that OSA and habitual short sleep duration, measured at ages 54-73 years, would be associated with adverse brain morphology at ages 67-89 years.Included in this analysis are 312 ARIC study participants who underwent in-home overnight polysomnography in 1996-1998 and brain MRI scans about 15 years later (2012-2013. Sleep apnea was quantified by the apnea-hypopnea index and categorized as moderate/severe (≥15.0 events/hour, mild (5.0-14.9 events/hour, or normal (<5.0 events/hour. Habitual sleep duration was categorized, in hours, as <7, 7 to <8, ≥8. MRI outcomes included number of infarcts (total, subcortical, and cortical and white matter hyperintensity (WMH and Alzheimer's disease signature region volumes. Multivariable adjusted logistic and linear regression models were used. All models incorporated inverse probability weighting, to adjust for potential selection bias.At the time of the sleep study participants were 61.7 (SD: 5.0 years old and 54% female; 19% had moderate/severe sleep apnea. MRI imaging took place 14.8 (SD: 1.0 years later, when participants were 76.5 (SD: 5.2 years old. In multivariable models which accounted for body mass index, neither OSA nor abnormal sleep duration were statistically significantly associated with odds of cerebral infarcts, WMH brain volumes or regional brain volumes.In this community-based sample, mid-life OSA and habitually short sleep duration were not associated with later-life cerebral markers of vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. However, selection bias may have influenced our results and the modest sample size led to relatively imprecise associations.

  17. Sleep Apnea, Sleep Duration and Brain MRI Markers of Cerebral Vascular Disease and Alzheimer's Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Norby, Faye L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Mosley, Thomas; MacLehose, Richard F; Punjabi, Naresh M; Shahar, Eyal; Jack, Clifford R; Alonso, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of literature has suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and habitual short sleep duration are linked to poor cognitive function. Neuroimaging studies may provide insight into this relation. We tested the hypotheses that OSA and habitual short sleep duration, measured at ages 54-73 years, would be associated with adverse brain morphology at ages 67-89 years. Included in this analysis are 312 ARIC study participants who underwent in-home overnight polysomnography in 1996-1998 and brain MRI scans about 15 years later (2012-2013). Sleep apnea was quantified by the apnea-hypopnea index and categorized as moderate/severe (≥15.0 events/hour), mild (5.0-14.9 events/hour), or normal (sleep duration was categorized, in hours, as sleep study participants were 61.7 (SD: 5.0) years old and 54% female; 19% had moderate/severe sleep apnea. MRI imaging took place 14.8 (SD: 1.0) years later, when participants were 76.5 (SD: 5.2) years old. In multivariable models which accounted for body mass index, neither OSA nor abnormal sleep duration were statistically significantly associated with odds of cerebral infarcts, WMH brain volumes or regional brain volumes. In this community-based sample, mid-life OSA and habitually short sleep duration were not associated with later-life cerebral markers of vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. However, selection bias may have influenced our results and the modest sample size led to relatively imprecise associations.

  18. Urine albumin/creatinine ratio, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide--three new cardiovascular risk markers--do they improve risk prediction and influence treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael H; Sehestedt, Thomas; Lyngbaek, Stig

    2010-01-01

    In order to prioritize limited health resources in a time of increasing demands optimal cardiovascular risk stratification is essential. We tested the additive prognostic value of 3 relatively new, but established cardiovascular risk markers: N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP), ......In order to prioritize limited health resources in a time of increasing demands optimal cardiovascular risk stratification is essential. We tested the additive prognostic value of 3 relatively new, but established cardiovascular risk markers: N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt...... of 48% with extremely high cardiovascular risk who should be referred for specialist care to optimize treatment....

  19. The positive effects of high-frequency right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on memory, correlated with increases in brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jun Qiao,1,2 Guixing Jin,1,2 Licun Lei,3 Lan Wang,1,2 Yaqiang Du,3 Xueyi Wang1,2 1Institute of Mental Health, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Brain Ageing and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Hebei Medical University, 3Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS on memory, and its correlation with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and methods: In this randomized, double-blind sham-controlled trial, alcohol-dependent patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups: the experimental group (rTMS, 10 Hz, on right DLPFC, 20 sessions and the control group (sham stimulation. Memory function was assessed using Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R before and after treatment. 1H-MRS was used to detect the levels of N-acetyl aspartic acid (NAA, choline (Cho, and creatine (Cr in bilateral hippocampi before and after treatment. Results: Thirty-eight patients (18 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group were included in the analyses. The experimental group showed significantly greater changes in HVLT-R, BVMT-R, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr after rTMS from baseline than the control group. The percentage change in BVMT-R and HVLT-R correlated with the percentage change in NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr in the right brain. Conclusion: High-frequency right DLPFC rTMS was associated with improvement in memory dysfunction, which is correlated with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by 1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Keywords: alcohol dependence, memory, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, MR spectroscopy

  20. In vivo turnover of tau and APP metabolites in the brains of wild-type and Tg2576 mice: greater stability of sAPP in the beta-amyloid depositing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Morales-Corraliza

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP and tau are central to the pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have examined the in vivo turnover of APP, secreted APP (sAPP, Abeta and tau in the wild-type and Tg2576 mouse brain using cycloheximide to block protein synthesis. In spite of overexpression of APP in the Tg2576 mouse, APP is rapidly degraded, similar to the rapid turnover of the endogenous protein in the wild-type mouse. sAPP is cleared from the brain more slowly, particularly in the Tg2576 model where the half-life of both the endogenous murine and transgene-derived human sAPP is nearly doubled compared to wild-type mice. The important Abeta degrading enzymes neprilysin and IDE were found to be highly stable in the brain, and soluble Abeta40 and Abeta42 levels in both wild-type and Tg2576 mice rapidly declined following the depletion of APP. The cytoskeletal-associated protein tau was found to be highly stable in both wild-type and Tg2576 mice. Our findings unexpectedly show that of these various AD-relevant protein metabolites, sAPP turnover in the brain is the most different when comparing a wild-type mouse and a beta-amyloid depositing, APP overexpressing transgenic model. Given the neurotrophic roles attributed to sAPP, the enhanced stability of sAPP in the beta-amyloid depositing Tg2576 mice may represent a neuroprotective response.

  1. The effect of short-term exposure to energy-matched diets enriched in fat or sugar on memory, gut microbiota and markers of brain inflammation and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilharz, Jessica E; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Maniam, Jayanthi; Morris, Margaret J

    2016-10-01

    Short-term exposure to high-energy diets impairs memory but there is little data on the relative contributions of fat and sugar to these deficits or the mechanisms responsible. Here, we investigated how these different macronutrients affect memory, neuroinflammation and neuroplasticity markers and the gut microbiota. Rats were fed matched purified diets for 2weeks; Control, Sugar, Saturated Fatty Acid (SFA) or Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA), which varied only in the percentage of energy available from sugar and the amount and type of fat. Rats consuming SFA and Sugar were impaired on hippocampal-dependent place recognition memory compared to Controls and PUFA rats, despite all rats consuming similar amounts of energy. All rats performed comparably on the object recognition task. Hippocampal and hypothalamic inflammatory markers were not substantially affected by the diets and there was no change in the neuroplasticity marker, brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Each of the diets significantly altered the microbial composition in distinct ways. Specifically, the relative abundance of 89 taxa differed significantly between groups with the majority of these changes accounted for by the Clostridiales order and within that, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae. These taxa showed a range of macronutrient specific correlations with place memory. In addition, Distance based Linear Models found relationships between memory, inflammation-related hippocampal genes and the gut microbiota. In conclusion, our study shows that the macronutrient profile of the diet is crucial for diet-induced memory deficits and suggests a possible link between diet, the gut microbiota and hippocampal inflammatory genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neural markers of negative symptom outcomes in distributed working memory brain activity of antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejad, Ayna B.; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Ebdrup, Bjørn H.

    2013-01-01

    -back task. Spatial independent component analysis identified task-modulated brain networks. A linear support vector machine was trained with these components to discriminate six patients who showed improvement in negative symptoms from eight non-improvers. Classification accuracy and significance...... was estimated by leave-one-out cross-validation and permutation tests, respectively. Two frontoparietal and one default mode network components predicted negative symptom improvement with a classification accuracy of 79% (p = 0.003). Discriminating features were found in the frontoparietal networks...

  3. Estimating Survival in Melanoma Patients With Brain Metastases: An Update of the Graded Prognostic Assessment for Melanoma Using Molecular Markers (Melanoma-molGPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperduto, Paul W; Jiang, Wen; Brown, Paul D; Braunstein, Steve; Sneed, Penny; Wattson, Daniel A; Shih, Helen A; Bangdiwala, Ananta; Shanley, Ryan; Lockney, Natalie A; Beal, Kathryn; Lou, Emil; Amatruda, Thomas; Sperduto, William A; Kirkpatrick, John P; Yeh, Norman; Gaspar, Laurie E; Molitoris, Jason K; Masucci, Laura; Roberge, David; Yu, James; Chiang, Veronica; Mehta, Minesh

    2017-11-15

    To update the Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (DS-GPA) for a markedly heterogeneous patient population, patients with melanoma and brain metastases, using a larger, more current cohort, including molecular markers. The original Melanoma-GPA is based on data from 483 patients whose conditions were diagnosed between 1985 and 2005. This is a multi-institutional retrospective database analysis of 823 melanoma patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2015. Multivariable analyses identified significant prognostic factors, which were weighted and included in the updated index (Melanoma-molGPA). Multiple Cox regression was used to select and weight prognostic factors in proportion to their hazard ratios to design the updated Melanoma-molGPA in which scores of 4.0 and 0.0 are associated with the best and worst prognoses, as with all of the diagnosis-specific GPA indices. Log-rank tests were used to compare adjacent classes. There were 5 significant prognostic factors for survival (age, Karnofsky performance status [KPS], extracranial metastases [ECM], number of brain metastases, and BRAF status), whereas only KPS and the number of brain metastases were significant in the original Melanoma-GPA. Median survival improved from 6.7 to 9.8 months between the 2 treatment eras, and the median survival times for patients with Melanoma-molGPA of 0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 2.0, 2.5 to 3.0, and 3.5 to 4.0 were 4.9, 8.3, 15.8, and 34.1 months (Pmelanoma patients with brain metastases has improved significantly. The updated Melanoma-molGPA, a user-friendly tool to estimate survival, will facilitate clinical decision making regarding whether and which treatment is appropriate and will also be useful for stratification of future clinical trials. To further simplify use, a free online/smart phone app is available at brainmetgpa.com. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide in arterial hypertension--a marker for left ventricular dimensions and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Per; Boesen, Mikael; Olsen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In arterial hypertension risk factor evaluation, including LV mass measurements, and risk stratification using risk charts or programs, is generally recommended. In heart failure NT-proBNP has been shown to be a marker of LV dimensions and of prognosis. If the same diagnostic and prognostic value...... is present in arterial hypertension, risk factor evaluation would be easier. In 36 patients with arterial hypertension, electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy and preserved left ventricular function, NT-proBNP was eight-fold higher than in healthy subjects. The log NT-proBNP correlated with LV mass index (R=0.......47, P=0.0002) measured by magnetic resonance imaging. In other subjects with arterial hypertension a significant but weak correlation to diastolic properties has been demonstrated. As for prognosis, a recent study in patients with hypertension, electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy...

  5. γ-H2AX as a marker for dose deposition in the brain of wistar rats after synchrotron microbeam radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Fernandez-Palomo

    Full Text Available Synchrotron radiation has shown high therapeutic potential in small animal models of malignant brain tumours. However, more studies are needed to understand the radiobiological effects caused by the delivery of high doses of spatially fractionated x-rays in tissue. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of the γ-H2AX antibody as a marker for dose deposition in the brain of rats after synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT.Normal and tumour-bearing Wistar rats were exposed to 35, 70 or 350 Gy of MRT to their right cerebral hemisphere. The brains were extracted either at 4 or 8 hours after irradiation and immediately placed in formalin. Sections of paraffin-embedded tissue were incubated with anti γ-H2AX primary antibody.While the presence of the C6 glioma does not seem to modulate the formation of γ-H2AX in normal tissue, the irradiation dose and the recovery versus time are the most important factors affecting the development of γ-H2AX foci. Our results also suggest that doses of 350 Gy can trigger the release of bystander signals that significantly amplify the DNA damage caused by radiation and that the γ-H2AX biomarker does not only represent DNA damage produced by radiation, but also damage caused by bystander effects.In conclusion, we suggest that the γ-H2AX foci should be used as biomarker for targeted and non-targeted DNA damage after synchrotron radiation rather than a tool to measure the actual physical doses.

  6. Cross-generational trans fat intake facilitates mania-like behavior: oxidative and molecular markers in brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevizol, F; Roversi, Kr; Dias, V T; Roversi, K; Barcelos, R C S; Kuhn, F T; Pase, C S; Golombieski, R; Veit, J C; Piccolo, J; Pochmann, D; Porciúncula, L O; Emanuelli, T; Rocha, J B T; Bürger, M E

    2015-02-12

    Since that fast food consumption have raised concerns about people's health, we evaluated the influence of trans fat consumption on behavioral, biochemical and molecular changes in the brain-cortex of second generation rats exposed to a model of mania. Two successive generations of female rats were supplemented with soybean oil (SO, rich in n-6 FA, control group), fish oil (FO, rich in n-3 FA) and hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF, rich in trans FA) from pregnancy, lactation to adulthood, when male rats from 2nd generation received amphetamine (AMPH-4 mg/kg-i.p., once a day, for 14 days) treatment. AMPH increased locomotor index in all animals, which was higher in the HVF group. While the FO group showed increased n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) incorporation and reduced n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio, HVF allowed trans fatty acid (TFA) incorporation and increased n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in the brain-cortex. In fact, the FO group showed minor AMPH-induced hyperactivity, decreased reactive species (RS) generation per se, causing no changes in protein carbonyl (PC) levels and dopamine transporter (DAT). FO supplementation showed molecular changes, since proBDNF was increased per se and reduced by AMPH, decreasing the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level following drug treatment. Conversely, HVF was related to increased hyperactivity, higher PC level per se and higher AMPH-induced PC level, reflecting on DAT, whose levels were decreased per se as well as in AMPH-treated groups. In addition, while HVF increased BDNF-mRNA per se, AMPH reduced this value, acting on BDNF, whose level was lower in the same AMPH-treated experimental group. ProBDNF level was influenced by HVF supplementation, but it was not sufficient to modify BDNF level. These findings reinforce that prolonged consumption of trans fat allows TFA incorporation in the cortex, facilitating hyperactive behavior, oxidative damages and molecular changes. Our study is a warning about cross-generational consumption

  7. Identification of metabolites of kurarinone from Sophora flavescens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A total of 11 metabolites, including the parent drug and 10 phase II metabolites in rat urine, were first detected and interpreted based on ... concentration range of 4.79-16.07 mg/g [2]. It is considered to be a marker compound ... metabolism of kurarinone by human liver microsomes in vitro indicated that kuarinone.

  8. Accurate measurement of the essential micronutrients methionine, homocysteine, vitamins B6, B12, B9 and their metabolites in plasma, brain and maternal milk of mice using LC/MS ion trap analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterink, J Efraim; Naninck, Eva F G; Korosi, Aniko; Lucassen, Paul J; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Schierbeek, Henk

    2015-08-15

    Methionine, homocysteine, vitamins B6, B12, B9, and their metabolites are crucial co-factors and substrates for many basic biological pathways including one-carbon metabolism, and they are particularly important for brain function and development and epigenetic mechanisms. These are essential nutrients that cannot be synthesized endogenously and thus need to be taken in via diet. A novel method was developed that enables simultaneous assessment of the exact concentrations of these essential micronutrients in various matrices, including maternal milk, plasma, and brain of neonatal mice. The protocol for analysis of these components in the various matrices consists of a cleanup step (i.e. lipid extraction followed by protein precipitation) combined with a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) ion trap method with high sensitivity and selectivity (SRM mode). This novel method enables the measurement of these essential nutrients with good recoveries (69-117%), and high intra-day (<10%) and high intra-day precision (defined as <15% for compounds with an isotopologue and <20% for compounds without an isotopologue as internal standard) in plasma, maternal milk, and brain of mice at low and high levels. In addition, lower limits of quantitation (LOQ) were determined for the various matrices in the range for methionine (700-2000nmol/L), homocysteine (280-460-nmol/L), vitamins B6 (5-230nmol/L), B12 (7-11nmol/L), B9 (20-30nmol/L). Degradation of vitamins and oxidation of homocysteine is limited to a minimum, and only small sample volumes (30μL plasma, 20mg brain and maternal milk) are needed for simultaneous measurement. This method can help to understand how these nutrients are transferred from mother to offspring via maternal milk, as well as how these nutrients are absorbed by the offspring and eventually taken up in various tissues amongst the brain in preclinical and clinical research settings. Therefore the method can help to explore critical periods in

  9. Early metabolite changes after melatonin treatment in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury studied by in-vivo1H MR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Hester Rijkje; Nyman, Axel K G; Morken, Tora Sund; Vettukattil, Riyas; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Widerøe, Marius

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin is a promising neuroprotective agent after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. We used in-vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate effects of melatonin treatment on brain metabolism after HI. Postnatal day 7 Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral HI brain injury were treated with either melatonin 10 mg/kg dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) with 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or vehicle (5% DMSO and/or PBS) directly and at 6 hours after HI. 1H MR spectra from the thalamus in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere were acquired 1 day after HI. Our results showed that injured animals had a distinct metabolic profile in the ipsilateral thalamus compared to sham with low concentrations of total creatine, choline, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), and high concentrations of lipids. A majority of the melatonin-treated animals had a metabolic profile characterized by higher total creatine, choline, NAA and lower lipid levels than other HI animals. When comparing absolute concentrations, melatonin treatment resulted in higher glutamine levels and lower lipid concentrations compared to DMSO treatment as well as higher macromolecule levels compared to PBS treatment day 1 after HI. DMSO treated animals had lower concentrations of glucose, creatine, phosphocholine and macromolecules compared to sham animals. In conclusion, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin were reflected in a more favorable metabolic profile including reduced lipid levels that likely represents reduced cell injury. Neuroprotective effects may also be related to the influence of melatonin on glutamate/glutamine metabolism. The modulatory effects of the solvent DMSO on cerebral energy metabolism might have masked additional beneficial effects of melatonin.

  10. Composite Marker of Cognitive Dysfunction and Brain Atrophy is Highly Accurate in Discriminating Between Relapsing-Remitting and Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizlaitienė, Rasa; Kaubrys, Gintaras; Giedraitienė, Nataša; Ramanauskas, Naglis; Dementavičienė, Jūratė

    2017-02-01

    BACKGROUND With the advent of numerous new-generation disease-modifying drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS), the discrimination between relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS) has become a problem of high importance. The aim of our study was to find a simple way to accurately discriminate between RRMS and SPMS that is applicable in clinical practice as a composite marker, using the linear measures of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the results of cognitive tests. MATERIAL AND METHODS We included 88 MS patients in the study: 43 participants had RRMS and 45 had SPMS. A battery consisting of 11 tests was used to evaluate cognitive function. We used 11 linear MRI measures and 7 indexes to assess brain atrophy. RESULTS Four cognitive tests and 3 linear MRI measures were able to distinguish RRMS from SPMS with the AUC >0.8 based on ROC analysis. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to identify the best set of cognitive and MRI markers. The model, using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), and Huckman Index, showed the highest predictive ability: AUC=0.921 (p<0.001). We constructed a simple remission-progression index from the same 3 variables, which discriminated well between RRMS and SPMS: AUC=0.920 (p<0.001), maximal Youden Index=0.702, cut-off=1.68, sensitivity=79.1%, and specificity=91.1%. CONCLUSIONS The composite remission-progression index, using the RAVLT test, DSST test, and MRI Huckman Index, is highly accurate in discriminating between RRMS and SPMS.

  11. Bignoniaceae Metabolites as Semiochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Castillo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Bignoniaceae are mostly found in tropical and neo-tropical regions in America, Asia and Africa, although some of them are cultivated in other regions as ornamentals. Species belonging to this family have been extensively studied in regard to their pharmacological properties (as extracts and isolated compounds. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported scientific evidence about the chemical properties as well as that of the extracts and isolated compounds from species of this family, focusing mainly in insect-plant interactions. As it is known, this family is recognized for the presence of iridoids which are markers of oviposition and feeding preference to species which have became specialist feeders. Some herbivore species have also evolved to the point of been able to sequester iridoids and use them as defenses against their predators. However, iridoids also exhibit anti-insect properties, and therefore they may be good lead molecules to develop botanical pesticides. Other secondary metabolites, such as quinones, and whole extracts have also shown potential as anti-insect agents.

  12. When pain really matters: A vicarious-pain brain marker tracks empathy for pain in the romantic partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Solà, Marina; Koban, Leonie; Krishnan, Anjali; Wager, Tor D

    2017-07-14

    In a previous study (Krishnan, 2016) we identified a whole-brain pattern, the Vicarious Pain Signature (VPS), which predicts vicarious pain when participants observe pictures of strangers in pain. Here, we test its generalization to observation of pain in a close significant other. Participants experienced painful heat (Self-Pain) and observed their romantic partner in pain (Partner-Pain). We measured whether (i) the VPS would respond selectively to Partner-Pain and (ii) the Neurologic Pain Signature (NPS), a measure validated to track somatic pain, would selectively respond to Self-Pain, despite the high interpersonal closeness between partners. The Partner-Pain condition activated the VPS (t = 4.71, p = 0.00005), but not the NPS (t = -1.03, p = 0.308). The Self-Pain condition activated the NPS (t = 13.70, p VPS (t = -1.03 p = 0.308). Relative VPS-NPS response differences strongly discriminated Partner-Pain vs. Self-Pain (cross-validated accuracy=97%, p VPS responses during Partner-Pain (r = 0.388, p = 0.050) and greater unpleasantness when observing the romantic partner in pain (r = 0.559, p = 0.003). The VPS generalizes across empathy paradigms and to an interactive social setting, and strongly activates when observing a close significant other in pain. VPS responses may be modulated by relevant interpersonal relationship factors. Self-Pain and Partner-Pain evoke non-overlapping large-scale neural representations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Caspase-Cleaved Tau Co-Localizes with Early Tangle Markers in the Human Vascular Dementia Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ryan J; Mason, Maria J; Thomas, Chloe; Poon, Wayne W; Rohn, Troy T

    2015-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common form of dementia in the United States and is characterized as a cerebral vessel vascular disease that leads to ischemic episodes. Whereas the relationship between caspase-cleaved tau and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been previously described, whether caspase activation and cleavage of tau occurs in VaD is presently unknown. To investigate a potential role for caspase-cleaved tau in VaD, we analyzed seven confirmed cases of VaD by immunohistochemistry utilizing a well-characterized antibody that specifically detects caspase-cleaved tau truncated at Asp421. Application of this antibody (TauC3) revealed consistent labeling within NFTs, dystrophic neurites within plaque-rich regions and corpora amylacea (CA) in the human VaD brain. Labeling of CA by the TauC3 antibody was widespread throughout the hippocampus proper, was significantly higher compared to age matched controls, and co-localized with ubiquitin. Staining of the TauC3 antibody co-localized with MC-1, AT8, and PHF-1 within NFTs. Quantitative analysis indicated that roughly 90% of PHF-1-labeled NFTs contained caspase-cleaved tau. In addition, we documented the presence of active caspase-3 within plaques, blood vessels and pretangle neurons that co-localized with TauC3. Collectively, these data support a role for the activation of caspase-3 and proteolytic cleavage of TauC3 in VaD providing further support for the involvement of this family of proteases in NFT pathology.

  14. Regional brain response to visual food cues is a marker of satiety that predicts food choice1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonya; Melhorn, Susan J; Smeraglio, Anne; Tyagi, Vidhi; Grabowski, Thomas; Schwartz, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neuronal processes that underlie the subjective experience of satiety after a meal are not well defined. Objective: We investigated how satiety alters the perception of and neural response to visual food cues. Design: Normal-weight participants (10 men, 13 women) underwent 2 fMRI scans while viewing images of high-calorie food that was previously rated as incompatible with weight loss and “fattening” and low-calorie, “nonfattening” food. After a fasting fMRI scan, participants ate a standardized breakfast and underwent reimaging at a randomly assigned time 15–300 min after breakfast to vary the degree of satiety. Measures of subjective appetite, food appeal, and ad libitum food intake (measured after the second fMRI scan) were correlated with activation by “fattening” (compared with “nonfattening”) food cues in a priori regions of interest. Results: Greater hunger correlated with higher appeal ratings of “fattening” (r = 0.46, P = 0.03) but not “nonfattening” (r = −0.20, P = 0.37) foods. Fasting amygdalar activation was negatively associated with fullness (left: r = −0.52; right: r = −0.58; both P ≤ 0.01), whereas postbreakfast fullness was positively correlated with activation in the dorsal striatum (right: r = 0.44; left: r = 0.45; both P foods with higher fat content. Conclusions: Postmeal satiety is shown in regional brain activation by images of high-calorie foods. Regions including the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and dorsal striatum may alter perception of, and reduce motivation to consume, energy-rich foods, ultimately driving food choice. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01631045. PMID:22990034

  15. Antisense directed against PS-1 gene decreases brain oxidative markers in aged senescence accelerated mice (SAMP8) and reverses learning and memory impairment: a proteomics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Förster, Sarah; Perluigi, Marzia; Cenini, Giovanna; Cini, Chiara; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Farr, Susan A.; Niehoff, Michael L.; Morley, John E.; Kumar, Vijaya B.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) through the induction of oxidative stress. This peptide is produced by proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the action of β- and γ-secretases. Previous studies demonstrated that reduction of Aβ, using an antisense oligonucleotide (AO) directed against the Aβ region of APP, reduced oxidative stress-mediated damage and prevented or reverted cognitive deficits in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8), a useful animal model to investigate the events related to Aβ pathology and possibly to the early phase of AD. In the current study, aged SAMP8 were treated by AO directed against PS-1, a component of the γ-secretase complex, and tested for learning and memory in T-maze foot shock avoidance and novel object recognition. Brain tissue was collected to identify the decrease of oxidative stress and to evaluate the proteins that are differently expressed and oxidized after the reduction in free radical levels induced by Aβ. We used both expression proteomics and redox proteomics approaches. In brain of AO-treated mice a decrease of oxidative stress markers was found, and the proteins identified by proteomics as expressed differently or nitrated are involved in processes known to be impaired in AD. Our results suggest that the treatment with AO directed against PS-1 in old SAMP8 mice reverses learning and memory deficits and reduces Aβ-mediated oxidative stress with restoration to the normal condition and identifies possible pharmacological targets to combat this devastating dementing disease. PMID:23777706

  16. Effects of hypotension and/or hypocapnia during sevoflurane anesthesia on perfusion and metabolites in the developing brain of piglets-a blinded randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Simone K; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Carrera, Inés; Mauch, Jacqueline; Spielmann, Nelly; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Weiss, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Hypotension (HT) and/or hypocapnia (HC) are frequent complications occurring during pediatric anesthesia and may cause cerebral injury in the developing brain. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of HT and/or HC on perfusion and metabolism in the developing brain. Twenty-eight piglets were randomly allocated to four groups: control (C), HT, HC, and hypotension and hyocapnia (HTC). Anesthesia was induced and maintained using sevoflurane. Fentanyl was added for instrumentation. Piglets were fully monitored and their lungs were artificially ventilated. Before treatment, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dynamic susceptibility-contrast-enhanced T2*-weighted MRI (DSC-MRI), and single voxel proton MR spectroscopy ((1) H MRS) were performed. Hypotension (mean arterial blood pressure: 30 ± 3 mmHg) was induced by blood withdrawal and nitroprusside infusion, and hyperventilation was used to induce HC (PaCO2 : 2.7-3.3 kPa). (1) H MRS and DSC-MRI were repeated immediately once treatment goals were achieved and 120 min later. Radiologists were blinded to the groups. DSCI-MRI and (1) H MRS analyses were performed in the thalamus, occipital and parietal lobe, hippocampus, and watershed areas. In comparison to C, mean time to peak (TTP) increased with HTC in all brain areas as assessed with DSC-MRI (n = 26). Using (1) H MRS, a significant decrease in N-acetyl aspartate, choline, and myoinositol, as well as an increase in glutamine-glutamate complex (Glx) were detected independent of group. Compared to C, changes were more pronounced for Glx (due to an increase in glutamate) and myoinositol with HTC, for N-acetyl aspartate with HT, and for Glx with HC. No lactate signal was present. The combination of HT and HC during sevoflurane anesthesia resulted in alteration of cerebral perfusion with signs of neuronal dysfunction and early neuronal ischemia. HT and HC alone also resulted in signs of metabolic disturbances despite the absence of detectable

  17. Fixation-related FMRI analysis in the domain of reading research: using self-paced eye movements as markers for hemodynamic brain responses during visual letter string processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richlan, Fabio; Gagl, Benjamin; Hawelka, Stefan; Braun, Mario; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin; Hutzler, Florian

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of using self-paced eye movements during reading (measured by an eye tracker) as markers for calculating hemodynamic brain responses measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Specifically, we were interested in whether the fixation-related fMRI analysis approach was sensitive enough to detect activation differences between reading material (words and pseudowords) and nonreading material (line and unfamiliar Hebrew strings). Reliable reading-related activation was identified in left hemisphere superior temporal, middle temporal, and occipito-temporal regions including the visual word form area (VWFA). The results of the present study are encouraging insofar as fixation-related analysis could be used in future fMRI studies to clarify some of the inconsistent findings in the literature regarding the VWFA. Our study is the first step in investigating specific visual word recognition processes during self-paced natural sentence reading via simultaneous eye tracking and fMRI, thus aiming at an ecologically valid measurement of reading processes. We provided the proof of concept and methodological framework for the analysis of fixation-related fMRI activation in the domain of reading research. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Neurochemical and structural markers in the brain predicting best choice-of-treatment in patients with schizophrenia - The Pan European Collaboration on Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia II (PECANS II) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kasper; Bojesen, Kirsten Borup; Sigvard, Anne Mette

    the progressive loss of brain tissue and social functions seen in many patients. Aim of PECANS II: To test if persistently high levels of glutamate and loss of brain tissue and social functions characterize a subgroup of patients with poor treatment response, while dopaminergic disturbances characterize another...... as markers for best-choice-of-treatment. Further, the results can pave the way for the development of new antipsychotic medication modulating glutamatergic disturbances and lead to better prevention strategies for the progressive loss of brain tissue and social functions in a treatment resistant subgroup...... disturbances with positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, and loss of brain tissue with analysis of a structural MR-scanning revealing loss of cortical thickness and surface area. Neurochemical and structural disturbances are compared with treatment response and level of function as measured by various...

  19. Metabolites in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Strand, Martin Frank; Krauss, Stefan; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2014-04-11

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical in embryonic development, stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, chemoattraction and synapse formation. Irregular HH signaling is associated with a number of disease conditions including congenital disorders and cancer. In particular, deregulation of HH signaling has been linked to skin, brain, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers. Key mediators of the HH signaling pathway are the 12-pass membrane protein Patched (PTC), the 7-pass membrane protein Smoothened (SMO) and the GLI transcription factors. PTC shares homology with the RND family of small-molecule transporters and it has been proposed that it interferes with SMO through metabolites. Although a conclusive picture is lacking, substantial efforts are made to identify and understand natural metabolites/sterols, including cholesterol, vitamin D3, oxysterols and glucocorticoides, that may be affected by, or influence the HH signaling cascade at the level of PTC and SMO. In this review we will elaborate the role of metabolites in HH signaling with a focus on oxysterols, and discuss advancements in modern analytical approaches in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolomics of Neurotransmitters and Related Metabolites in Post-Mortem Tissue from the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum of Alcoholic Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashem, Mohammed Abul; Ahmed, Selina; Sultana, Nilufa; Ahmed, Eakhlas U; Pickford, Russell; Rae, Caroline; Šerý, Omar; McGregor, Iain S; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-02-01

    We report on changes in neurotransmitter metabolome and protein expression in the striatum of humans exposed to heavy long-term consumption of alcohol. Extracts from post mortem striatal tissue (dorsal striatum; DS comprising caudate nucleus; CN and putamen; P and ventral striatum; VS constituted by nucleus accumbens; NAc) were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomics was studied in CN by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry. Proteomics identified 25 unique molecules expressed differently by the alcohol-affected tissue. Two were dopamine-related proteins and one a GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD65. Two proteins that are related to apoptosis and/or neuronal loss (BiD and amyloid-β A4 precursor protein-binding family B member 3) were increased. There were no differences in the levels of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5HT), homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (HIAA), histamine, L-glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Tryp) between the DS (CN and P) and VS (NAc) in control brains. Choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (Ach) were higher and norepinephrine (NE) lower, in the VS. Alcoholic striata had lower levels of neurotransmitters except for Glu (30 % higher in the alcoholic ventral striatum). Ratios of DOPAC/DA and HIAA/5HT were higher in alcoholic striatum indicating an increase in the DA and 5HT turnover. Glutathione was significantly reduced in all three regions of alcohol-affected striatum. We conclude that neurotransmitter systems in both the DS (CN and P) and the VS (NAc) were significantly influenced by long-term heavy alcohol intake associated with alcoholism.

  1. Proton NMR-based metabolite analyses of archived serial paired serum and urine samples from myeloma patients at different stages of disease activity identifies acetylcarnitine as a novel marker of active disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Lodi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biomarker identification is becoming increasingly important for the development of personalized or stratified therapies. Metabolomics yields biomarkers indicative of phenotype that can be used to characterize transitions between health and disease, disease progression and therapeutic responses. The desire to reproducibly detect ever greater numbers of metabolites at ever diminishing levels has naturally nurtured advances in best practice for sample procurement, storage and analysis. Reciprocally, since many of the available extensive clinical archives were established prior to the metabolomics era and were not processed in such an 'ideal' fashion, considerable scepticism has arisen as to their value for metabolomic analysis. Here we have challenged that paradigm. METHODS: We performed proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabolomics on blood serum and urine samples from 32 patients representative of a total cohort of 1970 multiple myeloma patients entered into the United Kingdom Medical Research Council Myeloma IX trial. FINDINGS: Using serial paired blood and urine samples we detected metabolite profiles that associated with diagnosis, post-treatment remission and disease progression. These studies identified carnitine and acetylcarnitine as novel potential biomarkers of active disease both at diagnosis and relapse and as a mediator of disease associated pathologies. CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that samples conventionally processed and archived can provide useful metabolomic information that has important implications for understanding the biology of myeloma, discovering new therapies and identifying biomarkers potentially useful in deciding the choice and application of therapy.

  2. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A

    2000-01-01

    Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations co...

  3. The antiadhesive activity of cranberry phytocomplex studied by metabolomics: Intestinal PAC-A metabolites but not intact PAC-A are identified as markers in active urines against uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Gregorio; Sut, Stefania; Pellizzaro, Anna; Brun, Paola; Voinovich, Dario; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Cranberry procyanidins and quercetin derivatives are considered possible active compounds against urinary tract infections (UTIs). In this paper a small group (n=6) of healthy subjects consumed a product containing 360mg of cranberry extract (42.6% w/w of PAC-A and 14.6% w/w of PAC-B) and 200mg of quercetin. Urine samples were collected after 2,4,6,8, and 24h. The changes in antiadhesive properties against urophatogenic E. coli of the urinary output were determined in vitro and modification to urinary metabolome were studied by LC-MS. Significant antiadhesive properties of urine samples were observed, with the greatest effect 6-8h after oral administration, confirming the possible usefulness of cranberry containing products in urinary tract infections (UTI). Metabolomic analysis revealed that valeric acid and valerolactone derivatives that were detected in 6 and 8h sample, while 4-hydroxy-5-(phenyl)-valeric acid-O-glucuronide and 5-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone at 6h and 4-hydroxy-5-(phenyl)-valeric acid-O-sulphate, 3-hydroxyphenyl-valeric acid, 5-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone-4'-O-glucuronide and 4-hydroxy-5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-valeric acid-3'-O-sulphate were the most abundant at 8h. The present study shows that the antiadhesive properties of urine sample after cranberry consumption are not ascribable to the direct effect of PAC-A, because their levels in urinary output are in the range of ng/mL. On the other hand, significant metabolites that were detected are mainly metabolites of intestinal action on polyphenols and PACs, as well as glucuronidated and sulphated quercetin, suggesting an important role of intestinal modification of phytoconstituents in the cranberry extract mechanism of action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain Atrophy Estimated from Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Marker of Large-Scale Network-Based Neurodegeneration in Aging and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Veldsman

    2017-01-01

    Brain atrophy is a normal part of healthy aging, and stroke appears to have neurodegenerative effects, accelerating this atrophy to pathological levels. The distributed pattern of atrophy in healthy aging suggests that large-scale brain networks may be involved. At the same time, the network wide effects of stroke are beginning to be appreciated. There is now widespread use of network methods to understand the brain in terms of coordinated brain activity or white matter connectivity. Examinin...

  5. Expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins is a candidate marker of brain metastasis in both ErbB-2+ and ErbB-2- primary breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Aragüés, Ramón; Driouch, Keltouma; Martín, Berta; Oliva, Baldo; Gil, Miguel; Boluda, Susana; Fernández, Pedro L.; Martínez, Antonio; Moreno, Víctor; Acebes, Juan J.; Lidereau, Rosette; Reyal, Fabien; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Sierra, Angels

    2011-01-01

    The increasing incidence of breast cancer brain metastasis in patients with otherwise well-controlled systemic cancer is a key challenge in cancer research. It is necessary to understand the properties of brain-tropic tumor cells to identify patients at risk for brain metastasis. Here we attempt to

  6. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide is a useful prognostic marker in patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension and renal insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Harbaum

    Full Text Available N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is a routinely used prognostic parameter in patients with pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH. As it accumulates in the presence of impaired renal function, the clinical utility of NT-proBNP in PH patients with concomitant renal insufficiency remains unclear. In a retrospective approach, patients with pre-capillary PH (group I or IV and concomitant renal insufficiency at time of right heart catheterization (glomerular filtration rate (GFR ≤60 ml/min/1.73 m2 were identified out of all prevalent pre-capillary PH patients treated at a single center. Forty patients with renal insufficiency (25.8% were identified and matched regarding hemodynamic parameters with a control group of 56 PH patients with normal renal function (GFR >60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Correlations of NT-proBNP levels with hemodynamic and prognostic parameters (time to clinical worsening and overall survival were assessed. Overall, GFR correlated inversely with NT-proBNP and had the strongest influence on NT-proBNP levels in a stepwise multiple linear regression model including hemodynamic parameters and age (r2 = 0.167. PH patients with renal insufficiency had significant higher levels of NT-proBNP (median: 1935 ng/l vs. 573 ng/l, p = 0.001. Nevertheless, NT-proBNP correlated with invasive hemodynamic parameters in these patients. Using higher cut-off values than in patients with preserved renal function, NT-proBNP levels were significantly associated with time to clinical worsening (>1660 ng/l, p = 0.001 and survival (>2212 ng/l, p = 0.047 in patients with renal insufficiency. Multivariate Cox's proportional hazards analysis including established prognostic parameters, age and GFR confirmed NT-proBNP as an independent risk factor for clinical worsening in PH patients with renal insufficiency (hazard ratio 4.8, p = 0.007. Thus, in a retrospective analysis we showed that NT-proBNP levels correlated with

  7. Enhanced metabolite generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan [Middle Island, NY

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  8. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  9. Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease Using Metabolite Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F; Heegaard, Niels H H; Færgeman, Nils J K

    2017-01-01

    Biomarker research in Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been dominated by measuring dopamine metabolites or alpha-synuclein in cerebrospinal fluid. However, these markers do not allow early detection, precise prognosis or monitoring of disease progression. Moreover, PD is now considered a multifa......Biomarker research in Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been dominated by measuring dopamine metabolites or alpha-synuclein in cerebrospinal fluid. However, these markers do not allow early detection, precise prognosis or monitoring of disease progression. Moreover, PD is now considered...

  10. Dopamine-modified TiO2 monolith-assisted LDI MS imaging for simultaneous localization of small metabolites and lipids in mouse brain tissue with enhanced detection selectivity and sensitivity† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00937b Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Chu, James L.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Gillette, Martha U.

    2017-01-01

    Localization of metabolites using multiplexed mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides important chemical information for biological research. In contrast to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), TiO2-assisted laser desorption/ionization (LDI) for MSI improves detection of low molecular mass metabolites (monolithic TiO2-DA structures. The sub-micron scale and higher surface pH of the TiO2 particle sizes led to improved detection of phospholipid signals. Compared to unmodified TiO2 sub-micron particles, the DA-modified TiO2 monolith led to 10- to 30-fold increases in the signal-to-noise ratios of a number of compound peaks. The TiO2-DA monolith-assisted LDI MSI approach has higher selectivity and sensitivity for Lewis basic compounds, such as fatty acids, cholesterols, ceramides, diacylglycerols, and phosphatidylethanolamine, when analyzed in positive mode, than traditional MALDI MS. Using this new method, over 100 molecules, including amino acids, alkaloids, free fatty acids, peptides, and lipids, were localized in mouse brain sections. By comparing the presence and localization of those molecules in young and old mouse brains, the approach demonstrated good performance in the determination of aging-related neurochemical changes in the brain. PMID:28553535

  11. The "first hit" toward alcohol reinforcement: role of ethanol metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Yedy; Quintanilla, María Elena; Karahanian, Eduardo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario

    2015-05-01

    This review analyzes literature that describes the behavioral effects of 2 metabolites of ethanol (EtOH): acetaldehyde and salsolinol (a condensation product of acetaldehyde and dopamine) generated in the brain. These metabolites are self-administered into specific brain areas by animals, showing strong reinforcing effects. A wealth of evidence shows that EtOH, a drug consumed to attain millimolar concentrations, generates brain metabolites that are reinforcing at micromolar and nanomolar concentrations. Salsolinol administration leads to marked increases in voluntary EtOH intake, an effect inhibited by mu-opioid receptor blockers. In animals that have ingested EtOH chronically, the maintenance of alcohol intake is no longer influenced by EtOH metabolites, as intake is taken over by other brain systems. However, after EtOH withdrawal brain acetaldehyde has a major role in promoting binge-like drinking in the condition known as the "alcohol deprivation effect"; a condition seen in animals that have ingested alcohol chronically, are deprived of EtOH for extended periods, and are allowed EtOH re-access. The review also analyzes the behavioral effects of acetate, a metabolite that enters the brain and is responsible for motor incoordination at low doses of EtOH. Also discussed are the paradoxical effects of systemic acetaldehyde. Overall, evidence strongly suggests that brain-generated EtOH metabolites play a major role in the early ("first-hit") development of alcohol reinforcement and in the generation of relapse-like drinking. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  12. Effect of pomegranate extracts on brain antioxidant markers and cholinesterase activity in high fat-high fructose diet induced obesity in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Zahra; Ghorbel, Asma; Turki, Mouna; Akrout, Férièle Messadi; Ayadi, Fatma; Elfeki, Abdelfateh; Hammami, Mohamed

    2017-06-27

    To investigate beneficial effects of Pomegranate seeds oil (PSO), leaves (PL), juice (PJ) and (PP) on brain cholinesterase activity, brain oxidative stress and lipid profile in high-fat-high fructose diet (HFD) induced-obese rat. In vitro and in vivo cholinesterase activity, brain oxidative status, body and brain weight and plasma lipid profile were measured in control rats, HFD-fed rats and HFD-fed rats treated by PSO, PL, PJ and PP. In vitro study showed that PSO, PL, PP, PJ inhibited cholinesterase activity in dose dependant manner. PL extract displayed the highest inhibitory activity by IC50 of 151.85 mg/ml. For in vivo study, HFD regime induced a significant increase of cholinesterase activity in brain by 17.4% as compared to normal rats. However, the administration of PSO, PL, PJ and PP to HDF-rats decreased cholinesterase activity in brain respectively by 15.48%, 6.4%, 20% and 18.7% as compared to untreated HFD-rats. Moreover, HFD regime caused significant increase in brain stress, brain and body weight, and lipid profile disorders in blood. Furthermore, PSO, PL, PJ and PP modulated lipid profile in blood and prevented accumulation of lipid in brain and body evidenced by the decrease of their weights as compared to untreated HFD-rats. In addition administration of these extract protected brain from stress oxidant, evidenced by the decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA) and Protein carbonylation (PC) levels and the increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels. These findings highlight the neuroprotective effects of pomegranate extracts and one of mechanisms is the inhibition of cholinesterase and the stimulation of antioxidant capacity.

  13. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolite profiles of neonatal rat hippocampus and brainstem regions following early postnatal exposure to intermittent hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnall, Robert A.; Chen, Xi; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Sirieix, Chrystelle M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2017-03-01

    Most premature infants born at less than 30 weeks gestation are exposed to periods of mild intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with apnea of prematurity and periodic breathing. In adults, IH associated with sleep apnea causes neurochemical and structural alterations in the brain. However, it is unknown whether IH in the premature infant leads to neurodevelopmental impairment. Quantification of biochemical markers that can precisely identify infants at risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome is essential. In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) facilitates the quantification of metabolites from distinct regions of the developing brain. We report the changes in metabolite profiles in the brainstem and hippocampal regions of developing rat brains, resulting from exposure to IH. Rat pups were chosen for study because there is rapid postnatal hippocampal development that occurs during the first 4 weeks in the developing rat brain, which corresponds to the first 2-3 postnatal years of development in humans. The brainstem was examined because of our interest in respiratory control disorders in the newborn and because of brainstem gliosis described in infants who succumb to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Metabolite profiles were compared between hypoxia treated rat pups (n = 9) and normoxic controls (n = 6). Metabolite profiles were acquired using the Point-RESolved spectroscopy (PRESS) MRS sequence and were quantified using the TARQUIN software. There was a significant difference in the concentrations of creatine (p = 0.031), total creatine (creatine + phosphocreatine) (p = 0.028), and total choline (p = 0.001) in the brainstem, and glycine (p = 0.031) in the hippocampal region. The changes are consistent with altered cellular bioenergetics and metabolism associated with hypoxic insult.

  14. Characterization of the radiolabeled metabolite of tau PET tracer {sup 18}F-THK5351

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Ryuichi [Tohoku University, Division of Neuro-imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Iwata, Ren; Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Katsutoshi, Furukawa; Ishiki, Aiko; Tomita, Naoki; Arai, Hiroyuki [Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Division of Neuro-imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Okamura, Nobuyuki [Tohoku University, Division of Neuro-imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Division of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    {sup 18}F-THK5351 is a novel radiotracer developed for in vivo imaging of tau pathology in the brain. For the quantitative assessment of tau deposits in the brain, it is important that the radioactive metabolite does not enter the brain and that it does not bind to tau fibrils. The purpose of the study was to identify a radiolabeled metabolite of {sup 18}F-THK5351 in blood samples from human subjects and to characterize its pharmacological properties. Venous blood samples were collected from three human subjects after injection of {sup 18}F-THK5351 and the plasma metabolite was measured by high performance thin layer chromatography. In addition, mass spectrometry analysis and enzymatic assays were used to identify this metabolite. Mice were used to investigate the blood-brain barrier permeability of the radioactive metabolite. Furthermore, the binding ability of the metabolite to tau aggregates was evaluated using autoradiography and binding assays using human brain samples. About 13 % of the unmetabolized radiotracer was detectable in human plasma at 60 min following the injection of {sup 18}F-THK5351. The isolated radiometabolite of {sup 18}F-THK5351 was the sulphoconjugate of THK5351. This metabolite could be produced in vitro by incubating THK5351 with liver but not brain homogenates. The metabolite did not penetrate the blood-brain barrier in mice, and exhibited little binding to tau protein aggregates in post-mortem human brain samples. These results suggest that the sole metabolite detectable in plasma seems to be generated outside the brain and does not cross into the brain, which does not affect quantitative analysis of PET images. (orig.)

  15. Fatty acid metabolites in rapidly proliferating breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T O'Flaherty

    Full Text Available Breast cancers that over-express a lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase are associated with poor survival possibly because they overproduce metabolites that alter the cancer's malignant behaviors. However, these metabolites and behaviors have not been identified. We here identify which metabolites among those that stimulate breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro are associated with rapidly proliferating breast cancer.We used selective ion monitoring-mass spectrometry to quantify in the cancer and normal breast tissue of 27 patients metabolites that stimulate (15-, 12-, 5-hydroxy-, and 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoate, 13-hydroxy-octadecaenoate [HODE] or inhibit (prostaglandin [PG]E2 and D2 breast cancer cell proliferation. We then related their levels to each cancer's proliferation rate as defined by its Mib1 score.13-HODE was the only metabolite strongly, significantly, and positively associated with Mib1 scores. It was similarly associated with aggressive grade and a key component of grade, mitosis, and also trended to be associated with lymph node metastasis. PGE2 and PGD2 trended to be negatively associated with these markers. No other metabolite in cancer and no metabolite in normal tissue had this profile of associations.Our data fit a model wherein the overproduction of 13-HODE by 15-lipoxygenase-1 shortens breast cancer survival by stimulating its cells to proliferate and possibly metastasize; no other oxygenase-metabolite pathway, including cyclooxygenase-PGE2/D2 pathways, uses this specific mechanism to shorten survival.

  16. Tissue distribution of rat flavanol metabolites at different doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Maria; Pons, Zara; Bravo, Francisca Isabel; Muguerza, Begoña; Arola-Arnal, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Flavanols are metabolized in the small intestine and the liver to produce their glucuronidated, sulfated or methylated conjugates that can be body distributed or excreted in the urine. However, the intake of large amounts of flavanols is not directly related to their bioavailability. This study aims to investigate the administered dose dependence of flavanols' conjugation and body distribution. In this study, different doses of a grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE; 125, 250, 375 and 1000 mg/kg) were orally administered to male Wistar rats. Tissues were collected 2h after GSPE administration. Flavanols were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS. Results show that the majority of GSPE metabolites are located in the kidney, followed by the liver. Lower concentrations were found in mesenteric white adipose tissue (MWAT) and the brain. Moreover, flavanol metabolites followed a tissue-specific distribution pattern independent of dosage. In the kidney, glucuronidated metabolites were the most abundant; however, in the liver, it was mainly methyl-glucuronidated metabolites. In MWAT, free flavanols were dominant, and methylated metabolites were dominant in the brain. Concentration within a tissue was dependent on the administered dose. In conclusion, flavanol metabolites follow a tissue-specific distribution pattern and only the tissue concentration of flavanol metabolites is dependent on the administered dose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, sin...

  18. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) had revealed that both DBS and electroacupuncture at acupoints with electrical stimulation are related to the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture might be useful to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa.

  20. Brain SPECT imaging with blood flow markers in epilepsy and balloon occlusion; Hirn-SPECT mit Durchblutungsmarkern in der Epilepsiediagnostik und bei der Ballon-Okklusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenwald, F. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1996-02-01

    Brain SPECT imaging is used as a routine technique in presurgical evaluation. In three fields (focus detection, prognosis, stimulation) the value of brain SPECT imaging in cost effective patient management is presented in this paper. Interictal and ictal brain SPECT imaging are used to detect the epileptic focus and are a powerful tool during implantation of subdural or depth electrodes, being able to replace an `invasive` evaluation in some cases. Brain SPECT can be used to estimate the patients` postoperative outcome (memory, seizure frequency). Using activation imaging, the functional activity of brain regions can be estimated prior to resection of larger areas. In balloon occlusion, the blood flow pattern during the occlusion and the risk of ischemia after resection or permanent occlusion of the careotid artery can be estimated by means of brain SPECT. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Hirn-SPECT-Untersuchung hat inzwischen einen festen Platz in der praechirurgischen Epilepsiediagnostik. Anhand von drei Einsatzgebieten innerhalb dieser Thematik (Fokussuche, Prognose, Stimulationsuntersuchung) wird gezeigt, dass die Indikation zur Hirn-SPECT auch unter Kosten-Nutzen-Aspekten gestellt werden kann. Iktale und interiktale Untersuchungen werden im Rahmen der Fokussuche eingesetzt und koennen bei der Implantation von Subdural- oder Tiefen-Elektroden hilfreich sein und in einzelnen Faellen eine invasive Abklaerung ersetzen. Der Hirn-SPECT-Befund kann zur Abschaetzung des postoperativen `outcome` (Gedaechtnis, Anfallsfrequenz) beitragen. Mittels Aktivierungsuntersuchungen kann vor groesseren resektiven Eingriffen die funktionelle Aktivitaet von Hirnarealen beurteilt werden. Bei der Ballon-Okklusion ist es mit Hilfe der Hirn-SPECT-Untersuchung praeoperativ moeglich, die Durchblutungsverhaeltnisse waehrend der Okklusion und damit das Risiko einer Ischaemie nach Resektion oder permanenter Okklusion zu beurteilen. (orig.)

  1. Understanding and classifying metabolite space and metabolite-likeness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio E Peironcely

    Full Text Available While the entirety of 'Chemical Space' is huge (and assumed to contain between 10(63 and 10(200 'small molecules', distinct subsets of this space can nonetheless be defined according to certain structural parameters. An example of such a subspace is the chemical space spanned by endogenous metabolites, defined as 'naturally occurring' products of an organisms' metabolism. In order to understand this part of chemical space in more detail, we analyzed the chemical space populated by human metabolites in two ways. Firstly, in order to understand metabolite space better, we performed Principal Component Analysis (PCA, hierarchical clustering and scaffold analysis of metabolites and non-metabolites in order to analyze which chemical features are characteristic for both classes of compounds. Here we found that heteroatom (both oxygen and nitrogen content, as well as the presence of particular ring systems was able to distinguish both groups of compounds. Secondly, we established which molecular descriptors and classifiers are capable of distinguishing metabolites from non-metabolites, by assigning a 'metabolite-likeness' score. It was found that the combination of MDL Public Keys and Random Forest exhibited best overall classification performance with an AUC value of 99.13%, a specificity of 99.84% and a selectivity of 88.79%. This performance is slightly better than previous classifiers; and interestingly we found that drugs occupy two distinct areas of metabolite-likeness, the one being more 'synthetic' and the other being more 'metabolite-like'. Also, on a truly prospective dataset of 457 compounds, 95.84% correct classification was achieved. Overall, we are confident that we contributed to the tasks of classifying metabolites, as well as to understanding metabolite chemical space better. This knowledge can now be used in the development of new drugs that need to resemble metabolites, and in our work particularly for assessing the metabolite

  2. Understanding and classifying metabolite space and metabolite-likeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Bender, Andreas; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    While the entirety of 'Chemical Space' is huge (and assumed to contain between 10(63) and 10(200) 'small molecules'), distinct subsets of this space can nonetheless be defined according to certain structural parameters. An example of such a subspace is the chemical space spanned by endogenous metabolites, defined as 'naturally occurring' products of an organisms' metabolism. In order to understand this part of chemical space in more detail, we analyzed the chemical space populated by human metabolites in two ways. Firstly, in order to understand metabolite space better, we performed Principal Component Analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering and scaffold analysis of metabolites and non-metabolites in order to analyze which chemical features are characteristic for both classes of compounds. Here we found that heteroatom (both oxygen and nitrogen) content, as well as the presence of particular ring systems was able to distinguish both groups of compounds. Secondly, we established which molecular descriptors and classifiers are capable of distinguishing metabolites from non-metabolites, by assigning a 'metabolite-likeness' score. It was found that the combination of MDL Public Keys and Random Forest exhibited best overall classification performance with an AUC value of 99.13%, a specificity of 99.84% and a selectivity of 88.79%. This performance is slightly better than previous classifiers; and interestingly we found that drugs occupy two distinct areas of metabolite-likeness, the one being more 'synthetic' and the other being more 'metabolite-like'. Also, on a truly prospective dataset of 457 compounds, 95.84% correct classification was achieved. Overall, we are confident that we contributed to the tasks of classifying metabolites, as well as to understanding metabolite chemical space better. This knowledge can now be used in the development of new drugs that need to resemble metabolites, and in our work particularly for assessing the metabolite-likeness of candidate

  3. The neurotoxicity of pyridinium metabolites of haloperidol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Górska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Haloperydol is a butyrophenone, typical neuroleptic agent characterized as a high antipsychotics effects in the treatment of schizophrenia and in palliative care to alleviation many syndromes, such as naursea, vomiting and delirium. Clinical problems occurs during and after administration of the drug are side effects, particularly extrapyrramidal symptoms (EPS. The neurotoxicity of haloperydol may be initiated by the cationic metabolites of haloperydol, HPP+, RHPP+, formed by oxidation and reduction pathways. These metabolites are transported by human organic cation transporters (hOCT to several brain structures for exapmle, in substantia nigra, striatum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus. After reaching the dopaminergic neurons inhibits mitochondrial complex I, evidence for free radical involvement, thus leading to neurodegeneration.

  4. Functional imaging markers of the MCI brain in task and at rest: detecting memory and connectivity impairments in prodromal Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kebets, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a major neurodegenerative disease, and currently the leading cause of dementia in the world. The application of machine learning algorithms has recently brought a novel perspective to the early identification of neurological diseases such as AD, as they can advantageously exploit multivariate information in high-dimensional data to predict patient diagnosis and ultimately prognosis at the individual level. This work aimed to develop an early functional marker for A...

  5. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  6. Spatial Elucidation of Spinal Cord Lipid- and Metabolite- Regulations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2014-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating, rapidly progressing disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the brain stem and the spinal cord. We employed time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to profile spatial lipid- and metabolite- regulations in post mortem human spinal cord tissue from ALS patients to investigate chemical markers of ALS pathogenesis. ToF-SIMS scans and multivariate analysis of image and spectral data were performed on thoracic human spinal cord sections. Multivariate statistics of the image data allowed delineation of anatomical regions of interest based on their chemical identity. Spectral data extracted from these regions were compared using two different approaches for multivariate statistics, for investigating ALS related lipid and metabolite changes. The results show a significant decrease for cholesterol, triglycerides, and vitamin E in the ventral horn of ALS samples, which is presumably a consequence of motor neuron degeneration. Conversely, the biogenic mediator lipid lysophosphatidylcholine and its fragments were increased in ALS ventral spinal cord, pointing towards neuroinflammatory mechanisms associated with neuronal cell death. ToF-SIMS imaging is a promising approach for chemical histology and pathology for investigating the subcellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  7. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uwerhiavwe

    Variability was observed for six ... rapid increase in climate change, so there is need to develop high yielding ... the past decade including assessment of genetic diversity in maize ... The SSR gel images and marker data were processed using.

  8. Correspondence of DNA Methylation Between Blood and Brain Tissue and Its Application to Schizophrenia Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Esther; Hass, Johanna; Liu, Jingyu; Roffman, Joshua L; Bernardoni, Fabio; Roessner, Veit; Kirsch, Matthias; Schackert, Gabriele; Calhoun, Vince; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Given the difficulty of procuring human brain tissue, a key question in molecular psychiatry concerns the extent to which epigenetic signatures measured in more accessible tissues such as blood can serve as a surrogate marker for the brain. Here, we aimed (1) to investigate the blood-brain correspondence of DNA methylation using a within-subject design and (2) to identify changes in DNA methylation of brain-related biological pathways in schizophrenia.We obtained paired blood and temporal lobe biopsy samples simultaneously from 12 epilepsy patients during neurosurgical treatment. Using the Infinium 450K methylation array we calculated similarity of blood and brain DNA methylation for each individual separately. We applied our findings by performing gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA) of peripheral blood DNA methylation data (Infinium 27K) of 111 schizophrenia patients and 122 healthy controls and included only Cytosine-phosphate-Guanine (CpG) sites that were significantly correlated across tissues.Only 7.9% of CpG sites showed a statistically significant, large correlation between blood and brain tissue, a proportion that although small was significantly greater than predicted by chance. GSEA analysis of schizophrenia data revealed altered methylation profiles in pathways related to precursor metabolites and signaling peptides.Our findings indicate that most DNA methylation markers in peripheral blood do not reliably predict brain DNA methylation status. However, a subset of peripheral data may proxy methylation status of brain tissue. Restricting the analysis to these markers can identify meaningful epigenetic differences in schizophrenia and potentially other brain disorders. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Production of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant micro-organism such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces and excretes into culture medium a stilbenoid metabolite product when grown under stilbenoid production conditions, which expresses in above native levels a ABC transporter which transports said stilbenoid out of said...... micro-organism cells to the culture medium. The genome of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces an auxotrophic phenotype which is compensated by a plasmid which also expresses one or more of said enzymes constituting said metabolic pathway producing said stilbenoid, an expression product of the plasmid...

  10. Irreversible effects of dichloromethane on the brain after long term exposure: a quantitative study of DNA and the glial cell marker proteins S-100 and GFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, L E; Kjellstrand, P; Aurell, A; Haglid, K G

    1986-01-01

    Two astroglial proteins S-100 and GFA, as well as DNA, were quantitatively determined in different regions of the gerbil brain after continuous long term exposure to moderate concentrations of dichloromethane. The intention of the experiment was to expose three groups of animals at three different solvent concentrations (210, 350, or 700 ppm) for three months. Because of the high mortality rate, however, the 700 ppm experiment was terminated after seven weeks. In the 350 ppm experiment half the exposed animals died and the exposure period was terminated after ten weeks. After the exposure period, the surviving gerbils in the 350 ppm exposure group and those from the 210 ppm group were allowed a postexposure solvent free period of four months. After exposure to 350 ppm, increased concentrations of the two astroglial proteins were found in the frontal and sensory motor cerebral cortex, compatible with astrogliosis in these regions. Exposure to 350 ppm and 210 ppm decreased the concentrations of DNA in the hippocampus. Moreover, after exposure at 350 ppm, DNA concentrations were also decreased in the cerebellar hemispheres. These results indicate a decreased cell density in these brain regions, probably due to cell loss. The neurotoxic effects were not found to correlate with the endogenous formation of carbon monoxide. Images PMID:3707866

  11. Mapping cortical hand motor representation using TMS: A method to assess brain plasticity and a surrogate marker for recovery of function after stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdemann-Podubecká, Jitka; Nowak, Dennis Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is associated with reorganization within motor areas of both hemispheres. Mapping the cortical hand motor representation using transcranial magnetic stimulation may help to understand the relationship between motor cortex reorganization and motor recovery of the affected hand after stroke. A standardized review of the pertinent literature was performed. We identified 20 trials, which analyzed the relationship between the extent and/or location of cortical hand motor representation using transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor function and recovery of the affected hand. Several correlations were found between cortical reorganization and measures of hand motor impairment and recovery. A better understanding of the relationships between the extent and location of cortical hand motor representation and the motor impairment and motor recovery of the affected hand after stroke may contribute to a targeted use of non-invasive brain stimulation protocols. In the future motor mapping may help to guide brain stimulation techniques to the most effective motor area in an affected individual. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a major risk marker for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, P; Hildebrandt, P; Hess, G

    2005-01-01

    , myocardial infarction, stroke, revascularisation procedures in the heart or legs, and amputations. RESULTS: In the whole group, plasma NT-proBNP being above the median was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease during follow-up, with an unadjusted hazard ratio of 4.4 (95% CI 2.3-8.4; p.../INTERPRETATION: We conclude that high plasma NT-proBNP is a major risk marker for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria........0001). A decrease in plasma NT-proBNP of 10 pg/ml during the first 2 years of intervention was associated with a 1% relative reduction in the primary endpoint (pdisease, the mean plasma NT-proBNP level increased during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS...

  13. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP-PROBOOK

    2016-10-05

    Oct 5, 2016 ... Cluster analysis was constructed using DARwin program version 6.0. Forty eight (48) coconut individuals were clustered into three groups. Key words: Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera ... markers, cluster analysis, diversity. INTRODUCTION ... industry in Kenya (Muhammed et al., 2013). Furthermore, the slow ...

  14. (SRAP) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... are a very powerful tool for characterization and genetic diversity estimation. Many molecular marker techniques have been successfully used in identification and genetic diversity analysis in mulberry, such as RAPD (Xiang et al., 1995; Feng et al., 1996; Zhao and Pan, 2004),. AFLP (Sharma and Sharma, ...

  15. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-30

    Jul 30, 2014 ... and attempt crosses for genetic improvement of the crop. Key words: Capsicum, genetic diversity, molecular characterization, simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers. INTRODUCTION. Chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) (Solanaceae) has a chromosome number 2n=2x=24. It is indigenous to South.

  16. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is an important oilseed crop worldwide. The objective of this research was to study the genetic diversity and relationships of B. napus accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR). A set of 217 genotypes was characterized using 37 SSR markers of mapping on the B.

  17. (RAPD) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... Biotechnol. Biotechnol. Equip.14: 16-18. Belaj A, Satovic Z, Cipriani G, Baldoni L, Testolin R, Rallo L, Trujillo I. (2003). Comparative study of the discriminating capacity of RAPD,. AFLP and SSR markers and of their effectiveness in establishing genetic relationships in olive. Theor. Appl. Genet. 107: 736-744 ...

  18. Role of Troponins I and T and N-Terminal Prohormone of Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Monitoring Cardiac Safety of Patients With Early-Stage Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer Receiving Trastuzumab : A Herceptin Adjuvant Study Cardiac Marker Substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Suter, Thomas M.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Steinseifer, Jutta; Noe, Johannes; Lauer, Sabine; Al-Sakaff, Nedal; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.; de Azambuja, Evandro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Women receiving trastuzumab with chemotherapy are at risk for trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction (TRCD). We explored the prognostic value of cardiac markers (troponins I and T, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]) to predict baseline susceptibility to develop

  19. Brain oxidative stress: detection and mapping of anti-oxidant marker 'Glutathione' in different brain regions of healthy male/female, MCI and Alzheimer patients using non-invasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pravat K; Tripathi, Manjari; Sugunan, Sreedevi

    2012-01-06

    Glutathione (GSH) serves as an important anti-oxidant in the brain by scavenging harmful reactive oxygen species that are generated during different molecular processes. The GSH level in the brain provides indirect information on oxidative stress of the brain. We report in vivo detection of GSH non-invasively from various brain regions (frontal cortex, parietal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum) in bilateral hemispheres of healthy male and female subjects and from bi-lateral frontal cortices in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). All AD patients who participated in this study were on medication with cholinesterase inhibitors. Healthy young male (age 26.4±3.0) and healthy young female (age 23.6±2.1) subjects have higher amount of GSH in the parietal cortical region and a specific GSH distribution pattern (parietal cortex>frontal cortex>hippocampus ~ cerebellum) has been found. Overall mean GSH content is higher in healthy young female compared to healthy young male subjects and GSH is distributed differently in two hemispheres among male and female subjects. In both young female and male subjects, statistically significant (p=0.02 for young female and p=0.001 for young male) difference in mean GSH content is found when compared between left frontal cortex (LFC) and right frontal cortex (RFC). In healthy young female subjects, we report statistically significant positive correlation of GSH content between RFC and LFC (r=0.641, p=0.004) as well as right parietal cortex (RPC) and left parietal cortex (LPC) (r=0.797, p=0.000) regions. In healthy young male subjects, statistically significant positive correlation of GSH content was observed between LFC and LPC (r=0.481, p=0.032) regions. This statistical analysis implicates that in case of a high GSH content in LPC of a young male, his LFC region would also contain high GSH and vice versa. The difference in mean of GSH content between healthy young female control and female AD

  20. Repeat variation in the human PER2 gene as a new genetic marker associated with cocaine addiction and brain dopamine D2 receptor availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumay, E; Fowler, J S; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alia-Klein, N; Goldstein, R Z; Maloney, T; Wong, C; Volkow, N D

    2012-03-06

    Low dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) levels in the striatum are consistently reported in cocaine abusers; inter-individual variations in the degree of the decrease suggest a modulating effect of genetic makeup on vulnerability to addiction. The PER2 (Period 2) gene belongs to the clock genes family of circadian regulators; circadian oscillations of PER2 expression in the striatum was modulated by dopamine through D2Rs. Aberrant periodicity of PER2 contributes to the incidence and severity of various brain disorders, including drug addiction. Here we report a newly identified variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the human PER2 gene (VNTR in the third intron). We found significant differences in the VNTR alleles prevalence across ethnic groups so that the major allele (4 repeats (4R)) is over-represented in non-African population (4R homozygosity is 88%), but not in African Americans (homozygosity 51%). We also detected a biased PER2 genotype distribution among healthy controls and cocaine-addicted individuals. In African Americans, the proportion of 4R/three repeat (3R) carriers in healthy controls is much lower than that in cocaine abusers (23% vs 39%, P=0.004), whereas among non-Africans most 3R/4R heterozygotes are healthy controls (10.5% vs 2.5%, P=0.04). Analysis of striatal D2R availability measured with positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride revealed higher levels of D2R in carriers of 4R/4R genotype (P<0.01). Taken together, these results provide preliminary evidence for the role of the PER2 gene in regulating striatal D2R availability in the human brain and in vulnerability for cocaine addiction.

  1. Investigation of metabolites for estimating blood deposition time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Karolina; Liu, Fan; Davies, Sarah K; Ackermann, Katrin; Ang, Joo Ern; Middleton, Benita; Revell, Victoria L; Raynaud, Florence J; Hoveijn, Igor; Hut, Roelof A; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    Trace deposition timing reflects a novel concept in forensic molecular biology involving the use of rhythmic biomarkers for estimating the time within a 24-h day/night cycle a human biological sample was left at the crime scene, which in principle allows verifying a sample donor's alibi. Previously, we introduced two circadian hormones for trace deposition timing and recently demonstrated that messenger RNA (mRNA) biomarkers significantly improve time prediction accuracy. Here, we investigate the suitability of metabolites measured using a targeted metabolomics approach, for trace deposition timing. Analysis of 171 plasma metabolites collected around the clock at 2-h intervals for 36 h from 12 male participants under controlled laboratory conditions identified 56 metabolites showing statistically significant oscillations, with peak times falling into three day/night time categories: morning/noon, afternoon/evening and night/early morning. Time prediction modelling identified 10 independently contributing metabolite biomarkers, which together achieved prediction accuracies expressed as AUC of 0.81, 0.86 and 0.90 for these three time categories respectively. Combining metabolites with previously established hormone and mRNA biomarkers in time prediction modelling resulted in an improved prediction accuracy reaching AUCs of 0.85, 0.89 and 0.96 respectively. The additional impact of metabolite biomarkers, however, was rather minor as the previously established model with melatonin, cortisol and three mRNA biomarkers achieved AUC values of 0.88, 0.88 and 0.95 for the same three time categories respectively. Nevertheless, the selected metabolites could become practically useful in scenarios where RNA marker information is unavailable such as due to RNA degradation. This is the first metabolomics study investigating circulating metabolites for trace deposition timing, and more work is needed to fully establish their usefulness for this forensic purpose.

  2. Molecular Markers of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Screening Tool of the Future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyia ePusparajah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is among the leading causes of new onset blindness in adults. Effective treatment may delay the onset and progression of this disease provided it is diagnosed early. At present retinopathy can only be diagnosed via formal examination of the eye by a trained specialist, which limits the population that can be effectively screened. An easily accessible, reliable screening biomarker of diabetic retinopathy would be of tremendous benefit in detecting the population in need of further assessment and treatment. This review highlights specific biomarkers that show promise as screening markers to detect early diabetic retinopathy or even to detect patients at increased risk of DR at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. The pathobiology of DR is complex and multifactorial giving rise to a wide array of potential biomarkers. This review provides an overview of these pathways and looks at older markers such as advanced glycation end products(AGEs, inflammatory markers, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF as well as other newer proteins with a role in the pathogenesis of DR including neuroprotective factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF; SA100A12, pentraxin 3, brain natriuretic peptide, apelin 3 and chemerin as well as various metabolites such as lipoprotein A, folate and homocysteine. We also consider the possible role of proteins identified through proteomics work whose levels are altered in the sera of patients with DR as screening markers though their role in pathophysiology remains to be characterized. The role of microRNA as a promising new screening marker is also discussed.

  3. Metabolites of Siamenoside I and Their Distributions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Rong Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Siamenoside I is the sweetest mogroside that has several kinds of bioactivities, and it is also a constituent of Siraitiae Fructus, a fruit and herb in China. Hitherto the metabolism of siamenoside I in human or animals remains unclear. To reveal its metabolic pathways, a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap-time of flight-multistage mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-IT-TOF-MSn method was used to profile and identify its metabolites in rats. Altogether, 86 new metabolites were identified or tentatively identified, and 23 of them were also new metabolites of mogrosides. In rats, siamenoside I was found to undergo deglycosylation, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, deoxygenation, isomerization, and glycosylation reactions. Among them, deoxygenation, pentahydroxylation, and didehydrogenation were novel metabolic reactions of mogrosides. The distributions of siamenoside I and its 86 metabolites in rat organs were firstly reported, and they were mainly distributed to intestine, stomach, kidney, and brain. The most widely distributed metabolite was mogroside IIIE. In addition, eight metabolites were bioactive according to literature. These findings would help to understand the metabolism and effective forms of siamenoside I and other mogrosides in vivo.

  4. Volatile metabolites of pathogens: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieuwe D J Bos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, invading bacteria are detected as early as possible in critically ill patients: the strain of morbific pathogens is identified rapidly, and antimicrobial sensitivity is known well before the start of new antimicrobial therapy. Bacteria have a distinct metabolism, part of which results in the production of bacteria-specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs, which might be used for diagnostic purposes. Volatile metabolites can be investigated directly in exhaled air, allowing for noninvasive monitoring. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of VOCs produced by the six most abundant and pathogenic bacteria in sepsis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Such VOCs could be used as biological markers in the diagnostic approach of critically ill patients. A systematic review of existing literature revealed 31 articles. All six bacteria of interest produce isopentanol, formaldehyde, methyl mercaptan, and trimethylamine. Since humans do not produce these VOCs, they could serve as biological markers for presence of these pathogens. The following volatile biomarkers were found for identification of specific strains: isovaleric acid and 2-methyl-butanal for Staphylococcus aureus; 1-undecene, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-quinazoline, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl thiocyanide for Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and methanol, pentanol, ethyl acetate, and indole for Escherichia coli. Notably, several factors that may effect VOC production were not controlled for, including used culture media, bacterial growth phase, and genomic variation within bacterial strains. In conclusion, VOCs produced by bacteria may serve as biological markers for their presence. Goal-targeted studies should be performed to identify potential sets of volatile biological markers and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers in critically

  5. Nitric oxide metabolites in goldfish under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie N.; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2010-01-01

    levels was assessed from metabolic and respiratory variables. In normoxic goldfish, the concentrations of NO metabolites in plasma and tissues were comparable with values reported in mammals, indicative of similar NOS activity. Exposure to hypoxia [at PO2 (partial pressure of O2) values close......) in multiple tissues of a non-mammalian vertebrate (goldfish) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. NO metabolites were measured in blood (plasma and red cells) and heart, brain, gill, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle, using highly sensitive reductive chemiluminescence. The severity of the chosen hypoxia...

  6. Antistaphylococcal metabolite from Aureobasidium pullulans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aureobasidium pullulans (NI.3) isolated from the leaves of Dracaena reflexa variegate produced intracellular antimicrobial metabolite the yield of which was 700-800 U from about 0.7-0.85 g of dry biomass. The antistaphyloccocal metabolite showed strong activity against different Staphylococcus spp. The MICs ranged from ...

  7. Circulating exosomes as new biomarkers for brain disease and injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graner, Michael W.; Epple, Laura M.; Dusto, Nathaniel L.; Lencioni, Alex M.; Nega, Meheret; Herring, Matthew; Winston, Ben; Madsen, Helen; Bemis, Lynne T.; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Brain diseases such as cancers, neurodegenerative disorders, or trauma are frequently diagnosed with imaging modalities and sometimes with intracranial biopsies. Treatment response is similarly monitored, along with clinical indications. While these technologies provide important windows into the disease state, they fail to provide us a detailed molecular portrait of the disease and of the changes taking place during therapy. Exosomes are virus-sized nanovesicles derived from the endosomal system and are released extracellularly from essentially all cell types. Exosomes contain intracellular entities (proteins, nucleic acids, metabolites), membrane proteins and lipids, and even extracellular proteins bound to them. Exosomes may be considered as mini-surrogates of their cells of origin, with some content common to all cells/exosomes, but some of the content would be cell-specific. These vesicles are found in all biofluids in humans, and are thus accessible to "liquid biopsy" with harvest of vesicles from such fluids. Current challenges are to identify disease-related markers or panels of markers to distinguish the disease state. Here we will show examples of brain tumor markers found in/on exosomes from cell culture and patient sera, and we will suggest that aspects of the biology of disease may have a relevant place in the search for biomarkers.

  8. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry determination of (4S,2RS)-2,5,5-trimethylthiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, a stable adduct formed between D-(-)-penicillamine and acetaldehyde (main biological metabolite of ethanol), in plasma, liver and brain rat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Elena; Pozo, Oscar J; Beltrán, Joaquin; Hernández, Felix; Font, Laura; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2007-01-01

    Acetaldehyde, the main biological metabolite of ethanol, is nowadays considered to mediate some ethanol-induced effects. Previous studies on alcohol effect attenuation have shown that D-(-)-penicillamine (3-mercapto-D-valine), a thiol amino acid, acts as an effective agent for the inactivation of acetaldehyde. In the study reported here, laboratory rats were treated with ethanol and D-(-)-penicillamine at different doses looking for the interaction (in vivo) of D-(-)-penicillamine with metabolically formed acetaldehyde following a condensation reaction to form the stable adduct (4S,2RS)-2,5,5-trimethylthiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TMTCA). A novel and rapid procedure based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was developed for quantification and reliable identification of TMTCA in different rat tissues, including plasma, liver and brain. Firstly, plasma was obtained from whole blood. Then, proteins were precipitated from plasma, brain and liver extracts with acetonitrile and the clarified extracts diluted 10-fold. A 20 microL aliquot of the final extracts was then analyzed using an Atlantis C18 5 microm, 100x2 mm column which was connected to the electrospray source of a LC/triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The analyte was detected in positive ion mode acquiring four MS/MS transitions in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The method has been validated and it has proved to be fast, reliable and sensitive. The accuracy and precision were evaluated by means of recovery experiments from plasma, liver and brain samples fortified at two concentration levels obtaining satisfactory recoveries in all cases: 95 and 105% in plasma (at 10 and 100 ng/mL, respectively), 79 and 89% in brain (100 and 1000 ng/g), 85 and 99% in liver (100 and 1000 ng/g). Precision, expressed as repeatability, was in all tissues analyzed lower than 17% at the two concentrations tested. The estimated detection limits were 1 ng/mL in plasma, 4 ng/g in brain

  9. Arsenic and nicotine co-exposure lead to some synergistic effects on oxidative stress and apoptotic markers in young rat blood, liver, kidneys and brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and nicotine exposure has been a major health concern globally. Individually both these toxicants increase the risk to various diseases including cancers. However, limited information exists on the co-exposure. In this study, we evaluate the effects of their individual and combined exposure and if co-exposure to these toxicants might have a synergism or antagonism. Male rats were exposed to a very low dose of arsenic (25 ppm in drinking water or nicotine (0.25 mg/kg, sub-cutaneously for a period of 5 months and post exposure various biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress and apoptosis evaluated. Almost all glutathione linked enzymes showed marked alteration in individual as well as co-exposure treated groups. While serum creatinine and apoptosis indicator, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were significantly increased in both treatments, an additive effect was noted in co-exposure group. A similar trend was also seen in brain and liver but not in kidneys. Gene expression studies showed marked reduction in catalase, Cu-Zn SOD, GST, there was a significant up regulation in Bax, caspase 3 in various tissues along with urinary 8-OHdG levels, indicative of DNA damage and apoptosis. Interestingly, a decrease in liver arsenic concentration was noted in co-exposed group compared to arsenic alone exposed group. In conclusion, the present study suggests that arsenic and nicotine exhibited significant toxicity during individual exposure whereas co-exposure to these toxins showed variable conditions (indicative of both synergism and antagonism in male rats.

  10. Oxidative metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and biologically active oxygenated metabolites of DHEA and epiandrosterone (EpiA)--recent reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kihel, Laïla

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a multifunctional steroid with a broad range of biological effects in humans and animals. DHEA can be converted to multiple oxygenated metabolites in the brain and peripheral tissues. The mechanisms by which DHEA exerts its effects are not well understood. However, evidence that the effects of DHEA are mediated by its oxygenated metabolites has accumulated. This paper will review the panel of oxygenated DHEA metabolites (7, 16 and 17-hydroxylated derivatives) including a number of 5α-androstane derivatives, such as epiandrosterone (EpiA) metabolites. The most important aspects of the oxidative metabolism of DHEA in the liver, intestine and brain are described. Then, this article reviews the reported biological effects of oxygenated DHEA metabolites from recent findings with a specific focus on cancer, inflammatory and immune processes, osteoporosis, thermogenesis, adipogenesis, the cardiovascular system, the brain and the estrogen and androgen receptors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Approach to Classify Plants Based on Metabolite-Content Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Huang, Ming; Nishioka, Takaaki; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are bioactive substances with diverse chemical structures. Depending on the ecological environment within which they are living, higher plants use different combinations of secondary metabolites for adaptation (e.g., defense against attacks by herbivores or pathogenic microbes). This suggests that the similarity in metabolite content is applicable to assess phylogenic similarity of higher plants. However, such a chemical taxonomic approach has limitations of incomplete metabolomics data. We propose an approach for successfully classifying 216 plants based on their known incomplete metabolite content. Structurally similar metabolites have been clustered using the network clustering algorithm DPClus. Plants have been represented as binary vectors, implying relations with structurally similar metabolite groups, and classified using Ward's method of hierarchical clustering. Despite incomplete data, the resulting plant clusters are consistent with the known evolutional relations of plants. This finding reveals the significance of metabolite content as a taxonomic marker. We also discuss the predictive power of metabolite content in exploring nutritional and medicinal properties in plants. As a byproduct of our analysis, we could predict some currently unknown species-metabolite relations.

  12. Metabolite Space of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    van Wietmarschen, Herman; van der Greef, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Metabolites play numerous roles in the healthy and diseased body, ranging from regulating physiological processes to providing building blocks for the body. Therefore, understanding the role of metabolites is important in elucidating the etiology and pathology of diseases and finding targets for new treatment options. Rheumatoid arthritis is a complex chronic disease for which new disease management strategies are needed. The aim of this review is to bring together and integrate information a...

  13. Volume, metabolites and neuroinflammation of the hippocampus in bipolar disorder - A combined magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haarman, Bartholomeus C. M. ('Benno'); Burger, Huibert; Doorduin, Janine; Renken, Remco J.; Sibeijn-Kuiper, Anita J.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C.; Vries, de Erik; de Groot, Jan Cees; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Mendes, Richard; Nolen, Willem A.; Riemersma-Van der Lek, Rixt F.

    Background: The hippocampus is one of the brain regions that is involved in several pathophysiological theories about bipolar disorder (BD), such as the neuroinflammation theory and the corticolimbic metabolic dysregulation theory. We compared hippocampal volume and hippocampal metabolites in

  14. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  15. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of inflammation, infection and ischemia of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, Irina [Section of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of the Freiburg University Hospital, Breisacher Street 64, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Freiburg Brain Imaging Center, Department of Neurology of the Freiburg University Hospital, Breisacher Street 64, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: irina.mader@uniklinik-freiburg.de; Rauer, Sebastian [Department of Neurology of the Freiburg University Hospital, Breisacher Street 64, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: sebastian.rauer@uniklinik-freiburg.de; Gall, Peter [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Street 49, 79095 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: peter.gall@uniklinik-freiburg.de; Klose, Uwe [Section of Experimental MR of the CNS, Department of Neuroradiology, Radiological University Hospital, Hoppe-Seyler-Street 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)], E-mail: uwe.klose@med.uni-tuebingen.de

    2008-08-15

    Different pathologic patterns in multiple sclerosis (MS) are reflected by alterations of metabolites in {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of the brain. Elevated choline (Cho), lactate (Lac), lipids and macromolecules are reliable markers for acute demyelination regardless of the clinical entity (also in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis). N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) is a suitable marker for neuronal integrity. It is reduced in acute MS lesions and in normal appearing white matter, even distant to acute and chronic-lesions. Recovery from reduced NAA levels to subnormal values during remyelination, and varying time courses of NAA in normal appearing white matter during relapsing remitting disease indicate the value of this spectroscopic marker for monitoring activity and recovery. Inositol (Ins) is increased in chronic MS lesions being a marker for astrocytic gliosis. In viral disease, Cho and Ins are always increased, whereas a reduction of NAA mostly reflects an advanced or a detoriated clinical state. In bacterial brain abscesses, numerous amino acids, lipids and Lac can be elevated. In ischemia, especially the Lac/NAA in comparison with perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging seems to be a new measure for areas of metabolic need, and may help to better characterise the penumbra of the stroke and the final infarct size.

  16. Two Domains of Vimentin Are Expressed on the Surface of Lymph Node, Bone and Brain Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lines along with the Putative Stem Cell Marker Proteins CD44 and CD133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, Nicole F. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Maurer, Jochen [Sanford-Burnham, Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Sheng, Huiming [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Bensussan, Armand [INSERM U976, Hôpital Saint Louis, F-75475 Paris (France); Department of Immunology, Dermatology and Oncology, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMRS976 F-75475 Paris (France); Maricic, Igor; Kumar, Vipin [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Laboratory of Autoimmunity, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Braciak, Todd A., E-mail: tbraciak@tpims.org [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2011-07-13

    Vimentin was originally identified as an intermediate filament protein present only as an intracellular component in many cell types. However, this protein has now been detected on the surface of a number of different cancer cell types in a punctate distribution pattern. Increased vimentin expression has been indicated as an important step in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required for the metastasis of prostate cancer. Here, using two vimentin-specific monoclonal antibodies (SC5 and V9 directed against the coil one rod domain and the C-terminus of the vimentin protein, respectively), we examined whether either of these domains would be displayed on the surface of three commonly studied prostate cancer cell lines isolated from different sites of metastases. Confocal analysis of LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines (derived from lymph node, bone or brain prostate metastases, respectively) demonstrated that both domains of vimentin are present on the surface of these metastatic cancer cell types. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that vimentin expression was readily detected along with CD44 expression but only a small subpopulation of prostate cancer cells expressed vimentin and the putative stem cell marker CD133 along with CD44. Finally, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) nanoparticles that target vimentin could bind and internalize into tested prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that at least two domains of vimentin are present on the surface of metastatic prostate cancer cells and suggest that vimentin could provide a useful target for nanoparticle- or antibody- cancer therapeutic agents directed against highly invasive cancer and/or stem cells.

  17. Mu receptor binding of some commonly used opioids and their metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhaorong; Irvine, R.J. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)); Somogyi, A.A.; Bochner, F. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia) Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    The binding affinity to the {mu} receptor of some opioids chemically related to morphine and some of their metabolites was examined in rat brain homogenates with {sup 3}H-DAMGO. The chemical group at position 6 of the molecule had little effect on binding. Decreasing the length of the alkyl group at position 3 decreased the K{sub i} values (morphine < codeine < ethylmorphine < pholcodine). Analgesics with high clinical potency containing a methoxyl group at position 3 had relatively weak receptor binding, while their O-demethylated metabolites had much stronger binding. Many opioids may exert their pharmacological actions predominantly through metabolites.

  18. Study on the radiation-induced biological responses based on the analysis of metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran; Roh, Changhyun; Shin, Heejune; Ryu, Dongkyoung

    2013-01-15

    1. Objectives □ Establishment of basis of biological radiation response study by metabolite analysis 2. Project results □ Establishment of analytical basis of radiation-responsive metabolites in biological samples - Large scale collection of tissue samples from irradiated animal for radiation metabolomics research - Establishment of mass spectromety (GC MS, LC MS-MS) analysis methods of biological samples - 3 Standard Operation Protocols (SOP) for ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS, Q-TOF MS) analysis of metabolites from biological samples - Establishment of database for radiation metabolites □ Basic research on radiation-responsive metabolites and the interpretation of their functions - Validation of spermidine as a candidate biomarker of acute radiation response in mouse blood - Verification of 5 radiation-responsive steroid hormones and alteration of their metabolic enzyme activities in mouse blood - Verification of 13 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain -Verification of 10 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain - Verification of 74 radiation-responsive metabolites in whole rat brain by ultra high resolution FT-ICR MS and Q-TOF MS analysis 3. Expected benefits and plan of application □ Establishment of research basis of radiation metabolomics in Korea □ Provision of core technology in radiation bioscience and safety field by application of radiation metabolomics results to the technology development in radiation biodosimetry, and radiation response evaluation and modulation.

  19. Comprehensive metabolite profiling in distinct chemotypes of Commiphora wightii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anil; Tripathi, Tusha; Singh, Suruchi; Bisht, Hema; Behl, Hari M; Roy, Raja; Sidhu, Om P

    2018-02-02

    Commiphora wightii (Arn.) Bhandari, known as guggul, produces a medicinally important gum resin which is used extensively by Ayurvedic physicians to treat various ailments. However, most of the studies on C. wightii have been limited to its gum resin. Comprehensive metabolic profiling of leaves, stem and gum resin samples was undertaken to analyse aqueous and non-aqueous metabolites from three distinct chemotypes (NBRI-101, NBRI-102 and NBRI-103) shortlisted from different agro-climatic zones. GC-MS, HPLC and NMR spectroscopy were used for comprehensive metabolomics. Multivariate analysis showed characteristic variation in quinic and citric acids, myo-inositol and glycine (aqueous metabolites) and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-phenol, trans-farnesol and guggulsterones (non-aqueous metabolites) amongst the three chemotypes. Quinic acid, citric acid and myo-ionositol were detected in substantial quantities from leaves and stem samples which provide opportunities for novel nutraceutical and pharmaceutical formulations. Quinic acid, from the leaves, was identified as a marker metabolite for early selection of high guggulsterones-yielding cultivars.

  20. Differentiating Hepatocellular Carcinoma from Hepatitis C Using Metabolite Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwei Wei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC accounts for most liver cancer cases worldwide. Contraction of the hepatitis C virus (HCV is considered a major risk factor for liver cancer. In order to identify the risk of cancer, metabolic profiling of serum samples from patients with HCC (n=40 and HCV (n=22 was performed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis showed a distinct separation of the two patient cohorts, indicating a distinct metabolic difference between HCC and HCV patient groups based on signals from lipids and other individual metabolites. Univariate analysis showed that three metabolites (choline, valine and creatinine were significantly altered in HCC. A PLS-DA model based on these three metabolites showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 71% and an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.83, outperforming the clinical marker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. The robustness of the model was tested using Monte-Carlo cross validation (MCCV. This study showed that metabolite profiling could provide an alternative approach for HCC screening in HCV patients, many of whom have high risk for developing liver cancer.

  1. Brain metabolic alterations in adolescents and young adults with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Ase; Heikkinen, Sami; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Korkman, Marit; Timonen, Marjut; Kuusi, Tuomo; Riley, Edward P; Lundbom, Nina

    2006-12-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure affects brain structure and function. This study examined brain metabolism using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and searched for regions of specific vulnerability in adolescents and young adults prenatally exposed to alcohol. Ten adolescents and young adults with confirmed heavy prenatal alcohol exposure and a diagnosis within the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) were included. Three of them had fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), 3 had partial FAS (PFAS), and 4 had alcohol-related neurobehavioral disorder (ARND). The control group consisted of 10 adolescents matched for age, sex, head circumference, handedness, and body mass. Exclusionary criteria were learning disorders and prenatal alcohol exposure. Three-dimensional (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI) was performed in the cerebrum and cerebellum. Metabolite ratios N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho), NAA/creatine (Cr) and Cho/Cr, and absolute metabolite intensities were calculated for several anatomic regions. In patients with FASD, lower NAA/Cho and/or NAA/Cr compared with controls were found in parietal and frontal cortices, frontal white matter, corpus callosum, thalamus, and cerebellar dentate nucleus. There was an increase in the absolute intensity of the glial markers Cho and Cr but no change in the neuronal marker NAA. Our results suggest that prenatal alcohol exposure alters brain metabolism in a long-standing or permanent manner in multiple brain areas. These changes are in accordance with previous findings from structural and functional studies. Metabolic alterations represent changes in the glial cell pool rather than in the neurons.

  2. Secondary metabolites from Eremostachys laciniata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calis, Ihsan; Güvenc, Aysegül; Armagan, Metin

    2008-01-01

    ), and forsythoside B (18), and five flavone derivatives, luteolin (19), luteolin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (20), luteolin 7-O-(6''-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (21), apigenin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22), and apigenin 7-O-(6''-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (23). The structures of the metabolites were...... elucidated from spectroscopic (UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and ESI-MS evidence, as well as from their specific optical rotation. The presence of these metabolites of three different classes strongly supports the close relationship of the genera Eremostachys and Phlomis....

  3. Exposure Marker Discovery of Phthalates Using Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Jen-Yi; Shih, Chia-Lung; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Phthalates are chemicals widely used in industry and the consequences on human health caused by exposure to these agents are of significant interest currently. The urinary metabolites of phthalates can be measured and used as exposure markers for the assessment of the actual internal contamination of phthalates coming from different sources and absorbed by various ways. The purpose of this paper is to review the markers for exposure and risk assessment of phthalates such as di-methyl phthalat...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  5. Unbiased Metabolite Profiling of Schizophrenia Fibroblasts under Stressful Perturbations Reveals Dysregulation of Plasmalogens and Phosphatidylcholines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Joanne H; Park, Hyoungjun; Iaconelli, Jonathan; Berkovitch, Shaunna S; Watmuff, Bradley; McPhie, Donna; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M; Clish, Clary B; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2017-02-03

    We undertook an unbiased metabolite profiling of fibroblasts from schizophrenia patients and healthy controls to identify metabolites and pathways that are dysregulated in disease, seeking to gain new insights into the disease biology of schizophrenia and to discover potential disease-related biomarkers. We measured polar and nonpolar metabolites in the fibroblasts under normal conditions and under two stressful physiological perturbations: growth in low-glucose media and exposure to the steroid hormone dexamethasone. We found that metabolites that were significantly different between schizophrenia and control subjects showed separation of the two groups by partial least-squares discriminant analysis methods. This separation between schizophrenia and healthy controls was more robust with metabolites identified under the perturbation conditions. The most significant individual metabolite differences were also found in the perturbation experiments. Metabolites that were significantly different between schizophrenia and healthy controls included a number of plasmalogens and phosphatidylcholines. We present these results in the context of previous reports of metabolic profiling of brain tissue and plasma in schizophrenia. These results show the applicability of metabolite profiling under stressful perturbations to reveal cellular pathways that may be involved in disease biology.

  6. Biochemical Markers in Neurocritical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidvar Rezae

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, a variety of serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical markers in daily clinical practice have been recommended to diagnose and monitor diverse diseases or pathologic situations. It will be essential to develop a panel of biomarkers, to be suitable for evaluation of treatment efficacy, representing distinct phases of injury and recovery and consider the temporal profile of those. Among the possible and different biochemical markers, S100b appeared to fulfill many of optimized criteria of an ideal marker. S100b, a cytosolic low molecular weight dimeric calciumbinding protein from chromosome 21, synthesized in glial cells throughout the CNS, an homodimeric diffusible, belongs to a family of closely related protein, predominantly expressed by astrocytes and Schwann cells and a classic immunohistochemical marker for these cells, is implicated in brain development and neurophysiology. Of the 3 isoforms of S-100, the BB subunit (S100B is present in high concentrations in central and peripheral glial and Schwann cells, Langerhans and anterior pituitary cells, fat, muscle, and bone marrow tissues. The biomarker has shown to be a sensitive marker of clinical and subclinical cerebral damage, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. Increasing evidence suggests that the biomarker plays a double function as an intracellular regulator and an extracellular signal of the CNS. S100b is found in the cytoplasm in a soluble form and also is associated with intracellular membranes, centrosomes, microtubules, and type III intermediate filaments. Their genomic organization now is known, and many of their target proteins have been identified, although the mechanisms of regulating S100b secretion are not completely understood and appear to be related to many factors, such as the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a, interleukin (IL-1b, and metabolic stress. 

  7. Metabolomics technologies and metabolite identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moco, S.I.A.; Bino, R.J.; Vos, de C.H.; Vervoort, J.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolomics studies rely on the analysis of the multitude of small molecules (metabolites) present in a biological system. Most commonly, metabolomics is heavily supported by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as parallel technologies that provide an overview of the

  8. BIOACTIVE METABOLITES FROM TRICHODERMA HARZIANUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    biocontrol agents against plant pathogens and could be a possible source of fungicides against. A. mellea fungus. It is therefore essential to identify and bioassay the secondary metabolites from Trichoderma isolates against A. mellea. Some Trichoderma species are antagonistic to many soil borne phytopathogenic fungi ...

  9. The metabolic impact of methamphetamine on the systemic metabolism of rats and potential markers of methamphetamine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tian; Liu, Linsheng; Shi, Jian; Yu, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Wenjing; Sun, Runbing; Zhou, Yahong; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2014-07-01

    Although the stimulating and psychotropic effects of methamphetamine (METH) on the nervous system are well documented, the impact of METH abuse on biological metabolism and the turnover of peripheral transmitters are poorly understood. Metabolomics has the potential to reveal the effect of METH abuse on systemic metabolism and potential markers suggesting the underlying mechanism of toxicity. In this study, male Sprague Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with METH at escalating doses of mg kg(-1) for 5 consecutive days and then were withdrawn for 2 days. The metabolites in the serum and urine were profiled and the systemic effects of METH on metabolic pathways were evaluated. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that METH caused distinct deviations, whereas the withdrawal of METH restored the metabolic patterns towards baseline. METH administration elevated energy metabolism, which was manifested by the distinct depletion of branched-chain amino acids, accelerated tricarboxylic-acid cycle and lipid metabolism, reduced serum glycerol-3-phosphate, and elevated serum and urinary 3-hydroxybutyrate and urinary glycerol. In addition to the increased serum levels of the excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate (the inhibitory neurotransmitters in the brain), a marked decline in serum alanine and glycine after METH treatment suggested the activation and decreased inhibition of the nervous system and hence elevated nervous activity. Withdrawal of METH for 2 days efficiently restored all but a few metabolites to baseline, including serum creatinine, citrate, 2-ketoglutarate, and urinary lactate. Therefore, these metabolites are potential markers of METH use, and they may be used to facilitate the diagnosis of METH abuse.

  10. Increased plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolites and vitamin D binding protein in women using hormonal contraceptives: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liendgaard, Ulla Kristine Møller; við Streym, Susanna; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn

    2013-01-01

    metabolites. AIM: In a cross-sectional study, plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolites, VDBP, and the calculated free vitamin D index in users and non-users of HC were compared and markers of calcium and bone metabolism investigated. RESULTS: 75 Caucasian women aged 25-35 years were included during...

  11. Serum estrogen and its metabolites in pregnant women exposed to dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuli; Chang, Y.C.; Li, C.M.; Chou, W.L. [National Health Research Insts., Kaohsiung (Taiwan). Div. of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine; Chao, H.R.; Guo, Y.L. [National Chung Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan). Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    2004-09-15

    Dioxins and PCBs are environmental endocrine disruptors that have half-life of 7-10 years in human bodies and have toxicities including carcinogenesis. Studies showed a high estrogen 4-/2- hydroxylation ratio appears to be a marker for neoplasm. The aim is to examine dioxin and PCBs body burden1 in relation to estrogen metabolites and catabolites.

  12. Brain markers of psychosis and autism: the brain in concert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, O.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Mensen met een ultra hoog risico (UHR) voor het ontwikkelen van een psychose hebben een kans van tien tot veertig procent om binnen twee jaar psychotisch te worden, meestal vanwege hun schizofrenie. Autisme spectrum stoornissen (ASS) zijn eveneens geassocieerd met een verhoogd risico op een

  13. Brain injury markers (S100B and NSE in chronic cocaine dependents Marcadores de lesão cerebral (S100B e NSE em dependentes crônicos de cocaína

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Henrique Paim Kessler

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Studies have shown signs of brain damage caused by different mechanisms in cocaine users. The serum neuron specific enolase and S100B protein are considered specific biochemical markers of neuronal and glial cell injury. This study aimed at comparing blood levels of S100B and NSE in chronic cocaine users and in volunteers who did not use cocaine or other illicit drugs. METHOD: Twenty subjects dependent on cocaine but not on alcohol or marijuana, and 20 non-substance using controls were recruited. Subjects were selected by consecutive and non-probabilistic sampling. Neuron specific enolase and S100B levels were determined by luminescence assay. RESULTS: Cocaine users had significantly higher scores than controls in all psychiatric dimensions of the SCL-90 and had cognitive deficits in the subtest cubes of WAIS and the word span. Mean serum S100B level was 0.09 ± 0.04 µg/l among cocaine users and 0.08 ± 0.04 µg/l among controls. Mean serum neuron specific enolase level was 9.7 ± 3.5 ng/l among cocaine users and 8.3 ± 2.6 ng/l among controls. CONCLUSIONS: In this first study using these specific brain damage markers in cocaine users, serum levels of S100B and neuron specific enolase were not statistically different between cocaine dependent subjects and controls.OBJETIVO: Estudos têm demonstrado sinais de lesão cerebral causadas por diferentes mecanismos em usuários de cocaína. A enolase sérica neurônio-específica e a proteína S100B são consideradas marcadores bioquímicos específicos de lesão neuronal e glial. Este estudo objetivou comparar os níveis sangüíneos de S100B e enolase sérica neurônio-específica em usuários crônicos de cocaína e em voluntários que não usam cocaína ou outras drogas ilícitas. MÉTODO: Vinte sujeitos dependentes de cocaína, mas não dependentes de álcool, maconha ou outra droga, e 20 sujeitos controles não usuários de drogas foram recrutados. Os sujeitos foram selecionados por

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications in patients with brain lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Luiz Ramin

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Proton spectroscopy has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method that, coupled with magnetic resonance imaging techniques, allows for the correlation of anatomical and physiological changes in the metabolic and biochemical processes occurring within previously-determined volumes in the brain. There are two methods of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: single voxel and chemical shift imaging OBJECTIVE: The present work focused on the clinical applications of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with brain lesions. CONCLUSIONS: In vivo proton spectroscopy allows the detection of certain metabolites in brain tissue, such as N-acetyl aspartate, creatine, choline, myoinositol, amino acids and lipids, among others. N-acetyl aspartate is a neuronal marker and, as such, its concentration will decrease in the presence of aggression to the brain. Choline increase is the main indicator of neoplastic diseases. Myoinositol is raised in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Amino acids are encountered in brain abscesses. The presence of lipids is related to necrotic processes.

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  19. Extraction of plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William P; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the preparation of extracts from plants using organic solvents, with emphasis on common problems encountered and methods for their reduction or elimination. In addition to generally applicable extraction protocols, methods are suggested for selectively extracting specific classes of plant-derived compounds, and phytochemical procedures are presented for the detection of classes of compounds encountered commonly during extraction, including selected groups of secondary metabolites and interfering compounds. Successful extraction begins with careful selection and preparation of plant samples and thorough review of the appropriate literature for suitable protocols for a particular class of compounds or plant species. During the extraction of plant material, it is important to minimize interference from compounds that may co-extract with the target compounds, and to avoid contamination of the extract, as well as to prevent decomposition of important metabolites or artifact formation as a result of extraction conditions or solvent impurities.

  20. IS MALE BRAIN DIFFERENT FROM FEMALE BRAIN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Summary In 1959, exactly 50 years ago, was published a paper by Phoenix, Goy, Gerall and Young entitled “Organizing action of prenatally administered testosterone propionate on the tissues mediating mating behavior in the female guinea pig”. Before the publication of this paper, it was widely accepted that hormones do act upon brain. However, the general thought was that hormones, especially sex steroid hormones, directly activate certain brain areas when needed, i.e. at the time of mating, parental care etc. In contrast to this thought, Phoenix and colleagues for the very first time proposed that hormone action in neonatal period could also permanently alter brain structure, and thus influence differences in behavior long after exposure to sex steroid hormones. The study of Phoenix and colleagues was therefore revolutionary, and as such, had many opponents at that time. Even the authors themselves were very cautious in their phrasing, never directly claiming that hormones could alter brain structure but rather even in the title used the words “tissues mediating mating behavior” instead of brain or central nervous system. Furthermore, as with many such revolutionary studies, study by Phoenix and colleagues left more questions unanswered than it did answer. The authors did and could not know at that time exactly where and how do steroid hormones act in the brain, they did not know whether observed effects in their study arose from the direct action of testosterone or perhaps from some testosterone metabolite. In half of the century since the publication of this seminal study, hundreds of papers have been published, confirming initial finding of Phoenix and colleagues, and these papers have provided answers to many questions raised by the authors. Today we know that at least in rodents, it is testosterone metabolite estradiol that masculinizes the brain. We know that brain structure could be altered by hormones in different periods including puberty and

  1. Exogenous and endogenous cannabimimetic metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Marzo, V.; Bisogno, T.; Melck, D. [CNR, Arco Felice, Naples (Italy). Ist. per la Chimica di Molecole di Interesse Biologico; De Petrocellis, L. [CNR, Arco Felice, Naples (Italy). Ist. di Cibernetica

    1998-04-01

    Only a few discoveries in the fields of pharmacology and physiology have benefited from the work of organic and synthetic chemists like the identification of the existence and possible physiological function of the `endogenous cannabinoid system`. The review emphasizes the key role played by chemists in this area of pharmacological research, and highlights the possible industrial implications of the discovery of cannabimimetic metabolites and of their mechanism of action.

  2. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He-Ping; Liu, Ji-Kai

    Secondary metabolites of higher fungi (mushrooms) are an underexplored resource compared to plant-derived secondary metabolites. An increasing interest in mushroom natural products has been noted in recent years. This chapter gives a comprehensive overview of the secondary metabolites from higher fungi, with 765 references highlighting the isolation, structure elucidation, biological activities, chemical syntheses, and biosynthesis of pigments, nitrogen-containing compounds, and terpenoids from mushrooms. Mushroom toxins are also included in each section.In a section on pigments of higher fungi, pigments are classified into four categories, namely, those from the shikimate-chorismate, acetate-malonate, and mevalonate biosynthetic pathways, and pigments containing nitrogen, with 145 references covering the years 2010-2016.In a section on other nitrogen-containing compounds of higher fungi, compounds are categorized primarily into nitrogen heterocycles, nucleosides, non-protein amino acids, cyclic peptides, and sphingolipids, with 65 references covering the years 2010-2016. In turn, in a section describing terpenoids of higher fungi, the sesquiterpenoids and diterpenoids are thoroughly elaborated, spanning the years 2001-2016, and 2009-2016, respectively. The divergent biosynthetic pathways from farnesyl pyrophosphate to sesquiterpenoids are also described. Selected triterpenoids with novel structures and promising biological activities, including lanostanes and ergostanes, are reported from the genus Ganoderma, and the fungi Antrodia cinnamomea and Poria cocos. In addition, cucurbitanes and saponaceolides are also compiled in this section.

  3. GPCR-Mediated Signaling of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Anna Sofie; Trauelsen, Mette; Rudenko, Olga

    2017-01-01

    In addition to their bioenergetic intracellular function, several classical metabolites act as extracellular signaling molecules activating cell-surface G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), similar to hormones and neurotransmitters. "Signaling metabolites" generated from nutrients or by gut...... in adipose tissue, the liver, and the endocrine pancreas. Importantly, distinct metabolite GPCRs act as efficient pro- and anti-inflammatory regulators of key immune cells, and signaling metabolites may thus function as important drivers of the low-grade inflammation associated with insulin resistance...... and obesity. The concept of key metabolites as ligands for specific GPCRs has broadened our understanding of metabolic signaling significantly and provides a number of novel potential drug targets....

  4. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Brain deposition and neurotoxicity of manganese in adult mice exposed via the drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Saritha; Dodd, Celia A; Hekmatyar, Shahryar K; Filipov, Nikolay M

    2014-01-01

    Natural leaching processes and/or anthropogenic contamination can result in ground water concentrations of the essential metal manganese (Mn) that far exceed the current regulatory standards. Neurological consequences of Mn drinking water (DW) overexposure to experimental animals, i.e., mice, including its brain deposition/distribution and behavioral effects are understudied. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Mn via the DW for 8 weeks. After 5 weeks of Mn exposure, magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant Mn deposition in all examined brain regions; the degree of Mn deposition did not increase further a week later. Behaviorally, early hyperactivity and more time spent in the center of the arenas in an open field test, decreased forelimb grip strength and less time swimming in a forced swim test were observed after 6 weeks of Mn DW exposure. Eight-week Mn DW exposure did not alter striatal dopamine, its metabolites, or the expression of key dopamine homeostatic proteins, but it significantly increased striatal 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (a serotonin metabolite) levels, without affecting the levels of serotonin itself. Increased expression (mRNA) of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocyte activation marker), heme oxygenase-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (oxidative and nitrosative stress markers, respectively) were observed 8 weeks post-Mn DW exposure in the substantia nigra. Besides mRNA increases, GFAP protein expression was increased in the substantia nigra pars reticulata. In summary, the neurobehavioral deficits, characterized by locomotor and emotional perturbations, and nigral glial activation associated with significant brain Mn deposition are among the early signs of Mn neurotoxicity caused by DW overexposure.

  6. Clinical MRS studies of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubesch, B.; Marinier, D.S.; Hetherington, H.P.; Twieg, D.B.; Weiner, M.W. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Image-guided {sup 31}P and 1H magnetic resonance localized spectroscopy was performed on patients with brain tumors, temporal lobe epilepsy, chronic brain stroke, and deep white matter lesions. Absolute molar concentrations of metabolites, peak area ratios, and pH were obtained. The important findings were that {sup 31}P metabolite concentrations were significantly reduced in tumors, infarcts, and deep white matter lesions. Similarly, {sup 1}H metabolite intensities were reduced in chronic stroke. In the seizure foci of epilepsy patients, in tumors, and in chronic stroke, the pH was more alkaline than the normal pH. Peak area ratios were altered in tumors (reduction of phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate) and in chronic stroke (large increases in Cr/NAA and Cho/NAA). Finally, the spectroscopic imaging technique offers a versatile alternative to the single point techniques, producing spectra or images of the spatial distribution of individual {sup 31}P metabolites.

  7. Temporal variability in urinary phthalate metabolite excretion based on spot, morning, and 24-h urine samples: Considerations for epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Kranich, Selma K.; Jørgensen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Urinary phthalate excretion is used as marker of phthalate exposure in epidemiological studies. Here we examine the reliability of urinary phthalate levels in exposure classification by comparing the inter- and intrasubject variation of urinary phthalate metabolite levels. Thirty-three young...... healthy men each collected two spot, three first-morning, and three 24-h urine samples during a 3-month period. Samples were analyzed for the content of 12 urinary metabolites of 7 different phthalates. Variability was assessed as intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). For the metabolites of diethyl...

  8. Metabolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC. Cellular responses to stress and toxic insults: adaptation, injury, and death. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  9. Engineering Microbial Metabolite Dynamics and Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Alexander C; Hartline, Christopher J; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2017-10-01

    As yields for biological chemical production in microorganisms approach their theoretical maximum, metabolic engineering requires new tools, and approaches for improvements beyond what traditional strategies can achieve. Engineering metabolite dynamics and metabolite heterogeneity is necessary to achieve further improvements in product titers, productivities, and yields. Metabolite dynamics, the ensemble change in metabolite concentration over time, arise from the need for microbes to adapt their metabolism in response to the extracellular environment and are important for controlling growth and productivity in industrial fermentations. Metabolite heterogeneity, the cell-to-cell variation in a metabolite concentration in an isoclonal population, has a significant impact on ensemble productivity. Recent advances in single cell analysis enable a more complete understanding of the processes driving metabolite heterogeneity and reveal metabolic engineering targets. The authors present an overview of the mechanistic origins of metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity, why they are important, their potential effects in chemical production processes, and tools and strategies for engineering metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity. The authors emphasize that the ability to control metabolite dynamics and heterogeneity will bring new avenues of engineering to increase productivity of microbial strains. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Levels of pollutants and their metabolites: exposures to organic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J C

    1995-07-26

    The measurement of levels of organic pollutants and/or their metabolites in body tissues or fluids are specific markers of internal dose and, provided that the pharmacokinetic properties of the compounds in question are known, these levels may also be used as predictors of effects. Although historical data still remain to be very useful in environmental studies, more reliable exposure measures than combination of environmental levels and such estimators as residential history, job titles, life-style habits, individual perceptions, etc., are highly desirable. This has been clearly demonstrated in studies with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorndibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), where more recent measurements of serum concentrations in persons earlier classified as belonging to exposed groups have indicated that severe misclassifications may have occurred in previously epidemiological studies. This also demonstrates that, in retrospective studies, levels of persistent organic compounds are useful as markers of exposure, as their tissue levels mainly reflect previous exposures. However, most organic compounds are readily metabolized and excreted from the human body, and in many instances it will not be possible with current methodology and instrumentation to detect transient organic pollutants at low levels in the blood. In most cases, the use of urine samples offers a better opportunity to provide samples containing detectable levels. Therefore, the measurement of non-persistent organic substances and/or their metabolites may find potential use in prospective environmental health studies, but the predictive value highly depends on proper timing and frequency of sampling according to their toxicokinetic behaviour. A few examples on the use of organic compounds and/or metabolites as biomarkers are given, e.g., polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), ochratoxin A, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  11. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  12. Imaging cerebral tryptophan metabolism in brain tumor-associated depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Behen, Michael E; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Depression in patients with brain tumors is associated with impaired quality of life and shorter survival. Altered metabolism of tryptophan to serotonin and kynurenine metabolites may play a role in tumor-associated depression. Our recent studies with alpha[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET in brain tumor patients indicated abnormal tryptophan metabolism not only in the tumor mass but also in normal-appearing contralateral brain. In the present study, we explored if tryptophan metabolism in such brain regions is associated with depression. Twenty-one patients (mean age: 57 years) with a brain tumor (10 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, and 3 brain metastases) underwent AMT-PET scanning. MRI and AMT-PET images were co-registered, and AMT kinetic parameters, including volume of distribution (VD', an estimate of net tryptophan transport) and K (unidirectional uptake, related to tryptophan metabolism), were measured in the tumor mass and in unaffected cortical and subcortical regions contralateral to the tumor. Depression scores (based on the Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II]) were correlated with tumor size, grade, type, and AMT-PET variables. The mean BDI-II score was 12 ± 10 (range: 2-33); clinical levels of depression were identified in seven patients (33 %). High BDI-II scores were most strongly associated with high thalamic AMT K values both in the whole group (Spearman's rho = 0.63, p = 0.004) and in the subgroup of 18 primary brain tumors (r = 0.68, p = 0.004). Frontal and striatal VD' values were higher in the depressed subgroup than in non-depressed patients (p Tumor size, grade, and tumor type were not related to depression scores. Abnormalities of tryptophan transport and metabolism in the thalamus, striatum, and frontal cortex, measured by PET, are associated with depression in patients with brain tumor. These changes may indicate an imbalance between the serotonin and kynurenine pathways and serve as a molecular imaging marker of

  13. The secondary metabolite bioinformatics portal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Tilmann; Kim, Hyun Uk

    2016-01-01

    . In this context, this review gives a summary of tools and databases that currently are available to mine, identify and characterize natural product biosynthesis pathways and their producers based on ‘omics data. A web portal called Secondary Metabolite Bioinformatics Portal (SMBP at http......://www.secondarymetabolites.org) is introduced to provide a one-stop catalog and links to these bioinformatics resources. In addition, an outlook is presented how the existing tools and those to be developed will influence synthetic biology approaches in the natural products field....

  14. Epigenome targeting by probiotic metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licciardi Paul V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and homeostasis. A disturbed microbiota during early infancy is associated with an increased risk of developing inflammatory and allergic diseases later in life. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood but are likely to involve alterations in microbial production of fermentation-derived metabolites, which have potent immune modulating properties and are required for maintenance of healthy mucosal immune responses. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that have the capacity to alter the composition of bacterial species in the intestine that can in turn influence the production of fermentation-derived metabolites. Principal among these metabolites are the short-chain fatty acids butyrate and acetate that have potent anti-inflammatory activities important in regulating immune function at the intestinal mucosal surface. Therefore strategies aimed at restoring the microbiota profile may be effective in the prevention or treatment of allergic and inflammatory diseases. Presentation of the hypothesis Probiotic bacteria have diverse effects including altering microbiota composition, regulating epithelial cell barrier function and modulating of immune responses. The precise molecular mechanisms mediating these probiotic effects are not well understood. Short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate are a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors important in the epigenetic control of host cell responses. It is hypothesized that the biological function of probiotics may be a result of epigenetic modifications that may explain the wide range of effects observed. Studies delineating the effects of probiotics on short-chain fatty acid production and the epigenetic actions of short-chain fatty acids will assist in understanding the association between microbiota and allergic or autoimmune disorders. Testing the hypothesis We propose that treatment with

  15. Enuresis as a Premorbid Developmental Marker of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Thomas M.; Deep-Soboslay, Amy; Iglesias, Bianca; Callicott, Joseph H.; Gold, James M.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Honea, Robyn A.; Bigelow, Llewellyn B.; Egan, Michael F.; Emsellem, Esther M.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    There is comparatively little information about premorbid maturational brain abnormalities in schizophrenia (SCZ). We investigated whether a history of childhood enuresis, a well-established marker of neurodevelopmental delay, is associated with SCZ and with measures of brain abnormalities also associated with SCZ. A Diagnostic and Statistical…

  16. Assessing Metabolism and Injury in Acute Human Traumatic Brain Injury with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Current and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G. Stovell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI triggers a series of complex pathophysiological processes. These include abnormalities in brain energy metabolism; consequent to reduced tissue pO2 arising from ischemia or abnormal tissue oxygen diffusion, or due to a failure of mitochondrial function. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS allows non-invasive interrogation of brain tissue metabolism in patients with acute brain injury. Nuclei with “spin,” e.g., 1H, 31P, and 13C, are detectable using MRS and are found in metabolites at various stages of energy metabolism, possessing unique signatures due to their chemical shift or spin–spin interactions (J-coupling. The most commonly used clinical MRS technique, 1H MRS, uses the great abundance of hydrogen atoms within molecules in brain tissue. Spectra acquired with longer echo-times include N-acetylaspartate (NAA, creatine, and choline. NAA, a marker of neuronal mitochondrial activity related to adenosine triphosphate (ATP, is reported to be lower in patients with TBI than healthy controls, and the ratio of NAA/creatine at early time points may correlate with clinical outcome. 1H MRS acquired with shorter echo times produces a more complex spectrum, allowing detection of a wider range of metabolites.31 P MRS detects high-energy phosphate species, which are the end products of cellular respiration: ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr. ATP is the principal form of chemical energy in living organisms, and PCr is regarded as a readily mobilized reserve for its replenishment during periods of high utilization. The ratios of high-energy phosphates are thought to represent a balance between energy generation, reserve and use in the brain. In addition, the chemical shift difference between inorganic phosphate and PCr enables calculation of intracellular pH.13 C MRS detects the 13C isotope of carbon in brain metabolites. As the natural abundance of 13C is low (1.1%, 13C MRS is typically performed following

  17. Genome-metabolite associations revealed low heritability, high genetic complexity, and causal relations for leaf metabolites in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matros, Andrea; Liu, Guozheng; Hartmann, Anja; Jiang, Yong; Zhao, Yusheng; Wang, Huange; Ebmeyer, Erhard; Korzun, Viktor; Schachschneider, Ralf; Kazman, Ebrahim; Schacht, Johannes; Longin, Friedrich; Reif, Jochen Christoph; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    We investigated associations between the metabolic phenotype, consisting of quantitative data of 76 metabolites from 135 contrasting winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines, and 17 372 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Metabolite profiles were generated from flag leaves of plants from three different environments, with average repeatabilities of 0.5-0.6. The average heritability of 0.25 was unaffected by the heading date. Correlations among metabolites reflected their functional grouping, highlighting the strict coordination of various routes of the citric acid cycle. Genome-wide association studies identified significant associations for six metabolic traits, namely oxalic acid, ornithine, L-arginine, pentose alcohol III, L-tyrosine, and a sugar oligomer (oligo II), with between one and 17 associated SNPs. Notable associations with genes regulating transcription or translation explained between 2.8% and 32.5% of the genotypic variance (pG). Further candidate genes comprised metabolite carriers (pG 32.5-38.1%), regulatory proteins (pG 0.3-11.1%), and metabolic enzymes (pG 2.5-32.5%). The combinatorial use of genomic and metabolic data to construct partially directed networks revealed causal inferences in the correlated metabolite traits and associated SNPs. The evaluated causal relationships will provide a basis for predicting the effects of genetic interferences on groups of correlated metabolic traits, and thus on specific metabolic phenotypes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies ... medication. This information may someday make it possible to predict who ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ...

  1. Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Brain lesions By Mayo Clinic Staff A brain lesion is an abnormality seen on a brain-imaging test, such as ... tomography (CT). On CT or MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don' ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  3. Metabolite Profiling of Red Sea Corals

    KAUST Repository

    Ortega, Jovhana Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    Looking at the metabolite profile of an organism provides insights into the metabolomic state of a cell and hence also into pathways employed. Little is known about the metabolites produced by corals and their algal symbionts. In particular, corals from the central Red Sea are understudied, but interesting study objects, as they live in one of the warmest and most saline environments and can provide clues as to the adjustment of corals to environmental change. In this study, we applied gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC–MS) metabolite profiling to analyze the metabolic profile of four coral species and their associated symbionts: Fungia granulosa, Acropora hemprichii, Porites lutea, and Pocillopora verrucosa. We identified and quantified 102 compounds among primary and secondary metabolites across all samples. F. granulosa and its symbiont showed a total of 59 metabolites which were similar to the 51 displayed by P. verrucosa. P. lutea and A. hemprichii both harbored 40 compounds in conjunction with their respective isolated algae. Comparing across species, 28 metabolites were exclusively present in algae, while 38 were exclusive to corals. A principal component and cluster analyses revealed that metabolite profiles clustered between corals and algae, but each species harbored a distinct catalog of metabolites. The major classes of compounds were carbohydrates and amino acids. Taken together, this study provides a first description of metabolites of Red Sea corals and their associated symbionts. As expected, the metabolites of coral hosts differ from their algal symbionts, but each host and algal species harbor a unique set of metabolites. This corroborates that host-symbiont species pairs display a fine-tuned complementary metabolism that provide insights into the specific nature of the symbiosis. Our analysis also revealed aquatic pollutants, which suggests that metabolite profiling might be used for monitoring pollution levels and assessing

  4. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Lee Mei Ng

    Full Text Available Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin, shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue.

  5. Metabolite pattern of Cysticercus cellulosae metacestode from different predilection sites of swine using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawla S.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis due to Taenia solium is one of the most common public health problems in various regions of the world. We have performed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS experiments of the fluid aspirated from cysticerci excised from skeletal muscle (n = 16 and brain (n = 9 of infected swine to compare the metabolite pattern of cysticerci in different predilection sites. Perchloric acid extract of cysticercus cysts excised from skeletal muscles (n = 16was also prepared to ascertain water-soluble, low molecular weight metabolites using1H MRS. Absolute quantification and statistical analysis of different metabolites was done to look for any significant differences in different locations of cysts. The metabolite pattern of cysticerci was found to be similar in the various predilection sites. Metabolites observed were leucine, valine, alanine, lysine, glycine, lipid contents, lactate, glutamate, acetate, succinate, creatine, choline, and glucose. Concentration of creatine in cysticercus fluid of cysts removed from the muscle was found to be significantly higher (p = 0.001 than the cysts located in the brain. We conclude that the metabolite pattern in the cysticerci is not influenced by the surrounding tissue location; however concentration of certain metabolites may depend upon the tissue location.

  6. Metabolites from Alternaria Fungi and Their Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Zhou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria is a cosmopolitan fungal genus widely distributing in soil and organic matter. It includes saprophytic, endophytic and pathogenic species. At least 268 metabolites from Alternaria fungi have been reported in the past few decades. They mainly include nitrogen-containing metabolites, steroids, terpenoids, pyranones, quinones, and phenolics. This review aims to briefly summarize the structurally different metabolites produced by Alternaria fungi, as well as their occurrences, biological activities and functions. Some considerations related to synthesis, biosynthesis, production and applications of the metabolites from Alternaria fungi are also discussed.

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  8. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojiao Zheng; Tianlu Chen; Aihua Zhao; Xiaoyan Wang; Guoxiang Xie; Fengjie Huang; Jiajian Liu; Qing Zhao; Shouli Wang; Chongchong Wang; Mingmei Zhou; Jun Panee; Zhigang He; Wei Jia

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and ami...

  9. The cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites as studied by {sup 13}C and {sup 14}C labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, B.

    1995-11-01

    The present investigations show the feasibility of analyzing the cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites by {sup 13}C-and {sup 14}C-labelling using labelled acetate and glucose as markers for glial and neuronal metabolism, respectively. Using [{sup 13}C]acetate, it was shown that glial cells export {approx}60% of their TCA cycle intermediates, mostly as glutamine, and that this glutamine is used by neurons partly as an energy reserve, and partly it is converted directly to glutamate and GABA. Using [{sup 13}C]glucose, the glial process or pyruvate carboxylation was shown to compensate fully for the loss of glutamine. The mechanism of action of two neurotoxins, fluorocitrate and 3-nitropropionate was elucidated. The latter toxin was shown to inhibit the TCA cycle of GABAergic neurons selectively. Formation of pyruvate and lactate from glial TCA cycle intermediates was demonstrated in vivo. This pathway may be important for glial inactivation of transmitter glutamate and GABA. The results illustrate glianeuronal interactions, and they suggest the applicability of {sup 13}CNMR spectroscopy to the detailed study of the cerebral metabolism of amino acids in the intact, unanesthetized human brain. 174 refs.

  10. Increased reactive oxygen metabolites is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and vascular endothelial damage in middle-aged Japanese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiura T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomonori Sugiura1, Yasuaki Dohi1, Hiroyuki Takase2, Sumiyo Yamashita1, Satoru Tanaka1, Genjiro Kimura11Department of Cardio-Renal Medicine and Hypertension, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Enshu Hospital, Hamamatsu, JapanBackground: Vascular endothelium, a provider of nitric oxide, is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in healthy vascular systems. Increased oxidative stress promotes vascular inflammation and is a common pathway involved in endothelial damage. The present study sought to investigate the usefulness of derivative reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROM as an oxidative stress marker for detecting endothelial damage in the clinical setting in subjects with early-stage atherosclerosis.Methods: Study 1 investigated the relationship between serum d-ROM levels and cardiovascular risk factors in apparently healthy middle-aged subjects (n = 1992, 49 ± 8 years who participated in our health checkup program. Study 2 analyzed the association between d-ROM levels and endothelial function assessed by flow-mediated dilation and that between d-ROM levels and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP levels in middle-aged outpatients with mild-to-moderate cardiovascular risk (n = 43, 40 ± 5 years.Results: In study 1, the d-ROM level was independently correlated with age, systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and brain natriuretic peptide in univariate and multivariate regression analysis. In study 2, the d-ROM level was correlated positively with the hs-CRP level and inversely with the flow-mediated dilation value. Patients in the highest tertile of d-ROM had significantly lower flow-mediated dilation values compared with patients in the other tertiles. Moreover, after subdivision of patients into four groups according to d-ROM and hs-CRP levels, patients with high levels of both d-ROM and hs-CRP showed

  11. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vriend Gert

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases, however, treat chemical structures more as illustrations than as a datafield in its own right. Lack of chemical accuracy impedes progress in the areas mentioned above. We present a database of metabolites called BioMeta that augments the existing pathway databases by explicitly assessing the validity, correctness, and completeness of chemical structure and reaction information. Description The main bulk of the data in BioMeta were obtained from the KEGG Ligand database. We developed a tool for chemical structure validation which assesses the chemical validity and stereochemical completeness of a molecule description. The validation tool was used to examine the compounds in BioMeta, showing that a relatively small number of compounds had an incorrect constitution (connectivity only, not considering stereochemistry and that a considerable number (about one third had incomplete or even incorrect stereochemistry. We made a large effort to correct the errors and to complete the structural descriptions. A total of 1468 structures were corrected and/or completed. We also established the reaction balance of the reactions in BioMeta and corrected 55% of the unbalanced (stoichiometrically incorrect reactions in an automatic procedure. The BioMeta database was implemented in PostgreSQL and provided with a web-based interface. Conclusion We demonstrate that the validation of metabolite structures and reactions is a feasible and worthwhile undertaking, and that the validation results can be used to trigger corrections and improvements to BioMeta, our metabolite database. BioMeta provides some tools for rational drug design, reaction searches, and

  12. Metabolomic method: UPLC-q-ToF polar and non-polar metabolites in the healthy rat cerebellum using an in-vial dual extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amera A Ebshiana

    Full Text Available Unbiased metabolomic analysis of biological samples is a powerful and increasingly commonly utilised tool, especially for the analysis of bio-fluids to identify candidate biomarkers. To date however only a small number of metabolomic studies have been applied to studying the metabolite composition of tissue samples, this is due, in part to a number of technical challenges including scarcity of material and difficulty in extracting metabolites. The aim of this study was to develop a method for maximising the biological information obtained from small tissue samples by optimising sample preparation, LC-MS analysis and metabolite identification. Here we describe an in-vial dual extraction (IVDE method, with reversed phase and hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography (HILIC which reproducibly measured over 4,000 metabolite features from as little as 3mg of brain tissue. The aqueous phase was analysed in positive and negative modes following HILIC separation in which 2,838 metabolite features were consistently measured including amino acids, sugars and purine bases. The non-aqueous phase was also analysed in positive and negative modes following reversed phase separation gradients respectively from which 1,183 metabolite features were consistently measured representing metabolites such as phosphatidylcholines, sphingolipids and triacylglycerides. The described metabolomics method includes a database for 200 metabolites, retention time, mass and relative intensity, and presents the basal metabolite composition for brain tissue in the healthy rat cerebellum.

  13. Antimycobacterial Metabolites from Marine Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daletos, Georgios; Ancheeva, Elena; Chaidir, Chaidir; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Proksch, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Marine organisms play an important role in natural product-based drug research due to accumulation of structurally unique and bioactive metabolites. The exploration of marine-derived compounds may significantly extend the scientific knowledge of potential scaffolds for antibiotic drug discovery. Development of novel antitubercular agents is especially significant as the emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains remains threateningly high. Marine invertebrates (i.e., sponges, corals, gorgonians) as a source of new chemical entities are the center of research for several scientific groups, and the wide spectrum of biological activities of marine-derived compounds encourages scientists to carry out investigations in the field of antibiotic research, including tuberculosis treatment. The present review covers published data on antitubercular natural products from marine invertebrates grouped according to their biogenetic origin. Studies on the structure-activity relationships of these important leads are highlighted as well. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Microbiome, probiotics and neurodegenerative diseases: deciphering the gut brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Susan; Lomis, Nikita; Kahouli, Imen; Dia, Si Yuan; Singh, Surya Pratap; Prakash, Satya

    2017-10-01

    The gut microbiota is essential to health and has recently become a target for live bacterial cell biotherapies for various chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and neurodegenerative disease. Probiotic biotherapies are known to create a healthy gut environment by balancing bacterial populations and promoting their favorable metabolic action. The microbiota and its respective metabolites communicate to the host through a series of biochemical and functional links thereby affecting host homeostasis and health. In particular, the gastrointestinal tract communicates with the central nervous system through the gut-brain axis to support neuronal development and maintenance while gut dysbiosis manifests in neurological disease. There are three basic mechanisms that mediate the communication between the gut and the brain: direct neuronal communication, endocrine signaling mediators and the immune system. Together, these systems create a highly integrated molecular communication network that link systemic imbalances with the development of neurodegeneration including insulin regulation, fat metabolism, oxidative markers and immune signaling. Age is a common factor in the development of neurodegenerative disease and probiotics prevent many harmful effects of aging such as decreased neurotransmitter levels, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis-all factors that are proven aggravators of neurodegenerative disease. Indeed patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases have a high rate of gastrointestinal comorbidities and it has be proposed by some the management of the gut microbiota may prevent or alleviate the symptoms of these chronic diseases.

  15. Differential Metabolite Profiles during Fruit Development in High-Yielding Oil Palm Mesocarp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Huey Fang; Neoh, Bee Keat; Hong, May Ping Li; Low, Jaime Yoke Sum; Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Ithnin, Nalisha; Thang, Yin Mee; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Chew, Fook Tim; Yusof, Hirzun Mohd.; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Appleton, David R.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand lipid biosynthesis in oil palm mesocarp, in particular the differences in gene regulation leading to and including de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, a multi-platform metabolomics technology was used to profile mesocarp metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in comparatively high- and low-yielding oil palm populations. Significantly higher amino acid levels preceding lipid biosynthesis and nucleosides during lipid biosynthesis were observed in a higher yielding commercial palm population. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis revealed interesting divergence of flux towards glycerol-3-phosphate, while carbon utilization differences in the TCA cycle were proven by an increase in malic acid/citric acid ratio. Apart from insights into the regulation of enhanced lipid production in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programmes. PMID:23593468

  16. Differential metabolite profiles during fruit development in high-yielding oil palm mesocarp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey Fang Teh

    Full Text Available To better understand lipid biosynthesis in oil palm mesocarp, in particular the differences in gene regulation leading to and including de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, a multi-platform metabolomics technology was used to profile mesocarp metabolites during six critical stages of fruit development in comparatively high- and low-yielding oil palm populations. Significantly higher amino acid levels preceding lipid biosynthesis and nucleosides during lipid biosynthesis were observed in a higher yielding commercial palm population. Levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis revealed interesting divergence of flux towards glycerol-3-phosphate, while carbon utilization differences in the TCA cycle were proven by an increase in malic acid/citric acid ratio. Apart from insights into the regulation of enhanced lipid production in oil palm, these results provide potentially useful metabolite yield markers and genes of interest for use in breeding programmes.

  17. Biochemical and secondary metabolites changes under moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed the importance of carbohydrate and nitrogen cycle related metabolites in mediating tolerance in cassava by affecting their phenotypic expression in the plant. Keywords: Hydrothermal stress, bio-chemicals, pigments, secondary metabolites, cassava. African Journal of Biotechnology, Vol 13(31) 3173-3186 ...

  18. Metabolite profiles of common Stemphylium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Solfrizzo, Michelle; Visconti, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-three isolates of Stemphylium spp. have been analysed for their metabolite profiles. Five metabolites, stemphylin, stemphyloxin II, stemphyperylenol, stemphol and a stemphol related compound, have been detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography and ide...

  19. Microsomal metabolism of trenbolone acetate metabolites ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenbolone acetate (TBA) is a synthetic growth promoter widely used in animal agriculture, and its metabolites are suspected endocrine disrupting compounds in agriculturally impacted receiving waters. However, beyond the three widely recognized TBA metabolites (17-trenbolone, 17-trenbolone and trendione), little is known about other metabolites formed in vivo and subsequently discharged into the environment, with some evidence suggesting these unknown metabolites comprise a majority of the TBA mass dosed to the animal. Here, we explored the metabolism of the three known TBA metabolites using rat liver microsome studies. All TBA metabolites are transformed into a complex mixture of monohydroxylated products. Based on product characterization, the majority are more polar than the parent metabolites but maintain their characteristic trienone backbone. A minor degree of interconversion between known metabolites was also observed, as were higher order hydroxylated products with a greater extent of reaction. Notably, the distribution and yield of products were generally comparable across a series of variably induced rat liver microsomes, as well as during additional studies with human and bovine liver microsomes. Bioassays conducted with mixtures of these transformation products suggest that androgen receptor (AR) binding activity is diminished as a result of the microsomal treatment, suggesting that the transformation products are generally less potent than

  20. Detecting beer intake by unique metabolite patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern...

  1. Novel Omega-3 Fatty Acid Epoxygenase Metabolite Reduces Kidney Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (CYP monooxygenases epoxidize the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA docosahexaenoic acid into novel epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs that have multiple biological actions. The present study determined the ability of the most abundant EDP regioisomer, 19,20-EDP to reduce kidney injury in an experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO renal fibrosis mouse model. Mice with UUO developed kidney tubular injury and interstitial fibrosis. UUO mice had elevated kidney hydroxyproline content and five-times greater collagen positive fibrotic area than sham control mice. 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice for 10 days reduced renal fibrosis with a 40%–50% reduction in collagen positive area and hydroxyproline content. There was a six-fold increase in kidney α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA positive area in UUO mice compared to sham control mice, and 19,20-EDP treatment to UUO mice decreased α-SMA immunopositive area by 60%. UUO mice demonstrated renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT with reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and elevated expression of multiple mesenchymal markers (FSP-1, α-SMA, and desmin. Interestingly, 19,20-EDP treatment reduced renal EMT in UUO by decreasing mesenchymal and increasing epithelial marker expression. Overall, we demonstrate that a novel omega-3 fatty acid metabolite 19,20-EDP, prevents UUO-induced renal fibrosis in mice by reducing renal EMT.

  2. High fat diet leads to changes in metabolite patterns in pig plasma, fecal, and urine samples detected by a ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem with high resolution mass spectrometry metabolomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-targeted metabolite profiling can identify robust biological markers of dietary exposure that can lead to a better understanding of causal interactions between diet and health. In this study, pigs were used as an animal model to develop an efficient procedure to discover metabolites in biolog...

  3. [Biologically active metabolites of the marine actinobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskaia, M P; Kuznetsova, T A

    2010-01-01

    This review systematically data on the chemical structure and biological activity of metabolites of obligate and facultative marine actinobacteria, published from 2000 to 2007. We discuss some structural features of the five groups of metabolites related to macrolides and compounds containing lactone, quinone and diketopiperazine residues, cyclic peptides, alkaloids, and compounds of mixed biosynthesis. Survey shows a large chemical diversity of metabolites actinobacteria isolated from marine environment. It is shown that, along with metabolites, identical to previously isolated from terrestrial actinobacteria, marine actinobacteria synthesize unknown compounds not found in other natural sources, including micro organisms. Perhaps the biosynthesis of new chemotypes bioactive compounds in marine actinobacteria is one manifestation of chemical adaptation of microorganisms to environmental conditions at sea. Review stresses the importance of the chemical study of metabolites of marine actinobacteria. These studies are aimed at obtaining new data on marine microorganisms producers of biologically active compounds and chemical structure and biological activity of new low-molecular bioregulators of natural origin.

  4. A New Paradigm for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Metabolite Identification Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Everett

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE, both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field.

  5. Constitutional Aneuploidy in the Normal Human Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rehen, Stevens K; Yung, Yun C; McCreight, Matthew P; Kaushal, Dhruv; Yang, Amy H; Almeida, Beatriz S. V; Kingsbury, Marcy A; Cabral, Katia M. S; McConnell, Michael J; Anliker, Brigitte; Fontanoz, Marisa; Chun, Jerold

    2005-01-01

    .... Chromosome 21 aneuploid cells constitute approximately 4% of the estimated one trillion cells in the human brain and include non-neuronal cells and postmitotic neurons identified by the neuronspecific nuclear protein marker...

  6. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: ... of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  9. [Molecular classification and markers of malignant melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tímár, József; Hársing, Judit; Somlai, Beáta

    2013-06-01

    Pathological classification of malignant melanoma did not change in the past decade, it was just completed with UV-induced skin alterations. A new feature, however, is the establishment of molecular classification of melanoma indicating that beside the most frequent genetic alterations (BRAF, NRAS, CKIT mutations) there is a wide variety of rare molecular subclasses. Unfortunately, none of these genetic alterations can be used to discriminate benign lesions from malignant ones. The frequently used "melanoma" markers are mostly melanosomal markers, therefore they are not helpful for this diagnostic purpose either. More recently, novel FISH kits have been developed analyzing characteristic copy number alterations specific for malignant melanoma. Though melanosomal markers are helpful in differencial diagnostics, the presence of normal melanocytes in various tissues (lymph nodes, intestine or brain) requires application of molecular techniques when melanoma metastasis is in question.

  10. Protective Effects of Dihydrocaffeic Acid, a Coffee Component Metabolite, on a Focal Cerebral Ischemia Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjin Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA in a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo rat model. The current study further investigated the protective effects of the metabolites of CGA and dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA was selected for further study after screening using the same tMCAo rat model. In the current study, tMCAo rats (2 h of MCAo followed by 22 h of reperfusion were injected with various doses of DHCA at 0 and 2 h after onset of ischemia. We assessed brain damage, functional deficits, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier damage at 24 h after ischemia. For investigating the mechanism, in vitro zymography and western blotting analysis were performed to determine the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9. DHCA (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, i.p. dose-dependently reduced brain infarct volume, behavioral deficits, brain water content, and Evans Blue (EB leakage. DHCA inhibited expression and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Therefore, DHCA might be one of the important metabolites of CGA and of natural products, including coffee, with protective effects on ischemia-induced neuronal damage and brain edema.

  11. Gut-Microbiota-Metabolite Axis in Early Renal Function Decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Barrios

    Full Text Available Several circulating metabolites derived from bacterial protein fermentation have been found to be inversely associated with renal function but the timing and disease severity is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between indoxyl-sulfate, p-cresyl-sulfate, phenylacetylglutamine and gut-microbial profiles in early renal function decline.Indoxyl-sulfate (Beta(SE = -2.74(0.24; P = 8.8x10-29, p-cresyl-sulfate (-1.99(0.24, P = 4.6x10-16, and phenylacetylglutamine(-2.73 (0.25, P = 1.2x10-25 were inversely associated with eGFR in a large population base cohort (TwinsUK, n = 4439 with minimal renal function decline. In a sub-sample of 855 individuals, we analysed metabolite associations with 16S gut microbiome profiles (909 profiles, QIIME 1.7.0. Three Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs were significantly associated with indoxyl-sulfate and 52 with phenylacetylglutamine after multiple testing; while one OTU was nominally associated with p-cresyl sulfate. All 56 microbial members belong to the order Clostridiales and are represented by anaerobic Gram-positive families Christensenellaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae. Within these, three microbes were also associated with eGFR.Our data suggest that indoxyl-sulfate, p-cresyl-sulfate and phenylacetylglutamine are early markers of renal function decline. Changes in the intestinal flora associated with these metabolites are detectable in early kidney disease. Future efforts should dissect this relationship to improve early diagnostics and therapeutics strategies.

  12. Unbiased Evaluation of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites in Complex Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Taichi; Wang, Yuehong; Pro, Samuel M.; Franzblau, Scott G.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of bioactive principles in a complex matrix such as natural products and botanical medicines are secondary rather than primary metabolites. In addition to being chemically diverse, the bioactivity of an ethnobotanical can comprise from one to several bioactive compounds, present in a complex mixture. Conventional discovery efforts utilize bioassay-guided fractionation (BGF) to isolate individual active compounds. When applied to complex natural products, BGF is often challenged by an apparent loss of activity during fractionation, resulting in weakly active isolated compounds. Metabolomic analysis can potentially complement existing the BGF paradigm by capturing the chemical complexity of the metabolites. The proposed biochemometric approach establishes a link between the chemistry of a secondary metabolome and a deserved health impact, using a high-throughput, high-resolution capable biological endpoint. The proof of principle is demonstrated for the anti-tuberculosis (TB) activity of the Alaskan ethnobotanical, Oplopanax horridus. Biochemometric analysis identified the 100 most active constituents from thousands of metabolites in the active extract by means of 2D orthogonal chromatography using countercurrent and GC-MS methods. Previously isolated O. horridus phytoconstituents were used as reference markers of known structure and bio(in)activity. Positive correlations allowed distinction of anti-TB actives from inactive compounds. A total of 29 bioactives from 3 main structural classes were assigned based on MS data. Biochemometric analysis is a new tool for the standardization of herbal medicines and ethnobotanicals, as well as for drug discovery from nature. The method can assign multiple active compounds in complex mixtures without their prior isolation or structure elucidation, while still providing an interface to structural information. PMID:22766306

  13. Gut-Microbiota-Metabolite Axis in Early Renal Function Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Clara; Beaumont, Michelle; Pallister, Tess; Villar, Judith; Goodrich, Julia K; Clark, Andrew; Pascual, Julio; Ley, Ruth E; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T; Menni, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Several circulating metabolites derived from bacterial protein fermentation have been found to be inversely associated with renal function but the timing and disease severity is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between indoxyl-sulfate, p-cresyl-sulfate, phenylacetylglutamine and gut-microbial profiles in early renal function decline. Indoxyl-sulfate (Beta(SE) = -2.74(0.24); P = 8.8x10-29), p-cresyl-sulfate (-1.99(0.24), P = 4.6x10-16), and phenylacetylglutamine(-2.73 (0.25), P = 1.2x10-25) were inversely associated with eGFR in a large population base cohort (TwinsUK, n = 4439) with minimal renal function decline. In a sub-sample of 855 individuals, we analysed metabolite associations with 16S gut microbiome profiles (909 profiles, QIIME 1.7.0). Three Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were significantly associated with indoxyl-sulfate and 52 with phenylacetylglutamine after multiple testing; while one OTU was nominally associated with p-cresyl sulfate. All 56 microbial members belong to the order Clostridiales and are represented by anaerobic Gram-positive families Christensenellaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae. Within these, three microbes were also associated with eGFR. Our data suggest that indoxyl-sulfate, p-cresyl-sulfate and phenylacetylglutamine are early markers of renal function decline. Changes in the intestinal flora associated with these metabolites are detectable in early kidney disease. Future efforts should dissect this relationship to improve early diagnostics and therapeutics strategies.

  14. An ultrasonication-assisted extraction and derivatization protocol for GC/TOFMS-based metabolite profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yumin; Chen, Tianlu; Qiu, Yunpin; Cheng, Yu; Cao, Yu; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Wei

    2011-05-01

    Conventional chemical derivatization of metabolites in biological specimens is time-consuming, which limits the throughput and efficiency of metabolite profiling using a gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS) platform. We report an ultrasonication-assisted protocol which reduces the derivatization time from hours to about 30 min and significantly enhances the derivatization efficiency prior to a GC/TOFMS analysis. The protocol was evaluated using 40 compounds representing different classes of human metabolites, and demonstrated good analytical precision and accuracy. In comparison with the conventional method, the new protocol was able to increase the intensity of most of the identified peaks (71.0%) in the GC/TOFMS chromatograms of human serum samples. The detected compounds with increased intensity include most amino acids, keto-containing organic acids, carbonyl-containing carbohydrates, and unsaturated fatty acids. We applied this protocol in a metabolomic study of human serum samples obtained from 34 patients diagnosed with hypertension and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. Metabolite markers associated with hypertension, including glucosamine, D-sorbitol, 1-stearoylglycerol, and homocysteine, were identified and validated by statistical methods and use of reference standards. Our work highlights the potential of this novel approach for the large-scale metabolite profiling of samples generated from plant, animal, and clinical and epidemiological studies.

  15. Retinoic Acid Induces Blood-Brain Barrier Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizee, M.R.; Wooldrik, D.; Lakeman, K.A.M.; van het Hof, B.; Drexhage, J.A.R.; Geerts, D.; Bugiani, M.; Aronica, E.; Mebius, R.E.; Prat, A.; de Vries, H.E.; Reijerkerk, A.

    2013-01-01

    The blood- brain barrier (BBB) is crucial in the maintenance of a controlled environment within the brain to safeguard optimal neuronal function. The endothelial cells (ECs) of theBBBpossess specific properties that restrict the entry of cells and metabolites into the CNS. The specialized BBB

  16. Retinoic acid induces blood-brain barrier development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizee, Mark R.; Wooldrik, Desiree; Lakeman, Kim A. M.; van het Hof, Bert; Drexhage, Joost A. R.; Geerts, Dirk; Bugiani, Marianna; Aronica, Eleonora; Mebius, Reina E.; Prat, Alexandre; de Vries, Helga E.; Reijerkerk, Arie

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is crucial in the maintenance of a controlled environment within the brain to safeguard optimal neuronal function. The endothelial cells (ECs) of the BBB possess specific properties that restrict the entry of cells and metabolites into the CNS. The specialized BBB

  17. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3’-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  18. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action.

  19. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  20. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain ... imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ... chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  14. Metabolite Profiling of Italian Tomato Landraces with Different Fruit Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana eBaldina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest towards traditional tomato varieties is fueled by the need to rescue desirable organoleptic traits and to improve the quality of fresh and processed tomatoes in the market. In addition, the phenotypic and genetic variation preserved in tomato landraces represents a means to understand the genetic basis of traits related to health and organoleptic aspects and improve them in modern varieties. To establish a framework for this approach, we studied the content of several metabolites in a panel of Italian tomato landraces categorized into three broad fruit type classes (flattened/ribbed, pear/oxheart, round/elongate. Three modern hybrids, corresponding to the three fruit shape typologies, were included as reference. Red ripe fruits were morphologically characterized and biochemically analyzed for their content in glycoalkaloids, phenols, amino acids and Amadori products. The round/elongate types showed a higher content in glycoalkaloids, whereas flattened types had higher levels of phenolic compounds. Flattened tomatoes were also rich in total amino acids and in particular in glutamic acid. Multivariate analysis of amino acid content clearly separated the three classes of fruit types. Making allowance of the very low number of genotypes, phenotype-marker relationships were analyzed after retrieving single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among the landraces available in the literature. Sixty-six markers were significantly associated with the studied traits. The positions of several of these SNPs showed correspondence with already described genomic regions and QTLs supporting the reliability of the association. Overall the data indicated that significant changes in quality-related metabolites occur depending on the genetic background in traditional tomato germplasm, frequently according to specific fruit shape categories. Such a variability is suitable to harness association mapping for metabolic quality traits using this germplasm

  15. Discovery of novel metabolites from marine actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kin S

    2006-06-01

    Recent findings from culture-dependent and culture-independent methods have demonstrated that indigenous marine actinomycetes exist in the oceans and are widely distributed in different marine ecosystems. There is tremendous diversity and novelty among the marine actinomycetes present in marine environments. Progress has been made to isolate novel actinomycetes from samples collected at different marine environments and habitats. These marine actinomycetes produce different types of new secondary metabolites. Many of these metabolites possess biological activities and have the potential to be developed as therapeutic agents. Marine actinomycetes are a prolific but underexploited source for the discovery of novel secondary metabolites.

  16. An isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for trace analysis of xylene and its metabolites in tissues following threshold limit value exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyon, K.H.; Kracko, D.A.; Strunk, M.R. [and others

    1995-12-01

    The existence of a nose-brain barrier that functions to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from inhaled toxicants has been postulated. Just as a blood-brain barrier protects the CNS from systemic toxicants, the nose-brain barrier may have similar characteristic functions. One component of interest is nasal xenobiotic metabolism and its effect on the transport of pollutants into the CNS at environmentally plausible levels of exposure. Previous results have shown that inhaled xylene are dimethyl phenol (DMP) and methyl benzyl alcohol (MBA), and the nonvolatile metabolites are toluic acid (TA) and methyl hippuric acid (MHA). The nonvolatile metabolites of xylene, along with a small quantity of volatiles, representing either parent xylene or volatile metabolites, are transported via the olfactory epithelium to the glomeruli within the olfactory bulbs of the brain. Further work will be done to establish the linearity for each analyte at the actual highest detection limit of the GC/MS.

  17. Tissue distribution of berberine and its metabolites after oral administration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Shan Tan

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR has been confirmed to have multiple bioactivities in clinic, such as cholesterol-lowering, anti-diabetes, cardiovascular protection and anti- inflammation. However, BBR's plasma level is very low; it cannot explain its pharmacological effects in patients. We consider that the in vivo distribution of BBR as well as of its bioactive metabolites might provide part of the explanation for this question. In this study, liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/MS(n-IT-TOF as well as liquid chromatography that coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was used for the study of tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of BBR in rats after oral administration (200 mg/kg. The results indicated that BBR was quickly distributed in the liver, kidneys, muscle, lungs, brain, heart, pancreas and fat in a descending order of its amount. The pharmacokinetic profile indicated that BBR's level in most of studied tissues was higher (or much higher than that in plasma 4 h after administration. BBR remained relatively stable in the tissues like liver, heart, brain, muscle, pancreas etc. Organ distribution of BBR's metabolites was also investigated paralleled with that of BBR. Thalifendine (M1, berberrubine (M2 and jatrorrhizine (M4, which the metabolites with moderate bioactivity, were easily detected in organs like the liver and kidney. For instance, M1, M2 and M4 were the major metabolites in the liver, among which the percentage of M2 was up to 65.1%; the level of AUC (0-t (area under the concentration-time curve for BBR or the metabolites in the liver was 10-fold or 30-fold higher than that in plasma, respectively. In summary, the organ concentration of BBR (as well as its bioactive metabolites was higher than its concentration in the blood after oral administration. It might explain BBR's pharmacological effects on human diseases in clinic.

  18. Mesothelin-specific Immune Responses Predict Survival of Patients With Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhenjiang

    2017-09-01

    Interpretation: This is the first evidence that immune responses to mesothelin serve as a marker of increased overall survival in patients with brain metastases, regardless of the primary tumor origin. Analyses of immunological markers could potentially serve as prognostic markers in patients with brain metastases and help to select patients in need for adjunct, immunological, treatment strategies.

  19. Developmental social isolation affects adult behavior, social interaction, and dopamine metabolite levels in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Soaleha; Amlani, Shahid; Buske, Christine; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The zebrafish is a social vertebrate and an excellent translational model for a variety of human disorders. Abnormal social behavior is a hallmark of several human brain disorders. Social behavioral problems can arise as a result of adverse early social environment. Little is known about the effects of early social isolation in adult zebrafish. We compared zebrafish that were isolated for either short (7 days) or long duration (180 days) to socially housed zebrafish, testing their behavior across ontogenesis (ages 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 days), and shoal cohesion and whole-brain monoamines and their metabolites in adulthood. Long social isolation increased locomotion and decreased shoal cohesion and anxiety in the open-field in adult. Additionally, both short and long social isolation reduced dopamine metabolite levels in response to social stimuli. Thus, early social isolation has lasting effects in zebrafish, and may be employed to generate zebrafish models of human neuropsychiatric conditions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  1. Metabolite production by species of Stemphylium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kresten Jon Kromphardt; Rossman, Amy; Andersen, Birgitte

    2018-01-01

    Morphology and phylogeny has been used to distinguish members of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Stemphylium. A third method for distinguishing species is by chemotaxonomy. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium via HPLC-UV-MS analysis, while...... also exploring the potential of chemotaxonomy as a robust identification method for Stemphylium. Several species were found to have species-specific metabolites, while other species were distinguishable by a broader metabolic profile rather than specific metabolites. Many previously described...... metabolites were found to be important for distinguishing species, while some unknown metabolites were also found to have important roles in distinguishing species of Stemphylium. This study is the first of its kind to investigate the chemical potential of Stemphylium across the whole genus....

  2. Regulation and Role of Fungal Secondary Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheleidt, Juliane; Mattern, Derek J; Fischer, Juliane; Netzker, Tina; Weber, Jakob; Schroeckh, Volker; Valiante, Vito; Brakhage, Axel A

    2016-11-23

    Fungi have the capability to produce a tremendous number of so-called secondary metabolites, which possess a multitude of functions, e.g., communication signals during coexistence with other microorganisms, virulence factors during pathogenic interactions with plants and animals, and in medical applications. Therefore, research on this topic has intensified significantly during the past 10 years and thus knowledge of regulatory mechanisms and the understanding of the role of secondary metabolites have drastically increased. This review aims to depict the complexity of all the regulatory elements involved in controlling the expression of secondary metabolite gene clusters, ranging from epigenetic control and signal transduction pathways to global and specific transcriptional regulators. Furthermore, we give a short overview on the role of secondary metabolites, focusing on the interaction with other microorganisms in the environment as well as on pathogenic relationships.

  3. Tissue distribution and elimination of estrogenic and anti-inflammatory catechol metabolites from sesaminol triglucoside in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Kuo-Ching; Ku, Kuo-Lung; Chu, Yan-Hwa; Hwang, Lucy Sun; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2010-07-14

    Sesaminol triglucoside (STG) is the main sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) lignan. Like many other plant lignans, STG can be converted to the mammalian lignans by intestinal microbiota. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the distribution of STG metabolite in rats, and the effects of STG and its metabolite on in vitro inflammation and estrogenic activities. STG was metabolized via intestinal microflora to a biologically active catechol moiety which would then be absorbed into the body in rats. After oral administration of STG to Sprague-Dawley rats, the concentrations of major STG metabolites in rectum, cecum, colon, and small intestines are higher than those in liver, lung, kidney, and heart. Its concentration in brain is low but detectable. The present study demonstrates that STG may be metabolized to form the catechol metabolites first by intestinal microflora and then incorporated via intestine absorption into the cardiovascular system and transported to other tissues. Results showed that the catechol metabolites were found to be able to penetrate the tail end of intestines (large intestine) and go through urinary excretion. STG metabolites significantly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-alpha in RAW264.7 murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. The estrogenic activities of STG metabolites were also established by ligand-dependent transcriptional activation through estrogen receptors. This study clearly shows that STG has anti-inflammatory and estrogenic activities via metabolism of intestinal microflora.

  4. A sex-specific metabolite identified in a marine invertebrate utilizing phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Kleps

    Full Text Available Hormone level differences are generally accepted as the primary cause for sexual dimorphism in animal and human development. Levels of low molecular weight metabolites also differ between men and women in circulating amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates and within brain tissue. While investigating the metabolism of blue crab tissues using Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, we discovered that only the male blue crab (Callinectes sapidus contained a phosphorus compound with a chemical shift well separated from the expected phosphate compounds. Spectra obtained from male gills were readily differentiated from female gill spectra. Analysis from six years of data from male and female crabs documented that the sex-specificity of this metabolite was normal for this species. Microscopic analysis of male and female gills found no differences in their gill anatomy or the presence of parasites or bacteria that might produce this phosphorus compound. Analysis of a rare gynandromorph blue crab (laterally, half male and half female proved that this sex-specificity was an intrinsic biochemical process and was not caused by any variations in the diet or habitat of male versus female crabs. The existence of a sex-specific metabolite is a previously unrecognized, but potentially significant biochemical phenomenon. An entire enzyme system has been synthesized and activated only in one sex. Unless blue crabs are a unique species, sex-specific metabolites are likely to be present in other animals. Would the presence or absence of a sex-specific metabolite affect an animal's development, anatomy and biochemistry?

  5. Biologically Active Secondary Metabolites from the Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Gerald F; Gloer, James B

    2016-11-01

    Many Fungi have a well-developed secondary metabolism. The diversity of fungal species and the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters underscores a nearly limitless potential for metabolic variation and an untapped resource for drug discovery and synthetic biology. Much of the ecological success of the filamentous fungi in colonizing the planet is owed to their ability to deploy their secondary metabolites in concert with their penetrative and absorptive mode of life. Fungal secondary metabolites exhibit biological activities that have been developed into life-saving medicines and agrochemicals. Toxic metabolites, known as mycotoxins, contaminate human and livestock food and indoor environments. Secondary metabolites are determinants of fungal diseases of humans, animals, and plants. Secondary metabolites exhibit a staggering variation in chemical structures and biological activities, yet their biosynthetic pathways share a number of key characteristics. The genes encoding cooperative steps of a biosynthetic pathway tend to be located contiguously on the chromosome in coregulated gene clusters. Advances in genome sequencing, computational tools, and analytical chemistry are enabling the rapid connection of gene clusters with their metabolic products. At least three fungal drug precursors, penicillin K and V, mycophenolic acid, and pleuromutilin, have been produced by synthetic reconstruction and expression of respective gene clusters in heterologous hosts. This review summarizes general aspects of fungal secondary metabolism and recent developments in our understanding of how and why fungi make secondary metabolites, how these molecules are produced, and how their biosynthetic genes are distributed across the Fungi. The breadth of fungal secondary metabolite diversity is highlighted by recent information on the biosynthesis of important fungus-derived metabolites that have contributed to human health and agriculture and that have negatively impacted crops

  6. Prenatal Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Their Hydroxylated Metabolites is Associated with Neurological Functioning in 3-Month-Old Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, Sietske A.; Soechitram, Shalini D.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental chemicals which are potentially toxic to the developing brain. Their hydroxylated metabolites (OH-PCBs) are suggested to be even more toxic. Knowledge about the health effects of prenatal OH-PCB exposure is limited. We aimed to determine whether

  7. Transplacental transport of netobimin metabolites in ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofol, C; Carretero, A; Fernandez, M; Navarro, M; Sautet, J; Ruberte, J; Arboix, M

    1995-01-01

    Neither netobimin (NTB) nor its metabolite albendazole (ABZ) were found in plasma after an oral administration of 20 mg/kg of NTB to pregnant ewes during the last third of gestation. ABZ metabolites, albendazole sulphoxide (ABZSO) and albendazole sulphone (ABZSO2) were found in plasma 30 min and 2 h, respectively, after administration. The maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) of ABZSO was detected at 11.6 +/- 1.0 h and for ABZSO2 at 16.5 +/- 2.3 h. The plasma levels of the latter remained constant for 36 h, and decreased as ABZSO was removed from the blood. Jugular plasma levels of both metabolites did not differ significantly from those observed in the ovarian vein, suggesting that there were no exchanges between foetal and placental tissues. Both metabolite concentrations were similar in the umbilical vein and artery and in the amniotic and allantoic fluids, their values were half the maternal plasma concentration, leading to the conclusion that there was transplacental movement of metabolites. Both metabolites reached the foetus and could be responsible for the teratogenicity of NTB in sheep.

  8. Antifungal activity of microbial secondary metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Coleman

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites are well known for their ability to impede other microorganisms. Reanalysis of a screen of natural products using the Caenorhabditis elegans-Candida albicans infection model identified twelve microbial secondary metabolites capable of conferring an increase in survival to infected nematodes. In this screen, the two compound treatments conferring the highest survival rates were members of the epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP family of fungal secondary metabolites, acetylgliotoxin and a derivative of hyalodendrin. The abundance of fungal secondary metabolites indentified in this screen prompted further studies investigating the interaction between opportunistic pathogenic fungi and Aspergillus fumigatus, because of the ability of the fungus to produce a plethora of secondary metabolites, including the well studied ETP gliotoxin. We found that cell-free supernatant of A. fumigatus was able to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans through the production of a secreted product. Comparative studies between a wild-type and an A. fumigatus ΔgliP strain unable to synthesize gliotoxin demonstrate that this secondary metabolite is the major factor responsible for the inhibition. Although toxic to organisms, gliotoxin conferred an increase in survival to C. albicans-infected C. elegans in a dose dependent manner. As A. fumigatus produces gliotoxin in vivo, we propose that in addition to being a virulence factor, gliotoxin may also provide an advantage to A. fumigatus when infecting a host that harbors other opportunistic fungi.

  9. Metabolite Profile of Cervicovaginal Fluids from Early Pregnancy Is Not Predictive of Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda M. Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In our study, we used a mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to search for biomarkers that may act as early indicators of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB. Samples were selected as a nested case-control study from the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE biobank in Auckland, New Zealand. Cervicovaginal swabs were collected at 20 weeks from women who were originally assessed as being at low risk of sPTB. Samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Despite the low amount of biomass (16–23 mg, 112 compounds were detected. Statistical analysis showed no significant correlations with sPTB. Comparison of reported infection and plasma inflammatory markers from early pregnancy showed two inflammatory markers were correlated with reported infection, but no correlation with any compounds in the metabolite profile was observed. We hypothesise that the lack of biomarkers of sPTB in the cervicovaginal fluid metabolome is simply because it lacks such markers in early pregnancy. We propose alternative biofluids be investigated for markers of sPTB. Our results lead us to call for greater scrutiny of previously published metabolomic data relating to biomarkers of sPTB in cervicovaginal fluids, as the use of small, high risk, or late pregnancy cohorts may identify metabolite biomarkers that are irrelevant for predicting risk in normal populations.

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. ... specialized brain systems. We have many specialized brain systems that work ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which ...

  14. The urine marker test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Stine Nylandsted; Elsborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    of this new method via two questionnaires (n = 253). Furthermore, a third study (n = 91) investigated whether ingestion of the marker can identify the urine as coming from a specific person and whether the marker interferes with the detection of prohibited substances. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The results...... indicate that this new method finds wide acceptance both from athletes who have only heard about the procedure and those who have actually tested the new method. Furthermore, the marker, which can identify urine as coming from a specific person, does not interfere with the detection of prohibited...... that athletes are actually delivering their own urine. A method that can be used to alleviate the negative impact of a supervised urination procedure and which can also identify urine as coming from a specific athlete is the urine marker test. Monodisperse low molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEGs...

  15. VT Roadside Historic Markers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Roadside Historic Site Marker program has proven an effective way to commemorate Vermont’s many people, events, and places of regional, statewide, or national...

  16. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine destroy serotonin terminals in rat brain: quantification of neurodegeneration by measurement of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, G.; Yeh, S.Y.; O' Hearn, E.; Molliver, M.E.; Kuhar, M.J.; De Souza, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    This study examines the effects of repeated systemic administration (20 mg/kg s.c., twice daily for 4 days) of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) on levels of brain monoamines, their metabolites and on the density of monoamine uptake sites in various regions of rat brain. Marked reductions (30-60%) in the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were observed in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus and midbrain at 2 weeks after a 4-day treatment regimen of MDMA or MDA; less consistent reductions in serotonin (5-HT) content were observed in these brain regions. In addition, both MDMA and MDA caused comparable and substantial reductions (50-75%) in the density of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine-labeled 5-HT uptake sites in all brain regions examined. In contrast, neither MDMA nor MDA caused any widespread or long-term changes in the content of the catecholaminergic markers (i.e., norepinephrine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) or in the number of (/sup 3/H)mazindol-labeled norepinephrine or dopamine uptake sites in the brain regions examined. These data demonstrate that MDMA and MDA cause long-lasting neurotoxic effects with respect to both the functional and structural integrity of serotonergic neurons in brain. Furthermore, our measurement of reductions in the density of 5-HT uptake sites provides a means for quantification of the neurodegenerative effects of MDMA and MDA on presynaptic 5-HT terminals.

  17. An ex Vivo Model for Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Efflux, and Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Karin; Aadal Nielsen, Peter; Ek, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    , risperidone, citalopram, fluoxetine, and haloperidol were studied, and one preselected metabolite for each drug was analyzed, identified, and quantified. Metabolite identification studies of clozapine and midazolam showed that the locust brain was highly metabolically active, and 18 and 14 metabolites......, respectively, were identified. The unbound drug fraction of clozapine, NDMC, carbamazepine, and risperidone was analyzed. In addition, coadministration of drugs with verapamil or fluvoxamine was performed to evaluate drug-drug interactions in all setups. All findings correlated well with the data...

  18. Role of Troponins I and T and N-Terminal Prohormone of Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Monitoring Cardiac Safety of Patients With Early-Stage Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer Receiving Trastuzumab: A Herceptin Adjuvant Study Cardiac Marker Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Suter, Thomas M; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Steinseifer, Jutta; Noe, Johannes; Lauer, Sabine; Al-Sakaff, Nedal; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J; de Azambuja, Evandro

    2017-03-10

    Purpose Women receiving trastuzumab with chemotherapy are at risk for trastuzumab-related cardiac dysfunction (TRCD). We explored the prognostic value of cardiac markers (troponins I and T, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]) to predict baseline susceptibility to develop TRCD. We examined whether development of cardiac end points or significant left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) drop was associated with markers' increases. Patients and Methods Cardiac marker assessments were coupled with LVEF measurements at different time points for 533 patients from the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) study who agreed to participate in this study. Patients with missing marker assessments were excluded, resulting in 452 evaluable patients. A primary cardiac end point was defined as symptomatic congestive heart failure of New York Heart Association class III or IV, confirmed by a cardiologist, and a significant LVEF drop, or death of definite or probable cardiac causes. A secondary cardiac end point was defined as a confirmed significant asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic LVEF drop. Results Elevated baseline troponin I (> 40 ng/L) and T (> 14 ng/L), occurring in 56 of 412 (13.6%) and 101 of 407 (24.8%) patients, respectively, were associated with an increased significant LVEF drop risk (univariate analysis: hazard ratio, 4.52; P < .001 and hazard ratio, 3.57; P < .001, respectively). Few patients had their first elevated troponin value recorded during the study (six patients for troponin I and 25 patients for troponin T). Two patients developed a primary and 31 patients a secondary cardiac end point (recovery rate of 74%, 23 of 31). For NT-proBNP, higher increases from baseline were seen in patients with significant LVEF drop. Conclusion Elevated troponin I or T before trastuzumab is associated with increased risk for TRCD. A similar conclusion for NT-proBNP could not be drawn because of the lack of a well-established elevation threshold; however

  19. HdhQ111 Mice Exhibit Tissue Specific Metabolite Profiles that Include Striatal Lipid Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B Carroll

    Full Text Available The HTT CAG expansion mutation causes Huntington's Disease and is associated with a wide range of cellular consequences, including altered metabolism. The mutant allele is expressed widely, in all tissues, but the striatum and cortex are especially vulnerable to its effects. To more fully understand this tissue-specificity, early in the disease process, we asked whether the metabolic impact of the mutant CAG expanded allele in heterozygous B6.HdhQ111/+ mice would be common across tissues, or whether tissues would have tissue-specific responses and whether such changes may be affected by diet. Specifically, we cross-sectionally examined steady state metabolite concentrations from a range of tissues (plasma, brown adipose tissue, cerebellum, striatum, liver, white adipose tissue, using an established liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry pipeline, from cohorts of 8 month old mutant and wild-type littermate mice that were fed one of two different high-fat diets. The differential response to diet highlighted a proportion of metabolites in all tissues, ranging from 3% (7/219 in the striatum to 12% (25/212 in white adipose tissue. By contrast, the mutant CAG-expanded allele primarily affected brain metabolites, with 14% (30/219 of metabolites significantly altered, compared to wild-type, in striatum and 11% (25/224 in the cerebellum. In general, diet and the CAG-expanded allele both elicited metabolite changes that were predominantly tissue-specific and non-overlapping, with evidence for mutation-by-diet interaction in peripheral tissues most affected by diet. Machine-learning approaches highlighted the accumulation of diverse lipid species as the most genotype-predictive metabolite changes in the striatum. Validation experiments in cell culture demonstrated that lipid accumulation was also a defining feature of mutant HdhQ111 striatal progenitor cells. Thus, metabolite-level responses to the CAG expansion mutation in vivo were tissue specific and

  20. Authentication of Zanthoxylum Species Based on Integrated Analysis of Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences and Metabolite Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Ju; Koo, Hyun Jo; Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Sang-Choon; Lee, Dong Young; Giang, Vo Ngoc Linh; Kim, Minjung; Shim, Hyeonah; Park, Jee Young; Yoo, Ki-Oug; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2017-11-29

    We performed chloroplast genome sequencing and comparative analysis of two Rutaceae species, Zanthoxylum schinifolium (Korean pepper tree) and Z. piperitum (Japanese pepper tree), which are medicinal and culinary crops in Asia. We identified more than 837 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 103 insertions/deletions (InDels) based on a comparison of the two chloroplast genomes and developed seven DNA markers derived from five tandem repeats and two InDel variations that discriminated between Korean Zanthoxylum species. Metabolite profile analysis pointed to three metabolic groups, one with Korean Z. piperitum samples, one with Korean Z. schinifolium samples, and the last containing all the tested Chinese Zanthoxylum species samples, which are considered to be Z. bungeanum based on our results. Two markers were capable of distinguishing among these three groups. The chloroplast genome sequences identified in this study represent a valuable genomics resource for exploring diversity in Rutaceae, and the molecular markers will be useful for authenticating dried Zanthoxylum berries in the marketplace.

  1. Cannabinoid Markers in Biological Fluids and Tissues: Revealing Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, Marilyn A; Smith, Michael L

    2018-02-01

    Understanding cannabis and synthetic cannabinoid intake history is vital for treating drug dependence, investigating cannabinoid effects, and providing information to healthcare personnel, medical examiners, and public health officials; this is particularly relevant today with cannabis medicalization and legalization. Required information includes identifying exposure, time of use, frequency of use, relapse, withdrawal, and predicting cannabinoid effects. Recent controlled cannabinoid administration studies enable the development of models and markers to better identify patterns of intake and exposure. Future challenges include developing behavioral markers of cannabis impairment, bringing to market breathalyzers for cannabinoid detection, and identifying markers of recent cannabis intake in diverse biological matrices. We posit that biological monitoring of cannabinoids and metabolites will improve the characterization of cannabis and synthetic cannabinoid intake history. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic profiling of Alzheimer's disease brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koichi; Tsutsui, Haruhito; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Toyo'Oka, Toshimasa

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease and can be definitively diagnosed after death through an examination of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in several brain regions. It is to be expected that changes in the concentration and/or localization of low-molecular-weight molecules are linked to the pathological changes that occur in AD, and determining their identity would provide valuable information regarding AD processes. Here, we propose definitive brain metabolic profiling using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. The acquired data were subjected to principal components analysis to differentiate the frontal and parietal lobes of the AD/Control groups. Significant differences in the levels of spermine and spermidine were identified using S-plot, mass spectra, databases and standards. Based on the investigation of the polyamine metabolite pathway, these data establish that the downstream metabolites of ornithine are increased, potentially implicating ornithine decarboxylase activity in AD pathology.

  3. Multi-center reproducibility of neurochemical profiles in the human brain at 7T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bank, B. L.; Emir, U. E.; Boer, VO; van Asten, J. J. A.; Maas, M. C.; Wijnen, J. P.; Kan, H. E.; Oz, G.; Klomp, D. W. J.; Scheenen, T. W. J.

    The purpose of this work was to harmonize data acquisition and post-processing of single voxel proton MRS (H-1-MRS) at 7T, and to determine metabolite concentrations and the accuracy and reproducibility of metabolite levels in the adult human brain. This study was performed in compliance with local

  4. GLOBAL EXPRESSION PROFILING AS A TOOL TO DEVELOP MOLECULAR MARKERS LINKED TO HERBICIDE STRESS IN ARABIDOPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide drift (unintentional physical movement from target to off-target plants) is a cause of crop loss in US. Low-dose, high-potency herbicides that have short environmental persistence times constrain efforts to develop or identify metabolite or biochemical markers of exposu...

  5. [Secondary Metabolites from Marine Microorganisms. I. Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinomycetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T I; Bulgakova, V G; Polin, A N

    2015-01-01

    Review represents data on new active metabolites isolated from marine actinomycetes published in 2007 to 2014. Marine actinomycetes are an unlimited source of novel secondary metabolites with various biological activities. Among them there are antibiotics, anticancer compounds, inhibitors of biochemical processes.

  6. Urinary Phthalate Metabolites and Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in a Mexican-American Cohort: Variability in Early and Late Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Holland

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available People are exposed to phthalates through their wide use as plasticizers and in personal care products. Many phthalates are endocrine disruptors and have been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, knowledge gaps exist in understanding the molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of exposure in early and late pregnancy. In this study, we examined the relationship of eleven urinary phthalate metabolites with isoprostane, an established marker of oxidative stress, among pregnant Mexican-American women from an agricultural cohort. Isoprostane levels were on average 20% higher at 26 weeks than at 13 weeks of pregnancy. Urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations suggested relatively consistent phthalate exposures over pregnancy. The relationship between phthalate metabolite concentrations and isoprostane levels was significant for the sum of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate and the sum of high molecular weight metabolites with the exception of monobenzyl phthalate, which was not associated with oxidative stress at either time point. In contrast, low molecular weight metabolite concentrations were not associated with isoprostane at 13 weeks, but this relationship became stronger later in pregnancy (p-value = 0.009 for the sum of low molecular weight metabolites. Our findings suggest that prenatal exposure to phthalates may influence oxidative stress, which is consistent with their relationship with obesity and other adverse health outcomes.

  7. Dose-dependent changes in neuroinflammatory and arachidonic acid cascade markers with synaptic marker loss in rat lipopolysaccharide infusion model of neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellom Matthew

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation, caused by six days of intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, stimulates rat brain arachidonic acid (AA metabolism. The molecular changes associated with increased AA metabolism are not clear. We examined effects of a six-day infusion of a low-dose (0.5 ng/h and a high-dose (250 ng/h of LPS on neuroinflammatory, AA cascade, and pre- and post-synaptic markers in rat brain. We used artificial cerebrospinal fluid-infused brains as controls. Results Infusion of low- or high-dose LPS increased brain protein levels of TNFα, and iNOS, without significantly changing GFAP. High-dose LPS infusion upregulated brain protein and mRNA levels of AA cascade markers (cytosolic cPLA2-IVA, secretory sPLA2-V, cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase, and of transcription factor NF-κB p50 DNA binding activity. Both LPS doses increased cPLA2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase levels, while reducing protein levels of the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin. Post-synaptic markers drebrin and PSD95 protein levels were decreased with high- but not low-dose LPS. Conclusions Chronic LPS infusion has differential effects, depending on dose, on inflammatory, AA and synaptic markers in rat brain. Neuroinflammation associated with upregulated brain AA metabolism can lead to synaptic dysfunction.

  8. Plant metabolites and nutritional quality of vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounsome, N; Hounsome, B; Tomos, D; Edwards-Jones, G

    2008-05-01

    Vegetables are an important part of the human diet and a major source of biologically active substances such as vitamins, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and cholesterol-lowering compounds. Despite a large amount of information on this topic, the nutritional quality of vegetables has not been defined. Historically, the value of many plant nutrients and health-promoting compounds was discovered by trial and error. By the turn of the century, the application of chromatography, mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance allowed quantitative and qualitative measurements of a large number of plant metabolites. Approximately 50000 metabolites have been elucidated in plants, and it is predicted that the final number will exceed 200000. Most of them have unknown function. Metabolites such as carbohydrates, organic and amino acids, vitamins, hormones, flavonoids, phenolics, and glucosinolates are essential for plant growth, development, stress adaptation, and defense. Besides the importance for the plant itself, such metabolites determine the nutritional quality of food, color, taste, smell, antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, antihypertension, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, immunostimulating, and cholesterol-lowering properties. This review is focused on major plant metabolites that characterize the nutritional quality of vegetables, and methods of their analysis.

  9. Detecting Beer Intake by Unique Metabolite Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde; Jensen, Morten Georg; Meier, Sebastian; Bech, Lene; Lund, Erik; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2016-12-02

    Evaluation of the health related effects of beer intake is hampered by the lack of accurate tools for assessing intakes (biomarkers). Therefore, we identified plasma and urine metabolites associated with recent beer intake by untargeted metabolomics and established a characteristic metabolite pattern representing raw materials and beer production as a qualitative biomarker of beer intake. In a randomized, crossover, single-blinded meal study (MSt1), 18 participants were given, one at a time, four different test beverages: strong, regular, and nonalcoholic beers and a soft drink. Four participants were assigned to have two additional beers (MSt2). In addition to plasma and urine samples, test beverages, wort, and hops extract were analyzed by UPLC-QTOF. A unique metabolite pattern reflecting beer metabolome, including metabolites derived from beer raw material (i.e., N-methyl tyramine sulfate and the sum of iso-α-acids and tricyclohumols) and the production process (i.e., pyro-glutamyl proline and 2-ethyl malate), was selected to establish a compliance biomarker model for detection of beer intake based on MSt1. The model predicted the MSt2 samples collected before and up to 12 h after beer intake correctly (AUC = 1). A biomarker model including four metabolites representing both beer raw materials and production steps provided a specific and accurate tool for measurement of beer consumption.

  10. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationships of Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamine Metabolite Levels With Clinical Variables in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung Shin; Hattori, Kotaro; Ogawa, Shintaro; Sasayama, Daimei; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    Many studies have investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolite levels in depressive disorders. However, their clinical significance is still unclear. We tried to determine whether CSF monoamine metabolite levels could be a state-dependent marker for major depressive disorder (MDD) based on analyses stratified by clinical variables in a relatively large sample. Subjects were 75 patients with MDD according to DSM-IV criteria and 87 healthy controls, matched for age, sex, and ethnicity (Japanese). They were recruited between May 2010 and November 2013. We measured homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG) in CSF samples by high-performance liquid chromatography. We analyzed the relationships of the metabolite levels with age, sex, diagnosis, psychotropic medication use, and depression severity. There was a weak positive correlation between age and 5-HIAA levels in controls (ρ = 0.26, P depressed patients (17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score > 12) were significantly lower than those in controls (P antipsychotics increased levels of HVA (ρ = 0.24, P .1), were related to depression severity. CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels could be state-dependent markers in MDD patients. Since 5-HIAA levels greatly decrease with the use of antidepressants, HVA levels might be more useful in the clinical setting.

  12. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of C-11-labeled isotopomers and metabolites of GTS-21, a partial alpha7 nicotinic cholinergic agonist drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Ding, Yu-Shin; Alexoff, David; Patel, Vinal; Logan, Jean; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Shea, Colleen; Muench, Lisa; Xu, Youwen; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Constanzo, Jasmine R; Ciaccio, James A; Fowler, Joanna S

    2007-07-01

    (3E)-3-[(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methylene]-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2,3'-bipyridine (GTS-21), a partial alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drug, has recently been shown to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. One of its two major demethylated metabolites, 4-OH-GTS-21, has been suggested to contribute to its therapeutic effects. We labeled GTS-21 in two different positions with carbon-11 ([2-methoxy-(11)C]GTS-21 and [4-(11)C]GTS-21) along with two corresponding demethylated metabolites ([2-methoxy-(11)C]4-OH-GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-(11)C]2-OH-GTS-21) for pharmacokinetic studies in baboons and mice with positron emission tomography (PET). Both [2-(11)C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-(11)C]GTS-21 showed similar initial high rapid uptake in baboon brain, peaking from 1 to 3.5 min (0.027-0.038%ID/cc) followed by rapid clearance (t(1/2)<15 min), resulting in low brain retention by 30 min. However, after 30 min, [2-methoxy-(11)C]GTS-21 continued to clear while [4-methoxy-(11)C]GTS-21 plateaued, suggesting the entry of a labeled metabolite into the brain. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics of the two labeled metabolites confirmed expected higher brain uptake and retention of [4-methoxy-(11)C]2-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [4-methoxy-(11)C]GTS-21) relative to [2-methoxy-(11)C]4-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [2-methoxy-(11)C]GTS-21), which had negligible brain uptake. Ex vivo studies in mice showed that GTS-21 is the major chemical form in the mouse brain. Whole-body dynamic PET imaging in baboon and mouse showed that the major route of excretion of C-11 is through the gallbladder. The major findings are as follows: (a) extremely rapid uptake and clearance of [2-methoxy-(11)C]GTS-21 from the brain, which may need to be considered in developing optimal dosing of GTS-21 for patients, and (b) significant brain uptake of 2-OH-GTS-21, suggesting that it might contribute to the therapeutic effects of GTS-21. This study illustrates the value of

  13. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of C-11 labeled isotopomers and metabolites of GTS-21, a partial α7 nicotinic cholinergic agonist drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Ding, Yu-Shin; Alexoff, David; Patel, Vinal; Logan, Jean; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Shea, Colleen; Muench, Lisa; Xu, Youwen; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Constanzo, Jasmine R.; Ciaccio, James A.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction GTS-21 ((3E)-3-[(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methylene]-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2,3′-bipyridine), a partial α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drug, has recently been shown to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. One of its two major demethylated metabolites, 4-OH-GTS-21, has been suggested to contribute to its therapeutic effects. Methods We labeled GTS-21 in two different positions with carbon-11 ([2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21) along with two corresponding demethylated metabolites ([2-methoxy-11C]4-OH-GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-11C]2-OH-GTS-21) for pharmacokinetic studies in baboons and mice with PET. Results Both [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 showed similar initial high rapid uptake in baboon brain, peaking from 1–3.5 min (0.027–0.038 %ID/cc) followed by rapid clearance (t1/2 <15 min), resulting in low brain retention by 30 min. However, after 30 min, [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 continued to clear while [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 plateaued, suggesting the entry of a labeled metabolite into the brain. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics of the two labeled metabolites confirmed expected higher brain uptake and retention of [4-methoxy-11C]2-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [4-methoxy-11C]GTS-21) relative to [2-methoxy-11C]4-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21) which had negligible brain uptake. Ex vivo studies in mice showed that GTS-21 is the major chemical form in the mouse brain. Whole body dynamic PET imaging in baboon and mouse showed that the major route of excretion of C-11 is through the gallbladder. Conclusions The major findings are (1) extremely rapid uptake and clearance of [2-methoxy-11C]GTS-21 from the brain which may need to be considered in developing optimal dosing of GTS-21 for patients, and (2) significant brain uptake of 2-OH-GTS-21, suggesting that it might contribute to the therapeutic effects of GTS-21. This study illustrates the value of comparing

  14. Synthesis and positron emission tomography studies of C-11-labeled isotopomers and metabolites of GTS-21, a partial {alpha}7 nicotinic cholinergic agonist drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Won [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)]. E-mail: swkim@bnl.gov; Ding Yushin [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Department of Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8048 (United States); Alexoff, David [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Patel, Vinal [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Logan, Jean [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Lin, K.-S. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Shea, Colleen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Muench, Lisa [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Xu Youwen [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Carter, Pauline [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); King, Payton [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Constanzo, Jasmine R. [Department of Chemistry, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Ciaccio, James A. [Department of Chemistry, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Fowler, Joanna S. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Introduction: (3E)-3-[(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)methylene]-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2,3'-bipyridine (GTS-21), a partial {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drug, has recently been shown to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. One of its two major demethylated metabolites, 4-OH-GTS-21, has been suggested to contribute to its therapeutic effects. Methods: We labeled GTS-21 in two different positions with carbon-11 ([2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 and [4-{sup 11}C]GTS-21) along with two corresponding demethylated metabolites ([2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]4-OH-GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]2-OH-GTS-21) for pharmacokinetic studies in baboons and mice with positron emission tomography (PET). Results: Both [2-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 and [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 showed similar initial high rapid uptake in baboon brain, peaking from 1 to 3.5 min (0.027-0.038%ID/cc) followed by rapid clearance (t {sub 1/2}<15 min), resulting in low brain retention by 30 min. However, after 30 min, [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 continued to clear while [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 plateaued, suggesting the entry of a labeled metabolite into the brain. Comparison of the pharmacokinetics of the two labeled metabolites confirmed expected higher brain uptake and retention of [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]2-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [4-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21) relative to [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]4-OH-GTS-21 (the labeled metabolite of [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21), which had negligible brain uptake. Ex vivo studies in mice showed that GTS-21 is the major chemical form in the mouse brain. Whole-body dynamic PET imaging in baboon and mouse showed that the major route of excretion of C-11 is through the gallbladder. Conclusions: The major findings are as follows: (a) extremely rapid uptake and clearance of [2-methoxy-{sup 11}C]GTS-21 from the brain, which may need to be considered in developing optimal dosing of GTS-21 for patients, and (b) significant brain uptake of 2-OH-GTS-21

  15. Metabolic fingerprints of altered brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a Rett syndrome model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Viola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is the leading cause of profound mental retardation of genetic origin in girls. Since RS is mostly caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, transgenic animal models such as the Mecp2-deleted ("Mecp2-null" mouse have been employed to study neurological symptoms and brain function. However, an interdisciplinary approach drawing from chemistry, biology and neuroscience is needed to elucidate the mechanistic links between the genotype and phenotype of this genetic disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed, for the first time, a metabolomic study of brain extracts from Mecp2-null mice by using high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of individual water-soluble metabolites and phospholipids were quantified without prior selection for specific metabolic pathways. Results were interpreted in terms of Mecp2 gene deletion, brain cell function and brain morphology. This approach provided a "metabolic window" to brain characteristics in Mecp2-null mice (n = 4, revealing (i the first metabolic evidence of astrocyte involvement in RS (decreased levels of the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, vs. wild-type mice; p = 0.034; (ii reduced choline phospholipid turnover in Mecp2-null vs. wild-type mice, implying a diminished potential of cells to grow, paralleled by globally reduced brain size and perturbed osmoregulation; (iii alterations of the platelet activating factor (PAF cycle in Mecp2-null mouse brains, where PAF is a bioactive lipid acting on neuronal growth, glutamate exocytosis and other processes; and (iv changes in glutamine/glutamate ratios (p = 0.034 in Mecp2-null mouse brains potentially indicating altered neurotransmitter recycling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study establishes, for the first time, detailed metabolic fingerprints of perturbed brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Combined with morphological and neurological findings

  16. Brain hypoxia imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The measurement of pathologically low levels of tissue pO{sub 2} is an important diagnostic goal for determining the prognosis of many clinically important diseases including cardiovascular insufficiency, stroke and cancer. The target tissues nowadays have mostly been tumors or the myocardium, with less attention centered on the brain. Radiolabelled nitroimidazole or derivatives may be useful in identifying the hypoxic cells in cerebrovascular disease or traumatic brain injury, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In acute stroke, the target of therapy is the severely hypoxic but salvageable tissue. {sup 18}F-MISO PET and {sup 99m}Tc-EC-metronidazole SPECT in patients with acute ischemic stroke identified hypoxic tissues and ischemic penumbra, and predicted its outcome. A study using {sup 123}I-IAZA in patient with closed head injury detected the hypoxic tissues after head injury. Up till now these radiopharmaceuticals have drawbacks due to its relatively low concentration with hypoxic tissues associated with/without low blood-brain barrier permeability and the necessity to wait a long time to achieve acceptable target to background ratios for imaging in acute ischemic stroke. It is needed to develop new hypoxic marker exhibiting more rapid localization in the hypoxic region in the brain. And then, the hypoxic brain imaging with imidazoles or non-imidazoles may be very useful in detecting the hypoxic tissues, determining therapeutic strategies and developing therapeutic drugs in several neurological disease, especially, in acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Biochemical responses and mitochondrial mediated activation of apoptosis on long-term effect of aspartame in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyaswamy Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame, an artificial sweetener, is very widely used in many foods and beverages. But there are controversies about its metabolite which is marked for its toxicity. Hence it is believed to be unsafe for human use. Previous studies have reported on methanol exposure with involvements of free radicals on excitotoxicity of neuronal apoptosis. Hence, this present study is proposed to investigate whether or not chronic aspartame (FDA approved Daily Acceptable Intake (ADI,40 mg/kg bwt administration could release methanol, and whether or not it can induce changes in brain oxidative stress status and gene and protein expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-3 in the rat brain region. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, Methotrexate (MTX-treated Wistar strain male albino rats were used and after the oral administration of aspartame, the effects were studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. Aspartame exposure resulted with a significant increase in the enzymatic activity in protein carbonyl, lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity in (aspartame MTX-treated animals and with a significant decrease in reduced glutathione, glutathione reductase and protein thiol, pointing out the generation of free radicals. The gene and protein expression of pro apoptotic marker Bax showed a marked increase whereas the anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 decreased markedly indicating the aspartame is harmful at cellular level. It is clear that long term aspartame exposure could alter the brain antioxidant status, and can induce apoptotic changes in brain.

  18. Emerging pesticide metabolites in groundwater and surface water as determined by the application of a multimethod for 150 pesticide metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reemtsma, Thorsten; Alder, Lutz; Banasiak, Ursula

    2013-10-01

    A recently developed multimethod for the determination of 150 pesticide metabolites was exemplarily applied to 58 samples of groundwater and surface water. 37 of these metabolites were detected in at least two samples with a concentration ≥0.025 μg/L. The detected metabolites were ranked according to their concentration and frequency of detection. Findings are clearly dominated by metabolites of chloroacetanilide herbicides, but metabolites of sulfonylurea and thiocarbamate herbicides and other herbicides (dichlobenil) together with metabolites of some fungicides (tolylfluanid, chlorothalonil, trifloxystrobin) were also prominent. A number of 17 of the ranked metabolites are denoted as emerging metabolites because no reports on their previous detection in groundwater or surface water were found. Most of them, however, were correctly predicted to occur in the summary reports of the European pesticide approval process. Median total concentrations of the analysed pesticide metabolites summed up to 0.62 μg/L in groundwater and 0.33 μg/L in surface waters. While the concentration of the individual metabolites is usually low (<0.1 μg/L) the diversity of metabolites found in one sample can be large; between two and six metabolites were detected most frequently (maximum of 12 metabolites). Runoff from urban surfaces was investigated in this study and also here previously undetected pesticide (biocide) metabolites were detected. The emerging pesticide metabolites detected in environmental water samples in this study require more extended monitoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Urinary estrogen metabolites and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallal, Cher M; Stone, Roslyn A; Cauley, Jane A

    2013-01-01

    ), and their ratio (2:16a-OHE1) in relation to breast cancer risk. ¿Methods: Primary data on 726 premenopausal women (183 invasive breast cancer cases and 543 controls) and 1,108 postmenopausal women (385 invasive breast cancer cases and 723 controls) were analyzed. Urinary estrogen metabolites were measured using...... enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. Study-specific and combined multivariable adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated based on tertiles of estrogen metabolites. Multinomial logistic regression models were fit according to hormone receptor status.¿Results: Higher......Background: Circulating estrogens are associated with increased breast cancer risk, yet the role of estrogen metabolites in breast carcinogenesis remains unclear. This combined analysis of 5 published studies evaluates urinary 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), 16a-hydroxyestrone (16a-OHE1...

  20. Dendritic Spine Injury Induced by the 8-Hydroxy Metabolite of Efavirenz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Bumpus, Namandjé N.; Pomerantz, Daniel; Avery, Lindsay B.; Sacktor, Ned; McArthur, Justin C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite combination antiretroviral therapies (cARTs), a significant proportion of HIV-infected patients develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Ongoing viral replication in the central nervous system (CNS) caused by poor brain penetration of cART may contribute to HAND. However, it has also been proposed that the toxic effects of long-term cART may contribute to HAND. A better understanding of the neurotoxic potential of cART is critically needed in light of the use of CNS-penetrating cARTs to contend with the virus reservoir in the brain. The efavirenz (EFV) metabolites 7-hydroxyefavirenz (7-OH-EFV) and 8-hydroxyefavirenz (8-OH-EFV) were synthesized and purified, and their chemical structures were confirmed by mass spectrometry and NMR. The effects of EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV on calcium, dendritic spine morphology, and survival were determined in primary neurons. EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV each induced neuronal damage in a dose-dependent manner. However, 8-OH-EFV was at least an order of magnitude more toxic than EFV or 7-OH-EFV, inducing considerable damage to dendritic spines at a 10 nM concentration. The 8-OH-EFV metabolite evoked calcium flux in neurons, which was mediated primarily by L-type voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs). Blockade of L-type VOCCs protected dendritic spines from 8-OH-EFV-induced damage. Concentrations of EFV and 8-OH-EFV in the cerebral spinal fluid of HIV-infected subjects taking EFV were within the range that damaged neurons in culture. These findings demonstrate that the 8-OH metabolite of EFV is a potent neurotoxin and highlight the importance of directly determining the effects of antiretroviral drugs and drug metabolites on neurons and other brain cells. PMID:22984227

  1. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Labs., West Point, PA (United States))

    1990-02-26

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and {beta}-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6{prime}exomethylene SV (I), 6{prime}CH{sub 2}OH-SV (II), 6{prime}COOH-SV (III) and a {beta}-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6{prime} is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However {sup 3}H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding {sup 14}C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man.

  2. Tumor Markers: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay G Nayak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is a potentially fatal disease that has been the bane of clinicians throughout the world. Though various modalities of management exist, early detection still provides the best hope for any cancer patient Advances in molecular diagnosis have led to a plethora of choices being available in the fight against cancer. Abnormal cellular products elucidated from malignant cells can be detected and measured in various body tissues and fluids and constitute tumor markers. The various clinical applications and their limitations are covered in the brief overview to help the oral medicine specialist understand the relevant advances made in the field of tumor markers.

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Careers at NIMH Staff Directories Getting to NIMH Transforming the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses. Search ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) ...

  7. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain. Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict ...

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    Full Text Available ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

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    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

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  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... of contact for receiving impulses on a neuron, branching off from the cell body. dopamine —A neurotransmitter ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  19. Prepuberal stimulation of 5-HT7-R by LP-211 in a rat model of hyper-activity and attention-deficit: permanent effects on attention, brain amino acids and synaptic markers in the fronto-striatal interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia A Ruocco

    Full Text Available The cross-talk at the prefronto-striatal interface involves excitatory amino acids, different receptors, transducers and modulators. We investigated long-term effects of a prepuberal, subchronic 5-HT7-R agonist (LP-211 on adult behaviour, amino acids and synaptic markers in a model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Naples High Excitability rats (NHE and their Random Bred controls (NRB were daily treated with LP-211 in the 5th and 6th postnatal week. One month after treatment, these rats were tested for indices of activity, non selective (NSA, selective spatial attention (SSA and emotionality. The quantity of L-Glutamate (L-Glu, L-Aspartate (L-Asp and L-Leucine (L-Leu, dopamine transporter (DAT, NMDAR1 subunit and CAMKIIα, were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC, dorsal (DS and ventral striatum (VS, for their role in synaptic transmission, neural plasticity and information processing. Prepuberal LP-211 (at lower dose reduced horizontal activity and (at higher dose increased SSA, only for NHE but not in NRB rats. Prepuberal LP-211 increased, in NHE rats, L-Glu in the PFC and L-Asp in the VS (at 0.250 mg/kg dose, whereas (at 0.125 mg/kg dose it decreased L-Glu and L-Asp in the DS. The L-Glu was decreased, at 0.125 mg/kg, only in the VS of NRB rats. The DAT levels were decreased with the 0.125 mg/kg dose (in the PFC, and increased with the 0.250 mg/kg dose (in the VS, significantly for NHE rats. The basal NMDAR1 level was higher in the PFC of NHE than NRB rats; LP-211 treatment (at 0.125 mg/kg dose decreased NMDAR1 in the VS of NRB rats. This study represents a starting point about the impact of developmental 5-HT7-R activation on neuro-physiology of attentive processes, executive functions and their neural substrates.

  20. Estradiol metabolites as biomarkers of endometrial cancer prognosis after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet-Delage, Yannick; Grégoire, Jean; Caron, Patrick; Turcotte, Véronique; Plante, Marie; Ayotte, Pierre; Simonyan, David; Villeneuve, Lyne; Guillemette, Chantal

    2017-10-29

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynecologic malignancy prevailing after menopause. Defining steroid profiles may help predict the risk of recurrence after hysterectomy, which remains limited due to the lack of reliable markers. Adrenal precursors, androgens, parent estrogens and catechol estrogen metabolites were measured by mass spectrometry (MS) in preoperative serums and those collected one month after hysterectomy from 246 newly diagnosed postmenopausal EC cases. We also examined the associations between steroid hormones and EC status by including 110 healthy postmenopausal women. Steroid concentrations were analyzed in relation to clinicopathological features, recurrence and overall survival (OS). The mean follow-up time was 65.5 months and 26 patients experienced relapse after surgery for a recurrence incidence of 10.6% (6.4% Type I and 29.5% Type II). Recurrence and OS were related to a more aggressive disease but not linked to body mass index. Preoperative levels of estriol (E3) and estrone-sulfate (E1-S) were inversely associated with recurrence in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (Hazard ratios (HRs) of 0.31, P=0.039 and 3.01, P=0.024; respectively). All circulating steroids declined considerably after surgery almost reaching those of healthy women, except 4-methoxy-E2 (4MeO-E2) for which postoperative levels increased by 35% and were associated to a 68% decreased risk of recurrence (HR=0.32, P=0.015). Women diagnosed with both histological types of EC present significantly higher levels of steroids, in support of their mitogenic effects. The estrogen precursor E1-S, the anticancer metabolite 4MeO-E2, and E3 that exert mixed antagonist and agonist estrogenic activities and immunological effects, are potential independent prognostic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MPINet: Metabolite Pathway Identification via Coupling of Global Metabolite Network Structure and Metabolomic Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput metabolomics technology, such as gas chromatography mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of hundreds of metabolites. Understanding that these metabolites dominate the study condition from biological pathway perspective is still a significant challenge. Pathway identification is an invaluable aid to address this issue and, thus, is urgently needed. In this study, we developed a network-based metabolite pathway identification method, MPINet, which considers the global importance of metabolites and the unique character of metabolomic profile. Through integrating the global metabolite functional network structure and the character of metabolomic profile, MPINet provides a more accurate metabolomic pathway analysis. This integrative strategy simultaneously captures the global nonequivalence of metabolites in a pathway and the bias from metabolomic experimental technology. We then applied MPINet to four different types of metabolite datasets. In the analysis of metastatic prostate cancer dataset, we demonstrated the effectiveness of MPINet. With the analysis of the two type 2 diabetes datasets, we show that MPINet has the potentiality for identifying novel pathways related with disease and is reliable for analyzing metabolomic data. Finally, we extensively applied MPINet to identify drug sensitivity related pathways. These results suggest MPINet’s effectiveness and reliability for analyzing metabolomic data across multiple different application fields.

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... a major mood circuit called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain ... in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays ...

  3. Brain Aneurysm

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    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic- ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent from one neuron to ... of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ...

  9. Brain Aneurysm

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    ... inside of the brain (ventricles) or surrounding your brain and spinal cord to drain the excess fluid into an external bag. Sometimes it may then be necessary to introduce a shunt system — which consists of a ... brain and ending in your abdominal cavity. Rehabilitative therapy. ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  12. Semen phthalate metabolites, spermatozoa apoptosis, and DNA damage: a cross-sectional study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ling; Wang, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Qiang; Li, Min; Huang, Yue-Hui; Hu, Yu; Cao, Wen-Cheng; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2015-03-17

    Toxicological studies have shown that phthalates, a class of widely used chemicals, can impair male reproductive function, but epidemiological evidence is inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate the associations of semen phthalate metabolites with sperm apoptosis and DNA damage in a Chinese population. We assessed sperm apoptosis markers with Annexin V/PI analysis and sperm DNA integrity with comet assay before measuring eight phthalate metabolites in semen by high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) among 463 men from Wuhan, China. We found a suggestive dose-response relationship between semen mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and an increased percentage of Annexin V+/PI- sperm (p for trend of comet (both p for trend of sperm apoptosis and that semen MMP and MEP are associated with increased sperm DNA damage in a Chinese population.

  13. Chemotaxonomy of Hawaiian Anthurium cultivars based on multivariate analysis of phenolic metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Benjamin R; Bliss, Barbara J; Suzuki, Jon Y; Borris, Robert P

    2014-11-19

    Thirty-six anthurium varieties, sampled from species and commercial cultivars, were extracted and profiled by liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Three hundred fifteen compounds, including anthocyanins, flavonoid glycosides, and other phenolics, were detected from these extracts and used in chemotaxonomic analysis of the specimens. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) revealed close chemical similarities between all the commercial standard cultivars, while tulip-shaped cultivars and species displayed much greater chemical variation. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) supported the results from HCA and were used to identify key metabolites characteristic of standard and tulip cultivars and to identify chemical markers indicative of a particular ancestry. Discriminating metabolites included embinin, 4, which was characteristic of standard-shaped spathes and indicated ancestry from Anthurium andraeanum, while isocytisoside 7-glucoside, 7, was found in the majority of tulip-shaped cultivars and suggested that Anthurium amnicola or Anthurium antioquiense had contributed to their pedigree.

  14. Urine volume dependency of specific dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and cortisol metabolites in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lijie; Wudy, Stefan A; Maser-Gluth, Christiane; Hartmann, Michaela F; Remer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Urine volume should be considered as a confounder when using urinary free cortisol (UFF) and cortisone (UFE) to assess glucocorticoid (GC) status. We aimed to examine whether adrenal androgen (AA) metabolites may be also affected by urine volume in healthy children. To compare the flow dependence of GC and AA metabolites, specific GC metabolites were examined. In 24-h urine samples of 120 (60 boys) healthy children (4-10 yr), steroid profiles were determined by GC-MS analysis, UFF and UFE by radioimmunoassay. To assess daily AA and GC secretion rates, 7 quantitatively most important AA (∑C19) and GC (∑C21) metabolites were summed. Sum of DHEA and its 16α-hydroxylated metabolites were denoted as DHEA&M. Association of urine volume with AA (∑C19, DHEA&M, DHEA, 16α-hydroxy-DHEA, 3β,16α,17β-androstenetriol) and GC (∑C21, UFF, UFE, 6β-hydroxycortisol, 20α-dihydrocortisol) were examined in linear regression models. Among the examined AA metabolites, 16α-hydroxy-DHEA (β=0.56, pDHEA (β=0.43, p=0.05) showed relatively strong association with urine volume. A trend was seen for ∑C19 (β=0.23, p=0.08), but not for DHEA&M (p>0.1). Regarding GC metabolites, urine volume showed a stronger association with cortisol's direct metabolites, i.e., cortisone, 6β-hydroxycortisol and 20α-dihydrocortisol (β=0.4-0.6, pcortisol itself (β=0.28, pDHEA, 16α-hydroxy-DHEA, 6β-hydroxycortisol, and 20α-dihydrocortisol may also depend on urine volume. The intrarenal production of the latter three and cortisone might explain their relative strong water-flow-dependency. Total AA or GC secretion marker appears not to be relevantly confounded by urine volume. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging and Volumetric Measurements of the Brain in Patients with Postcancer Fatigue: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Hetty; Heerschap, Arend; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Zwarts, Machiel J.; Leer, Jan Willem H.; van Asten, Jack J.; van der Graaf, Marinette; Rijpkema, Mark; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Postcancer fatigue is a frequently occurring problem, impairing quality of life. Until now, little is known about (neuro) physiological factors determining postcancer fatigue. For non-cancer patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, certain characteristics of brain morphology and metabolism have been identified in previous studies. We investigated whether these volumetric and metabolic traits are a reflection of fatigue in general and thus also of importance for postcancer fatigue. Methods Fatigued patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention condition (cognitive behavior therapy) or the waiting list condition. Twenty-five patients in the intervention condition and fourteen patients in the waiting list condition were assessed twice, at baseline and six months later. Baseline measurements of 20 fatigued patients were compared with 20 matched non-fatigued controls. All participants had completed treatment of a malignant, solid tumor minimal one year earlier. Global brain volumes, subcortical brain volumes, metabolite tissue concentrations, and metabolite ratios were primary outcome measures. Results Volumetric and metabolic parameters were not significantly different between fatigued and non-fatigued patients. Change scores of volumetric and metabolic parameters from baseline to follow-up were not significantly different between patients in the therapy and the waiting list group. Patients in the therapy group reported a significant larger decrease in fatigue scores than patients in the waiting list group. Conclusions No relation was found between postcancer fatigue and the studied volumetric and metabolic markers. This may suggest that, although postcancer fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome show strong resemblances as a clinical syndrome, the underlying physiology is different. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01096641 PMID:24040301

  16. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and volumetric measurements of the brain in patients with postcancer fatigue: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetty Prinsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postcancer fatigue is a frequently occurring problem, impairing quality of life. Until now, little is known about (neuro physiological factors determining postcancer fatigue. For non-cancer patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, certain characteristics of brain morphology and metabolism have been identified in previous studies. We investigated whether these volumetric and metabolic traits are a reflection of fatigue in general and thus also of importance for postcancer fatigue. METHODS: Fatigued patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention condition (cognitive behavior therapy or the waiting list condition. Twenty-five patients in the intervention condition and fourteen patients in the waiting list condition were assessed twice, at baseline and six months later. Baseline measurements of 20 fatigued patients were compared with 20 matched non-fatigued controls. All participants had completed treatment of a malignant, solid tumor minimal one year earlier. Global brain volumes, subcortical brain volumes, metabolite tissue concentrations, and metabolite ratios were primary outcome measures. RESULTS: Volumetric and metabolic parameters were not significantly different between fatigued and non-fatigued patients. Change scores of volumetric and metabolic parameters from baseline to follow-up were not significantly different between patients in the therapy and the waiting list group. Patients in the therapy group reported a significant larger decrease in fatigue scores than patients in the waiting list group. CONCLUSIONS: No relation was found between postcancer fatigue and the studied volumetric and metabolic markers. This may suggest that, although postcancer fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome show strong resemblances as a clinical syndrome, the underlying physiology is different. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01096641.

  17. Comparison of primary and secondary metabolites for suitability to discriminate the origins of Schisandra chinensis by GC/MS and LC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Yoon, Min Hye; Kang, Yun Pyo; Yu, Jin; Park, Jeong Hill; Lee, Jeongmi; Kwon, Sung Won

    2013-12-15

    Discrimination of the origins of plants as traditional medicinal herbs or functional foods is important to accurately comprehend their therapeutic effects or to appropriately utilize their qualities because different environmental backgrounds can induce diverse metabolic changes. In the present study, the origins of the herbal medicine Schisandra chinensis were differentiated using two instrumental approaches, GC/MS and LC/MS. The acquired data were processed using various programs to detect metabolites and statistically examined to measure the suitability of the methods. The R(2)X value of the PCA analysis was used to examine the identified metabolites as potential discriminative markers. The identification of markers by primary metabolites using GC/MS analysis was advantageous because of its reproducibility and the use of a constructed database. However, LC/MS analysis using secondary metabolites provided a greater number of distinguishable variables and higher qualitative R(2)X values for the markers, which suggested that determination of the origins of the plants was more favourable using secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  19. Magik Markers Trehvis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Müra-rock'i viljelevast USA duost Magik Markers (ansambel osaleb režissöör Veiko Õunapuu uue mängufilmi "Püha Tõnu kiusamine" võtetel, kontsert 15. nov. Tartus klubis Trehv, vt. www.magikmarkers.audiosport.org.)

  20. (DArT) markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Industry and Investment and Charles Sturt. University), P. O. Box 588 Wagga Wagga, .... between-cluster variance in relative hybridization intensity as a percentage of the total .... markers tend to cluster on one or two linkage groups. The data of both sets of ...