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Sample records for brain magnetic resolution

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  2. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm

  3. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Tong In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr; Woo, Eung Je [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Bum [Department of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kyung, Eun Jung [Department of Pharmacology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh In [Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-13

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  4. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyun Bum; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-07-01

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  5. High-Resolution Longitudinal Screening with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Murine Brain Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Bock

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main limitations of intracranial models of diseases is our present inability to monitor and evaluate the intracranial compartment noninvasively over time. Therefore, there is a growing need for imaging modalities that provide thorough neuropathological evaluations of xenograft and transgenic models of intracranial pathology. In this study, we have established protocols for multiple-mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to follow the growth and behavior of intracranial xenografts of gliomas longitudinally. We successfully obtained weekly images on 16 mice for a total of 5 weeks on a 7-T multiple-mouse MRI. T2- and Ti-weighted imaging with gadolinium enhancement of vascularity was used to detect tumor margins, tumor size, and growth. These experiments, using 3D whole brain images obtained in four mice at once, demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining repeat radiological images in intracranial tumor models and suggest that MRI should be incorporated as a research modality for the investigation of intracranial pathobiology.

  6. Metabolomic analysis of rat brain by high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of tissue extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Norbert W; Béraud, Evelyne; Cozzone, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene expression on the RNA and protein levels have long been used to explore biological processes underlying disease. More recently, genomics and proteomics have been complemented by comprehensive quantitative analysis of the metabolite pool present in biological systems. This strategy, termed metabolomics, strives to provide a global characterization of the small-molecule complement involved in metabolism. While the genome and the proteome define the tasks cells can perform, the metabolome is part of the actual phenotype. Among the methods currently used in metabolomics, spectroscopic techniques are of special interest because they allow one to simultaneously analyze a large number of metabolites without prior selection for specific biochemical pathways, thus enabling a broad unbiased approach. Here, an optimized experimental protocol for metabolomic analysis by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is presented, which is the method of choice for efficient quantification of tissue metabolites. Important strengths of this method are (i) the use of crude extracts, without the need to purify the sample and/or separate metabolites; (ii) the intrinsically quantitative nature of NMR, permitting quantitation of all metabolites represented by an NMR spectrum with one reference compound only; and (iii) the nondestructive nature of NMR enabling repeated use of the same sample for multiple measurements. The dynamic range of metabolite concentrations that can be covered is considerable due to the linear response of NMR signals, although metabolites occurring at extremely low concentrations may be difficult to detect. For the least abundant compounds, the highly sensitive mass spectrometry method may be advantageous although this technique requires more intricate sample preparation and quantification procedures than NMR spectroscopy. We present here an NMR protocol adjusted to rat brain analysis; however, the same protocol can be applied to other tissues with minor

  7. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) with high-resolution matrix in intra-axial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, R.; Scheidler, J.; Porn, U.; Reiser, M. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Seelos, K.; Yousry, T. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Exner, H. [Institute for Medical Epidemiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Rosen, B.R. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, NMR Center, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of high-speed interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) to achieve diagnostic image quality comparable to T2-weighted imaging in patients with brain tumors. Seventeen patients with intra-axial, supratentorial tumors (10 untreated gliomas, 7 radiated gliomas) were investigated on a 1.5-T scanner. The conventional scan (SE, TR/TE = 2200/80 ms, 18 slices) was acquired in 8 min, 4 s, and EPI (TR/TE = 3000/80 ms, 18 slices) was completed in 25 s. The films were compared in a blinded trail by three radiologists. On the general impression and anatomic display, both sequences were rated to be of similar quality. Artifacts were slightly more pronounced at the skull base and around surgical clips using EPI. Tumor delineation was nearly equivalent using EPI, compared with the T2-weighted sequence. Echo-planar imaging reached diagnostic quality in all patients. Interleaved high-resolution EPI yielded sufficient quality to depict intra-axial, supratentorial brain tumors. Since EPI can be obtained in a small fraction of the time needed for conventional spin echo, in addition to other indications it could be considered to study patients unable to cooperate. (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 27 refs.

  8. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) with high-resolution matrix in intra-axial brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of high-speed interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) to achieve diagnostic image quality comparable to T2-weighted imaging in patients with brain tumors. Seventeen patients with intra-axial, supratentorial tumors (10 untreated gliomas, 7 radiated gliomas) were investigated on a 1.5-T scanner. The conventional scan (SE, TR/TE = 2200/80 ms, 18 slices) was acquired in 8 min, 4 s, and EPI (TR/TE = 3000/80 ms, 18 slices) was completed in 25 s. The films were compared in a blinded trail by three radiologists. On the general impression and anatomic display, both sequences were rated to be of similar quality. Artifacts were slightly more pronounced at the skull base and around surgical clips using EPI. Tumor delineation was nearly equivalent using EPI, compared with the T2-weighted sequence. Echo-planar imaging reached diagnostic quality in all patients. Interleaved high-resolution EPI yielded sufficient quality to depict intra-axial, supratentorial brain tumors. Since EPI can be obtained in a small fraction of the time needed for conventional spin echo, in addition to other indications it could be considered to study patients unable to cooperate. (orig.)

  9. Post-mortem magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM of the murine brain at 7 Tesla results in a gain of resolution as compared to in-vivo MRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver evon Bohlen und Halbach

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small animal MRI with high field strength allows imaging of the living animal. However, spatial resolution in in-vivo brain imaging is limited by the scanning time. Measurements of fixated mouse brains allow longer measurement time, but fixation procedures are time consuming, since the process of fixation may take several weeks. We here present a quick and simple post-mortem approach without fixation that allows high-resolution MRI even at 7 Tesla (T2-weighted MRI. This method was compared to in-vivo scans with optimized spatial resolution for the investigation of anaesthetized mice (T1-weighted MRI as well as to ex-situ scans of fixed brains (T1- and T2-weighted scans by using standard MRI-sequences, along with anatomic descriptions of areas observable in the MRI, analysis of tissue shrinkage and post-processing procedures (intensity inhomogeneity correction, PCNN3D brain extract, SPMMouse segmentation and volumetric measurement. Post-mortem imaging quality was sufficient to determine small brain substructures on the morphological level, provided fast possibilities for volumetric acquisition and for automatized processing without manual correction. Moreover, since no fixation was used, tissue shrinkage due to fixation does not occur as it is, e.g., the case by using ex-vivo brains that have been kept in fixatives for several days. Thus, the introduced method is well-suited for comparative investigations, since it allows determining small structural alterations in the murine brain at a reasonable high resolution even by MRI performed at 7 Tesla.

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  12. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E; Oppeneer, Peter M; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  13. Magnetic Resonance Lithography with Nanometer Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad AlGhannam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is capable of producing arbitrary one and two dimensional high-resolution patterns with high contrast.

  14. Noninvasive transcranial focused ultrasonic-magnetic stimulation for modulating brain oscillatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi; Chen, Yudong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    A novel technique, transcranial focused ultrasonic-magnetic stimulation (tFUMS), has been developed for noninvasive brain modulation in vivo. tFUMS has a higher spatial resolution (stimulation on the neuromodulation. The results demonstrate that tFUMS can modulate brain oscillatory activities by stimulating brain tissues.

  15. Design of modern high resolution magnetic spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of correcting nonlinear aberrations in high resolution magnetic spectrometers with software or hardware is examined. The ability of raytracing methods, using realistic focal plane detector resolutions, is demonstrated for the S800 spectrograph under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Furthermore, Differential Algebraic methods are shown to reproduce the results for accurately known fields at a considerable savings in design time. (Author)

  16. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology

  17. Bioavailability of magnetic nanoparticles to the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.-R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, P.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Chang-Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Huang, C.-Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jung, S.-M. [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ma, Y.-H. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tony [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-P. [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Wei, K.-C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 5 Fushing Street, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuochenwei@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2009-05-15

    This study investigates the bioavailability of carboxymethyl dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMD-MNP) to the brain. The cytotoxicity of CMD-MNP was assessed by co-culture with C6, a rat glioma cell line. To investigate the effects of an external magnetic field on the biodistribution of nanoparticles in a rat model, a magnet of 0.3 Tesla was applied externally over the cranium and the particles injected via the external jugular vein. Nanoparticles were also injected into rats implanted with C6 tumor cells. Staining of histological samples with Prussian blue to detect iron particles revealed that the external magnetic field enhanced the aggregation of nanoparticles in the rat brain; this enhancement was even more pronounced in the tumor region.

  18. Bioavailability of magnetic nanoparticles to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the bioavailability of carboxymethyl dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMD-MNP) to the brain. The cytotoxicity of CMD-MNP was assessed by co-culture with C6, a rat glioma cell line. To investigate the effects of an external magnetic field on the biodistribution of nanoparticles in a rat model, a magnet of 0.3 Tesla was applied externally over the cranium and the particles injected via the external jugular vein. Nanoparticles were also injected into rats implanted with C6 tumor cells. Staining of histological samples with Prussian blue to detect iron particles revealed that the external magnetic field enhanced the aggregation of nanoparticles in the rat brain; this enhancement was even more pronounced in the tumor region.

  19. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Tyrosinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3.5-year-old girl with tyrosinemia is reported. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed multiple hepatic nodules. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral high-signal changes confined to the globus pallidus on T2-weighted images. Globus pallidus lesions likely represented neuropathologic changes such as astocytosis, delayed myelination, and status spongiosus (myelin splitting and vacuolation)

  20. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  1. Magnetic Resonance and Brain Function. Approaches from Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade of this millennium, while, on the one hand, the international scientific community has focused with increasing endeavour on the research about the great unknown of the mechanism and the pathologies of the human brain, on the other hand, the NMR community has achieved some important results, which should widely affect, in the future, the possibility of understanding the function and disfunction of the human brain. In the early 1980's, the beginning of the application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to the morphological study of the brain in vivo, has played an extraordinary role, which, since then, placed MRI in a leading position among the methodologies used for investigation and diagnostics of the Central Nervous System. In the 1990s, the objective of finding new means, based on MRI, capable of giving functional and metabolic information, with the highest possible space resolution, drove the scientists towards different approaches. Among these, the first one to generate a breakthrough in the localization of specific cerebral functions was the Blood Oxygen Level Development (BOLD) MRI. A very wide range of applications followed the discovery of BOLD imaging. Still, this method gives an indirect information of the localization of functions, via the variation of oxygen release and deoxyhemoglobin formation. Of course, a high-resolution spatial distribution of the metabolites, crucial to brain function, would give a deeper insight into the occurring processes. This finality is aimed at by the Double Magnetic Resonance methods, which are developing new procedures able to detect some metabolites with increasing sensitivity and resolution. A third new promising approach to functional MRI should derive from the use of hyperpolarized, opens a series of potential applications to the study of brain function

  2. High resolution magnetic spectrograph 'Grand Raiden'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report of the last 1988, the basic design of a new high resolution (p/Δp = 37750) magnetic spectrograph of the type QSQDMD (+D), named 'Grand Raiden', was presented. Here, we show results of more detailed ray-tracing calculations; the focal line property, the image aberration, and the compensation of the kinematic broadening by multipole fields. The final design of the new DSR (dipole for spin rotation) for the measurement of in-plane spin observables are also reported. (author)

  3. Separate effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function revealed by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and spatial navigation assessment of the Four Core Genotype mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corre, Christina; Friedel, Miriam; Vousden, Dulcie A; Metcalf, Ariane; Spring, Shoshana; Qiu, Lily R; Lerch, Jason P; Palmert, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Males and females exhibit several differences in brain structure and function. To examine the basis for these sex differences, we investigated the influences of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on brain structure and function in mice. We used the Four Core Genotype (4CG) mice, which can generate both male and female mice with XX or XY sex chromosome complement, allowing the decoupling of sex chromosomes from hormonal milieu. To examine whole brain structure, high-resolution ex vivo MRI was performed, and to assess differences in cognitive function, mice were trained on a radial arm maze. Voxel-wise and volumetric analyses of MRI data uncovered a striking independence of hormonal versus chromosomal influences in 30 sexually dimorphic brain regions. For example, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the parieto-temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex displayed steroid-dependence while the cerebellar cortex, corpus callosum, and olfactory bulbs were influenced by sex chromosomes. Spatial learning and memory demonstrated strict hormone-dependency with no apparent influence of sex chromosomes. Understanding the influences of chromosomes and hormones on brain structure and function is important for understanding sex differences in brain structure and function, an endeavor that has eventual implications for understanding sex biases observed in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25445841

  4. Nonparametric Bayesian Clustering of Structural Whole Brain Connectivity in Full Image Resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø; Albers, Kristoffer Jon; Dyrby, Tim B.;

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging enables measuring the structural connectivity of the human brain at a high spatial resolution. Local noisy connectivity estimates can be derived using tractography approaches and statistical models are necessary to quantify the brain’s salient structural organ...... can aid in understanding the underlying connectivity patterns, and the proposed method for large scale data driven generation of structural units provides a promising framework that can exploit the increasing spatial resolution of neuro-imaging technologies.......Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging enables measuring the structural connectivity of the human brain at a high spatial resolution. Local noisy connectivity estimates can be derived using tractography approaches and statistical models are necessary to quantify the brain’s salient structural...... groups) that defines structural units at the resolution of statistical support. We apply the model to a network of structural brain connectivity in full image resolution with more than one hundred thousand regions (voxels in the gray-white matter boundary) and around one hundred million connections. The...

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method based on the detecting signal from hydrogen nuclei of water molecules and fat. Performances of MRI are continuously increasing, and its domains of investigation of the human body are growing in both morphological and functional study. MRI also allows It also performing advanced management of tumours especially in the brain, by combining anatomical information (morphological MRI), functional (diffusion, perfusion and BOLD contrast) and metabolic (tissue composition in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). The MRI techniques have an important role in cancerology. These techniques allow essential information for the diagnosis and answering therapist's questions before, during or after the treatment. The MR allows clarifying the localization of expanding processes, the differential diagnosis between brain tumour and a lesion confined by another structural aspect, the diagnosis of the tumoral aspect of a lesion, the histological ranking in case of glial tumour and the extension of its localization as well as the therapeutic follow-up (pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutics assessments). A better combination between the morphological, functional and metabolic studies, as well as integrating new technical developments, especially while using a multichannel bird cage coils the 3T magnet and suitable computing software, would allow significant improvements of the exploration strategies and management of brain tumors.

  6. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author).

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

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    Oikawa, Akihiro; Kagawa, Mizuo; Yatoh, Seiji; Izawa, Masahiro; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Jun; Onda, Hideaki; Kitamura, Kohichi

    1988-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess.

  11. Developments in magnets for the high resolution RCNP spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given for the developments of magnets employed in the high resolution spectrometer now in operation at RCNP. Special care was taken to obtain high uniformities in the magnetic field distributions. A new method for constructing a magnet with a high field uniformity as well as a good reproducibility at a reasonable cost is described. (author)

  12. Impact of the resolution of brain parcels on connectome-wide association studies in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellec, Pierre; Benhajali, Yassine; Carbonell, Felix; Dansereau, Christian; Albouy, Geneviève; Pelland, Maxime; Craddock, Cameron; Collignon, Oliver; Doyon, Julien; Stip, Emmanuel; Orban, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    A recent trend in functional magnetic resonance imaging is to test for association of clinical disorders with every possible connection between selected brain parcels. We investigated the impact of the resolution of functional brain parcels, ranging from large-scale networks to local regions, on a mass univariate general linear model (GLM) of connectomes. For each resolution taken independently, the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure controlled the false-discovery rate (FDR) at nominal level on realistic simulations. However, the FDR for tests pooled across all resolutions could be inflated compared to the FDR within resolution. This inflation was severe in the presence of no or weak effects, but became negligible for strong effects. We thus developed an omnibus test to establish the overall presence of true discoveries across all resolutions. Although not a guarantee to control the FDR across resolutions, the omnibus test may be used for descriptive analysis of the impact of resolution on a GLM analysis, in complement to a primary analysis at a predefined single resolution. On three real datasets with significant omnibus test (schizophrenia, congenital blindness, motor practice), markedly higher rate of discovery were obtained at low resolutions, below 50, in line with simulations showing increase in sensitivity at such resolutions. This increase in discovery rate came at the cost of a lower ability to localize effects, as low resolution parcels merged many different brain regions together. However, with 30 or more parcels, the statistical effect maps were biologically plausible and very consistent across resolutions. These results show that resolution is a key parameter for GLM-connectome analysis with FDR control, and that a functional brain parcellation with 30 to 50 parcels may lead to an accurate summary of full connectome effects with good sensitivity in many situations. PMID:26241681

  13. High resolution magnetic spectrometer SHARAQ in RIBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a new spectroscopy of nuclei using intense RI beams at RIBF, we started the SHARAQ project where a high-resolution SHARAQ spectrometer is being constructed together with a high-resolution secondary beam line. Physics motivation and the specification of the spectrometer are presented

  14. Recent development in noninvasive brain activity measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) is a non-invasive brain imaging technique with which the distribution of neural activity is estimated by measuring local blood flow changes. Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) method measures changes in the density of deoxidized hemoglobin in blood caused by blood flow changes, while other methods have been developed to measure the blood flow changes directly. Effort has been expended to realize a submillimeter spatial resolution by using higher static magnetic field. fMRI has been carried out with various mental tasks, and many important findings have been made on the localization of higher brain functions. (author)

  15. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality. (orig.)

  16. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  17. High-resolution magnetic measurements of HTSC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janů, Zdeněk; Novák, Miloslav; Tsoi, G.

    272-276, - (2004), e1099-e1101. ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/02/0994; GA AV ČR IAA1010104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : superconductivity * low-dimensional systems * resonance scattering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.031, year: 2004

  18. High resolution magnetic anomaly map of Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sánchez

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents magnetic anomaly data from a new high-resolution, low-altitude helicopter-borne magnetic survey recently collected on and offshore Tenerife in the Canary Archipelago. The Italian Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV in collaboration with the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales of the CSIC of Spain conducted the survey in 2006. The data for Tenerife and surrounding marine areas were processed into digital total intensity magnetic anomalies for geomagnetic epoch 2006.4. Relative to previously available higher altitude magnetic survey data, the new survey mapped higher resolution anomalies with significantly improved spatial details, especially over the Las Cañadas caldera and Teide-Pico Viejo complex in the central part of the island. A good correlation is evident between known structural geology and the magnetic anomalies, where the new shorter wavelength anomalies facilitate more detailed and comprehensive geologic interpretations.

  19. Resolutions of Problems that Occurred in SPEAR3 Magnet Production

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Nanyang; Qu, Huamin

    2005-01-01

    Few problems occurred during the SPEAR3 magnets production at IHEP, China. It was very hard to find resolution from existing knowledge of those problems. It was possible that similar problems might happen in building accelerator magnet in other institutes before, but they were not addressed in public papers. Those problems were discussed and solved by engineers from both SSRL and IHEP after conducting certain experiments. Traditionally, the magnet design and measurement data have been always well documented and addressed in the papers, but the production experiences have not been recorded adequately. It is the goal of this paper to record the problems and their resolutions during SPEAR3 magnet production, which will certainly benefit future magnet projects.

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation activates specific regions in rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive ther...

  1. Functional connectivity of the rat brain in magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kalthoff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Functional connectivity – generally defined by Friston as “temporal correlation of a neurophysiological index measured in different brain areas” – was first reported for human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain by Biswal and co-workers in 1995. It relies on spontaneous low frequency fluctuations (< 0.1 Hz) of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal that are synchronized in distant brain regions in the absence of any task or stimulus, hence the ...

  2. BabySQUID: A mobile, high-resolution multichannel magnetoencephalography system for neonatal brain assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Pratt, Kevin; Atwood, Christopher; Mascarenas, Anthony; Reineman, Richard; Nurminen, Jussi; Paulson, Douglas

    2006-02-01

    We developed a prototype of a mobile, high-resolution, multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, called babySQUID, for assessing brain functions in newborns and infants. Unlike electroencephalography, MEG signals are not distorted by the scalp or the fontanels and sutures in the skull. Thus, brain activity can be measured and localized with MEG as if the sensors were above an exposed brain. The babySQUID is housed in a moveable cart small enough to be transported from one room to another. To assess brain functions, one places the baby on the bed of the cart and the head on its headrest with MEG sensors just below. The sensor array consists of 76 first-order axial gradiometers, each with a pickup coil diameter of 6mm and a baseline of 30mm, in a high-density array with a spacing of 12-14mm center-to-center. The pickup coils are 6±1mm below the outer surface of the headrest. The short gap provides unprecedented sensitivity since the scalp and skull are thin (as little as 3-4mm altogether) in babies. In an electromagnetically unshielded room in a hospital, the field sensitivity at 1kHz was ˜17fT/√Hz. The noise was reduced from ˜400to200fT/√Hz at 1Hz using a reference cancellation technique and further to ˜40fT/√Hz using a gradient common mode rejection technique. Although the residual environmental magnetic noise interfered with the operation of the babySQUID, the instrument functioned sufficiently well to detect spontaneous brain signals from babies with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of as much as 7.6:1. In a magnetically shielded room, the field sensitivity was 17fT/√Hz at 20Hz and 30fT/√Hz at 1Hz without implementation of reference or gradient cancellation. The sensitivity was sufficiently high to detect spontaneous brain activity from a 7month old baby with a SNR as much as 40:1 and evoked somatosensory responses with a 50Hz bandwidth after as little as four averages. We expect that both the noise and the sensor gap can be reduced further by

  3. Photo-magnetic Imaging: Resolving Optical Contrast at MRI resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely Photo-magnetic Imaging (PMI). PMI uses laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite element-based algorithm with iterative approach, is presented in...

  4. Resolution changes of MCP-PMTs in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, J.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    Micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs) are chosen in many applications that have to cope with strong magnetic fields. The DIRC detectors of the PANDA experiment plan to employ them as they show excellent timing characteristics, radiation hardness, relatively low dark count rates and sufficient lifetime. This article mainly focuses on the performance of the position reconstruction of detected photons. Two different MCP-PMTs with segmented anode geometries have been tested in magnetic fields of different strengths. The variation of their performance has been studied. The measurements show improved position resolution and image shifts with increasing magnetic field strength.

  5. Microfabrication of High Resolution X-ray Magnetic Calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic magnetic calorimeter (MMC) is one of the most promising x-ray detector technologies for providing the very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray imaging spectroscopy. For this purpose, we have developed micro-fabricated 5x5 arrays of MMC of which each individual pixel has excellent energy resolution as good as 3.4 eV at 6 keV x-ray. Here we report on the fabrication techniques developed to achieve good resolution and high efficiency. These include: processing of a thin insulation layer for strong magnetic coupling between the AuEr sensor film and the niobium pick-up coil; production of overhanging absorbers for enhanced efficiency of x-ray absorption; fabrication on SiN membranes to minimize the effects on energy resolution from athermal phonon loss. We have also improved the deposition of the magnetic sensor film such that the film magnetization is nearly completely that is expected from the AuEr sputter target bulk material. In addition, we have included a study of a positional sensitive design, the Hydra design, which allows thermal coupling of four absorbers to a common MMC sensor and circuit.

  6. High-resolution mechanical imaging of glioblastoma by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To generate high-resolution maps of the viscoelastic properties of human brain parenchyma for presurgical quantitative assessment in glioblastoma (GB. METHODS: Twenty-two GB patients underwent routine presurgical work-up supplemented by additional multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography. Two three-dimensional viscoelastic parameter maps, magnitude |G*|, and phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus were reconstructed by inversion of full wave field data in 2-mm isotropic resolution at seven harmonic drive frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 Hz. RESULTS: Mechanical brain maps confirmed that GB are composed of stiff and soft compartments, resulting in high intratumor heterogeneity. GB could be easily differentiated from healthy reference tissue by their reduced viscous behavior quantified by φ (0.37±0.08 vs. 0.58±0.07. |G*|, which in solids more relates to the material's stiffness, was significantly reduced in GB with a mean value of 1.32±0.26 kPa compared to 1.54±0.27 kPa in healthy tissue (P = 0.001. However, some GB (5 of 22 showed increased stiffness. CONCLUSION: GB are generally less viscous and softer than healthy brain parenchyma. Unrelated to the morphology-based contrast of standard magnetic resonance imaging, elastography provides an entirely new neuroradiological marker and contrast related to the biomechanical properties of tumors.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome, Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalieri, Margherita; Ropele, Stefan; Petrovic, Katja; Pluta-Fuerst, Aga; Homayoon, Nina; Enzinger, Christian; Grazer, Anja; Katschnig, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Berghold, Andrea; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We explored cognitive impairment in metabolic syndrome in relation to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 819 participants free of clinical stroke and dementia of the population-based Austrian Stroke Prevention Study who had undergone brain MRI, neuropsychological testing, and a risk factor assessment relevant to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria–defined metabolic syndrome. High-sensitivity C...

  8. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process

  9. Magnetic resonance studies of brain function and neurochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Uǧurbil, K.; Adriany, G.; Andersen, P; Chen, W.; Gruetter, R.; Hu, X.; Merkle, H; Kim, D.-S.; Kim, S. -G.; Strupp, J.; Zhu, X H; Ogawa, S

    2000-01-01

    In the short time since its introduction, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has rapidly evolved to become an indispensable tool for clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. Recently, this methodology has been successfully used for the acquisition of functional, physiological, and biochemical information in intact systems, particularly in the human body. The ability to map areas of altered neuronal activity in the brain, often referred to as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), is p...

  10. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body. PMID:24486465

  11. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking models then use the directions of greatest diffusion as estimates of white matter fibre orientation. Several fibre tracking algorithms have emerged in the last few years that provide reproducible visu...

  12. The psychopath magnetized: insights from brain imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Nathaniel E.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2011-01-01

    Psychopaths commit a disproportionate amount of violent crime, and this places a substantial economic and emotional burden on society. Elucidation of the neural correlates of psychopathy may lead to improved management and treatment of the condition. Although some methodological issues remain, the neuroimaging literature is generally converging on a set of brain regions and circuits that are consistently implicated in the condition: the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and the anterior and pos...

  13. Ultra-high-resolution brain SPECT imaging: Simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial resolution in a reconstructed SPECT image is obviously influenced by the intrinsic resolution of the detector, but it is not generally recognized that the photon-counting efficiency of SPECT systems is also determined by the intrinsic resolution. In fact, it is often stated that increased intrinsic detector resolution is of little use since the overall resolution is limited by the collimator rather than the detector, and that collimator resolution cannot be increased without an unacceptable sacrifice in efficiency. In this paper, the authors attempt to demonstrate that improvements in detector resolution can lead to both improved spatial resolution in the image and improved counting efficiency compared to conventional systems. In this paper they report simulation studies that demonstrate the image quality that is attainable with such detectors. Reconstructions were performed using an iterative search algorithm on a custom-designed parallel computer. The imaging system was described by a calculated system matrix relating all voxels in the object space to all pixels on the detector. They found a resolution close to 2 mm on the reconstructed images obtained from these computer simulations with clinically reasonable exposure times. This resolution may be even further improved by optimization of the multiple-pinhole aperture. Thus the novel semiconductor modular gamma-camera design should provide a large improvement not only in detector resolution but also in reconstructed resolution

  14. The possible resolution of Boltzmann brains problem in phantom cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Yurov, Artyom V.; Yurov, Valerian V.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the well-known Boltzmann brains problem in frames of simple phantom energy models with little rip and big rip singularity. It is showed that these models (i) satisfy to observational data and (ii) may be free from Boltzmann brains problem. The human observers in phantom models can exist only in during for a certain period $t

  15. Resolution and sensitivity of high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arrival of very high field magnets and cryogenic circuitries, and the development of relaxation-optimized pulse sequences have added powerful tools for increasing sensitivity and resolution in NMR studies of biomacromolecules. The potential of these advances is not fully realized in practice, however, since current experimental protocols do not permit sufficient data sampling for optimal resolution in the indirect dimensions. Here we analyze quantitatively how increasing resolution in indirect dimensions affects the S/N ratio and compare this with currently used sampling routines. Optimal resolution would require sampling up to ∼3R2-1, and the S/N reaches a maximum at ∼1.2R2-1. Currently used data acquisition protocols rarely sample beyond 0.4R2-1, and extending evolution times would result in prohibitively long experiments. We show that a general solution to this problem is to use non-uniform sampling, where only a small subset of data points in the indirect sampling space are measured, and possibly different numbers of transients are collected for different evolution times. Coupled with modern methods of spectrum analysis, this strategy delivers substantially improved resolution and/or reduced measuring times compared to uniform sampling, without compromising sensitivity. Higher resolution in the indirect dimensions will facilitate the use of automated assignment programs

  16. Pattern recognition on brain magnetic resonance imaging in alpha dystroglycanopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Parayil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha dystroglycanopathies are heterogeneous group of disorders both phenotypically and genetically. A subgroup of these patients has characteristic brain imaging findings. Four patients with typical imaging findings of alpha dystroglycanopathy are reported. Phenotypic features included: global developmental delay, contractures, hypotonia and oculomotor abnormalities in all. Other manifestations were consanguinity (3, seizures (3, macrocephaly (1, microcephaly (3, retinal changes (2 and hypogenitalism (2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed polymicrogyria, white matter changes, pontine hypoplasia, and subcortical cerebellar cysts in all the patients, ventriculomegaly, callosal abnormalities, and absent septum pellucidum in two and Dandy -Walker variant malformation in three. Magnetic resonace imaging of the first cousin of one the patient had the same characteristic imaging features. Brain imaging findings were almost identical despite heterogeneity in clinical presentation and histopathological features. Pattern recognition of MR imaging features may serve as a clue to the diagnosis of alpha dystroglycanopathy.

  17. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs. PMID:21919951

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging based volumetry: a primary approach to unravelling the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiaoqi; Lü Su; Li Dongming; Gong Qiyong

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based volumetry is recognized as an important technique for studying the brain. In this review, two principle volumetric methods using high resolution MR images were introduced, namely the Cavalieri method and the voxel based morphometry (VBM). The Cavalieri method represents a manual technique that allows the volume of brain structures to be estimated efficiently with no systematic error or sampling bias, whereby the VBM represents an automated image analysis which involves the use of statistical parametric mapping of the MR imaging data. Both methods have been refined and applied extensively in recent neuroscience research. The present paper aims to describe the development of methodologies and also to update the knowledge of their applications in studying the normal and diseased brain.

  19. Thresholding magnetic resonance images of human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-mao HU; Wieslaw L NOWINSKI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, methods are proposed and validated to determine low and high thresholds to segment out gray matter and white matter for MR images of different pulse sequences of human brain. First, a two-dimensional reference image is determined to represent the intensity characteristics of the original three-dimensional data. Then a region of interest of the reference image is determined where brain tissues are present. The non-supervised fuzzy c-means clustering is employed to determine: the threshold for obtaining head mask, the low threshold for T2-weighted and PD-weighted images, and the high threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Supervised range-constrained thresholding is employed to determine the low threshold for T1-weighted, SPGR and FLAIR images. Thresholding based on pairs of boundary pixels is proposed to determine the high threshold for T2- and PD-weighted images. Quantification against public data sets with various noise and inhomogeneity levels shows that the proposed methods can yield segmentation robust to noise and intensity inhomogeneity. Qualitatively the proposed methods work well with real clinical data.

  20. Magnetic resonance elastography in normal human brain: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the application of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the human brain. Methods: An external force actuator was developed. The actuator was fixed to the head coil. During MRE scan, one side of the actuator was attached to the volunteers' head. Low frequency oscillation was produced by the actuator and generated shear waves propagating into brain tissue. The pulse sequence of MRE was designed. A modified gradient echo sequence was developed with motion sensitizing gradient (MSG) imposed along X, Y or Z direction. Cyclic displacement within brain tissue induced by shear waves caused a measurable phase shift in the received MR signal. From the measured phase shift, the displacement at each voxel could be calculated, and the shear waves within the brain were directly imaged. By adjusting the phase offset, the dynamic propagation of shear waves in a wave cycle was obtained. Phase images were processed with local frequency estimation (LFE) technique to obtain the elasticity images. Shear waves at 100 Hz, 150 Hz, and 200 Hz were applied. Results: The phase images of MRE directly imaged the propagating shear waves within the brain. The direction of the propagation was from surface of the brain to the center. The wavelength of shear waves varied with the change of actuating frequency. The change of wavelength of shear waves in gray and white matter of the brain was identified. The wavelength of shear waves in gray matter was shorter than that in white matter. The elasticity image of the brain revealed that the shear modulus of the white matter was higher than that of gray matter. Conclusion: The phase images of MRE can directly visualize the propagation of shear waves in the brain tissue. The elasticity image of the brain can demonstrate the change of elasticity between gray and white matter. (authors)

  1. STEREOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF BRAIN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES OF SCHIZOPHRENIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Abdelrazag Elfaki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in neuroimaging have enabled studies of specific neuroanatomical abnormalities with relevance to schizophrenia. This study quantified structural alterations on brain magnetic resonance (MR images of patients with schizophrenia. MR brain imaging was done on 88 control and 57 schizophrenic subjects and Dicom images were analyzed with ImageJ software. The brain volume was estimated with the planimetric stereological technique. The volume fraction of brain structures was also estimated. The results showed that, the mean volume of right, left, and total hemispheres in controls were 551, 550, and 1101 cm³, respectively. The mean volumes of right, left, and total hemispheres in schizophrenics were 513, 512, and 1026 cm³, respectively. The schizophrenics’ brains were smaller than the controls (p < 0.05. The mean volume of total white matter of controls (516 cm³ was bigger than the schizophrenics’ volume (451 cm³, (p < 0.05. The volume fraction of total white matter was also lower in schizophrenics (p < 0.05. Volume fraction of the lateral ventricles was higher in schizophrenics (p < 0.05. According to the findings, the volumes of schizophrenics’ brain were smaller than the controls and the volume fractional changes in schizophrenics showed sex dependent differences. We conclude that stereological analysis of MR brain images is useful for quantifying schizophrenia related structural changes.

  2. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    an ongoing chemical reaction due to the fixative used. Short-term instabilities within the first 15 hours of DWI scanning were observed and found likely to be caused by the preparation of the postmortem tissue prior to MR scanning. This artefact can be avoided e.g. by simply excluding DW......Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking...... environment differs from that of in vivo both due to a lowered environmental temperature and due to the fixation process itself. We argue that the perfusion fixation procedure employed in this thesis ensures that the postmortem tissue is as close to that of in vivo as possible. Different fibre reconstruction...

  3. Preliminary study in vitro brain tumor with high resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy%离体脑肿瘤高分辨魔角旋转磁共振质子波谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore water soluble metabolite features of brain tumor specimens with HRMAS-1HMRS and its potential clinical value.Methods: There were thirty cases of pathologically proven brain tumor, including 6Ⅰ-Ⅱgrade astrocytomas, 7Ⅲgrade anaplastic astrocytomas, 10 IV grade glioblastomas and 7 meningiomas.Used Varian Company 600 MHz spectrometer with the Nano-probe for acquisition HRMAS-1HMRS, which was postprocessed with jMRUI 3.2 version software.These metabolic probability and their ratios to Cr were summed.Results: (1)HRMAS-1HMRS could resolve NAA, PCr/Cr, GPC+Pcho+Cho, Ghu/Gin, Gly, Tau, Ala, Lac, ml and so on.All samples showed Lac, 6 samples showed unknown single peak at 3.72 ppm or 3.90 ppm.(2)The mean Cho/Cr of 6Ⅰ-Ⅱgrade astrocytomas was 2.42±1.01(P=0.003, compared with glioblastoma).The mean Cho/Cr of 7 anaplastic astrocytomas was 3.48±0.59 (P=0.01, compared with glioblastoma).The Cho/Cr of 10 glioblastomas broadly ranged from 0.9 to 11.3 (mean 5.40±1.23).FromⅠ-Ⅱgrade astrocytoma to glioblastoma, Ala/Cr, Tau/Cr and Gly/Cr trends were increased; the mean Ala/Cr of glioma was 0.31±0.13.(3)Meningiomas showed higher Ala and Cho.Their Cr was lower than that of gliomas.4/7 cases had no NAA, 3/7 patients had lower NAA.Mean Cho/Cr was 3.56±1.01, Ala/Cr was 0.53±0.28(P=0.006, compared with glioma).Conclusion: HRMAS-1HMRS can show further details in vivo MRS, resolve in vivo spectroscopic metabolite of Cho compound and differentiate the extent of benign and malignant glioma.With the increase in the malignant degree of gliomas, Cho, ml, Ala, Tau and Gly will increase.HRMAS-1HMRS is the only method of isotropic spectroscopy for pathological specimens.

  4. Rock magnetism linked to human brain magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Magnetite has a long and distinguished career as one of the most important minerals in geophysics, as it is responsible for most of the remanent magnetization in marine sediments and the oceanic crust. It may come as a surprise to discover that it also ranks as the third or fourth most diverse mineral product formed biochemically by living organisms, and forms naturally in a variety of human tissues [Kirschvink et al., 1992].Magnetite was discovered in teeth of the Polyplacophora mollusks over 30 years ago, in magnetotactic bacteria nearly 20 years ago, in honey bees and homing pigeons nearly 15 years ago, but only recently in human tissue.

  5. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T2*-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T2* and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm3 and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T2*-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in the water resonance that is not present at

  6. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxley, Sean, E-mail: sean.foxley@ndcn.ox.ac.uk; Karczmar, Gregory S. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Domowicz, Miriam [Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Schwartz, Nancy [Department of Pediatrics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in

  7. Dynamic magnetic resonance inverse imaging of human brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Wald, Lawrence L; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Kwong, Kenneth K; Belliveau, John W

    2006-10-01

    MRI is widely used for noninvasive hemodynamic-based functional brain imaging. In traditional spatial encoding, however, gradient switching limits the temporal resolution, which makes it difficult to unambiguously identify possible fast nonhemodynamic changes. In this paper we propose a novel reconstruction approach, called dynamic inverse imaging (InI), that is capable of providing millisecond temporal resolution when highly parallel detection is used. To achieve an order-of-magnitude speedup in generating time-resolved contrast estimates and dynamic statistical parametric maps (dSPMs), the spatial information is derived from an array of detectors rather than by time-consuming gradient-encoding methods. The InI approach was inspired by electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) source localization techniques. Dynamic MR InI was evaluated by means of numerical simulations. InI was also applied to measure BOLD hemodynamic time curves at 20-ms temporal resolution in a visual stimulation experiment using a 90-channel head array. InI is expected to improve the time resolution of MRI and provide increased flexibility in the trade-off between spatial and temporal resolution for studies of dynamic activation patterns in the human brain. PMID:16964616

  8. Community detection in weighted brain connectivity networks beyond the resolution limit

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolini, Carlo; Bifone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Graph theory provides a powerful framework to investigate brain functional connectivity networks and their modular organization. However, most graph-based methods suffer from a fundamental resolution limit that may have affected previous studies and prevented detection of modules, or communities, that are smaller than a specific scale. Surprise, a resolution-limit-free function rooted in discrete probability theory, has been recently introduced and applied to brain networks, revealing a wide size-distribution of functional modules, in contrast with many previous reports. However, the use of Surprise is limited to binary networks, while brain networks are intrinsically weighted, reflecting a continuous distribution of connectivity strengths between different brain regions. Here, we propose Asymptotical Surprise, a continuous version of Surprise, for the study of weighted brain connectivity networks, and validate this approach in synthetic networks endowed with a ground-truth modular structure. We compare Asymp...

  9. Human brain diffusion tensor imaging at submillimeter isotropic resolution on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Sundman, Mark; Petit, Laurent; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chu, Mei-Lan; Petty, Christopher; Song, Allen W; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-09-01

    The advantages of high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been demonstrated in a recent post-mortem human brain study (Miller et al., NeuroImage 2011;57(1):167-181), showing that white matter fiber tracts can be much more accurately detected in data at a submillimeter isotropic resolution. To our knowledge, in vivo human brain DTI at a submillimeter isotropic resolution has not been routinely achieved yet because of the difficulty in simultaneously achieving high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in DTI scans. Here we report a 3D multi-slab interleaved EPI acquisition integrated with multiplexed sensitivity encoded (MUSE) reconstruction, to achieve high-quality, high-SNR and submillimeter isotropic resolution (0.85×0.85×0.85mm(3)) in vivo human brain DTI on a 3Tesla clinical MRI scanner. In agreement with the previously reported post-mortem human brain DTI study, our in vivo data show that the structural connectivity networks of human brains can be mapped more accurately and completely with high-resolution DTI as compared with conventional DTI (e.g., 2×2×2mm(3)). PMID:26072250

  10. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -1200 C to +1600 C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author)

  11. Project for a high resolution magnetic spectrometer for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy loss spectrometer presented in this report has an energy resolution of 2x10-4 with the full solid angle of 5 msr. The maximum magnetic rigidity of the particles analysed is 2.88 Tesla-meters on the optical axis and the total acceptance in energy is 14%. Experiments with reaction angles near 00 are possible. Kinematic compensation is adapted to heavy ion physics. In this report, we have paid special attention to the simplicity of the construction and of the use of this spectrometer by experimentalists. This report is addressed both to non-specialists and to future users as well

  12. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity

  13. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W. (AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  14. Clinical anatomy of the canine brain using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Edmund J; Mackillop, Edward; Robertson, Ian D; Hudson, Lola C

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce an magnetic resonsnce (MR) image atlas of clinically relevant brain anatomy and to relate this neuroanatomy to clinical signs. The brain of a large mixed breed dog was imaged in transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes using a 1.5 T MR unit and the following pulse sequences: Turbo (fast) spin echo (TSE) T2, T1, and T2- weighted spatial and chemical shift-encoded excitation sequence. Relevant neuroanatomic structures were identified using anatomic texts, sectioned cadaver heads, and previously published atlases. Major subdivisions of the brain were mapped and the neurologic signs of lesions in these divisions were described. TSE T2-weighted images were found to be the most useful for identifying clinically relevant neuroanatomy. Relating clinical signs to morphology as seen on MR will assist veterinarians to better understand clinically relevant neuroanatomy in MR images. PMID:18418990

  15. A nested phosphorus and proton coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan; Lakshmanan, Karthik; Madelin, Guillaume; Parasoglou, Prodromos

    2016-01-01

    A dual-nuclei radiofrequency coil array was constructed for phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the human brain at 7T. An eight-channel transceive degenerate birdcage phosphorus module was implemented to provide whole-brain coverage and significant sensitivity improvement over a standard dual-tuned loop coil. A nested eight-channel proton module provided adequate sensitivity for anatomical localization without substantially sacrificing performance on the phosphorus module. The developed array enabled phosphorus spectroscopy, a saturation transfer technique to calculate the global creatine kinase forward reaction rate, and single-metabolite whole-brain imaging with 1.4cm nominal isotropic resolution in 15min (2.3cm actual resolution), while additionally enabling 1mm isotropic proton imaging. This study demonstrates that a multi-channel array can be utilized for phosphorus and proton applications with improved coverage and/or sensitivity over traditional single-channel coils. The efficient multi-channel coil array, time-efficient pulse sequences, and the enhanced signal strength available at ultra-high fields can be combined to allow volumetric assessment of the brain and could provide new insights into the underlying energy metabolism impairment in several neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as mental disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:26375209

  16. Human brain somatic representation: a functional magnetic resonance mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romo, Juan; Rojas, Rafael; Salgado, Perla; Sánchez-Cortázar, Julián; Vazquez-Vela, Arturo; Barrios, Fernando A.

    2001-10-01

    Central nervous system studies of injury and plasticity for the reorganization in the phantom limb sensation area presented. In particular functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) mapping of the somatic and motor cortex of amputee patients, in the case of referred sensations. Using fMRI we can show the correlation between structure and functional field and study the reorganization due to plasticity in the brain.

  17. Scanning magnetic tunnel junction microscope for high-resolution imaging of remanent magnetization fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning magnetic microscopy is a new methodology for mapping magnetic fields with high spatial resolution and field sensitivity. An important goal has been to develop high-performance instruments that do not require cryogenic technology due to its high cost, complexity, and limitation on sensor-to-sample distance. Here we report the development of a low-cost scanning magnetic microscope based on commercial room-temperature magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors that typically achieves spatial resolution better than 7 µm. By comparing different bias and detection schemes, optimal performance was obtained when biasing the MTJ sensor with a modulated current at 1.0 kHz in a Wheatstone bridge configuration while using a lock-in amplifier in conjunction with a low-noise custom-made preamplifier. A precision horizontal (x–y) scanning stage comprising two coupled nanopositioners controls the position of the sample and a linear actuator adjusts the sensor-to-sample distance. We obtained magnetic field sensitivities better than 150 nT/Hz1/2 between 0.1 and 10 Hz, which is a critical frequency range for scanning magnetic microscopy. This corresponds to a magnetic moment sensitivity of 10–14 A m2, a factor of 100 better than achievable with typical commercial superconducting moment magnetometers. It also represents an improvement in sensitivity by a factor between 10 and 30 compared to similar scanning MTJ microscopes based on conventional bias-detection schemes. To demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument, two polished thin sections of representative geological samples were scanned along with a synthetic sample containing magnetic microparticles. The instrument is usable for a diversity of applications that require mapping of samples at room temperature to preserve magnetic properties or viability, including paleomagnetism and rock magnetism, nondestructive evaluation of materials, and biological assays. (paper)

  18. Scanning magnetic tunnel junction microscope for high-resolution imaging of remanent magnetization fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, E. A.; Bruno, A. C.; Carvalho, H. R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2014-10-01

    Scanning magnetic microscopy is a new methodology for mapping magnetic fields with high spatial resolution and field sensitivity. An important goal has been to develop high-performance instruments that do not require cryogenic technology due to its high cost, complexity, and limitation on sensor-to-sample distance. Here we report the development of a low-cost scanning magnetic microscope based on commercial room-temperature magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors that typically achieves spatial resolution better than 7 µm. By comparing different bias and detection schemes, optimal performance was obtained when biasing the MTJ sensor with a modulated current at 1.0 kHz in a Wheatstone bridge configuration while using a lock-in amplifier in conjunction with a low-noise custom-made preamplifier. A precision horizontal (x-y) scanning stage comprising two coupled nanopositioners controls the position of the sample and a linear actuator adjusts the sensor-to-sample distance. We obtained magnetic field sensitivities better than 150 nT/Hz1/2 between 0.1 and 10 Hz, which is a critical frequency range for scanning magnetic microscopy. This corresponds to a magnetic moment sensitivity of 10-14 A m2, a factor of 100 better than achievable with typical commercial superconducting moment magnetometers. It also represents an improvement in sensitivity by a factor between 10 and 30 compared to similar scanning MTJ microscopes based on conventional bias-detection schemes. To demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument, two polished thin sections of representative geological samples were scanned along with a synthetic sample containing magnetic microparticles. The instrument is usable for a diversity of applications that require mapping of samples at room temperature to preserve magnetic properties or viability, including paleomagnetism and rock magnetism, nondestructive evaluation of materials, and biological assays.

  19. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy of spins: Magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films with spatio-temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpene, E., E-mail: ettore.carpene@fisi.polimi.i [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mancini, E.; Dallera, C. [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Puppin, E. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Silvestri, S. [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), we have developed an experimental set-up that allows us to fully characterize the magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films by measuring all three real space components of the magnetization vector M. By means of the pump-probe technique it is possible to extract the time dependence of each individual projection with sub-picosecond resolution. This method has been exploited to investigate the temporal evolution of the magnetization (modulus and orientation) induced by an ultrashort laser pulse in thin epitaxial iron films. According to our results, we deduced that the initial, sub-picosecond demagnetization is established at the electronic level through electron-magnon excitations. The subsequent dynamics is characterized by a precessional motion on the 100 ps time scale, around an effective, time-dependent magnetic field. Following the full dynamics of M, the temporal evolution of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy constant can be unambiguously determined, providing the experimental evidence that the precession is triggered by the rapid, optically-induced misalignment between the magnetization vector and the effective magnetic field. These results suggest a possible pathway toward the ultrarapid switching of the magnetization.

  20. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy of spins: Magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films with spatio-temporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), we have developed an experimental set-up that allows us to fully characterize the magnetization dynamics in thin magnetic films by measuring all three real space components of the magnetization vector M. By means of the pump-probe technique it is possible to extract the time dependence of each individual projection with sub-picosecond resolution. This method has been exploited to investigate the temporal evolution of the magnetization (modulus and orientation) induced by an ultrashort laser pulse in thin epitaxial iron films. According to our results, we deduced that the initial, sub-picosecond demagnetization is established at the electronic level through electron-magnon excitations. The subsequent dynamics is characterized by a precessional motion on the 100 ps time scale, around an effective, time-dependent magnetic field. Following the full dynamics of M, the temporal evolution of the magneto-crystalline anisotropy constant can be unambiguously determined, providing the experimental evidence that the precession is triggered by the rapid, optically-induced misalignment between the magnetization vector and the effective magnetic field. These results suggest a possible pathway toward the ultrarapid switching of the magnetization.

  1. Brain size and brain organization of the whale shark, Rhincodon typus, using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopak, Kara E; Frank, Lawrence R

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the brain organization of the suction filter feeder, Rhincodon typus, and how it compares to other orectolobiforms in light of its specialization as a plankton-feeder. Brain size and overall brain organization was assessed in two specimens of R. typus in relation to both phylogeny and ecology, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to over 60 other chondrichthyan species, R. typus demonstrated a relatively small brain for its body size (expressed in terms of encephalization quotients and residuals), similar to the lamniforms Carcharodon carcharias, Cetorhinus maximus, and Carcharias taurus. R. typus possessed a relatively small telencephalon with some development of the dorsal pallium, which was suggestive of moderate social behavior, in addition to a relatively large diencephalon and a relatively reduced mesencephalon. The most notable characteristic of the brain of Rhincodon was a large and highly foliated cerebellum, one of the largest cerebellums within the chondrichthyan clade. Early development of the brain was qualitatively assessed using an in situ MRI scan of the brain and chondrocranium of a neonate specimen of R. typus. There was evidence that folding of the cerebellar corpus appeared in early development, although the depth and number of folds might vary ontogenetically in this species. Hierarchical cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling ordinations showed evidence of convergent evolution with the basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, another large-bodied filter feeding elasmobranch, supporting the claim that organization of the brain is more similar in species with analogous but independently evolved lifestyles than those that share taxonomic classification. PMID:19729899

  2. High Resolution Mri Brain Image Segmentation Technique Using Holder Exponent

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ganesh; Palanisamy, V.

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation is a technique to locate certain objects or boundaries within an image. Imagesegmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications. There are many algorithms andtechniques have been developed to solve image segmentation problems. Spectral pattern is not sufficient inhigh resolution image for image segmentation due to variability of spectral and structural information.Thus the spatial pattern or texture techniques are used. Thus the concept of Holder Exponen...

  3. High-Resolution Mapping of Myeloarchitecture In Vivo: Localization of Auditory Areas in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Federico; Moerel, Michelle; Xu, Junqian; van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Ugurbil, Kamil; Goebel, Rainer; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    2015-10-01

    The precise delineation of auditory areas in vivo remains problematic. Histological analysis of postmortem tissue indicates that the relation of areal borders to macroanatomical landmarks is variable across subjects. Furthermore, functional parcellation schemes based on measures of, for example, frequency preference (tonotopy) remain controversial. Here, we propose a 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging method that enables the anatomical delineation of auditory cortical areas in vivo and in individual brains, through the high-resolution visualization (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6 mm(3)) of intracortical anatomical contrast related to myelin. The approach combines the acquisition and analysis of images with multiple MR contrasts (T1, T2*, and proton density). Compared with previous methods, the proposed solution is feasible at high fields and time efficient, which allows collecting myelin-related and functional images within the same measurement session. Our results show that a data-driven analysis of cortical depth-dependent profiles of anatomical contrast allows identifying a most densely myelinated cortical region on the medial Heschl's gyrus. Analyses of functional responses show that this region includes neuronal populations with typical primary functional properties (single tonotopic gradient and narrow frequency tuning), thus indicating that it may correspond to the human homolog of monkey A1. PMID:24994817

  4. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Xi; Xiaojie Lin; Falei Yuan; Guo-Yuan Yang; Jun Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displa...

  5. ACRH Brain Scanner. Comparison Between Sensitivity and Resolution based on a Clinical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argonne Cancer Research Hospital (ACRH) brain scanner uses four collimated detectors arranged in opposing pairs that scan the head concurrently, and yield simultaneous lateral or anterior and posterior photoscans recorded with a data blending system. The high-resolution collimators used in this series have a 7.5-cm focal length, a 1.72-cm diameter of view, and a long depth of field. In an effort to determine whether the detection of focal disease can be improved with better resolution, a series of technetium-99m pertechnetate brain scans of 85 autopsy or surgically proven lesions carried out on the ACRH system was analysed and compared with the results of other workers using a conventional 3-in. scanner. The data showed that no increased detection rate resulted from the high-resolution brain scans. In eight of the cases (10%), however, the superior resolution made it possible to distinguish significant structure within the lesion. This consisted of a central area of diminished uptake (the 'doughnut' sign). Of these eight cases, four were glioblastomas, one was a cystic astrocytoma, two were abscesses, and one was metastatic disease. In one of these cases, the intrinsic structure of the lesion depicted on the scan was the exclusive factor determining the surgical approach to the patient. The high-resolution scan, in general, frequently provides valuable additional information about the precise localization of the lesion in relation to other vital structures (e. g., the relation of a lesion to the sagittal sinus or tentorium) which is of significant benefit in connection with surgical planning. This series suggests that a rational approach to brain scanning with currently available nuclides would be to do a preliminary rapid screening scan with high efficiency and low-resolution collimators. In cases of abnormality, the initial studies should be followed with a high-resolution view centered through the lesion. This would permit the neurosurgeon to utilize all of

  6. Localization and distribution of magnetic chemotherapeutic drugs with magnetic targeting in rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI An-min; ZHANG Chuan-xiu; FU Xiang-ping; ZHANG Zhi-wen; XUE Qing-hui; YAN Run-min; YI Lin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background Magnetic targeting therapy may be a new method for the treatment of malignent tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the localization and distribution of ferrofluid microsphere of human serum albumin methotrexate (FM-HSA-MTX) carriers in the brain and to explore the magnetic targeting chemotherapy for malignant brain tumor. Methods Ninety SD rats were divided into three groups: targeting group, non-magnetic targeting group, and control group. Synthesized FM-HSA-MTX carriers (MTX 25 mg/kg) were injected into the systemic circulation via the caudal vein (magnetic targeting group, n=30). A 0.6 T magnetic field was placed around the right hemisphere. The non-magnetic targeting group (n=30) was administered with FM-HSA-MTX without external magnetic field, meanwhile the control group (n=30) was treated with MTX and a magnetic field. Random serial sacrifices (n=10) were conducted at 15, 30 and 45 minutes after drug administration. Bilateral hemispheres were collected respectively, and analyzed for total MTX content. Results MTX content in the right hemisphere of the magnetic targeting group was significantly higher than that in the other two groups at 15, 30 and 45 minutes after drug administration (P<0.05) No difference was seen between the non-targeting group and control group. In the magnetic targeting group, MTX returned to the peak level [(0.564±0.018) mg/g, q15-45=32.252, P<0.05] 45 minutes after the injection but it deceased in the other two groups [non-magnetic targeting group: (0.060±0.015) mg/g, q15-45=9.245, P<0.05, control group: (0.074±0.045) mg/g, q15-45=6.299, P<0.05]. In the magnetic targeting group, the concentration of MTX in the right hemisphere was significantly higher than that in the left hemisphere (t45min=21.135, P=0.000) but no difference was observed between bilateral hemispheres in the other two groups (non-magnetic targeting group: t45min=0.434, P=0.670; control group: t45min=0.533, P=0.600). Conclusion In

  7. Classification of brain tumor extracts by high resolution ¹H MRS using partial least squares discriminant analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Faria

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H MRS can be used to detect biochemical changes in vitro caused by distinct pathologies. It can reveal distinct metabolic profiles of brain tumors although the accurate analysis and classification of different spectra remains a challenge. In this study, the pattern recognition method partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA was used to classify 11.7 T ¹H MRS spectra of brain tissue extracts from patients with brain tumors into four classes (high-grade neuroglial, low-grade neuroglial, non-neuroglial, and metastasis and a group of control brain tissue. PLS-DA revealed 9 metabolites as the most important in group differentiation: γ-aminobutyric acid, acetoacetate, alanine, creatine, glutamate/glutamine, glycine, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartate, and choline compounds. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that PLS-DA was efficient in group characterization. The metabolic patterns detected can be explained on the basis of previous multimodal studies of tumor metabolism and are consistent with neoplastic cell abnormalities possibly related to high turnover, resistance to apoptosis, osmotic stress and tumor tendency to use alternative energetic pathways such as glycolysis and ketogenesis.

  8. Study of magnetic multilayers by RBS with nanometer resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interface roughness of thermally grown giant magnetoresistance (GMR) multilayers was investigated with nanometer depth scale by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) using a high-resolution magnetic spectrograph. Co/Cu multilayers were prepared by electron beam evaporation under ultra-high vacuum conditions in an MBE system. The samples were measured by RBS under several scattering angles to obtain the concentration depth profiles. Ion beam mixing effects deduced from the experimental data and theoretical models were used to unfold the experimental spectra, giving the initial interface roughness. It is shown that the interface roughness, comparable to the amount of surface roughness, is probably not responsible for the extremely weak GMR effect, found in this type of samples

  9. Fluorescent-protein stabilization and high-resolution imaging of cleared, intact mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Schwarz

    Full Text Available In order to observe and quantify long-range neuronal connections in intact mouse brain by light microscopy, it is first necessary to clear the brain, thus suppressing refractive-index variations. Here we describe a method that clears the brain and preserves the signal from proteinaceous fluorophores using a pH-adjusted non-aqueous index-matching medium. Successful clearing is enabled through the use of either 1-propanol or tert-butanol during dehydration whilst maintaining a basic pH. We show that high-resolution fluorescence imaging of entire, structurally intact juvenile and adult mouse brains is possible at subcellular resolution, even following many months in clearing solution. We also show that axonal long-range projections that are EGFP-labelled by modified Rabies virus can be imaged throughout the brain using a purpose-built light-sheet fluorescence microscope. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, we determined a detailed map of the monosynaptic projections onto a target cell population in the lateral entorhinal cortex. This example demonstrates that our method permits the quantification of whole-brain connectivity patterns at the subcellular level in the uncut brain.

  10. High resolution NMR imaging using a high field yokeless permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the homogeneity and stability of the magnetic field of a high field (about 1.04 tesla) yokeless permanent magnet with 40-mm gap for high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. Homogeneity was evaluated using a 3-dimensional (3D) lattice phantom and 3D spin-echo imaging sequences. In the central sphere (20-mm diameter), peak-to-peak magnetic field inhomogeneity was about 60 ppm, and the root-mean-square was 8 ppm. We measured room temperature, magnet temperature, and NMR frequency of the magnet simultaneously every minute for about 68 hours with and without the thermal insulator of the magnet. A simple mathematical model described the magnet's thermal property. Based on magnet performance, we performed high resolution (up to [20 μm]2) imaging with internal NMR lock sequences of several biological samples. Our results demonstrated the usefulness of the high field small yokeless permanent magnet for high resolution NMR imaging. (author)

  11. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  12. Image characterization by fractal descriptors in variational mode decomposition domain: Application to brain magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The main purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of fractal descriptors estimated in multi-resolution domains to characterize biomedical digital image texture. In this regard, three multi-resolution techniques are considered: the well-known discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and; the newly introduced; variational mode decomposition mode (VMD). The original image is decomposed by the DWT, EMD, and VMD into different scales. Then, Fourier spectrum based fractal descriptors is estimated at specific scales and directions to characterize the image. The support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform supervised classification. The empirical study was applied to the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected with Alzheimer disease (AD). Our results demonstrate that fractal descriptors estimated in VMD domain outperform those estimated in DWT and EMD domains; and also those directly estimated from the original image.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier: When Physics Rises to a Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antònia Busquets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a physical and physiological barrier that protects the brain from toxic substances within the bloodstream and helps maintain brain homeostasis. It also represents the main obstacle in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system. Among the different approaches employed to overcome this barrier, the use of nanoparticles as a tool to enhance delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain is particularly promising. There is special interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles, as their physical characteristics endow them with additional potentially useful properties. Following systemic administration, a magnetic field applied externally can mediate the capacity of magnetic nanoparticles to permeate the blood-brain barrier. Meanwhile, thermal energy released by magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of radiofrequency radiation can modulate blood-brain barrier integrity, increasing its permeability. In this review, we present the strategies that use magnetic nanoparticles, specifically iron oxide nanoparticles, to enhance drug delivery to the brain.

  14. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  15. Anatomical Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Typically Developing Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedd, Jay N.; Lalonde, Francois M.; Celano, Mark J.; White, Samantha L.; Wallace, Gregory L.; Lee, Nancy R.; Lenroot, Rhoshel K.

    2009-01-01

    Methodological issues relevant to magnetic resonance imaging studies of brain anatomy are discussed along with the findings on the neuroanatomic changes during childhood and adolescence. The development of the brain is also discussed.

  16. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10free Linear Discriminant Analysis approach. Biexponential fittings revealed statistically significant increases in the slow diffusion parameters of the model, consistent with a neurocellular swelling response in the fasted hypothalamus. Increased resolution approaches allowed the detection of increases in the diffusion parameters within the Arcuate Nucleus, Ventromedial Nucleus and Dorsomedial Nucleus. Independently, Linear Discriminant Analysis was able to classify successfully the diffusion data sets from mice and humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies. PMID:23000787

  17. Three-dimensional structure of brain tissue at submicrometer resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological objects are composed of submicrometer structures such as cells and organelles that are essential for their functions. Here, we report on three-dimensional X-ray visualization of cells and organelles at resolutions up to 100 nm by imaging microtomography (micro-CT) equipped with Fresnel zone plate optics. Human cerebral tissue, fruit fly cephalic ganglia, and Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with high atomic-number elements were embedded in epoxy resin and subjected to X-ray microtomography at the BL37XU and BL47XU beamlines of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The obtained results indicated that soft tissue structures can be visualized with the imaging microtomography

  18. Three-dimensional structure of brain tissue at submicrometer resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiga, Rino; Mizutani, Ryuta, E-mail: ryuta@tokai-u.jp [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Tokai University, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nakamura, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akio; Osawa, Motoki [Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Arai, Makoto; Oshima, Kenichi; Itokawa, Masanari [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Setagaya, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    Biological objects are composed of submicrometer structures such as cells and organelles that are essential for their functions. Here, we report on three-dimensional X-ray visualization of cells and organelles at resolutions up to 100 nm by imaging microtomography (micro-CT) equipped with Fresnel zone plate optics. Human cerebral tissue, fruit fly cephalic ganglia, and Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with high atomic-number elements were embedded in epoxy resin and subjected to X-ray microtomography at the BL37XU and BL47XU beamlines of the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The obtained results indicated that soft tissue structures can be visualized with the imaging microtomography.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging research progress on brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the recent years, with the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging technology the brain plasticity and functional reorganization are hot topics in the central nervous system imaging studies. Brain functional reorganization and rehabilitation after peripheral nerve injury may have certain regularity. In this paper, the progress of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging technology and its applications in the world wide clinical and experimental researches of the brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury is are reviewed. (authors)

  20. Radiofrequency field inhomogeneity compensation in high spatial resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) is a non-invasive functional technique, whose mathematical framework falls into the category of linear inverse problems. However, its use in medical diagnostics is hampered by two main problems, both linked to the Fourier-based technique usually implemented for spectra reconstruction: poor spatial resolution and severe blurring in the spatial localization of the reconstructed spectra. Moreover, the intrinsic ill-posedness of the MRSI problem might be worsened by (i) spatially dependent distortions of the static magnetic field (B0) distribution, as well as by (ii) inhomogeneity in the power deposition distribution of the radiofrequency magnetic field (B1). Among several alternative methods, slim (Spectral Localization by IMaging) and bslim (B0 compensated slim) are reconstruction algorithms in which a priori information concerning the spectroscopic target is introduced into the reconstruction kernel. Nonetheless, the influence of the B1 field, particularly when its operating wavelength is close to the size of the human organs being studied, continues to be disregarded. starslim (STAtic and Radiofrequency-compensated slim), an evolution of the slim and bslim methods, is therefore proposed, in which the transformation kernel also includes the B1 field inhomogeneity map, thus allowing almost complete 3D modelling of the MRSI problem. Moreover, an original method for the experimental determination of the B1 field inhomogeneity map specific to the target under evaluation is also included. The compensation capabilities of the proposed method have been tested and illustrated using synthetic raw data reproducing the human brain. (paper)

  1. In vivo interactions of magnetic nanoparticles with the blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeted drug delivery to the brain parenchyma, i.e., in brain tumor patients, by means of magnetically supported carrier delivery through the tight vascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier is of critical biomedical importance. We were interested in delineating the first steps in successful brain drug delivery, which focuses on the interactions between magnetically guided yet freely blood circulating nanoparticles and the blood-brain barrier. We employed an in vivo model to quantitatively determine changes in cerebrovascular flow rate and volume during magnetically guided exposure of circulating nanoparticles.

  2. Modular structure of brain functional networks: breaking the resolution limit by Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Carlo; Bifone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The modular organization of brain networks has been widely investigated using graph theoretical approaches. Recently, it has been demonstrated that graph partitioning methods based on the maximization of global fitness functions, like Newman’s Modularity, suffer from a resolution limit, as they fail to detect modules that are smaller than a scale determined by the size of the entire network. Here we explore the effects of this limitation on the study of brain connectivity networks. We demonstrate that the resolution limit prevents detection of important details of the brain modular structure, thus hampering the ability to appreciate differences between networks and to assess the topological roles of nodes. We show that Surprise, a recently proposed fitness function based on probability theory, does not suffer from these limitations. Surprise maximization in brain co-activation and functional connectivity resting state networks reveals the presence of a rich structure of heterogeneously distributed modules, and differences in networks’ partitions that are undetectable by resolution-limited methods. Moreover, Surprise leads to a more accurate identification of the network’s connector hubs, the elements that integrate the brain modules into a cohesive structure.

  3. Base-resolution DNA methylation landscape of zebrafish brain and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Chatterjee

    2014-12-01

    To our knowledge, these datasets are the only RRBS datasets and base-resolution DNA methylation data available at this time for zebrafish brain and liver. These datasets could serve as a resource for future studies to document the functional role of DNA methylation in zebrafish. In addition, these datasets could be used as controls while performing analysis on treated samples.

  4. Grooved multi-pole magnetic gratings for high-resolution positioning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Hao; Tseng, Bin-Hui; Chang, Ching; Wang, Sheng-Ching; Chin, Tsung-Shune; Sung, Cheng-Kuo

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic encoders are much advantageous for precision positioning specifically under harsh environments. The finer the magnetic pole-pitches of the magnetic scale in a magnetic encoder the higher the resolution of the encoder. In this paper, a grooved multi-pole magnetic grating (MPMG) is substituted for conventional non-structured magnetic scale. A MPMG with pole-pitch of 200 µm was prepared by photo-lithography and electro-deposition. Simulation was first done to attain the relationship among magnetic flux density, magnetic properties of electrodeposited alloy layers, magnetizing directions and the grating dimensions. The MPMG can be fully magnetized for use by just a single pulse in a solenoid coil. Magnetic properties were investigated in which CoNiP layers were electrodeposited under various current densities. Measured magnetic flux densities versus grating heights, magnetizing directions and detection gaps on magnetized MPMG validate the applicability of ultra-fine pitched MPMG.

  5. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    This thesis concerns application specific 3D head tracking. The purpose is to improve motion correction in position emission tomography (PET) brain imaging through development of markerless tracking. Currently, motion correction strategies are based on either the PET data itself or tracking devices...... images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution...... of a few millimeters. Stateof- the-art hardware and software solutions are integrated into an operational device. This novel system is tested against a commercial tracking system popular in PET brain imaging. Testing and demonstrations are carried out in clinical settings. A compact markerless...

  6. In vivo H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in investigation of fetus brain metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capabilities of in vivo H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in investigation of the fetal brain metabolism was studied. In vivo H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to in investigate 36 women with single pregnancy

  7. Focusing and targeting of magnetic brain stimulation using multiple coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohonen, J; Ilmoniemi, R J

    1998-05-01

    Neurones can be excited by an externally applied time-varying electromagnetic field. Focused magnetic brain stimulation is attained using multiple small coils instead of one large coil, the resultant induced electric field being a superposition of the fields from each coil. In multichannel magnetic brain stimulation, partial cancellation of fields from individual coils provides a significant improvement in the focusing of the stimulating field, and independent coil channels allow targeting of the stimuli on a given spot without moving the coils. The problem of shaping the stimulating field in multichannel stimulation is analysed, and a method is derived that yields the driving currents required to induce a field with a user-defined shape. The formulation makes use of lead fields and minimum-norm estimation from magneto-encephalography. Using these methods, some properties of multichannel coil arrays are examined. Computer-assisted multichannel stimulation of the cortex will enable several new studies, including quick determination of the cortical regions, the stimulation of which disrupts cortical processing required by a task. PMID:9747568

  8. Viscoelastic properties of the ferret brain measured in vivo at multiple frequencies by magnetic resonance elastography

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Y.; Clayton, E. H.; Chang, Y.; Okamoto, R.J.; Bayly, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the dynamic mechanical behavior of brain tissue is essential for understanding and simulating the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Changes in mechanical properties may also reflect changes in the brain due to aging or disease. In this study, we used magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to measure the viscoelastic properties of ferret brain tissue in vivo. Three-dimensional (3D) displacement fields were acquired during wave propagation in the brain induced by ha...

  9. Exploiting temporal information in functional magnetic resonance imaging brain data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Samaras, Dimitris; Tomasi, Dardo; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Cottone, Lisa; Leskovjan, Andreana; Volkow, Nora; Goldstein, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging(fMRI) has enabled scientists to look into the active human brain, leading to a flood of new data, thus encouraging the development of new data analysis methods. In this paper, we contribute a comprehensive framework for spatial and temporal exploration of fMRI data, and apply it to a challenging case study: separating drug addicted subjects from healthy non-drug-using controls. To our knowledge, this is the first time that learning on fMRI data is performed explicitly on temporal information for classification in such applications. Experimental results demonstrate that, by selecting discriminative features, group classification can be successfully performed on our case study although training data are exceptionally high dimensional, sparse and noisy fMRI sequences. The classification performance can be significantly improved by incorporating temporal information into machine learning. Both statistical and neuroscientific validation of the method's generalization ability are provided. We demonstrate that incorporation of computer science principles into functional neuroimaging clinical studies, facilitates deduction about the behavioral probes from the brain activation data, thus providing a valid tool that incorporates objective brain imaging data into clinical classification of psychopathologies and identification of genetic vulnerabilities. PMID:16685905

  10. Visible rodent brain-wide networks at single-neuron resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eYuan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There are some unsolvable fundamental questions, such as cell type classification, neural circuit tracing and neurovascular coupling, though great progresses are being made in neuroscience. Because of the structural features of neurons and neural circuits, the solution of these questions needs us to break through the current technology of neuroanatomy for acquiring the exactly fine morphology of neuron and vessels and tracing long-distant circuit at axonal resolution in the whole brain of mammals. Combined with fast-developing labeling techniques, efficient whole-brain optical imaging technology emerging at the right moment presents a huge potential in the structure and function research of specific-function neuron and neural circuit. In this review, we summarize brain-wide optical tomography techniques, review the progress on visible brain neuronal/vascular networks benefit from these novel techniques, and prospect the future technical development.

  11. Super resolution imaging of genetically labelled synapses in Drosophila brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Ayumi Spühler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding synaptic connectivity and plasticity within brain circuits and their relationship to learning and behavior is a fundamental quest in neuroscience. Visualizing the fine details of synapses using optical microscopy remains however a major technical challenge. Super resolution microscopy opens the possibility to reveal molecular features of synapses beyond the diffraction limit. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, we image synaptic proteins in the brain tissue of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Super resolution imaging of brain tissue harbors difficulties due to light scattering and the density of signals. In order to reduce out of focus signal, we take advantage of the genetic tools available in the Drosophila and have fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins expressed in only a small number of neurons. These neurons form synapses within the calyx of the mushroom body, a distinct brain region involved in associative memory formation. Our results show that super resolution microscopy, in combination with genetically labelled synaptic proteins, is a powerful tool to investigate synapses in a quantitative fashion providing an entry point for studies on synaptic plasticity during learning and memory formation

  12. 25 T high resolution NMR magnet program and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, W.D.; Dixon, I.R.; Eyssa, Y.M.; Schwartz, J.; Swenson, C.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The program at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory for the design and development of 1 GHz class NMR magnets is described. The parameters are given for a 1.066 GHz magnet incorporating an HTS inner coil. The design of the related wide bore 900 MHz conventional superconductor magnet is described. Aspects of the technology development program supporting these designs are presented.

  13. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEGylated PAMAM conjugated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles (PEGylated PFMSNs) have been synthesized for evaluating their ability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and distribution in rat brain. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA), zeta potential (ζ-potential) titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BBB penetration and distribution of PEGylated PFMSNs and FMSNs in rat brain were investigated not only at the cellular level with Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but also at the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results provide direct evidents that PEGylated PFMSNs could penetrate the BBB and spread into the brain parenchyma.

  14. Brain magnetic resonance findings in infective endocarditis with neurological complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosing infective endocarditis and its complications can be difficult because of the nonspecific symptoms. We reviewed findings of intracranial abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 14 patients with neurological complications and herein discuss the overall intracranial MRI findings. We retrospectively reviewed patients with infective endocarditis from August 2004 to August 2006. Brain MRI, the causative bacteria, and abnormal neurological symptoms were reviewed for 14 patients with neurological complications. Of the 14 patients, 13 showed intracranial abnormalities on MRI. Embolization was seen in 10 patients, hemorrhage in 3, abscess formation in 3, and encephalitis in 2. Hyperintense lesions with a central hypointense area on T2-weighted and/or T2*-weighted imaging (Bull's-eye-like lesion) were seen in four patients. A combination of these intracranial abnormalities was observed in 6 patients. The MRI findings associated with infective endocarditis are wide-ranging: embolization, hemorrhage, meningitis, cerebritis, abscess, the bull's-eye-like lesion. Clinicians should consider the possibility of infective endocarditis in patients with unknown fever and neurological abnormality. Brain MRI should be promptly performed for those patients, and T2*-weighted imaging is recommended for an early diagnosis of infective endocarditis. (author)

  15. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C13-enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C13-labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C13-enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C13 spin pairs. (author)

  16. Super resolution imaging of genetically labeled synapses in drosophila brain tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Spühler, Isabelle A.; Conley, Gaurasundar M.; Scheffold, Frank; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding synaptic connectivity and plasticity within brain circuits and their relationship to learning and behavior is a fundamental quest in neuroscience. Visualizing the fine details of synapses using optical microscopy remains however a major technical challenge. Super resolution microscopy opens the possibility to reveal molecular features of synapses beyond the diffraction limit. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, we image synaptic proteins in the...

  17. High resolution paraventricular nucleus serial section model constructed within a traditional rat brain atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Donna M.; Larry W Swanson

    2008-01-01

    As a starting point for constructing a high resolution, resliceable computer graphics model for the extraction, quantitative analysis, display, and modeling of neuroanatomical data the outer border and the boundaries of inner divisions and parts of the paraventricular nucleus have been drawn for all 39 serial histological sections prepared for a published reference atlas of the rat brain. This careful parceling revealed three new features of paraventricular nucleus topography: the full rostra...

  18. High Resolution Mapping of Modafinil Induced Changes in Glutamate Level in Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Haris, Mohammad; Singh, Anup; Cai, Kejia; Nath, Kavindra; Verma, Gaurav; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Hariharan, Hari; Detre, John A.; Epperson, Neill; Reddy, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Modafinil is marketed in the United States for the treatment of narcolepsy and daytime somnolence due to shift-work or sleep apnea. Investigations of this drug in the treatment of cocaine and nicotine dependence in addition to disorders of executive function are also underway. Modafinil has been known to increase glutamate levels in rat brain models. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) has been commonly used to detect the glutamate (Glu) changes in vivo. In this study, we used a re...

  19. A Magnetic Resonance Image Based Atlas of the Rabbit Brain for Automatic Parcellation

    OpenAIRE

    Emma Muñoz-Moreno; Ariadna Arbat-Plana; Dafnis Batalle; Guadalupe Soria; Miriam Illa; Alberto Prats-Galino; Elisenda Eixarch; Eduard Gratacos

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit brain has been used in several works for the analysis of neurodevelopment. However, there are not specific digital rabbit brain atlases that allow an automatic identification of brain regions, which is a crucial step for various neuroimage analyses, and, instead, manual delineation of areas of interest must be performed in order to evaluate a specific structure. For this reason, we propose an atlas of the rabbit brain based on magnetic resonance imaging, including both structural and d...

  20. Mapping function in the human brain with magnetoencephalography, anatomical magnetic resonance imaging, and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J S; Aine, C J; Mosher, J C; Schmidt, D M; Ranken, D M; Schlitt, H A; Wood, C C; Lewine, J D; Sanders, J A; Belliveau, J W

    1995-09-01

    Integrated analyses of human anatomical and functional measurements offer a powerful paradigm for human brain mapping. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and EEG provide excellent temporal resolution of neural population dynamics as well as capabilities for source localization. Anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides excellent spatial resolution of head and brain anatomy, whereas functional MRI (fMRI) techniques provide an alternative measure of neural activation based on associated hemodynamic changes. These methodologies constrain and complement each other and can thereby improve our interpretation of functional neural organization. We have developed a number of computational tools and techniques for the visualization, comparison, and integrated analysis of multiple neuroimaging techniques. Construction of geometric anatomical models from volumetric MRI data allows improved models of the head volume conductor and can provide powerful constraints for neural electromagnetic source modeling. These approaches, coupled to enhanced algorithmic strategies for the inverse problem, can significantly enhance the accuracy of source-localization procedures. We have begun to apply these techniques for studies of the functional organization of the human visual system. Such studies have demonstrated multiple, functionally distinct visual areas that can be resolved on the basis of their locations, temporal dynamics, and differential sensitivity to stimulus parameters. Our studies have also produced evidence of internal retinotopic organization in both striate and extrastriate visual areas but have disclosed organizational departures from classical models. Comparative studies of MEG and fMRI suggest a reasonable but imperfect correlation between electrophysiological and hemodynamic responses. We have demonstrated a method for the integrated analysis of fMRI and MEG, and we outline strategies for improvement of these methods. By combining multiple measurement techniques, we

  1. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  2. Torsional resonance mode magnetic force microscopy: enabling higher lateral resolution magnetic imaging without topography-related effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present experimental work that reveals the benefits of performing magnetic force microscopy measurements employing the torsional resonance mode of cantilever oscillation. This approach provides two clear advantages: the ability of performing magnetic imaging without topography-related interference and the significant lateral resolution improvement (approximately 15%). We believe that this work demonstrates a significant improvement to a versatile magnetic imaging technique widely used in academia and in industry. (paper)

  3. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging After High-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Childhood Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Brain necrosis or other subacute iatrogenic reactions has been recognized as a potential complication of radiotherapy (RT), although the possible synergistic effects of high-dose chemotherapy and RT might have been underestimated. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the clinical and radiologic data of 49 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with high-dose thiotepa and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue, preceded or followed by RT. The patients were assessed for neurocognitive tests to identify any correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anomalies. Results: Of the 49 children, 18 (6 of 25 with high-grade gliomas and 12 of 24 with primitive neuroectodermal tumors) had abnormal brain MRI findings occurring a median of 8 months (range, 2-39 months) after RT and beginning to regress a median of 13 months (range, 2-26 months) after onset. The most common lesion pattern involved multiple pseudonodular, millimeter-size, T1-weighted unevenly enhancing, and T2-weighted hyperintense foci. Four patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors also had subdural fluid leaks, with meningeal enhancement over the effusion. One-half of the patients had symptoms relating to the new radiographic findings. The MRI lesion-free survival rate was 74% ± 6% at 1 year and 57% ± 8% at 2 years. The number of marrow ablative courses correlated significantly to the incidence of radiographic anomalies. No significant difference was found in intelligent quotient scores between children with and without radiographic changes. Conclusion: Multiple enhancing cerebral lesions were frequently seen on MRI scans soon after high-dose chemotherapy and RT. Such findings pose a major diagnostic challenge in terms of their differential diagnosis vis-a-vis recurrent tumor. Their correlation with neurocognitive results deserves further investigation

  4. Grid Computing Application for Brain Magnetic Resonance Image Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work emphasizes the use of grid computing and web technology for automatic post-processing of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) in the context of neuropsychiatric (Alzheimer's disease) research. Post-acquisition image processing is achieved through the interconnection of several individual processes into pipelines. Each process has input and output data ports, options and execution parameters, and performs single tasks such as: a) extracting individual image attributes (e.g. dimensions, orientation, center of mass), b) performing image transformations (e.g. scaling, rotation, skewing, intensity standardization, linear and non-linear registration), c) performing image statistical analyses, and d) producing the necessary quality control images and/or files for user review. The pipelines are built to perform specific sequences of tasks on the alphanumeric data and MRIs contained in our database. The web application is coded in PHP and allows the creation of scripts to create, store and execute pipelines and their instances either on our local cluster or on high-performance computing platforms. To run an instance on an external cluster, the web application opens a communication tunnel through which it copies the necessary files, submits the execution commands and collects the results. We present result on system tests for the processing of a set of 821 brain MRIs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study via a nonlinear registration pipeline composed of 10 processes. Our results show successful execution on both local and external clusters, and a 4-fold increase in performance if using the external cluster. However, the latter's performance does not scale linearly as queue waiting times and execution overhead increase with the number of tasks to be executed.

  5. Grid Computing Application for Brain Magnetic Resonance Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, F.; Crépeault, B.; Duchesne, S.

    2012-02-01

    This work emphasizes the use of grid computing and web technology for automatic post-processing of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) in the context of neuropsychiatric (Alzheimer's disease) research. Post-acquisition image processing is achieved through the interconnection of several individual processes into pipelines. Each process has input and output data ports, options and execution parameters, and performs single tasks such as: a) extracting individual image attributes (e.g. dimensions, orientation, center of mass), b) performing image transformations (e.g. scaling, rotation, skewing, intensity standardization, linear and non-linear registration), c) performing image statistical analyses, and d) producing the necessary quality control images and/or files for user review. The pipelines are built to perform specific sequences of tasks on the alphanumeric data and MRIs contained in our database. The web application is coded in PHP and allows the creation of scripts to create, store and execute pipelines and their instances either on our local cluster or on high-performance computing platforms. To run an instance on an external cluster, the web application opens a communication tunnel through which it copies the necessary files, submits the execution commands and collects the results. We present result on system tests for the processing of a set of 821 brain MRIs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study via a nonlinear registration pipeline composed of 10 processes. Our results show successful execution on both local and external clusters, and a 4-fold increase in performance if using the external cluster. However, the latter's performance does not scale linearly as queue waiting times and execution overhead increase with the number of tasks to be executed.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance im-aging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance imaging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  8. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges in neuropsychiatric lupus: association with cerebritis in magnetic resonance imaging and resolution after intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K-S; Cheong, K-L; Tan, C-T

    2010-05-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a known diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus presented with seizures and psychosis. An electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed continuous, non-evolving periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) in the left temporal region, which did not resolve with benzodiazepine. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan demonstrated a focal hyperintensity in the left medial temporal and left occipital lobes, left thalamus and bilateral cerebellar white matter, with evidence of vasculitis in the magnetic resonance angiography. Intravenous immunoglobulin was given because of failed steroid therapy, which resulted in a full resolution of clinical, EEG and MRI abnormalities. Lupus cerebritis should be considered as a possible aetiology in PLEDs, and immunoglobulin can be effective in neuropsychiatric lupus. PMID:20133346

  9. Triangulating the sexually dimorphic brain through high-resolution neuroimaging of murine sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raznahan, Armin; Lue, YanHe; Probst, Frank; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay; Wang, Christina; Lerch, Jason; Swerdloff, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Murine sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) provide powerful models for charting sex chromosome influences on mammalian brain development. Here, building on prior work in X-monosomic (XO) mice, we use spatially non-biased high-resolution imaging to compare and contrast neuroanatomical alterations in XXY and XO mice relative to their wild-type XX and XY littermates. First, we show that carriage of a supernumerary X chromosome in XXY males (1) does not prevent normative volumetric masculinization of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and medial amygdala, but (2) causes distributed anatomical alterations relative to XY males, which show a statistically unexpected tendency to be co-localized with and reciprocal to XO-XX differences in anatomy. These overlaps identify the lateral septum, BNST, ventral group thalamic nuclei and periaqueductal gray matter as regions with replicable sensitivity to X chromosome dose across two SCAs. We then harness anatomical variation across all four karyotype groups in our study--XO, XX, XY and XXY--to create an agnostic data-driven segmentation of the mouse brain into five distributed clusters which (1) recover fundamental properties of brain organization with high spatial precision, (2) define two previously uncharacterized systems of relative volume excess in females vs. males ("forebrain cholinergic" and "cerebelo-pontine-thalamo-cortical"), and (3) adopt stereotyped spatial motifs which delineate ordered gradients of sex chromosome and gonadal influences on volumetric brain development. Taken together, these data provide a new framework for the study of sexually dimorphic influences on brain development in health and disrupted brain development in SCA. PMID:25146308

  10. Triangulating the sexually dimorphic brain through high-resolution neuroimaging of murine sex chromosome aneuploidies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, YanHe; Probst, Frank; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay; Wang, Christina; Lerch, Jason; Swerdloff, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Murine sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) provide powerful models for charting sex chromosome influences on mammalian brain development. Here, building on prior work in X-monosomic (XO) mice, we use spatially non-biased high-resolution imaging to compare and contrast neuroanatomical alterations in XXY and XO mice relative to their wild-type XX and XY littermates. First, we show that carriage of a supernumerary X chromosome in XXY males (1) does not prevent normative volumetric masculinization of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and medial amygdala, but (2) causes distributed anatomical alterations relative to XY males, which show a statistically unexpected tendency to be colocalized with and reciprocal to XO-XX differences in anatomy. These overlaps identify the lateral septum, BNST, ventral group thalamic nuclei and periaqueductal gray matter as regions with replicable sensitivity to X chromosome dose across two SCAs. We then harness anatomical variation across all four karyotype groups in our study—XO, XX, XY and XXY—to create an agnostic data-driven segmentation of the mouse brain into five distributed clusters which (1) recover fundamental properties of brain organization with high spatial precision, (2) define two previously uncharacterized systems of relative volume excess in females vs. males (“forebrain cholinergic” and “cerebelo-pontine-thalamo-cortical”), and (3) adopt stereotyped spatial motifs which delineate ordered gradients of sex chromosome and gonadal influences on volumetric brain development. Taken together, these data provide a new framework for the study of sexually dimorphic influences on brain development in health and disrupted brain development in SCA. PMID:25146308

  11. On Asymmetry of Magnetic Helicity in Emerging Active Regions: High Resolution Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Lirong; Démoulin, Pascal; Alexander, David; Zhu, Chunming

    2011-01-01

    We employ the DAVE (differential affine velocity estimator, Schuck 2005; 2006) tracking technique on a time series of MDI/1m high spatial resolution line- of-sight magnetograms to measure the photospheric flow velocity for three newly emerging bipolar active regions. We separately calculate the magnetic helicity injection rate of the leading and following polarities to confirm or refute the magnetic helicity asymmetry, found by Tian & Alexander (2009) using MDI/96m low spatial resolution magn...

  12. Magnetic resonance monitoring of focused ultrasound/magnetic nanoparticle targeting delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chu, Po-Chun; Wu, Jia-Shin; Tseng, I-Chou; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The superparamagnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) allow them to be guided by an externally positioned magnet and also provide contrast for MRI. However, their therapeutic use in treating CNS pathologies in vivo is limited by insufficient local accumulation and retention resulting from their inability to traverse biological barriers. The combined use of focused ultrasound and magnetic targeting synergistically delivers therapeutic MNPs across the blood–brain barrier to enter th...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, H.; Sakai, F.; Kan, S.; Okada, J.; Tazaki, Y. (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was studied in 91 patients with migraine and in 98 controls. Risk factors known to cause MRI lesions were carefully examined. In 36 patients with migraine (39.6%), small foci of high intensity on T{sub 2}-weighted and proton-density-weighted images were seen in the white matter. Of patients with migraine who were less than 40 years old and without any risk factor, 29.4% showed lesions on MRI; this was singificantly higher than the 11.2% for the group of age-matched controls (n=98). The lesions were distributed predominantly in the centrum semiovale and frontal white matter in young patients, but extended to the deeper white matter at the level of basal ganglia in the older age group. The side of the MRI lesions did not always correspond to the side of usual aura or headache. Migraine-related variables such as type of migraine, frequency, duration or intensity of headache or consumption of ergotamine showed no significant correlation with the incidence om MRI abnormalities. The data indicated that migraine may be associated with early pathologic changes in the brain. 26 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was studied in 91 patients with migraine and in 98 controls. Risk factors known to cause MRI lesions were carefully examined. In 36 patients with migraine (39.6%), small foci of high intensity on T2-weighted and proton-density-weighted images were seen in the white matter. Of patients with migraine who were less than 40 years old and without any risk factor, 29.4% showed lesions on MRI; this was singificantly higher than the 11.2% for the group of age-matched controls (n=98). The lesions were distributed predominantly in the centrum semiovale and frontal white matter in young patients, but extended to the deeper white matter at the level of basal ganglia in the older age group. The side of the MRI lesions did not always correspond to the side of usual aura or headache. Migraine-related variables such as type of migraine, frequency, duration or intensity of headache or consumption of ergotamine showed no significant correlation with the incidence om MRI abnormalities. The data indicated that migraine may be associated with early pathologic changes in the brain. 26 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  16. Wada-test, functional magnetic resonance imaging and direct electrical stimulation - brain mapping methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern neurosurgery requires accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization of brain pathologies but also of brain functions. The presence of individual variations in healthy subjects and the shift of brain functions in brain diseases provoke the introduction of various methods for brain mapping. The aim of this paper was to analyze the most widespread methods for brain mapping: Wada-test, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES). This study included 4 patients with preoperative brain mapping using Wada-test and fMRI. Intraoperative mapping with DES during awake craniotomy was performed in one case. The histopathological diagnosis was low-grade glioma in 2 cases, cortical dysplasia (1 patient) and arteriovenous malformation (1 patient). The brain mapping permits total lesion resection in three of four patients. There was no new postoperative deficit despite surgery near or within functional brain areas. Brain plasticity provoking shift of eloquent areas from their usual locations was observed in two cases. The brain mapping methods allow surgery in eloquent brain areas recognized in the past as 'forbidden areas'. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. The precise location of brain functions and pathologies frequently requires combination of different brain mapping methods. (authors)

  17. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during carbohydrate ingestion suggest that glucose may regulate HT signaling but are potentially confoun...

  18. High Resolution Marine Magnetic Survey of Shallow Water Littoral Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Sharvit

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a system developed for detection andaccurate mapping of ferro-metallic objects buried below the seabed in shallow waters. Thesystem comprises a precise magnetic gradiometer and navigation subsystem, both installedon a non-magnetic catamaran towed by a low-magnetic interfering boat. In addition wepresent the results of a marine survey of a near-shore area in the vicinity of Atlit, a townsituated on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about 15 km south of Haifa. The primarypurpose of the survey was to search for a Harvard airplane that crashed into the sea in 1960.A magnetic map of the survey area (3.5 km2 on a 0.5 m grid was created revealing theanomalies at sub-meter accuracy. For each investigated target location a correspondingferro-metallic item was dug out, one of which turned to be very similar to a part of thecrashed airplane. The accuracy of location was confirmed by matching the position of theactual dug artifacts with the magnetic map within a range of ± 1 m, in a water depth of 9 m.

  19. Multiclass imbalance learning:Improving classification of pediatric brain tumors from magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Wilson, Martin P; Gill, Simrandip K.; Manias, Karen A; Davies, Nigel P; Peet, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Classification of pediatric brain tumors from (1) H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can aid diagnosis and management of brain tumors. However, varied incidence of the different tumor types leads to imbalanced class sizes and introduces difficulties in classifying rare tumor groups. This study assessed different imbalanced multiclass learning techniques and compared the use of complete spectra and quantified metabolite profiles for classification of three main childhood brain tu...

  20. Admission criteria to the Danish Brain Cancer Program are moderately associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Mie Kiszka; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year. The...

  1. Optimal Magnetic Field for Crossing Super-Para-Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Brain Blood Barrier: A Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysam Z. Pedram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper scrutinizes the magnetic field effect to deliver the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs through the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. Herein we study the interaction between the nanoparticle (NP and BBB membrane using Molecular Dynamic (MD techniques. The MD model is used to enhance our understanding of the dynamic behavior of SPMNs crossing the endothelial cells in the presence of a gradient magnetic field. Actuation of NPs under weak magnetic field offers the great advantage of a non-invasive drug delivery without the risk of causing injury to the brain. Furthermore, a weak magnetic portable stimulator can be developed using low complexity prototyping techniques. Based on MD simulation results in this paper, SPMNs can cross the cell membrane while experiencing very weak mechanical forces in the range of pN. This study also derives guidelines for the design of the SPMNs dedicated to crossing the BBB using external magnetic fields.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism ...

  3. Design of a scanning Josephson junction microscope for submicron-resolution magnetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a magnetic field scanning instrument designed to extend the spatial resolution of scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy into the submicron regime. This instrument, the scanning Josephson junction microscope, scans a single Josephson junction across the surface of a sample, detecting the local magnetic field by the modulation of the junction critical current. By using a submicron junction and a scanning tunneling microscope feedback system to maintain close proximity to the surface, magnetic field sensitivity of 10 μG with a spatial resolution of 0.3 μm should be attainable, opening up new opportunities for imaging vortex configurations and core structure in superconductors and magnetic domains in magnetic materials. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  4. Magnetic resonance images of the brain of a dwarf sperm whale (Kogia simus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, L; Sudheimer, K; Pabst, D A; McLellan, W A; Johnson, J I

    2003-07-01

    Cetacean (dolphin, whale and porpoise) brains are among the least studied mammalian brains because of the difficulty of collecting and histologically preparing such relatively rare and large specimens. Among cetaceans, there exist relatively few studies of the brain of the dwarf sperm whale (Kogia simus). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a means of observing the internal structure of the brain when traditional histological procedures are not practical. Therefore, MRI has become a critical tool in the study of the brain of cetaceans and other large species. This paper represents the first MRI-based anatomically labelled three-dimensional description of the dwarf sperm whale brain. Coronal plane sections of the brain of a sub-adult dwarf sperm whale were originally acquired and used to produce virtual digital scans in the other two orthogonal spatial planes. A sequential set of images in all three planes has been anatomically labelled and displays the proportions and positions of major neuroanatomical features. PMID:12892406

  5. Providing and optimizing functional MR (Magnetic Resonance) of motor cortex of human brain by MRI ( Magnetic Resonance Imaging) facilities of Imam Khomeinie Hospital

    CERN Document Server

    Khosravie, H R

    2000-01-01

    During the stimulation, an observable increased signal (%2-%5)in respective sensory-motor cortex was obtained after correcting for partial volume effects, optimizing S/N,and incorporating small vowels. The 2 D F A S T functional image obtained by this method, showed an anatomical association of the increased signal with gray matter of sensory-motor cortex(in T 1 weighted image). The resultant data showed the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging using optimized gradient echo sequences on a standard 1.5 T imager. Display of human brain cortical activity is accomplished using various techniques, by them different spatial and temporal resolution may be obtained. F MRI technique with proper spatial and temporal resolution due to its noninvasivity is one of the promising techniques for detection of brain activities. This can be used as an important tool by neurologists, since a great development has been achieved for display different brain function. This thesis report the results of simulation effe...

  6. In vivo 3D digital atlas database of the adult C57BL/6J mouse brain by magnetic resonance microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ma

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D digital atlas of the live mouse brain based on magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM is presented. C57BL/6J adult mouse brains were imaged in vivo on a 9.4 Tesla MR instrument at an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 μm. With sufficient signal-to-noise (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, 20 brain regions were identified. Several atlases were constructed including 12 individual brain atlases, an average atlas, a probabilistic atlas and average geometrical deformation maps. We also investigated the feasibility of using lower spatial resolution images to improve time efficiency for future morphological phenotyping. All of the new in vivo data were compared to previous published in vitro C57BL/6J mouse brain atlases and the morphological differences were characterized. Our analyses revealed significant volumetric as well as unexpected geometrical differences between the in vivo and in vitro brain groups which in some instances were predictable (e.g. collapsed and smaller ventricles in vitro but not in other instances. Based on these findings we conclude that although in vitro datasets, compared to in vivo images, offer higher spatial resolutions, superior SNR and CNR, leading to improved image segmentation, in vivo atlases are likely to be an overall better geometric match for in vivo studies, which are necessary for longitudinal examinations of the same animals and for functional brain activation studies. Thus the new in vivo mouse brain atlas dataset presented here is a valuable complement to the current mouse brain atlas collection and will be accessible to the neuroscience community on our public domain mouse brain atlas website.

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Max M.; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Daniel B. Carr; Ayache, Samar S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, pr...

  8. Advanced techniques in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in children with ADHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastura, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.pastura@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Pediatria; Mattos, Paulo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Psiquiatria; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Radiologia; Araujo, Alexandra Prufer de Queiroz Campos [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagao Gesteira. Dept. de Neuropediatria

    2011-04-15

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects about 5% of school-aged child. Previous published works using different techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have demonstrated that there may be some differences between the brain of people with and without this condition. This review aims at providing neurologists, pediatricians and psychiatrists an update on the differences between the brain of children with and without ADHD using advanced techniques of magnetic resonance imaging such as diffusion tensor imaging, brain volumetry and cortical thickness, spectroscopy and functional MRI. Data was obtained by a comprehensive, non-systematic review of medical literature. The regions with a greater number of abnormalities are splenium of the corpus callosum, cingulated gyrus, caudate nucleus, cerebellum, striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. The brain regions where abnormalities are observed in studies of diffusion tensor, volumetry, spectroscopy and cortical thickness are the same involved in neurobiological theories of ADHD coming from studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  9. Advanced techniques in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in children with ADHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects about 5% of school-aged child. Previous published works using different techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have demonstrated that there may be some differences between the brain of people with and without this condition. This review aims at providing neurologists, pediatricians and psychiatrists an update on the differences between the brain of children with and without ADHD using advanced techniques of magnetic resonance imaging such as diffusion tensor imaging, brain volumetry and cortical thickness, spectroscopy and functional MRI. Data was obtained by a comprehensive, non-systematic review of medical literature. The regions with a greater number of abnormalities are splenium of the corpus callosum, cingulated gyrus, caudate nucleus, cerebellum, striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. The brain regions where abnormalities are observed in studies of diffusion tensor, volumetry, spectroscopy and cortical thickness are the same involved in neurobiological theories of ADHD coming from studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  10. Neural stem cells harvested from live brains by antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, C N P; Tsui, Y P; Ho, A S L; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Wu, C T; Li, H W; Tsang, S C Edman; Yung, K K L

    2013-11-18

    It stems from the magnetism: The extraction of stem/progenitor cells from the brain of live animals is possible using antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs). The Ab-MNPs are introduced to a rat's brain with a superfine micro-syringe. The stem cells attach to the Ab-MNPs and are magnetically isolated and removed. They can develop into neurospheres and differentiate into different types of cells outside the subject body. The rat remains alive and healthy. PMID:24108547

  11. A hybrid CPU-GPU accelerated framework for fast mapping of high-resolution human brain connectome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    Full Text Available Recently, a combination of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques and graph theoretical approaches has provided a unique opportunity for understanding the patterns of the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain (referred to as the human brain connectome. Currently, there is a very large amount of brain imaging data that have been collected, and there are very high requirements for the computational capabilities that are used in high-resolution connectome research. In this paper, we propose a hybrid CPU-GPU framework to accelerate the computation of the human brain connectome. We applied this framework to a publicly available resting-state functional MRI dataset from 197 participants. For each subject, we first computed Pearson's Correlation coefficient between any pairs of the time series of gray-matter voxels, and then we constructed unweighted undirected brain networks with 58 k nodes and a sparsity range from 0.02% to 0.17%. Next, graphic properties of the functional brain networks were quantified, analyzed and compared with those of 15 corresponding random networks. With our proposed accelerating framework, the above process for each network cost 80∼150 minutes, depending on the network sparsity. Further analyses revealed that high-resolution functional brain networks have efficient small-world properties, significant modular structure, a power law degree distribution and highly connected nodes in the medial frontal and parietal cortical regions. These results are largely compatible with previous human brain network studies. Taken together, our proposed framework can substantially enhance the applicability and efficacy of high-resolution (voxel-based brain network analysis, and have the potential to accelerate the mapping of the human brain connectome in normal and disease states.

  12. Reversible lesions in the brain parenchyma in Wilson’s disease conifrmed by magnetic resonance imaging:earlier administration of chelating therapy can reduce the damage to the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duko B Kozi; Igor Petrovi; Marina Svetel; Tatjana Pekmezovi; Aleksandar Ragaji; Vladimir S Kosti

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resolution of brain lesions in patients with Wilson’s disease during the long-term chelating therapy using magnetic resonance imaging and a possible signiifcance of the time latency between the initial symptoms of the disease and the introduction of this therapy. Initial magnetic resonance examination was performed in 37 patients with proven neurological form of Wilson’s disease with cerebellar, parkinsonian and dystonic presentation. Magnetic resonance reexamination was done 5.7 ± 1.3 years later in 14 patients. Patients were divided into: group A, where chelating therapy was initiated < 24 months from the ifrst symp-toms and group B, where the therapy started≥ 24 months after the initial symptoms. Symmetry of the lesions was seen in 100% of patients. There was a signiifcant difference between groups A and B regarding complete resolution of brain stem and putaminal lesions (P= 0.005 andP=0.024, respectively). If the correct diagnosis and adequate treatment are not established less than 24 months after onset of the symptoms, irreversible lesions in the brain parenchyma could be ex-pected. Signal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging might therefore, at least in the early stages, represent reversible myelinolisis or cytotoxic edema associated with copper toxicity.

  13. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions. PMID:27044994

  14. Optimized magnetic resonance diffusion protocol for ex-vivo whole human brain imaging with a clinical scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Stamm, Aymeric; Singh, Jolene; Warfield, Simon K.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) provides a novel insight into the brain to facilitate our understanding of the brain connectivity and microstructure. While in-vivo DW-MRI enables imaging of living patients and longitudinal studies of brain changes, post-mortem ex-vivo DW-MRI has numerous advantages. Ex-vivo imaging benefits from greater resolution and sensitivity due to the lack of imaging time constraints; the use of tighter fitting coils; and the lack of movement artifacts. This allows characterization of normal and abnormal tissues with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity, facilitating our ability to investigate anatomical structures that are inaccessible in-vivo. This also offers the opportunity to develop today novel imaging biomarkers that will, with tomorrow's MR technology, enable improved in-vivo assessment of the risk of disease in an individual. Post-mortem studies, however, generally rely on the fixation of specimen to inhibit tissue decay which starts as soon as tissue is deprived from its blood supply. Unfortunately, fixation of tissues substantially alters tissue diffusivity profiles. In addition, ex-vivo DW-MRI requires particular care when packaging the specimen because the presence of microscopic air bubbles gives rise to geometric and intensity image distortion. In this work, we considered the specific requirements of post-mortem imaging and designed an optimized protocol for ex-vivo whole brain DW-MRI using a human clinical 3T scanner. Human clinical 3T scanners are available to a large number of researchers and, unlike most animal scanners, have a bore diameter large enough to image a whole human brain. Our optimized protocol will facilitate widespread ex-vivo investigations of large specimen.

  15. An alternative 3D inversion method for magnetic anomalies with depth resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chiappini

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method to invert magnetic anomaly data in a variety of non-complex contexts when a priori information about the sources is not available. The region containing magnetic sources is discretized into a set of homogeneously magnetized rectangular prisms, polarized along a common direction. The magnetization distribution is calculated by solving an underdetermined linear system, and is accomplished through the simultaneous minimization of the norm of the solution and the misfit between the observed and the calculated field. Our algorithm makes use of a dipolar approximation to compute the magnetic field of the rectangular blocks. We show how this approximation, in conjunction with other correction factors, presents numerous advantages in terms of computing speed and depth resolution, and does not affect significantly the success of the inversion. The algorithm is tested on both synthetic and real magnetic datasets.

  16. Development of a high resolution alpha spectrometer using a magnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a high resolution alpha spectrometer with a magnetic calorimeter. The operating principle of the detector is the calorimetric measurement of the temperature increase from particle absorption in a gold foil absorber at milli-Kelvin temperatures. A magnetic calorimeter made of gold doped with erbium on a superconducting meander pickup coil was used to accurately measure the temperature change, thereby acting as an ultra-sensitive thermometer. The detector demonstrated 1.2 keV FWHM equivalent resolution in alpha particle detection with an 241Am source. Many peaks were observed in the low-energy region from the absorption of low-energy X-rays, gamma rays, and conversion electrons. An energy resolution of 400 eV FWHM was achieved for 60 keV gamma rays that were measured with the alpha particles. Possible applications of such high resolution detectors are discussed

  17. Development of a high resolution alpha spectrometer using a magnetic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, W.S. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, C.S. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.R., E-mail: yhkim@kriss.re.kr [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.B. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.J. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M.K.; Lee, J.H. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); So, J.H. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.H. [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a high resolution alpha spectrometer with a magnetic calorimeter. The operating principle of the detector is the calorimetric measurement of the temperature increase from particle absorption in a gold foil absorber at milli-Kelvin temperatures. A magnetic calorimeter made of gold doped with erbium on a superconducting meander pickup coil was used to accurately measure the temperature change, thereby acting as an ultra-sensitive thermometer. The detector demonstrated 1.2 keV FWHM equivalent resolution in alpha particle detection with an {sup 241}Am source. Many peaks were observed in the low-energy region from the absorption of low-energy X-rays, gamma rays, and conversion electrons. An energy resolution of 400 eV FWHM was achieved for 60 keV gamma rays that were measured with the alpha particles. Possible applications of such high resolution detectors are discussed.

  18. Development of a high resolution alpha spectrometer using a magnetic calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, W. S.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, S. R.; Kim, G. B.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, J. H.; So, J. H.; Kim, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a high resolution alpha spectrometer with a magnetic calorimeter. The operating principle of the detector is the calorimetric measurement of the temperature increase from particle absorption in a gold foil absorber at milli-Kelvin temperatures. A magnetic calorimeter made of gold doped with erbium on a superconducting meander pickup coil was used to accurately measure the temperature change, thereby acting as an ultra-sensitive thermometer. The detector demonstrated 1.2 keV FWHM equivalent resolution in alpha particle detection with an 241Am source. Many peaks were observed in the low-energy region from the absorption of low-energy X-rays, gamma rays, and conversion electrons. An energy resolution of 400 eV FWHM was achieved for 60 keV gamma rays that were measured with the alpha particles. Possible applications of such high resolution detectors are discussed.

  19. High resolution imaging of tunnels by magnetic resonance neurography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhawong, Ty K.; Thawait, Shrey K.; Machado, Antonio J.; Carrino, John A.; Chhabra, Avneesh [Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Kenneth C. [Baltimore VA Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Williams, Eric H. [Dellon Institute for Peripheral Nerve Surgery, Towson, MD (United States); Hashemi, Shahreyar Shar [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Peripheral nerves often traverse confined fibro-osseous and fibro-muscular tunnels in the extremities, where they are particularly vulnerable to entrapment and compressive neuropathy. This gives rise to various tunnel syndromes, characterized by distinct patterns of muscular weakness and sensory deficits. This article focuses on several upper and lower extremity tunnels, in which direct visualization of the normal and abnormal nerve in question is possible with high resolution 3T MR neurography (MRN). MRN can also serve as a useful adjunct to clinical and electrophysiologic exams by discriminating adhesive lesions (perineural scar) from compressive lesions (such as tumor, ganglion, hypertrophic callous, or anomalous muscles) responsible for symptoms, thereby guiding appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  20. High resolution imaging of tunnels by magnetic resonance neurography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peripheral nerves often traverse confined fibro-osseous and fibro-muscular tunnels in the extremities, where they are particularly vulnerable to entrapment and compressive neuropathy. This gives rise to various tunnel syndromes, characterized by distinct patterns of muscular weakness and sensory deficits. This article focuses on several upper and lower extremity tunnels, in which direct visualization of the normal and abnormal nerve in question is possible with high resolution 3T MR neurography (MRN). MRN can also serve as a useful adjunct to clinical and electrophysiologic exams by discriminating adhesive lesions (perineural scar) from compressive lesions (such as tumor, ganglion, hypertrophic callous, or anomalous muscles) responsible for symptoms, thereby guiding appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  1. High Resolution Observations and Modeling of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    This research contract investigating the radiative transfer and dynamic physics of the smallest observable magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Due to the lack of a high-resolution visible light satellite instrument for solar studies, all data were acquired using ground-based instrumentation. The primary goal of the investigation was to understand the formation and evolution of "G-band bright points" in relation to the associated magnetic elements. G-band bright points are small (on the order of 100 kin or less in diameter) bright signatures associated with magnetic flux elements in the photosphere. They are seen in the A2A-X2 4308 A molecular bandhead of the CH radical ill the solar spectrum and offer the highest spatial resolution and highest contrast "tracers" of small magnetic structure on the Sun.

  2. Mapping Human Brain Capillary Water Lifetime: High-Resolution Metabolic Neuromaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, William D.; Li, Xin; Sammi, Manoj K.; Bourdette, Dennis N.; Neuwelt, Edward A.; Springer, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Shutter-speed analysis of Dynamic-Contrast-Agent-(CA)-Enhanced normal, multiple sclerosis [MS], and glioblastoma [GBM] human brain data gives the mean capillary water molecule lifetime [τb] and blood volume fraction [vb; capillary density·volume product (′†·V)] in a high-resolution 1H2O MRI voxel [40 μL] or ROI. The equilibrium water extravasation rate constant, kpo [τb−1], averages 3.2 and 2.9 s−1 in resting-state normal white matter [NWM] and gray matter [NGM], respectively [n = 6]. The results {parenthesized} lead to three major conclusions. A) kpo differences are dominated by capillary water permeability [PW†], not size, differences. {NWM and NGM voxel kpo and vb values are independent. Quantitative analyses of concomitant population-averaged kpo,vb variations in normal and normal-appearing MS brain ROIs confirm PW† dominance.} B) PW† is dominated [> 95%] by a trans[endothelial]cellular pathway, not the PCA† para-cellular route. {In MS lesions and GBM tumors, PCA† increases but PW† decreases.} C) kpo tracks steady-state ATP production/consumption flux per capillary. {In normal, MS, and GBM brain, regional kpo correlates with literature MRSI ATP [positively] and Na+ [negatively] tissue concentrations. These suggest the PW† pathway is metabolically active. Excellent agreement of the relative NGM/NWM kpo·vb product ratio with the literature 31PMRSI-MT CMRoxphos ratio confirms the flux property.} We have previously shown the cellular water molecule efflux rate constant [kio] is proportional to plasma membrane P-type ATPase turnover, likely due to active trans-membrane water cycling. With synaptic proximities and synergistic metabolic co-operativities, polar brain endothelial, neuroglial, and neuronal cells form “gliovascular units.” We hypothesize a chain of water cycling processes transmits brain metabolic activity to kpo, letting it report neurogliovascular unit Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Cerebral kpo maps represent metabolic

  3. High-resolution imaging of the large non-human primate brain using microPET: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neuroanatomy and physiology of the baboon brain closely resembles that of the human brain and is well suited for evaluating promising new radioligands in non-human primates by PET and SPECT prior to their use in humans. These studies are commonly performed on clinical scanners with 5 mm spatial resolution at best, resulting in sub-optimal images for quantitative analysis. This study assessed the feasibility of using a microPET animal scanner to image the brains of large non-human primates, i.e. papio hamadryas (baboon) at high resolution. Factors affecting image accuracy, including scatter, attenuation and spatial resolution, were measured under conditions approximating a baboon brain and using different reconstruction strategies. Scatter fraction measured 32% at the centre of a 10 cm diameter phantom. Scatter correction increased image contrast by up to 21% but reduced the signal-to-noise ratio. Volume resolution was superior and more uniform using maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstructed images (3.2-3.6 mm3 FWHM from centre to 4 cm offset) compared to both 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) (5.6-8.3 mm3) and 3D reprojection (3DRP) (5.9-9.1 mm3). A pilot 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([18F]FDG) scan was performed on a healthy female adult baboon. The pilot study demonstrated the ability to adequately resolve cortical and sub-cortical grey matter structures in the baboon brain and improved contrast when images were corrected for attenuation and scatter and reconstructed by MAP. We conclude that high resolution imaging of the baboon brain with microPET is feasible with appropriate choices of reconstruction strategy and corrections for degrading physical effects. Further work to develop suitable correction algorithms for high-resolution large primate imaging is warranted

  4. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm.

  5. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm. PMID:25557860

  6. A True Multi-modality Approach for High Resolution Optical Imaging: Photo-Magnetic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Luk, Alex T.; Ha, Seunghoon; Nouizi, Farouk; Thayer, David; Lin, Yuting; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging leverages the competitive advantage of different imaging systems to improve the overall resolution and quantitative accuracy. Our new technique, Photo-Magnetic Imaging (PMI) is one of these true multi-modality imaging approaches, which can provide quantitative optical absorption map at MRI spatial resolution. PMI uses laser light to illuminate tissue and elevate its temperature while utilizing MR thermometry to measure the laser-induced temperature variation with high s...

  7. Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility high-resolution-spectrometer dipole magnets: a summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report explains the design, fabrication, measurement, optimization, and installation of two 122 metric ton electromagnets for the High Resolution Proton Spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. These two magnets are the principal components of the proton spectrometer, which has an energy resolution of less than or equal to 10-4 FWHM. Many technical problems occurred during fabrication, measurement, and optimization, and the majority have been successfully solved. We hope that this report will help others planning similar projects

  8. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    OpenAIRE

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-01-01

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase distribution using the aberration-corrected optics of an scanning transmission electron microscope. The required phase di...

  9. Compact magnet array for portable high-resolution NMR and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Perlo, Juan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico [ITMC, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Portable NMR probes built from permanent magnets offer several advantages over conventional NMR systems. However, the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field generated by these sensors precludes their use in high resolution NMR spectroscopy and MRI. Recently we have demonstrated that the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field can be removed by providing the sensor with movable permanent magnets which allows generating and controlling harmonic field corrections by a mechanical shimming approach. In this work we present a high-performance magnet design based on this concept, which enables us to reduce the size of the magnet keeping the field strength and the sample volume constant. In particular, it was used to build a palm size magnet working in a volume large enough to fit conventional 5 mm NMR tubes where the high field homogeneity allowed us to measure proton NMR spectra of different solvents with a resolution better than 0.16 ppm at 30 MHz. By scaling the dimensions of the magnet the same geometry was optimized to build a portable MRI scanner for imaging samples of 4 cm DSV 1.

  10. Compact magnet array for portable high-resolution NMR and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portable NMR probes built from permanent magnets offer several advantages over conventional NMR systems. However, the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field generated by these sensors precludes their use in high resolution NMR spectroscopy and MRI. Recently we have demonstrated that the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field can be removed by providing the sensor with movable permanent magnets which allows generating and controlling harmonic field corrections by a mechanical shimming approach. In this work we present a high-performance magnet design based on this concept, which enables us to reduce the size of the magnet keeping the field strength and the sample volume constant. In particular, it was used to build a palm size magnet working in a volume large enough to fit conventional 5 mm NMR tubes where the high field homogeneity allowed us to measure proton NMR spectra of different solvents with a resolution better than 0.16 ppm at 30 MHz. By scaling the dimensions of the magnet the same geometry was optimized to build a portable MRI scanner for imaging samples of 4 cm DSV 1.

  11. High resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human brain in vivo at 1.5 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Madhwesha; Stewart, Neil J.; Norquay, Graham; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Upon inhalation, xenon diffuses into the bloodstream and is transported to the brain, where it dissolves in various compartments of the brain. Although up to five chemically distinct peaks have been previously observed in 129Xe rat head spectra, to date only three peaks have been reported in the human head. This study demonstrates high resolution spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging (CSI) of 129Xe dissolved in the human head at 1.5 Tesla. Methods A 129Xe radiofrequency coil was built in‐house and 129Xe gas was polarized using spin‐exchange optical pumping. Following the inhalation of 129Xe gas, NMR spectroscopy was performed with spectral resolution of 0.033 ppm. Two‐dimensional CSI in all three anatomical planes was performed with spectral resolution of 2.1 ppm and voxel size 20 mm × 20 mm. Results Spectra of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head showed five distinct peaks at 188 ppm, 192 ppm, 196 ppm, 200 ppm, and 217 ppm. Assignment of these peaks was consistent with earlier studies. Conclusion High resolution spectroscopy and CSI of hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved in the human head has been demonstrated. For the first time, five distinct NMR peaks have been observed in 129Xe spectra from the human head in vivo. Magn Reson Med 75:2227–2234, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27080441

  12. Estimating brain age using high-resolution pattern recognition: Younger brains in long-term meditation practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luders, Eileen; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Gaser, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Normal aging is known to be accompanied by loss of brain substance. The present study was designed to examine whether the practice of meditation is associated with a reduced brain age. Specific focus was directed at age fifty and beyond, as mid-life is a time when aging processes are known to become more prominent. We applied a recently developed machine learning algorithm trained to identify anatomical correlates of age in the brain translating those into one single score: the BrainAGE index (in years). Using this validated approach based on high-dimensional pattern recognition, we re-analyzed a large sample of 50 long-term meditators and 50 control subjects estimating and comparing their brain ages. We observed that, at age fifty, brains of meditators were estimated to be 7.5years younger than those of controls. In addition, we examined if the brain age estimates change with increasing age. While brain age estimates varied only little in controls, significant changes were detected in meditators: for every additional year over fifty, meditators' brains were estimated to be an additional 1month and 22days younger than their chronological age. Altogether, these findings seem to suggest that meditation is beneficial for brain preservation, effectively protecting against age-related atrophy with a consistently slower rate of brain aging throughout life. PMID:27079530

  13. Stellar magnetic field parameters from a Bayesian analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, V.; Wade, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a Bayesian statistical method designed to infer the magnetic properties of stars observed using high-resolution circular spectropolarimetry in the context of large surveys. This approach is well suited for analysing stars for which the stellar rotation period is not known, and therefore the rotational phases of the observations are ambiguous. The model assumes that the magnetic observations correspond to a dipole oblique rotator, a situation commonly encountered in i...

  14. Improved Depiction of Pterygopalatine Fossa Anatomy Using Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 7 Tesla

    OpenAIRE

    Oomen, K. P. Q.; Pameijer, F. A.; Zwanenburg, J. J. M.; Hordijk, G J; De Ru, J. A.; Bleys, R L A W

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To study the anatomy of the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) using ultrahigh-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. A human cadaveric tissue block containing the pterygopalatine fossa was examined on a clinical 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system. Subsequently, cryosections of the tissue block were created in a coronal plane. The cryosections were photographed and collected on adhesive tape. The on-tape sections were stained for Mallory-Cason, in order to detail the anatomi...

  15. Magneto-Optic Fiber Bragg Gratings with Application to High-Resolution Magnetic Field Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Jian Wu; Ying Yang; Kun Qiu

    2008-01-01

    Magneto-optic fiber Bragg gratings (MFBG) based on magneto-optic materials have a lot of potential applications for sensing and optical signal processing. The transmission and reflection spectra of guided optical waves in the MFBG are investigated. According to the sensitivity of MFBG spectral lines to the magneto-optic coupling intensity varying with applied magnetic field, a novel magnetic field sensor of high-resolution up to 0.01 nm/(kA/m) is predicted.

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H1-MRS is a non-invasive technique which provides different levels of information on brain tissue: the N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) is an indicator of neuronal development, the choline containing compound peak (Cho) provides information on myelination and on cell membrane turnover and gliosis, inositol (Ins) is considered a marker of neuronal degeneration. Lactate may be detected in presence of defective energy metabolism. In the perineonatal period, the brain is apt to be insulted by a variety of events including asphyxia, hypoxemia, hemorrhage, which may subsequently cause delay in development. It is clinically important to assess the degree of brain damage and to obtain the prognostic information in the neonatal and early infantile period. MRS has become available for clinical examinations of the brain during development and these techniques can be used to document improvement or the progression towards irreversible damage

  17. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic center than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan

  18. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzmann, D.R.; Britt, R.H.; Lyons, B.; Carroll, B.; Wilson, D.A.; Buxton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic center than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan.

  19. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong, E-mail: chenz@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: lylfj2005@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Smith, Pieter E. S. [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2015-12-28

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials’ structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences’ phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, “ultrafast” NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  20. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  1. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials’ structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences’ phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, “ultrafast” NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets

  2. Low temperature magnetic analysis in the identification of iron compounds from human brain tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brem, F [Institute of Geophysics, ETH-Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Hirt, A M [Institute of Geophysics, ETH-Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Simon, C [Neurology/EEG, University Hospital Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Wieser, H-G [Neurology/EEG, University Hospital Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dobson, J [Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7QB, (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    In the brain, iron plays an important role, but also is potentially toxic if iron metabolism is disrupted. Excess iron accumulation in the brain has been shown to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases. However, identification of iron compounds in human tissue is difficult because concentrations are very low. Three types of magnetic methods were used to characterize iron compounds in tumour tissue from epileptic patients. Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM) was measured at 77 K and 300 K and reveals a low-coercivity phase with the properties of magnetite or maghemite. Induced magnetization was measured between 2 K and 300 K after cooling in zero-field and in a 50 mT field. These curves reveal an average blocking temperature of 11 K, which is compatible with ferritin. The results of this study show that the combination of different magnetic methods provides a useful and sensitive tool for the characterisation of magnetic iron compounds in human tissue.

  3. High resolution mapping of modafinil induced changes in glutamate level in rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Haris

    Full Text Available Modafinil is marketed in the United States for the treatment of narcolepsy and daytime somnolence due to shift-work or sleep apnea. Investigations of this drug in the treatment of cocaine and nicotine dependence in addition to disorders of executive function are also underway. Modafinil has been known to increase glutamate levels in rat brain models. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS has been commonly used to detect the glutamate (Glu changes in vivo. In this study, we used a recently described glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer (GluCEST imaging technique to measure Modafinil induced regional Glu changes in rat brain and compared the results with Glu concentration measured by single voxel 1HMRS. No increases in either GluCEST maps or 1HMRS were observed after Modafinil injection over a period of 5 hours. However, a significant increase in GluCEST (19 ± 4.4% was observed 24 hours post Modafinil administration, which is consistent with results from previous biochemical studies. This change was not consistently seen with 1HMRS. GluCEST mapping allows regional cerebral Glu changes to be measured and may provide a useful clinical biomarker of Modafinil effects for the management of patients with sleep disorders and addiction.

  4. Simulations of magnetic capturing of drug carriers in the brain vascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Blood flow and magnetic particles distributions in the brain vascular system simulated. ► Numerical mesh generated from raw MRI images. ► Significant increase in local capturing of magnetic particles obtained. ► Promising technique for localised non-invasive treatment of brain tumours. - Abstract: The present paper reports on numerical simulations of blood flow and magnetic drug carrier distributions in a complex brain vascular system. The blood is represented as a non-Newtonian fluid by the generalised power law. The Lagrangian tracking of the double-layer spherical particles is performed to estimate particle deposition under influence of imposed magnetic field gradients across arterial walls. Two situations are considered: neutral (magnetic field off) and active control (magnetic field on) case. The double-layer spherical particles that mimic a real medical drug are characterised by two characteristic diameters - the outer one and the inner one of the magnetic core. A numerical mesh of the brain vascular system consisting of multi-branching arteries is generated from raw MRI scan images of a patient. The blood is supplied through four main inlet arteries and the entire vascular system includes more than 30 outlets, which are modelled by Murray’s law. The no-slip boundary condition is applied for velocity components along the smooth and rigid arterial walls. Numerical simulations revealed detailed insights into blood flow patterns, wall-shear-stress and local particle deposition efficiency along arterial walls. It is demonstrated that magnetically targeted drug delivery significantly increased the particle capturing efficiency in the pre-defined regions. This feature can be potentially useful for localised, non-invasive treatment of brain tumours.

  5. Developing a multiscale, multi-resolution agent-based brain tumor model by graphics processing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Le

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiscale agent-based modeling (MABM has been widely used to simulate Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM and its progression. At the intracellular level, the MABM approach employs a system of ordinary differential equations to describe quantitatively specific intracellular molecular pathways that determine phenotypic switches among cells (e.g. from migration to proliferation and vice versa. At the intercellular level, MABM describes cell-cell interactions by a discrete module. At the tissue level, partial differential equations are employed to model the diffusion of chemoattractants, which are the input factors of the intracellular molecular pathway. Moreover, multiscale analysis makes it possible to explore the molecules that play important roles in determining the cellular phenotypic switches that in turn drive the whole GBM expansion. However, owing to limited computational resources, MABM is currently a theoretical biological model that uses relatively coarse grids to simulate a few cancer cells in a small slice of brain cancer tissue. In order to improve this theoretical model to simulate and predict actual GBM cancer progression in real time, a graphics processing unit (GPU-based parallel computing algorithm was developed and combined with the multi-resolution design to speed up the MABM. The simulated results demonstrated that the GPU-based, multi-resolution and multiscale approach can accelerate the previous MABM around 30-fold with relatively fine grids in a large extracellular matrix. Therefore, the new model has great potential for simulating and predicting real-time GBM progression, if real experimental data are incorporated.

  6. A Novel Method for Brain MRI Super-resolution by Wavelet-based POCS and Adaptive Edge Zoom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hema Rajini,

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to make the super-resolution of a high-resolution image from a sequence of low-resolution frames containing non-stationary objects. The challenges of making super-resolution image, like unavoidable smoothing effects, introduction of artifacts, computational efficiency in time and computational efficiency in memory requirements, are considered and a novel method is proposed to solve these problems. The proposed method handles the super-resolution process by using wavelet based projection-onto-convex-set with adaptive edge zoom algorithm. Adaptive edge zoom algorithm address the problem of producing enlarged picture from the given digital image. Wavelet based projection-onto-convex-set method is usedto enhance spatial resolution of MRI brain images from a temporal sequence. This method produces more clarity with high peak signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities.

  8. EMAG2. A 2-arc-minute resolution Earth magnetic anomaly grid compiled from satellite, airborne and marine magnetic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Airborne and marine magnetic data have been collected for more than half a century, providing extensive coverage of the Earth. Due to the changing main field from the Earth's core, and due to differences in quality and coverage, combining these data to a consistent global magnetic anomaly grid is challenging. A key ingredient is the long wavelength magnetic field observed by the low-orbiting CHAMP satellite. To produce a homogeneous grid, the marine and aeromagnetic trackline data are first line-leveled and then merged with the existing grids of continental-scale compilations by Least Squares Collocation. The method takes the anisotropy of the oceanic magnetic field into account. This leads to an improved representation of oceanic magnetic lineations and allows for the interpolation between adjacent tracks in sparsely surveyed regions, particularly in the southern oceans. In the final processing step the short-to- intermediate wavelengths of the near-surface grid are merged with the latest CHAMP satellite magnetic anomaly model MF6 (http://geomag.org/models/MF6.html). In analogy to NGDC's 2-arc-minute resolution ETOPO2 grid, the new magnetic anomaly grid is named EMAG2. The grid is available in digital form and as plug-ins for NASA World Wind, Google Earth and Google Maps at http://geomag.org.

  9. Metabolic abnormalities in lobar and subcortical brain regions of abstinent polysubstance users: Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Abé, C.; Mon, A.; Hoefer, ME; Durazzo, TC; Pennington, DL; Schmidt, TP; Meyerhoff, DJ

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to explore neurometabolic and associated cognitive characteristics of patients with polysubstance use (PSU) in comparison with patients with predominant alcohol use using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods: Brain metabolite concentrations were examined in lobar and subcortical brain regions of three age-matched groups: 1-monthabstinent alcohol-dependent PSU, 1-month-abstinent individuals dependent on alcohol alone (ALC) and light drinking controls (...

  10. Brain white matter lesions detected by magnetic resosnance imaging are associated with balance and gait speed

    OpenAIRE

    John M Starr; Leaper, S A; Murray, A D; Lemmon, H A; Staff, R T; Deary, Ian J.; Whalley, Lawrence J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relations between premorbid and current mental ability, mood, and white matter signal abnormalities detected by T2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and impairment of balance and mobility in older adults. Methods: 97 subjects from the Aberdeen 1921 birth cohort underwent brain MRI, evaluation of balance, and measurement of gait speed. White matter hyperintensities detected on T2 weighted MRI scans were rated by three independent raters on three ...

  11. Increased blood–brain barrier permeability in type II diabetes demonstrated by gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, J; Wardlaw, J; Ferguson, K; MacLullich, A; Deary, I; Marshall, I

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with type II diabetes are at increased risk of cognitive impairment. The retinal and renal complications of diabetes follow microvascular damage permitting small arterioles to leak, hence the cerebral damage might also follow loss of blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Magnetic resonance (MR) brain imaging with intravenous gadolinium (Gd) diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was used to identify increased BBB permeability.

  12. Fetal brain tumors: Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hérbene; José; Milani; Edward; Araujo; Júnior; Sérgio; Cavalheiro; Patrícia; Soares; Oliveira; Wagner; Jou; Hisaba; Enoch; Quinderé; Sá; Barreto; Maurício; Mendes; Barbosa; Luciano; Marcondes; Nardozza; Antonio; Fernandes; Moron

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central nervous system tumors diagnosed during pregnancy are rare, and often have a poor prognosis. The most frequent type is the teratoma. Use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance image allows the suspicion of brain tumors during pregnancy. However, the definitive diagnosis is only confirmed after birth by histology. The purpose of this mini-review article is to describe the general clinical aspects of intracranial tumors and describe the main fetal brain tumors.

  13. Review: magnetic resonance imaging of male/female differences in human adolescent brain anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Giedd Jay N; Raznahan Armin; Mills Kathryn L; Lenroot Rhoshel K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Improvements in neuroimaging technologies, and greater access to their use, have generated a plethora of data regarding male/female differences in the developing brain. Examination of these differences may shed light on the pathophysiology of the many illnesses that differ between the sexes and ultimately lead to more effective interventions. In this review, we attempt to synthesize the anatomic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) literature of male/female brain differences with emphasi...

  14. A magnetic-free high-resolution parabolic mirror time-of-flight electron energy spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Yuanqin; CHEN Deying; WU Xiaoyan; LU Xingfa; YAO Qin; Wang Qi

    2001-01-01

    The principle and structure of a magnetic-free high-resolution high-efficiency parabolic mirror time-offligght electron energy spectrometer are presented. The electron energy spectrum of Nz in a flight tube is measured using a 105 fs Ti:sappbire laser under different gas pressures.

  15. Magnetic and electrical responses of the human brain to texture-defined form and to textons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, D; He, P

    1995-09-01

    1. We searched for a neurophysical correlate of preattentive texture discrimination by recording magnetic and electric evoked responses from the human brain during the first few hundred milliseconds following the presentation of texture-defined (TD) checkerboard form. The only two textons that changed when the TD checkerboard appeared or disappeared were the local orientation and line termination textons. (Textons are conspicuous local features within a texture pattern). 2. Our evidence that the magnetic response to TD form cannot be explained in terms of responses to the two associated textons is as follows: 1) by dissociating the two responses we showed that the magnetic response to TD form is almost entirely independent of the magnetic response to the local orientation texton; 2) a further distinction between the two responses is that their distributions over the head are different; and 3) the magnetic response to TD form differs from the magnetic response to the line termination texton in both distribution over the head and waveform. We conclude that this evidence identifies the existence of a brain response correlate of preattentive texture discrimination. 3. We also recorded brain responses to luminance-defined (LD) checkerboard form. Our grounds for concluding that magnetic brain responses to the onset of checkerboard form are generated by different and independent neural systems for TD and LD form are as follows: 1) magnetic responses to the onset of TD form and LD form had different distributions over the skull, had different waveforms, and depended differently on check size; and 2) the waveform of the response to superimposed TD and LD checks closely approximated the linear sum of responses to TD checks and LD checks alone. 4. One possible explanation for the observed differences between the magnetic and electric evoked responses is that responses to both onset and offset of TD form predominantly involve neurons aligned parallel to the skull, whereas that

  16. High Spatiotemporal-Resolution Magnetic Tweezers: Calibration and Applications for DNA Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, David; Cui, Tao Ju; Cnossen, Jelmer; Docter, Margreet W; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H

    2015-11-17

    The observation of biological processes at the molecular scale in real time requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Magnetic tweezers are straightforward to implement, free of radiation or photodamage, and provide ample multiplexing capability, but their spatiotemporal resolution has lagged behind that of other single-molecule manipulation techniques, notably optical tweezers and AFM. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a new high-resolution magnetic tweezers apparatus. We systematically characterize the achievable spatiotemporal resolution for both incoherent and coherent light sources, different types and sizes of beads, and different types and lengths of tethered molecules. Using a bright coherent laser source for illumination and tracking at 6 kHz, we resolve 3 Å steps with a 1 s period for surface-melted beads and 5 Å steps with a 0.5 s period for double-stranded-dsDNA-tethered beads, in good agreement with a model of stochastic bead motion in the magnetic tweezers. We demonstrate how this instrument can be used to monitor the opening and closing of a DNA hairpin on millisecond timescales in real time, together with attendant changes in the hairpin dynamics upon the addition of deoxythymidine triphosphate. Our approach opens up the possibility of observing biological events at submillisecond timescales with subnanometer resolution using camera-based detection. PMID:26588570

  17. Brain Topological Correlates of Motor Performance Changes After Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chang-hyun; Chang, Won Hyuk; Yoo, Woo-Kyoung; Shin, Yong-Il; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) influences the brain temporally beyond the stimulation period and spatially beyond the stimulation site. Application of rTMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) has been shown to lead to plastic changes in interregional connectivity over the motor system as well as alterations in motor performance. With a sequential combination of rTMS over the M1 and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we sought changes in the topology of brain net...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and pathologic studies on lateral fluid percussion injury as a model of focal brain injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, morphologic changes in brain lesions initiated by moderate lateral fluid percussion injury in rats were investigated chronologically using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic methods. Rats were subjected to moderate fluid percussion injury (average 2.80±0.48 atmospheres) over the exposed dura overlying the right parietal cortex. MRI obtained in vivo were compared with corresponding pathologic findings at 1, 6, and 24 h and at 3, 6, 14 and 80 days after injury. T2-weighted images showed scattered low-signal intensity in the injured cortex within a few hours after injury, whereas histologic findings revealed intraparenchymal hemorrhages. T2-weighted images of the ipsilateral cerebral cortex and/or corpus callosum showed a high-signal-intensity area 4 h after injury. The high-signal-intensity area became largest in size between 6 and 24 h, then declined gradually, and almost disappeared 14 days after injury. Histologic examination revealed pyknosis, retraction of the cell body of neurons with vacuolated neuropile in the corresponding regions 6 and 24 h after injury, and cystic necrosis 14 days after injury. The location and extent of these pathologic changes were depicted accurately by MRI in vivo. In the hippocampus, pyknosis and retraction of the cell body of pyramidal neurons were observed on the injured side 24 h after injury, and the number of neurons in the CA1 and CA2-CA3 regions decreased significantly on the same side by 14 days after injury. It is concluded that morphologic changes in the brain following experimental traumatic brain injury in rats are detectable in vivo by high-resolution MRI, and that MRI may be useful for the evaluation of treatment effects in experimental brain injury. (author)

  19. High-Resolution Observations of Flare Precursors and Their Relationship with Magnetic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haimin; Xu, Yan; Ahn, Kwangsu; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Huang, Nengyi; Gary, Dale E.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-05-01

    The study of precursors of flares is important for understanding the basic magnetic instability leading to solar flares, which can aid the forecasting of eruptions potentially related to severe space weather effects. Although literatures reported many important clues, high-resolution observations of pre-flare activities before a well-observed solar flare have been rare. Even rarely, the associated magnetic structures in fine scale (below 1") were also observed. In this study we take advantage of multiwavelength high-resolution observations completely covering the 2015 June 22 M6.6 flare, which were obtained under excellent seeing condition with the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The NST data includes observations of the H-alpha line in five spectral positions at a spatial resolution of 0.1" and magnetograms at a resolution of 0.25". These are complemented by IRIS UV observations with a resolution of 0.25". We find that there are two episodes of pre-flare brightenings (precursors), which are spatially associated with magnetic channels, i.e., elongated structures comprising alternating magnetic polarity inversion lines (Zirin & Wang, 1993, Nature, 363, 426). The pre-flare chromospheric and coronal features reflect an extremely sheared magnetic topology, while the initiation of main flare brightenings correspond to a much less sheared configuration. RHESSI HXR observations reveal that the precursors have both thermal and nonthermal components, and the latter is further evidenced by the microwave observations of the newly expanded Solar Radio Array at Owens Valley.We further investigate the electric current system above the magnetic channels using NLFFF extrapolations, which show strong current sheets above the channel structure. This is consistent with the MHD modeling of Kusano et al (2012, Ap.J., 760, 31), who noted the importance of localized small-scale magnetic structure in triggering the eruption of the whole active region. We

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD

  1. Noninvasive detection of temozolomide in brain tumor xenografts by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Y.; Holm, David Alberg; Okollie, B.;

    2010-01-01

    Poor drug delivery to brain tumors caused by aberrant tumor vasculature and a partly intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) can significantly impair the efficacy of chemotherapy. Determining drug delivery to brain tumors is a challenging problem, and the noninvasive...... detection of drug directly in the tumor can be critically important for accessing, predicting, and eventually improving effectiveness of therapy. In this study, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to detect an anticancer agent, temozolomide (TMZ), in vivo in murine xenotransplants of U87...... of similar to 140 mg/kg (450 mg/m(2), well within the maximal clinical dose of 1000 mg/m(2) used in humans) during the course of in vivo MRS experiments. Heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) MRS of brain tumors was performed before and after i.p. administration of [C-13]TMZ. Dynamic MRI...

  2. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN SMALL RUMINANTS WITH BRAIN DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertelt, Katrin; Oevermann, Anna; Precht, Christina; Lauper, Josiane; Henke, Diana; Gorgas, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Brain disease is an important cause of neurologic deficits in small ruminants, however few MRI features have been described. The aim of this retrospective, case series study was to describe MRI characteristics in a group of small ruminants with confirmed brain disease. A total of nine small ruminants (six sheep and three goats) met inclusion criteria. All had neurologic disorders localized to the brain and histopathologic confirmation. In animals with toxic-metabolic diseases, there were bilaterally symmetric MRI lesions affecting either the gray matter (one animal with polioencephalomalacia) or the white matter (two animals with enterotoxemia). In animals with suppurative inflammation, asymmetric focal brainstem lesions were present (two animals with listeric encephalitis), or lesions typical of an intra-axial (one animal) or dural abscess (one animal), respectively. No MRI lesions were detected in one animal with suspected viral cerebellitis and one animal with parasitic migration tracts. No neoplastic or vascular lesions were identified in this case series. Findings from the current study supported the use of MRI for diagnosing brain diseases in small ruminants. PMID:26776819

  3. STUDY OF BRAIN TUMOURS BY NOVE L MAGNETIC RESONANCE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shamim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study , thirty patients in the age range of 22 to 63 years of age were included after being diagnosed to be having brain tumour on CT scan or conventional MRI. In addition DWI , MRS , and PWI were carried out i n these patients. All the patients with suspicious malignant lesions were then subjected to FDG - PET examination . Histopathological correlation was obtained in all the patients to serve as gold standard against which other modalities will be assessed for th eir sensitivity , specificity , positive predictive value , negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy. Out of thirty patients selected for this study , twenty cases were found to be malignant and ten cases were benign on Histopathological evaluation. Majority of malignant lesions were glioblastoma multiforme. Amongst benign cases , majorities were meningioma , one was a Granulomatous lesion and one was a benign cystic lesion. MRI including the novel techniques showed high sensitivity and spe cificity in identifying malignant brain lesions and has a future role in better characterization of brain tumours. Wherever available , it should be integrated in routine workup of patients presenting with brain tumours or for follow up of patients undergon e surgery / adjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. First high-resolution near-seafloor survey of magnetic anomalies of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Xu, X.; Li, C.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Qiu, N.

    2013-12-01

    We successfully conducted the first high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic survey of the Central, Southwest, and Northern Central Basins of the South China Sea (SCS) during two cruises on board Chinese R/V HaiYangLiuHao in October-November 2012 and March-April 2013, respectively. Measurements of magnetic field were made along four long survey lines, including (1) a NW-SE across-isochron profile transecting the Southwest Basin and covering all ages of the oceanic crust (Line CD); (2) a N-S across-isochron profile transecting the Central Basin (Line AB); and (3) two sub-parallel NE-SW across-isochron profiles transecting the Northern Central Basin of the SCS (Lines D and E). A three-axis magnetometer was mounted on a deep-tow vehicle, flying within 0.6 km above the seafloor. The position of the tow vehicle was provided by an ultra-short baseline navigation system along Lines D and E, while was estimated using shipboard GPS along Lines AB and CD. To investigate crustal magnetization, we first removed the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) of 2010 from the measured magnetic data, and then downward continued the resultant magnetic field data to a horizontal plane at a water depth of 4.5 km to correct for variation due to the fishing depth of the deep-tow vehicle. Finally, we calculated magnetic anomalies at various water depths after reduction-to-the-pole corrections. We also constructed polarity reversal block (PRB) models of crustal magnetization by matching peaks and troughs of the observed magnetic field anomaly. Our analysis yielded the following results: (1) The near-bottom magnetic anomaly showed peak-to-trough amplitudes of more than 2,500 nT, which are several times of the anomaly amplitudes at the sea surface, illustrating that deep-tow measurements acquired much higher spatial resolutions. (2) The deep-tow data revealed several distinctive magnetic anomalies with wavelengths of 5-15 km and amplitudes of several hundred nT. These short

  5. In vivo magnetic resonance diffusion measurement in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J; Stubgaard, M; Henriksen, O

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty-two of ...... diffusion capability signifies an increase of the extracellular water space, which probably is related to the degree ofdemyelination. Thus, measurement of water self-diffusion in multiple sclerosis plaques may contribute to the study of pathogenesis of demyelination.......Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty-two of...

  6. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R. [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja [LMU Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Dassinger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  7. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  8. High-Resolution Magnetic Analyzer MAVR for the Study of Exotic Weakly-Bound Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, V. A.; Kazacha, V. I.; Kolesov, I. V.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Melnikov, V. N.; Osipov, N. F.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Skobelev, N. K.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Voskoboinik, E. I.

    2015-11-01

    A project of the high-resolution magnetic analyzer MAVR is proposed. The analyzer will comprise new magnetic optical and detecting systems for separation and identification of reaction products in a wide range of masses (5-150) and charges (1-60). The magnetic optical system consists of the MSP-144 magnet and a doublet of quadrupole lenses. This will allow the solid angle of the spectrometer to be increased by an order of magnitude up to 30 msr. The magnetic analyzer will have a high momentum resolution (10-4) and high focal-plane dispersion (1.9 m). It will allow products of nuclear reactions at energies up to 30 MeV/nucleon to be detected with the charge resolution ~1/60. Implementation of the project is divided into two stages: conversion of the magnetic analyzer proper and construction of the nuclear reaction products identification system. The MULTI detecting system is being developed for the MAVR magnetic analyzer to allow detection of nuclear reaction products and their identification by charge Q, atomic number Z, and mass A with a high absolute accuracy. The identification will be performed by measuring the energy loss (ΔE), time of flight (TOF), and total kinetic energy (TKE) of reaction products. The particle trajectories in the analyzer will also be determined using the drift chamber developed jointly with GANIL. The MAVR analyzer will operate in both primary beams of heavy ions and beams of radioactive nuclei produced by the U400-U400M acceleration complex. It will also be used for measuring energy spectra of nuclear reaction products and as an energy monochromator.

  9. Investigation of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging by means of surface and array radiofrequency coils at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaag, Wietske; Marques, José P; Hergt, Martin; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    In this investigation, high-resolution, 1x1x1-mm(3) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 7 T is performed using a multichannel array head coil and a surface coil approach. Scan geometry was optimized for each coil separately to exploit the strengths of both coils. Acquisitions with the surface coil focused on partial brain coverage, while whole-brain coverage fMRI experiments were performed with the array head coil. BOLD sensitivity in the occipital lobe was found to be higher with the surface coil than with the head array, suggesting that restriction of signal detection to the area of interest may be beneficial for localized activation studies. Performing independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of the fMRI data, we consistently detected BOLD signal changes and resting state networks. In the surface coil data, a small negative BOLD response could be detected in these resting state network areas. Also in the data acquired with the surface coil, two distinct components of the positive BOLD signal were consistently observed. These two components were tentatively assigned to tissue and venous signal changes. PMID:19261421

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  12. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  13. Neural basis for brain responses to TV commercials: a high-resolution EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, Laura; De Vico Fallani, F; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; Bianchi, L; Marciani, M G; Salinari, S; Colosimo, A; Tocci, A; Soranzo, R; Babiloni, F

    2008-12-01

    We investigated brain activity during the observation of TV commercials by tracking the cortical activity and the functional connectivity changes in normal subjects. The aim was to elucidate if the TV commercials that were remembered by the subjects several days after their first observation elicited particular brain activity and connectivity compared with those generated during the observation of TV commercials that were quickly forgotten. High-resolution electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings were performed in a group of healthy subjects and the cortical activity during the observation of TV commercials was evaluated in several regions of interest coincident with the Brodmann areas (BAs). The patterns of cortical connectivity were obtained in the four principal frequency bands, Theta (3-7 Hz), Alpha (8-12 Hz), Beta (13-30 Hz), Gamma (30-40 Hz) and the directed influences between any given pair of the estimated cortical signals were evaluated by use of a multivariate spectral technique known as partial directed coherence. The topology of the cortical networks has been identified with tools derived from graph theory. Results suggest that the cortical activity and connectivity elicited by the viewing of the TV commercials that were remembered by the experimental subjects are markedly different from the brain activity elicited during the observation of the TV commercials that were forgotten. In particular, during the observation of the TV commercials that were remembered, the amount of cortical spectral activity from the frontal areas (BA 8 and 9) and from the parietal areas (BA 5, 7, and 40) is higher compared with the activity elicited by the observation of TV commercials that were forgotten. In addition, network analysis suggests a clear role of the parietal areas as a target of the incoming flow of information from all the other parts of the cortex during the observation of TV commercials that have been remembered. The techniques presented here shed new light on

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain in cardiogenic insults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI characteristic of stroke in patients with different forms of atrial fibrillation with the account of main vascular risk factors was described. The most frequent type of MRI picture in cardio embolic stroke is a wedge-shaped area in the cortical subcortical portions of the frontoparietal or patient temporal lobe. Hemorrhagic transformation of the brain infarct was diagnosed in 33,3% of the patient with cardio embolic insult. Small lacunar infarcts were visualized mainly in the patients with arterial hypertension

  15. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials

  16. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  17. Reconstructing brain magnetic susceptibility distributions from T2* phase images by TV-regularized 2-subproblem split Bregman iterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Z

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zikuan Chen,1 Vince D Calhoun1,21The Mind Research Network and LBERI, Albuquerque, NM, USA; 2University of New Mexico, ECE Dept, Albuquerque, NM, USAAbstract: The underlying source of brain imaging by T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI is mainly due to the intracranial inhomogeneous magnetic susceptibility distribution (denoted by χ. We can reconstruct the source χ by two computational steps: first, calculate a fieldmap from a T2* phase image and then second, calculate a χ map from the fieldmap. The internal χ distribution reconstruction from observed T2* phase images is termed χ tomography, which connotes the digital source reproduction with spatial conformance by solving inverse problems in the context of medical imaging. In the small phase angle regime, the T2* phase image remains unwrapped (−πbrain χ states at 2 mm spatial resolution.Keywords: T2*-weighted MRI (T2*MRI, magnetic susceptibility tomography (χ tomography, dipole effect, 3D deconvolution, filter truncation, total variation (TV, split Bregman iteration, computed inverse magnetic resonance imaging (CIMRI

  18. Application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the differentiation of high-grade brain neoplasm and inflammatory brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz-Filho, Jose Roberto Lopes; Santana-Netto, Pedro Vieira; Sgnolf, Aline [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Image Dept.], e-mail: jrl.ferraz@terra.com.br; Rocha-Filho, Jose Alves; Mauad, Fernando [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Radiology Dept.; Sanches, Rafael Angelo [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Imaging Dept.

    2009-06-15

    This study aims at evaluating the application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors and inflammatory brain lesions. The examinations of 81 individuals, who performed brain MRS and were retrospectively analyzed. The patients with ages between 10 and 80 years old, were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 42 individuals with diagnoses of cerebral toxoplasmosis and Group B was formed of 39 individuals with diagnosis of glial neoplasms. On analyzing the ROC curve, the discriminatory boundary for the Cho/Cr ratio between inflammatory lesions and tumors was 1.97 and for the NAA/Cr ratio it was 1.12. RMS is an important method useful in the distinction of inflammatory brain lesions and high-degree tumors when the Cho/Cr ratio is greater than 1.97 and the NAA/Cr ratio is less than 1.12. And so this method is important in the planning of treatment and monitoring of the therapeutic efficiency. (author)

  19. Application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the differentiation of high-grade brain neoplasm and inflammatory brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at evaluating the application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors and inflammatory brain lesions. The examinations of 81 individuals, who performed brain MRS and were retrospectively analyzed. The patients with ages between 10 and 80 years old, were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 42 individuals with diagnoses of cerebral toxoplasmosis and Group B was formed of 39 individuals with diagnosis of glial neoplasms. On analyzing the ROC curve, the discriminatory boundary for the Cho/Cr ratio between inflammatory lesions and tumors was 1.97 and for the NAA/Cr ratio it was 1.12. RMS is an important method useful in the distinction of inflammatory brain lesions and high-degree tumors when the Cho/Cr ratio is greater than 1.97 and the NAA/Cr ratio is less than 1.12. And so this method is important in the planning of treatment and monitoring of the therapeutic efficiency. (author)

  20. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-01

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform’s size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257–65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke’s brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz.

  1. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-21

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform's size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257-65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke's brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz. PMID:27223143

  2. A challenge for probing the statistics of interstellar magnetic fields: beyond the Planck resolution with Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, Andrea; André, Philippe; Boulanger, Francois

    2015-08-01

    The recent Planck results in polarization at sub-mm wavelengths allow us to gain insight into the Galactic magnetic field topology, revealing its statistical correlation with matter, from the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), to molecular clouds (MCs) (Planck intermediate results. XXXII, XXXIII, XXXV). This correlation has a lot to tell us about the dynamics of the turbulent ISM, stressing the importance of considering magnetic fields in the formation of structures, some of which eventually undergo gravitational collapse producing new star-forming cores.Investigating the early phases of star formation has been a fundamental scope of the Herschel Gould Belt survey collaboration (http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr), which, in the last years, has thoroughly characterized, at a resolution of few tens of arcseconds, the statistics of MCs, such as their filamentary structure, kinematics and column density.Although at lower angular resolution, the Planck maps of dust emission at 353GHz, in intensity and polarization, show that all MCs are complex environments, where we observe a non-trivial correlation between the magnetic field and their density structure. This result opens new perspectives on their formation and evolution, which we have started to explore.In this talk, I will present first results of a comparative analysis of the Herschel-Planck data, where we combine the high resolution Herschel maps of some MCs of the Gould Belt with the Planck polarization data, which sample the structure of the field weighted by the density.In particular, I will discuss the large-scale envelopes of the selected MCs, and, given the correlation between magnetic field and matter, I will show how to make use of the high resolution information of the density structure provided by Herschel to investigate the statistics of interstellar magnetic fields in the Planck data.

  3. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-qun Zhang; Yan-jie Wang; Ji-ping Zhang; Jun-qi Chen; Chun-xiao Wu; Zhi-peng Li; Jia-rong Chen; Huai-liang Ouyang; Yong Huang; Chun-zhi Tang

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and Taixi (KI3) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupunctur...

  4. Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Compared with Stereotactic Biopsy of Intra-axial Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Osama; Eshra, Mohamed; Belal, Ahmed; Elshafei, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Background Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is usually added to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to refine the diagnosis of different brain lesions. Stereotactic brain biopsy is a well-established method to obtain tissues for histopathologic examination. The purpose of the study is to compare the diagnostic yields of MRS and stereotactic biopsy in the characterization of brain lesions. Material and Methods A prospective study conducted on 27 consecutive patients presenting with multifocal, diffuse, as well as deeply seated intra-axial brain lesions. All patients had both brain MRI and MRS prior to stereotactic biopsy. Histopathologic examinations of the obtained tissue specimens, using appropriate stains including immunostains, were performed. Results MRS diagnosed neoplastic brain lesions in 15 cases (56%) and nonneoplastic brain lesions in 12 (44%). Correlation between the preoperative diagnosis by MRS and the histopathologic diagnosis following stereotactic biopsy of either a neoplastic or nonneoplastic lesion revealed matching in 25 of 27 cases (sensitivity 88%; specificity 100%). Within the group of cases (n = 15) diagnosed preoperatively by MRS as neoplastic, 12 patients were diagnosed with brain gliomas of different grades. The MRS grading of gliomas exactly matched the histopathologic grading following stereotactic biopsy in 10 of the 12 cases (sensitivity 89%; specificity 67%). Conclusions MRS is a useful addition to the management armamentarium, providing molecular information that assists in the characterization of various brain lesions. Multivoxel MRS may increase the diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsy by guidance to target the higher choline and lower N-acetylaspartate areas, expected to have greater tumor activity. PMID:26935295

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid metabolic profiles in multiple sclerosis and degenerative dementias obtained by high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 19 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 12 patients with degenerative dementia and 17 control patients using in vitro high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 400 MHz. The CSF metabolic profile is slightly modified in MS patients (increased lactate and fructose concentrations, decreased creatinine and phenylalanine concentrations) and is not correlated with the intensity of the intrathecal inflammation. Proton MRS of CSF does not differentiate relapsing-remitting MS and primary progressive MS. We have not detected any specific abnormal resonance in native or lyophilized CSF. The CSF metabolic profile of demented patients is much more altered (increased concentration of lactate, pyruvate, alanine, lysine, valine, leucine-isoleucine, tyrosine, glutamine) and is in agreement with a brain oxidative metabolism impairment as already described in Alzheimer's disease. Unassigned abnormal but non specific or constant resonances have been detected on MR spectra of demented patients. CSF inositol concentration is also increased in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease. In vitro high resolution proton MRS of the CSF constitutes a new and original way to explore CSF for the differential and/or early diagnosis of dementias, as a complement to in vivo proton cerebral MRS. (authors). 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Preliminary analysis of proton magnetic resonance 1D spectra of cerebrospinal fluid and brain cancer extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In series of cerebrospinal fluid samples from 25 patients proton spectra of magnetic resonance were measured. The spectra were measured also for series of brain tumor tissue extracts received from another 25 patients. This paper presents an attempt to apply statistical methods of image recognition for spectra analysis of the two measured series

  7. Quantification of brain metabolites in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, O; Rosenbaum, S; Topp, S;

    1997-01-01

    We performed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in patients with motor neuron disease (MND) to determine the absolute in vivo concentrations in the brain of the metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr/PCr). We examined the spectra acquired from a 20 x 20 x...

  8. Prevalence of incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging: Cuban project to map the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the prevalence of incidental findings in healthy subjects of the Cuban Human Brain Mapping Project sample, it was performed a retrospective descriptive study of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained from 394 healthy subjects that make up the sample of the project, between 2006-2007, with an age range of 18 to 68 years (mean 33,12), of which 269 (68,27 %) are male and 125 (31,73 %) are women. It was shown that 40,36 % had one or more anomaly in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In total, the number of incidental findings was 188, 23,6 % of which were brain findings and 24,11 % were non-brain findings, among the latter, were the sinusopathy with 20,81 % and maxillary polyps with 3,30 %. The most prevalent brain findings were: intrasellar arachnoidocele, 11,93 %, followed by the prominence of the pituitary gland, 5,84 %, ventricular asymmetry, 1,77 % and bone defects, 1,02 %. Other brain abnormalities found with very low prevalence had no pathological significance, except for two cases with brain tumor, which were immediately sent to a specialist. Incidental findings in MRI are common in the general population (40,36 %), being the sinusopathy, and intrasellar arachnoidocele the most common findings. Asymptomatic individuals who have any type of structural abnormality provide invaluable information on the prevalence of these abnormalities in a presumably healthy population, which may be used as references for epidemiological studies

  9. An ultra­high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy study of post exercise brain lactate, glutamate and glutamine change in the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eDennis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolise lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise and, (b to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally-derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise.

  10. EMAG2: A 2-arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, S.; Barckhausen, U.; Berkenbosch, H.; Bournas, N.; Brozena, J.; Childers, V.; Dostaler, F.; Fairhead, J.D.; Finn, C.; von Frese, R.R.B; Gaina, C.; Golynsky, S.; Kucks, R.; Lu, Hai; Milligan, P.; Mogren, S.; Muller, R.D.; Olesen, O.; Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R.; Schreckenberger, B.; Thebault, E.; Tontini, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne magnetic measurements. EMAG2 is a significant update of our previous candidate grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2 arc min, and the altitude has been reduced from 5 km to 4 km above the geoid. Additional grid and track line data have been included, both over land and the oceans. Wherever available, the original shipborne and airborne data were used instead of precompiled oceanic magnetic grids. Interpolation between sparse track lines in the oceans was improved by directional gridding and extrapolation, based on an oceanic crustal age model. The longest wavelengths (>330 km) were replaced with the latest CHAMP satellite magnetic field model MF6. EMAG2 is available at http://geomag.org/models/EMAG2 and for permanent archive at http://earthref.org/ cgi-bin/er.cgi?s=erda.cgi?n=970. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Comparative anatomy of the pig brain : an integrative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the porcine brain with special emphasis on the external morphology of the cerebral cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Verena

    2015-01-01

    For this study the healthy brains of the domestic pigs are examined post mortem. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans in transverse, sagittal and dorsal orientation (native and formalin fixed) are produced with a 1.0 Tesla scanner. 12 sagittal, 13 dorsal and 22 transverse scans are selected and labelled to produce a MRI picture atlas of the porcine brain. With the aid of the graphical software programs AMIRA® and AVIZO® (Mercury Computer Systems Inc.) it was possible to identify brain s...

  12. Influence of type 2 diabetes on brain volumes and changes in brain volumes: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Espeland, MA; Bryan, RN; Goveas, JS; Robinson, JG; Siddiqui, MS; Liu, S.; Hogan, PE; Casanova, R; Coker, LH; Yaffe, K.; Masaki, K.; Rossom, R; Resnick, SM

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To study how type 2 diabetes adversely affects brain volumes, changes in volume, and cognitive function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Regional brain volumes and ischemic lesion volumes in 1,366 women, aged 72-89 years, were measured with structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Repeat scans were collected an average of 4.7 years later in 698 women. Cross-sectional differences and changes with time between women with and without diabetes were compared. Relationships that...

  13. Use of High resolution 3D Diffusion tensor imaging to study brain white matter development in live neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu eCai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available High resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI can provide important information on brain development, yet it is challenging in live neonatal rats due to the small size of neonatal brain and motion-sensitive nature of DTI. Imaging in live neonatal rats has clear advantages over fixed brain scans, as longitudinal and functional studies would be feasible to understand neuro-developmental abnormalities. In this study, we developed imaging strategies that can be used to obtain high resolution 3D DTI images in live neonatal rats at postnatal day 5 (PND5 and postnatal day 14 (PND14, using only 3 hours of imaging acquisition time. An optimized 3D DTI pulse sequence and appropriate animal setup to minimize physiological motion artifacts are the keys to successful high resolution 3D DTI imaging. Thus, a 3D RARE DTI sequence with twin navigator echoes was implemented to accelerate imaging acquisition time and minimize motion artifacts. It has been suggested that neonatal mammals possess a unique ability to tolerate mild to moderate hypothermia and hypoxia without long term impact. Thus, we additionally utilized this ability to minimize motion artifacts in MR images by carefully suppressing the respiratory rate to around 15/min for PND5 and 30/min for PND14 using mild to moderate hypothermia. These imaging strategies have been successfully implemented to study how the effect of cocaine exposure in dams might affect brain development in their rat pups. Image quality resulting from this in vivo DTI study was comparable to ex vivo scans. FA values were also similar between the live and fixed brain scans. The capability of acquiring high quality in vivo DTI imaging offers a valuable opportunity to study many neurological disorders in brain development in an authentic living environment.

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumours: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel to the rapid development of clinical MRI, MR spectroscopy (MRS) has, after starting as an analytical tool used in chemistry and physics, evolved to a noninvasive clinical examination. Most common neuroradiological diagnostic indications for MRS are functional inborn errors, neonatal hypoxia, ischaemia, metabolic diseases, white matter and degenerative diseases, epilepsy, inflammation, infections and intracranial neoplasm. Compared to CT and MRI, well-established morphological diagnostic tools, MRS provides information on the metabolic state of brain tissue. We review the clinical impact of MRS in diagnosis of tumours and their differentiation from non-neoplastic lesions. (orig.)

  15. Whole-genome analysis of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and 5-methylcytosine at base resolution in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Lu; Li, Xianlong; Yan, Liying; Tan, Yuexi; Li, Rong; Zhao, Yangyu; Wang, Yan; Xie, Jingcheng; Zhang, Yan; Song, Chunxiao; Yu, Miao; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Ping; Li, XiaoYu; Hou, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background 5-methylcytosine (mC) can be oxidized by the tet methylcytosine dioxygenase (Tet) family of enzymes to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC), which is an intermediate of mC demethylation and may also be a stable epigenetic modification that influences chromatin structure. hmC is particularly abundant in mammalian brains but its function is currently unknown. A high-resolution hydroxymethylome map is required to fully understand the function of hmC in the human brain. Results We present gen...

  16. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood–brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood–brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  17. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, C; Slabu, I; Wiekhorst, F; Bergemann, C; von Eggeling, F; Hochhaus, A; Trahms, L; Clement, J H

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles' shape, material, size, and coating. PMID:27163489

  18. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  19. Regional magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in autistic individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisaoka, S.; Harada, M.; Nishitani, H. [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Tokushima (Japan); Mori, K. [Dept. of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Tokushima (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    We studied the variations in the concentration of metabolites with brain region and age in autistic individuals and normal controls using multiple analysis of covariance. We examined 55 autistic individuals (2-21 years old, 47 male and eight female) and 51 normal children (3 months-15 years old, 26 boys and 25 girls). Single volumes of interest were placed in the frontal, parietal and temporal region on both sides, the brain stem and cingulate gyrus. The concentration of each metabolite was quantified by the water reference method. The concentration of N-acetylaspartate in the temporal regions (Brodmann's areas 41 and 42) in the autistic individuals were significantly lower than those in the controls (P < 0.05), but concentrations in other regions were not significantly different between the autistic individuals and controls. This suggests low density or dysfunction of neurones in Brodmann's areas 41 and 42 in autistic individual, which might be related to the disturbances of the sensory speech centre (Wernicke's area) in autism. (orig.)

  20. Regional magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in autistic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the variations in the concentration of metabolites with brain region and age in autistic individuals and normal controls using multiple analysis of covariance. We examined 55 autistic individuals (2-21 years old, 47 male and eight female) and 51 normal children (3 months-15 years old, 26 boys and 25 girls). Single volumes of interest were placed in the frontal, parietal and temporal region on both sides, the brain stem and cingulate gyrus. The concentration of each metabolite was quantified by the water reference method. The concentration of N-acetylaspartate in the temporal regions (Brodmann's areas 41 and 42) in the autistic individuals were significantly lower than those in the controls (P < 0.05), but concentrations in other regions were not significantly different between the autistic individuals and controls. This suggests low density or dysfunction of neurones in Brodmann's areas 41 and 42 in autistic individual, which might be related to the disturbances of the sensory speech centre (Wernicke's area) in autism. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesch, C.; Issakainen, J.; Kewitz, G.; Kikinis, R.; Martin, E.; Boltshauser, E.

    1989-01-01

    The children (age 2 months to 8 years) with a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.35 Tesla magnet. CMV infection was confirmed by serological investigations and virus culture in the neonatal period. Nine children had severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy, 1 patient suffered from microcephaly, ataxia and deafness. The cranial MRI examination showed the following abnormalities (N): Dilated lateral ventricles (10) and subarachnoid space (8), oligo/pacgyria (8), delayed/pathological myelination (7), paraventricular cysts (6), intra-cerebral calcification (1). This lack of sensitivity for calcification is explainable by the basic principles of MRI. The paraventricular cystic lesions were adjacent ot the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles and separated only by a thin membrane. This finding might represent a 'new sign' for congenital CMV infection in MRI examinations, being characteristic but nevertheless nonspecific, like calcification in CT.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The children (age 2 months to 8 years) with a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 2.35 Tesla magnet. CMV infection was confirmed by serological investigations and virus culture in the neonatal period. Nine children had severe mental retardation and cerebral palsy, 1 patient suffered from microcephaly, ataxia and deafness. The cranial MRI examination showed the following abnormalities (N): Dilated lateral ventricles (10) and subarachnoid space (8), oligo/pacgyria (8), delayed/pathological myelination (7), paraventricular cysts (6), intra-cerebral calcification (1). This lack of sensitivity for calcification is explainable by the basic principles of MRI. The paraventricular cystic lesions were adjacent ot the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles and separated only by a thin membrane. This finding might represent a 'new sign' for congenital CMV infection in MRI examinations, being characteristic but nevertheless nonspecific, like calcification in CT. (orig.)

  3. Fast Human Brain Magnetic Resonance Responses Associated With Epileptiform Spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Sundaram, Padmavathi; Wells, William M.; Mulkern, Robert V.; Bubrick, Ellen J.; Bromfield, Edward B.; Münch, Mirjam; Orbach, Darren B.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal currents produce local electromagnetic fields that can potentially modulate the phase of the magnetic resonance signal and thus provide a contrast mechanism tightly linked to neuronal activity. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of direct MRI of neuronal activity in phantoms and cell culture, but in vivo efforts have yielded inconclusive, conflicting results. The likelihood of detecting and validating such signals can be increased with (i) fast gradient-echo echo-planar i...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain involvement in aids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive and the most specific technique for the study of the neurological complications of AIDS. The analysis of the images must be aimed at recognizing the specific lesions produced by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in order to identify the opportunistic lesions, which are often multiple. For each major opportunistic disease, a number of arguments likely to guide the treatment can be pointed out

  5. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation is beneficial for enhancing synaptic plasticity in the aging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the aging brain, cognitive function gradually declines and causes a progressive reduction in the structural and functional plasticity of the hippocampus. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an emerging and novel neurological and psychiatric tool used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (≤1 Hz ameliorates synaptic plasticity and spatial cognitive deficits in learning-impaired mice. However, the mechanisms by which this treatment improves these deficits during normal aging are still unknown. Therefore, the current study investigated the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal pathway, synaptic protein markers, and spatial memory behavior in the hippocampus of normal aged mice. The study also investigated the downstream regulator, Fyn kinase, and the downstream effectors, synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 (both synaptic markers, to determine the possible mechanisms by which transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates cognitive capacity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1 Hz increased mRNA and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, and Fyn in the hippocampus of aged mice. The treatment also upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 in the hippocampus of these mice. In conclusion, brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling may play an important role in sustaining and regulating structural synaptic plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in the hippocampus of aging mice, and Fyn may be critical during this regulation. These responses may change the structural plasticity of the aging hippocampus, thereby improving cognitive function.

  6. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation is beneifcial for enhancing synaptic plasticity in the aging brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-chi Zhang; Feng Luan; Chun-yan Xie; Dan-dan Geng; Yan-yong Wang; Jun Ma

    2015-01-01

    In the aging brain, cognitive function gradually declines and causes a progressive reduction in the structural and functional plasticity of the hippocampus. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an emerging and novel neurological and psychiatric tool used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (≤1 Hz) ameliorates synaptic plasticity and spatial cognitive deifcits in learning-im-paired mice. However, the mechanisms by which this treatment improves these deifcits during normal aging are still unknown. Therefore, the current study investigated the effects of tran-scranial magnetic stimulation on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal pathway, synaptic protein markers, and spatial memory behavior in the hippocampus of normal aged mice. The study also investigated the downstream regulator, Fyn kinase, and the downstream effectors, syn-aptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 (both synaptic markers), to determine the possible mechanisms by which transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates cognitive capacity. Transcra-nial magnetic stimulation with low intensity (110%average resting motor threshold intensity, 1 Hz) increased mRNA and protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, and Fyn in the hippocampus of aged mice. The treatment also upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 in the hippo-campus of these mice. In conclusion, brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling may play an important role in sustaining and regulating structural synaptic plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in the hippocampus of aging mice, and Fyn may be critical during this reg-ulation. These responses may change the structural plasticity of the aging hippocampus, thereby improving cognitive function.

  7. Magnetic bead-quantum dot assay for detection of a biomarker for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chloe; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-10-01

    Current diagnostic methods for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which accounts for 15% of all emergency room visits, are limited to neuroimaging modalities. The challenges of accurate diagnosis and monitoring of TBI have created the need for a simple and sensitive blood test to detect brain-specific biomarkers. Here we report on an assay for detection of S100B, a putative biomarker for TBI, using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads for capture of the protein, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. From Western Blot, we show efficient antigen capture and concentration by the magnetic beads. Using magnetic bead capture and quantum dot detection in serum samples, we show a wide detection range and detection limit below the clinical cut-off level.Current diagnostic methods for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which accounts for 15% of all emergency room visits, are limited to neuroimaging modalities. The challenges of accurate diagnosis and monitoring of TBI have created the need for a simple and sensitive blood test to detect brain-specific biomarkers. Here we report on an assay for detection of S100B, a putative biomarker for TBI, using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads for capture of the protein, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. From Western Blot, we show efficient antigen capture and concentration by the magnetic beads. Using magnetic bead capture and quantum dot detection in serum samples, we show a wide detection range and detection limit below the clinical cut-off level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05608j

  8. On the Voxel Size and Magnetic Field Strength Dependence of Spectral Resolution in MR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fleysher, Roman; Fleysher, Lazar; Liu, Songtao; Gonen, Oded

    2008-01-01

    While the inherent low sensitivity of in vivo MR spectroscopy motivated a trend towards higher magnetic fields, B0, it since has become apparent that this increase does not seem to translate into the anticipated improvement in spectral resolution. This is attributed to the decrease of the transverse relaxation time, T2*, in vivo due to macro- and mesoscopic tissue susceptibility. Using spectral contrast to noise ratio arguments we show that if in biological systems the linewidth (on the frequ...

  9. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging analysis of breast cancer xenograft on the chick chorioallantoic membrane

    OpenAIRE

    ZUO, ZHI

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis an age-adapted cooling regime for immobilization of the chick embryo is proposed. Reliable immobilization completely avoided motion artifacts, enabling high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chicken embryo and also tumor xenograft on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Tumor growth monitoring was firstly evaluated after xenotransplantation of MDA-MB-231 cells on the CAM. Tumor volumes were monitored from day 4 to day 9 after grafting applying a T2-weighted R...

  10. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) studies on meat components: potentialities and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Sacco; Gino Vonghia; Francesco Giannico; Daniela Sacco; Vincenzo di Martino; Anna Caputi Jambrenghi; Maria Antonietta Brescia

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, increasing application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the study of the agricultur-  al food products has been remarked, thanks to the advantages of this technique over other conventional analytical tech-  niques. This preliminary work presents, for the first time, the application of an innovative NMR technique, the  proton  high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS), for studying meat features. It stresses that this method makes ...

  11. Studies of phospholipid hydration by high-resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Z.; Sayer, B G; Hughes, D. W.; Stark, R E; Epand, R M

    1999-01-01

    A sample preparation method using spherical glass ampoules has been used to achieve 1.5-Hz resolution in 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of aqueous multilamellar dispersions of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), serving to differentiate between slowly exchanging interlamellar and bulk water and to reveal new molecular-level information about hydration phenomena in these model biolo...

  12. Internal brain motion pumping of CSF using high-resolution velocity MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MR velocity density (MRVD) technique able to detect velocities as low as 0.4 mm/sec was applied to obtain images of the brain synchronized to the cardiac cycle in 25 healthy subjects and five patients. During systole (100-200 msec after the R wave), MRVD images demonstrated a caudad velocity in the central regions of the brain, most prominent in the brain stem (up to 1.5 mm/sec). This caudad brain motion and the synchronous ejection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the ventricles into the basal cisterns, taken together, strongly suggest a cardiac-driven pumping action of the brain on the CSF

  13. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  14. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  15. Dynamic neuroimaging of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, G V; Pflieger, M E; Foxe, J J; Ahlfors, S P; Vaughan, H G; Hrabe, J; Ilmoniemi, R J; Lantos, G

    1995-09-01

    To fully characterize the brain processes underlying sensorimotor and cognitive function, the spatial distribution of active regions, their interconnected regions must be measured. We describe methods for imaging brain sources from surface-recorded EEG and magnetoencephalographic data, called electromagnetic source imaging (EMSI). EMSI provides brain source locations within the common framework of magnetic resonance (MR) images of brain anatomy. This allows integration of data from other functional brain imaging methods, like positron emission tomography and functional MR imaging, which can improve the accuracy of EMSI localization. EMSI also provides submillisecond temporal resolution of the dynamic processes within brain systems. Examples are given of applications to visual perceptual and attentional studies. PMID:8576389

  16. Focused Azimuthally E-Polarized Vector Beam and Spatial Magnetic Resolution below the Diffraction Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Veysi, Mehdi; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    An azimuthally E-polarized vector beam (AEVB) has a salient feature that it contains a magnetic-dominant region within which electric field has a null and longitudinal magnetic field is maximum. Fresnel diffraction theory and plane-wave spectral (PWS) calculations are applied to quantify the field features of such a beam upon focusing through a lens. The diffraction-limited full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the beams longitudinal magnetic field intensity profile and complementary FWHM (CFWHM) of the beam's annular-shaped total electric field intensity profile are calculated at the lens's focal plane as a function of the lens's paraxial focal distance. Subsequently, we demonstrate, for the first time, that a very high resolution magnetic field at optical frequency with the total magnetic field FWHM of 0.23{\\lambda}(magnetic field spot size of 0.04{\\lambda}^2) can be achieved by placing a subwavelength dense dielectric Mie scatterer in the minimum-waist plane of a self-standing converging AEVB. The theory sh...

  17. Phase separation and magnetic ordering studied by high resolution neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In a previous work on the (U1-xNdx)Co2Ge2 system, two magnetic transitions were observed in the temperature dependencies of the magnetic susceptibility and in the intensity of the magnetic reflections in neutron diffraction [1]. Because of insufficient resolution, it was not clear whether this is due to clustering or phase separation. In both cases the U-rich regions are expected to order magnetically at higher temperature than the U-poor ones, resulting in two magnetic transitions. In order to resolve this question a temperature dependent TOF neutron diffraction of the x = 0.25 compound has been performed on the SEPD at Argonne's IPNS [2]. The temperature dependent diffractograms were refined by the Rietveld method. It was found that the compound separates into two phases: x = 0.4 (55 wt%) and x = 0.1 (45 wt%). The temperature dependence of the magnetic moment was obtained for each phase, with the transition temperatures: TN(x=0.4) = 130 K, and TN(x=0.1) = 165 K. (author) [1] E. Caspi et al., Phys. Rev. B, 57 (198) 449.; [2] J.D. Jorgensen et al., J. Appl. Cryst. 22 (1989) 321

  18. Wilson's disease: start with psychiatric symptoms. Brain magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson's disease - hepatolenticular degeneration - is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder, characterized by an excessive and toxic accumulation of cooper in different tissues. This accumulation is produced by an inherited defect in cooper's biliary excretion. This rare disorder affects approximately one on 30.000 individuals. Signs and symptoms of hepatic, neurologic and psychiatric disease are the most common clinical presentations of symptomatic Wilson's disease. The diagnosis can usually be made by laboratory tests that find a decreased cooper binding protein in blood called ceruloplasmin, an increase in the excretion of cooper in 24 hour urine and the appearance of corneal Kayser-Fleischer ring. We present a 28 years patient who began with depression and panic attacks, followed by neurologic symptoms. Brain MRI was performed and showed different alterations suggesting the diagnosis of this infrequent sickness. (author)

  19. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of primary brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Daniel; Kingston, Sara; Hoque, Kristina E; Law, Meng; Shiroishi, Mark S

    2014-08-01

    Gliomas comprise 80% of primary brain neoplasms, with glioblastoma multiforme being the most commonly diagnosed glioma. The annual incidence is 5.26 per 100,000, or 17,000 newly diagnosed cases per year in the United States. The incidence increases with age, peaking between the 6th and 8th decades. Gliomas are more common among Caucasians and occur more often in men. They can be associated with certain rare hereditary syndromes including Cowden, Turcot, Li-Fraumeni, neurofibromatosis type 1 and type 2, tuberous sclerosis, and familial schwannomatosis. Known risk factors include a history of ionizing radiation, family history of glioma, and certain genetic susceptibility variants that are weakly associated with glioma. Preventative measures have not been shown to decrease the risk of later development. In addition, screening tests are unwarranted since early diagnosis and treatment have not been shown to improve outcome. PMID:25173141

  20. Resolution Enhanced Magnetic Sensing System for Wide Coverage Real Time UXO Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Bregman, Yuri; Salomonski, Nizan; Zafrir, Hovav

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we present a new high resolution automatic detection algorithm based upon a Wavelet transform and then validate it in marine related experiments. The proposed approach allows obtaining an automatic detection in a very low signal to noise ratios. The amount of calculations is reduced, the magnetic trend is depressed and the probability of detection/ false alarm rate can easily be controlled. Moreover, the algorithm enables to distinguish between close targets. In the algorithm we use the physical dependence of the magnetic field of a magnetic dipole in order to define a Wavelet mother function that later on can detect magnetic targets modeled as dipoles and embedded in noisy surrounding, at improved resolution. The proposed algorithm was realized on synthesized targets and then validated in field experiments involving a marine surface-floating system for wide coverage real time unexploded ordinance (UXO) detection and mapping. The detection probability achieved in the marine experiment was above 90%. The horizontal radial error of most of the detected targets was only 16 m and two baseline targets that were immersed about 20 m one to another could easily be distinguished.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiao; ZHANG Xue-ning; ZHANG Yun-ting; YU Chun-shui; XU De-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors.Data sources Published articles about assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors were selected using PubMed. The search terms were "MRI", "gamma knife" and "brain tumors".Study selection Articles regarding the MRI techniques using for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife were selected.Results MRI techniques, especially diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, are useful for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife by detecting the hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. Moreover, they can also provide important information on prognosis.Conclusions Diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors, and also information of tumor progression or recurrence earlier than conventional MRI. But there are still many questions to be answered which should be based on the development and advancement of MRI and related disciplines.

  2. Stellar magnetic field parameters from a Bayesian analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, V

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a Bayesian statistical method designed to infer the magnetic properties of stars observed using high-resolution circular spectropolarimetry in the context of large surveys. This approach is well suited for analysing stars for which the stellar rotation period is not known, and therefore the rotational phases of the observations are ambiguous. The model assumes that the magnetic observations correspond to a dipole oblique rotator, a situation commonly encountered in intermediate and high-mass stars. Using reasonable assumptions regarding the model parameter prior probability density distributions, the Bayesian algorithm determines the posterior probability densities corresponding to the surface magnetic field geometry and strength by performing a comparison between the observed and computed Stokes V profiles. Based on the results of numerical simulations, we conclude that this method yields a useful estimate of the surface dipole field strength based on a small number (i.e. 1 or 2) of...

  3. A milliKelvin scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance of a novel scanning Hall probe microscope for milliKelvin magnetic imaging with submicron lateral resolution is presented. The microscope head is housed in the vacuum chamber of a commercial 3He-refrigerator and operates between room temperature and 300 mK in magnetic fields up to 10 T. Mapping of the local magnetic induction at the sample surface is performed by a micro-fabricated 2DEG Hall probe equipped with an integrated STM tip. The latter provides a reliable mechanism of surface tracking by sensing and controlling the tunnel currents. We discuss the results of tests of the system and illustrate its potential with images of suitable reference samples captured in different modes of operation.

  4. Whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging of human brain during voluntary movements of dominant and subdominant hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To identify the neural substrates of voluntary movements of dominant and subdominant hands by using the whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Seven right-handed healthy volunteers were scanned at a Sonata 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner (Siemens) while they were performing the visually instructive movement tasks with their right and left index fingers. Image data were co-registered to correct head motion, spatially normalized according to the standard coordinates, and spatially smoothed with isotopic Guassian Kernel. Statistical parametric maps (activation maps) for right and left hands were generated respectively by cross-correlation analysis. Results: Voluntary movements of the right/dominant hand mainly activated contralateral primary motor cortex (MI), bilateral supplementary motor area (SMA), bilateral second motor area (MII), and ipsilateral cerebellum, whereas movements of the left/subdominant hand additionally elicited activation in contralateral premotor area (PMC). Moreover, activation volumes in SMA and MII during movements of the subdominant hand were significantly larger than those during movements of the dominant hand. Conclusion: A large set of structures in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum is involved in voluntary movements, as revealed by whole brain-based fMRI. Movements of the subdominant hand are more dependent on higher control areas, such as SMA and PMC, comparing to movements of the dominant hand

  5. Magnetic nanoformulation of azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate for targeted delivery across the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainulabedin M Saiyed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Zainulabedin M Saiyed, Nimisha H Gandhi, Madhavan PN Nair1Department of Immunology, College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Despite significant advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, the prevalence of neuroAIDS remains high. This is mainly attributed to inability of antiretroviral therapy (ART to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB, thus resulting in insufficient drug concentration within the brain. Therefore, development of an active drug targeting system is an attractive strategy to increase the efficacy and delivery of ART to the brain. We report herein development of magnetic azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate (AZTTP liposomal nanoformulation and its ability to transmigrate across an in vitro BBB model by application of an external magnetic field. We hypothesize that this magnetically guided nanoformulation can transverse the BBB by direct transport or via monocyte-mediated transport. Magnetic AZTTP liposomes were prepared using a mixture of phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol. The average size of prepared liposomes was about 150 nm with maximum drug and magnetite loading efficiency of 54.5% and 45.3%, respectively. Further, magnetic AZTTP liposomes were checked for transmigration across an in vitro BBB model using direct or monocyte-mediated transport by application of an external magnetic field. The results show that apparent permeability of magnetic AZTTP liposomes was 3-fold higher than free AZTTP. Also, the magnetic AZTTP liposomes were efficiently taken up by monocytes and these magnetic monocytes showed enhanced transendothelial migration compared to normal/non-magnetic monocytes in presence of an external magnetic field. Thus, we anticipate that the developed magnetic nanoformulation can be used for targeting active nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors to the brain by application of an external magnetic force and thereby eliminate the brain HIV reservoir and help

  6. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for investigating causal brain-behavioral relationships and their time course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinska, Magdalena W; Vitello, Sylvia; Devlin, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a safe, non-invasive brain stimulation technique that uses a strong electromagnet in order to temporarily disrupt information processing in a brain region, generating a short-lived "virtual lesion." Stimulation that interferes with task performance indicates that the affected brain region is necessary to perform the task normally. In other words, unlike neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that indicate correlations between brain and behavior, TMS can be used to demonstrate causal brain-behavior relations. Furthermore, by varying the duration and onset of the virtual lesion, TMS can also reveal the time course of normal processing. As a result, TMS has become an important tool in cognitive neuroscience. Advantages of the technique over lesion-deficit studies include better spatial-temporal precision of the disruption effect, the ability to use participants as their own control subjects, and the accessibility of participants. Limitations include concurrent auditory and somatosensory stimulation that may influence task performance, limited access to structures more than a few centimeters from the surface of the scalp, and the relatively large space of free parameters that need to be optimized in order for the experiment to work. Experimental designs that give careful consideration to appropriate control conditions help to address these concerns. This article illustrates these issues with TMS results that investigate the spatial and temporal contributions of the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG) to reading. PMID:25079670

  7. 3D-visualization of intracranial vessels and brain anatomy in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a 3D-image processing approach to generate a combination display of intracranial vessels and adjacent brain tissue surfaces in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The algorithm is based on the ray-tracing principle and may be regarded as a union of the techniques of surface integration and maximum intensity projection (MIP). Measurement methods and preprocessing steps of acquisition of a flow-compensated vessel dataset and a T1 weighted tissue volume with isolated brain with equal partitioning are described. The method is intended as a tool for the optimization of neurosurgical planning

  8. Effect of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Patients with Brain Injury and Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Leesuk; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Bo Ryun; Lee, Sook Joung

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on recovery of the swallowing function in patients with a brain injury. Method Patients with a brain injury and dysphagia were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to sham, and low and high frequency stimulation groups. We performed rTMS at 100% of motor evoked potential (MEP) threshold and a 5 Hz frequency for 10 seconds and then repeated this every minute in the high frequency group. In the low f...

  9. Computer-Aided Diagnosis Systems for Brain Diseases in Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Yamashita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the basics and recent researches of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD systems for assisting neuroradiologists in detection of brain diseases, e.g., asymptomatic unruptured aneurysms, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and multiple sclerosis (MS, in magnetic resonance (MR images. The CAD systems consist of image feature extraction based on image processing techniques and machine learning classifiers such as linear discriminant analysis, artificial neural networks, and support vector machines. We introduce useful examples of the CAD systems in the neuroradiology, and conclude with possibilities in the future of the CAD systems for brain diseases in MR images.

  10. Mapping Social Behavior-Induced Brain Activation at Cellular Resolution in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Yongsoo Kim; Kannan Umadevi Venkataraju; Kith Pradhan; Carolin Mende; Julian Taranda; Srinivas C. Turaga; Ignacio Arganda-Carreras; Lydia Ng; Michael J. Hawrylycz; Kathleen S. Rockland; H. Sebastian Seung; Pavel Osten

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP-positive neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference bra...

  11. Magnetic resonance brain tissue segmentation based on sparse representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation or delineation of specific organs and structures in medical images is an important task in the clinical diagnosis and treatment, since it allows to characterize pathologies through imaging measures (biomarkers). In brain imaging, segmentation of main tissues or specific structures is challenging, due to the anatomic variability and complexity, and the presence of image artifacts (noise, intensity inhomogeneities, partial volume effect). In this paper, an automatic segmentation strategy is proposed, based on sparse representations and coupled dictionaries. Image intensity patterns are singly related to tissue labels at the level of small patches, gathering this information in coupled intensity/segmentation dictionaries. This dictionaries are used within a sparse representation framework to find the projection of a new intensity image onto the intensity dictionary, and the same projection can be used with the segmentation dictionary to estimate the corresponding segmentation. Preliminary results obtained with two publicly available datasets suggest that the proposal is capable of estimating adequate segmentations for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissues, with an average overlapping of 0:79 for GM and 0:71 for WM (with respect to original segmentations).

  12. Brain damages in ketamine addicts as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eWang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, a known antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA glutamate receptors, had been used as an anesthetic particularly for pediatric or for cardiac patients. Unfortunately, ketamine has become an abusive drug in many parts of the world while chronic and prolonged usage led to damages of many organs including the brain. However, no studies on possible damages in the brains induced by chronic ketamine abuse have been documented in the human via neuroimaging. This paper described for the first time via employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI the changes in ketamine addicts of 0.5 to 12 years and illustrated the possible brain regions susceptible to ketamine abuse. Twenty-one ketamine addicts were recruited and the results showed that the lesions in the brains of ketamine addicts were located in many regions which appeared 2-4 years after ketamine addiction. Cortical atrophy was usually evident in the frontal, parietal or occipital cortices of addicts. Such study confirmed that many brain regions in the human were susceptible to chronic ketamine injury and presented a diffuse effect of ketamine on the brain which might differ from other central nervous system (CNS drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine.

  13. Prenatal magnetic resonance imaging: brain normal linear biometric values below 24 gestational weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently used to measure quantitative data concerning brain structural development. At present, morphometric MR imaging studies have been focused mostly on the third trimester of gestational age. However, in many countries, because of legal restriction on abortion timing, the majority of MR imaging fetal examination has to be carried out during the last part of the second trimester of pregnancy (i.e., before the 24th week of gestation). Accurate and reliable normative data of the brain between 20 and 24 weeks of gestation is not available. This report provides easy and practical parametric support to assess those normative data. From a database of 1,200 fetal MR imaging studies, we retrospectively selected 84 studies of the brain of fetuses aged 20-24 weeks of gestation that resulted normal on clinical and radiological follow-up. Fetuses with proved or suspected infections, twin pregnancy, and fetuses of mothers affected by pathology that might have influenced fetal growth were excluded. Linear biometrical measurements of the main cerebral structures were obtained by three experienced pediatric neuroradiologists. A substantial interobserver agreement for each measurements was reached, and normative data with median, maximum, and minimum value were obtained for brain structures. The knowledge of a range of normality and interindividual variability of linear biometrical values for the developing brain between 20th and 24th weeks of gestation may be valuable in assessing normal brain development in clinical settings. (orig.)

  14. Time-difference imaging of magnetic induction tomography in a three-layer brain physical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a contactless and noninvasive technique to reconstruct the conductivity distribution in a human cross-section. In this paper, we want to study the feasibility of imaging the low-contrast perturbation and small volume object in human brains. We construct a three-layer brain physical phantom which mimics the real conductivity distribution of brains by introducing an artificial skull layer. Using our MIT data acquisition system on this phantom and differential algorithm, we have obtained a series of reconstructed images of conductivity perturbation objects. All of the conductivity perturbation objects in the brain phantom can be clearly distinguished in the reconstructed images. The minimum detectable conductivity difference between the object and the background is 0.03 S m−1 (12.5%). The minimum detectable inner volume of the objects is 3.4 cm3. The three-layer brain physical phantom is able to simulate the conductivity distribution of the main structures of a human brain. The images of the low-contrast perturbation and small volume object show the prospect of MIT in the future. (paper)

  15. Prenatal magnetic resonance imaging: brain normal linear biometric values below 24 gestational weeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parazzini, C.; Righini, A.; Triulzi, F. [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Rustico, M. [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Milan (Italy); Consonni, D. [Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Unit of Epidemiology, Milan (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently used to measure quantitative data concerning brain structural development. At present, morphometric MR imaging studies have been focused mostly on the third trimester of gestational age. However, in many countries, because of legal restriction on abortion timing, the majority of MR imaging fetal examination has to be carried out during the last part of the second trimester of pregnancy (i.e., before the 24th week of gestation). Accurate and reliable normative data of the brain between 20 and 24 weeks of gestation is not available. This report provides easy and practical parametric support to assess those normative data. From a database of 1,200 fetal MR imaging studies, we retrospectively selected 84 studies of the brain of fetuses aged 20-24 weeks of gestation that resulted normal on clinical and radiological follow-up. Fetuses with proved or suspected infections, twin pregnancy, and fetuses of mothers affected by pathology that might have influenced fetal growth were excluded. Linear biometrical measurements of the main cerebral structures were obtained by three experienced pediatric neuroradiologists. A substantial interobserver agreement for each measurements was reached, and normative data with median, maximum, and minimum value were obtained for brain structures. The knowledge of a range of normality and interindividual variability of linear biometrical values for the developing brain between 20th and 24th weeks of gestation may be valuable in assessing normal brain development in clinical settings. (orig.)

  16. Rapid eye movement-related brain activation in human sleep: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrle, Renate; Czisch, Michael; Kaufmann, Christian; Wetter, Thomas C; Holsboer, Florian; Auer, Dorothee P; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2005-05-31

    In animal models, ponto-geniculo-occipital waves appear as an early sign of rapid eye movement sleep and may be functionally significant for brain plasticity processes. In this pilot study, we use a combined polysomnographic and functional magnetic resonance imaging approach, and show distinct magnetic resonance imaging signal increases in the posterior thalamus and occipital cortex in close temporal relationship to rapid eye movements during human rapid eye movement sleep. These findings are consistent with cell recordings in animal experiments and demonstrate that functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized to detect ponto-geniculo-occipital-like activity in humans. Studying intact neuronal networks underlying sleep regulation is no longer confined to animal models, but has been shown to be feasible in humans by a combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalograph approach. PMID:15891584

  17. Magnetic field measurements at milliarcsecond resolution around massive young stellar objects

    CERN Document Server

    Surcis, G; van Langevelde, H J; Kramer, B Hutawarakorn; Bartkiewicz, A; Engelkamp, H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields have only recently been included in theoretical simulations of high-mass star formation. The simulations show that magnetic fields can play a crucial role not only in the formation and dynamics of molecular outflows, but also in the evolution of circumstellar disks. Therefore, new measurements of magnetic fields at milliarcsecond resolution close to massive young stellar objects (YSOs) are fundamental for providing new input for numerical simulations and for understanding the formation process of massive stars. The polarized emission of 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers allows us to investigate the magnetic field close to the massive YSO where the outflows and disks are formed. Recently, we have detected with the EVN CH3OH maser polarized emission towards 10 massive YSOs. From a first statistical analysis we have found evidence that magnetic fields are primarily oriented along the molecular outflows. To improve our statistics we are carrying on a large observational EVN campaign for a total of 19 sources, ...

  18. The magnetic fields of Ap stars from high resolution Stokes IQUV spectropolarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, James

    In this thesis we describe the acquisition of high resolution time resolved spectropolarimetric observations of 7 (bright and well understood) Ap stars in Stokes IQUV using the ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the 2m Telescope Bernard Lyot at Pic du Midi Observatory. We compare these observations with those obtained a decade earlier using the MuSiCoS spectropolarimeter to confirm consistency with the older data and provide evidence that both ESPaDOnS and Narval perform as expected in all Stokes parameters. We demonstrate that our refined longitudinal magnetic field and linear polarisation measurements for these 7 stars are of much greater quality than was previously obtained with MuSiCoS and that the global magnetic properties of these stars are stable over a long timescale. The ultimate aim of these new data is to provide a basis from which mapping of both the magnetic field and abundance structures can be performed on our target stars. We then describe magnetic field mapping of the Ap star alpha 2 CVn using these data. This mapping is achieved with the use of tomographic inversion of Doppler-broadened Stokes IQUV profiles of a large variety of spectral lines using the INVERS10 Magnetic Doppler imaging code. We show that not only are the new magnetic field maps of alpha 2 CVn consistent with a previous generation of maps of alpha 2 CVn, but that the same magnetic field topology can be derived from a variety of atomic line sets. This indicates that the magnetic field we derive for alpha2 CVn is a realistic representation of the star's true magnetic topology. Finally we investigate surface abundance structures for alpha 2 CVn for various chemical elements. We investigate the correlation between the location of these abundance features and the magnetic field of alpha 2 CVn. We will demonstrate that whilst the magnetic field plays a role in the formation of abundance structures, the current theoretical framework does

  19. High Resolution Magnetic Anomaly Imaging of Southern McMurdo Sound (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, M.; Gaya Pique, L. R.; Pignatelli, A.; Wilson, T.

    2004-12-01

    During the 2003-04 austral summer season, a low-altitude, high-resolution airborne magnetic survey was conducted in the area of Southern McMurdo Sound, western Ross Sea, in the framework of the joint Italian-US initiative called GEOIMAG (GEOphysical IMAGing of Antarctic tectonic and volcanic units in the Transantarctic Mountains and Ross Sea area). The survey was flown by helicopter from McMurdo Station, at a constant terrain clearance of 70 m. Profile spacing was 350 m. The resolution of the survey, the accuracy of the data acquisition, and a preliminary digital enhancement of the processed magnetic data have contributed to highlight the short-wavelength component of the regional magnetic anomaly field, resolving volcanic bodies and faults. A broad positive anomaly tapers northward from the volcanic Brown Peninsula. The breadth and low amplitude of the anomaly suggests this may mark relatively thin deposits of volcanic material on or near the seafloor. High-frequency and high-amplitude anomalies are associated with the volcanic Daily Islands at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. Anomalies of similar amplitude and size in adjacent areas indicate additional volcanic cones occur on the seafloor and beneath the ice sheet. Low-amplitude, curvilinear anomalies with a convex shape toward McMurdo Sound occur offshore of the outlet of Ferrar Glacier and extending southward parallel to the coastline. The new data are being integrated with a multi-source database (magnetic, digital terrain data, bathymetry, regional structural trends) to obtain an unprecedented view of the magnetic signature of the major tectonic elements in the area. The structural and volcanic framework resulting from this investigation will provide important site survey information for the proposed ANDRILL drill sites in southern McMurdo Sound.

  20. Region specific optimization of continuous linear attenuation coefficients based on UTE (RESOLUTE): application to PET/MR brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Benoit, Didier; Law, Ian; Holm, Søren; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of PET brain data in a PET/MR hybrid scanner is challenging in the absence of transmission sources, where MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The main challenge of MR-AC is to separate bone and air, as neither have a signal in traditional MR images, and to assign the correct linear attenuation coefficient to bone. The ultra-short echo time (UTE) MR sequence was proposed as a basis for MR-AC as this sequence shows a small signal in bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new clinically feasible MR-AC method with patient specific continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficients in bone that provides accurate reconstructed PET image data. A total of 164 [18F]FDG PET/MR patients were included in this study, of which 10 were used for training. MR-AC was based on either standard CT (reference), UTE or our method (RESOLUTE). The reconstructed PET images were evaluated in the whole brain, as well as regionally in the brain using a ROI-based analysis. Our method segments air, brain, cerebral spinal fluid, and soft tissue voxels on the unprocessed UTE TE images, and uses a mapping of R2* values to CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to measure the density in bone voxels. The average error of our method in the brain was 0.1% and less than 1.2% in any region of the brain. On average 95% of the brain was within  ±10% of PETCT, compared to 72% when using UTE. The proposed method is clinically feasible, reducing both the global and local errors on the reconstructed PET images, as well as limiting the number and extent of the outliers.

  1. How does transcranial magnetic stimulation modify neuronal activity in the brain? Implications for studies of cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebner, Hartwig R; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Kassuba, Tanja;

    2009-01-01

    cortex is at the time the stimulus is applied: if many neurones are close to firing threshold then the more of them are recruited by the pulse than at rest. Many studies have noted this context-dependent modulation. However, it is often assumed that the excitability of an area has a simple relationship......Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) uses a magnetic field to "carry" a short lasting electrical current pulse into the brain where it stimulates neurones, particularly in superficial regions of cerebral cortex. TMS can interfere with cognitive functions in two ways. A high intensity TMS pulse...... in the human brain. This transient neurodisruption has been termed a "virtual lesion". Smaller intensities of stimulation produce less activity; in such cases, cognitive operations can probably continue but are disrupted because of the added noisy input from the TMS pulse. It is usually argued that...

  2. Quantitative magnetic resonance and isotopic imaging: early evaluation of radiation injury to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Using magnetic resonance (MR) and isotopic imaging to investigate the cerebral alterations after high-dose single-fraction irradiation on a pig model. We assessed the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times as early markers of radiation injury to the healthy brain. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 animals was studied; 15 irradiated and 2 unirradiated controls. Pigs were irradiated with a 12 MeV electron beam at a rate of 2 Gy/min. Ten animals received 40 Gy at the 90% isodose, five animals received 60 Gy, and two animals were unirradiated. The follow-up intervals ranged from 2 days to 6 months. T1-weighted scans, T2-weighted scans, and scintigrams were performed on all animals to study neurological abnormalities, cerebral blood flow, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. T1 and T2 relaxation times were measured in selected regions of interest (ROIs) within the irradiated and contralateral hemispheres. A ratio T1 after irradiation/T1 before irradiation, and a ratio T2 after irradiation/T2 before irradiation, were calculated, pooled for each dose group, and followed as a function of time after irradiation. Results: Scintigraphy visualized the brain perfusion defect and BBB disruption in all irradiated brains. The ratio T2 after irradiation/T2 before irradiation was proportional to the effective dose received. The T2 ratio kinetics could be analyzed in three phases: an immediate and transient phase, two long-lasting phases, which preceded compression of the irradiated lateral ventricle, and edema and necrosis at later stages of radiation injury, respectively. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) observations correlated well with histological analysis. Conclusion: The results show that quantitative imaging is a sensitive in vivo method for early detection of cerebral radiation injury. The reliability and dose dependence of T2 relaxation time may offer new opportunities to detect and understand brain pathophysiology after high-dose single

  3. Dynamic characterisation of brain tumours growth from time series of nuclear magnetic resonance scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of a high grade glioblastoma of a patient undergoing radio-therapy has been analysed by considering a mathematical model which simulates the brain tumour growth within a two-dimensional domain defined by the brain and ventricles geometry. This simulated behaviour was compared with morphological data obtained from successive nuclear magnetic resonance scans of the patient. The model parameters include the proliferation rate and the diffusion coefficient of the tumour cells as well as their sensitivity to the irradiation. They were estimated using optimisation techniques to minimise the distance between simulated tumour area and scan data from different brain sections. The relevance of this quantitative estimation for the prognosis and for the consideration of additional parameters in the pre and post therapeutic evaluation of glioma is discussed. (authors). 12 refs., 2 figs

  4. Spatiotemporal Modeling of Brain Dynamics Using Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Gaussian Hidden Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyang; Langley, Jason; Chen, Xiangchuan; Hu, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Analyzing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time courses with dynamic approaches has generated a great deal of interest because of the additional temporal features that can be extracted. In this work, to systemically model spatiotemporal patterns of the brain, a Gaussian hidden Markov model (GHMM) was adopted to model the brain state switching process. We assumed that the brain switches among a number of different brain states as a Markov process and used multivariate Gaussian distributions to represent the spontaneous activity patterns of brain states. This model was applied to resting-state fMRI data from 100 subjects in the Human Connectome Project and detected nine highly reproducible brain states and their temporal and transition characteristics. Our results indicate that the GHMM can unveil brain dynamics that may provide additional insights regarding the brain at resting state. PMID:27008543

  5. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Yang LIU; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present stu...

  6. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwen Song; LiZhuang Yang; Anna zilverstand; Xiaochu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state...

  7. Effect of slice thickness on brain magnetic resonance image texture analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Heinonen Tomi; Luukkaala Tiina; Harrison Lara CV; Savio Sami J; Dastidar Prasun; Soimakallio Seppo; Eskola Hannu J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The accuracy of texture analysis in clinical evaluation of magnetic resonance images depends considerably on imaging arrangements and various image quality parameters. In this paper, we study the effect of slice thickness on brain tissue texture analysis using a statistical approach and classification of T1-weighted images of clinically confirmed multiple sclerosis patients. Methods We averaged the intensities of three consecutive 1-mm slices to simulate 3-mm slices. Two h...

  8. Correlation between voxel based morphometry and manual volumetry in magnetic resonance images of the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo R. Uchida; Cristina M. Del-Ben; David Araújo; Geraldo Busatto-Filho; Duran, Fábio L.S.; Crippa, José A. S.; Graeff, Frederico G.

    2008-01-01

    This is a comparative study between manual volumetry (MV) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) as methods of evaluating the volume of brain structures in magnetic resonance images. The volumes of the hippocampus and the amygdala of 16 panic disorder patients and 16 healthy controls measured through MV were correlated with the volumes of gray matter estimated by optimized modulated VBM. The chosen structures are composed almost exclusively of gray matter. Using a 4 mm Gaussian filter, statistical...

  9. Theta, alpha and beta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation: brain modulation in tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Some forms of tinnitus are considered to be auditory phantom phenomena related to reorganization and hyperactivity of the auditory central nervous system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive tool capable of modulating human brain activity, using single pulse or burst stimuli. Burst rTMS has only been performed in the theta range, and has not been used clinically. The authors analyze whether burst TMS at theta (5 Hz), alpha (10 Hz) and beta (20 H...

  10. Current and future applications of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the brain in hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VP Bob Grover; M Alex Dresner; Daniel M Forton; Serena Counsell; David J Larkman; Nayna Patel; Howard C Thomas; Simon D Taylor-Robinson

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease and results from hepatocellular failure and/or portosystemic shunting.The manifestations of HE are widely variable and involve a spectrum from mild subclinical disturbance to deep coma. Research interest has focused on the role of circulating gut-derived toxins, particularly ammonia, the development of brain swelling and changes in cerebral neurotransmitter systems that lead to global CNS depression and disordered function. Until recently the direct investigation of cerebral function has been difficult in man. However, new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide a non-invasive means of assessment of changes in brain volume (coregistered MRI) and impaired brain function (fMRI), while proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) detects changes in brain biochemistry, including direct measurement of cerebral osmolytes, such as myoinositol, glutamate and glutamine which govern processes intrinsic to cellular homeostasis, including the accumulation of intracellular water. The concentrations of these intracellular osmolytes alter with hyperammonaemia. MRS-detected metabolite abnormalities correlate with the severity of neuropsychiatric impairment and since MR spectra return towards normal after treatment, the technique may be of use in objective patient monitoring and in assessing the effectiveness of various treatment regimens.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of cold injury-induced brain edema in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chronological changes of blood-brain barrier disruption, and diffusion and absorption of edema fluid were investigated in rats with cold-induced brain injury (vasogenic edema) using magnetic resonance imaging. Contrast medium was administered intravenously at 3 and 24 hours after lesioning as a tracer of edema fluid. Serial T1-weighted multiple-slice images were obtained for 180 minutes after contrast administration. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier was more prominent at 24 hours after lesioning than at 3 hours. Contrast medium leaked from the periphery of the injury and gradually diffused to the center of the lesion. Contrast medium diffused into the corpus callosum and the ventricular system (cerebrospinal fluid). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier induced by cold injury was most prominent at the periphery of the vasogenic edema. Edema fluid subsequently extended into the center of the lesion and was also absorbed by the ventricular system. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful method to assess the efficacy of therapy for vasogenic edema. (author)

  12. High-precision three-dimensional field mapping of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer for hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Yuu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kato, Seigo; Matsui, Jumei; Sako, Katsuhisa; Brindza, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS), which consists of two quadrupole magnets and one dipole magnet, was designed and constructed for high-resolution spectroscopy of hypernuclei using the (e,e'K+) reaction in Hall C, Jefferson Lab (JLab). It was used to analyze momenta of around 1.2 GeV/c K^+ s with a resolution of 2 ×10^-4 (FWHM). To achieve the target resolution, a full three-dimensional magnetic field measurement of each magnet was successfully performed, and a full three-dimensional magnetic field map of the HKS magnets was reconstructed. Using the measured field map, the initial reconstruction function was generated. The target resolution would be achieved via careful tuning of the reconstruction function of HKS with the p(e,e'K+)Lambda,Sigma^0 and C-12 (e,e'K+)12_Lambda B_g.s. reactions. After tuning of the initial reconstruction function generated from the measured map, the estimated HKS momentum resolution was 2.2×10^-4 (FWHM).

  13. Brain-targeted delivery of trans-activating transcriptor-conjugated magnetic PLGA/lipid nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangru Wen

    Full Text Available Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG-NH2, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES, naringin (NAR, and glutathione (GSH were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10% and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%. The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain.

  14. Whole brain magnetization transfer histogram analysis of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving intrathecal methotrexate therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akira [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: mikiy@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Souichi [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: sadachi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp (and others)

    2006-03-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the hypothesis that magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram analysis of the whole brain could detect early and subtle brain changes nonapparent on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Materials and methods: Subjects in this prospective study comprised 10 children with ALL (mean age, 6 years; range, 0-16 years). In addition to conventional MRI, magnetization transfer images were obtained before and after intrathecal and intravenous MTX therapy. MTR values were calculated and plotted as a histogram, and peak height and location were calculated. Differences in peak height and location between pre- and post-MTX therapy scans were statistically analyzed. Conventional MRI was evaluated for abnormal signal area in white matter. Results: MTR peak height was significantly lower on post-MTX therapy scans than on pre-MTX therapy scans (p = 0.002). No significant differences in peak location were identified between pre- and post-chemotherapy imaging. No abnormal signals were noted in white matter on either pre- or post-MTX therapy conventional MRI. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that MTR histogram analysis allows better detection of early and subtle brain changes in ALL patients who receive MTX therapy than conventional MRI.

  15. Ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography of physiological brain activity - Glymphatic pulsation mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Wang, Xindi; Korhonen, Vesa; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Autio, Joonas; LeVan, Pierre; Keilholz, Shella; Zang, Yu-Feng; Hennig, Jürgen; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-06-01

    The theory on the glymphatic convection mechanism of cerebrospinal fluid holds that cardiac pulsations in part pump cerebrospinal fluid from the peri-arterial spaces through the extracellular tissue into the peri-venous spaces facilitated by aquaporin water channels. Since cardiac pulses cannot be the sole mechanism of glymphatic propulsion, we searched for additional cerebrospinal fluid pulsations in the human brain with ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography. We detected three types of physiological mechanisms affecting cerebral cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: cardiac, respiratory, and very low frequency pulsations. The cardiac pulsations induce a negative magnetic resonance encephalography signal change in peri-arterial regions that extends centrifugally and covers the brain in ≈1 Hz cycles. The respiratory ≈0.3 Hz pulsations are centripetal periodical pulses that occur dominantly in peri-venous areas. The third type of pulsation was very low frequency (VLF 0.001-0.023 Hz) and low frequency (LF 0.023-0.73 Hz) waves that both propagate with unique spatiotemporal patterns. Our findings using critically sampled magnetic resonance encephalography open a new view into cerebral fluid dynamics. Since glymphatic system failure may precede protein accumulations in diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia, this methodological advance offers a novel approach to image brain fluid dynamics that potentially can enable early detection and intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26690495

  16. Fourier magnetic imaging with nanoscale resolution and compressed sensing speed-up using electronic spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, K.; Belthangady, C.; Zhang, H.; Bar-Gill, N.; Devience, S. J.; Cappellaro, P.; Yacoby, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond is a leading modality for nanoscale magnetic field imaging, as it provides single electron spin sensitivity, three-dimensional resolution better than 1 nm (ref. 5) and applicability to a wide range of physical and biological samples under ambient conditions. To date, however, NV-diamond magnetic imaging has been performed using ‘real-space’ techniques, which are either limited by optical diffraction to ˜250 nm resolution or require slow, point-by-point scanning for nanoscale resolution, for example, using an atomic force microscope, magnetic tip, or super-resolution optical imaging. Here, we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV-diamond. In analogy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we employ pulsed magnetic field gradients to phase-encode spatial information on NV electronic spins in wavenumber or ‘k-space’ followed by a fast Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field of view and compressed sensing speed-up.

  17. Magnetization transfer ratio measurements of the brain in children with tuberous sclerosis complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetization transfer contrast and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in brain are mainly related to the presence of myelin. Neuropathological studies of brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) have demonstrated disordered myelin sheaths. To evaluate the MTR of the brain in children with TSC and to compare with that in controls. Four patients (aged 0.41-8.4 years, mean 2.5 years) with TSC and four age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated with classic MR sequences and with a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence without and with magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR was calculated as: (SI0-SIm)/SI0 x 100%, where SIm refers to signal intensity from an image acquired with a magnetization transfer pre-pulse and SI0 the signal intensity from the image acquired without a magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR values of cortical tubers (44.1±4.1), of subependymal nodules (51.6±4.8) and of white matter lesions (52.4±1.8) were significantly lower than those of cortex (58.7±3.53), of basal ganglia (caudate nucleus 58.2±2.8, putamen 59.6±2.5, thalamus 61.3±2.4) and of white matter (64.2±2.5) in controls (P<0.001). The MTR of normal-appearing white matter (61.2±3.0) in patients was lower than that of white matter in controls (P<0.01). The MTR of cortex and basal ganglia in patients was not significantly different from that in controls. MTR measurements not only provide semiquantitative information for TSC lesions but also reveal more extensive disease. (orig.)

  18. Magnetization transfer ratio measurements of the brain in children with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zikou, Anastasia; Ioannidou, Maria-Christina; Astrakas, Loukas; Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Tzoufi, Meropi [University of Ioannina, Child Health Department, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2005-11-01

    Magnetization transfer contrast and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in brain are mainly related to the presence of myelin. Neuropathological studies of brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) have demonstrated disordered myelin sheaths. To evaluate the MTR of the brain in children with TSC and to compare with that in controls. Four patients (aged 0.41-8.4 years, mean 2.5 years) with TSC and four age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated with classic MR sequences and with a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence without and with magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR was calculated as: (SI{sub 0}-SI{sub m})/SI{sub 0} x 100%, where SI{sub m} refers to signal intensity from an image acquired with a magnetization transfer pre-pulse and SI{sub 0} the signal intensity from the image acquired without a magnetization transfer pre-pulse. The MTR values of cortical tubers (44.1{+-}4.1), of subependymal nodules (51.6{+-}4.8) and of white matter lesions (52.4{+-}1.8) were significantly lower than those of cortex (58.7{+-}3.53), of basal ganglia (caudate nucleus 58.2{+-}2.8, putamen 59.6{+-}2.5, thalamus 61.3{+-}2.4) and of white matter (64.2{+-}2.5) in controls (P<0.001). The MTR of normal-appearing white matter (61.2{+-}3.0) in patients was lower than that of white matter in controls (P<0.01). The MTR of cortex and basal ganglia in patients was not significantly different from that in controls. MTR measurements not only provide semiquantitative information for TSC lesions but also reveal more extensive disease. (orig.)

  19. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. Results: A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Conclusion: Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the combination of

  20. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiri, E-mail: ferda@fnplzen. [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Kastner, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Mukensnabl, Petr [Sikl' s Institute of Pathological Anatomy, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Choc, Milan [Department of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Horemuzova, Jana; Ferdova, Eva; Kreuzberg, Boris [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Aim: To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. Results: A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Conclusion: Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the

  1. Effect of magnetic quadrupole lens alignment on a nuclear microprobe resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolinko, S. V.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The paper reports the research trends in developing probe-forming systems with high demagnification and analysis factors that limit a nuclear microprobe resolution. Parasitic aberrations caused by tilts and offsets of magnetic quadrupoles are studied in terms of their effect on probe parameters on a target. The most common arrangements of probe-forming systems such as a triplet and "Russian quadruplet" with separated geometry are considered. The accuracy prerequisites for the positioning of the quadrupoles are defined, and practical guidelines for alignment of probe-forming systems with high demagnification factors are suggested.

  2. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the lower extremity nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Alissa J; Gold, Stephanie L; Kuong, Sharon; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the nerves, commonly known as MR neurography is increasingly being used as noninvasive means of diagnosing peripheral nerve disease. High-resolution imaging protocols aimed at imaging the nerves of the hip, thigh, knee, leg, ankle, and foot can demonstrate traumatic or iatrogenic injury, tumorlike lesions, or entrapment of the nerves, causing a potential loss of motor and sensory function in the affected area. A thorough understanding of normal MR imaging and gross anatomy, as well as MR findings in the presence of peripheral neuropathies will aid in accurate diagnosis and ultimately help guide clinical management. PMID:24210318

  3. High-Throughput, High-Resolution Mapping of Protein Localization in Mammalian Brain by In Vivo Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuni, Takayasu; Nishiyama, Jun; Sun, Ye; Kamasawa, Naomi; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2016-06-16

    A scalable and high-throughput method to identify precise subcellular localization of endogenous proteins is essential for integrative understanding of a cell at the molecular level. Here, we developed a simple and generalizable technique to image endogenous proteins with high specificity, resolution, and contrast in single cells in mammalian brain tissue. The technique, single-cell labeling of endogenous proteins by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair (SLENDR), uses in vivo genome editing to insert a sequence encoding an epitope tag or a fluorescent protein to a gene of interest by CRISPR-Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair (HDR). Single-cell, HDR-mediated genome editing was achieved by delivering the editing machinery to dividing neuronal progenitors through in utero electroporation. We demonstrate that SLENDR allows rapid determination of the localization and dynamics of many endogenous proteins in various cell types, regions, and ages in the brain. Thus, SLENDR provides a high-throughput platform to map the subcellular localization of endogenous proteins with the resolution of micro- to nanometers in the brain. PMID:27180908

  4. Progress in the micro-fabrication of high resolution magnetic calorimeters for X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMC) are energy dispersive particle detectors with high energy resolution, that are operated at temperatures below 100 mK. MMCs consist of an absorber for the particles to be detected and a paramagnetic temperature sensor in tight thermal contact. The temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle, e.g. an X-ray photon, is detected via the change of the sensor's magnetization, being monitored by a low-noise high-bandwidth dc-SQUID. The thermodynamic properties of MMCs can be calculated with confidence, allowing for a prediction of the responsivity and the noise of detectors with given geometry and, consequently, a numerical optimization of MMCs for a given application. We studied two different types of fully micro-fabricated MMCs, that were optimized for the detection of X-ray photons with energies up to 10 keV. One of which made use of a cylindrical sensor positioned in the circular loop of a dc-SQUID residing in an external magnetic field. The second was based on a planar temperature sensor, that was read-out by a meander-shaped superconducting pick-up coil, transformer-coupled to a dc-SQUID. Both detectors were characterized at a number of operating temperatures and magnetic fields. We present data of both detectors and compare their performance with each other as well as with theoretical predictions.

  5. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E;

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  6. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  7. Brain 'Embolism' Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Percutaneous Mitral Balloon Commissurotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The common finding of thrombi between the bifoil balloons when they were extracted after mitral dilation prompted us to look for evidence of minor brain embolisms using the sensitive technique of BMRI (brain magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging). Methods: BMRI was performed within 48 hr before and after a percutaneous mitral balloon commissurotomy (PMBC) in each of the 63 patients in this study. Results: There was evidence (hyperintensity foci: HI) of a previous asymptomatic brain embolism in 38 of 63 patients before PMBC and a new HI appeared in 18 of 63 patients after the procedure. New HI signals were found exclusively in the white matter in 8 of 18 patients and in only 3 of 18 were HI signs larger than 1 cm. One patient, with an HI signal >1 cm in the thalamus and another 8; 4, patients from western countries vs the others) were not statistically significant, probably because the number of patients in each subgroup was low. Patients in atrial fibrillation had slightly more (not significant) HI before PMBC (15/20, 75%) than patients in sinus rhythm (23/43, 53%), but after PMBC their HI frequencies were similar (atrial fibrillation: 5/20, 25%; sinus rhythm: 13/43, 30%). Conclusion: Brain microembolism is frequent during PMBC, but is often anatomically limited and free from clinical signs in most cases. Brain embolism seems to be related mainly to the procedure itself and not the features of the patient

  8. Review: magnetic resonance imaging of male/female differences in human adolescent brain anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedd Jay N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Improvements in neuroimaging technologies, and greater access to their use, have generated a plethora of data regarding male/female differences in the developing brain. Examination of these differences may shed light on the pathophysiology of the many illnesses that differ between the sexes and ultimately lead to more effective interventions. In this review, we attempt to synthesize the anatomic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI literature of male/female brain differences with emphasis on studies encompassing adolescence – a time of divergence in physical and behavioral characteristics. Across all ages total brain size is consistently reported to be about 10% larger in males. Structures commonly reported to be different between sexes include the caudate nucleus, amygdala, hippocampus, and cerebellum – all noted to have a relatively high density of sex steroid receptors. The direction and magnitude of reported brain differences depends on the methodology of data acquisition and analysis, whether and how the subcomponents are adjusted for the total brain volume difference, and the age of the participants in the studies. Longitudinal studies indicate regional cortical gray matter volumes follow inverted U shaped developmental trajectories with peak size occurring one to three years earlier in females. Cortical gray matter differences are modulated by androgen receptor genotyope and by circulating levels of hormones. White matter volumes increase throughout childhood and adolescence in both sexes but more rapidly in adolescent males resulting in an expanding magnitude of sex differences from childhood to adulthood.

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: novel non-invasive technique for diagnosing brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the accuracy of MR Spectroscopy (MRS) in diagnosing brain tumors. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study:Neurosurgery Department, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from November 2010 to April 2011. Methodology: Fifty cases with brain tumors, who presented to Neurosurgery Department of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, during the study period, were included in the study. All patients underwent MRS and later brain. Those with recurrent disease were excluded. Data was collected with the help of proforma. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Comparison of MRS findings and biopsy diagnosis was done. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values (NPV and PPV) were determined keeping histopathology as the gold standard. Results: Out of the 50 patients, there were 20 (40%) females and 30 (60%) males with mean age of 37 13.24 years. The commonest presenting complaint was headache (76%) followed by weakness (62%) and seizures (30%). MRI had diagnosed 27 (51%) as neoplastic lesion. Spectroscopy reported 44 (88%) as neoplasms, while on histopathology, 42 (84%) were confirmed to have neoplasm. The accuracy of MRS was 94%, with 97.6% sensitivity, 71.42% specificity, 95.45% PPV and 83.3% NPV. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can readily help in differentiating neoplasm from non-neoplastic brain tumors, thus an invasive brain biopsy procedure can be avoided. (author)

  10. BRAIN FUNCTIONAL IMAGING BASED ON BRAIN TISSUE OXYGEN CONTENT VIA MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A OGHABIAN

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: FMRI is a new approach in MRI to provide functional data of human brain activities. Some methods such as BOLD contrast, perfusion imaging, diffusion imaging, and spectroscopy in MRI have used to yield functional images. Material and Methods: This research was performed in imaging center of IMAM KHOMEINI hospital in TEHRAN in 1997. The experiments were performed on a conventional 1.5- T picker MR instrument, using a standard head coil. CE – FAST gradient echo images were obtained (TR=100, TE = 35, 128*256 matrix, 10 mm slice, FOV = 250 mm, F.A =25 Degree, NEX = 1, 13 s per image. Images were obtained during sensory - motor stimulation by pressing fingers to each other, coronal oblique images were acquired through central sulcus (precentral gyrus where the related sensory cortex is. Then, the Images were transferred to personal computers in order to eliminate noise and highlight the functional differences. These images were processed by various mathematical methods such as subtraction and student T- test. Results: Although some changes were seen in functional area, there were not significant results by the conventional system protocols. Some new protocols were designed and implemented to increase the sensitivity of the system to functional changes. Discussion: However, more research needs to be done in the future to obtain faster and more efficient techniques and in regard to clinical applications of the method.

  11. Assessing brain plasticity across the lifespan with transcranial magnetic stimulation: Why, how, and what is the ultimate goal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina eFreitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustaining brain and cognitive function across the lifespan must be one of the main biomedical goals of the XXI Century. We need to aim to prevent neuropsychiatric diseases and, thus, to identify and remediate brain and cognitive dysfunction before clinical symptoms manifest and disability develops. The brain undergoes a complex array of changes from developmental years into old age, putatively the underpinnings of changes in cognition and behavior throughout life. A functionally ‘normal’ brain is a changing brain, a brain whose capacity and mechanisms of change are shifting appropriately from one time-point to another in a given individual’s life. Therefore, assessing the mechanisms of brain plasticity across the lifespan is critical to gain insight into an individual’s brain health. Indexing brain plasticity in humans is possible with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, which, in combination with neuroimaging, provides a powerful tool for exploring local cortical and brain network plasticity. Here, we review investigations to date, summarize findings, and discuss some of the challenges that need to be solved to enhance the use of TMS measures of brain plasticity across all ages. Ultimately, TMS measures of plasticity can become the foundation for a brain health index to enable objective correlates of an individual’s brain health over time, assessment across diseases and disorders, and reliable evaluation of indicators of efficacy of future preventive and therapeutic interventions.

  12. Brain Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging of Sleep Homeostasis and Restoration in Drug Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George H. Trksak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous reports have documented a high occurrence of sleep difficulties in drug-dependent populations, prompting researchers to characterize sleep profiles and physiology in drug abusing populations. This mini-review examines studies indicating that drug-dependent populations exhibit alterations in sleep homeostatic and restoration processes in response to sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation is a principal sleep research tool that results in marked physiological challenge, which provides a means to examine sleep homeostatic processes in response to extended wakefulness. A report from our laboratory demonstrated that following recovery sleep from sleep deprivation, brain high-energy phosphates particularly beta–nucleoside triphosphate (beta-NTP are markedly increased as measured with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. A more recent study examined the effects of sleep deprivation in opiate-dependent methadone-maintained (MM subjects. The study demonstrated increases in brain beta-NTP following recovery sleep. Interestingly, these increases were of a markedly greater magnitude in MM subjects compared to control subjects. A similar study examined sleep deprivation in cocaine-dependent subjects demonstrating that cocaine-dependent subjects exhibit greater increases in brain beta-NTP following recovery sleep when compared to control subjects. The studies suggest that sleep deprivation in both MM subjects and cocaine-dependent subjects is characterized by greater changes in brain ATP levels than control subjects. Greater enhancements in brain ATP following recovery sleep may reflect a greater disruption to or impact of sleep deprivation in drug dependent subjects, whereby sleep restoration processes may be unable to properly regulate brain ATP and maintain brain high-energy equilibrium. These studies support the notion of a greater susceptibility to sleep loss in drug dependent populations. Additional sleep studies in drug abusing

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of neonatal brain. Assessment of normal and abnormal findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish the normal MRI appearance of the neonatal brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 124 neonates who admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit. Degree of myelination, ventricular size, width of the extracerebral space and focal lesion in the brain were evaluated to investigate the relationship between MRI findings of neonatal brain and the neurological prognosis. 85 neonates underwent MRI both at neonatal period and at the corrected age of one year. The change of abnormal MRI findings was evaluated. 19 neonates had abnormal neurological outcome on subsequent examinations. Delayed myelination, ventriculomegaly and large extracerebral space were seen in 13, 7 and 9 neonates respectively. 4, 3 and 5 neonates out of them showed abnormal neurological prognosis respectively. Of the 19 neonates with focal lesion in MRI, 2 had parenchymal hematoma in the brain, 2 had subdural hematoma, 5 had chronic hematoma following subependymal hemorrhage, 6 had cystic formation following subependymal hemorrhage, 2 had subcortical leukomalacia, one had periventricular leukomalacia and one had cyst in the parenchyma of cerebellum. 4 neonates of 19 with focal lesion in MRI showed abnormal development. Of the neonates who had abnormal neurological prognosis, 7 neonates showed no abnormal finding in MRI at neonatal period. 3 of them had mild mental retardation. MRI shows promise in the neonatal period. It facilitates recognition of abnormalities of neonatal brain and may be used to predict abnormal neurologic outcome. However physiological change in the brain of neonates, especially of premature neonates, should be considered on interpreting these findings. Awareness of developmental features should help to minimize misinterpretation of normal changes in the neonatal brain. (author)

  14. In vivo quantification of localized neuronal activation and inhibition in the rat brain using a dedicated high temporal-resolution β+-sensitive microprobe

    OpenAIRE

    Pain, Frédéric; Besret, Laurent; Vaufrey, Françoise; Grégoire, Marie-Claude; Pinot, Laurent; Gervais, Philippe; Ploux, Lydie; Bloch, Gilles; Mastrippolito, Roland; Lanièce, Philippe; Hantraye, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Understanding brain disorders, the neural processes implicated in cognitive functions and their alterations in neurodegenerative pathologies, or testing new therapies for these diseases would benefit greatly from combined use of an increasing number of rodent models and neuroimaging methods specifically adapted to the rodent brain. Besides magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and functional MR, positron-emission tomography (PET) remains a unique methodology to study in vivo brain processes. Howeve...

  15. Acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field increases DNA strand breaks in rat brain cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, H.; Singh, N.P. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Acute exposure of rats to a 60 Hz magnetic field caused a dose-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks in brain cells of the animals (assayed by a microgel electrophoresis method at 4 h postexposure). An increase in single-strand DNA breaks was observed after exposure to magnetic fields of 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mT, whereas an increase in double-strand DNA breaks was observed at 0.25 and 0.5 mT. Because DNA strand breaks may affect cellular functions, lead to carcinogenesis and cell death, and be related to onset of neurodegenerative diseases, the data may have important implications for the possible health effects of exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields.

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  17. High-resolution characterisation of the aging brain using simultaneous quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and R2* measurements at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Matthew J; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Nestor, Peter J; Düzel, Emrah

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has recently emerged as a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method to detect non-haem iron deposition, calcifications, demyelination and vascular lesions in the brain. It has been suggested that QSM is more sensitive than the more conventional quantifiable MRI measure, namely the transverse relaxation rate, R2*. Here, we conducted the first high-resolution, whole-brain, simultaneously acquired, comparative study of the two techniques using 7Tesla MRI. We asked which of the two techniques would be more sensitive to explore global differences in tissue composition in elderly adults relative to young subjects. Both QSM and R2* revealed strong age-related differences in subcortical regions, hippocampus and cortical grey matter, particularly in superior frontal regions, motor/premotor cortices, insula and cerebellar regions. Within the basal ganglia system-but also hippocampus and cerebellar dentate nucleus-, QSM was largely in agreement with R2* with the exception of the globus pallidus. QSM, however, provided superior anatomical contrast and revealed age-related differences in the thalamus and in white matter, which were otherwise largely undetected by R2* measurements. In contrast, in occipital cortex, age-related differences were much greater with R2* compared to QSM. The present study, therefore, demonstrated that in vivo QSM using ultra-high field MRI provides a novel means to characterise age-related differences in the human brain, but also combining QSM and R2* using multi-gradient recalled echo imaging can potentially provide a more complete picture of mineralisation, demyelination and/or vascular alterations in aging and disease. PMID:27181761

  18. Segmentation of tongue muscles from super-resolution magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Prince, Jerry L; Murano, Emi Z; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2015-02-01

    Imaging and quantification of tongue anatomy is helpful in surgical planning, post-operative rehabilitation of tongue cancer patients, and studying of how humans adapt and learn new strategies for breathing, swallowing and speaking to compensate for changes in function caused by disease, medical interventions or aging. In vivo acquisition of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) images with clearly visible tongue muscles is currently not feasible because of breathing and involuntary swallowing motions that occur over lengthy imaging times. However, recent advances in image reconstruction now allow the generation of super-resolution 3D MR images from sets of orthogonal images, acquired at a high in-plane resolution and combined using super-resolution techniques. This paper presents, to the best of our knowledge, the first attempt towards automatic tongue muscle segmentation from MR images. We devised a database of ten super-resolution 3D MR images, in which the genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles were manually segmented and annotated with landmarks. We demonstrate the feasibility of segmenting the muscles of interest automatically by applying the landmark-based game-theoretic framework (GTF), where a landmark detector based on Haar-like features and an optimal assignment-based shape representation were integrated. The obtained segmentation results were validated against an independent manual segmentation performed by a second observer, as well as against B-splines and demons atlasing approaches. The segmentation performance resulted in mean Dice coefficients of 85.3%, 81.8%, 78.8% and 75.8% for the second observer, GTF, B-splines atlasing and demons atlasing, respectively. The obtained level of segmentation accuracy indicates that computerized tongue muscle segmentation may be used in surgical planning and treatment outcome analysis of tongue cancer patients, and in studies of normal subjects and subjects with speech and

  19. Providing and optimizing functional MR (Magnetic Resonance) of motor cortex of human brain by MRI ( Magnetic Resonance Imaging) facilities of Imam Khomeinie Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Display of human brain cortical activity is accomplished using various techniques, by them different spatial and temporal resolution may be obtained. F MRI technique with proper spatial and temporal resolution due to its noninvasivity is one of the promising techniques for detection of brain activities. This can be used as an important tool by neurologists, since a great development has been achieved for display different brain function. This thesis report the results of simulation effects of thumb motor cortex of normal volunteer by using conventional standard 1.5 T imager and optimized gradient echo techniques. Activating sensory and motor stimulations can be led to, respective cortical area of that stimulation by which oxygenated blood flow is increased in that area (Bold contrast). By designing of a T 2* sensitized gradient echo protocol, thumb's sensory and motor cortex activation is evaluated. A protocol known as FASTin picker system with the following specifications was used for F MRI: Band Width:24 Hz/Pixel, Tr=101 m Sec , T E=49 m Sec , Flip Angle= 10 deg., N E X=1 ,Slice thickness=5-7 mm F O V=250 mm ,Matrix=128*128 and total scan time= 14 Sec. Stimulation of the motor cortex was performed by periodic movement of dominant thumb in up-down and right-left direction within a Lshape trajectory of plastic sheet with a frequency about 2 Hz. Then, acquired images in rest and stimulation period were evaluated by S P M 97, S P M 99 b software. During the stimulation, an observable increased signal (%2-%5)in respective sensory-motor cortex was obtained after correcting for partial volume effects, optimizing S/N,and incorporating small vowels. The 2 D F A S T functional image obtained by this method, showed an anatomical association of the increased signal with gray matter of sensory-motor cortex(in T 1 weighted image). The resultant data showed the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging using optimized gradient echo sequences on a standard 1.5 T

  20. An Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of Post Exercise Lactate, Glutamate and Glutamine Change in the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Andrea; Thomas, Adam G.; Rawlings, Nancy B.; Near, Jamie; Nichols, Thomas E.; Clare, Stuart; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Stagg, Charlotte J.

    2015-01-01

    During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolize lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The a...

  1. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) for high-resolution conductivity imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-sectional imaging of an electrical conductivity distribution inside the human body has been an active research goal in impedance imaging. By injecting current into an electrically conducting object through surface electrodes, we induce current density and voltage distributions. Based on the fact that these are determined by the conductivity distribution as well as the geometry of the object and the adopted electrode configuration, electrical impedance tomography (EIT) reconstructs cross-sectional conductivity images using measured current–voltage data on the surface. Unfortunately, there exist inherent technical difficulties in EIT. First, the relationship between the boundary current–voltage data and the internal conductivity distribution bears a nonlinearity and low sensitivity, and hence the inverse problem of recovering the conductivity distribution is ill posed. Second, it is difficult to obtain accurate information on the boundary geometry and electrode positions in practice, and the inverse problem is sensitive to these modeling errors as well as measurement artifacts and noise. These result in EIT images with a poor spatial resolution. In order to produce high-resolution conductivity images, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been lately developed. Noting that injection current produces a magnetic as well as electric field inside the imaging object, we can measure the induced internal magnetic flux density data using an MRI scanner. Utilization of the internal magnetic flux density is the key idea of MREIT to overcome the technical difficulties in EIT. Following original ideas on MREIT in early 1990s, there has been a rapid progress in its theory, algorithm and experimental techniques. The technique has now advanced to the stage of human experiments. Though it is still a few steps away from routine clinical use, its potential is high as a new impedance imaging modality providing conductivity images with a spatial

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  3. Creating a Magnetic Imaging System for Diagnosing Infant Brain Activity Based on NI PXI and LabVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G. Atwood

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Developing a noninvasive magnetic imaging system to spatially and temporally map the magnetic fields generated by brain activity in infants at severe risk of developing cerebral palsy and epilepsy, so that medical doctors can intervene at an early stage.

  4. Fuzzy neural-network-based segmentation of multispectral magnetic-resonance brain images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonda, Palma N.; Bennardo, A.; Satalino, Giuseppe; Pasquariello, Guido; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Milella, D.

    1996-06-01

    This study investigates the applicability of a multimodular neuro-fuzzy system in the multispectral analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. The system consists of two components: an unsupervised neural module for image segmentation in tissue regions and a supervised module for tissue labeling. The former is the fuzzy Kohonen clustering network (FKCN). The latter is a feed-forward network based on the back-propagation learning rule. The results obtained with the FKCN have been compared with those extracted by a self organizing map (SOM). The system has been used to analyze the multispectral MR brain images of a healthy volunteer. The data set included the proton density (PD), T2, T1 weighted spin-echo (SE) bands and a new T1- weighted three dimensional sequence, i.e. the magnetization- prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE). One of the main objectives of this study has been to evaluate the usefulness of brain imaging with the MP-RAGE sequence in view of automatic tissue classification. To this purpose, a quantitative evaluation has been provided on the base of some labeled areas selected interactively by a neuro- radiologist from the input raw images. Quantitative results seem to indicate that the MP-RAGE sequence may provide higher tissue separability than the T1-weighted SE sequence.

  5. High-resolution brain tumor visualization using three-dimensional x-ray phase contrast tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, F; Bunk, O; David, C; Bech, M; Le Duc, G; Bravin, A; Cloetens, P

    2007-12-01

    We report on significant advances and new results concerning a recently developed method for grating-based hard x-ray phase tomography. We demonstrate how the soft tissue sensitivity of the technique is increased and show in vitro tomographic images of a tumor bearing rat brain sample, without use of contrast agents. In particular, we observe that the brain tumor and the white and gray brain matter structure in a rat's cerebellum are clearly resolved. The results are potentially interesting from a clinical point of view, since a similar approach using three transmission gratings can be implemented with more readily available x-ray sources, such as standard x-ray tubes. Moreover, the results open the way to in vivo experiments in the near future. PMID:18029984

  6. Monitoring gold nanoparticle distribution with high resolution using photo-magnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Alex T.; Nouizi, Farouk; Marks, Michael; Kart, Turkay; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    One major advantage of using gold nanoparticles is the possibility of tuning their absorption peak by modifying their surface plasma resonance. They are proven to be a promising multi-functional platform that can be used for many imaging and therapeutic applications. As a true multi-modality imaging technique, Photo-Magnetic Imaging (PMI) has a great potential to monitor the distribution of gold nanoparticles non-invasively with MR resolution. With a simple addon of a continuous wave laser to an MRI system, PMI uses the laser induced temperature increase, measured by MR Thermometry (MRT), to provide tissue optical absorption maps at MR resolution. PMI utilizes a Finite Element Method (FEM) based algorithm to solve the combined diffusion and bio-heat equations. This system of combined equations models the photon distribution in the tissue and heat generation due to the absorption of the light and consequent heat diffusion. The key characteristic of PMI is that its spatial resolution is preserved at any depth as long as the temperature change within the imaged medium is detectable by MRT. Agar phantoms containing gold nanoparticles are used to validate the ability of PMI in monitoring their distribution. To make PMI suitable for diagnostic purposes, the laser powers has been kept under the American National Standard Institute maximum skin exposure limits in this study.

  7. Design of High Resolution Soft X-Ray Microcalorimeters Using Magnetic Penetration Thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch. Sarah; Balvin, Manuel; Bandler, Simon; Denis, Kevin; Finkbeiner, Fred; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Sadlier, Jack; Smith, Stephen; Stevenson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We have designed high-resolution soft x-ray microcalorimeters using magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) in an array of pixels covering a total of 2 square centimeters to have a resolving power of 300 at energies around 300 eV. This performance is desirable for studying the soft x-ray background from the warm hot intergalactic medium. MPT devices have small sensor heat capacity and high responsivities, which makes them excellent detector technology for attempting to attain sub-eV resolution. We are investigating the feasibility of pixels with absorbers that are 625 x 625 square micrometers, up to 1 x 1 square millimeters in area and 0.35 micrometer thick and thinner. Our tests have shown that suspended gold absorbers 0.35 micrometers thick (RRR = 6.7) are feasible to fabricate. We modeled the thermal diffusion from such thin gold over the size of a 625 x 625 square micrometer absorber, and conclude that the effect of the thermalization on the resolution of a 300 eV photon is an additional approximately 0.2 eV FWHM of broadening. We discuss the thermal effects of small absorber attachment sterns on solid substrate, as well as considerations for multiplexed readout. We will present the progress we have made towards building and testing this soft x-ray detector.

  8. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Brain and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kurhanewicz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI for the study of brain and prostate cancer have expanded significantly over the past 10 years. Proton MRSI studies of the brain and prostate have demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasively assessing human cancers based on metabolite levels before and after therapy in a clinically reasonable amount of time. MRSI provides a unique biochemical “window” to study cellular metabolism noninvasively. MRSI studies have demonstrated dramatic spectral differences between normal brain tissue (low choline and high N-acetyl aspartate, NAA and prostate (low choline and high citrate compared to brain (low NAA, high choline and prostate (low citrate, high choline tumors. The presence of edema and necrosis in both the prostate and brain was reflected by a reduction of the intensity of all resonances due to reduced cell density. MRSI was able to discriminate necrosis (absence of all metabolites, except lipids and lactate from viable normal tissue and cancer following therapy. The results of current MRSI studies also provide evidence that the magnitude of metabolic changes in regions of cancer before therapy as well as the magnitude and time course of metabolic changes after therapy can improve our understanding of cancer aggressiveness and mechanisms of therapeutic response. Clinically, combined MRI/MRSI has already demonstrated the potential for improved diagnosis, staging and treatment planning of brain and prostate cancer. Additionally, studies are under way to determine the accuracy of anatomic and metabolic parameters in providing an objective quantitative basis for assessing disease progression and response to therapy.

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of metastatic brain tumors. Variations of metabolic profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopic imaging can be helpful for the noninvasive identification of parenchymal brain tumors. The objective of the present study was the characterization of the metabolic profile of intracranial metastases, based on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). One hundred and four metastatic brain tumors were evaluated by long-echo (TR, 2000 ms; TE, 136 ms) single-voxel volume-selected proton MRS. In 83 patients the tumor fraction within the MRS voxel constituted more than 50%. Compared to normal brain, the tumors showed statistically significant decreases of N-acetylaspartate (P<0.0001), creatine (P<0.0001), and the [NAA]/choline-containing compounds ratio (P<0.0001), increases of [Cho] (P<0.0001) and the mobile lipids/[Cr] ratio (P<0.0001) and the lactate/[Cr] ratio (P<0.05), and the more frequent presence of [Lip] (P<0.0001) and [Lac] (P<0.0001) resonances. However, the majority of these differences were lost when data for patients whose tumor fraction within the MRS voxel constituted less than 50% were analyzed separately. Determination of the predominant metabolite peak on the MR spectrum [NAA, Cho, Lip] permitted us to define three general metabolic patterns of brain metastases, which, showed statistically significant associations with the size of the neoplasm (P<0.001), type of its contrast enhancement (P<0.01), and the extent of perilesional edema (P<0.05). Proton MRS can define metabolically different subsets of metastatic brain tumors, and these characteristics should be taken into consideration during the differential diagnosis of parenchymal brain lesions. (author)

  10. Implementation of magnetic resonance elastography for the investigation of traumatic brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Thomas

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a potentially transformative imaging modality allowing local and non-invasive measurement of biological tissue mechanical properties. It uses a specific phase contrast MR pulse sequence to measure induced vibratory motion in soft material, from which material properties can be estimated. Compared to other imaging techniques, MRE is able to detect tissue pathology at early stages by quantifying the changes in tissue stiffness associated with diseases. In an effort to develop the technique and improve its capabilities, two inversion algorithms were written to evaluate viscoelastic properties from the measured displacements fields. The first one was based on a direct algebraic inversion of the differential equation of motion, which decouples under certain simplifying assumptions, and featured a spatio-temporal multi-directional filter. The second one relies on a finite element discretization of the governing equations to perform a direct inversion. Several applications of this technique have also been investigated, including the estimation of mechanical parameters in various gel phantoms and polymers, as well as the use of MRE as a diagnostic tools for brain disorders. In this respect, the particular interest was to investigate traumatic brain injury (TBI), a complex and diverse injury affecting 1.7 million Americans annually. The sensitivity of MRE to TBI was first assessed on excised rat brains subjected to a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, before execution of in vivo experiments in mice. MRE was also applied in vivo on mouse models of medulloblastoma tumors and multiple sclerosis. These studies showed the potential of MRE in mapping the brain mechanically and providing non-invasive in vivo imaging markers for neuropathology and pathogenesis of brain diseases. Furthermore, MRE can easily be translatable to clinical settings; thus, while this technique may not be used directly to diagnose different abnormalities in

  11. Novel aspects of brain metabolism as revealed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The techniques of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Imaging (MRI) are outlined, and compared with Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Invasive PET techniques using 19F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18O2 form the main basis of brain activation studies, and with 19F-fluoroDOPA, make major contributions to studies on neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However the technique has no chemical specificity so can provide no knowledge of intermediary metabolism. Non-invasive MRI is also being applied to brain activation studies but also has no chemical specificity. On the other hand MRS has superb chemical specificity, although it suffers from low sensitivity. A most interesting example of this is the use of 13C-MRS. If glucose is labelled on the no. 1 or no. 2 positions with 13C, the passage of the label through different neuronal and glial metabolic pathways can be followed. If acetate is similarly labelled, metabolic routes through specifically glial pathways can be monitored, since acetate is taken up only by glia. These studies contributed to knowledge on metabolic trafficking, in that glia produce alanine, citrate and lactate in addition to the previously characterised production of glutamine. Studies on the hypoxic brain revealed increased production of alanine, lactate and glycerol 3-phosphate, providing further understanding of the role of the NADH redox state. 'Isotopomer analysis' of 13C resonances provides more information on metabolic pathways, because the chemical shift of a 13C atom is specifically affected by a neighbouring 13C within the same molecule. This approach was used to demonstrate that neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) is partly derived from glial glutamine. Analogous 13C MRS studies are now providing novel information on metabolic flux rates within the human brain, and the most exciting developments are to follow changes in these rates on brain activation which can be

  12. Globally conditioned Granger causality in brain-brain and brain-heart interactions: a combined heart rate variability/ultra-high-field (7 T) functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggento, Andrea; Bianciardi, Marta; Passamonti, Luca; Wald, Lawrence L; Guerrisi, Maria; Barbieri, Riccardo; Toschi, Nicola

    2016-05-13

    The causal, directed interactions between brain regions at rest (brain-brain networks) and between resting-state brain activity and autonomic nervous system (ANS) outflow (brain-heart links) have not been completely elucidated. We collected 7 T resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data with simultaneous respiration and heartbeat recordings in nine healthy volunteers to investigate (i) the causal interactions between cortical and subcortical brain regions at rest and (ii) the causal interactions between resting-state brain activity and the ANS as quantified through a probabilistic, point-process-based heartbeat model which generates dynamical estimates for sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as sympathovagal balance. Given the high amount of information shared between brain-derived signals, we compared the results of traditional bivariate Granger causality (GC) with a globally conditioned approach which evaluated the additional influence of each brain region on the causal target while factoring out effects concomitantly mediated by other brain regions. The bivariate approach resulted in a large number of possibly spurious causal brain-brain links, while, using the globally conditioned approach, we demonstrated the existence of significant selective causal links between cortical/subcortical brain regions and sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation as well as sympathovagal balance. In particular, we demonstrated a causal role of the amygdala, hypothalamus, brainstem and, among others, medial, middle and superior frontal gyri, superior temporal pole, paracentral lobule and cerebellar regions in modulating the so-called central autonomic network (CAN). In summary, we show that, provided proper conditioning is employed to eliminate spurious causalities, ultra-high-field functional imaging coupled with physiological signal acquisition and GC analysis is able to quantify directed brain-brain and brain-heart interactions reflecting

  13. Peculiarities of permalloy thin film microcore hysteretic magnetization process in high space resolution fluxgate device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidanov, V. [Institute for Design Problems in Microelectronics RAS, Sovetskaja st. 3, Moscow 124681 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: skidanov@zelnet.ru

    2008-07-15

    Magnetization processes of the sectioned thin film permalloy core were examined in relation with its geometrical dimensions using magnetooptical Kerr technique and ferrofluid observation. It is shown quantitatively the intermediate case between Stoner-Wohlfarth and zero internal field contradicting models takes place. Ferrofluid investigation had shown the stable quasi-saturated state with closing domain structures at permalloy bar edges. Magnetization reversal occurs by hysteretic manner but the hysteresis loop parameters are reproducible and depend strongly upon core geometry. Hysteresis is characterized by parallelogram form with clear critical field and loop slope depending on bars dimensions and their mutual position in array. Loop shape approaches the rectangular form and critical field increases if bar thickness t, width w and bar density in array are decreased. The critical field value H{sub cr} is defined by demagnetizing field at bar edges while the saturation field H{sub s} depends only on width w at of a bar in array. Variation of the bar form or shift of every second bar in array possesses to increase the core thickness to enhance the stray field without increase of the saturating exciting current. The core described can be used with magnetooptical garnet film or Hall sensor in fluxgate regime for magnetic field measurement with space resolution 10-100 mcm.

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  16. Using R2* values to evaluate brain tumours on magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhenghua; Liao, Haibo; Yin, Jianhua [the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, The Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Medical Image Center, Nanchang (China); Li, Yanfang [Heze Medical College, The Department of Preventive Medicine, Shandong (China)

    2014-03-15

    To determine the usefulness of the R2* value in assessing the histopathological grade of glioma at magnetic resonance imaging and differentiating various brain tumours. Sixty-four patients with brain tumours underwent R2* mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging examinations. ANOVA was performed to analyse R2* values among four groups of glioma and among high-grade gliomas (grades III and IV), low-grade gliomas (grades I and II), meningiomas, and brain metastasis. Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationships between the R2* values or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the histopathological grade of gliomas. R2* values of low- and high-grade gliomas were analysed with the receiver-operator characteristic curve. R2* values were significantly different among high-grade gliomas, low-grade gliomas, meningiomas, and brain metastasis, but not between grade I and grade II or between grade III and grade IV. The R2* value (18.73) of high-grade gliomas provided a very high sensitivity and specificity for differentiating low-grade gliomas. A strong correlation existed between the R2* value and the pathological grade of gliomas. R2* mapping is a useful sequence for determining grade of gliomas and in distinguishing benign from malignant tumours. R2* values are better than ADC for characterising gliomas. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of fetal brain development by magnetic resonance imaging. Subependymal germinal matrix layer and cerebral ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional data of brain from the formalin-fixed fetuses were collected without isolation, by the 4.7 tesla super high magnetic field MRI and the developmental process of the cerebral parenchyma was studied by 3D images. Subjects were 13 fetal brain and MRI was performed using 3D-steady-state free precession sequence. The isolated brain is very soft and fragile and is deformed by its weight at the imaging. However 3D-MRI can be obtained without isolation, and the deformation is remarkably small. The subependymal germinal matrix layer did not be observed in 7 weeks-old fetus, appeared at 9 weeks-old and increased gradually. Then it rapidly reduced from 28 weeks-old. The volume calculated, from 3D-MRI, increased rapidly from 9 weeks-old to 23 weeks-old, and reached the maximum (2.346 mm3) at 23 weeks-old. The relation between fetal ages and volume of cerebral ventricle also showed similar pattern. This method will be useful to examine the development of the fetal brain without any damage. (K.H.)

  18. WAVELET STATISTICAL TEXTURE FEATURES WITH ORTHOGONAL OPERATORS TUMOUR CLASSIFICATION IN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors medically also called neoplasms are an abnormal mass of tissue resulting from uncontrolled proliferation or division of cells occurring in the human body. If such growth is located in the brain then it is called as brain tumor. Identification of such tumors is a major challenge in the field of medical science. Early identification of tumors prove to be critical as serious consequences can be averted. Its threat level depends on a combination of various factors like the type of tumor, its location, its size and its developmental stage. Tumor can occur in any part of the body. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI technique is mainly used for analyzing the brain, as the images produced are of high precision and applicability. The main objective of this study is to classify the brain MRI dataset for the existence or non existence of tumors. The proposed method uses Two Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform (2D-DWT for pre-processing and further classification with orthogonal operators and SVM. The usage of 2D-DWT for pre-processing improves the classification accuracy by 2% when compared to the existing classification techniques.

  19. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and studies of degenerative diseases of the developing human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rett syndrome is a progressive disorder which is associated with regression of psychomotor development and precipitous deceleration of brain growth during the first year of life. General histopathological surveys in postmortem specimens have identified degeneration of subpopulations of neurons of the nigrostriatal system but no other evidence of degenerative process. Magnetic resonance imaging-based morphometry may usefully guide application of rigorous but demanding quantitative histologic search for evidence of neuronal degeneration. The volumes of the principal set of cortical and nuclear structures of principal interest in the disorder may be measured by currently avaiable MRI-based methods. Opimized levels of precision now allow detection of volumetric changes over time in the same brain of approximately 10% at the 95% confidence level. (author)

  20. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and studies of degenerative diseases of the developing human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caviness, V.S. Jr. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Phil, D.; Filipek, P.A.; Kennedy, D.N.

    1992-05-01

    The Rett syndrome is a progressive disorder which is associated with regression of psychomotor development and precipitous deceleration of brain growth during the first year of life. General histopathological surveys in postmortem specimens have identified degeneration of subpopulations of neurons of the nigrostriatal system but no other evidence of degenerative process. Magnetic resonance imaging-based morphometry may usefully guide application of rigorous but demanding quantitative histologic search for evidence of neuronal degeneration. The volumes of the principal set of cortical and nuclear structures of principal interest in the disorder may be measured by currently avaiable MRI-based methods. Opimized levels of precision now allow detection of volumetric changes over time in the same brain of approximately 10% at the 95% confidence level. (author).

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in normal aging and dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unusual sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging in detecting white matter lesions has yielded striking results in studying the aging brain and in diagnosing a variety of central nervous system disorders. These lesions are most obvious in the periventricular white matter and appear as punctate or confluent hyperintense abnormalities on T2-weighted images. Their correlation with increasing age and the ensuing increase of cardiovascular risk factors suggests ischemic damage as their probable underlying pathologic cause. MRI thus may prove an early and very sensitive indicator of incipient cerebrovascular disease, adding information on the association of vascular damage with the development of dementing illness. This report is a preliminary communication of an ongoing study which is evaluating the importance of these findings in the 'normal' aging brain and different forms of dementia. 11 refs.; 1 table

  2. Brain nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enhanced by a paramagnetic nitroxide contrast agent: preliminary report. [Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasch, R.C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Nitecki, D.E.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Enzmann, D.R.; Wesbey, G.E.; Tozer, T.N.; Tuck, L.D.; Cann, C.E.; Fike, J.R.; Sheldon, P.

    1983-11-01

    Contrast-enhancing agents for demonstrating abnormalities of the blood-brain barrier may extend the diagnostic utility of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. TES, a nitroxide stable free radical derivative, was tested as a central nervous system contrast enhancer in dogs with experimentally induced unilateral cerebritis or radiation cerebral damage. After intravenous injection of TES, the normal brain showed no change in NMR appearance, but areas of disease demonstrated a dramatic increase (up to 45%) in spin-echo intensity and a decrease in T/sub 1/, relaxation times. The areas of disease defined by TES enhancement were either not evident on the nonenhanced NMR images or were better defined after contrast administration. In-depth tests of toxicity, stability, and metabolism of this promising NMR contrast agent are now in progress.

  3. Brain nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enhanced by a paramagnetic nitroxide contrast agent: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhancing agents for demonstrating abnormalities of the blood-brain barrier may extend the diagnostic utility of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. TES, a nitroxide stable free radical derivative, was tested as a central nervous system contrast enhancer in dogs with experimentally induced unilateral cerebritis or radiation cerebral damage. After intravenous injection of TES, the normal brain showed no change in NMR appearance, but areas of disease demonstrated a dramatic increase (up to 45%) in spin-echo intensity and a decrease in T1, relaxation times. The areas of disease defined by TES enhancement were either not evident on the nonenhanced NMR images or were better defined after contrast administration. In-depth tests of toxicity, stability, and metabolism of this promising NMR contrast agent are now in progress

  4. Analysis of the brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy - differences between normal grey and white matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HMRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic method that allows for an assessment of the metabolite concentration in tissues. The sources of the strongest resonance signals within the brain are N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), myoinositol (mI) and water. The aim of our study was to analyse the ratios of metabolite signals within the brain in HMRS in the healthy population, to define the differences between the grey and white matter spectra. Material/Methods: We studied prospectively 90 subjects aged from 8 to 80 years (mean 43.3 years, SD=17.9), without neurological symptoms or abnormalities in magnetic resonance imaging. In all patients, brain HMRS with Signa HDx 1.5 T MR unit (GE Healthcare) was performed with PRESS sequence, using a single voxel method, at TE of 35 ms and TR of 1500 ms. Spectroscopic evaluation involved voxels placed in the white matter of parietal lobe (PWM) and the grey matter of posterior cingulate gyrus (PGM). On the basis of the intensity of NAA, Cr, Cho, mI and water signals, the proportions of these signals were calculated, as well as the ratio of the analyzed metabolite signal to the sum of signals of NAA, Cho, Cr and mI (%Met) in the PGM and PWM voxels. We compared the proportions in the same patients in PGM and PWM voxels. Results: There has been a statistically significant difference between the proportions of a majority of the metabolite ratios evaluated in PGM and PWM, indicating the higher concentration of NAA, Cr and mI in grey matter, and higher concentration of Cho in white matter. Conclusions: HMRS spectra of the brain grey and white matter differ significantly. The concentrations of NAA, Cr and mI are higher in grey matter, while of choline - in the white matter. (authors)

  5. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities

  6. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, MacCallum J. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Agostino, Christopher J. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); N' Diaye, Alpha T. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chen, Gong [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Im, Mi-Young [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Emerging Materials Science, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Fischer, Peter, E-mail: PJFischer@lbl.gov [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 94056 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities.

  7. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, MacCallum J.; Agostino, Christopher J.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Chen, Gong; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities.

  8. Case control study: magnetic resonance spectroscopy of brain in HIV infected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bairwa, Devender; Kumar, Virendra; Vyas, Surabhi; Das, Bimal Kumar; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Pandey, Ravinder M.; Sharma, Surendra K; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.; Sinha, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) studies on brain in HIV infected patients have shown significant alteration in neuro-biochemicals. Methods In this study, we measured the neuro-biochemical metabolites from the left frontal white matter (FWM) and left basal ganglia (BG) caudate head nucleus in 71 subjects that include 30 healthy controls, 20 asymptomatic HIV and 21 HIV patients with CNS lesion. Proton MR spectra were acquired at 3 T MRI system and the concentr...

  9. Imaging diagnosis--magnetic resonance imaging findings in a dog with sequential brain infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Alison C; Caine, Abby; Rodriguez, Sue B; Cherubini, Giunio B

    2012-01-01

    An adult greyhound was evaluated on three occasions for acute, intracranial neurologic signs. Based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, there were T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense, noncontrast enhancing lesions in the cerebellum, and brain stem. Using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), the lesions were characterized initially by restricted water diffusion. The presumptive diagnosis on each occasion was acute ischemic cerebrovascular accident leading to infarction. This allowed us to characterize the changes in appearance of infarcted neural tissue on the standard MR sequences over time, and to confirm that the DWI could be successfully used in low-field imaging. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound. PMID:22731883

  10. Improvement of image resolution of brain SPECT by use of the wide-angle offset acquisition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images require high spatial and contrast resolution for precise evaluation of the abnormal tracer distribution in the brain. A shorter data acquisition time is preferable so that artifacts due to patient movement are avoided. We tried to shorten data acquisition time applying larger sampling angle and offset acquisition method, in which half degree of the step angle was shifted in the opposite gamma camera of the dual-detector SPECT system. A simulation study was performed with a 3-dimensional mathematical phantom. The phantom studies were performed with a hot-rod phantom and a brain phantom. A clinical study with 99mTc-ECD SPECT was also performed on a patient who had a cerebral infarction. Reconstruction of images was done for the normal 6 deg and 12 deg onset and 12 deg offset. Data for the 12 deg offset were acquired by shifting of sampling angles of the opposite detector by half (6 deg) of the sampling angles of 12 deg. The maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Image qualities in the simulation study, the phantom studies, and the clinical study were compared for the 6 deg and 12 deg onset, and for the 12 deg offset by quantitative analysis with use of profile curves. Analysis of the profile curves revealed that the image quality of the 12 deg offset was better than that of the 12 deg onset and compared to that of the 6 deg onset in the simulation study, the phantom studies, and the clinical study. The present study indicates that wide-angle offset data acquisition improves the image resolution of brain SPECT compared to onset data acquisition with the same sampling time. (author)

  11. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain in utero: Methods and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anat; Biegon; Chen; Hoffmann

    2014-01-01

    Application of modern magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) techniques to the live fetus in utero is a relatively recent endeavor. The relative advantages and disadvantages of clinical MRI relative to the widely used and accepted ultrasonographic approach are the subject of a continuing debate; however the focus of this review is on the even younger field of quantitative MRI as applied to non-invasive studies of fetal brain development. The techniques covered under this header include structural MRI when followed by quan-titative(e.g., volumetric) analysis, as well as quantita-tive analyses of diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional MRI. The majority of the published work re-viewed here reflects information gathered from normal fetuses scanned during the 3rd trimester, with relatively smaller number of studies of pathological samples including common congenital pathologies such as ven-triculomegaly and viral infection.

  12. Predicting Outcome after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury by Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lesion Location and Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, Emily; Hernandez, Ana; Stavinoha, Peter L; Huang, Rong; Kernie, Steven G; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Miles, Darryl K

    2016-01-01

    Brain lesions after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are heterogeneous, rendering outcome prognostication difficult. The aim of this study is to investigate whether early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lesion location and lesion volume within discrete brain anatomical zones can accurately predict long-term neurological outcome in children post-TBI. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI hyperintense lesions in 63 children obtained 6.2±5.6 days postinjury were correlated with the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended-Pediatrics (GOS-E Peds) score at 13.5±8.6 months. FLAIR lesion volume was expressed as hyperintensity lesion volume index (HLVI)=(hyperintensity lesion volume / whole brain volume)×100 measured within three brain zones: zone A (cortical structures); zone B (basal ganglia, corpus callosum, internal capsule, and thalamus); and zone C (brainstem). HLVI-total and HLVI-zone C predicted good and poor outcome groups (p<0.05). GOS-E Peds correlated with HLVI-total (r=0.39; p=0.002) and HLVI in all three zones: zone A (r=0.31; p<0.02); zone B (r=0.35; p=0.004); and zone C (r=0.37; p=0.003). In adolescents ages 13-17 years, HLVI-total correlated best with outcome (r=0.5; p=0.007), whereas in younger children under the age of 13, HLVI-zone B correlated best (r=0.52; p=0.001). Compared to patients with lesions in zone A alone or in zones A and B, patients with lesions in all three zones had a significantly higher odds ratio (4.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-16.0) for developing an unfavorable outcome. PMID:25808802

  13. Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields and brain tumour risks in the INTEROCC study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michelle C; Benke, Geza; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Kincl, Laurel; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, Dave; Parent, Marie-Elise; Richardson, Lesley; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Schüz, Joachim; Siemiatycki, Jack; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumours, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumours. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumours in the large-scale INTEROCC study. Methods Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1–4, 5–9, and 10+ years prior to the diagnosis/reference date. Results There were 3,761 included brain tumour cases (1,939 glioma, 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1–4 years prior to the diagnosis/reference date and glioma (odds ratio (OR) ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36–2.07, p < 0.0001 linear trend), and, somewhat weaker associations with meningioma (OR ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.23, 95% CI 0.97–1.57, p = 0.02 linear trend). Conclusions Results showed positive associations between ELF in the recent past and glioma. Impact Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumourigenesis. PMID:24935666

  14. Continuous wave free precession Practical analytical tool for low-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of continuous wave free precession (CWFP) as a practical analytical tool for quantitative determinations in low-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (LRNMR) is examined. The requirements of this technique are shown to be no more demanding than those prevailing in free-induction decay or spin-echo measurements. It is shown that the substantial gain in signal to noise ratio for a given acquisition time permitted by CWFP, can be exploited with advantage in practically any application of LRNMR. This applies not only to homogeneous low viscosity liquid samples but also to multi-component systems where differences in relaxation times of each component permit a separation of the individual contributions. As an example, the use of CWFP for fast quantitative determination of oil and moisture in various seeds is presented

  15. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR studies on meat components: potentialities and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sacco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy in the study of the agricultur-  al food products has been remarked, thanks to the advantages of this technique over other conventional analytical tech-  niques. This preliminary work presents, for the first time, the application of an innovative NMR technique, the  proton  high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS, for studying meat features. It stresses that this method makes it pos-  sible to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about chemical composition, both quickly and without any par-  ticular preparation of the sample to be analysed. Finally, the study highlights the potentiality of this method in defining  the origin of meat and the possibility of identifying meat adulteration. 

  16. Stabilization and positioning of CLIC quadrupole magnets with sub-nanometre resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Janssens, S; Collette, C; Esposito, M; Fernandez Carmona, P; Guinchard, M; Hauviller, C; Kuzmin, A; Leuxe, R; Moron Ballester, R

    2011-01-01

    To reach the required luminosity at the CLIC interaction point, about 2000 quadrupoles along each linear collider are needed to obtain a vertical beam size of 1 nm at the interaction point. Active mechanical stabilization is required to limit the vibrations of the magnetic axis to the nanometre level in a frequency range from 1 to 100 Hz. The approach of a stiff actuator support was chosen to isolate from ground motion and technical vibrations acting directly on the quadrupoles. The actuators can also reposition the quadrupoles between beam pulses with nanometre resolution. A first conceptual design of the active stabilization and nano positioning based on the stiff support and seismometers was validated in models and experimentally demonstrated on test benches. Lessons learnt from the test benches and information from integrated luminosity simulations using measured stabilization transfer functions lead to improvements of the actuating support, the sensors used and the system controller. The controller elect...

  17. Measurement of Fluid Flow in Pipe and Porous Media by High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lan-lan; SONG Yong-chen; LIU Yu; DOU Bin-lin; ZHU Ning-jun; ZHAO Jia-fei; BULITI Abudula

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the process of fluid flow in pipe and porous media with different pore structures.High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique was used to visualize the pore structure and measure fluid flow.The porous media was formed by packed bed of glass beads.Flow measurement was carried out by a modified spin echo sequence.The results show that the velocity distribution in pipe is annular and the linear relation between MRI velocity and actual velocity is found in pipe flow measurement.The flow distribution in porous media is rather heterogeneous,and it is consistent with heterogeneous pore structure.The flow through pores with the high volume flow rate is determined largely by geometrical effects such as pore size and cross-sectional area.

  18. Measurement of Two Phase Flow in Porous Medium Using High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lanlan; SONG Yongchen; LIU Yu; YANG Mingjun; ZHU Ningjun; WANG Xiaojing; DOU Binlin

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of two phase flow in porous medium for sequestration was carried out using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique.The porous medium was a packed bed of glass beads.Spin echo multi sequence was used to measure the distribution of CO2 and water in the porous medium.The intensity images show that the fluid distribution is non-uniform due to its viscosity and pore structure of porous medium.The velocity distribution of fluids is calculated from the saturation of water and porosity of porous medium.The experimental results show that fluid velocities vary with time and position.The capillary dispersion rate donated the effects of capillary,which was largest at water saturations of 0.45.The displacement process is different between in BZ-02 and BZ-2.The final water residual saturation depends on permeability and porosity.

  19. Plasma Diagnostics in High Resolution X-Ray Spectra of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauche, C W

    2001-10-02

    Using the Chandra HETG spectrum of EX Hya as an example, we discuss some of the plasma diagnostics available in high-resolution X-ray spectra of magnetic cataclysmic variables. Specifically, for conditions appropriate to collisional ionization equilibrium plasmas, we discuss the temperature dependence of the H- to He-like line intensity ratios and the density and photoexcitation dependence of the He-like R line ratios and the Fe XVII I(17.10 {angstrom})/I(17.05 {angstrom}) line ratio. We show that the plasma temperature in EX Hya spans the range from {approx}0.5 to {approx}10 keV and that the plasma density n {ge} 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, orders of magnitude greater than that observed in the Sun or other late-type stars.

  20. Serial changes in metabolism and histology in the cold-injury trauma rat brain model. Proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serial changes in metabolism and histology during the first 24 hours in the cold-injury trauma rat brain model were investigated by proton magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and high-resolution proton MR spectroscopy. Edema developed extensively via the corpus callosum in the ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres during observation as shown by gradually increased signal intensity on proton MR images. Proton MR spectroscopy showed increased levels of acetate (Ace), lactate (Lac), and glutamine (Glmi) 1 hour after lesion formation. The elevated Glmi level slightly decreased, the level of alanine (Ala) increased substantially, and that of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) decreased markedly after 24 hours. Increased Lac, Ace, and Ala might reflect anaerobic glycolysis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, while decreased Glmi and NAA reveal brain tissue breakdown. The relationship between brain edema and tissue viability can be analyzed in detail using this simple traumatic model and MR techniques which will be useful in the development of therapeutic agents for brain injury. (author)

  1. THE STUDY OF THE BRAIN IN A PATIENT WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS USING TECHNIQUES OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. Samoylova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is now widely distributed worldwide and in theRussian Federation, it is an important medical and social problem in connection with the development of serious, disabling complications. Some of these complications could make changes in the brain which are accompanied by cognitive impairments that decrease quality of life and worsening disease compensation. The diagnosis of these disorders to date, possible by using modern methods of magnetic resonance imaging, which describe not only the morphological changes of the brain, but also the metabolism of nervous tissue. The study of the brain, namely structural and metabolic manifestations of diabetes, is one of the priority problem of modern medical science.The aim of the study was to evaluate dynamics in the different techniques of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of brain changes in patients with T1DM.Research methods included physical examination, in accordance with the diagnostic algorithm of patients with T1DM, a neurologist consultation, an assessment of cognitive function, analysis of brain changes using standard magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Statistical processing was performed using software package R-system. This publication presents a clinical case of a patient with T1DM and severe cognitive impairments are associated with changes in the brain, diagnosed using standard magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. The study shows the positive role of correction of carbohydrate metabolism in improving cognitive function in a patient with T1DM.In addition, the process analysis revealed the absence of dynamic changes in the brain of a patient with T1DM according to standard magnetic resonance imaging. This required the use of additional techniques – magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which revealed changes of metabolism in the thalamus N-acetyl aspartate, choline and creatinine.

  2. 3-D Rat Brain Phantom for High-Resolution Molecular Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Beekman; B. Vastenhouw; G. van der Wilt; M. Vervloet; R. Visscher; J. Booij; M. Gerrits; C. Ji; R. Ramakers; F. van der Have

    2009-01-01

    With the steadily improving resolution of novel small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography devices, highly detailed phantoms are required for testing and optimizing these systems. We present a three-dimensional (3-D) digital and physical phantom

  3. The EMPOWER Code: Electro-Magnetic Particle Operation With Enhanced Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Vu, H. X.

    2007-11-01

    Large-scale full PIC simulations play a crucial role in the modeling of laser-plasma interactions, accelerators, HPM devices and magnetic reconnection. These simulations ubiquitously employ uniform meshes, which severely limits their CPU speed and in many cases makes high-resolution runs prohibitive even on massively parallel computers. On the other hand, inadequate spatial resolution of realistic features (localized plasma volumes, device boundaries, etc.) is known to result in unacceptable errors. Structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) has successfully been applied to fluid dynamics and MHD simulations. However, extending SAMR to practical electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) models has proven to be nontrivial due to a number of additional numerical challenges, with spurious wave reflection and macro-particle self-force at the coarse-fine mesh interfaces being the most severe. These approximation errors typically result in a significant loss of simulation accuracy, energy/momentum non-conservation and long-time instabilities. We review our progress in resolving these issues in our new EM-PIC code, EMPOWER. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the new techniques on realistic examples related to simulations of high-power EM pulses and energetic particle beams.

  4. Development of a metallic magnetic calorimeter for high resolution spectroscopy; Entwicklung eines metallischen magnetischen Kalorimeters fuer die hochaufloesende Roentgenspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linck, M.

    2007-05-02

    In this thesis the development of a metallic magnetic calorimeter for high resolution detection of single x-ray quanta is described. The detector consists of an X-ray absorber and a paramagnetic temperature sensor. The raise in temperature of the paramagnetic sensor due to the absorption of a single X-ray is measured by the change in magnetization of the sensor using a low-noise SQUID magnetometer. The thermodynamic properties of the detector can be described by a theoretical model based on a mean field approximation. This allows for an optimization of the detector design with respect to signal size. The maximal archivable energy resolution is limited by thermodynamic energy fluctuations between absorber, heat bath and thermometer. An interesting field of application for a metallic magnetic calorimeter is X-ray astronomy and the investigation of X-ray emitting objects. Through high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy it is possible to obtain information about physical processes of even far distant objects. The magnetic calorimeter that was developed in this thesis has a metallic absorber with a quantum efficiency of 98% at 6 keV. The energy resolution of the magnetic calorimeter is EFWHM=2.7 eV at 5.9 keV. The deviation of the detector response from a linear behavior of the detector is only 0.8% at 5.9 keV. (orig.)

  5. Feasibility of a novel design of high resolution parallax-free Compton enhanced PET scanner dedicated to brain research

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Correia, J G; Garibaldi, F; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Nappi, E; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Schoenahl, F; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; Zaidi, H

    2004-01-01

    A novel concept for a positron emission tomography (PET) camera module is proposed, which provides full 3D reconstruction with high resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. The key components are a matrix of long scintillator crystals and hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) with matched segmentation and integrated readout electronics. The HPDs read out the two ends of the scintillator package. Both excellent spatial (x, y, z) and energy resolution are obtained. The concept allows enhancing the detection efficiency by reconstructing a significant fraction of events which underwent Compton scattering in the crystals. The proof of concept will first be demonstrated with yttrium orthoaluminate perovskite (YAP):Ce crystals, but the final design will rely on other scintillators more adequate for PET applications (e.g. LSO:Ce or LaBr /sub 3/:Ce). A promising application of the proposed camera module, which is currently under development, is a high resolution 3D brain PET camera with an axial fi...

  6. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial 3He-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6x6x7 mm3 space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields ≥10 mG/Hz1/2. The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  7. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotkevych, V. V.; Milošević, M. V.; Bending, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial H3e-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6×6×7 mm3 space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields ⩾10 mG/Hz1/2. The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  8. Solar coronal magnetic field topology inferred from high resolution optical and x-ray movies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are using high resolution digital movies of solar active regions in optical and X-ray wavelengths to study solar flares and other transients. The optical movies were collected at the Swedish Solar Observatory on La Palma using the Lockheed tunable filtergraph system, in May-July, 1992. They include longitudinal and transverse magnetograms, H-alpha Doppler and intensity images at many wavelengths, Ca K, Na D, and white light images. Simultaneous X-ray images from Yohkoh are available much of the time. Several ways to establish the connectivity of some coronal magnetic field lines are being explored. Some of the clues available are: magnetic footpoint polarities and transverse field direction; H-alpha fibrils and loops seen in several wavelengths; proper motion and Dopper shifts of blobs moving along field lines; footprint brightening in micro-flares; spreading of flare ribbons during gradual phases of flares; X-ray morphology and correlations with H-alpha; and draining of flare loops. Examples of each of these will be shown on video

  9. A high resolution electrostatic time-of-flight spectrometer with adiabatic magnetic collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of spectrometer for low energy charged particles is presented. It consists of an adiabatic magnetic collimation and two filters: an electrostatic retarding potential to set a lower limit (high pass) and a time-of-flight analysis to reject high energy charged particles (low pass). Both filters are only limited in their resolution by the efficiency of the adiabatic magnetic collimation. The proof of this principle is demonstrated by a pilot measurement on the K conversion line of 83mKr. Possible applications to pulsed and continuous electron sources are discussed with the emphasis on the investigation of the β spectrum of T2 to deduce information on the mass of the electron antineutrino and possible anomalies in the β spectrum. In this context design parameters of a spectrometer with a resolving power of E/ΔE=20 000 and a luminosity of A ΔΩ/4π=4 cm2 for 20 keV electrons are given

  10. Amyloids in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: potential causes of the usually low resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espargaró A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alba Espargaró, Maria Antònia Busquets, Joan Estelrich, Raimon Sabate Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (IN2UB, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Amyloids are non-crystalline and insoluble, which imply that the classical structural biology tools, ie, X-ray crystallography and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, are not suitable for their analysis. In the last years, solid-state NMR (ssNMR has emerged as an alternative tool to decrypt the structural signatures of amyloid fibrils, providing major contributions to our understanding of molecular structures of amyloids such as β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease or fungal prions, among others. Despite this, the wide majority of amyloid fibrils display low resolution by ssNMR. Usually, this low resolution has been attributed to a high disorder or polymorphism of the fibrils, suggesting the existence of diverse elementary β-sheet structures. Here, we propose that a single β-sheet structure could be responsible for the broadening of the line widths in the ssNMR spectra. Although the fibrils and fibers consist of a single elementary structure, the angle of twist of each individual fibril in the mature fiber depends on the number of individual fibrils as well as the fibril arrangement in the final mature fiber. Thus, a wide range of angles of twist could be observed in the same amyloid sample. These twist variations involve changes in amino acid alignments that could be enough to limit the ssNMR resolution. Keywords: amyloid, fibril, misfolding, β-structure, ssNMR, NMR, β-sheet

  11. High temporal resolution magnetic resonance imaging: development of a parallel three dimensional acquisition method for functional neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echo Planar Imaging is widely used to perform data acquisition in functional neuroimaging. This sequence allows the acquisition of a set of about 30 slices, covering the whole brain, at a spatial resolution ranging from 2 to 4 mm, and a temporal resolution ranging from 1 to 2 s. It is thus well adapted to the mapping of activated brain areas but does not allow precise study of the brain dynamics. Moreover, temporal interpolation is needed in order to correct for inter-slices delays and 2-dimensional acquisition is subject to vascular in flow artifacts. To improve the estimation of the hemodynamic response functions associated with activation, this thesis aimed at developing a 3-dimensional high temporal resolution acquisition method. To do so, Echo Volume Imaging was combined with reduced field-of-view acquisition and parallel imaging. Indeed, E.V.I. allows the acquisition of a whole volume in Fourier space following a single excitation, but it requires very long echo trains. Parallel imaging and field-of-view reduction are used to reduce the echo train durations by a factor of 4, which allows the acquisition of a 3-dimensional brain volume with limited susceptibility-induced distortions and signal losses, in 200 ms. All imaging parameters have been optimized in order to reduce echo train durations and to maximize S.N.R., so that cerebral activation can be detected with a high level of confidence. Robust detection of brain activation was demonstrated with both visual and auditory paradigms. High temporal resolution hemodynamic response functions could be estimated through selective averaging of the response to the different trials of the stimulation. To further improve S.N.R., the matrix inversions required in parallel reconstruction were regularized, and the impact of the level of regularization on activation detection was investigated. Eventually, potential applications of parallel E.V.I. such as the study of non-stationary effects in the B.O.L.D. response

  12. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Yang, Victor C

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity--properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 +/- 3 microg Fe/ml min. To improve "passive" GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent "active" magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p=0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (zeta-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p=0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (zeta-potential= -12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p=0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. PMID:20494439

  13. Lesion localization of global aphasia without hemiparesis by overlapping of the brain magnetic resonance images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo Jin Kim; Nam-Jong Paik

    2014-01-01

    Global aphasia without hemiparesis is a striking stroke syndrome involving language impairment without the typically manifested contralateral hemiparesis, which is usually seen in patients with global aphasia following large left perisylvian lesions. The objective of this study is to elucidate the speciifc areas for lesion localization of global aphasia without hemiparesis by retrospectively studying the brain magnetic resonance images of six patients with global aphasia without hemi-paresis to deifne global aphasia without hemiparesis-related stroke lesions before overlapping the images to visualize the most overlapped area. Talairach coordinates for the most overlapped areas were converted to corresponding anatomical regions. Lesions where the images of more than three patients overlapped were considered significant. The overlapped global aphasia without hemiparesis related stroke lesions of six patients revealed that the signiifcantly involved anatomi-cal lesions were as follows:frontal lobe, sub-gyral, sub-lobar, extra-nuclear, corpus callosum, and inferior frontal gyrus, while caudate, claustrum, middle frontal gyrus, limbic lobe, temporal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, uncus, anterior cingulate, parahippocampal, amygdala, and subcallosal gyrus were seen less signiifcantly involved. This study is the ifrst to demonstrate the heteroge-neous anatomical involvement in global aphasia without hemiparesis by overlapping of the brain magnetic resonance images.

  14. MR_CHIROD v.2: magnetic resonance compatible smart hand rehabilitation device for brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanicheh, Azadeh; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Weinberg, Brian; Tzika, A Aria; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and testing of a novel, one degree-of-freedom, magnetic resonance compatible smart hand interfaced rehabilitation device (MR_CHIROD v.2), which may be used in brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during handgrip rehabilitation. A key feature of the device is the use of electrorheological fluids (ERFs) to achieve computer controlled, variable, and tunable resistive force generation. The device consists of three major subsystems: 1) an ERF based resistive element, 2) handles, and c) two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. MR_CHIROD v.2 is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Our results demonstrate that the MR environment does not interfere with the performance of the MR_CHIROD v.2, and, reciprocally, its use does not cause fMR image artifacts. The results are encouraging in jointly using MR_CHIROD v.2 and brain MR imaging to study motor performance and assess rehabilitation after neurological injuries such as stroke. PMID:18303810

  15. Detection of cerebral atrophy in type- II diabetes mellitus by magnetic resonance imaging of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects many systems in the body. Cerebral atrophy is one of the complications of diabetes and research is on going to find out its aetiopathological factors. The main aim of the study was to determine the frequency of cerebral atrophy in type-II diabetes mellitus using magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Methods: One hundred diabetic patients (Random blood sugar >126 mg/dl) were recruited in this study after the informed consent from every patient. Duration of diabetes was five years and more in all the patients as determined by their glycosylated haemoglobin which was >6 in all the patients. All the patients were undergone MRI of brain using 1.5 Tesla power magnetic resonance imaging machine of Picker Company. Evan's index, a specific parameter for measurement of cerebral atrophy was calculated on MR images and was used in this study. Results: In male group the frequency of cerebral atrophy was 22 (47%) and in female group it was found to be 23 (43%). When we study the overall population the frequency was found to be 45 (45%). The results are well in concordance with the previous data published on this issue. Conclusions: Cerebral atrophy, a complication of long standing diabetes is quite frequent in our population and is well diagnosed by MRI. (author)

  16. Brain tissue segmentation using q-entropy in multiple sclerosis magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R.B. Diniz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of brain volume has been used as a marker of tissue destruction and can be used as an index of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we tested a new method for tissue segmentation based on pixel intensity threshold using generalized Tsallis entropy to determine a statistical segmentation parameter for each single class of brain tissue. We compared the performance of this method using a range of different q parameters and found a different optimal q parameter for white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the conclusion that the differences in structural correlations and scale invariant similarities present in each tissue class can be accessed by generalized Tsallis entropy, obtaining the intensity limits for these tissue class separations. In order to test this method, we used it for analysis of brain magnetic resonance images of 43 patients and 10 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The values found for the entropic q index were 0.2 for cerebrospinal fluid, 0.1 for white matter and 1.5 for gray matter. With this algorithm, we could detect an annual loss of 0.98% for the patients, in agreement with literature data. Thus, we can conclude that the entropy of Tsallis adds advantages to the process of automatic target segmentation of tissue classes, which had not been demonstrated previously.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of functional connectivity in Parkinson disease in the resting brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate functional connectivity changes in Parkinson disease in the resting brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Nine patients with Parkinson disease and eight age-matched healthy volunteers were entered into the study. The bilateral globus pallidus were chosen as seed points, the functional MR data acquired in the resting state were processed to investigate functional connectivity in PD patients and the results were compared with those of the controls. Results: In age-matched healthy controls, there are regions which had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus, including bilateral temporal poles, bilateral hippocampus, bilateral thalami, posterior cingulate cortex, right middle occipital gyms and right superior parietal gyms. In PD patients, brain regions including bilateral cerebellum, left hippocampus, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, left inferior parietal gyrus and left superior parietal gyrus, had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus. Compared to healthy controls, increased functional connectivity in bilateral cerebellum, bilateral temporal lobes, left frontal lobe and left parietal lobe, and decreased functional connectivity in bilateral thalami were observed in PD patients. Conclusion: Abnormal changes of brain functional connectivity exists in Parkinson's disease in the resting state. (authors)

  18. Temporal filtering of longitudinal brain magnetic resonance images for consistent segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehashis Roy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal analysis of magnetic resonance images of the human brain provides knowledge of brain changes during both normal aging as well as the progression of many diseases. Previous longitudinal segmentation methods have either ignored temporal information or have incorporated temporal consistency constraints within the algorithm. In this work, we assume that some anatomical brain changes can be explained by temporal transitions in image intensities. Once the images are aligned in the same space, the intensities of each scan at the same voxel constitute a temporal (or 4D intensity trend at that voxel. Temporal intensity variations due to noise or other artifacts are corrected by a 4D intensity-based filter that smooths the intensity values where appropriate, while preserving real anatomical changes such as atrophy. Here smoothing refers to removal of sudden changes or discontinuities in intensities. Images processed with the 4D filter can be used as a pre-processing step to any segmentation method. We show that such a longitudinal pre-processing step produces robust and consistent longitudinal segmentation results, even when applying 3D segmentation algorithms. We compare with state-of-the-art 4D segmentation algorithms. Specifically, we experimented on three longitudinal datasets containing 4–12 time-points, and showed that the 4D temporal filter is more robust and has more power in distinguishing between healthy subjects and those with dementia, mild cognitive impairment, as well as different phenotypes of multiple sclerosis.

  19. High permeability cores to optimize the stimulation of deeply located brain regions using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient stimulation of deeply located brain regions with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) poses many challenges, arising from the fact that the induced field decays rapidly and becomes less focal with depth. We propose a new method to improve the efficiency of TMS of deep brain regions that combines high permeability cores, to increase focality and field intensity, with a coil specifically designed to induce a field that decays slowly with increasing depth. The performance of the proposed design was investigated using the finite element method to determine the total electric field induced by this coil/core arrangement on a realistically shaped homogeneous head model. The calculations show that the inclusion of the cores increases the field's magnitude by as much as 25% while also decreasing the field's decay with depth along specific directions. The focality, as measured by the area where the field's norm is greater than 1/√2 of its maximum value, is also improved by as much as 15% with some core arrangements. The coil's inductance is not significantly increased by the cores. These results show that the presence of the cores might make this specially designed coil even more suited for the effective stimulation of deep brain regions.

  20. Impaired cognitive functions in mild traumatic brain injury patients with normal and pathologic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common neurological (neurotraumatological) diagnosis. As well as different subjective symptoms, many patients develop neuropsychological dysfunction with objective impairment of attention, memory and certain executive functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not routinely used in MTBI patients despite its proven greater sensitivity and specificity in comparison with computed tomography (CT). The patient group consisted of 30 persons with MTBI and the control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Both groups underwent neurological examination, neuropsychological testing (including the Postconcussion Symptoms Scale questionnaire, PCSS) and brain MRI (the patient group within 96 h after injury). The analyzed groups did not differ significantly in terms of sex, age, or level or duration of education. MRI pathological findings (traumatic and nonspecific) were present in nine patients. Traumatic lesions were found in seven patients. Nonspecific white matter lesions were found in five healthy controls. There were significant differences between MTBI patients and controls in terms of subjective symptoms (PCSS) and selected neuropsychological tests. Statistically significant neuropsychological differences were found between MTBI patients with true traumatic lesions and MTBI patients with nonspecific lesions. There is evidence that MTBI patients with true traumatic MRI lesions are neuropsychologically different from MTBI patients with nonspecific MRI lesions or normal brain MRI. These results support the hypothesis that some acute MTBI signs and symptoms have a real organic basis which can be detected by selected new MRI modalities. (orig.)

  1. Brain tissue segmentation using q-entropy in multiple sclerosis magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, P.R.B.; Brum, D.G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Santos, A. C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Clinica Medica; Murta-Junior, L.O.; Araujo, D.B. de, E-mail: murta@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2010-01-15

    The loss of brain volume has been used as a marker of tissue destruction and can be used as an index of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we tested a new method for tissue segmentation based on pixel intensity threshold using generalized Tsallis entropy to determine a statistical segmentation parameter for each single class of brain tissue. We compared the performance of this method using a range of different q parameters and found a different optimal q parameter for white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the conclusion that the differences in structural correlations and scale invariant similarities present in each tissue class can be accessed by generalized Tsallis entropy, obtaining the intensity limits for these tissue class separations. In order to test this method, we used it for analysis of brain magnetic resonance images of 43 patients and 10 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The values found for the entropic q index were 0.2 for cerebrospinal fluid, 0.1 for white matter and 1.5 for gray matter. With this algorithm, we could detect an annual loss of 0.98% for the patients, in agreement with literature data. Thus, we can conclude that the entropy of Tsallis adds advantages to the process of automatic target segmentation of tissue classes, which had not been demonstrated previously. (author)

  2. Uptake of dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured brain astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, Mark; Hohnholt, Michaela C.; Thiel, Karsten; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Grunwald, Ingo; Rezwan, Kurosch; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NP) are currently considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the brain. However, little is known on the accumulation and biocompatibility of such particles in brain cells. We have synthesized and characterized dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated Fe-NP and have investigated their uptake by cultured brain astrocytes. DMSA-coated Fe-NP that were dispersed in physiological medium had an average hydrodynamic diameter of about 60 nm. Incubation of cultured astrocytes with these Fe-NP caused a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of cellular iron, but did not lead within 6 h to any cell toxicity. After 4 h of incubation with 100-4000 µM iron supplied as Fe-NP, the cellular iron content reached levels between 200 and 2000 nmol mg - 1 protein. The cellular iron content after exposure of astrocytes to Fe-NP at 4 °C was drastically lowered compared to cells that had been incubated at 37 °C. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of Fe-NP-containing vesicles in cells that were incubated with Fe-NP at 37 °C, but not in cells exposed to the nanoparticles at 4 °C. These data demonstrate that cultured astrocytes efficiently take up DMSA-coated Fe-NP in a process that appears to be saturable and strongly depends on the incubation temperature.

  3. Uptake of dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured brain astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geppert, Mark; Hohnholt, Michaela C; Dringen, Ralf [Center for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen, University of Bremen, PO Box 330440, D-28334 Bremen (Germany); Thiel, Karsten; Grunwald, Ingo [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials, Wiener Strasse 12, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Nuernberger, Sylvia [Department of Traumatology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Rezwan, Kurosch, E-mail: ralf.dringen@uni-bremen.de [Advanced Ceramics, University of Bremen, Am Biologischen Garten 2, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2011-04-08

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NP) are currently considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the brain. However, little is known on the accumulation and biocompatibility of such particles in brain cells. We have synthesized and characterized dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated Fe-NP and have investigated their uptake by cultured brain astrocytes. DMSA-coated Fe-NP that were dispersed in physiological medium had an average hydrodynamic diameter of about 60 nm. Incubation of cultured astrocytes with these Fe-NP caused a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of cellular iron, but did not lead within 6 h to any cell toxicity. After 4 h of incubation with 100-4000 {mu}M iron supplied as Fe-NP, the cellular iron content reached levels between 200 and 2000 nmol mg{sup -1} protein. The cellular iron content after exposure of astrocytes to Fe-NP at 4 deg. C was drastically lowered compared to cells that had been incubated at 37 deg. C. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of Fe-NP-containing vesicles in cells that were incubated with Fe-NP at 37 deg. C, but not in cells exposed to the nanoparticles at 4 deg. C. These data demonstrate that cultured astrocytes efficiently take up DMSA-coated Fe-NP in a process that appears to be saturable and strongly depends on the incubation temperature.

  4. Uptake of dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured brain astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NP) are currently considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the brain. However, little is known on the accumulation and biocompatibility of such particles in brain cells. We have synthesized and characterized dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated Fe-NP and have investigated their uptake by cultured brain astrocytes. DMSA-coated Fe-NP that were dispersed in physiological medium had an average hydrodynamic diameter of about 60 nm. Incubation of cultured astrocytes with these Fe-NP caused a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of cellular iron, but did not lead within 6 h to any cell toxicity. After 4 h of incubation with 100-4000 μM iron supplied as Fe-NP, the cellular iron content reached levels between 200 and 2000 nmol mg-1 protein. The cellular iron content after exposure of astrocytes to Fe-NP at 4 deg. C was drastically lowered compared to cells that had been incubated at 37 deg. C. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of Fe-NP-containing vesicles in cells that were incubated with Fe-NP at 37 deg. C, but not in cells exposed to the nanoparticles at 4 deg. C. These data demonstrate that cultured astrocytes efficiently take up DMSA-coated Fe-NP in a process that appears to be saturable and strongly depends on the incubation temperature.

  5. Impaired cognitive functions in mild traumatic brain injury patients with normal and pathologic magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurca, E.; Sivak, S. [Comenius University, Clinic of Neurology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Kucera, P. [Comenius University, 1st Clinic of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2006-09-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common neurological (neurotraumatological) diagnosis. As well as different subjective symptoms, many patients develop neuropsychological dysfunction with objective impairment of attention, memory and certain executive functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not routinely used in MTBI patients despite its proven greater sensitivity and specificity in comparison with computed tomography (CT). The patient group consisted of 30 persons with MTBI and the control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Both groups underwent neurological examination, neuropsychological testing (including the Postconcussion Symptoms Scale questionnaire, PCSS) and brain MRI (the patient group within 96 h after injury). The analyzed groups did not differ significantly in terms of sex, age, or level or duration of education. MRI pathological findings (traumatic and nonspecific) were present in nine patients. Traumatic lesions were found in seven patients. Nonspecific white matter lesions were found in five healthy controls. There were significant differences between MTBI patients and controls in terms of subjective symptoms (PCSS) and selected neuropsychological tests. Statistically significant neuropsychological differences were found between MTBI patients with true traumatic lesions and MTBI patients with nonspecific lesions. There is evidence that MTBI patients with true traumatic MRI lesions are neuropsychologically different from MTBI patients with nonspecific MRI lesions or normal brain MRI. These results support the hypothesis that some acute MTBI signs and symptoms have a real organic basis which can be detected by selected new MRI modalities. (orig.)

  6. The contribution of the Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive technique which allows study of the metabolism of lesions or of normal tissue, increasing the method's specificity. In this way, the biochemical information provided by MRS is added to the morphologic information provided by the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Even though the gold standards to determine the definite diagnosis of a brain lesion is still the biopsy, the MRS is a non-invasive method, free of complications which would help determine the type of lesion and avoid unnecessary biopsies in non-tumor processes. The objective of this work is to determine if the monovoxel MRS hydrogen proton (H+) long Eco Time (TE) is capable to differentiating or not the nature of the tumor from the brain lesions and classify them into levels of malignity. Material and Method: This is a retrospective study in which female and male patients of any ages were selected. A standard study of MRI was performed in them and it was completed with monovoxel ERM. Results: 47 lesions were analyzed and 43 (92.9%) were adequately characterized, with a sensibility (S) of 96.8% (IC 89-100), specificity (E) of 89.6% (IC 76-100), positive predictive value (PPV) of 91.1% (IC 80-100) and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 96.3% (IC 87-100). There are many variables that can influence the acquisition of a spectrum capable of being analyzed and from them, inter-observer differences can emerge. However, our results were similar to those in other publications. Conclusion: The MRS together with the MRI proved to be a reliable method to determine whether a brain lesion is a tumor or not, with acceptable statistic values. (authors)

  7. Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy: report of a series of pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Spinoza, Zulma; Choi, Hoon

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a novel, minimally invasive treatment that has multiple advantages in pediatric use and broad applicability for different types of lesions. Here, the authors report the preliminary results of the first series of pediatric brain tumors treated with MRgLITT at Golisano Children's Hospital in Syracuse, New York. METHODS Pediatric brain tumors treated with MRgLITT between February 2012 and August 2014 at Golisano Children's Hospital were evaluated retrospectively. Medical records, radiological findings, surgical data, complications, and results of tumor volumetric analyses were reviewed. The Visualase thermal laser system (Medtronic) was used in all MRgLITT procedures. RESULTS This series included 11 patients with 12 tumors (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, medulloblastoma, choroid plexus xanthogranuloma, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, and ganglioglioma). A single laser and multiple overlapping ablations were used for all procedures. The mean laser dose was 10.23 W, and the mean total ablation time was 68.95 seconds. The mean initial target volume was 6.79 cm(3), and the mean immediate post-ablation volume was 7.86 cm(3). The mean hospital stay was 3.25 days, and the mean follow-up time was 24.5 months. Tumor volume decreased in the first 3 months after surgery (n = 11; p = 0.007) and continued to decrease by the 4- to 6-month followup (n = 11; mean volume 2.61 cm(3); p = 0.009). Two patients experienced post-ablation complications: transient right leg weakness in one patient, and transient hemiparesis, akinetic mutism, and eye movement disorder in the other. CONCLUSIONS Magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy is an effective first- or second-line treatment for select pediatric brain tumors. Larger multiinstitutional clinical trials are necessary to evaluate its use for different types of lesions to further standardize practices. PMID:26849811

  8. Magnetization transfer ratio and volumetric analysis of the brain in macrocephalic patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margariti, Persefoni N.; Katzioti, Frosso G.; Zikou, Anastasia K.; Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Blekas, Konstantinos [University of Ioannina, Department of Computer Science, Ioannina (Greece); Tzoufi, Meropi [University of Ioannina, Child Health Department, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate brain myelination by measuring the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and to measure grey (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) in macrocephalic children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Seven NF1 patients (aged 0.65-16.67 years) and seven age- and gender-matched controls were studied. A three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequence with and without magnetization transfer (MT) prepulse was used for MTR assessment. Volume measurements of GM and WM were performed by applying segmentation techniques on T2-weighted turbo spin echo images (T2WI). MTR of unidentified bright objects (UBOs) on T2WI in cerebellar white matter (52.8{+-}3.3), cerebral peduncles (48.5{+-}1.5), hippocampus (52.6{+-}1.1), internal capsule (55.7{+-}0.3), globus pallidus (52.7{+-}3.9), and periventricular white matter (52.6{+-}1.2) was lower than in the corresponding areas of controls (64.6{+-}2.5, 60.8{+-}1.3, 56.4{+-}0.9, 64.7{+-}1.9, 59.2{+-}2.3, 63.6{+-}1.7, respectively; p<0.05). MTR of normal-appearing brain tissue in patients was not significantly different than in controls. Surface area (mm{sup 2}) of the corpus callosum (809.1{+-}62.8), GMV (cm{sup 3}) (850.7{+-}42.9), and white matter volume (WMV) (cm{sup 3}) (785.1{+-}85.2) were greater in patients than in controls (652.5{+-}52.6 mm{sup 2}, 611.2{+-}92.1 cm{sup 3}, 622.5{+-}108.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p<0.05). To conclude, macrocephaly in NF1 patients is related to increased GMV and WMV and corpus callosum enlargement. MTR of UBOs is lower than that of normal brain tissue. (orig.)

  9. The role of nonlinearity in computing graph-theoretical properties of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging brain networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, D.; Hlinka, J.; Paluš, M.; Mantini, D.; Corbetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the study of large-scale brain activity interaction structure from the perspective of complex networks, based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements. To assess the strength of interaction (functional connectivity, FC) between two brain regions, the linear (Pearson) correlation coefficient of the respective time series is most commonly used. Since a potential use of nonlinear FC measures has recently been discussed...

  10. Brain glucose concentrations in poorly controlled diabetes mellitus as measured by high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Tkac, Ivan; Damberg, Greg; Thomas, William; Gruetter, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and diabetes alter the function and metabolism of many tissues. The effect on the brain remains poorly defined, but some animal data suggest that chronic hyperglycemia reduces rates of brain glucose transport and/or metabolism. To address this question in human beings, we measured glucose in the occipital cortex of patients with poorly controlled diabetes and healthy volunteers at the same levels of plasma glucose using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Fourteen patients w...

  11. Mapping whole-brain activity with cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Paciscopi, Marco; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Frasconi, Paolo; Hyman, Bradley T.; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Mapping neuronal activity patterns across the whole brain with cellular resolution is a challenging task for state-of-the-art imaging methods. Indeed, despite a number of technological efforts, quantitative cellular-resolution activation maps of the whole brain have not yet been obtained. Many techniques are limited by coarse resolution or by a narrow field of view. High-throughput imaging methods, such as light sheet microscopy, can be used to image large specimens with high resolution and in reasonable times. However, the bottleneck is then moved from image acquisition to image analysis, since many TeraBytes of data have to be processed to extract meaningful information. Here, we present a full experimental pipeline to quantify neuronal activity in the entire mouse brain with cellular resolution, based on a combination of genetics, optics and computer science. We used a transgenic mouse strain (Arc-dVenus mouse) in which neurons which have been active in the last hours before brain fixation are fluorescently labelled. Samples were cleared with CLARITY and imaged with a custom-made confocal light sheet microscope. To perform an automatic localization of fluorescent cells on the large images produced, we used a novel computational approach called semantic deconvolution. The combined approach presented here allows quantifying the amount of Arc-expressing neurons throughout the whole mouse brain. When applied to cohorts of mice subject to different stimuli and/or environmental conditions, this method helps finding correlations in activity between different neuronal populations, opening the possibility to infer a sort of brain-wide 'functional connectivity' with cellular resolution.

  12. Low-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging in the canine brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 0,23 T) of the canine brain was performed. Each scan plane was compared with corresponding anatomic sections. The best imaging planes to visualize various anatomic structures were determined. Low-field-strength MRI allowed the good definition of all relevant anatomic structures of the brain of 55 dogs with the exception of most cranial nerves. White matter could be best differentiated using proton-weighted images. On T1-weighted images the contrast of white matter was markedly limited in the living dogs in contrast to the examined canine specimens. The relative size of the lateral ventricle was defined as the ratio of the size of the lateral ventricle and the size of the half brain. The relative size of the lateral ventricle of Yorkshire Terrier dogs (5,35 %) was significantly (p 0,05) in the relative size of the lateral ventricles of healthy Yorkshire Terrier dogs (5,35 %) and Yorkshire Terrier dogs with neurological symptoms (7,06 %). Asymmetric lateral ventricles were very common in the examined dogs independently from body size, skull shape and neurological status. Occasionally the septum telencephali was not developed completely. 11 of 12 intracranial neoplasm could be delineated using low-field-strength MRI. Anatomic site, number of intracerebral lesions, limitation, shape and growth pattern, secondary brain lesions and development of peritumoral edema were described for each intracranial neoplasm as well as its signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images and contrast enhancement pattern. MRI did not allow an accurate diagnosis of tumor type, nevertheless skull shape (brachycephalic/dolichocephalic), anatomic site and number of intracerebral lesions facilitated a presumable diagnosis of the tumor type. (author)

  13. Clinical advantage and limitation of the 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss practical techniques of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance images. Raw data for 3-dimensional MRI were acquired using a 3D turbo-FLASH sequence. The data were processed in the following three ways; 1) volume rendering of all the raw data, 2) segmentation of the brain from other tissue using other software and the volume rendering of all the raw data, and 3) reconstruction of 2-dimensional image of the arbitrary orientation (oblique-oblique and curvature) using multi-planar reconstruction (MPR). In addition to these basic techniques, a surgical window technique, maximum intensity projection (MIP), and skin marking using fatty acid gel in capsules can provide the following unique images; 1) surface images of the skin, skull and brain, 2) images of the arteries and the main cortical vein superimposed on the brain-surface images, and 3) surgical images simulating craniotomy. The drawbacks of 3-dimensional MRI at present are twofold; 1)it requires mini-computers, which is not always available at every clinical site, and 2) the time necessary for data processing and image reconstruction depends on the performance of the computer, but in any case the segmentation of the brain from other soft tissue is a time-consuming job, one which generally takes several hours. However, it is expected that these present limitations of 3-dimentional MRI are only temporary because fast and high cost-performance computers for this specific purpose (image processing) have recently become available. The authors stress that the most important factor which drives the development of a high cost-performance system for 3-dimensional MRI is the demand from clinicians, who realize the advantages of 3-dimensional MRI. (author)

  14. Magnetic susceptibility of brain iron is associated with childhood spatial IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kimberly L H; Li, Wei; Wei, Hongjiang; Wu, Bing; Xiao, Xue; Liu, Chunlei; Worley, Gordon; Egger, Helen Link

    2016-05-15

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for healthy brain function and development. Because of the importance of iron in the brain, iron deficiency results in widespread and lasting effects on behavior and cognition. We measured iron in the basal ganglia of young children using a novel MRI method, quantitative susceptibility mapping, and examined the association of brain iron with age and cognitive performance. Participants were a community sample of 39 young children recruited from pediatric primary care who were participating in a 5-year longitudinal study of child brain development and anxiety disorders. The children were ages 7 to 11years old (mean age: 9.5years old) at the time of the quantitative susceptibility mapping scan. The differential abilities scale was administered when the children were 6years old to provide a measure of general intelligence and verbal (receptive and expressive), non-verbal, and spatial performance. Magnetic susceptibility values, which are linearly related to iron concentration in iron-rich areas, were extracted from regions of interest within iron-rich deep gray matter nuclei from the basal ganglia, including the caudate, putamen, substantia nigra, globus pallidus, and thalamus. Controlling for scan age, there was a significant positive association between iron in the basal ganglia and spatial IQ, with this effect being driven by iron in the right caudate We also replicated previous findings of a significant positive association between iron in the bilateral basal ganglia and age. Our finding of a positive association between spatial IQ and mean iron in the basal ganglia, and in the caudate specifically, suggests that iron content in specific regions of the iron-rich deep nuclei of the basal ganglia influences spatial intelligence. This provides a potential neurobiological mechanism linking deficits in spatial abilities reported in children who were severely iron deficient as infants to decreased iron within the caudate. PMID:26899787

  15. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  16. On the peculiarities of manifestation of kG magnetic elements in observations of the Sun with low spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Mikhail L.; Veretsky, Renat M.; Kiselev, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    On the agenda of modern astrophysics is the exploration of not only disk-integrated stellar magnetic fields but surface mapping of them. However, it is hardly possible to expect that spatial resolution better than some dozens or hundreds pixels over stellar disk will be achieved for this goal in the foreseeable future. Among other reasons this fact makes very important observations of the average and large-scale magnetic fields of the Sun, which can be naturally used for testing polarimetric measurements on other stars, especially on solar-type stars. In this study we explore different aspects of observations of solar magnetic fields (SMF) with low spatial resolution, including Sun-as-a-star observations, which are characterized by extremely low magnetic flux densities. Comparison of disk-integrated and spatially resolved Stokes observations of the Sun allow us to demonstrate how Stokes V profiles depend on the distribution of large-scale magnetic fields in the disk center. It is shown that center-to-limb variations of magnetic strength ratios (MSR) and area asymetries, most likely could be interpreted as the manifestation of kG magnetic flux tubes. We have made cross-calibration of the full-disk magnetograms obtained by space-borned SDO/HMI and by the ground-based STOP telescope, and pretty good agreement is found. Finally, the absence of significant systematic time variations of MSRs with solar cycle is demonstrated.

  17. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain; Fetale Magnetresonanztomographie des Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States). Div. of Pediatric Radiology

    2008-03-15

    Fetal magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a valuable adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis. The high spatial resolution, the large field-of-view, the different contrasts that can be generated and the development of functional MRI-sequences are especially valuable in the diagnosis of complex pathologies of the central nervous system. In addition, fetal MRI does not suffer from obscuring maternal or fetal osseous structures, intestinal gas or maternal obesitas. The ultrafast MRI sequences allow imaging without fetal sedation. Nowadays, fetal MRI is used to confirm, complete or correct US-findings in order to offer the best possible fetal treatment pre- and postnatally. (orig.)

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be used to explore tactile and nociceptive processing in the infant brain.

    OpenAIRE

    G. Williams; Fabrizi, L.; Meek, J.; Jackson, D.; Tracey, I.; Robertson, N; Slater, R.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Despite the importance of neonatal skin stimulation, little is known about activation of the newborn human infant brain by sensory stimulation of the skin. We carried out functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the feasibility of measuring brain activation to a range of mechanical stimuli applied to the skin of neonatal infants. Methods We studied 19 term infants with a mean age of 13 days. Brain activation was measured in response to brushing, von Frey hair (vFh) punctate ...

  19. Enhancing lexical ambiguity resolution by brain polarization of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Yael; Lavidor, Michal

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have reported a hemispheric asymmetry in processing dominant (e.g., paper) and subordinate (e.g., farmer) associations of ambiguous words (pen). Here we applied sham and anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over Wernicke's area and its right homologue to test whether we can modulate the selective hemispheric expertise in processing lexical ambiguity. Ambiguous prime words were presented followed by target words that could be associated to the dominant or subordinate meaning of the prime in a semantic relatedness task. Anodal stimulation of the right Wernicke's area significantly decreased response time (RTs) to subordinate but not dominant associations compared to sham stimulation. There was also a complementary trend of faster responses to dominant associations following anodal stimulation of Wernicke's area. The results support brain asymmetry in processing lexical ambiguity and show that tDCS can enhance complex language processing even in a sample of highly literate individuals. PMID:22513342

  20. Investigating the impact of blood pressure increase to the brain using high resolution serial histology and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, F.; Castonguay, A.; Tardif, P. L.; Lefebvre, J.; Li, B.

    2015-09-01

    A combined serial OCT/confocal scanner was designed to image large sections of biological tissues at microscopic resolution. Serial imaging of organs embedded in agarose blocks is performed by cutting through tissue using a vibratome which sequentially cuts slices in order to reveal new tissue to image, overcoming limited light penetration encountered in microscopy. Two linear stages allow moving the tissue with respect to the microscope objective, acquiring a 2D grid of volumes (1x1x0.3 mm) with OCT and a 2D grid of images (1x1mm) with the confocal arm. This process is repeated automatically, until the entire sample is imaged. Raw data is then post-processed to re-stitch each individual acquisition and obtain a reconstructed volume of the imaged tissue. This design is being used to investigate correlations between white matter and microvasculature changes with aging and with increase in pulse pressure following transaortic constriction in mice. The dual imaging capability of the system allowed to reveal different contrast information: OCT imaging reveals changes in refractive indices giving contrast between white and grey matter in the mouse brain, while transcardial perfusion of FITC or pre-sacrifice injection of Evans Blue shows microsvasculature properties in the brain with confocal imaging.

  1. Three-Dimensional Electroencephalographic Changes on Low-Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) During the Sleep Onset Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Doo-Heum; Ha, Jee Hyun; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Yu, Jaehak; Shin, Chul-Jin

    2015-10-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns during sleep are markedly different from those measured during the waking state, but the process of falling asleep is not fully understood in terms of biochemical and neurophysiological aspects. We sought to investigate EEG changes that occur during the transitional period from wakefulness to sleep in a 3-dimensional manner to gain a better understanding of the physiological meaning of sleep for the brain. We examined EEG 3-dimensionally using LORETA (low-resolution electromagnetic tomography), to localize the brain region associated with changes that occur during the sleep onset period (SOP). Thirty-channel EEG was recorded in 61 healthy subjects. EEG power spectra and intracortical standardized LORETA were compared between 4 types of 30-second states, including the wakeful stage, transition stage, early sleep stage 1, and late sleep stage 1. Sleep onset began with increased delta and theta power and decreased alpha-1 power in the occipital lobe, and increased theta power in the parietal lobe. Thereafter, global reductions of alpha-1 and alpha-2 powers and greater increases of theta power in the occipito-parietal lobe occurred. As sleep became deeper in sleep stage 1, beta-2 and beta-3, powers decreased mainly in the frontal lobe and some regions of the parieto-temporo-limbic area. These findings suggest that sleep onset includes at least 3 steps in a sequential manner, which include an increase in theta waves in the posterior region of the brain, a global decrease in alpha waves, and a decrease in beta waves in the fronto-central area. PMID:25150221

  2. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  3. Effect of slice thickness on brain magnetic resonance image texture analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinonen Tomi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of texture analysis in clinical evaluation of magnetic resonance images depends considerably on imaging arrangements and various image quality parameters. In this paper, we study the effect of slice thickness on brain tissue texture analysis using a statistical approach and classification of T1-weighted images of clinically confirmed multiple sclerosis patients. Methods We averaged the intensities of three consecutive 1-mm slices to simulate 3-mm slices. Two hundred sixty-four texture parameters were calculated for both the original and the averaged slices. Wilcoxon's signed ranks test was used to find differences between the regions of interest representing white matter and multiple sclerosis plaques. Linear and nonlinear discriminant analyses were applied with several separate training and test sets to determine the actual classification accuracy. Results Only moderate differences in distributions of the texture parameter value for 1-mm and simulated 3-mm-thick slices were found. Our study also showed that white matter areas are well separable from multiple sclerosis plaques even if the slice thickness differs between training and test sets. Conclusions Three-millimeter-thick magnetic resonance image slices acquired with a 1.5 T clinical magnetic resonance scanner seem to be sufficient for texture analysis of multiple sclerosis plaques and white matter tissue.

  4. USE OF PROTON MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING DATA IN PLANNING FOCAL RADIATION THERAPIES FOR BRAIN TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E Graves

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms have produced techniques such as Gamma Knife radiosurgery, capable of delivering an ablative dose to a specific, irregular volume of tissue. However, efficient use of these techniques requires the identification of a target volume that will produce the best therapeutic response while sparing surrounding normal brain tissue. Accomplishing this task using conventional computed tomography (CT and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques has proven difficult because of the difficulties in identifying the effective tumor margin. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI has been shown to offer a clinically-feasible metabolic assessment of the presence and extent of neoplasm that can complement conventional anatomic imaging. This paper reviews current Gamma Knife protocols and MRSI acquisition, reconstruction, and interpretation techniques, and discusses the motivation for including magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings while planning focal radiation therapies. A treatment selection and planning strategy incorporating MRSI is then proposed, which can be used in the future to assess the efficacy of spectroscopy-based therapy planning.

  5. Direct mapping of 19F in 19FDG-6P in brain tissue at subcellular resolution using soft X-ray fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Poitry-yamate, Carole; Gianoncelli, A; Kourousias, G.; Kaulich, B; Lepore, Mario; Gruetter, Rolf; M. Kiskinova

    2013-01-01

    Low energy x-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) detection was optimized for imaging cerebral glucose metabolism by mapping the fluorine LEXRF signal of 19 F in 19 FDG, trapped as intracellular 19 F-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate ( 19 FDG-6P) at 1μm spatial resolution from 3μm thick brain slices. 19 FDG metabolism was evaluated in brain structures closely resembling the general cerebral cytoarchitecture following formalin fixation of brain slices and their inclusion in an epon matrix. 2-dimensional distribu...

  6. A device to measure the effects of strong magnetic fields on the image resolution of PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, D; Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N H; Cochran, E; Honscheid, K; Huh, S S; Kagan, H; Knopp, M; Lacasta, C; Mikuz, M; Schmalbrock, P; Studen, A; Weilhammer, P

    2009-01-01

    Very high resolution images can be achieved in small animal PET systems utilizing solid state silicon pad detectors. As these systems approach sub-millimeter resolutions, the range of the positron is becoming the dominant contribution to image blur. The size of the positron range effect depends on the initial positron energy and hence the radioactive tracer used. For higher energy positron emitters, such as and , which are gaining importance in small animal studies, the width of the annihilation point distribution dominates the spatial resolution. This positron range effect can be reduced by embedding the field of view of the PET scanner in a strong magnetic field. In order to confirm this effect experimentally, we developed a high resolution PET instrument based on silicon pad detectors that can operate in a 7 T magnetic field. In this paper, we describe the instrument and present initial results of a study of the effects of magnetic fields up to 7 T on PET image resolution for and point sources.

  7. A combined solenoid-surface RF coil for high-resolution whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Yuan, Chun; Hayes, Cecil E

    2010-09-01

    Rat brain models effectively simulate a multitude of human neurological disorders. Improvements in coil design have facilitated the wider utilization of rat brain models by enabling the utilization of clinical MR scanners for image acquisition. In this study, a novel coil design, subsequently referred to as the rat brain coil, is described that exploits and combines the strengths of both solenoids and surface coils into a simple, multichannel, receive-only coil dedicated to whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 T clinical MR scanner. Compared with a multiturn solenoid mouse body coil, a 3-cm surface coil, a modified Helmholtz coil, and a phased-array surface coil, the rat brain coil improved signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 72, 61, 78, and 242%, respectively. Effects of the rat brain coil on amplitudes of static field and radiofrequency field uniformity were similar to each of the other coils. In vivo, whole-brain images of an adult male rat were acquired with a T(2)-weighted spin-echo sequence using an isotropic acquisition resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 x 0.25 mm(3) in 60.6 min. Multiplanar images of the in vivo rat brain with identification of anatomic structures are presented. Improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by the rat brain coil may broaden experiments that utilize clinical MR scanners for in vivo image acquisition. PMID:20535812

  8. 3-Dimensional modelling of chick embryo eye development and growth using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Nicola; Kisiswa, Lilian; Prashar, Ankush; Faulkner, Stuart; Tokarczuk, Paweł; Singh, Krish; Erichsen, Jonathan T; Guggenheim, Jez; Halfter, Willi; Wride, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for generating 3-dimensional structural and functional image data. MRI has already proven valuable in creating atlases of mouse and quail development. Here, we have exploited high resolution MRI to determine the parameters necessary to acquire images of the chick embryo eye. Using a 9.4 Tesla (400 MHz) high field ultra-shielded and refrigerated magnet (Bruker), MRI was carried out on paraformaldehyde-fixed chick embryos or heads at E4, E6, E8, and E10. Image data were processed using established and custom packages (MRICro, ImageJ, ParaVision, Bruker and mri3dX). Voxel dimensions ranged from 62.5 microm to 117.2 microm. We subsequently used the images obtained from the MRI data in order to make precise measurements of chick embryo eye surface area, volume and axial length from E4 to E10. MRI was validated for accurate sizing of ocular tissue features by direct comparison with previously published literature. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of high resolution MRI for making accurate measurements of morphological changes due to experimental manipulation of chick eye development, thereby facilitating a better understanding of the effects on chick embryo eye development and growth of such manipulations. Chondroitin sulphate or heparin were microinjected into the vitreous cavity of the right eyes of each of 3 embryos at E5. At E10, embryos were fixed and various eye parameters (volume, surface area, axial length and equatorial diameter) were determined using MRI and normalised with respect to the un-injected left eyes. Statistically significant alterations in eye volume (p < 0.05; increases with chondroitin sulphate and decreases with heparin) and changes in vitreous homogeneity were observed in embryos following microinjection of glycosaminoglycans. Furthermore, in the heparin-injected eyes, significant disturbances at the vitreo-retinal boundary were observed as well as retinal folding and detachment

  9. An Evaluation of the Left-Brain vs. Right-Brain Hypothesis with Resting State Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Jared A; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ferguson, Michael A.; Janet E. Lainhart; Anderson, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Lateralized brain regions subserve functions such as language and visuospatial processing. It has been conjectured that individuals may be left-brain dominant or right-brain dominant based on personality and cognitive style, but neuroimaging data has not provided clear evidence whether such phenotypic differences in the strength of left-dominant or right-dominant networks exist. We evaluated whether strongly lateralized connections covaried within the same individuals. Data were analyzed from...

  10. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  11. Refining language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with left-sided perisylvian brain lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Ille, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The present thesis is based on two publications for which we performed language mapping in patients suffering from left-sided perisylvian brain lesions by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and direct cortical stimulation (DCS) during awake surgery. In summary, we ascertained that rTMS language mappings should be analyzed with specific thresholds in order to avoid false-positive results. Furthermore, we showed that b...

  12. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [123I]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [123I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [123I]β-CIT and [123I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [123I]β-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [123I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  13. Quantification of dopamine transporters in the mouse brain using ultra-high resolution single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional imaging of small animals, such as mice and rats, using ultra-high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission tomography (SPET), is becoming a valuable tool for studying animal models of human disease. While several studies have shown the utility of PET imaging in small animals, few have used SPET in real research applications. In this study we aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of using ultra-high resolution SPET in quantitative studies of dopamine transporters (DAT) in the mouse brain. Four healthy ICR male mice were injected with (mean±SD) 704±154 MBq [99mTc]TRODAT-1, and scanned using an ultra-high resolution SPET system equipped with pinhole collimators (spatial resolution 0.83 mm at 3 cm radius of rotation). Each mouse had two studies, to provide an indication of test-retest reliability. Reference tissue kinetic modeling analysis of the time-activity data in the striatum and cerebellum was used to quantitate the availability of DAT. A simple equilibrium ratio of striatum to cerebellum provided another measure of DAT binding. The SPET imaging results were compared against ex vivo biodistribution data from the striatum and cerebellum. The mean distribution volume ratio (DVR) from the reference tissue kinetic model was 2.17±0.34, with a test-retest reliability of 2.63%±1.67%. The ratio technique gave similar results (DVR=2.03±0.38, test-retest reliability=6.64%±3.86%), and the ex vivo analysis gave DVR=2.32±0.20. Correlations between the kinetic model and the ratio technique (R2=0.86, P2=0.92, P=0.04) were both excellent. This study demonstrated clearly that ultra-high resolution SPET of small animals is capable of accurate, repeatable, and quantitative measures of DAT binding, and should open up the possibility of further studies of cerebral binding sites in mice using pinhole SPET. (orig.)

  14. Ultra-wide bore 900 MHz high-resolution NMR at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, R.; Brey, W. W.; Shetty, K.; Gor'kov, P.; Saha, S.; Long, J. R.; Grant, S. C.; Chekmenev, E. Y.; Hu, J.; Gan, Z.; Sharma, M.; Zhang, F.; Logan, T. M.; Brüschweller, R.; Edison, A.; Blue, A.; Dixon, I. R.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Cross, T. A.

    2005-11-01

    Access to an ultra-wide bore (105 mm) 21.1 T magnet makes possible numerous advances in NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging, as well as novel applications. This magnet was developed, designed, manufactured and tested at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and on July 21, 2004 it was energized to 21.1 T. Commercial and unique homebuilt probes, along with a standard commercial NMR console have been installed and tested with many science applications to develop this spectrometer as a user facility. Solution NMR of membrane proteins with enhanced resolution, new pulse sequences for solid state NMR taking advantage of narrowed proton linewidths, and enhanced spatial resolution and contrast leading to improved animal imaging have been documented. In addition, it is demonstrated that spectroscopy of single site 17O labeled macromolecules in a hydrated lipid bilayer environment can be recorded in a remarkably short period of time. 17O spectra of aligned samples show the potential for using this data for orientational restraints and for characterizing unique details of cation binding properties to ion channels. The success of this NHMFL magnet illustrates the potential for using a similar magnet design as an outsert for high temperature superconducting insert coils to achieve an NMR magnet with a field >25 T.

  15. Investigation of feline brain anatomy for the detection of cortical spreading depression with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; James, M F; Bockhorst, K H; Smith, M I; Bradley, D P; Papadakis, N G; Carpenter, T A; Parsons, A A; Leslie, R A; Hall, L D; Huang, C L

    2001-05-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and peri-infarct depolarisation (PID) are related phenomena that have been associated with the human clinical syndromes of migraine (CSD), head injury and stroke (PID). Nevertheless the existence of CSD in man remains controversial, despite the detection of this phenomenon in the brains of most, if not all, other animal species investigated. This failure to unambiguously detect CSD clinically may be at least partly due to the anatomically complex, gyrencephalic structure of the human brain. This study was designed to establish conditions for the study of CSD in the brain of a gyrencephalic species using the noninvasive technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 3-dimensional (3D) gyrencephalic anatomy of the cat brain was examined to determine the imaging conditions necessary to detect CSD events. Orthogonal transverse, sagittal and horizontal T1-weighted image slices showed that the marginal and suprasylvian gyri were the most appropriate cortical structures to study CSD. This was in view of (1) their simple geometry: (2) their lengthy extent of grey matter orientated rostrocaudally in the cortex: (3) their separation by a sulcus across which CSD spread could be studied and (4) the discontinuity in the grey matter in these regions between the right and left hemispheres dorsal to the corpus callosum. The structure suggested by the T1-weighted images was corroborated by systematic diffusion tensor imaging to map the fractional anisotropy and diffusion trace. Thus a single horizontal image plane could visualise the neighbouring suprasylvian and marginal gyri of both cerebral hemispheres, whereas its complex shape and position ruled out the ectosylvian gyrus for CSD studies. With the horizontal imaging plane, CSD events were reproducibly detected by animating successive diffusion-weighted MR images following local KCl stimulation of the cortical surface. In single image frames, CSD detection and characterisation required

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of normal human brain and glioma:a quantitive in vivo study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Zhi-yong; YAMAKI Toshiaki; WANG Yun-jie

    2005-01-01

    Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a noninvasive method of examining a wide variety of cerebral metabolites in both healthy subjects and patients with various brain diseases.Absolute metabolite concentrations have been determined using external and internal standards with known concentrations.When an external standard is placed beside the head, variations in signal amplitudes due to B1 field inhomogeneity and static field inhomogeneity may occur.Hence an internal standard is preferable.The purpose of this study was to quantitatively analyze the metabolite concentrations in normal adult brains and gliomas by in vivo proton MRS using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard.Methods Between January 1998 and October 2001, 28 healthy volunteers and 16 patients with gliomas were examined by in vivo proton MRS.Single-voxel spectra were acquired using the point-resolved spectroscopic pulse sequence with a 1.5 T scanner (TR/TE/Ave=3000 ms/30 ms/64).Results The calculated concentrations of N-acetyl-asparatate (NAA), creatine (Cre), choline (Cho), and water (H2O) in the normal hemispheric white matter were (23.59±2.62) mmol/L, (13.06±1.8) mmol/L, (4.28±0.8) mmol/L, and (47 280.96±5414.85) mmol/L, respectively.The metabolite concentrations were not necessarily uniform in different parts of the brain.The concentrations of NAA and Cre decreased in all gliomas (P<0.001).The ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/H2O showed a significant difference between the normal brain and gliomas, and also between the high and low grades (P<0.001).Conclusions Quantitative analysis of in vivo proton MR spectra using the fully relaxed water signal as an internal standard is useful.The concentrations of NAA and the ratios of NAA/H2O and NAA/Cho conduce to discriminating between the glioma and normal brain, and also between the low-grade glioma and high-grade glioma.

  17. Association of Metabolic Dysregulation With Volumetric Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cognitive Markers of Subclinical Brain Aging in Middle-Aged Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Beiser, Alexa S; Au, Rhoda; Himali, Jayandra J.; Debette, Stephanie; DeCarli, Charles; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wolf, Philip A.; Seshadri, Sudha; Tan, Zaldy S.; Fox, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Diabetic and prediabtic states, including insulin resistance, fasting hyperglycemia, and hyperinsulinemia, are associated with metabolic dysregulation. These components have been individually linked to increased risks of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. We aimed to comprehensively relate all of the components of metabolic dysregulation to cognitive function and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in middle-aged adults. Research Design and Methods: Framingham Offspring ...

  18. High-resolution near-bottom vector magnetic anomalies over Raven Hydrothermal Field, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Johnson, H. Paul; Salmi, Marie S.; Hutnak, Michael

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution, near-bottom vector magnetic data were collected by remotely operated vehicle Jason over the Raven hydrothermal vent field (47°57.3'N 129°5.75'W) located north of Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The survey was part of a comprehensive heat flow study of the Raven site using innovative thermal blanket technology to map the heat flux and crustal fluid pathways around a solitary hydrothermal vent field. Raven hydrothermal activity is presently located along the western axial valley wall, while additional inactive hydrothermal deposits are found to the NW on the upper rift valley wall. Magnetic inversion results show discrete areas of reduced magnetization associated with both active and inactive hydrothermal vent deposits that also show high conductive heat flow. Higher spatial variability in the heat flow patterns compared to the magnetization is consistent with the heat flow reflecting the currently active but ephemeral thermal environment of fluid flow, while crustal magnetization is representative of the static time-averaged effect of hydrothermal alteration. A general NW to SE trend in reduced magnetization across the Raven area correlates closely with the distribution of hydrothermal deposits and heat flux patterns and suggests that the fluid circulation system at depth is likely controlled by local crustal structure and magma chamber geometry. Magnetic gradient tensor components computed from vector magnetic data improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly source and indicate that the hydrothermally altered zone directly beneath the Raven site is approximately 15 × 106 m3 in volume.

  19. Ductal carcinoma in situ. Correlations between high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine and correlate contrast-enhanced areas and multiple internal dark dots and lines on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) with findings in surgical specimens of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and to evaluate the ability of HR-MRI to detect DCIS lesions and clarify HR-MRI features characteristic of DCIS. This study retrospectively reviewed 11 patients diagnosed with DCIS who had undergone HR-MRI. Pathological findings and results of HR-MRI were compared, and causes of periductal enhancements were analyzed. In all patients, HR-MRI using microscopic coils revealed ductally, segmentally, or regionally enhanced areas containing multiple dark dots and lines, representing local enhancement of stroma adjacent to the mammary duct containing DCIS. Neovascularization, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and focal edema occurred in enhanced periductal stroma. Poorly enhanced linear or dot-like structures correlated with dilated mammary ducts displaying necrosis and tumor impaction. DCIS was successfully depicted on HR-MRI using a microscopy coil in all 11 cases. Ductal, segmental, or regional areas of enhancement with multiple dark dots and lines on HR-MRI corresponded to mammary glands containing DCIS with periductal enhancement. (author)

  20. High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance angiography: a feasibility study on biological and medical tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel Lene WT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In biomedical sciences, ex vivo angiography is a practical mean to elucidate vascular structures three-dimensionally with simultaneous estimation of intravascular volume. The objectives of this study were to develop a magnetic resonance (MR method for ex vivo angiography and to compare the findings with computed tomography (CT. To demonstrate the usefulness of this method, examples are provided from four different tissues and species: the human placenta, a rice field eel, a porcine heart and a turtle. Results The optimal solution for ex vivo MR angiography (MRA was a compound containing gelatine (0.05 g/mL, the CT contrast agent barium sulphate (0.43 mol/L and the MR contrast agent gadoteric acid (2.5 mmol/L. It was possible to perform angiography on all specimens. We found that ex vivo MRA could only be performed on fresh tissue because formalin fixation makes the blood vessels permeable to the MR contrast agent. Conclusions Ex vivo MRA provides high-resolution images of fresh tissue and delineates fine structures that we were unable to visualise by CT. We found that MRA provided detailed information similar to or better than conventional CTA in its ability to visualize vessel configuration while avoiding interfering signals from adjacent bones. Interestingly, we found that vascular tissue becomes leaky when formalin-fixed, leading to increased permeability and extravascular leakage of MR contrast agent.

  1. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging of urethral anatomy in continent nulliparous pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To quantify the distribution of morphologic appearances of urethral anatomy and measure variables of urethral sphincter anatomy in continent, nulliparous, pregnant women by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: We studied fifteen women during their first pregnancy. We defined and quantified bladder neck and urethral morphology on axial and sagittal MR images from healthy, continent women. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) total transverse urethral diameter, anterior–posterior diameter, unilateral striated sphincter muscle thickness, and striated sphincter length were 15 ± 2 mm (range: 12–19 mm), 15 ± 2 mm (range: 11–20 mm), 2 ± 1 mm (range: 1–4 mm), and 13 ± 3 mm (range: 9–18 mm) respectively. The mean (±standard deviation) total urethral length on sagittal scans was 22 ± 3 mm (range: 17.6–26.4 mm). Discussion: Advances in MR technique combined with anatomical and histological findings will provide an insight to understand how changes in urethral anatomy might affect the continence mechanisms in pregnant and non-pregnant, continent or incontinent individuals.

  2. Position resolution of the track drift chamber (TPC) in the magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis the ExB effect was studied, the expected angular dependence sigmasub(ExB) = g . cosα . (tanα-tanphi) confirmed, and the strength g and the Lorentz angle phi at different argon-methane mixtures under normal conditions measured. α is the angle between the counting wires and the direction of the narrow side of the cathodes. In all performed measurements the ionization track (laser respectively particles) was parallel to the long side of the cathodes. The expected dependence of the pad-response width on the diffusion was observed. An ExB effect of the pad-response width was detected. This contribution lies between 1 until 4%. A change of the ExB effect of the spatial resolution by the counting wire voltage at constant gas gain was not observed. The tangens of the Lorentz angle is to a great extent proportional to the magnetic field strength. The tangens of the Lorentz angle is between 5 and 10% methane independent on the methane concentration and grows between 10 and 30% methane contribution nearly linearly with the methane admixture. (orig.)

  3. Study of $\\overline{p}$-Nucleus Interaction with a High Resolution Magnetic Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment uses the high resolution, large solid angle and large momentum acceptance magnetic spectrometer SPES~II to study the interaction between @* and complex nuclei in the following experiments: \\\\ \\\\ \\item 1)~~~~A(@*, @*)A. Angular distribution of @* elastically scattered from |1|2C, |4|0Ca and |2|0|8Pb. \\item 2)~~~~A(@*, @*')A*. Excitation energy spectra and some angular distributions of @* inelastically scattered from |1|2C, |4|0Ca and |2|0|8Pb up to an excitation energy of &prop.~100~MeV. \\item 3)~~~~A(@*, p)A^z^-^1 (@*). Excitation energy spectra for knock out reaction on |6Li, |1|2C, |6|3Cu and |2|0|9Bi at several angles. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Any beam momentum between 300 MeV/c and 800 MeV/c will be suitable for this experiment. In order to vary the effect of strong absorption of @* by nuclei, elastic and inelastic scattering will be performed at two or three different @* momenta (depending on the way LEAR will be operated) down to 300~MeV/c.

  4. Measurements of the magnetic fields produced by the human heart, brain, and lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic fields produced by organs of the human body are being measured in a shielded room, using both a SQUID magnetometer and second-derivative gradiometer. Measurements of the field around the human body can yield new information not obtainable with surface electrodes about organs which generate current and about organs which contain foreign, ferromagnetic particles. Magnetocardiograms of normal and abnormal heart subjects are being analyzed and visually displayed in order to assess their information content. Magnetoencephalograms recorded from normal and abnormal brain subjects are also under analysis. Measurements were made of magnetite dust in the lung, with two potential medical applications: (1) the use of pure magnetite dust as a deliberately inhaled tracer (harmless) for pulmonary diagnosis; and (2) the assessment of the amount of asbestos accumulated in the lungs of heavily-exposed workers, since most asbestos (harmful) occurs with adhered magnetite

  5. Neuropsychological correlates of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive cognitive evaluation were carried out in a series of 29 patients with mild to moderate Huntington's disease (HD). A factor analysis of the neuropsychological test scores provided three factors: A memory/speed-of-processing factor, a 'frontal' factor, and a response inhibition factor. The memory/speed factor correlated significantly with measures of caudate atrophy, frontal atrophy, and atrophy of the left (but not the right) sylvian cistern. There were no significant correlations between the 'frontal' or response inhibition factors and measures of cortical or subcortical brain atrophy. Our findings confirm that subcortical atrophy is significantly correlated with specific cognitive deficits in HD, and demonstrate that cortical atrophy also has important association with the cognitive deficits of patients with HD. (orig.)

  6. Neuropsychological correlates of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkstein, S.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry Inst. of Neurological Investigation ' Dr. Raul Carrea' , Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Brandt, J.; Bylsma, F.; Peyser, C.; Folstein, M.; Folstein, S.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry)

    1992-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive cognitive evaluation were carried out in a series of 29 patients with mild to moderate Huntington's disease (HD). A factor analysis of the neuropsychological test scores provided three factors: A memory/speed-of-processing factor, a 'frontal' factor, and a response inhibition factor. The memory/speed factor correlated significantly with measures of caudate atrophy, frontal atrophy, and atrophy of the left (but not the right) sylvian cistern. There were no significant correlations between the 'frontal' or response inhibition factors and measures of cortical or subcortical brain atrophy. Our findings confirm that subcortical atrophy is significantly correlated with specific cognitive deficits in HD, and demonstrate that cortical atrophy also has important association with the cognitive deficits of patients with HD. (orig.).

  7. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with bilateral inferior collicular hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is chronic encephalitis occurring after infection with measles virus. An 8-year-old boy presented with progressive behavioral changes, cognitive decline and myoclonic jerks, progressing to a bed bound state over 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in the subcortical areas of the left occipital lobe and brachium of the inferior colliculus on both sides. EEG showed bilateral, synchronous periodic discharges. Serum/cerebrospinal fluid measles IgG titer was significantly positive. The overall features were suggestive of SSPE. MRI finding of bilateral inferior colliculus changes on MRI without significant involvement of other commonly involved areas suggests an uncommon/rare imaging pattern of SSPE.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging for radiotherapy planning of brain cancer patients using immobilization and surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the compatibility of a head and neck immobilization device with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The immobilization device is used to position a patient in the same way as when receiving a computed tomography (CT) scan for radiotherapy planning and radiation treatment. The advantage of using immobilization in MR is improved accuracy in CT/MR image registration enabling greater confidence in the delineation of structures. The main practical difficulty in using an immobilization device in MRI is that physical constraints make their use incompatible with head imaging coils. Within this paper we describe a method for MR imaging of the brain which allows the use of head and neck immobilization devices. By a series of image quality tests we obtained the same or better image quality as a multi-channel head coil.

  9. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of the neuroligin-3 knock-in mouse model associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD comprise an etiologically heterogeneous set of neurodevelopmental disorders. Neuroligin-3 (NL-3 is a cell adhesion protein that mediates synapse development and has been implicated in ASD. We performed ex-vivo high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and behavioral (social approach and zero maze tests at 3 different time points (30, 50 and 70 days-of-age on NL-3 and wild-type littermates to assess developmental brain abnormalities in NL-3 mice. MRI data were segmented in 39 different gray and white matter regions. Volumetric measurements, along with DTI indices from these segmented regions were also performed. After controlling for age and gender, the NL-3 knock-in animals demonstrated significantly reduced sociability and lower anxiety-related behavior in comparison to their wild type littermates. Significantly reduced volume of several white and gray matter regions in the NL-3 knock-in mice were also observed after considering age, gender and time point as covariates. These findings suggest that structural changes in the brain of NL-3 mice are induced by the mutation in the NL-3 gene. No significant differences in DTI indices were observed, which suggests that the NL-3 mutation may not have a profound effect on water diffusion as detected by DTI. The volumetric and DTI studies aid in understanding the biology of disrupting function on an ASD risk model and may assist in the development of imaging biomarkers for ASD.

  10. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States); He, Bin, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  11. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction

  12. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-qun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3 and Taixi (KI3 using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19, inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18 and cuneus (Brodmann area 18, but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11, inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44 and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present findings indicate that acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi specifically promote blood flow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory.

  13. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Qun; Wang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Jun-Qi; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Li, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Jia-Rong; Ouyang, Huai-Liang; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chun-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and Taixi (KI3) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19), inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18) and cuneus (Brodmann area 18), but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11), inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44) and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present findings indicate that acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi specifically promote blood flow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory. PMID:25883630

  14. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong andTaixi:resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-qun Zhang; Chun-zhi Tang; Yan-jie Wang; Ji-ping Zhang; Jun-qi Chen; Chun-xiao Wu; Zhi-peng Li; Jia-rong Chen; Huai-liang Ouyang; Yong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture atTaichong (LR3) andTaixi (KI3) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture atTaichong andTaixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic res-onance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency lfuctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19), inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18) and cuneus (Brodmann area 18), but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11), inferi-or frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44) and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present ifndings indicate that acupuncture atTaichong andTaixi speciifcally promote blood lfow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory.

  15. Magnetization transfer ratio and volumetric analysis of the brain in macrocephalic patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate brain myelination by measuring the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and to measure grey (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) in macrocephalic children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Seven NF1 patients (aged 0.65-16.67 years) and seven age- and gender-matched controls were studied. A three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequence with and without magnetization transfer (MT) prepulse was used for MTR assessment. Volume measurements of GM and WM were performed by applying segmentation techniques on T2-weighted turbo spin echo images (T2WI). MTR of unidentified bright objects (UBOs) on T2WI in cerebellar white matter (52.8±3.3), cerebral peduncles (48.5±1.5), hippocampus (52.6±1.1), internal capsule (55.7±0.3), globus pallidus (52.7±3.9), and periventricular white matter (52.6±1.2) was lower than in the corresponding areas of controls (64.6±2.5, 60.8±1.3, 56.4±0.9, 64.7±1.9, 59.2±2.3, 63.6±1.7, respectively; p2) of the corpus callosum (809.1±62.8), GMV (cm3) (850.7±42.9), and white matter volume (WMV) (cm3) (785.1±85.2) were greater in patients than in controls (652.5±52.6 mm2, 611.2±92.1 cm3, 622.5±108.7 cm3, respectively; p<0.05). To conclude, macrocephaly in NF1 patients is related to increased GMV and WMV and corpus callosum enlargement. MTR of UBOs is lower than that of normal brain tissue. (orig.)

  16. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen eSong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC across a lover group (LG, N=34, currently intensely in love, ended-love group (ELG, N=34, romantic relationship ended recently, and single group (SG, N=32, never fallen in love.The results showed that:1 ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG; 2 ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; 3 functional connectivity (FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala and nucleus accumbens and the social cognition network (temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, inferior parietal, precuneus and temporal lobe was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG; 4 in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the love duration in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations of brain functional architecture. The results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the possibility of applying a resting state approach for investigating romantic love.

  17. Robust image registration for functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C C; Wu, M T; Lee, C

    2001-09-01

    Motion-related artifacts are still a major problem in data analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) studies of brain activation. However, the traditional image registration algorithm is prone to inaccuracy when there are residual variations owing to counting statistics, partial volume effects or biological variation. In particular, susceptibility artifacts usually result in remarkable signal intensity variance, and they can mislead the estimation of motion parameters. In this study, Two robust estimation algorithms for the registration of FMRI images are described. The first estimation algorithm was based on the Newton method and used Tukey's biweight objective function. The second estimation algorithm was based on the Levenberg-Marquardt technique and used a skipped mean objective function. The robust M-estimators can suppress the effects of the outliers by scaling down their error magnitudes or completely rejecting outliers using a weighting function. The proposed registration methods consisted of the following steps: fast segmentation of the brain region from noisy background as a preprocessing step; pre-registration of the volume centroids to provide a good initial estimation; and two robust estimation algorithms and a voxel sampling technique to find the affine transformation parameters. The accuracy of the algorithms was within 0.5 mm in translation and within 0.5 degrees in rotation. For the FMRI data sets, the performance of the algorithms was visually compared with the AIR 2.0 software, which is a software for image registration, using colour-coded statistical mapping by the Kolmogorov-Smirov method. Experimental results showed, that the algorithms provided significant improvement in correcting motion-related artifacts and can enhance the detection of real brain activation. PMID:11712647

  18. Brain Activity Throughout Audiovisual Speech Perception by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Neuroimaging techniques in audiovisual speech processing are innovative approach to neuroscience investigation that steadily influences the deep survey of highly mechanisms involved in this process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate brain activity via functional magnetic resonance imaging throughout audiovisual speech perception in Persian language.Methods: Functional MRI was used to assess 19 normal 20-30 year old women while they had been presented syllable /ka/ visually and /pa/ auditory using block design method, in which it would provide two series of imaging, functional and T1-weighted. Subsequently, the results were analyzed and compared by FSL software.Results: The results of this study pointed out that both middle and cortical regions of brain are activated in visual stimuli and its middle regions are activated in response to auditory stimuli. Hence, left anterior supramarginal, some parts of motor speech system including insular and cingulate cortex-precentral cortex were stimulated with visual stimulus and left posterior supramarginal as well as right supramarginal gyrus were stimulated with auditory stimulus. Moreover, in this investigation, McGurk effect was behaviorally proven in fifteen subjects.Conclusion: It was hypothesized that the activation of unique region, supramarginal gyrus, with both audio and visual stimuli indicated the presence of commonplace region for phonologic processing of sensory inputs. In addition, auditory stimuli develop more intense activity; and on the other hand, broaden-maximum voxel-as well as extra regions are demonstrated in response to visual stimuli. These points represent the unfamiliarity of normal individual brain to percept visual speech stimuli.

  19. Marchiafava-Bignami disease: a case studied with brain magnetic resonance and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To show the correlation between brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) and single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) in a patient with Marchiafava-Bignami (MB) disease. Background: MB disease is a rare disorder associated with chronic alcoholism. It is characterized by symmetric demyelination of corpus callosum (CC) and adjacent white matter. These lesions can be demonstrated both by computed tomography or/and MRI. Scarce information is available about MRI and SPECT according to the research done. Design/methods: A 79-year-old white man with a history of excessive alcohol consumption (predominantly wine) was admitted to our Institute. A decrease in his physical activity was evidenced in the two years prior to admission and in the last twelve months progressive dementia with hallucinations and severe apathy developed. On admission neurologic examination showed papillae pale in both eyes, left hearing loss, action tremor of upper limbs and proximal hyporeflexia with distal arreflexia of all four limbs was observed. Affectation of higher cortical functions was evident. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal and serology for syphilis and HIV were negative. Both renal and hepatic functions were normal. Brain MRI and SPECT were performed. The patient died 70 days after diagnosis of MB disease. Results: MRI scans of the brain showed multiple hyperintense T2-weighted lesions in white matter and basal ganglia. Cortical atrophy, especially in the fronto-temporal areas, and a CC thickness reduction were also observed. Sagittal view showed an irregular cavitation in the genu of the CC, hypointense and hyperintense on T1 and T2-weighted images respectively. The SPECT showed an abnormal low perfusion on both frontal lobes, left temporo-parietal lobes and right basal ganglia. Conclusion: The clinical features and MRI were consistent with the diagnosis of MB disease. MRI and SPECT studies showed the connection between the lesion in the CC and bilateral cortical

  20. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis of paediatric low grade brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Low grade gliomas are the commonest brain tumours in children but present in a myriad of ways, each with its own treatment challenges. Conventional MRI scans play an important role in their management but have limited ability to identify likely clinical behaviour. The aim of this study is to investigate 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as a method for detecting differences between the various low grade gliomas and related tumours in children. Patients and methods: Short echo time single voxel 1H MRS at 1.5 or 3.0 T was performed prior to treatment on children with low grade brain tumours at two centres and five MR scanners, 69 cases had data which passed quality control. MRS data was processed using LCModel to give mean spectra and metabolite concentrations which were compared using T-tests, ANOVA, Receiver Operator Characteristic curves and logistic regression in SPSS. Results: Significant differences were found in concentrations of key metabolites between glioneuronal and glial tumours (T-test p < 0.05) and between most of the individual histological subtypes of low grade gliomas. The discriminatory metabolites identified, such as choline and myoinositol, are known tumour biomarkers. In the set of pilocytic astrocytomas and unbiopsied optic pathway gliomas, significant differences (p < 0.05, ANOVA) were found in metabolite profiles of tumours depending on location and patient neurofibromatosis type 1 status. Logistic regression analyses yielded equations which could be used to assess the probability of a tumour being of a specific type. Conclusions: MRS can detect subtle differences between low grade brain tumours in children and should form part of the clinical assessment of these tumours

  1. {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis of paediatric low grade brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orphanidou-Vlachou, E., E-mail: eleni.orphanidou@googlemail.com [School of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Auer, D., E-mail: dorothee.auer@nottingham.ac.uk [Division of Academic Radiology, School of Medical and Surgical Sciences, The University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Children' s Brain Tumour Research Centre, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Brundler, M.A., E-mail: marie-anne.brundler@bch.nhs.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Davies, N.P., E-mail: nigel.davies@nhs.net [School of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); Jaspan, T., E-mail: tim.jaspan@nuh.nhs.uk [Children' s Brain Tumour Research Centre, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); MacPherson, L., E-mail: Lesley.MacPherson@bch.nhs.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Natarajan, K., E-mail: Kal.Natarajan@uhb.nhs.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Whittall Street, Birmingham, B4 6NH (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2WB (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-06-15

    Introduction: Low grade gliomas are the commonest brain tumours in children but present in a myriad of ways, each with its own treatment challenges. Conventional MRI scans play an important role in their management but have limited ability to identify likely clinical behaviour. The aim of this study is to investigate {sup 1}H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as a method for detecting differences between the various low grade gliomas and related tumours in children. Patients and methods: Short echo time single voxel {sup 1}H MRS at 1.5 or 3.0 T was performed prior to treatment on children with low grade brain tumours at two centres and five MR scanners, 69 cases had data which passed quality control. MRS data was processed using LCModel to give mean spectra and metabolite concentrations which were compared using T-tests, ANOVA, Receiver Operator Characteristic curves and logistic regression in SPSS. Results: Significant differences were found in concentrations of key metabolites between glioneuronal and glial tumours (T-test p < 0.05) and between most of the individual histological subtypes of low grade gliomas. The discriminatory metabolites identified, such as choline and myoinositol, are known tumour biomarkers. In the set of pilocytic astrocytomas and unbiopsied optic pathway gliomas, significant differences (p < 0.05, ANOVA) were found in metabolite profiles of tumours depending on location and patient neurofibromatosis type 1 status. Logistic regression analyses yielded equations which could be used to assess the probability of a tumour being of a specific type. Conclusions: MRS can detect subtle differences between low grade brain tumours in children and should form part of the clinical assessment of these tumours.

  2. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in cryptogenic stroke patients under 60 years with patent foramen ovale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain feature in cryptogenic stroke patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO), cryptogenic stroke patients without PFO and patients with cardioembolic stroke. Materials and methods: The ethics committee required neither institutional review board approval nor informed patient consent for retrospective analyses of the patients’ medical records and imaging data. The patients’ medical files were retrospectively reviewed in accordance with human subject research protocols. Ninety-two patients under 60 years of age were included: 15 with cardioembolic stroke, 32 with cryptogenic stroke with PFO and 45 with cryptogenic stroke without PFO. Diffusion-weighted imaging of brain MRI was performed by a radiologist blinded to clinical data. Univariate, Fischer's exact test for qualitative data and non-parametric Wilcoxon test for quantitative data were used. Results: There was no statistically significant difference found between MRI features of patients with PFO and those with cardioembolic stroke (p < .05). Patients without PFO present more corticosubcortical single lesions (p < .05) than patients with PFO. Patients with PFO have more often subcortical single lesions larger than 15 mm, involvement of posterior cerebral arterial territory and intracranial occlusion (p < .05) than patients with cryptogenic stroke without PFO. Conclusion: Our study suggests a cardioembolic mechanism in ischemic stroke with PFO

  3. A multi-channel magnetic induction tomography measurement system for human brain model imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a multi-channel magnetic induction tomography measurement system for biological conductivity imaging in a human brain model. A hemispherical glass bowl filled with a salt solution is used as the human brain model; meanwhile, agar blocks of different conductivity are placed in the solution to simulate the intracerebral hemorrhage. The excitation and detection coils are fixed co-axially, and the axial gradiometer is used as the detection coil in order to cancel the primary field. On the outer surface of the glass bowl, 15 sensor units are arrayed in two circles as measurement parts, and a single sensor unit for canceling the phase drift is placed beside the glass bowl. The phase sensitivity of our system is 0.204°/S m−1 with the excitation frequency of 120 kHz and the phase noise is in the range of −0.03° to +0.05°. Only the coaxial detection coil is available for each excitation coil; therefore, 15 phase data are collected in each measurement turn. Finally, the two-dimensional images of conductivity distribution are obtained using an interpolation algorithm. The frequency-varying experiment indicates that the imaging quality becomes better as the excitation frequency is increased

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain inflammation using microparticles of iron oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, Martina A; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin; Anthony, Daniel C; Sibson, Nicola R; Choudhury, Robin P

    2011-01-01

    For molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI), microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO) create potent hypointense contrast effects that extend a distance far exceeding their physical size. The potency of the contrast effects derive from their high iron content and are significantly greater than that of ultra-small particles of iron oxide (USPIO), commonly used for MRI. Due to their size and incompressible nature, MPIO are less susceptible to nonspecific vascular egress or uptake by endothelial cells. Therefore, MPIO may be useful contrast agents for detection of endovascular molecular targets by MRI. This Chapter describes the methodology of a novel, functional MPIO probe targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), for detection of acute brain inflammation in vivo, at a time when pathology is undetectable by conventional MRI. Protocols are included for conjugation of MPIO to mouse monoclonal antibodies against VCAM-1 (VCAM-MPIO), the validation of VCAM-MPIO binding specificity to activated endothelial cells in vitro, and the application of VCAM-MPIO for in vivo targeted MRI of acute brain inflammation in mice. This functional molecular imaging tool may potentially accelerate accurate diagnosis of early cerebral vascular inflammation by MRI, and guide specific therapy. PMID:21153376

  5. Estimation of cell membrane permeability of the rat brain using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imae, T.; Shinohara, H.; Sekino, M.; Ueno, S.; Ohsaki, H.; Mima, K.; Ootomo, K.

    2008-04-01

    We propose a method to noninvasively evaluate the permeability of the cell membrane in the rat brain using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion MRI reflects the intra- and extracellular diffusion coefficients of water and cell membrane permeability. The images were acquired using a 4.7T MRI system with applications to motion-probing gradients in six directions. Numerical simulations based on the finite-difference method were carried out for estimating diffusion MRI signals with various combinations of membrane permeability and intracellular diffusion coefficient values. We defined an evaluative function as the difference between the signals estimated by simulation and experimentally obtained signals. We found that the combination of membrane permeability and intracellular diffusion coefficient in the simulation corresponding to the minimum value of the evaluative function leads to an estimation of these properties of the rat brain. The estimated intracellular diffusion coefficient and membrane permeability were (1.3±0.1)×10-3mm2/s and 74±23μm/s, respectively. Our method is useful for noninvasively estimating the cell membrane permeability of biological tissues, and is easily applicable to human tissues.

  6. Whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral arteriovenous malformations involving the motor pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate cortical, basal ganglia and cerebellar activation in patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the motor pathways, we studied ten patients (six male, four female, mean age 30.3 years, range 7.4-44.1) by whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a 1.5-T scanner with the EPI-BOLD-technique. In seven cases multiple fMRI studies were available, acquired in the course of the multi-session endovascular interventional treatment. Self-paced right- and left-handed finger-tapping tasks were used to invoke activation. In six patients a super-selective amytal test (Wada test) was performed during diagnostic pre-interventional angiography studies. Abnormal cortical activation patterns, with activation of the primary sensorimotor area, the supplementary motor area and/or the cerebellum shifted to unphysiological locations, were found in four patients. In all cases, localization of the AVM could account for the changes from the normal. After endovascular procedures, fMRI demonstrated shifts in the activation pattern in three patients. In the six patients that had undergone fMRI studies and the Wada test, both methods yielded comparable results. The fact that AVMs are structural anomalies for which the brain can partly compensate ('plasticity') was underlined by these results. fMRI is a valuable tool in the pre-therapeutic evaluation and post-interventional follow-up of patients with cerebral AVMs in whom an operation or an endovascular procedure is planned. (orig.)

  7. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ciulla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii monovariate sinc, and (iv bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i classic-curvature, (ii signal resilient to interpolation, (iii intensity-curvature measure and (iv intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional.

  8. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  9. Does Magnetic Resonance Brain Scanning at 3.0 Tesla Pose a Hyperthermic Challenge to Term Neonates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Paul; Few, Karen; Greenwood, Richard; Malcolm, Paul; Johnson, Glyn; Lally, Pete; Thayyil, Sudhin; Clarke, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation 3-Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners offer improved neonatal neuroimaging, but the greater associated radiofrequency radiation may increase the risk of hyperthermia. Safety data for neonatal 3-T MR scanning are lacking. We measured rectal temperatures continuously in 25 neonates undergoing 3-T brain MR imaging and observed no significant hyperthermic threat. PMID:27318382

  10. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of an open low-field magnetic resonance simulator for radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.H.; Laursen, F.J.; Logager, V.;

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior to computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy of brain tumours. In this study an open low-field MR-simulator is evaluated in order to eliminate the cost of and time spent on additional CT scanning. Materials and methods: Eleven...

  11. The Relationship Between Brain Oscillatory Activity and Therapeutic Effectiveness of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Francis Leuchter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is marked by disturbances in brain functional connectivity. This connectivity is modulated by rhythmic oscillations of brain electrical activity, which enable coordinated functions across brain regions. Oscillatory activity plays a central role in regulating thinking and memory, mood, cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter levels, and restoration of normal oscillatory patterns is associated with effective treatment of MDD. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a robust treatment for MDD, but the mechanism of action (MOA of its benefits for mood disorders remains incompletely understood. Benefits of rTMS have been tied to enhanced neuroplasticity in specific brain pathways. We summarize here the evidence that rTMS entrains and resets thalamocortical oscillators, normalizes regulation and facilitates reemergence of intrinsic cerebral rhythms, and through this mechanism restores normal brain function. This entrainment and resetting may be a critical step in engendering neuroplastic changes and the antidepressant effects of rTMS. It may be possible to modify the method of rTMS administration to enhance this mechanism of action and achieve better antidepressant effectiveness. We propose that rTMS can be administered: 1 synchronized to a patient’s individual alpha rhythm (IAF, or synchronized rTMS (sTMS; 2 as a low magnetic field strength sinusoidal wave form; and, 3 broadly to multiple brain areas simultaneously. We present here the theory and evidence indicating that these modifications could enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of rTMS for the treatment of MDD.

  12. Coupling of transient near infrared photonic with magnetic nanoparticle for potential dissipation-free biomedical application in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Vidya; Atluri, V. S. R.; Tomitaka, A.; Shah, P.; Nagasetti, A.; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, S.; El-Hage, N.; McGoron, A.; Takemura, Y.; Nair, M.

    2016-07-01

    Combined treatment strategies based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with near infrared ray (NIR) biophotonic possess tremendous potential for non-invasive therapeutic approach. Nonetheless, investigations in this direction have been limited to peripheral body region and little is known about the potential biomedical application of this approach for brain. Here we report that transient NIR exposure is dissipation-free and has no adverse effect on the viability and plasticity of major brain cells in the presence or absence superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The 808 nm NIR laser module with thermocouple was employed for functional studies upon NIR exposure to brain cells. Magnetic nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic laser scattering (DLS), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Brain cells viability and plasticity were analyzed using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing system, cytotoxicity evaluation, and confocal microscopy. When efficacious non-invasive photobiomodulation and neuro-therapeutical targeting and monitoring to brain remain a formidable task, the discovery of this dissipation-free, transient NIR photonic approach for brain cells possesses remarkable potential to add new dimension.

  13. A thin film magnetic field sensor of sub-pT resolution and magnetocardiogram (MCG) measurement at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabukami, S. [Tohoku-Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Tagajo 985-8537 (Japan)], E-mail: yab@tjcc.tohoku-gakuin.ac.jp; Kato, K.; Ohtomo, Y. [Tohoku-Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Tagajo 985-8537 (Japan); Ozawa, T. [Miyagi National College of Technology, 48 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiote, Natori 981-1239 (Japan); Arai, K.I. [Research Institute for Electric and Magnetic Materials, 2-1-1 Yagiyama minami, Taihaku-ku, Sendai 982 0807 (Japan); National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 6-6-3 Minami-Yoshinari, Aoba-ku, Sendai 989 3204 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    We developed a very sensitive high-frequency carrier-type thin film sensor with a sub-pT resolution using a transmission line. The sensor element consists of Cu conductor with a meander pattern (20 mm in length, 0.8 mm in width, and 18 {mu}m in thickness), a ground plane, and amorphous CoNbZr film (4 {mu}m in thickness). The amplitude modulation technique was employed to enhance the magnetic field resolution for measurement of the high-frequency field (499 kHz), a resolution of 7.10x10{sup -13} T/Hz{sup 1/2} being achieved, when we applied an AC magnetic field at 499 kHz. The phase detection technique was applied for measurement of the low frequency field (around 1 Hz). A small phase change was detected using a dual mixer time difference method. A high phase change of 130 deg./Oe was observed. A magnetic field resolution of 1.35x10{sup -12} T/Hz{sup 1/2} was obtained when a small AC field at 1 Hz was applied. We applied the sensor for magnetocardiogram (MCG) measurement using the phase detection technique. We succeeded in measuring the MCG signal including typical QRS and T waves, and compared the MCG with a simultaneously obtained conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) signal.

  14. Ultrasound/Magnetic Targeting with SPIO-DOX-Microbubble Complex for Image-Guided Drug Delivery in Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Cheng, Yu-Hang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Ho, Yi-Ju; Hsu, Po-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the deployment of chemotherapeutic drugs against brain tumors is ensuring that sufficient drug concentrations reach the tumor, while minimizing drug accumulation at undesired sites. Recently, injection of therapeutic agents following blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening by focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles (MBs) has been shown to enhance drug delivery in targeted brain regions. Nevertheless, the distribution and quantitative deposition of agents delivered to the brain are still hard to estimate. Based on our previous work on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-loaded MBs, we present a novel theranostic complex of SPIO-Doxorubicin (DOX)-conjugated MB (SD-MB) for drug delivery to the brain. Magnetic labeling of the drug enables direct visualization via magnetic resonance imaging, and also facilitates magnetic targeting (MT) to actively enhance targeted deposition of the drug. In a rat glioma model, we demonstrated that FUS sonication can be used with SD-MBs to simultaneously facilitate BBB opening and allow dual ultrasound/magnetic targeting of chemotherapeutic agent (DOX) delivery. The accumulation of SD complex within brain tumors can be significantly enhanced by MT (25.7 fold of DOX, 7.6 fold of SPIO). The change in relaxation rate R2 (1/T2) within tumors was highly correlated with SD deposition as quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (R2 = 0.93) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (R2 = 0.94), demonstrating real-time monitoring of DOX distribution. Our results suggest that SD-MBs can serve as multifunction agents to achieve advanced molecular theranostics. PMID:27446489

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  17. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain's functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) across an "in-love" group (LG, N = 34, currently intensely in love), an "ended-love" group (ELG, N = 34, ended romantic relationship recently), and a "single" group (SG, N = 32, never fallen in love). Results show that: (1) ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG); (2) ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; (3) FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion regulation network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens) as well as FC in the social cognition network [temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal, precuneus, and temporal lobe] was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG); (4) in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the duration of love in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration of time since breakup in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations in brain functional architecture. Furthermore, the results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the

  18. Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrabian Shima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis in a man with mild to moderate dementia and marked hippocampal atrophy, mimicking early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Few cases have so far described bilateral hippocampal atrophy mimicking Alzheimer’s disease in neurosyphilis. Case presentation The patient presented here is a 33 year old Bulgarian male, whose clinical features include progressive cognitive decline and behavioral changes over the last 18 months. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild to moderate dementia (Mini Mental State Examination score was 16/30 with impaired memory and attention, and executive dysfunction. Pyramidal, and extrapyramidal signs, as well as dysarthria and impairment in coordination, were documented. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy with noticeable bilateral hippocampal atrophy. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis was based on positive results of the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test/Treponema pallidum hemagglutination reactions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein levels. High-dose intravenous penicillin therapy was administered. At 6 month follow up, improvements were noted clinically, on neuropsychological examinations, and in cerebrospinal fluid samples. Conclusion This case underlines the importance of early diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when magnetic resonance imaging results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities and hippocampal atrophy. Neurosyphilis is a treatable condition which requires early aggressive antibiotic therapy.

  19. Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Background: This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis in a 33-years-old man with mild to moderate dementia and marked hippocampal atrophy, mimicking early onset Alzheimer's disease. Few number of cases described bilateral hippocampal atrophy mimicking Alzheimer's disease in neurosyphilis. Case presentation: The clinical feature is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and behavioral changes for the last 18 months. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild to moderate dementia (MMSE=16) with impaired memory, attention and executive dysfunction. Pyramidal, extrapyramidal signs, dysarthria and impairment in coordination were documented. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy with marked bilateral hippocampal atrophy. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis was based on positive results of Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test - Treponema Pallidum. Hemagglutination reactions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein levels. High dose intravenous penicillin therapy was administered. During the follow up examination at 6 month, the clinical signs, and neuropsychological examinations, and cerebrospinal fluid samples showed improvement. Conclusion: This case underlines the importance of early diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when magnetic resonance imaging results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities and hippocampal atrophy. Neurosyphilis is a treatable condition and needs early aggressive antibiotic therapy

  20. Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Alexandria; Zenitsky, Gary; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive surgery-free tool used to stimulate the brain by time-varying magnetic fields. TMS is currently being investigated as a treatment for neurological disorders such as depression, Parkinson's disease and TBI. Before moving to human TMS/TBI trials, animal testing should be pursued to determine suitability and adverse effects. As an initial study, four healthy mice were treated with TMS at different power levels to determine short-term behavioral effects and set a control group baseline. The mouse's behavior was studied using the Rotorod test, which measures the animal's latency to fall off a rotating rod, and the Versamax test, which measures horizontal and vertical movement, and total distance traveled. The Rotorod test has shown for TMS power levels >=90% the mice begin to fall directly post-treatment. Similarly, the Versamax test has shown for power levels >=80% the mice are less mobile directly post-treatment. Versamax mobility was found to return to normal the day following treatment. These mice were housed in the facility for 4 months and the behavioral tests were repeated. Versamax results showed there was no significant variation in mobility indicating there are no long-term side effects of TMS treatment on the mice. This work was supported by the Barbara and James Palmer Endowment and the Carver Charitable Trust at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University.

  1. Performance evaluation of three-dimensional position-sensitive CdTe detector blocks for an ultra-high resolution brain PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an ultra-high resolution human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with the resolution of less than 1 mm FWHM, in which cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detectors were used. As the detector of the scanner, we have developed a two-dimensional position-sensitive CdTe detector (2D-PSD) which was developed in our previous study. The 2D-PSD can detect gamma rays with a position resolution of approximately 1.2 mm. We developed a three-dimensional position-sensitive CdTe detector block (3D-PSD block) by stacking 80 2D-PSDs which were connected to subsequent circuits (amplifiers, analog to digital converters, and other data processing circuits). We constructed an ultra-high resolution semiconductor brain PET gantry placing the ten 3D-PSD blocks in decagonal arrangement. In this paper, we checked all 2D-PSDs and classified their performance. As the results, we confirmed that our 3D-PSD blocks can be used to the ultra-high resolution human brain PET. We made a circuit to reduce the dead time due to restoration from polarization phenomena in CdTe detector and we could stabilize count rates. (author)

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Max M; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B; Ayache, Samar S; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-09-01

    Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after initiation

  6. Can fruits and vegetables be used as substitute phantoms for normal human brain tissues in magnetic resonance imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various custom-made phantoms designed to optimize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences have been created and subsequently reported in Japanese Society of Radiological Technology (JSRT). However, custom-made phantoms that correctly match the T1-value and T2-values of human brain tissue (gray matter and white matter) cannot be made easily or quickly. The aim of this project was to search for alternative materials, such as fruits and vegetables, for optimizing MRI sequences. The following eight fruits and vegetables were investigated: apple, tomato, melon, apple mango (Mangifera indica), banana, avocado, peach, and eggplant. Their potential was studied for use in modeling phantoms of normal human brain tissues. MRI (T1- and T2-weighted sequences) was performed on the human brain and the fruits and vegetables using various concentrations of contrast medium (gadolinium) in the same size tubes as the custom-made phantom. The authors compared the signal intensity (SI) in human brain tissue (gray matter and white matter) with that of the fruits and the custom-made phantom. The T1 and T2 values were measured for banana tissue and compared with those for human brain tissue in the literature. Our results indicated that banana tissue is similar to human brain tissue (both gray matter and white matter). Banana tissue can thus be employed as an alternative phantom for the human brain for the purpose of MRI. (author)

  7. A MICROFLUIDIC MAGNETIC HYBRID ACTUATOR FOR ADVANCED HANDLING FUNCTIONS AT CELL RESOLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Fouet, Marc; Courson, Rémi; Dollat, Xavier; Medale, Daniel; Gué, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In microfluidics, the use of super-paramagnetic microparticles (SMPs) has experienced a dramatic increase over the last decade, but control of the magnetic field at micro scale is still a topical issue. Permanent magnets don't offer a programmable approach, external coils require a certain power, and neither are usually integrated. Hybrid systems, which include external magnets to generate a high and homogeneous magnetic field, and integrated coils that produce a high gradient, are seemingly ...

  8. First MMS Observations of High Time Resolution 3D Electric and Magnetic fields at the Dayside Magnetopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Le Contel, O.; Vaith, H.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Rau, D.; Needell, J.; King, B.; Granoff, M.; Chutter, M.; Dors, I.; Argall, M. R.; Shuster, J. R.; Olsson, G.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Eriksson, A. I.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Steller, M.; Bromund, K. R.; Le, G.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Tucker, S.; Westfall, J.; Fischer, D.; Plaschke, F.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electrodynamics at the magnetopause is key to our understanding of ion and electron acceleration within reconnection regions. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) fleet of four spacecraft was launched into its Phase-1 equatorial orbit of 12 Re apogee specifically to investigate these regions at the Earth's magnetopause. In addition to a comprehensive suite of particle measurements, MMS makes very high time resolution 3D electric and magnetic field measurements of high accuracy using flux-gate, search coil, 3-axis double probe, and electron drift sensors. In September 2015, the MMS fleet will begin to encounter the dusk-side magnetopause in its initial configuration of approximately 160 km separation, allowing investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of important electrodynamics during reconnection. Using these field and particle measurements, we present first observations of 3D magnetic and electric fields (including their parallel component), and inferred current sheets, during active magnetopause crossings using the highest time resolution data available on MMS.

  9. High-Resolution B Dot Probe for Measuring 3D Magnetic Fields in the MOCHI Labjet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuara Rosales, Manuel; von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The MOCHI Labjet experiment will use a triple electrode planar plasma gun to explore canonical helicity transport in laboratory astrophysical jets. Canonical helicity transport suggests that destabilizing magnetic energy can be converted into stabilizing shear flows at two-fluid spatial scales li ~c/wpi . A high-resolution . B probe array, capable of measuring magnetic field dynamics at length and time scales important to canonical helicity transport is being built. The probe array consists of three tridents, made of 5 . 13 mm OD and 4 . 32 mm ID stainless steel tubes of 102 cm length, enclosing a total of 1215 commercial inductor chips with a three axis spatial resolution of 11 mm. The average value for the effective NA of each inductor chip is 1 . 21 .10-4 m2. The probe array lays in a plane perpendicular to the jet, and is axially translatable. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  10. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluat...

  11. Q-ball imaging models: comparison between high and low angular resolution diffusion-weighted MRI protocols for investigation of brain white matter integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Trojsi, Francesca; Cirillo, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino [MRI Research Center SUN-FISM-Neurological Institute for Diagnosis and Care ' ' Hermitage Capodimonte' ' , Naples (Italy); Second University of Naples, Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, Naples (Italy); Esposito, Fabrizio [University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Baronissi (Salerno) (Italy); Maastricht University, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is one of the typical data models for quantifying white matter (WM) anisotropy in diffusion-weighted MRI (DwMRI) studies. Brain and spinal investigation by high angular resolution DwMRI (high angular resolution imaging (HARDI)) protocols exhibits higher angular resolution in diffusion imaging compared to low angular resolution models, although with longer acquisition times. We aimed to assess the difference between QBI-derived anisotropy values from high and low angular resolution DwMRI protocols and their potential advantages or shortcomings in neuroradiology. Brain DwMRI data sets were acquired in seven healthy volunteers using both HARDI (b = 3000 s/mm{sup 2}, 54 gradient directions) and low angular resolution (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, 32 gradient directions) acquisition schemes. For both sequences, tract of interest tractography and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) measures were extracted by using QBI model and were compared between the two data sets. QBI tractography and voxel-wise analyses showed that some WM tracts, such as corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal, and uncinate fasciculi, were reconstructed as one-dominant-direction fiber bundles with both acquisition schemes. In these WM tracts, mean percent different difference in GFA between the two data sets was less than 5 %. Contrariwise, multidirectional fiber bundles, such as corticospinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus, were more accurately depicted by HARDI acquisition scheme. Our results suggest that the design of optimal DwMRI acquisition protocols for clinical investigation of WM anisotropy by QBI models should consider the specific brain target regions to be explored, inducing researchers to a trade-off choice between angular resolution and acquisition time. (orig.)

  12. Q-ball imaging models: comparison between high and low angular resolution diffusion-weighted MRI protocols for investigation of brain white matter integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is one of the typical data models for quantifying white matter (WM) anisotropy in diffusion-weighted MRI (DwMRI) studies. Brain and spinal investigation by high angular resolution DwMRI (high angular resolution imaging (HARDI)) protocols exhibits higher angular resolution in diffusion imaging compared to low angular resolution models, although with longer acquisition times. We aimed to assess the difference between QBI-derived anisotropy values from high and low angular resolution DwMRI protocols and their potential advantages or shortcomings in neuroradiology. Brain DwMRI data sets were acquired in seven healthy volunteers using both HARDI (b = 3000 s/mm2, 54 gradient directions) and low angular resolution (b = 1000 s/mm2, 32 gradient directions) acquisition schemes. For both sequences, tract of interest tractography and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) measures were extracted by using QBI model and were compared between the two data sets. QBI tractography and voxel-wise analyses showed that some WM tracts, such as corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal, and uncinate fasciculi, were reconstructed as one-dominant-direction fiber bundles with both acquisition schemes. In these WM tracts, mean percent different difference in GFA between the two data sets was less than 5 %. Contrariwise, multidirectional fiber bundles, such as corticospinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus, were more accurately depicted by HARDI acquisition scheme. Our results suggest that the design of optimal DwMRI acquisition protocols for clinical investigation of WM anisotropy by QBI models should consider the specific brain target regions to be explored, inducing researchers to a trade-off choice between angular resolution and acquisition time. (orig.)

  13. Structure and dynamics of small scale magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere Results of high resolution polarimetry and image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, K.

    2003-07-01

    Two-dimensional spectrograms were obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife, in order to study the structure of small scale magnetic fields on the Sun. The speckle reconstruction method that is used for data processing gives high resolution images and wavelength scans in left and right circular polarized light, from which magnetic field maps are calculated using the center of gravity method. The geometric similarity of magnetic structures is studied via the area- perimeter-relation, from which the Hausdorff-dimension of the rim of a structure is determined. The investigation shows that the actual value of the fractal dimension depends on the threshold that is used to determine the borders of the magnetic areas. Higher treshold values lead to smaller fractal dimensions. This can be explained by the concentration of strong magnetic fields while weak fields spread out in more complex structures. With a treshold of 80 Gauss a fractal dimension of D=1,40(5) is obtained. Furthermore, the dimension obtained by observed data is compared to the fractal dimension gained from MHD simulations. It is found that if the measurement scales are adjusted correctly the dimensions for both datasets match quite well. In a second part the dynamics of the mass motions were analysed and a coarse estimate of the energy conveyed by these movements to the magnetic field is given. The energy flux is strong enough to participate in the heating of the solar chromosphere and corona over active regions.

  14. Magnetic resonance diffusion and perfusion imaging in differentiation and grading the diffuse glial brain neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. They are heterogenous group of tumors, which have infiltrative growth and relative resistance to radio-and chemotherapy. Gliomas are estimated from the WHO classification by means of grades from I go IV. Grade I (localized, 'special' gliomas) and grade II (diffuse gliomas) are considered low-grade, while grade III, IV are high-grade. Although histologically benign, the majority of grade II tumors will transform into malignant grades III and IV during the interval 5-10 years from the initial diagnosis. Glial tumor grading is based on a histo-pathological analysis of the most malignant tumour region, and takes into account the number of mitoses, nuclear atypia, microvascular proliferation and presence of necrosis. These grade are important, because they determine the therapeutic approach and the prognosis in patients with gliomas. Conventional MR images provide important information about contrast-enhancement, oedema, distant tumoral focuses, hemorrhage, necrosis, mass effect and etc, which are very useful in assessment of the tumor aggressiveness and hence tumor grade. Contrast-enhancement reflects the blood-brain-barrier status and could not be a reliable marker of malignancy. Modern physiological MR techniques like MR diffusion and MR perfusion imaging provide information about tumor physiology like microvascularity, angiogenesis and cellularity, all of which are also important in defining the tumor grade. Diffusion weighted imaging estimates the tumor structure-cellularity and water content. Perfusion weighted imaging shows capillary density and neovascularization. (authors) Key words: DIFFUSE GLIOMAS. GLIOMA GRADE. DIFFUSION WEIGHTED AND PERFUSION WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

  15. Brain SPECT guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shailesh; Chadda, Rakesh K; Kumar, Nand; Bal, C S

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has emerged as a potential treatment in treatment resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is no consensus about the exact site of stimulation for rTMS. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers a potential technique in deciding the site of stimulation. The present study was conducted to assess the difference in outcome of brain SPECT assisted rTMS versus standard protocol of twenty sessions of high frequency rTMS as add on treatment in 20 patients with treatment resistant MDD, given over a period of 4 weeks. Thirteen subjects (group I) received high frequency rTMS over an area of hypoperfusion in the prefrontal cortex, as identified on SPECT, whereas 7 subjects (group II) were administered rTMS in the left dorsoslateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area. Improvement was monitored using standardized instruments. Patients in the group I showed a significantly better response compared to those in the group II. In group I, 46% of the subjects were responders on MADRS, 38% on BDI and 77% on CGI. The parallel figures of responders in Group II were 0% on MADRS, 14% on BDI and 43% on CGI. There were no remitters in the study. No significant untoward side effects were noticed. The study had limitations of a small sample size and non-controlled design, and all the subjects were also receiving the standard antidepressant therapy. Administration of rTMS over brain SPECT specified area of hypoperfusion may have a better clinical outcome compared to the standard protocol. PMID:27208445

  16. Microwave and magnetic (M2 proteomics of a mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. Evans

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Short-term increases in oxidative stress and decreases in motor function, including debilitating effects on balance and motor control, can occur following primary mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI. However, the long-term effects on motor unit impairment and integrity as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying secondary injuries are poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in central nervous system-specific protein (CSP expression might correlate to these long-term effects. To test our hypothesis, we longitudinally assessed a closed-skull mTBI mouse model, vs. sham control, at 1, 7, 30, and 120 days post-injury. Motor impairment was determined by rotarod and grip strength performance measures, while motor unit integrity was determined using electromyography. Relative protein expression was determined by microwave and magnetic (M2 proteomics of ipsilateral brain tissue, as previously described. Isoprostane measurements were performed to confirm a primary oxidative stress response. Decoding the relative expression of 476 ± 56 top-ranked proteins for each specimen revealed statistically significant changes in the expression of two well-known CSPs at 1, 7 and 30 days post-injury: P < 0.001 for myelin basic protein (MBP and p < 0.05 for myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG. This was confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, MAG, αII-spectrin (SPNA2 and neurofilament light (NEFL expression at 30 days post-injury were directly related to grip strength (p < 0.05. While higher-powered studies of larger cohorts merit further investigation, this study supports the proof-of-concept that M2 proteomics is a rapid method to quantify putative protein biomarkers and therapeutic targets of mTBI and suggests the feasibility of CSP expression correlations to long-term effects on motor impairment.

  17. Identification of brain metabolites by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in MND/ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, J M; Jones, A P; Redmond, J P; Shaw, I C

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has provided a novel means of studying the brain biochemistry of motor neurone disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (MND/ALS) patients in vivo in situ. Previous studies have demonstrated changes in the ratios of areas under specific spectral peaks in MND/ALS patients (Jones et al., 1995). However, the significance of such findings cannot be fully elucidated without first ascertaining the biochemical identity of each peak. Each peak in a MRS spectrum corresponds to the resonance of specific protons in a particular chemical environment. Many biochemicals contain similar protons in similar environments so it is possible that a single spectral peak could represent protons from more than one biochemical. In this study of major brain MRS peaks we have demonstrated that peaks are potentially composed of a number of protons from different chemicals. For example, the peak at chemical shift 2.01 ppm, conventionally recognised as the neurotransmitter N-acetyl aspartate, may actually be a result of the protons of the N-acetyl moiety (Frahm et al., 1991). We have consequently shown that other N-acetylated compounds such as N-acetyl glutamate are also capable of producing a peak here, whereas their non-acetylated derivatives are not. We have also shown GABA is capable of producing a peak at chemical shift 3.00 ppm, a peak which is generally assigned to creatine/phosphocreatine. These findings have important implications in the identification of spectral peaks in MRS studies and in the interpretation of spectral differences between MND patients and controls. PMID:8899668

  18. Automated segmentation and classification of multispectral magnetic resonance images of brain using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, W E; Glass, J O; Cook, E N; Elkin, T D; Deaton, R J

    1997-12-01

    We present a fully automated process for segmentation and classification of multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images. This hybrid neural network method uses a Kohonen self-organizing neural network for segmentation and a multilayer backpropagation neural network for classification. To separate different tissue types, this process uses the standard T1-, T2-, and PD-weighted MR images acquired in clinical examinations. Volumetric measurements of brain structures, relative to intracranial volume, were calculated for an index transverse section in 14 normal subjects (median age 25 years; seven male, seven female). This index slice was at the level of the basal ganglia, included both genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, and generally, showed the putamen and lateral ventricle. An intraclass correlation of this automated segmentation and classification of tissues with the accepted standard of radiologist identification for the index slice in the 14 volunteers demonstrated coefficients (ri) of 0.91, 0.95, and 0.98 for white matter, gray matter, and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), respectively. An analysis of variance for estimates of brain parenchyma volumes in five volunteers imaged five times each demonstrated high intrasubject reproducibility with a significance of at least p < 0.05 for white matter, gray matter, and white/gray partial volumes. The population variation, across 14 volunteers, demonstrated little deviation from the averages for gray and white matter, while partial volume classes exhibited a slightly higher degree of variability. This fully automated technique produces reliable and reproducible MR image segmentation and classification while eliminating intra- and interobserver variability. PMID:9533591

  19. Microvascular permeability of brain astrocytoma with contrastenhanced magnetic resonance imaging: correlation analysis with histopathologic grade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Zhong-zheng; GENG Dao-ying; LIU Ying; CHEN Xing-rong; ZHANG Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The degree of pathological microvascular proliferation is an important element in evaluation of the astrocytoma grade.This study was aimed to quantitatively assess the microvascular permeability of brain astrocytoma with the volume transfer constant (Ktrans) and volume of extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (Ve) from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and to evaluate the effectiveness of the Ktrans and Ve in the grading of astrocytoma.Methods The highest values of the Ktrans and Ve of 67 patients with astrocytoma (27 with grade Ⅱ,12 with grade Ⅲ,and 28 with grade Ⅳ) were obtained.The comparisons of the differences of the Ktrans and Ve between the different grades were conducted using the Mann-Whitney rank-sum tests.Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were determined between Ktrans values,Ve values and astrocytoma grades.Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to determine the cut-off values for the Ktrans and Ve to distinguish between the different grades of astrocytoma.Results There were significant differences (P<0.001) between the different grades in the Ktrans values and Ve values,except for grades Ⅲ and Ⅳ.The Ktrans values and Ve values were both correlated with astrocytoma grades (both P<0.001).The ROC curve analyses showed that the cut-off values for the Ktrans and Ve provided the best combination of sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing between grade Ⅱ and grade Ⅲ or Ⅳ astrocytomas.Conclusions DCE-MRI can play an important role in assessing the microvascular permeability and the grading of brain astrocytoma.

  20. Limitations on the resolution and suitability of global gravity and magnetic models for geological interpretation: A user health warning!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhead, J. D.; Somerton, I. W.

    2011-12-01

    There have been major advances in the generation of global gravity and crustal magnetic models that are now down loadable from the Internet. All models have variable spatial resolution which is not always readily apparent when viewing these models. The global models include: 1) Free air gravity: EGM08 (5'), Danish DTU(1') and Sandwell and Smith V16.1 (1'). 2) TMI crustal magnetic: WDMAM (3') and EMAG3 (3'), where grid cell size is in arc minutes, where 1'≈ 2 km Both models can be spectrally divided into Long wavelength components: that are very well constrained and are derived from satellite observations. For Free air gravity: wavelengths > 150 km from Grace and for TMI crustal magnetic:wavlengths > 400 km from CHAMP MF6 Shorter wavelength components: The spatial resolution is very dependent on the data coverage of the terrestrial (ground, ship and airborne) surveys and are discussed below Gravity Model: The gravity model is expressed as the Free air gravity anomaly. For marine and large inland water areas the data used are derived from satellite altimeter measurements that generate a spatial gravity resolution of 15 to 20 km (full wavelength) from 3 to 4 km spaced orbital track data. For onshore areas the data coverage is highly variable from no data (e.g. interior Angola) to more than adequate coverage (e.g. Europe). To infill data gaps, free air correction values derived from the SRTM topography data were used. This results in a free air anomaly grid that appears to have full spectral content down to the resolution of the model. Locating where the data gaps exist is difficult, since the land gravity survey coverage for EGM08, used by all models, has not been released. A further resolution problem is that many large surveys used in EGM08 have been decimated to preserve their commercial value (e.g. GETECH input grids were decimated to at least 15' grid). TMI Crustal Magnetic Model: For marine areas these models suffer even larger problems in that the sparsity of

  1. Human brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just as there have been dramatic advances in the molecular biology of the human brain in recent years, there also have been remarkable advances in brain imaging. This paper reports on the development and broad application of microscopic imaging techniques which include the autoradiographic localization of receptors and the measurement of glucose utilization by autoradiography. These approaches provide great sensitivity and excellent anatomical resolution in exploring brain organization and function. The first noninvasive external imaging of receptor distributions in the living human brain was achieved by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Developments, techniques and applications continue to progress. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is also becoming important. Its initial clinical applications were in examining the structure and anatomy of the brain. However, more recent uses, such as MRI spectroscopy, indicate the feasibility of exploring biochemical pathways in the brain, the metabolism of drugs in the brain, and also of examining some of these procedures at an anatomical resolution which is substantially greater than that obtainable by PET scanning. The issues will be discussed in greater detail

  2. Segmentation of internal brain structures in three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For neurological studies, the in vivo aspect of imaging systems is very attractive. Brain images are currently a classical tool used in clinical routine and research. The most appropriate system to observe brain anatomy is tridimensional magnetic resonance imaging, and a major issue of image processing is to segment automatically cerebral structures. This is the scope of our thesis. The number of applications is steadily growing: morphometric measurements, pathology detection, surgery planning, getting a reference for functional studies,a and so forth. The use of pattern recognition to classify the different cerebral tissues from the only radiometric levels of the images is limited. Even supervised, these methods can not lead to distinguish easily several classes of grey matter. When these methods are automatic, their use has to be empirical in order to ensure robust results, and has to be restricted to regions of interest in order to get reliable results. As these methods do not fully respect the spatial consistency of classes in the images, we have introduced contextual information with the help of different formalisms. With Markovian regularization, we have shown that energetic terms of localization permit the separation of two grey classes: cortex and central nuclei. With mathematical morphology, we have proposed processing chains dedicated to several cerebral objects; in particular, brain segmentation is robust and reproducible, and we have successfully obtained individual markers for lateral ventricles, caudate nuclei, putamen and thalami. We have also proposed a contextual method to estimate pure tissue characteristics from a rough segmentation. Our main contribution has been to present a recognition method which is progressive and atlas guided. The originality of this method is manifold. At first, it takes into account structural information processed as flexible spatial constraints the formalism of which relies on fuzzy set theory and information fusion

  3. Developmental changes in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine normal subjects (aged 3 months to 15 years) were exmined by a Picker Vista magnetic resonance (MR) imager with a 0.5 T superconducting magnet operated at 0.256 T. Inversion-recovery images showed a high intensity in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and thalami and occipital radiation, and a low intensity in the frontal region in an infant aged 3 months. In an infant aged 8 months, high intensity areas were seen in the anterior limb of the internal capsule and in the corpus callosum. In a child aged 1 year, there were extensive high intensities in the subcortical white matter. At the age of 8, this became more extensive. A consistent decrease in the T1 values in all regions was observed with age. The T1 values decreased rapidly from 3 to 8 months, and then remained relatively constant in the second decade of life. There was a difference in T1 values between the frontal and occipital white matter in the first year of life. For a 3-month-old infant, the T1 value was 650 msec in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. The T1 value decreased rapidly in infants below 1 year and reached the constant level (300 to 350 msec) in the second decade of life. The central somatosensory conduction time decreased gradually from 3 to 8 months after birth. We suppose that the developmental changes in MR imaging and T1 values are correlated with those of the water and lipid contents and the myelination cycles of the brain. (J.P.N.)

  4. Ultra-high-resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, David B

    2015-01-01

    Here we review the recent progress made in the detection, examination, characterisation and interpretation of oscillations manifesting in small-scale magnetic elements in the solar photosphere. This region of the Sun's atmosphere is especially dynamic, and importantly, permeated with an abundance of magnetic field concentrations. Such magnetic features can span diameters of hundreds to many tens of thousands of km, and are thus commonly referred to as the `building blocks' of the magnetic solar atmosphere. However, it is the smallest magnetic elements that have risen to the forefront of solar physics research in recent years. Structures, which include magnetic bright points, are often at the diffraction limit of even the largest of solar telescopes. Importantly, it is the improvements in facilities, instrumentation, imaging techniques and processing algorithms during recent years that have allowed researchers to examine the motions, dynamics and evolution of such features on the smallest spatial and temporal ...

  5. Focused Azimuthally E-Polarized Vector Beam and Spatial Magnetic Resolution below the Diffraction Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Veysi, Mehdi; Guclu, Caner; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    An azimuthally E-polarized vector beam (AEVB) has a salient feature that it contains a magnetic-dominant region within which electric field has a null and longitudinal magnetic field is maximum. Fresnel diffraction theory and plane-wave spectral (PWS) calculations are applied to quantify the field features of such a beam upon focusing through a lens. The diffraction-limited full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the beams longitudinal magnetic field intensity profile and complementary FWHM (CFW...

  6. A Magnetic Thermometer for High-Resolution 10 mK Scale Thermometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative thin-film magnetic thermometer with integrated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout is described for fast, precision...

  7. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, William Frans Christian; Raabjerg Christensen, A M;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder...

  8. Glioblastoma multiforme versus solitary supratentorial brain metastasis. Differentiation based on morphology and magnetic resonance signal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic potential of a multi-factor analysis of morphometric parameters and magnetic resonance (MR) signal characteristics of a mass and peritumoral area to distinguish solitary supratentorial metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Materials and Methods: MR examinations of 51 patients with histologically proven GBM and 44 with a single supratentorial metastasis were evaluated. A large variety of morphologic criteria and MR signal characteristics in different sequences were analyzed. The data were subjected to logistic regression to investigate their ability to discriminate between GBM and cerebral metastasis. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to select an optimal cut-off point for prediction and to assess the predictive value in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the final model. Results: The logistic regression analysis revealed that the ratio of the maximum diameter of the peritumoral area measured on T2-weighted images (d T2) to the maximum diameter of the enhancing mass area (d T1, post-contrast) is the only useful criterion to distinguish single supratentorial brain metastasis from GBM with a lower ratio favoring GBM (accuracy 68 %, sensitivity 84 % and specificity 45 %). The cut-off point for the ratio d T2/d T1 post-contrast was calculated as 2.35. Conclusion: Measurement of maximum diameters of the peritumoral area in relation to the enhancing mass can be evaluated easily in the clinical routine to discriminate GBM from solitary supratentorial metastasis with an accuracy comparable to that of advanced MRI techniques. (orig.)

  9. Automated parcellation of the brain surface generated from magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a fast and reliable pipeline to automatically parcellate the cortical surface into sub-regions. The pipeline can be used to study brain changes associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders. First, a genus zero cortical surface for one hemisphere is generated from the magnetic resonance images at the parametric boundary of the white matter and the gray matter. Second, a hemisphere-specific surface atlas is registered to the cortical surface using geometry features mapped in the spherical domain. The deformation field is used to warp statistic labels from the atlas to the subject surface. The Dice index of the labeled surface area is used to evaluate the similarity between the automated labels with the manual labels on the subject. The average Dice across twenty-four regions on fourteen testing subjects is 0.86. Alternative evaluations have also chosen to show the accuracy and flexibility of the present method. The point-wise accuracy of fourteen testing subjects is above 86% in average. The experiment shows that the present method is highly consistent with FreeSurfer (>99% of the surface area, using the same set of labels.

  10. Comparing implementations of magnetic-resonance-guided fluorescence molecular tomography for diagnostic classification of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) systems coupled to conventional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography provide unique opportunities to combine data sets and improve image quality and content. Yet, the ideal approach to combine these complementary data is still not obvious. This preclinical study compares several methods for incorporating MRI spatial prior information into FMT imaging algorithms in the context of in vivo tissue diagnosis. Populations of mice inoculated with brain tumors that expressed either high or low levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were imaged using an EGF-bound near-infrared dye and a spectrometer-based MRI-FMT scanner. All data were spectrally unmixed to extract the dye fluorescence from the tissue autofluorescence. Methods to combine the two data sets were compared using student's t-tests and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Bulk fluorescence measurements that made up the optical imaging data set were also considered in the comparison. While most techniques were able to distinguish EGFR(+) tumors from EGFR(-) tumors and control animals, with area-under-the-curve values=1, only a handful were able to distinguish EGFR(-) tumors from controls. Bulk fluorescence spectroscopy techniques performed as well as most imaging techniques, suggesting that complex imaging algorithms may be unnecessary to diagnose EGFR status in these tissue volumes.

  11. A longitudinal magnetic resonance elastography study of murine brain tumors following radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Clayton, E. H.; Okamoto, R. J.; Engelbach, J.; Bayly, P. V.; Garbow, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate and noninvasive method for assessing treatment response following radiotherapy is needed for both treatment monitoring and planning. Measurement of solid tumor volume alone is not sufficient for reliable early detection of therapeutic response, since changes in physiological and/or biomechanical properties can precede tumor volume change following therapy. In this study, we use magnetic resonance elastography to evaluate the treatment effect after radiotherapy in a murine brain tumor model. Shear modulus was calculated and compared between the delineated tumor region of interest (ROI) and its contralateral, mirrored counterpart. We also compared the shear modulus from both the irradiated and non-irradiated tumor and mirror ROIs longitudinally, sampling four time points spanning 9–19 d post tumor implant. Results showed that the tumor ROI had a lower shear modulus than that of the mirror ROI, independent of radiation. The shear modulus of the tumor ROI decreased over time for both the treated and untreated groups. By contrast, the shear modulus of the mirror ROI appeared to be relatively constant for the treated group, while an increasing trend was observed for the untreated group. The results provide insights into the tumor properties after radiation treatment and demonstrate the potential of using the mechanical properties of the tumor as a biomarker. In future studies, more closely spaced time points will be employed for detailed analysis of the radiation effect.

  12. Visualizing functional pathways in the human brain using correlation tensors and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhaohua; Xu, Ran; Bailey, Stephen K; Wu, Tung-Lin; Morgan, Victoria L; Cutting, Laurie E; Anderson, Adam W; Gore, John C

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex which is irrigated by rich vasculature to meet high metabolic demands. We recently demonstrated that MRI signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions in a resting state exhibit structure-specific temporal correlations along white matter tracts. In this report we validate our preliminary findings and introduce spatio-temporal functional correlation tensors to characterize the directional preferences of temporal correlations in MRI signals acquired at rest. The results bear a remarkable similarity to data obtained by diffusion tensor imaging but without any diffusion-encoding gradients. Just as in gray matter, temporal correlations in resting state signals may reflect intrinsic synchronizations of neural activity in white matter. Here we demonstrate that functional correlation tensors are able to visualize long range white matter tracts as well as short range sub-cortical fibers imaged at rest, and that evoked functional activities alter these structures and enhance the visualization of relevant neural circuitry. Furthermore, we explore the biophysical mechanisms underlying these phenomena by comparing pulse sequences, which suggest that white matter signal variations are consistent with hemodynamic (BOLD) changes associated with neural activity. These results suggest new ways to evaluate MRI signal changes within white matter. PMID:26477562

  13. Caveat of measuring perfusion indexes using intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Chau [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Oncology, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Chen, Ya-Fang; Yang, Shun-Chung; My, Pei-Chi [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Tseng, Han-Min [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Taipei (China)

    2015-08-15

    To numerically and experimentally investigate the robustness of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) magnetic resonance imaging in measuring perfusion indexes in the human brain. Eighteen healthy volunteers were imaged on a 3 T clinical system. Data of IVIM imaging (12 b-values ranging from 0 to 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, 12 repetitions) were fitted with a bi-exponential model to extract blood volume fraction (f) and pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*). The robustness of measurement was assessed by bootstrapping. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging and arterial spin-labelling (ASL) imaging were performed for cross-modal comparison. Numerical simulations were performed to assess the accuracy and precision of f and D* estimates at varied signal-to-noise ratio (SNR{sub b1000}). Based on our experimental setting (SNR{sub b1000} ∝ 30), the average error/variability is ∝ 5 %/25 % for f and ∝ 100 %/30 % for D* in gray matter, and ∝ 10 %/50 % for f and ∝ 300 %/60 % for D* in white matter. Correlation was found between f and DSC-derived cerebral blood volume in gray matter (r = 0.29 - 0.48 across subjects, p < 10{sup -5}), but not in white matter. No correlation was found between f-D* product and ASL-derived cerebral blood flow. f may provide noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood volume, particularly in gray matter. D* has limited robustness and should be interpreted with caution. (orig.)

  14. Cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study using the Stroop task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a key role in cognition, motor function, and emotion processing. However, little is known about how traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the ACC system. Our purpose was to compare, by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the patterns of cortical activation in patients with cognitive impairment after TBI and those of normal subjects. Cortical activation maps of 11 right-handed healthy control subjects and five TBI patients with cognitive impairment were recorded in response to a Stroop task during a block-designed fMRI experiment. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) was used for individual subjects and group analysis. In TBI patients and controls, cortical activation, found in similar regions of the frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes, resembled patterns of activation documented in previous neuroimaging studies of the Stroop task in healthy controls. However, the TBI patients showed a relative decrease in ACC activity compared with the controls. Cognitive impairment in TBI patients seems to be associated with alterations in functional cerebral activity, especially less activation of the ACC. These changes are probably the result of destruction of neural networks after diffuse axonal injury and may reflect cortical disinhibition attributable to disconnection or compensation for an inefficient cognitive process. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging structural alterations in brain of alcohol abusers and its association with impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Samuel; Morales, Julia L; Senabre, Isabel; Romero, Maria J; Beltran, Miguel A; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Barcia, Jorge M; Romero, Francisco J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the suggestion that impulsivity plays a central role in the transfer from a recreational drug use to a substance use disorder, very few studies focused on neurobiological markers for addiction. This study aimed to identify volumetric alterations in a sample of patients with mild alcohol use disorder with a short history of alcohol use, compared with a control group, and also focused on its association with impulsivity levels. Most magnetic resonance imaging studies have focused on severe alcohol use disorder, formerly called alcohol-dependent patients, showing alcohol-related structural alterations and their association with alcohol use history variables but not with personality parameters like impulsivity. Our hypothesis is that our group of alcohol users may already display structural alterations especially in brain regions related to inhibitory control like medial-prefrontal regions, and that those structural alterations could be more associated to personality traits like impulsivity than to drug use variables. Our results clearly demonstrate that our population showed lower regional grey and white matter volumes in the medial-prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices, as well as higher regional white matter volume in the ventral striatum and the internal capsule. Volumetric alterations were associated to the Barratt's impulsivity score: the more impulsive the subjects, the lower the medial-prefrontal cortex grey matter volume. PMID:25988724

  16. Anatomy and metabolism of the normal human brain studied by magnetic resonance at 1.5 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained of the human head in magnetic fields as high as 1.5 Tesla (T) using slotted resonator high radio-frequency (RF) detection coils. The images showed no RF field penetration problems and exhibited an 11 (+/-1)-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over a .12-T imaging system. The first localized phosphorus 31, carbon 13, and proton MR chemical shift spectra recorded with surface coils from the head and body in the same instrument showed relative concentrations of phosphorus metabolites, triglycerides, and, when correlated with proton images, negligible lipid (-CH2-) signal from brain tissue on the time scale of the imaging experiment. Sugar phosphate and phosphodiester concentrations were significantly elevated in the head compared with muscle. This method should allow the combined assessment of anatomy, metabolism, and biochemistry in both the normal and diseased brain

  17. Is it Possible to Extract Brain Metabolic Pathways Information from In Vivo H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data?

    CERN Document Server

    de Lara, Alejandro Chinea Manrique

    2010-01-01

    In vivo H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important tool for performing non-invasive quantitative assessments of brain tumour glucose metabolism. Brain tumours are considered as fast-growth tumours because of their high rate of proliferation. In addition, tumour cells exhibit profound genetic, biochemical and histological differences with respect to the original non-transformed cellular types. Therefore, there is a strong interest from the clinical investigator point of view in understanding the role of brain metabolites in normal and pathological conditions and especially on the development of early tumour detection techniques. Unfortunately, current diagnosis techniques ignore the dynamic aspects of these signals. It is largely believed that temporal variations of NMR Spectra are noisy or just simply do not carry enough information to be exploited by any reliable diagnosis procedure. Thus, current diagnosis procedures are mainly based on empirical observations extracted from single avera...

  18. Metabolic Profiling of Dividing Cells in Live Rodent Brain by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1HMRS) and LCModel Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, June-Hee; Lee, Hedok; Makaryus, Rany;

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Dividing cells can be detected in the live brain by positron emission tomography or optical imaging. Here we apply proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) and a widely used spectral fitting algorithm to characterize the effect of increased neurogenesis after electroconvulsive...... shock in the live rodent brain via spectral signatures representing mobile lipids resonating at ∼1.30 ppm. In addition, we also apply the same 1HMRS methodology to metabolically profile glioblastomas with actively dividing cells growing in RCAS-PDGF mice. METHODS: 1HMRS metabolic profiles were acquired...... on a 9.4T MRI instrument in combination with LCModel spectral analysis of: 1) rat brains before and after ECS or sham treatments and 2) RCAS-PDGF mice with glioblastomas and wild-type controls. Quantified 1HMRS data were compared to post-mortem histology. RESULTS: Dividing cells in the rat...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in three-dimensional brain positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H; Slosman, D O

    2003-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction represents an essential component of the long chain of modules required for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative brain positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this work we demonstrate the proof of principle of segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in 3D brain PET. We have developed a method for attenuation correction based on registered T1-weighted MRI, eliminating the need of an additional transmission (TX) scan. The MR images were realigned to preliminary reconstructions of PET data using an automatic algorithm and then segmented by means of a fuzzy clustering technique which identifies tissues of significantly different density and composition. The voxels belonging to different regions were classified into air, skull, brain tissue and nasal sinuses. These voxels were then assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients as reported in the ICRU 44 report followed by Gaussian smoothing and additio...

  20. Applications of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) techniques to plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) techniques have been applied to a number of plant materials. The study demonstrates the usefulness of these methods in nondestructively estimating several factors related to pathology and histochemistry in important cash crops. (author). 16 refs., 10 figs