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Sample records for brain lysophospholipids ether

  1. Towards selective lysophospholipid GPCR modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbold, Julia K; Martin, Jennifer L; Sweet, Matthew J

    2014-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that recognize the lysophospholipids (LPLs) are grouped into two phylogenetically distinct families: the endothelial differentiation gene (Edg) and non-Edg GPCRs. Owing to their more recent identification, and hindered by a lack of selective pharmacological tools, our understanding of the functions and signaling pathways of the non-Edg GPCRs is still in its infancy. Targeting the non-conserved allosteric binding sites of the LPL GPCRs shows particular promise for the development of selective modulators by structure-based drug design. However, only one Edg GPCR (S1PR1) structure has been determined to date, and it has low sequence identity with the non-Edg GPCRs (structure of a non-Edg GPCR remains a pressing objective for selective structure-based drug design. Obtaining selective modulators targeting the non-Edg receptors would help to unravel the biology behind these novel GPCRs and potentially will support therapeutic treatment of diseases such as cancer, inflammation, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipase-catalyzed production of lysophospholipids

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    Mnasri Taha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysophospholipids, such as lysophosphatidic acid or lysophosphatidylcholine, are important bioactive lipids, involved in various normal and pathological cellular processes. They also have industrial and pharmaceutical uses such as emulsifiers or components of drug delivery systems. Lipases, which natural substrates are long chain triacylglycerols, are important biocatalysts for organic synthesis mainly due to their broad substrate specificity and their ability to display high catalytic activity in organic media. This paper describes the various lipase-catalyzed reactions implemented for the production of lysophospholipids. They include hydrolysis or alcoholysis of phospholipids and acylation of the glycerophosphoryl moiety. Special emphasis is made on our work dealing with the production of lysophospholipids rich in dososahexaenoic acid, an important dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid via the hydrolysis of phospholipids extracted from the microalga Isochrysis galbana.

  4. Lipase-catalyzed production of lysophospholipids

    OpenAIRE

    Mnasri Taha; Hérault Josiane; Gauvry Laurent; Loiseau Céline; Poisson Laurent; Ergan Françoise; Pencréac'h Gaëlle

    2017-01-01

    Lysophospholipids, such as lysophosphatidic acid or lysophosphatidylcholine, are important bioactive lipids, involved in various normal and pathological cellular processes. They also have industrial and pharmaceutical uses such as emulsifiers or components of drug delivery systems. Lipases, which natural substrates are long chain triacylglycerols, are important biocatalysts for organic synthesis mainly due to their broad substrate specificity and their ability to display high catalytic activi...

  5. Cytoprotective Effects of Lysophospholipids from Sea Cucumber Holothuria atra.

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    Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Furukawa, Ayumi; Shiga, Ikumi; Muroi, Yoshikage; Ishii, Toshiaki; Hongo, Yayoi; Takahashi, Shunya; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Lysophospholipids are important signaling molecules in animals and metazoan cells. They are widely distributed among marine invertebrates, where their physiological roles are unknown. Sea cucumbers produce unique lysophospholipids. In this study, two lysophospholipids were detected in Holothuria atra for the first time, lyso-platelet activating factor and lysophosphatidylcholine, with nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometric analyses. The lipid fraction of H. atra contained lyso-platelet activating factor and lysophosphatidylcholine, and inhibited H2O2-induced apoptosis in the macrophage cell line J774A.1. The antioxidant activity of the lysophospholipid-containing lipid fraction of H. atra was confirmed with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method. Our results suggest that the lysophospholipids from H. atra are potential therapeutic agents for the inflammation induced by oxidative stress.

  6. Cytoprotective Effects of Lysophospholipids from Sea Cucumber Holothuria atra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Nishikawa

    Full Text Available Lysophospholipids are important signaling molecules in animals and metazoan cells. They are widely distributed among marine invertebrates, where their physiological roles are unknown. Sea cucumbers produce unique lysophospholipids. In this study, two lysophospholipids were detected in Holothuria atra for the first time, lyso-platelet activating factor and lysophosphatidylcholine, with nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometric analyses. The lipid fraction of H. atra contained lyso-platelet activating factor and lysophosphatidylcholine, and inhibited H2O2-induced apoptosis in the macrophage cell line J774A.1. The antioxidant activity of the lysophospholipid-containing lipid fraction of H. atra was confirmed with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method. Our results suggest that the lysophospholipids from H. atra are potential therapeutic agents for the inflammation induced by oxidative stress.

  7. Supramolecular Lysophospholipid-Carbon Nanotube Complexes Enable Cellular Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Apparao; Wu, Yonnie; Moore, Jessica; Ke, Pu-Chun

    2006-03-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have found tremendous applications in electronics, nanophotonics, chemical and biosensing, and very recently, in nanomedicine. The bottleneck for many of these applications is the inherent insolubility of SWNTs due to their mutual interactions. Here we report that lysophospholipids, or single-chained phospholipids offer unprecedented solubility for SWNTs. The biocompatibility of lysophospholipids is unsurpassed since they occur naturally in the cell membrane. Using transmission electron microscopy we show lysophospholipids wrap SWNTs as striations whose size and regularity are affected by the polarity of the lysophospholipids. These findings shed light on the debate over the binding mechanism of amphiphilic polymers and cylindrical nanostructures and has implications on the design of novel supramolecular complexes and nanodevices. Since the head groups of lysophospholipids can be functionalized with tags such as quantum dots, antioxidants, and monoclonal antibodies, our method opens the door for utilizing nanomaterials for in vivo imaging, gene and drug therapy, and novel nanomedicine.

  8. Genotypic Variation in Wheat Flour Lysophospholipids

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    Lei Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lysophospholipids (LPLs are the most abundant polar lipids in wheat endosperm and naturally complex with amylose, affecting starch physicochemical properties. We analyzed LPLs in wheat flour from 58 cultivars which differ by grain hardness using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS. There were significant differences in LPL content between cultivars, demonstrating that genotype rather than environment contributes most to the total variance in wheat endosperm LPLs. Polar lipids such as LPLs may play a role in grain hardness through their interaction with puroindoline proteins, however, no strong correlation between kernel hardness and LPLs was detected. This may reflect the location of LPLs within the starch granule as opposed to the puroindoline proteins outside starch granules. LPLs may have an indirect relationship with kernel hardness as they could share the same origin as polar lipids that interact with puroindoline on the starch granule surface.

  9. DMPD: Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15189145 Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology. Ishii I, Fukushima N, Y...e X, Chun J. Annu Rev Biochem. 2004;73:321-54. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology.... PubmedID 15189145 Title Lysophospholipid receptors: signaling and biology. Authors

  10. [STUDYING THE ROLE OF BRAIN MELANOCORTIN RECEPTORS IN THE SUPPRESSING OF FOOD INTAKE UNDER ETHER STRESS IN MICE].

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    Bazhan, N M; Kulikova, E V; Makarova, E N; Yakovleva, T V; Kazantseva, A Yu

    2015-12-01

    Melanocortin (MC) system regulates food intake under the rest conditions. Stress inhibits food intake. It is not clear whether brain MC system is involved in stress-induced anorexia in mice. The aim of the work was to investigate the effect of pharmacological blockade and activation of brain MC receptors on food intake under stress. C57B1/6J male mice were subjected to ether stress (0.5 minute ether anesthesia) before the administration of saline solution or synthetic non-selective blocker (SHU9119) or agonist (Melanotan II) of MC receptors into the lateral brain ventricle. Food intake was pre-stimulated with 17 hours of fasting in all mice. Ether stress decreased food intake, increased the plasma corticosterone level and hypothalamic mRNA AgRP (natural MC receptor antagonist) level at 1 hour after the stress. Pharmacological blockade of the MC receptors weakened stress-induced anorexia and decreased mRNA AgRP level in the hypothalamus. Pharmacological stimulation of the MC receptors enhanced ether stress-induced anorexia and hypercortisolism. Thus, our data demonstrated that the central MC system was involved in the development of stress-induced anorexia in mice.

  11. Use of phospholipase A2 for the production of lysophospholipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arisz, S.A.; Munnik, T.

    2013-01-01

    Biological lipid extracts often contain small amounts of lysophospholipids (LPLs). Since different functions are emerging for LPLs in lipid metabolism and signalling, there is need for a reliable and cost-effective method for their identification. For this purpose, authentic LPL standards have to be

  12. Serum lysophospholipid levels are altered in dyslipidemic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-García, Susana; Caimari, Antoni; Del Bas, Josep Maria; Suárez, Manuel; Arola, Lluís

    2017-09-05

    Dyslipidemias are common disorders that predispose individuals to severe diseases. It is known that healthy living habits can prevent dyslipidemias if they are diagnosed properly. Therefore, biomarkers that assist in diagnosis are essential. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of dyslipidemia progression, which in turn disclose its etiology. These findings will pave the way for examinations of the regulatory mechanisms involved in dyslipidemias. Hamsters were fed either a normal-fat diet (NFD) or a high-fat diet. Some of the NFD-fed animals were further treated with the hyperlipidemic agent Poloxamer 407. Non-targeted metabolomics was used to investigate progressive changes in unknown serum metabolites. The hepatic expression of putative biomarker-related genes was also analyzed. The serum levels of lysophospholipids (Lyso-PLs) and their related enzymes lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) and paraoxonase-1 were altered in dyslipidemic hamsters. Lysophosphatidylcholine levels were increased in diet-induced dyslipidemic groups, whereas lysophosphatidylethanolamine levels increased in response to the chemical treatment. The liver was significantly involved in regulating the levels of these molecules, based on the modified expression of endothelial lipase (Lipg), sPLA2 (Pla2g2a) and acyltransferases (Lcat and Lpcat3). We concluded that Lyso-PL evaluation could aid in the comprehensive diagnosis and management of lipid disorders.

  13. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

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    Callihan Phillip

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors.

  14. Dietary exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether 47 (BDE-47) inhibits development and alters thyroid hormone-related gene expression in the brain of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Alexandra T; Thornton, Leah M; Venables, Barney J; Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have investigated the thyroid-disrupting effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) across multiple levels of biological organization in anurans, despite their suitability for the screening of thyroid disruptors. Therefore, the present study evaluated the effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on development, thyroid histology and thyroid hormone-related gene expression in Xenopus laevis exposed to 0 (control), 50 (low), 500 (medium) or 5000μg BDE-47/g food (high) for 21days. Only the high dose of BDE-47 hindered growth and development; however, thyroid hormone-associated gene expression was downregulated in the brains of tadpoles regardless of dose. These results show that BDE-47 disrupts thyroid hormone signaling at the molecular and whole-organism levels and suggest that gene expression in the brain is a more sensitive endpoint than metamorphosis. Furthermore, the altered gene expression patterns among BDE-47-exposed tadpoles provide insight into the mechanisms of PBDE-induced thyroid disruption and highlight the potential for PBDEs to act as neurodevelopmental toxicants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Accumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the brain compared with the levels in other tissues among different vertebrates from an e-waste recycling site.

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    Zhao, Yaxian; Li, Yuanyuan; Qin, Xiaofei; Lou, Qinqin; Qin, Zhanfen

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the accumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the brain compared with that in other tissues among different vertebrates. We collected mice, chickens, ducks, frogs, and fish from an e-waste recycling region in Taizhou, China, and measured PBDE concentrations in brain, liver and muscle tissues. The levels of PBDE in the tissues of mice, chickens, ducks, frogs and fish ranged 0.45-206, 0.06-18.8, 1.83-112, 2.75-108, and 0.02-32.0 ng/g wet weight, respectively. Preferential distribution in the liver and muscle relative to the brain was observed for PBDEs in mice, chickens, ducks and frogs. However, a high retention in the brain compared to the liver and muscle was observed in fish. Comparison of the brain/liver concentration (B/L) ratios revealed differences in PBDEs accumulation in the brain among these vertebrates. PBDEs accumulation in the brain was greatest in fish, followed by frogs, while the lowest accumulation occurred in the brains of mammals and birds. The findings apparently coincided with the evolution of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) across vertebrates, i.e. the BBB of fish might be less efficient than those of mammals, birds and amphibian. Low brominated congeners (such as BDE-28, BDE-47 and BDE-99) were predominant in the brains of investigated vertebrates, whereas BDE-209 was most abundant in liver and muscle tissues of mice, chickens and ducks. Significant differences in B/L ratios among PBDE congeners were found in both mice and chickens (p < 0.05). Particularly in mice, the B/L ratios of PBDE congeners presented a declining trend with increased bromine number. Our findings suggested that low brominated congeners might have a higher capacity to penetrate the BBB and accumulate in the brain, whereas high brominated congeners such as BDE-209 might have less potency to pass through the barrier. Further experimental studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Ethyleneglycol ethers (ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether, ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether acetate, diethyleneglycol monomethyl ether, diethyleneglycol monoethyl ether and diethyleneglycol monobutyl ether).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maclaine Pont, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The committee recommends the following exposure limits as concentrations in air averaged over 8 hours (8 h TWA): - ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether: 1 mg/m3 (0.3 ppm) - ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether acetate: 1.5 mg/3 (0.3 ppm) - diethyleneglycol monomethyl ether: 45 mg/m3 (9 ppm) - diethyleneglycol

  17. Bioactive lysophospholipids generated by hepatic lipase degradation of lipoproteins lead to complement activation via the classical pathway.

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    Ma, Wanchao; Paik, David C; Barile, Gaetano R

    2014-09-09

    We determined bioactivity of lysophospholipids generated by degradation of the low-density (LDL), very low-density (VLDL), and high-density (HDL) lipoproteins with hepatic lipase (HL), cholesterol esterase (CE), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). The LDL, VLDL, and HDL were treated with HL, CE, and Lp-PLA2 after immobilization on plates, and complement activation studies were performed with diluted human serum. Complement component 3 (C3) fixation, a marker for complement activation, was determined with a monoclonal anti-human C3d antibody. Enzymatic properties of HL and CE were assayed with triglyceride and phosphatidylcholine substrates for triglyceride hydrolase and phospholipase A activities. The ARPE-19 cells were used for viability studies. The HL degradation of human lipoproteins LDL, VLDL, or HDL results in the formation of modified lipoproteins that can activate the complement pathway. Complement activation is dose- and time-dependent upon HL and occurs via the classical pathway. Enzymatic studies suggest that the phospholipase A1 activity of HL generates complement-activating lysophospholipids. C-reactive protein (CRP), known to simultaneously interact with complement C1 and complement factor H (CFH), further enhances HL-induced complement activation. The lysophospholipids, 1-Palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-Oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, can be directly cytotoxic to ARPE-19 cells. The HL degradation of lipoproteins, known to accumulate in the outer retina and in drusen, can lead to the formation of bioactive lysophospholipids that can trigger complement activation and induce RPE cellular dysfunction. Given the known risk associations for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with HL, CRP, and CFH, this study elucidates a possible damage pathway for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in genetically predisposed individuals, that HL activity may lead to accumulation of lysophospholipids to initiate complement

  18. Ether: a forgotten addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenz, Sonia; Zimmermann, Grégoire; Kolly, Stéphane; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-08-01

    Among abused inhalants, ether has recently received little attention. The case of a patient suffering from ether dependence is reported. Whereas several features of DSM-IV dependence were fulfilled, no physical withdrawal signs were observed.

  19. Exogenous lysophospholipids with large head groups perturb clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit D; Kvalvaag, Audun S; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Brech, Andreas; Koster, Gerbrand; Dommersnes, Paul G; Bergan, Jonas; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we have investigated how clathrin-dependent endocytosis is affected by exogenously added lysophospholipids (LPLs). Addition of LPLs with large head groups strongly inhibits transferrin (Tf) endocytosis in various cell lines, while LPLs with small head groups do not. Electron and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (EM and TIRF) reveal that treatment with lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) with the fatty acyl group C18:0 leads to reduced numbers of invaginated clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) at the plasma membrane, fewer endocytic events per membrane area and increased lifetime of CCPs. Also, endocytosis of Tf becomes dependent on actin upon LPI treatment. Thus, our results demonstrate that one can regulate the kinetics and properties of clathrin-dependent endocytosis by addition of LPLs in a head group size- and fatty acyl-dependent manner. Furthermore, studies performed with optical tweezers show that less force is required to pull membrane tubules outwards from the plasma membrane when LPI is added to the cells. The results are in agreement with the notion that insertion of LPLs with large head groups creates a positive membrane curvature which might have a negative impact on events that require plasma membrane invagination, while it may facilitate membrane bending toward the cell exterior. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Sulfonated Poly (ether ether ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proton-conducting membranes of organic–inorganic (sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/phosphated zirconia nanoparticles) composite were prepared by incorporating various ratios of phosphated zirconia nanoparticles (ZP) in sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK). SPEEK/ZP showed an improvement of ...

  1. Ether formulations of relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, M.C.

    1980-12-01

    Contemporary ether theories are surveyed and criticized, especially those formally identical to orthodox Relativity. The historical development of Relativity, Special and General, in terms of an ether, is briefly indicated. Classical interpretations of Generalized Relativity using ether are compared to Euclidean formulations using a background space. The history of a sub-group of theories, formulating a 'new' Relativity involving modified transforms, is outlined. According to the theory with which they agree, recent supposed detections of drift are classified and criticized. Cosmological evidence suggesting an ether is mentioned. Only ether theories formally identical to Relativity have been published in depth. They stand criticized as being contrary to the positivist spirit. The history of mechanical analogues is traced, from Hartley's representing gravitating matter as spherical standing waves, to recent suggestions that vortex-sponge might model electromagnetic, quantum, uncertainty and faster-than-light phenomena. Contemporary theories are particular physical theories, themselves 'second interpretations' of a primary mathematical model. Mechanical analogues are auxiliary, not necessary, to other theory, disclosing relationships between classical and non-classical descriptions of assemblies charging state. The ether-relativity polemic, part of a broader dispute about relativity, is founded on mistaken conceptions of the roles of mathematical and physical models, mechanical analogues; and a distored view of history, which indicates that ether theories have become relativistic. 103 references.

  2. Cation permeable membranes from blends of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and poly (ether sulfone)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, F.G.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Strathmann, H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    Sulfonated poly(aryl ether ether ketone), S-PEEK, is blended with non-sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) (PES) to adjust the properties of ion permeable and ion selective membranes. In this study, membranes are prepared from blends with (i) a S-PEEK content between 10 and 100 wt.% using one S-PEEK batch

  3. Molecular Characterization of Two Lysophospholipid:acyl-CoA Acyltransferases Belonging to the MBOAT Family in Nicotiana benthamiana.

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    Donghui Zhang

    Full Text Available In the remodeling pathway for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC, acyl-CoA-dependent lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC acyltransferase (LPCAT catalyzes the reacylation of lysoPC. A number of genes encoding LPCATs have been cloned and characterized from several plants in recent years. Using Arabidopsis and other plant LPCAT sequences to screen the genome database of Nicotiana benthamiana, we identified two cDNAs encoding the putative tobacco LPCATs (NbLPCAT1 and NbLPCAT2. Both of them were predicted to encode a protein of 463 amino acids with high similarity to LPCATs from other plants. Protein sequence features such as the presence of at least eight putative transmembrane regions, four highly conserved signature motifs and several invariant residues indicate that NbLPCATs belong to the membrane bound O-acyltransferase family. Lysophospholipid acyltransferase activity of NbLPCATs was confirmed by testing lyso-platelet-activating factor (lysoPAF sensitivity through heterologous expression of each full-length cDNA in a yeast mutant Y02431 (lca1△ disrupted in endogenous LPCAT enzyme activity. Analysis of fatty acid profiles of phospholipids from the NbLPCAT-expressing yeast mutant Y02431 cultures supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acids suggested more incorporation of linoleic acid (18:2n6, LA and α-linolenic acid (18:3n3, ALA into PC compared to yeast mutant harbouring empty vector. In vitro enzymatic assay demonstrated that NbLPCAT1had high lysoPC acyltransferase activity with a clear preference for α-linolenoyl-CoA (18:3, while NbLPCAT2 showed a high lysophosphatidic acid (lysoPA acyltransferase activity towards α-linolenoyl-CoA and a weak lysoPC acyltransferase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed a ubiquitous expression of NbLPCAT1 and NbLPCAT2 in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and seeds, and a strong expression in developing flowers. This is the first report on the cloning and characterization of lysophospholipid

  4. Lysophospholipids and Their Receptors Serve as Conditional DAMPs and DAMP Receptors in Tissue Oxidative and Inflammatory Injury.

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    Shao, Ying; Nanayakkara, Gayani; Cheng, Jiali; Cueto, Ramon; Yang, William Y; Park, Joon-Young; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-26

    We proposed lysophospholipids (LPLs) and LPL-G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as conditional danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and conditional DAMP receptors as a paradigm shift to the widely accepted classical DAMP and DAMP receptor model. Recent Advances: The aberrant levels of LPLs and GPCRs activate pro-inflammatory signal transduction pathways, trigger innate immune response, and lead to tissue oxidative and inflammatory injury. Classical DAMP model specifies only the endogenous metabolites that are released from damaged/dying cells as DAMPs, but fails to identify elevated endogenous metabolites secreted from viable/live cells during pathologies as DAMPs. The current classification of DAMPs also fails to clarify the following concerns: (i) Are molecules, which bind to pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), the only DAMPs contributing to inflammation and tissue injury? (ii) Are all DAMPs acting only via classical PRRs during cellular stress? To answer these questions, we reviewed the molecular characteristics and signaling mechanisms of LPLs, a group of endogenous metabolites and their specific receptors and analyzed the significant progress achieved in characterizing oxidative stress mechanisms of LPL mediated tissue injury. Further LPLs and LPL-GPCRs may serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of pathologies induced by sterile inflammation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  5. Ether space-time & cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this first volume of papers is to examine the different paths by which the modern ether concept has been developed and to highlight the part it plays in major departments of 21st century physics. The evidence for its existence is reviewed, and it is hoped, widespread misconceptions concerning ether are corrected. It is anticipated that the emerging modern concept of ether will play a fundamental part in the development of 21st century physical science.

  6. Lysophospholipid Growth Factors and Their G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Immunity, Coronary Artery Disease, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Goetzl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological lysophospholipids (LPLs, exemplified by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, are omnific mediators of normal cellular proliferation, survival, and functions. Although both LPA and S1P attain micromolar concentrations in many biological fluids, numerous aspects of their biosynthesis, transport, and metabolic degradation are unknown. Eight members of a new subfamily of G protein-coupled LPA/S1P receptors, originally termed Edg Rs, bind either LPA or S1P with high affinity and transduce a series of growth-related and/or cytoskeleton-based functional responses. The most critical areas of LPL biology and pathobiology are neural development and neurodegeneration, immunity, atherosclerosis and myocardial injury, and cancer. Data from analyses of T cells established two basic points: (1 the plasticity and adaptability of expression of LPA/S1P Rs by some cells as a function of activation, and (2 the role of opposing signals from two different receptors for the same ligand as a mechanism for fine control of effects of LPLs. In the heart, LPLs may promote coronary atherosclerosis, but are effectively cytoprotective for hypoxic cardiac myocytes and those exposed to oxygen free radicals. The findings of production of LPA by some types of tumor cells, overexpression of selected sets of LPA receptors by the same tumor cells, and augmentation of the effects of protein growth factors by LPA have suggested pathogenetic roles for the LPLs in cancer. The breadth of physiologic and pathologic activities of LPLs emphasizes the importance of developing bioavailable nonlipid agonists and antagonists of the LPA/S1P receptors for diverse therapeutic applications.

  7. Review of the Third Domain Receptor Binding Fragment of Alphafetoprotein (AFP): Plausible Binding of AFP to Lysophospholipid Receptor Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizejewski, Gerald J

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a 69 kD fetal- and tumor-associated single-chain glycoprotein belonging to the albuminoid gene family. AFP functions as a carrier/transport molecule as well as a growth regulator and has been utilized as a clinical biomarker for both fetal defects and cancer growth. Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are plasma membrane-derived bioactive lipid signaling mediators composed of a small molecular weight single acyl carbon chain (palmitic, oleic acid) attached to a polar headgroup; they range in molecular mass from 250-750 daltons. The LPLs consist of either sphingosine-1-phosphate or lysophosphatidic acid, and mostly their choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol derivatives. They are present only in vertebrates. These bioactive paracrine lipid mediators are ubiquitously distributed in tissues and are released from many different cell types (platelets, macrophages, monocytes, etc.) involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes. The LPLs bind to four different classes of G-protein coupled receptors described herein which transduce a multiple of cell effects encompassing activities such as morphogenesis, neural development, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. The identification of potential binding sites of LPL receptors on the AFP third domain receptor binding fragment was derived by computer modeling analysis. It is conceivable, but not proven, that AFP might bind not only to the LPL receptors, but also to LPLs themselves since AFP binds medium and long chain fatty acids. It is proposed that some of the activities ascribed to AFP in the past might be due in part to the presence of bound LPLs and/or their receptors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuerschner, Lars; Richter, Doris; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high...... amounts of ether-phosphatidylcholine and ether-phosphatidylethanolamine. Both lipids were specifically labeled using the corresponding lyso-ether lipids, which we established as supreme precursors for lipid tagging. Polyfosine, a fluorescent analogue of the anti-neoplastic ether lipid edelfosine...... in ether lipid metabolism and intracellular ether lipid trafficking....

  9. First International Conference on Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Disease Sponsored by the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Goetzl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The First International Conference on “Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Diseases” was held in Tucson, AZ on June 10�14, 2001, under the sponsorship of the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB. More than 100 scientists from 11 countries discussed the recent results of basic and clinical research in the broad biology of this emerging field. Immense progress was reported in defining the biochemistry of generation and biology of cellular effects of the bioactive lysophospholipids (LPLs. These aspects of LPLs described at the conference parallel in many ways those of the eicosanoid mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. As for eicosanoids, the LPLs termed lysophosphatidic acid (LPA and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P are produced enzymatically from phospholipid precursors in cell membranes and act on cells at nanomolar concentrations through subfamilies of receptors of the G protein–coupled superfamily. The rate-limiting steps in production of LPLs were reported to be controlled by specific phospholipases for LPA and sphingosine kinases for S1P. The receptor subfamilies formerly were designated endothelial differentiation gene-encoded receptors or Edg Rs for their original discovery in endothelial cells. A currently active nomenclature committee at this conference suggested the ligand-based names: S1P1 = Edg-1, S1P2 = Edg-5, S1P3 = Edg-3, S1P4 = Edg-6, and S1P5 = Edg-8; LPA1 = Edg-2, LPA2 = Edg-4, and LPA3 = Edg-7 receptors. Several families of lysophospholipid phosphatases (LPPs have been characterized, which biodegrade LPA, whereas S1P is inactivated with similar rapidity by both a lyase and S1P phosphatases.

  10. Biodegradation of gasoline ether oxygenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Ether oxygenates such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) are added to gasoline to improve fuel combustion and decrease exhaust emissions. Ether oxygenates and their tertiary alcohol metabolites are now an important group of groundwater pollutants. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the microorganisms, enzymes and pathways involved in both the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of these compounds. This review also aims to illustrate how these microbiological and biochemical studies have guided, and have helped refine, molecular and stable isotope-based analytical approaches that are increasingly being used to detect and quantify biodegradation of these compounds in contaminated environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 21 CFR 868.5420 - Ether hook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ether hook. 868.5420 Section 868.5420 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5420 Ether hook. (a) Identification. An ether hook is a device that fits inside a patient's mouth and that is intended to deliver vaporized ether. (b) Classification...

  12. Ether the nothing that connects everything

    CERN Document Server

    Milutis, Joe

    2006-01-01

    In Ether, the histories of the unseen merge with discussions of the technology of electromagnetism. Navigating more than three hundred years of the ether''s cultural and artistic history, Joe Milutis reveals its continuous reinvention and tangible impact without ever losing sight of its ephemeral, elusive nature. The true meaning of ether, Milutis suggests, may be that it can never be fully grasped.

  13. Rearrangements of Cycloalkenyl Aryl Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedesz Törincsi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rearrangement reactions of cycloalkenyl phenol and naphthyl ethers and the acid-catalyzed cyclization of the resulting product were investigated. Claisen rearrangement afforded 2-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. Combined Claisen and Cope rearrangement resulted in the formation of 4-substituted phenol and naphthol derivatives. In the case of cycloocthylphenyl ether the consecutive Claisen and Cope rearrangements were followed by an alkyl migration. The mechanism of this novel rearrangement reaction is also discussed.

  14. Recent Advances of Poly(ether-ether) and Poly(ether-ester) Block Copolymers in Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi-Yao; Shi, Kun; Wei, Yu-Quan; Qian, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ether-ether) and poly(ether-ester) block copolymers have been widely applied in biomedical fields over two decades due to their good safety and biocompatibility. Poly(ethylene glycol), poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(propylene glycol) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) have been approved as excipients by Food and Drug Administration. Because of the broad perspective in biomedical fields, many novel poly(etherether) and poly(ether-ester) block copolymers have been developed for drug delivery, gene therapy and tissue engineering in recent years. This review focuses on active targeting theranostic systems, gene delivery systems and tissue engineering based on poly(ether-ether) and poly(ether-ester) block copolymers. We perform a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed scientific reports using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The literatures related to the topics of this review are cataloged according to the developed copolymers or their applications such as active targeting theranostic systems, gene delivery systems and tissue engineering. Some important advances and new trends are summarized in this review. Some commercial poly(ether-ether) copolymers have been used as excipients for drug research and development. Amphiphilic and biodegradable poly(ether-ester) diblock copolymers are capable of formulating biomedical nanoparticulate theranostic systems, and targeting moiety-functionalized poly(ether-ester) diblock copolymers will be further developed and applied in biomedical nanotechnology fields in the near future. Meanwhile, triblock or multiblock poly(ether-ether) and poly(ether-ester) copolymers with environmentsensitive properties are suitable for gene delivery and tissue engineering. Poly(ether-ether) and poly(ether-ester) copolymers are being extensively applied in active targeting theranostic systems, gene delivery systems and tissue engineering. Biodegradable, environment-sensitive and targeting moiety

  15. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kuerschner

    Full Text Available Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high amounts of ether-phosphatidylcholine and ether-phosphatidylethanolamine. Both lipids were specifically labeled using the corresponding lyso-ether lipids, which we established as supreme precursors for lipid tagging. Polyfosine, a fluorescent analogue of the anti-neoplastic ether lipid edelfosine, accumulated to mitochondria and induced morphological changes and cellular apoptosis. These data indicate that edelfosine could exert its pro-apoptotic power by targeting and damaging mitochondria and thereby inducing cellular apoptosis. In general, this study implies an important role of mitochondria in ether lipid metabolism and intracellular ether lipid trafficking.

  16. Monovalent cation selective crown ether containing poly(arylene ether ketone)/SPEEK blend membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Sinem; Zoetebier, Bram; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.

    2016-01-01

    Blend membranes of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and poly(arylene ether ketone) (PAEK) derivatives containing crown ether units in the main chain (CPAEK) were prepared and characterized in terms of water swelling and ion exchange capacity (IEC). The miscibility of the polymers was

  17. 40 CFR 721.3437 - Dialkyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkyl ether. 721.3437 Section 721... Dialkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkyl ether (PMN P-93-1308) is subject to reporting under this section...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3374 - Alkylenediolalkyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylenediolalkyl ether. 721.3374... Substances § 721.3374 Alkylenediolalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as an alkylenediolalkyl ether (PMN P-93-362) is subject to...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3380 - Anilino ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anilino ether. 721.3380 Section 721... Anilino ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as anilino ether (P-83-910) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3364 - Aliphatic ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic ether. 721.3364 Section 721... Aliphatic ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aliphatic ether (PMN P-93-1381) is subject to reporting under this...

  1. Hydrogen storage by functionalised Poly(ether ether ketone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, R.; Giacoppo, G.; Carbone, A.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, Messina (Italy). Inst. for Advanced Energy Technologies

    2010-07-01

    In this work a functionalised polymer was studied as potential material for hydrogen storage in solid state. A Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) matrix was modified by a manganese oxide in situ formation. Here we report the functionalisation process and the preliminary results on hydrogen storage capability of the synthesised polymer. The polymer was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Gravimetric Hydrogen Adsorption measurements. In the functionalised PEEK, morphological changes occur as a function of oxide precursor concentration and reaction time. Promising results by gravimetric measurements were obtained with a hydrogen sorption of 0.24%wt/wt at 50 C and 60 bar, moreover, reversibility hydrogen adsorption and desorption in a wide range of both temperature and pressure was confirmed. (orig.)

  2. Lysophospholipid receptors are differentially expressed in rat terminal Schwann cells, as revealed by a single cell rt-PCR and in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Hiroaki; Yaoi, Takeshi; Oda, Ryo; Okajima, Seiichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-04-22

    Terminal Schwann cells (TSCs) that cover motor neuron terminals, are known to play an important role in maintaining neuromuscular junctions, as well as in the repair process after nerve injury. However, the molecular characteristics of TSCs remain unknown, because of the difficulties in analyzing them due to their paucity. By using our previously reported method of selectively and efficiently collecting TSCs, we have analyzed the difference in expression patterns of lysophospholipid (LPL) receptor genes (LPA1, LPA2, LPA3, S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5) between TSCs and myelinating Schwann cells (MSCs). LPL, which includes lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), is the bioactive lipid that induces a myriad of cellular responses through specific members of G-protein coupled receptors for LPA. It turned out that LPA3 was expressed only in TSCs, whereas S1P1 was expressed in TSCs and skeletal muscle, but not in MSCs. Other types of LPL receptor genes, including LPA1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, were expressed in both types of Schwann cells. None of the LPL receptor gene family showed MSCs-specific expression.

  3. Comparison of Properties among Dendritic and Hyperbranched Poly(ether ether ketones and Linear Poly(ether ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Morikawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ether ether ketone dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers were prepared from 3,5-dimethoxy-4′-(4-fluorobenzoyldiphenyl ether and 3,5-dihydroxy-4′-(4-fluorobenzoyldiphenyl ether through aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. 1-(tert-Butyldimethylsiloxy-3,5-bis(4-fluorobenzoylbenzene was polycondensed with bisphenols, followed by cleavage of the protective group to form linear poly(ether ketones having the same hydroxyl groups in the side chains as the chain ends of the dendrimer and hyperbranched polymers. Their properties, such as solubilities, reduced viscosities, and thermal properties, were compared with one another. Similar comparisons were also carried out among the corresponding methoxy group polymers, and the size of the molecules was shown to affect the properties.

  4. Conformational Study of Dibenzyl Ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Abeysekera, Chamara; Hewett, Daniel M.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the initial stages of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) aggregation, the onset of soot formation, is an important goal on the pathway to cleaner combustion processes. PAHs with short alkyl chains, present in fuel-rich combustion environments, can undergo reactions that will chemically link aromatic rings together. One such example of a linked diaryl compound is dibenzyl ether, C_{6}H_{5}-CH_{2}-O-CH_{2}-C_{6}H_{5}. The -CH_{2}-O-CH_{2}- linkage has a length and flexibility well-suited to forming a π-stacked conformation between the two phenyl rings. In this talk, we will explore the single-conformation spectroscopy of dibenzyl ether under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. Laser-induced fluorescence, chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave (8-18 GHz region), and single-conformation infrared spectroscopy in the alkyl CH stretch region were all carried out on the molecule, thereby interrogating its full array of electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. This work is the first step in a broader study to determine the extent of π-stacking in linked aryl compounds as a function of linkage and PAH size.

  5. 27 CFR 21.108 - Ethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethyl ether. 21.108 Section 21.108 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT....108 Ethyl ether. (a) Odor. Characteristic odor. (b) Specific gravity at 15.56 °/15.56 °C. Not more...

  6. The synthesis of cholesteryl alkyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, G; Gatt, S

    1980-01-01

    Seventeen cholesteryl alkyl ethers were synthesized through alcoholysis of cholesterol p-toluenesulfonate. This method was found superior to the etherification of sodium or potassium cholesterylate with alkyl halides or methanesulfonates, especially for the preparation of long-chain unsaturated aklyl ethers of [7(m)-3H]cholesterol of high specific activity.

  7. Atmospheric lifetimes of selected fluorinated ether compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heathfield, A.E.; Anastasi, C.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric lifetimes have been estimated for a selection of ethers, the latter representing a class of compounds being considered as replacements for chlorofluorocarbons. The estimates are based on laboratory measurements of rate constants for the reaction of the OH radical with the ethers......, and a comparison with the behaviour of methyl chloroform in the atmosphere. The lifetimes for the ethers ranged from a few hours to half a year, significantly lower than those of chlorofluorocarbons and other replacements being considered. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. Clinical comparison of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the formalin-ether sedimentation technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Erdman, D D

    1981-01-01

    A substitute for the volatile solvent diethyl ether has been actively sought for the Formalin-ether sedimentation technique. Ethyl acetate has recently been shown to be a comparable substitute. In an effort to verify these findings and evaluate ethyl acetate under clinical conditions, comparison studies with 62 fresh human stool specimens were performed. Parallel concentrates with diethyl ether and ethyl acetate were prepared for each specimen, and the quantity and appearance of recovered par...

  9. Activity relationships for aromatic crown ethers

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, M J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis involves an investigation of aromatic crown ethers and a study of their binding constants for alkali metals. The study was motivated by the current needs of the semiconductor industry to improve the scavenging of mobile ions from fabricated circuits. A number of aromatic crown ethers have been sulphonated in an attempt to improve their water solubility and cation binding activity. These materials have been extensively studied and their binding activity determined. In collaboration with a molecular modelling study, the effect of ionisable sulphonate groups on the macrocycles' behaviour has been investigated. The broader issue of the effect of substituents in aromatic crown ethers has also been studied with the preparation of a wide range of substituted crown ethers. The cation binding activity of these materials has been found to bear a simple relationship to the electron withdrawing nature of the aromatic substituents. This relationship can be accurately monitored using electronic charge densities...

  10. Isomerization of allyl ethers initiated by lithium diisopropylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chicheung; Williard, Paul G

    2010-12-03

    Lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) promotes virtually quantitative conversion of allylic ethers to (Z)-propenyl ethers. It was discovered that allylic ethers can be isomerized efficiently with very high stereoselectivity to (Z)-propenyl ethers by LDA in THF at room temperature. The reaction time for the conversion increases with more sterically hindered allylic ethers. Different amides were also compared with LDA for their ability to effect this isomerization.

  11. Final report on the safety assessment of PPG-2 methyl ether, PPG-3 methyl ether, and PPG-2 methyl ether acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Valerie; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2009-01-01

    PPG-2 methyl ether, PPG-3 methyl ether, and PPG-2 methyl ether acetate are used in cosmetics as fragrance ingredients and/or solvents at concentrations of 0.4% to 2%. Propylene glycol ethers are rapidly absorbed and distributed throughout the body when introduced by inhalation or oral exposure, but the inhalation toxicity of PPG-2 methyl ether vapor, for example, is low. Aerosols, such as found with hair sprays, produce particle sizes that are not respirable. Because these ingredients are highly water-soluble, they are likely to be absorbed through the human skin only at slow rates, resulting in low blood concentrations and rapid removal by the kidney. These ingredients are not genotoxic and are not reproductive or developmental toxicants. Overall the data are sufficient to conclude that PPG-2 methyl ether, PPG-3 methyl ether, and PPG-2 methyl ether acetate are safe as used in cosmetics.

  12. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) based composite membranes for nanofiltration of acidic and alkaline media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalwani, M.R.; Bargeman, Gerrald; Hosseiny, Seyed Schwan; Schwan Hosseiny, Seyed; Boerrigter, M.E.; Wessling, Matthias; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Several thin film composite nanofiltration membranes have been prepared by spin coating a sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) solution on a polyethersulfone support, followed by thermal treatment. The most optimal developed nanofiltration membrane shows a clean water permeance of ∼4.5 L m−2 h−1

  13. Novel crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanqin; Zieren, Shelley; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2011-07-14

    Novel covalently crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and carboxylated polysulfone exhibit much lower methanol crossover and better performance in direct methanol fuel cells at 65 °C in 1 and 2 M methanol solutions compared to Nafion 115 membranes.

  14. Atmospheric degradation of 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether, allyl ether and allyl ethyl ether: Kinetics with OH radicals and UV photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiñolo, M; Ocaña, A J; Aranguren, J P; Lane, S I; Albaladejo, J; Jiménez, E

    2017-08-01

    Unsaturated ethers are oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) emitted by anthropogenic sources. Potential removal processes in the troposphere are initiated by hydroxyl (OH) radicals and photochemistry. In this work, we report for the first time the rate coefficients of the gas-phase reaction with OH radicals (k OH ) of 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (2ClEVE), allyl ether (AE), and allyl ethyl ether (AEE) as a function of temperature in the 263-358 K range, measured by the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. No pressure dependence of k OH was observed in the 50-500 Torr range in He as bath gas, while a slightly negative T-dependence was observed. The temperature dependent expressions for the rate coefficients determined in this work are: The estimated atmospheric lifetimes (τ OH ) assuming k OH at 288 K were 3, 2, and 4 h for 2ClEVE, AE and AEE, respectively. The kinetic results are discussed in terms of the chemical structure of the unsaturated ethers by comparison with similar compounds. We also report ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) absorption cross sections (σ λ and σ(ν˜), respectively). We estimate the photolysis rate coefficients in the solar UV actinic region to be less than 10 -7 s -1 , implying that these compounds are not removed from the atmosphere by this process. In addition, from σ(ν˜) and τ OH , the global warming potential of each unsaturated ether was calculated to be almost zero. A discussion on the atmospheric implications of the titled compounds is presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhalation anaesthesia: from diethyl ether to xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, J G

    2008-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia is said to have began with the successful demonstration of ether anaesthesia by William Morton in October 1846, even though anaesthesia with nitrous oxide had been used in dentistry 2 years before. Anaesthesia with ether, nitrous oxide and chloroform (introduced in 1847) rapidly became commonplace for surgery. Of these, only nitrous oxide remains in use today. All modern volatile anaesthetics, with the exception of halothane (a fluorinated alkane), are halogenated methyl ethyl ethers. Methyl ethyl ethers are more potent, stable and better anaesthetics than diethyl ethers. They all cause myocardial depression, most markedly halothane, while isoflurane and sevoflurane cause minimal cardiovascular depression. The halogenated ethers also depress the normal respiratory response to carbon dioxide and to hypoxia. Other adverse effects include hepatic and renal damage. Hepatitis occurs most frequently with halothane, although rare cases have been reported with the other agents. Liver damage is not caused by the anaesthetics themselves, but by reactive metabolites. Type I hepatitis occurs fairly commonly and takes the form of a minor disturbance of liver enzymes, which usually resolves without treatment. Type II, thought to be immune-mediated, is rare, unpredictable and results in a severe fulminant hepatitis with a high mortality. Renal damage is rare, and was most often associated with methoxyflurane because of excessive plasma fluoride concentrations resulting from its metabolism. Methoxyflurane was withdrawn from the market because of the high incidence of nephrotoxicity. Among the contemporary anaesthetics, the highest fluoride concentrations have been reported with sevoflurane, but there are no reports of renal dysfunction associated with its use. Recently there has been a renewed interest in xenon, one of the noble gases. Xenon has many of the properties of an ideal anaesthetic. The major factor limiting its more widespread is the high cost, about

  16. A technique to anesthetize turtles with ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belló, A A; Belló-Klein, A

    1991-10-01

    A technique to anesthetize turtles with ether is presented, in which a plastic cannula is passed through the glottis into the trachea. This procedure avoids apnea and allows ether vapours obtained from a chamber to be introduced, by the animal respiratory movements or by means of a pump, into the animal lungs. The anesthesia is rapidly obtained and lasts from 45-90 minutes. The time of recovery from anesthesia ranged from 60-90 minutes. With this technique no deaths were observed and the same animal could be anesthetized repeatedly.

  17. Synthesis of alkynyl ethers and low-temperature sigmatropic rearrangement of allyl and benzyl alkynyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Juan R; Tudjarian, Armen A; Minehan, Thomas G

    2008-11-06

    Alpha-alkoxy ketones 3 can be transformed into 1-alkynyl ethers 5 by a two-step procedure involving formation of the enol triflate or phosphate and base-induced elimination. Performing the same reaction sequence with allylic alcohols (R2OH, R2 = allyl) furnishes instead gamma,delta-unsaturated carboxylic acid derivatives 6, derived from [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of the intermediate allyl alkynyl ethers at -78 degrees C and trapping of the subsequently formed ketene with nucleophiles (Nu-H). Benzyl alkynyl ether 5 (R2 = benzyl) rearranges to indanone 7 upon heating to 60 degrees C.

  18. Synthesis of Alkynyl Ethers and Low Temperature Sigmatropic Rearrangement of Allyl and Benzyl Alkynyl Ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Juan R.; Tudjarian, Armen A.; Minehan, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    α–Alkoxy ketones 3 can be transformed into 1-alkynyl ethers 5 by a two-step procedure involving formation of the enol triflate or phosphate and base-induced elimination. Performing the same reaction sequence with allylic alcohols (R2OH, R2 = allyl) furnishes instead γ,δ-unsaturated carboxylic acid derivatives 6, derived from [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of the intermediate allyl alkynyl ethers at −78 °C and trapping of the subsequently formed ketene with nucleophiles (Nu-H). Benzyl alkynyl ether 5 (R2 = benzyl) rearranges to indanone 7 upon heating to 60 °C. PMID:18847213

  19. Syntheses of Diazadithiacrown Ethers Containing Two 8-Hydroxyquinoline Side Arms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, H

    2001-01-01

    Ten new diazadithiacrown ethers containing two 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) sidearms attached through the HQ 7-positions and four new diazadithiacrown ethers containing two HQ sidearms attached through the HQ 2-positions have been prepared...

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Decabromodiphenyl Ether (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Decabromodiphenyl Ether: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Decabromodiphenyl Ether and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Da...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3486 - Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether... Substances § 721.3486 Polyglycerin mono(4-nonylphenyl) ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-nonylphenyl) ether (PMN P-94-2230) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3500 - Perhalo alkoxy ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Perhalo alkoxy ether. 721.3500 Section... Substances § 721.3500 Perhalo alkoxy ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as perhalo alkoxy ether (PMN P-83-1227) is...

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-42 - Ethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethyl ether. 151.50-42 Section 151.50-42 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-42 Ethyl ether. (a)(1) Gravity tanks... liquid. (g) Precautions shall be taken to prevent the contamination of ethyl ether by strong oxidizing...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3435 - Butoxy-substituted ether alkane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butoxy-substituted ether alkane. 721... Substances § 721.3435 Butoxy-substituted ether alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as butoxy-substituted ether alkane...

  5. 40 CFR 799.4440 - Triethylene glycol monomethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Triethylene glycol monomethyl ether... REQUIREMENTS Specific Chemical Test Rules § 799.4440 Triethylene glycol monomethyl ether. (a) Identification of test substance. (1) Triethylene glycol monomethyl ether (TGME, CAS No. 112-35-6) shall be tested in...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3485 - Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3485 Hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a hydrofluorocarbon alkyl ether...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3550 - Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether. 721... Substances § 721.3550 Dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as dipropylene glycol dimethyl ether (PMN P-93...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3420 - Brominated arylalkyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated arylalkyl ether. 721.3420... Substances § 721.3420 Brominated arylalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated arylalkyl ether (P-83-906) is...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10069 - Ether amine phosphonate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10069 Ether amine phosphonate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as ether amine phosphonate (PMN P...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3465 - Stilbene diglycidyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stilbene diglycidyl ether. 721.3465... Substances § 721.3465 Stilbene diglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as stilbene diglycidyl ether (PMN P-96-1427) is subject to...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3438 - Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3438 Chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical substance... chlorohydroxyalkyl butyl ether (PMN P-99-1295) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new use...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1846 - Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks. 520.1846... Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether blocks. (a) Specifications. Each molasses-based block contains 2.2 percent polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether. (b) Sponsor. See No. 067949 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3520 - Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. 721.3520... Substances § 721.3520 Aliphatic polyglycidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance aliphatic polyglycidyl ether (PMN P-89-1036) is subject to...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3430 - 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether. 721.3430... Substances § 721.3430 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance 4-bromophenyl phenyl ether (CAS No. 101-55-3) is subject to reporting...

  15. Information draft on the development of air standards for ethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    Ethyl ether is a clear, volatile liquid with a sweet, pungent odour. It is used as a solvent for waxes, fats, oils, perfumes, alkaloids and gums. It is an easily removable extractant of hormones from animal and plant tissues. Therapeutically, it is used as an inhalation anesthetic and antispasmodic. Ethyl ether can be absorbed via inhalation or ingestion. From the blood it passes quickly into the brain. It is partly metabolized to carbon dioxide and to urinary metabolites, but over 90 per cent is excreted unchanged through exhaled air. Inhalation may cause dizziness, giddiness, euphoria, skin, eye and mucous membrane irritation, and rarely death, due to respiratory failure. Release into the environment is usually from its industrial application. Ethyl ether is not a candidate substance in the National Pollutant Release Inventory for the reporting of environmental releases. No data in ambient air concentrations was found for Ontario or Canada. This report discusses the scientific and technical evidence relevant to the setting of a revised air standard for ethyl ether. The available evidence has been gathered from world-wide sources. Only three of the agencies reviewed have derived ambient air quality criteria. These were based on the occupational exposure limit of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. Odour thresholds have been found to be in the range of 700 to 3,000 microgram/cubic meter, which may provide an appropriate effect to consider for developing air quality limits for Ontario. 42 refs., 1 tab., appendix

  16. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether

  17. Children's exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, M.; Leijs, M.; Schoeters, G.; Tusscher, G. Ten; Koppe, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a class of brominated flame retardants, are frequently used in consumer products. PBDEs levels in environmental and human samples have increased in recent decades. Children are exposed to PBDEs through diet, mainly through fish, meat and milk.

  18. The Lubrication Qualities of Dimethyl Ether (DME)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Sorenson, Spencer C; Jakobsen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Dimethyl Ether (DME) has been recognised as a clean alternative for diesel oil for some years now. Fuelling diesel engines with DME solves their two most significant problems: The emission of particulate matter is virtually eliminated and the level of NOx can be reduced considerably by exhaust gas......, as the clean emission advantage obtained when using DME will be lost....

  19. Chemical clearing and dehydration of GFP expressing mouse brains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Becker, Klaus; Jährling, Nina; Saghafi, Saiedeh; Weiler, Reto; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    ...) can be applied as a more GFP-friendly clearing medium. Clearing with dibenzyl ether provides improved tissue transparency and strikingly improved fluorescence intensity in GFP expressing mouse brains and other samples as mouse spinal cords, or embryos...

  20. Ion-Selective Ionic Polymer Metal Composite (IPMC) Actuator Based on Crown Ether Containing Sulfonated Poly(Arylene Ether Ketone)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Sinem; Zoetebier, Bram; Sardan Sukas, Ö.; Bayraktar, Muharrem; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.

    This study introduces the concept of ion selective actuation in polymer metal composite actuators, employing crown ether bearing aromatic polyether materials. For this purpose, sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) (SPAEK) and crown ether containing SPAEK with molar masses suitable for membrane

  1. Preparation and characterization of monovalent ion selective cation exchange membranes based on sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balster, J.H.; Krupenko, O.; Krupenko, O.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses the separation properties of various commercial cation exchange membranes (CEMs) and tailor made membranes based on sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone) and poly(ether sulphone) for binary electrolyte solutions containing protons and calcium ions. All membranes are thoroughly

  2. Impaired neurotransmission in ether lipid-deficient nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodde, Alexander; Teigler, Andre; Brugger, Britta; Lehmann, Wolf D; Wieland, Felix; Berger, Johannes; Just, Wilhelm W

    2012-06-15

    Isolated defects of ether lipid (EL) biosynthesis in humans cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2 and type 3, serious peroxisomal disorders. Using a previously described mouse model [Rodemer, C., Thai, T.P., Brugger, B., Kaercher, T., Werner, H., Nave, K.A., Wieland, F., Gorgas, K., and Just, W.W. (2003) Inactivation of ether lipid biosynthesis causes male infertility, defects in eye development and optic nerve hypoplasia in mice. Hum. Mol. Genet., 12, 1881-1895], we investigated the effect of EL deficiency in isolated murine nerve terminals (synaptosomes) on the pre-synaptic release of the neurotransmitters (NTs) glutamate and acetylcholine. Both Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and Ca(2+)-independent efflux of the transmitters were affected. EL-deficient synaptosomes respire at a reduced rate and exhibit a lowered adenosin-5'-triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio. Consequently, ATP-driven processes, such as synaptic vesicle cycling and maintenance of Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis, might be disturbed. Analyzing reactive oxygen species in EL-deficient neural and non-neural tissues revealed that plasmalogens (PLs), the most abundant EL species in mammalian central nervous system, considerably contribute to the generation of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde. Although EL-deficient tissue contains less lipid peroxidation products, fibroblasts lacking ELs are more susceptible to induced oxidative stress. In summary, these results suggest that due to the reduced energy state of EL-deficient tissue, the Ca(2+)-independent efflux of NTs increases while the Ca(2+)-dependent release declines. Furthermore, lack of PLs is mainly compensated for by an increase in the concentration of phosphatidylethanolamine and results in a significantly lowered level of lipid peroxidation products in the brain cortex and cerebellum.

  3. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes differing in alkaloid profiles were sequenced, revealing that those with mutated lolO accumulated exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine but no lolines. Heterologous expression of wild-type lolO complemented a lolO mutant, resulting in the production of N-acetylnorloline. These results indicated that the non-heme iron oxygenase, LolO, is required for ether bridge formation, probably through oxidation of exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine. PMID:24374065

  4. Synthesis of New Liquid Crystalline Diglycidyl Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issam Ahmed Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic Schiff bases I–VI were synthesized by condensation reactions between various diamines, namely o-dianisidine, o-tolidine and ethylenediamine with vanillin or p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and subsequent reactions between these phenolic Schiff bases and epichlorohydrin to produce new diglycidyl ethers Ia–VIa. The structures of these compounds were confirmed by CHN, FT-IR, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Their thermotropic liquid crystalline behavior was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and polarizing optical microscopy (POM. All the diglycidyl ethers prepared exhibit nematic mesophases, except for Va and VIa, which did not show any transition mesophases, but simply flow to liquids.

  5. Model for Photodegradation of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, M.; Vajglová, Zuzana; Kotas, Petr; Křišťál, Jiří; Ponec, Robert; Jiřičný, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 7 (2015), s. 4949-4963 ISSN 0944-1344 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0880; GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/12/0664 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : polybrominated diphenyl ethers * photodegradation model * quantum chemical calculation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.760, year: 2015

  6. Alkyl aryl ethers in lignite solubilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustral, A.M.; Cebolla, V.L.; Gavilan, J.M.

    1985-03-01

    The FT-I.R. and /sup 1/H N.M.R. spectroscopic analyses of oils or maltenes from a Spanish lignite (Utrillas, Teruel), are reported. These oils were obtained by depolymerization with alkyl aromatic ethers (anisole, 3-methyl anisole and 1,3-dimethoxybenzene) catalyzed by Lewis acids ZnCl/sub 2/, AlCl/sub 3/, SbCl/sub 3/ and BF/sub 3/ (as boron trifluoride etherate), at atmospheric pressure and temperatures <220/sup 0/C. Bands due to aromatic ethers in the I.R. and N.M.R. spectra of the oils obtained by depolymerization indicate solvent incorporation. Oils obtained by direct lignite extraction showed 25% aromatic H and some H /sub i/ (approx. = 3%) without OH groups. These appeared in some oils obtained by depolymerization with AlCl/sub 3/ and were due to secondary reactions with the aromatic extract. Oils derived from processes with good yields showed increases in aromaticity. The extent of substitution of aromatic rings in oils obtained by depolymerization was less than for oils directly extracted. All the oils studied show a low degree of condensation.

  7. Nikola Tesla, the Ether and his Telautomaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milar, Kendall

    2014-03-01

    In the nineteenth century physicists' understanding of the ether changed dramatically. New developments in thermodynamics, energy physics, and electricity and magnetism dictated new properties of the ether. These have traditionally been examined from the perspective of the scientists re-conceptualizing the ether. However Nikola Tesla, a prolific inventor and writer, presents a different picture of nineteenth century physics. Alongside the displays that showcased his inventions he presented alternative interpretations of physical, physiological and even psychical research. This is particularly evident in his telautomaton, a radio remote controlled boat. This invention and Tesla's descriptions of it showcase some of his novel interpretations of physical theories. He offered a perspective on nineteenth century physics that focused on practical application instead of experiment. Sometimes the understanding of physical theories that Tesla reached was counterproductive to his own inventive work; other times he offered new insights. Tesla's utilitarian interpretation of physical theories suggests a more scientifically curious and invested inventor than previously described and a connection between the scientific and inventive communities.

  8. From ether theory to ether theology: Oliver Lodge and the physics of immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raia, Courtenay Grean

    2007-01-01

    This article follows the development of physicist Oliver Lodge's religio-scientific worldview, beginning with his reticent attraction to metaphysics in the early 1880s to the full formulation of his "ether theology" in the late 1890s. Lodge undertook the study of psychical phenomena such as telepathy, telekinesis, and "ectoplasm" to further his scientific investigations of the ether, speculating that electrical and psychical manifestations were linked phenomena that described the deeper underlying structures of the universe, beneath and beyond matter. For Lodge, to fully understand the ether was to force from the universe an ultimate Revelation, and psychical research, as the most modern and probatory science, was poised to replace religion as the means of that disclosure. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. 40 CFR 721.10067 - Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10067 Ether amine phosphonate salt (generic). (a) Chemical substances... ether amine phosphonate salt (PMNs P-05-57, P-05-58, P-05-59, P-05-61, P-05-62, P-05-63, P-05-64, and P...

  10. Silane Cross-Linked Sulfonted Poly(Ether Ketone/Ether Benzimidazoles for Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilu Yao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-(2,3-epoxypropoxy propyltrimethoxysilane (KH-560 was incorporated in various proportions into side-chain-type sulfonated poly(ether ketone/ether benzimidazole (SPEKEBI as a crosslinker, to make membranes with high ion exchange capacities and excellent performance for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. Systematical measurements including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS proved the complete disappearance of epoxy groups in KH-560 and the existence of Si in the membranes. The resulting membranes showed increased mechanical strength and thermal stability compared to the unmodified sulfonated poly(ether ketone/ether benzimidazole membrane in appropriate doping amount. Meanwhile, the methanol permeability has decreased, leading to the increase of relative selectivities of SPEKEBI-x-SiO2 membranes. Furthermore, the H2/O2 cell performance of SPEKEBI-2.5-SiO2 membrane showed a much higher peak power density compared with the pure SPEKEBI memrbrane.

  11. Lithiated and sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone) solid state electrolyte films for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, K.-F.; Su, S.-H., E-mail: minimono42@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films have been synthesised and used as solid-state electrolytes for supercapacitors. In order to increase their ion conductivity, the PEEK films were sulphonated by sulphuric acid, and various amounts of LiClO{sub 4} were added. The solid-state electrolyte films were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The ionic conductivities of the electrolyte films were analysed by performing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained electrolyte films can be sandwiched or directly coated on activated carbon electrodes to form solid-state supercapacitors. The electrochemical characteristics of these supercapacitors were investigated by performing cyclic voltammetry and charge–discharge tests. Under an optimal content of LiClO{sub 4}, the supercapacitor can provide a capacitance as high as 190 F/g. After 1000 cycles, the supercapacitors show almost no capacitance fading, indicating high stability of the solid-state electrolyte films. - Highlights: • Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films have been used as solid-state electrolytes. • LiClO4 addition can efficiently improve the ionic conductivity. • Supercapacitors using PEEK electrolyte films deliver high capacitance.

  12. Synthesis and Antiplasmodial Activity of EG-Artemisinin Ethers and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to synthesize a series of ethylene glycol (EG) ethers and quinoline hybrids of the antimalarial drug artemisinin and to evaluate their antimalarial activity in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum strains. The ethers were synthesized in a one-step process by coupling ethylene glycol (EG) moieties of ...

  13. 40 CFR 721.825 - Certain aromatic ether diamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain aromatic ether diamines. 721.825 Section 721.825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.825 Certain aromatic ether diamines. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses...

  14. Synthesis and bioactivity of rotenone oxime O -ether derivatives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of rotenone oxime O-ether derivatives were synthesized and characterized. All compounds were tested for their insecticidal, miticidal and fungicidal activities against the selected pests and compared with those of rotenone. The results of biological tests show that the rotenone oxime O-ether derivatives have ...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.1008 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1915.1008 Section 1915.1008 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1008 bis-Chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1915.1006 Section 1915.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Hazardous Substances § 1915.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1108 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1926.1108 Section 1926.1108 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...-Chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1008 - bis-Chloromethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false bis-Chloromethyl ether. 1910.1008 Section 1910.1008 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... bis-Chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens. ...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.1006 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1910.1006 Section 1910.1006 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Substances § 1910.1006 Methyl chloromethyl ether. See § 1910.1003, 13 carcinogens. ...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1106 - Methyl chloromethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methyl chloromethyl ether. 1926.1106 Section 1926.1106 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1926.1106 Methyl chloromethyl ether. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this...

  1. Synthesis and Biophysical Characterization of Chlorambucil Anticancer Ether Lipid Prodrugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Palle Jacob; Christensen, Mikkel Stochkendahl; Ruysschaert, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis and biophysical characterization of four prodrug ether phospholipid conjugates are described. The lipids are prepared from the anticancer drug chlorambucil and have C16 and C18 ether chains with phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylglycerol headgroups. All four prodrugs have the ability...

  2. Congenital malformations and maternal occupational exposure to glycol ethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordier, S; Bergeret, A; Goujard, J; Ha, MC; Ayme, S; Calzolari, E; DeWalle, HEK; KnillJones, R; Candela, S; Dale, [No Value; Dananche, B; deVigan, C; Fevotte, J; Kiel, G; Mandereau, L

    Glycol ethers are found in a wide range of domestic and industrial products, many of which are used in women's work environments. Motivated by concern about their potential reproductive toxicity, we have evaluated the risk of congenital malformations related to glycol ether exposure during preg

  3. Formation and Structural Analysis of Novel Dibornyl Ethers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF P.T. KAYE

    stereochemistry of novel dibornyl ethers, obtained by acid-catalysed condensation of camphor-derived α-hydroxybornanones. Keywords Dibornyl ethers; structure analysis; camphor derivatives. The results of some of our previous studies on the use of camphor-derived chiral auxiliaries in asymmetric synthesis1,2 indicated ...

  4. Ether in the developing world: rethinking an abandoned agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Connie Y; Goldstein, Elisabeth; Agarwal, Nitin; Swan, Kenneth G

    2015-10-16

    The first true demonstration of ether as an inhalation anesthetic was on October 16, 1846 by William T.G. Morton, a Boston dentist. Ether has been replaced completely by newer inhalation agents and open drop delivery systems have been exchanged for complicated vaporizers and monitoring systems. Anesthesia in the developing world, however, where lack of financial stability has halted the development of the field, still closely resembles primitive anesthetics. In areas where resources are scarce, patients are often not given supplemental intraoperative analgesia. While halothane provides little analgesia, ether provides excellent intra-operative pain control that can extend for several hours into the postoperative period. An important barrier to the widespread use of ether is availability. With decreasing demand, production of the inexpensive inhalation agent has fallen. Ether is inexpensive to manufacture, and encouraging increased production at a local level would help developing nations to cut costs and become more self-sufficient.

  5. Synthesis of poly(arylene ether ketone)s bearing skeletal crown ether units for cation exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetebier, Bram; Tas, Sinem; Vancso, Gyula J.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Hempenius, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(arylene ether ketone)s (PAEKs) are the most commonly known high-performance materials used for ion exchange and fuel cell membranes. Described here is the design of novel sulfonated PAEKs (SPAEKs) and nonsulfonated PAEKs containing crown ether units in the main chain, which can be used in

  6. Characterization of melt-blended graphene – poly(ether ether ketone) nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewatia, Arya; Hendrix, Justin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States); Dong, Zhizhong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Taghon, Meredith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States); Tse, Stephen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Chiu, Gordon; Mayo, William E.; Kear, Bernard; Nosker, Thomas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States); Lynch, Jennifer, E-mail: jklynch@rci.rutgers.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Using a high shear melt-processing method, graphene-reinforced polymer matrix composites (G-PMCs) were produced with good distribution and particle–matrix interaction of bi/trilayer graphene at 2 wt. % and 5 wt. % in poly ether ether ketone (2Gn-PEEK and 5Gn-PEEK). The morphology, structure, thermal properties, and mechanical properties of PEEK, 2Gn-PEEK and 5 Gn-PEEK were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), flexural mechanical testing, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Addition of graphene to PEEK induces surface crystallization, increased percent crystallinity, offers a composite that is thermally stable until 550 °C and enhances thermomechanical properties. Results show that graphene was successfully melt-blended within PEEK using this method.

  7. [Recent development of research on the biotribology of carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Pan, Yusong

    2014-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced poly ether ether ketone (CF/PEEK) composite possesses excellent biocompatible, biomechanical and bioribological properties. It is one of the most promising implant materials for artificial joint. Many factors influence the bioribological properties of CF/PEEK composites. In this paper, the authors reviewed on the biotribology research progress of CF/PEEK composites. The influences of various factors such as lubricant, reinforcement surface modification, functional particles, friction counterpart and friction motion modes on the bio-tribological properties of CF/PEEK composites are discussed. Based on the recent research, the authors suggest that the further research should be focused on the synergistic effect of multiple factors on the wear and lubrication mechanism of CF/PEEK.

  8. Modification of Poly(ether ether ketone Polymer for Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM is an important part of PEM fuel cell. Nafion is a commercially known membrane which gives the satisfactory result in PEM fuel cell operating at low temperature. Present research paper includes functionalization of Poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK polymer with phosphonic acid group. The functionalization was done with the help of nickel-based catalyst. Further, the polymer was characterized by the FTIR, EDAX, DSC, TGA, and 1H NMR, and it was found that PEEK polymer was functionalized with phosphonic acid group with good thermal stability in comparison to virgin PEEK. Finally, the thin films of functionalized polymer were prepared by solution casting method, and proton conductivity of film samples was measured by impedance spectra whose value was found satisfactory with good thermal stability in comparison to commercially available Nafion membrane.

  9. Poly(vinylbenzyl sulfonic acid)-grafted poly(ether ether ketone) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Mi-Lim; Choi, Jisun; Woo, Hyun-Su; Kumar, Vinod; Sohn, Joon-Yong; Shin, Junhwa, E-mail: shinj@kaeri.re.kr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • PEEK-g-PVBSA, a polymer electrolyte membrane was prepared by a radiation grafting technique. • Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK), an aromatic hydrocarbon polymer was used as a grafting backbone film. • The water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability of the membranes were evaluated. • PEEK-g-PVBSA membranes show considerably lower methanol permeability compared to a Nafion membrane. -- Abstract: In this study, an aromatic hydrocarbon based polymer electrolyte membrane, poly(vinylbenzyl sulfonic acid)-grafted poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK-g-PVBSA), has been prepared by the simultaneous irradiation grafting of vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC) monomer onto a PEEK film and subsequent sulfonation. Each chemical conversion was monitored by FT-IR and SEM–EDX instruments. The physicochemical properties including IEC, water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability of the prepared membranes were also investigated and found that the values of these properties increase with the increase of degree of grafting. It was observed that the IEC values of the prepared PEEK-g-PVBSA membranes with 32%, 58%, and 80% DOG values were 0.50, 1.05, and 1.22 meq/g while the water uptakes were 14%, 20%, and 21%, respectively. The proton conductivities (0.0272–0.0721 S/cm at 70 °C) were found to be somewhat lower than Nafion 212 (0.126 S/cm at 70 °C) at a relative humidity of 90%. However, the prepared membranes showed a considerably lower methanol permeability (0.61–1.92 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/s) compared to a Nafion 212 membrane (5.37 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/s)

  10. Mass transport of direct methanol fuel cell species in sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, V.S.; Boaventura, M.; Mendes, A.M.; Madeira, L.M. [LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Ruffmann, B.; Vetter, S.; Nunes, S.P. [GKSS Research Centre, Max-Planck Str., 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2006-05-05

    Homogeneous membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with different sulfonation degrees (SD) were prepared and characterized. In order to perform a critical analysis of the SD effect on the polymer barrier and mass transport properties towards direct methanol fuel cell species, proton conductivity, water/methanol pervaporation and nitrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide pressure rise method experiments are proposed. This procedure allows the evaluation of the individual permeability coefficients in hydrated sPEEK membranes with different sulfonation degrees. Nafion{sup (R)} 112 was used as reference material. DMFC tests were also performed at 50{sup o}C. It was observed that the proton conductivity and the permeability towards water, methanol, oxygen and carbon dioxide increase with the sPEEK sulfonation degree. In contrast, the SD seems to not affect the nitrogen permeability coefficient. In terms of selectivity, it was observed that the carbon dioxide/oxygen selectivity increases with the sPEEK SD. In contrast, the nitrogen/oxygen selectivity decreases. In terms of barrier properties for preventing the DMFC reactants loss, the polymer electrolyte membrane based on the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) with SD lower or equal to 71%, although having slightly lower proton conductivity, presented much better characteristics for fuel cell applications compared with the well known Nafion{sup (R)} 112. In terms of the DMFC tests of the studied membranes at low temperature, the sPEEK membrane with SD=71% showed to have similar performance, or even better, as that of Nafion{sup (R)} 112. However, the highest DMFC overall efficiency was achieved using sPEEK membrane with SD=52%. (author)

  11. Thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether: A model of ether linkages in low rank coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Malcolm, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, an area of interest and frustration for coal chemists has been the direct liquefaction of low rank coal. Although low rank coals are more reactive than bituminous coals, they are more difficult to liquefy and offer lower liquefaction yields under conditions optimized for bituminous coals. Solomon, Serio, and co-workers have shown that: in the pyrolysis and liquefaction of low rank coals, a low temperature cross-linking reaction associated with oxygen functional groups occurs before tar evolution. A variety of pretreatments (demineralization, alkylation, and ion-exchange) have been shown to reduce these retrogressive reactions and increase tar yields, but the actual chemical reactions responsible for these processes have not been defined. In order to gain insight into the thermochemical reactions leading to cross-linking in low rank coal, we have undertaken a study of the pyrolysis of oxygen containing coal model compounds. Solid state NMR studies suggest that the alkyl aryl ether linkage may be present in modest amounts in low rank coal. Therefore, in this paper, we will investigate the thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) as a model of 0-aryl ether linkages found in low rank coal, lignites, and lignin, an evolutionary precursor of coal. Our results have uncovered a new reaction channel that can account for 25% of the products formed. The impact of reaction conditions, including restricted mass transport, on this new reaction pathway and the role of oxygen functional groups in cross-linking reactions will be investigated.

  12. Vapor intrusion risk of fuel ether oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE): A modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Xiong, Desen; Li, Haiyan; Ding, Yi; Xia, Xiangcheng; Yang, Yongqi

    2017-06-15

    Vapor intrusion of synthetic fuel additives represents a critical yet still neglected problem at sites contaminated by petroleum fuel releases. This study used an advanced numerical model to investigate the vapor intrusion potential of fuel ether oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE). Simulated indoor air concentration of these compounds can exceed USEPA indoor air screening level for MTBE (110μg/m 3 ). Our results also reveal that MTBE has much higher chance to cause vapor intrusion problems than TAME and ETBE. This study supports the statements made by USEPA in the Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) Guidance that the vertical screening criteria for petroleum hydrocarbons may not provide sufficient protectiveness for fuel additives, and ether oxygenates in particular. In addition to adverse impacts on human health, ether oxygenate vapor intrusion may also cause aesthetic problems (i.e., odour and flavour). Overall, this study points out that ether oxygenates can cause vapor intrusion problems. We recommend that USEPA consider including the field measurement data of synthetic fuel additives in the existing PVI database and possibly revising the PVI Guidance as necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Levels and distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in various tissues of birds of prey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voorspoels, Stefan [Department of Pharmacy, Toxicology Division, University of Antwerp, CDE-gebouw S, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)]. E-mail: stefan.voorspoels@ua.ac.be; Covaci, Adrian [Department of Pharmacy, Toxicology Division, University of Antwerp, CDE-gebouw S, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Lepom, Peter [Department of Pharmacy, Toxicology Division, University of Antwerp, CDE-gebouw S, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Jaspers, Veerle L.B. [Department of Pharmacy, Toxicology Division, University of Antwerp, CDE-gebouw S, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Schepens, Paul [Department of Pharmacy, Toxicology Division, University of Antwerp, CDE-gebouw S, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2006-11-15

    In the present study, concentrations and tissue distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; IUPAC nos. 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, and 209) were examined in brain, adipose tissue, liver, muscle, and serum of birds of prey. Median {sigma}PBDE levels (BDE 28-183) in the tissues of sparrowhawks ranged from 360 to 1900 ng/g lipid weight (lw), which was in general one order of magnitude higher than in the tissues of common buzzards (26-130 ng/g lw). There were no differences in PBDE congener patterns between the various tissues within individuals of a certain species. Inter-species differences in PBDE patterns and in particular the percentage of BDE 99, 100 and 153 were, however, pronounced between sparrowhawk and common buzzard. BDE 209 was detected in nearly all serum and in some liver samples, but not in any other tissues. This observation suggests that exposure to BDE 209 is low or that this congener is poorly accumulated. Passive (lipid content related) diffusion could not completely describe the PBDE tissue distribution, e.g. the lowest PBDE-load was measured in brain, a fairly lipid rich tissue. - Distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in birds of prey is tissue dependent.

  14. Characterization of Microsolvated Crown Ethers from Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cristobal; Schnell, Melanie; Blanco, Susana; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Since they were first synthetized, crown ethers have been extensively used in organometallic chemistry due to their unparalleled binding selectivity with alkali metal cations. From a structural point of view, crown ethers are heterocycles containing oxygen and/or other heteroatoms, although the most common ones are formed from ethylene oxide unit. Crown ethers are conventionally seen as being hydrophilic inside and hydrophobic outside when the structures found for the metal cation complexes are considered. However, crown ethers are extremely flexible and in isolation may present a variety of stable conformations so that their structure may be easily adapted in presence of a strong ligand as an alkali metal cation minimize the energy of the resulting complex. Water can be considered a soft ligand which interacts with crown ethers through moderate hydrogen bonds. It is thus interesting to investigate which conformers are selected by water to form complexes, the preferred interaction sites and the possible conformational changes due to the presence of one or more water molecules. Previous studies identified microsolvated crown ethers but in all cases with a chromophore group attached to the structure. Here we present a broadband rotational spectroscopy study of microsolvated crown ethers produced in a pulsed molecular jet expansion. Several 1:1 and 1:2 crown ether:water aggregates are presented for 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6. Unambiguous identification of the structures has been achieved using isotopic substitution within the water unit. The subtle changes induced in the structures of the crown ether monomer upon complexation and the hydrogen-bonding network that hold them together will be also discussed. F. Gámez, B. Martínez-Haya, S. Blanco,J. C. López and J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2014, 14 12912-12918 V. A. Shubert, C.W. Müller and T. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113 8067-8079

  15. MRI sensing of neurotransmitters with a crown ether appended Gd(3+) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukhatar, Fatima; Même, Sandra; Même, William; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Logothetis, Nikos K; Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2015-02-18

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches that detect biomarkers associated with neural activity would allow more direct observation of brain function than current functional MRI based on blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast. Our objective was to create a synthetic molecular platform with appropriate recognition moieties for zwitterionic neurotransmitters that generate an MR signal change upon neurotransmitter binding. The gadolinium complex (GdL) we report offers ditopic binding for zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters, via interactions (i) between the positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated metal center and the carboxylate function and (ii) between a triazacrown ether and the amine group of the neurotransmitters. GdL discriminates zwitterionic neurotransmitters from monoamines. Neurotransmitter binding leads to a remarkable relaxivity change, related to a decrease in hydration number. GdL was successfully used to monitor neural activity in ex vivo mouse brain slices by MRI.

  16. Enzymatic network for production of ether amines from alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palacio, Cyntia M.; Crismaru, Ciprian G.; Bartsch, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We constructed an enzymatic network composed of three different enzymes for the synthesis of valuable ether amines. The enzymatic reactions are interconnected to catalyze the oxidation and subsequent transamination of the substrate and to provide cofactor recycling. This allows production...... of the desired ether amines from the corresponding ether alcohols with inorganic ammonium as the only additional substrate. To examine conversion, individual and overall reaction equilibria were established. Using these data, it was found that the experimentally observed conversions of up to 60% observed...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1970 - Vinyl chloride-lauryl vinyl ether copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vinyl chloride-lauryl vinyl ether copolymers. 177...-lauryl vinyl ether copolymers. The vinyl chloride-lauryl vinyl ether copolymers identified in paragraph... section vinyl chloride-lauryl vinyl ether copolymers consist of basic copolymers produced by the...

  18. Evaluation of crystallization kinetics of poly (ether-ketone-ketone and poly (ether-ether-ketone by DSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibran da Cunha Vasconcelos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The poly (aryl ether ketones are used as matrices in advanced composites with high performance due to its high thermal stability, excellent environmental performance and superior mechanical properties. Most of the physical, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of semi-crystalline polymers depend on the degree of crystallinity and morphology of the crystalline regions. Thus, a study on the crystallization process promotes a good prediction of how the manufacturing parameters affect the developed structure, and the properties of the final product. The objective of this work was to evaluate the thermoplastics polymers PEKK e PEEK by DSC, aiming to obtain the relationship between kinetics, content, nucleation and geometry of the crystalline phases, according to the parameters of the Avrami and Kissinger models. The analysis of the Avrami exponents obtained for the studied polymers indicates that both showed the formation of crystalline phases with heterogeneous nucleation and growth geometry of the type sticks or discs, depending on the cooling conditions. It was also found that the PEEK has a higher crystallinity than PEKK.

  19. The zeolite mediated isomerization of allyl phenyl ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebriana, R.; Mujahidin, D.; Syah, Y. M.

    2017-04-01

    Allyl phenyl ether is an important starting material in organic synthesis that has several applications in agrochemical industry. The green transformation of allyl phenyl ether assisted by heterogeneous catalyst is an attractive topic for an industrial process. In this report, we investigated the isomerization of allyl phenyl ether by heating it in zeolite H-ZSM-5 and Na-ZSM-5. The conversion of allyl phenyl ether (neat) in H-ZSM-5 was 67% which produced 40% of 2-allylphenol, 17% of 2-methyldihydrobenzofuran, and other product (4:1.7:1), while in Na-ZSM-5 produced exclusively 2-allylphenol with 52% conversion. These results showed that zeolite properties can be tuned to give a selective transformation by substitution of metal ion into the zeolite interior.

  20. Formation and Structural Analysis of Novel Dibornyl Ethers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF P.T. KAYE

    . SHORT COMMUNICATION. Formation and Structural Analysis of Novel Dibornyl Ethers. Perry T. Kaye*, Andrew R. Duggan, Joseph M. Matjila, Warner E. Molema, and. Swarnam S. Ravindran. Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, ...

  1. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  2. Aquatic Life Criteria - Methyl Tertiary-Butyl Ether (MTBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information pertaining to the 1999 Acute and Chronic Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Methyl Tertiary-Butyl Ether (MTBE) for freshwater and salt water. Information includes the safe levels of MTBE that should protect the majority of species.

  3. Catalytic rearrangement of the chloroallyl ethers of p-cresol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, N.A.; Bunina-Krivorukova, L.I.; Levashova, V.I.

    1986-07-20

    The rearrangement of a series of p-cresol ethers (..beta..- and ..gamma..-chloro-, ..beta gamma..- and ..beta gamma..,..gamma..-trichloroallyl), catalyzed by boron trifluoride etherate, was studied. Increase in the number of chlorine atoms in the allyl unit of the ether hinders the rearrangement, and its mechanism changes in the investigated series of ethers from intramolecular (3,3)-sigmatropic (with inversion of the allyl unit) to intermolecular, which corresponds to electrophilic substitution in the aromatic ring (without inversion). The presence of the chlorine atom at the ..beta.. position of the allyl unit promotes rearrangement by a concerted intramolecular mechanism, while a chlorine atom at the ..gamma.. position promotes rearrangement by an intermolecular stage mechanism. Two chlorine atoms at the ..gamma.. position give rise mainly to the intermolecular rearrangement path.

  4. Spatial trends of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spatial trends of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were analyzed in young of the year bluefish collected along the U.S. Atlantic coastline from...

  5. Evaluation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are additive flame retardants that are present in many commercial ... recent monitoring study conducted by United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Environmental .... building materials, electronic products manufacturing factories) Oworonsoki and Agboyin stations were.

  6. POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HOUSE DUST AND CLOTHES DRYER LINT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are now considered ubiquitous and persistent pollutants. Few studies have examined the concentrations of these chemicals in the home and here we report measurements of PBDEs in house dust samples collected from the Washington...

  7. Thermally reversible cross-linked poly(ether-urethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gaina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linked poly(ether-urethanes were prepared by Diels-Alder (DA reaction of the furan-containing poly(ether-urethane to bismaleimides and showed thermal reversibility evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance in conjunction with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. The furan-containing poly(ether-urethanes were synthesized by the polyaddition reaction of 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI or 4,4'- dibenzyl diisocyanate (DBDI to poly(tetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG having Mn = 250, 650, 1000, 1500 and 2000 and 2-[N,N-bis(2-methyl-2-hydroxyethylamino]furfuryl as chain extender by the solution prepolymer method. The molar ratio of isocyanate: PTMEG:chain extender varied from 2:1:1 to 4:1:3, which produces a molar concentration of furyl group ranging between 3.65•10–4 and 1.25•10–3 mol/g.

  8. Nickel-catalyzed direct synthesis of dialkoxymethane ethers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    catalyzed direct synthesis of dialkoxymethane ethers. MURUGAN SUBARAMANIAN ABHIJIT BERA BHAGAVATULA L V PRASAD EKAMBARAM BALARAMAN. RAPID COMMUNICATION Volume 129 Issue 8 August 2017 pp 1153-1159 ...

  9. Synthesis and Antiplasmodial Activity of EG-Artemisinin Ethers and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    capillary temperature of 180 °C and discharge Current at 10 uA. 2.2. Synthetic Procedures. 2.2.1. Synthesis of EG Ethers of Artemisinin 3–8. The synthesis of EG ethers of artemisinin (Scheme 1) was achieved by using with slight modifications the general method reported by Li et al.18, and described as follows: to a solution.

  10. Impaired neurotransmission in ether lipid-deficient nerve terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Brodde, Alexander; Teigler, Andre; Brugger, Britta; Lehmann, Wolf D.; Wieland, Felix; Berger, Johannes; Just, Wilhelm W.

    2012-01-01

    Isolated defects of ether lipid (EL) biosynthesis in humans cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2 and type 3, serious peroxisomal disorders. Using a previously described mouse model [Rodemer, C., Thai, T.P., Brugger, B., Kaercher, T., Werner, H., Nave, K.A., Wieland, F., Gorgas, K., and Just, W.W. (2003) Inactivation of ether lipid biosynthesis causes male infertility, defects in eye development and optic nerve hypoplasia in mice. Hum. Mol. Genet., 12, 1881–1895], we investigated ...

  11. Accelerated Expansion as Predicted by an Ether Theory of Gravitation

    OpenAIRE

    Arminjon, Mayeul

    1999-01-01

    Cosmology is investigated within a new, scalar theory of gravitation, which is a preferred-frame bimetric theory with flat background metric. Before coming to cosmology, the motivation for an " ether theory " is exposed at length; the investigated concept of ether is presented: it is a compressible fluid, and gravity is seen as Archimedes' thrust due to the pressure gradient in that fluid. The construction of the theory is explained and the current status of the experimental confrontation is ...

  12. Marine Sponge Dysidea herbacea revisited: Another Brominated Diphenyl Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce F. Bowden

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A pentabrominated phenolic diphenyl ether (1 that has not previously been reported from marine sources has been isolated from Dysidea herbacea collected at Pelorus Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The structure was determined by comparison of NMR data with those of known structurally-related metabolites. NMR spectral assignments for (1 are discussed in context with those of three previously reported isomeric pentabrominated phenolic diphenyl ethers.

  13. Effects of the ether phospholipid AMG-PC on mast cells are similar to that of the ether lipid AMG but different from that of the analogue hexadecylphosphocholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosman, Nina

    1991-01-01

    Farmakologi, ether phospholipid, hexacylphosphocholine, miltefosine, protein kinase C, AMG-PC(alkyl-methyl-glycero-phosphocholine), Histamine release, mast cell......Farmakologi, ether phospholipid, hexacylphosphocholine, miltefosine, protein kinase C, AMG-PC(alkyl-methyl-glycero-phosphocholine), Histamine release, mast cell...

  14. Fabrication and properties of poly(polyethylene glycol n-alkyl ether vinyl ether)s as polymeric phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Dong-fang; Chen, Sai; Li, Shu-qin; Shi, Hai-feng; Li, Wei; Li, Xuan; Zhang, Xing-xiang, E-mail: zhangpolyu@aliyun.com

    2016-06-10

    A series of poly(polyethylene glycol n-alkyl ether vinyl ether)s (PC{sub m}E{sub n}VEs) with various lengths of alkyl chains and polyethylene glycol spacers as side chain (m = 16,18; n = 1,2) were synthesized via two steps. First, monomers-ethylene glycol hexadecyl ether vinyl ether (C{sub 16}E{sub 1}VE), ethylene glycol octadecyl ether vinyl ether (C{sub 18}E{sub 1}VE), diethylene glycol hexadecyl ether vinyl ether (C{sub 16}E{sub 2}VE) and diethylene glycol octadecyl ether vinyl ether (C{sub 18}E{sub 2}VE) were synthesized by a modified Williamson etherification. Then, four new types of phase change materials were successfully fabricated by a living cationic polymerization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) were employed to characterize their composition, thermal properties and crystallization behavior. The results show that, the side chains of PC{sub 16}E{sub 1}VE, PC{sub 18}E{sub 1}VE, PC{sub 16}E{sub 2}VE and PC{sub 18}E{sub 2}VE are in a hexagonal lattice, and the onset temperatures for melting of PC{sub 16}E{sub 1}VE, PC{sub 18}E{sub 1}VE, PC{sub 16}E{sub 2}VE and PC{sub 18}E{sub 2}VE are 39.8 °C, 37.4 °C, 51.0 °C and 48.9 °C, the onset temperatures for crystallization are 36.7 °C, 35.2 °C, 47.4 °C and 46.3 °C, respectively. The enthalpy changes of PC{sub 18}E{sub 1}VE, PC{sub 16}E{sub 2}VE and PC{sub 18}E{sub 2}VE are higher than 100 J/g; on the contrary, it is 96 J/g for PC{sub 16}E{sub 1}VE. The enthalpy decrease is no more than 11% after 10 heating and cooling cycles. The 5 wt% mass loss temperatures of PC{sub 18}E{sub 1}VE, PC{sub 16}E{sub 2}VE and PC{sub 18}E{sub 2}VE are higher than 300 °C; on the contrary, it’s 283 °C for PC{sub 16}E{sub 1}VE. Using a weak polarity, flexible alkyl ether chain (-OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O-) as a spacer to link the main chain and side chain

  15. Review on Modification of Sulfonated Poly (-ether-ether-ketone Membranes Used as Proton Exchange Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin GAO

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC is a type of modern power, but the traditional proton exchange membranes (PEM of PEMFC are limited by high methanol permeability and water uptake. Poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK is a widely used thermoplastic with good cost-effective property. Sulfonated poly (-ether-ether-ketone (SPEEK has high electric conductivity and low methanol permeability, as well as comprehensive property, which is expected to be used as PEMs. However, the proton exchange ability, methanol resistance, mechanical property and thermal stability of SPEEK are closely related to the degree of sulfonation (DS of SPEEK membranes. Additionally, the proton conductivity, methanol permeability, and stability of SPEEK membranes applied in various conditions need to be further improved. In this paper, the research into modification of SPEEK membranes made by SPEEK and other polymers, inorganic materials are introduced. The properties and modification situation of the SPEEK and the composite membranes, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of membranes prepared by different materials are summarized. From the results we know that, the methanol permeability of SPEEK/PES-C membranes is within the order of magnitude, 10-7cm2/s. The proton conductivity of the SPPESK/SPEEK blend membrane reaches 0.212 S cm-1 at 80 °C. The cross-linked SPEEK membranes have raised thermal and dimensional stability. The non-solvent caused aggregation of the SPEEK ionomers. The proton conductivity of SPEEK/50%BMIMPF6/4.6PA membrane maintains stable as 2.0 x 10-2S cm-1 after 600 h at 160 °C. Incorporation of aligned CNT into SPEEK increases the proton conductivity and reduces the methanol permeability of the composite membranes. The PANI improves the hydrothermal stability. More proton transfer sites lead to a more compact structure in the composite membranes. According to the results, the proton exchange capacity, water uptake, and conductivity of

  16. Nonlinear dielectric effect in supercritical diethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd-Rzoska, Aleksandra; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Martinez-Garcia, Julio Cesar

    2014-09-07

    Nonlinear dielectric effect (NDE) describes changes of dielectric permittivity induced by a strong electric field in a liquid dielectric. The most classical finding related to this magnitude is the negative sign of NDE in liquid diethyl ether (DEE), recalled by Peter Debye in his Nobel Prize lecture. This article shows that the positive sign of NDE in DEE is also possible, in the supercritical domain. Moreover, NDE on approaching the gas-liquid critical point exhibits a unique critical effect described by the critical exponent ψ ≈ 0.4 close to critical temperature (T(C)) and ψ ≈ 0.6 remote from T(C). This can be linked to the emergence of the mean-field behavior in the immediate vicinity of T(C), contrary to the typical pattern observed for critical phenomena. The multi-frequency mode of NDE measurements made it possible to estimate the evolution of lifetime of critical fluctuations. The new way of data analysis made it possible to describe the critical effect without a knowledge of the non-critical background contribution in prior.

  17. Emergent gravity and ether-drift experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, M.; Pappalardo, L.

    2010-11-01

    According to several authors, gravity might be a long-wavelength phenomenon emerging in some ‘hydrodynamic limit’ from the same physical, flat-space vacuum viewed as a form of superfluid medium. In this framework, light might propagate in an effective acoustic geometry and exhibit a tiny anisotropy that could be measurable in the present ether-drift experiments. By accepting this view of the vacuum, one should also consider the possibility of sizeable random fluctuations of the signal that reflect the stochastic nature of the underlying ‘quantum ether’ and could be erroneously interpreted as instrumental noise. To test the present interpretation, we have extracted the mean amplitude of the signal from various experiments with different systematics, operating both at room temperature and in the cryogenic regime. They all give the same consistent value {< A rangle ={mathcal O}(10^{-15})} which is precisely the magnitude expected in an emergent-gravity approach, for an apparatus placed on the Earth’s surface. Since physical implications could be substantial, it would be important to obtain more direct checks from the instantaneous raw data and, possibly, with new experimental set-ups operating in gravity-free environments.

  18. Dimethyl ether (DME) as an alternative fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semelsberger, Troy A.; Borup, Rodney L.; Greene, Howard L.

    With ever growing concerns on environmental pollution, energy security, and future oil supplies, the global community is seeking non-petroleum based alternative fuels, along with more advanced energy technologies (e.g., fuel cells) to increase the efficiency of energy use. The most promising alternative fuel will be the fuel that has the greatest impact on society. The major impact areas include well-to-wheel greenhouse gas emissions, non-petroleum feed stocks, well-to-wheel efficiencies, fuel versatility, infrastructure, availability, economics, and safety. Compared to some of the other leading alternative fuel candidates (i.e., methane, methanol, ethanol, and Fischer-Tropsch fuels), dimethyl ether appears to have the largest potential impact on society, and should be considered as the fuel of choice for eliminating the dependency on petroleum. DME can be used as a clean high-efficiency compression ignition fuel with reduced NO x, SO x, and particulate matter, it can be efficiently reformed to hydrogen at low temperatures, and does not have large issues with toxicity, production, infrastructure, and transportation as do various other fuels. The literature relevant to DME use is reviewed and summarized to demonstrate the viability of DME as an alternative fuel.

  19. Keeping ether "en-vogue": the role of Nathan Cooley Keep in the history of ether anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnick, Walter C; Kaban, Leonard B

    2011-07-01

    In this report, we explore the little known role of Dr Nathan Cooley Keep in the dissemination of ether anesthesia in Boston. Keep was a prominent Boston dentist who, for a short time, taught and employed both William Morton and Horace Wells. He used ether anesthesia for a variety of dental and other surgical procedures requiring pain control. Keep administered ether to anesthetize Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's wife during the delivery of their daughter. This was the first use of ether for obstetric anesthesia. Dr Keep was also the first Dean of the Harvard Dental School and convinced the Massachusetts General Hospital to appoint a dentist to the staff of the hospital for the first time. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrical conductivity of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) based composite membranes containing sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celso, Fabricio; Mikhailenko, Serguei D.; Rodrigues, Marco A. S.; Mauler, Raquel S.; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2016-02-01

    Composite proton exchange membranes (PEMs) intended for fuel cell applications were prepared by embedding of various amounts of dispersed tri-sulfonic acid ethyl POSS (S-Et-POSS) and tri-sulfonic acid butyl POSS (S-Bu-POSS) in thin films of sulfonated poly ether-ether ketone. The electrical properties of the PEMs were studied by Impedance spectroscopy and it was found that their conductivity σ changes with the filler content following a curve with a maximum. The water uptake of these PEMs showed the same dependence. The investigation of initial isolated S-POSS substances revealed the properties of typical electrolytes, which however in both cases possessed low conductivities of 1. 17 × 10-5 S cm-1 (S-Et-POSS) and 3.52 × 10-5 S cm-1 (S-Bu-POSS). At the same time, the insoluble in water S-POSS was found forming highly conductive interface layer when wetted with liquid water and hence producing a strong positive impact on the conductivity of the composite PEM. Electrical properties of the composites were analysed within the frameworks of effective medium theory and bounding models, allowing to evaluate analytically the range of possible conductivity values. It was found that these approaches produced quite good approximation of the experimental data and constituted a fair basis for interpretation of the observed relationship.

  1. A novel sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and cross-linked membranes for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongtao; Zhang, Gang; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Chengji; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Ke; Han, Miaomiao; Lin, Haidan; Zhu, Jing; Na, Hui

    A novel poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) containing pendant carboxyl groups has been synthesized by a nucleophilic polycondensation reaction. Sulfonated polymers (SPEEKs) with different ion exchange capacity are then obtained by post-sulfonation process. The structures of PEEK and SPEEKs are characterized by both FT-IR and 1H NMR. The properties of SPEEKs as candidates for proton exchange membranes are studied. The cross-linking reaction is performed at 140 °C using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as the cross-linker. In comparison with the non-cross-linked membranes, some properties of the cross-linked membranes are significantly improved, such as water uptake, methanol resistance, mechanical and oxidative stabilities, while the proton conductivity decreases. The effect of PVA content on proton conductivity, water uptake, swelling ratio, and methanol permeability is also investigated. Among all the membranes, SPEEK-C-8 shows the highest selectivity of 50.5 × 10 4 S s cm -3, which indicates that it is a suitable candidate for applications in direct methanol fuel cells.

  2. Copoly(arlene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Dae Sik [CANADA NRC; Robertson, Gilles [CANADA NRC; Guiver, Michael [CANADA NRC

    2008-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The P AE and PAEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2-phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sP AE and sP AEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (DS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v}(wet) (volume-based, wet state)) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm{sup 3}, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5-51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the area of outstanding properties in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based). Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  3. The Effects of Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone Ion Exchange Preparation Conditions on Membrane Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. L. Yee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A low cost cation exchange membrane to be used in a specific bioelectrochemical system has been developed using poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK. This material is presented as an alternative to current commercial ion exchange membranes that have been primarily designed for fuel cell applications. To increase the hydrophilicity and ion transport of the PEEK material, charged groups are introduced through sulfonation. The effect of sulfonation and casting conditions on membrane performance has been systematically determined by producing a series of membranes synthesized over an array of reaction and casting conditions. Optimal reaction and casting conditions for producing SPEEK ion exchange membranes with appropriate performance characteristics have been established by this uniquely systematic experimental series. Membrane materials were characterized by ion exchange capacity, water uptake, swelling, potential difference and NMR analysis. Testing this extensive membranes series established that the most appropriate sulfonation conditions were 60 °C for 6 h. For mechanical stability and ease of handling, SPEEK membranes cast from solvent casting concentrations of 15%–25% with a resulting thickness of 30–50 µm were also found to be most suitable from the series of tested casting conditions. Drying conditions did not have any apparent impact on the measured parameters in this study. The conductivity of SPEEK membranes was found to be in the range of 10−3 S cm−1, which is suitable for use as a low cost membrane in the intended bioelectrochemical systems.

  4. Interface and properties of inorganic fullerene tungsten sulphide nanoparticle reinforced poly (ether ether ketone) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nannan; Yang, Zhuxian; Wang, Yuan; Thummavichai, Kunyapat; Xia, Yongde; Ghita, Oana; Zhu, Yanqiu

    We report a simple and effective method to fabricate PEEK (poly ether ether ketone)/IF-WS2 (Inorganic Fullerene Tungsten Sulphide) nanocomposites with IF-WS2 content up to 8 wt%. We have used electron microscopies to characterise the morphology and structural features of the nancomposites, and FTIR and XPS to show that some chemical interface bondings were formed between the PEEK and IF-WS2. We demonstrate that the resulting PEEK/IF-WS2 nanocomposites showed an extraordinary 190% increase in thermal conductivity, 50 °C higher in degradation temperature, and mild improvements in strength and hardness. The increased degradation activation energy from 64 to 76 kJ/mol for neat PEEK and PEEK/IF-WS2 nanocomposites, respectively, is attributed to the synergistic interface between the PEEK matrix and IF-WS2 nanoparticles. The enhancements in both the mechanical and thermal properties will significantly expand the capacities of PEEK-based nanocomposites towards applications where thermal conductivity and stability are important.

  5. Evaluation of workers exposed to ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Yoon, Chungsik; Byun, Hyaejeong; Kim, Yangho; Park, Donguk; Ha, Kwonchul; Lee, Sang man; Park, Sungki; Chung, Eunkyo

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (EGMEA) are widely used in industries as solvents for coatings, paint and ink, but exposure data are limited because they are minor components out of mixed solvents, as well as because of inconsistency in desorption solvent use. The objective of this study was to investigate the worker exposure profile of EGME and EGMEA. Our study investigated 27 workplaces from June to September 2008 and detected EGME and EGMEA in 20 and 13, respectively. Both personal and area sampling were conducted using a charcoal tube to collect EGME and EGMEA. Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector was used to analyze these compounds after desorption using a mixture of methylene chloride and methanol. The arithmetic mean concentrations of EGME and EGMEA during periods of full work shifts were 2.59 ppm and 0.33 ppm, respectively. The exposure levels were lower than the Korean Ministry of Labor (MOL) OEL (5 ppm) but higher than the ACGIH TLV (0.1 ppm). In general, the working environments were poor and required much improvement, including the use of personal protective equipment. Only 50% of the workplaces had local exhaust ventilation systems in operation. The average capture velocity of the operating local exhaust ventilation systems was 0.27 m/s, which did not meet the legal requirement of 0.5 m/s. Educating workers to clearly understand the handling and use of hazardous chemicals and improving working conditions are strongly suggested.

  6. Rheological, mechanical and tribological properties of carbon-nanofibre reinforced poly (ether ether ketone composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Altstaedt

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ether ether ketone nanocomposites containing vapour-grown carbon nanofibres (CNF were produced using standard polymer processing techniques. At high shear rates no significant increase in resin viscosity was observed. Nevertheless, the addition of the CNFs results in a higher melt strength at 360°C. Electron microscopy confirmed the homogeneous dispersion and alignment of nanofibres in the polymer matrix. Evaluation of the mechanical composite properties revealed a linear increase in tensile stiffness and strength with nanofibre loading fractions up to 15 wt% whilst matrix ductility was maintained up to 10 wt%. An interpretation of the composite performance by short-fibre theory resulted in rather low intrinsic stiffness properties of the vapour-grown CNF. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate crystallization kinetics and degree of crystallinity. The CNFs were found not to act as nucleating sites. Furthermore, unidirectional sliding tests against two different counterpart materials (100Cr6 martensitic bearing steel, X5CrNi18-10 austenitic stainless steel were performed. The carbon nanofibres were found to reduce the wear rate of PEEK significantly.

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  8. Microwave-assisted extraction for the simultaneous determination of Novolac glycidyl ethers, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, and its derivatives in canned food using HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Xue, Ming; Lu, Yanbin; Dai, Zhiyuan; Wang, Honghai

    2010-02-01

    A microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) protocol and an efficient HPLC analysis method were first developed for the fast extraction and simultaneous determination of bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (Novolac glycidyl ether 2-Ring), Novolac glycidyl ether 3-Ring, Novolac glycidyl ether 4-Ring, Novolac glycidyl ether 5-Ring, Novolac glycidyl ether 6-Ring, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, bisphenol A (2,3-dihydroxypropyl) glycidyl ether, bisphenol A (3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) glycidyl ether, bisphenol A bis(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) ether, bisphenol A (3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) (2,3-dihydroxypropyl) ether in canned fish and meat. After being optimized in terms of solvents, microwave power and irradiation time, MAE was selected to carry out the extraction of ten target compounds. Analytes were purified by poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) SPE columns and determined by HPLC-fluorescence detection. LOD varied from 0.79 to 3.77 ng/g for different target compounds based on S/N=3; LOQ were from 2.75 to 10.92 ng/g; the RSD for repeatability were <8.64%. The analytical recoveries ranged from 70.46 to 103.44%. This proposed method was successfully applied to 16 canned fish and meat, and the results acquired were in good accordance with the studies reported. Compared with the conventional liquid-liquid extraction and ultrasonic extraction, the optimized MAE approach gained the higher extraction efficiency (20-50% improved).

  9. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, substituted proplyamine and...-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, substituted proplyamine and polyethylenepolyamines (generic). (a) Chemical... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

  10. Lysophospholipid Receptors and Effects in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goetzl, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S 1 P) are widely-distributed growth factors generated enzymatically from membrane precursors in activated cells, which attain micromolar concentrations in plasma and tissue fluids...

  11. Copoly(arylene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dae Sik, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu Seung, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilles, Robertson [CANADA-NRC; Guiver, Michael D [CANADA-NRC

    2009-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The PAE and P AEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sPAE and sPAEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (OS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v})(wet) (volume-based, wet state) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm3, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5 -51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the upper left-hand corner in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based), i.e., high proton conductivity and low water uptake. Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  12. Polydopamine-functionalized poly(ether ether ketone) tube for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wenpeng; Liu, Yikun; Yu, Xinhong; Chen, Zilin

    2017-09-22

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is a hyphenated technique that combines the advantages like low sample consumption, high separation efficiency, short analytical time in CE and high sensitivity, powerful molecular structure elucidation in MS. Polyimide-coated fused silica capillary has become the most dominant capillary for CE, but it suffers from swelling and aminolysis of polyimide coating when treated with organic solvents and alkaline buffer in the CE-MS interface in which the polyimide coating at the end of the capillary is exposed to the solution, and this phenomenon can result in current instability, irregular electrospray and clogging at outlet after prolonged use. In this work, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) capillary was explored as separation capillary for CE-MS. The problems like swelling and aminolysis of polyimide coating were solved due to the high thermal and chemical stability of PEEK material. After modification with polydopamine, PEEK capillary (PD-PEEK) can generate adjustable electroosmotic flow and provide good separation selectivity. The zwitterion polymer of polydopamine can provide cathodic electroosmotic flow (EOF) at high pH value (pH ≥ 5) and anodic EOF at low pH value (pH ≤ 4), and the EOF mobility can also be adjusted by controlling the modification time of polydopamine. Good separation performance was obtained in the analysis for several classes of compounds including amino acids, phenols and plant hormones at rational EOF direction. Repeatability of the PD-PEEK capillary was studied, with relative standard deviations for intra-day, inter-day runs and between tubes less than 4.94%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fuel cell performance of pendent methylphenyl sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyu; Stanis, Ronald J.; Song, Yang; Hu, Wei; Cornelius, Chris J.; Shi, Qiang; Liu, Baijun; Guiver, Michael D.

    2017-11-01

    Meta- and para-linked homopolymers bearing 3-methylphenyl (Me) pendent groups were postsulfonated to create sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) (SPEEKK) backbone isomers, which are referred to as Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK. Their thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties, dimensional stability, methanol permeability, and proton conductivity are characterized. Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK proton conductivities at 100 °C are 116 and 173 mS cm-1, respectively. Their methanol permeabilities are 3.3-3.9 × 10-7 cm2 s-1, and dimensional swelling at 100 °C is 16.4-17.5%. Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), and electrochemical properties were evaluated within a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). When O2 is used as the oxidant at 80 °C and 100% RH, the maximum power density of Me-m-SPEEKK reaches 657 mW cm-2, which is higher than those of Nafion 115 (552 mW cm-2). DMFC performance is 85 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with 2.0 M methanol using Me-p-SPEEKK due to its low MeOH crossover. In general, these electrochemical results are comparable to Nafion. These ionomer properties, combined with a potentially less expensive and scalable polymer manufacturing process, may broaden their potential for many practical applications.

  14. Thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether: a model for ether linkages in lignin and low rank coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C.; Malcolm, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Division of Chemistry and Analytical Science

    1995-10-06

    The thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) was studied at 330-425{degree}C to resolve the discrepancies in the reported mechanisms of this important model of the beta-ether linkage found in lignin and low rank coal. Cracking of PPE proceeded by two competitive pathways that produced styrene plus phenol and two previously undetected products, benzaldehyde plus toluene. The ratio of these pathways, defined as the alpha/beta selectivity, was 3.1 +/- 0.3 at 375{degree}C and independent of the PPE concentration. Thermolysis of PPE in tetralin, a model hydrogen donor solvent, increased the alpha/beta selectivity to 7 and accelerated the formation of secondary products. All the data were consistent with a free-radical chain mechanism for the decomposition of PPE. Styrene and phenol are produced by hydrogen abstraction at the alpha-carbon, beta-scission to form styrene and the phenoxy radical, followed by hydrogen abstraction. Benzaldehyde and toluene are formed by hydrogen abstraction at the beta-carbon, 1,2-phenyl migration from oxygen to carbon, beta-scission to form benzaldehyde, and the benzyl radical followed by hydrogen abstraction. Thermochemical kinetic estimates indicate that product formation is controlled by the relative rate of hydrogen abstraction at the alpha- and beta-carbons by the phenoxy radical (dominant) and benzyl radical (minor) since beta-scission and 1,2-phenyl migration are fast relative to hydrogen abstraction. Thermolysis of PhCD{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh and PhCH{sub 2}CD{sub 2}OPh was consistent with the previous results, indicating that there was no significant contribution of a concerted retro-ene pathway to the thermolysis of PPE.

  15. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L.) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangale, Jitendra O; Acharya, Sanjeev R

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson's activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE) leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH) in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson's disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol) were significantly (p glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg) significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress.

  16. Enzymatic network for production of ether amines from alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Cyntia M; Crismaru, Ciprian G; Bartsch, Sebastian; Navickas, Vaidotas; Ditrich, Klaus; Breuer, Michael; Abu, Rohana; Woodley, John M; Baldenius, Kai; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2016-09-01

    We constructed an enzymatic network composed of three different enzymes for the synthesis of valuable ether amines. The enzymatic reactions are interconnected to catalyze the oxidation and subsequent transamination of the substrate and to provide cofactor recycling. This allows production of the desired ether amines from the corresponding ether alcohols with inorganic ammonium as the only additional substrate. To examine conversion, individual and overall reaction equilibria were established. Using these data, it was found that the experimentally observed conversions of up to 60% observed for reactions containing 10 mM alcohol and up to 280 mM ammonia corresponded well to predicted conversions. The results indicate that efficient amination can be driven by high concentrations of ammonia and may require improving enzyme robustness for scale-up. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1853-1861. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of thermolysis of dibenzyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobov, V.Yu.; Grigorieva, E.N.; Senko, O.V.; Kalechitz, I.V.

    1988-10-01

    The kinetics of thermolysis of dibenzyl ether in tetralin have been studied at 350-410 degrees C in a hydrogen atmosphere at 8.5 MPa pressure. A kinetic model has been proposed that satisfactorily describes the process and takes into account both the known transformation of ethers into toluene and benzaldehyde and the direct destruction of ether to benzene and toluene with elimination of CO and secondary conversions of benzaldehyde. It has been shown that at lower temperatures the first reaction prevails whereas at higher temperatures both reactions become competitive. The kinetic parameters support an intramolecular rearrangement as a pathway of the first reaction and a radical mechanism as a pathway of the second. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Coal liquefaction model studies: free radical chain decomposition of diphenylpropane, dibenzyl ether, and phenyl ether via. beta. -scission reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillert, K.E. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington); Gojewski, J.J.

    1982-12-03

    The thermal decompositions to 1,3-diphenylpropane (1), dibenzyl ether (2), and phenethyl phenyl ether (3) have been found to proceed by free radical chain processes. 1 gave toluene and styrene with a reaction order of 1.55, E/sub A/ = 51.4 kcal/mol, and log A = 12.5. The reaction could be initiated by benzyl phenyl ether but not by 1,2-diphenylethane. 2 gave toluene and benzaldehyde with a reaction order of 1.43,E/sub A/ = 48 kcal/mol, and log A = 12.6. The reaction could be initiated with benzyl phenyl ether. 3 gave phenol and styrene with a reaction order of 1.21, E/sub A/ = 50.3 kcal/mol, and log A =12.3. The reaction could be initiated by benzyl phenyl ether. All of the data are consistent with free radical processes with the reaction order determined by the termination reaction. No evidence for concerted reactions has been found.

  19. A local-ether model of propagation of electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, C.C. [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, National Tsinghua University, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    2001-07-01

    It is pointed out that the classical propagation model can be in accord with the Sagnac effect due to earth's rotational and orbital motions in the high-precision GPS (global positioning system) and interplanetary radar, if the reference frame of the classical propagation medium is endowed with a switchability according to the location of the wave. Accordingly, it is postulated that, as in the obsolete theory, electromagnetic waves propagate via a medium like the ether. However, the ether is not universal. It is proposed that in the region under sufficient influence of the gravity due to the earth, the sun, or another celestial body, there forms a local ether, which in turn is stationary with respect to the gravitational potential of the respective body. For earthbound and interplanetary propagation, the medium is stationary in a geocentric and a heliocentric inertial frame, respectively. An electromagnetic wave propagates at a constant speed with respect to the associated local ether, independent of the motions of source and receiver. Based on this local-ether model of wave propagation, a wide variety of earthbound, interplanetary, and interstellar propagation phenomena are accounted for. Strong evidence of this new classical model is its consistent account of the Sagnac effect due to earth's motions among GPS, the intercontinental microwave link, and the interplanetary radar. Moreover, as examined within the present precision, this model is still in accord with the Michelson-Morley experiment. To test the local-ether propagation model, a one-way-link rotor experiment is proposed. (orig.)

  20. [Effect of ether and fluorothane on higher nervous activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrak, G E; Zakopka, V M

    1978-01-01

    Tests conducted with dogs by using Pavlov's method of conditioned reflexes (salivation procedure) showed fluothane to act on the central nervous system 3 times as strong as does ether. This is confirmed by a longer time necessary for the higher nervous system to normalize. Thus, awakening of the animals after the ether anesthesia, the re-establishment of the conditioned reflex activity supervened by the 7th day on the average, whereas, after the fluothane anesthesia, this occurred only on the 24th day.

  1. A crown ether appended super gelator with multiple stimulus responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengyi; Zheng, Bo; Xu, Donghua; Yan, Xuzhou; Zhang, Mingming; Huang, Feihe

    2012-06-26

    A crown ether appended super gelator is designed and synthesized. It can gel a variety of organic solvents and shows excellent gelation properties with both low critical gelation concentration and short gelation time. Due to the introduction of the crown ether moiety and a secondary ammonium unit, the supramolecular gels show reversible gel-sol transitions. The supramolecular gels can also be molded into shape-persistent and free-standing objects. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-40 - Additional requirements for carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and ethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... bisulfide) and ethyl ether. 151.50-40 Section 151.50-40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... ether. (a) The provisions of this section are applicable if specifically referenced in the Special... disulfide (carbon bisulfide) and § 151.50-42 for ethyl ether shall also be observed. ...

  7. 76 FR 69659 - Methacrylic Acid-Methyl Methacrylate-Polyethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether Methacrylate Graft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Methacrylic Acid-Methyl Methacrylate-Polyethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether... residues of methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate- polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether methacrylate graft... permissible level for residues of methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate-polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3845 - Alkyl substituted aromatic glycidyl ether (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ether (generic). 721.3845 Section 721.3845 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3845 Alkyl substituted aromatic glycidyl ether (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkyl substituted aromatic glycidyl ether (PMN P-97-661) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10017 - Amine terminated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... diglycidyl ether polymer (generic). 721.10017 Section 721.10017 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... ether polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine terminated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether polymer (PMNs P...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9952 - Alkoxylated aliphatic diisocyanate allyl ether (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allyl ether (generic). 721.9952 Section 721.9952 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9952 Alkoxylated aliphatic diisocyanate allyl ether... identified generically as alkoxylated aliphatic diisocyanate allyl ether (PMN P-00-0353) is subject to...

  11. 75 FR 4288 - Oxirane, 2-Methyl-, Polymer with Oxirane, Dimethyl Ether; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Oxirane, 2-Methyl-, Polymer with Oxirane, Dimethyl Ether; Tolerance Exemption... oxirane, dimethyl ether (CAS Reg. No. 61419-46-3); minimum number average molecular weight (in AMW) 2,800... oxirane, dimethyl ether (CAS Reg. No. 61419-46-3) on food or feed commodities. DATES: This regulation is...

  12. Ionic crosslinking of imidazolium functionalized poly(aryl ether ketone) by sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for anion exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yixin; Ye, Niya; Zhang, Dengji; Yang, Jingshuai; He, Ronghuan

    2017-07-01

    Two N3-substituted imidazoles 1,2-dimethylimidazole and 1-butyl-2-methylimidazole were chosen to functionalize poly(aryl ether ketone), respectively. The generated imidazolium cations could electrostatically react with sulfonate ions of the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) forming the ionic crosslinking structure of the membranes. The changes in crosslinking degree and the alkyl chain-length on N3 site of the imidazoliums could highly affect the properties of the anion exchange membranes (AEMs). The AEMs functionalized by 1-butyl-2-methylimidazole exhibited superior properties compared to those functionalized by 1,2-dimethylimidazole according to the tolerance tests of the AEMs towards hot alkaline solutions. After exposed to 1M KOH at 80°C for 200h, the 1-butyl-2-methylimidazole modified AEMs maintained the ion exchange capacity of above 85%, the conductivity of about 70%, and the tensile stress at break of around 80%, respectively. The hydrophile-lipophile balance of the polymer membranes was calculated and proposed to better understand the correlation between structures and properties of the AEMs. The degradation of the imidazolium functional groups of the AEMs under the attack of hydroxide ions was evidenced by FT-IR analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Certain pollutants, particularly synthetic organic compounds have given rise to important environmental concerns. New organic pollutants especially polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDEs) employed in electronic equipment and in some household items as flame retardants are now finding their way into the aquatic ...

  14. Formation and Structural Analysis of Novel Dibornyl Ethers | Kaye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to establish the regio- and stereochemistry of novel dibornyl ethers, obtained by acid-catalysed condensation of camphor-derived a-hydroxybornanones. South African Journal of Chemistry Vol.55 2002: 111-118 ...

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Divalent Zinc and Cadmium Crown Ether Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, T. E.; Carl, D. R.; Oomens, J.; Steill, J. D.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of transition-metal dication (Zn2+ and Cd2+) complexes with varying sized crown ethers, 12-crown-4 (12c4), 15-crown-5 (15c5), and 18-crown-6 (18c6), are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations. The

  16. Ether lipids of planktonic archae in the marine water column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hoefs, M.J.L.; Schouten, S.; King, L.L.; Wakeham, S.G.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    Acyclic and cyclic biphytanes derived from the membrane ether lipids of archaea were found in water column particulate and sedimentary organic matter from several oxic and anoxic marine environments. Compound-specific isotope analyses of the carbon skeletons suggest that planktonic archaea utilize

  17. Photodegradation of poly(ether sulphone). Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, K.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2004-01-01

    The photodegradation of poly(ether sulphone) (PES) was investigated systematically by time-of-flight SIMS (ToF-SIMS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of varying the irradiation dose, wavelength and the atmosphere was studied along with mechanistic photooxidation studies using...

  18. Synthesis and reduction of 2-nitroalkyl polysaccharide ethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, A.; Spoelma, F.F.; Doren, H.A. van; Gotlieb, K.F.; Bleeker, I.P.; Kellogg, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Several 2-nitroalkyl polysaccharide ethers (from pullulan (1), guar (2), agarose (3), inulin (4), cellulose (5), Na-α-polyglucuronate (6) and hydroxyethyl cellulose (7)) were synthesized by reaction with 2-nitro-1-alkenes (2-nitro-1-propene and 2-nitro-1-butene) formed in situ from 2-nitroalkyl

  19. Synthesis and reduction of 2-nitroalkyl polysaccharide ethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, A; Spoelma, FF; van Doren, HA; Gotlieb, KF; Bleeker, IP; Kellogg, RM

    Several 2-nitroalkyl polysaccharide ethers (from pullulan (1), guar (2), agarose (3), inulin (4), cellulose (5), Na-alpha-polyglucuronate (6) and hydroxyethyl cellulose (7)) were synthesized by reaction with 2-nitro-1-alkenes (2-nitro-1-propene and 2-nitro-1-butene) formed in situ from 2-nitroalkyl

  20. Comparative evaluation of direct stool smear and Formol-ether ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryptosporidium is a common cause of diarrhoea in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Unfortunately this pathogen is not often checked for in Microbiology laboratories because the formol-ether stool concentration method for identification of Cryptosporidium is ...

  1. Binary mixtures of carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether as alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data were predicted for the binary mixture of carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethyl ether (DME) at ten temperatures ranging from 273.15 to 386.56 K and pressure upto 7.9 MPa to observe this mixture's potential of COP enhancement and capacity modulation as a working fluid in a refrigeration ...

  2. Acute toxicities of diethyl ether and ethanol extracted Nerium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A four-day static renewal acute toxicity test was performed to determine the LC50 value of ethanol and diethyl ether extracted Nerium indicum leaf for the freshwater fish, Heteropneustes fossilis. The LC50 values, their upper and lower confidence limits and slope functions were calculated. The LC50 values for ethanol ...

  3. Evaluation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    environmental concerns. New organic pollutants especially polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDEs) employed in electronic equipment and in some household items as flame retardants are now finding their way into the aquatic environment as components of waste discharge into the water body. These highly hazardous ...

  4. Lithium air batteries having ether-based electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Curtiss, Larry A.; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-10-25

    A lithium-air battery includes a cathode including a porous active carbon material, a separator, an anode including lithium, and an electrolyte including a lithium salt and polyalkylene glycol ether, where the porous active carbon material is free of a metal-based catalyst.

  5. Li-air batteries having ether-based electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Curtiss, Larry A; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2015-03-03

    A lithium-air battery includes a cathode including a porous active carbon material, a separator, an anode including lithium, and an electrolyte including a lithium salt and polyalkylene glycol ether, where the porous active carbon material is free of a metal-based catalyst.

  6. Synthesis of Hydroxytyrosyl Alkyl Ethers from Olive Oil Waste Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernández-Bolaños

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of a new type of derivatives of the naturally occurring antioxidant hydroxytyrosol is reported. Hydroxytyrosyl alkyl ethers were obtained in high yield by a three-step procedure starting from hydroxytyrosol isolated from olive oil waste waters. Preliminary results obtained by the Rancimat method have shown that these derivatives retain the high protective capacity of free hydroxytyrosol.

  7. Dimethyl ether in diesel engines - progress and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorenson, Spencer C

    2001-01-01

    A review of recent developments related to the use of dimethyl ether (DME) in engines is presented Research work discussed is in the areas of engine performance and emissions, fuel injection systems, spray and ignition delay, and detailed chemical kinetic modeling. DME's properties and safety...

  8. Bio-inspired ion selective crown-ether polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tas, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    Development of unctional membranes that are capable of selectively recognizing and transporting ions have key importance for the recovery and separation of specific icons (e.d. K+, Li+, Na+) from multicomponent mixtures. In this thesis, new membrane materials based on crown ether-metal ion

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Water-Soluble Xylan Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Hettrich

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xylan is a predominant hemicellulose component that is found in plants and in some algae. This polysaccharide is made from units of xylose (a pentose sugar. One promising source of xylan is oat spelt. This feedstock was used for the synthesis of two xylan ethers. To achieve water soluble products, we prepared dihydroxypropyl xylan as a non-ionic ether on the one hand, and carboxymethyl xylan as an ionic derivative on the other hand. Different preparation methods like heterogeneous, pseudo-homogeneous, and homogeneous syntheses were compared. In the case of dihydroxypropyl xylan, the synthesis method did not significantly affect the degree of substitution (DS. In contrast, in the case of carboxymethyl xylan, clear differences of the DS values were found in dependence on the synthesis method. Xylan ethers with DS values of >1 could be obtained, which mostly show good water solubility. The synthesized ionic, as well as non-ionic, xylan ethers were soluble in water, even though the aqueous solutions showed slight turbidity. Nevertheless, stable, transparent, and stainable films could be prepared from aqueous solutions from carboxymethyl xylans.

  10. Why do crown ethers activate enzymes in organic solvents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Unen, D.J.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of enzymes in nonaqueous solvents is that their activity is often dramatically low compared to that in water. This limitation can be largely overcome by crown ether treatment of enzymes. In this paper, we describe a number of carefully designed new experiments that have

  11. Binding of ether and carbonyl oxygens to lithium ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blint, R.J. [Physical Chemistry Dept., Warren, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The electrolyte for a lithium battery is a lithium salt (e.g. lithium Perchlorate) dissolved in an organic solvent or a mixture of organic solvents. The conductivity in these electrolytes is ionic and needs to be as high as possible to efficiently remove energy from the battery. The diffusion coefficient of the solvated ion in liquid electrolytes is inversely dependent on the radius of the salvation sphere. Consequently conductivity will increase with a decrease in the size of the salvation shell. The size of the salvation shell is determined by the size and coordination number of the solvent molecules. The types of organic solvents in electrolytes used in lithium battery applications are usually differentiated based on their perceived solvation properties. These solvents are often small, oxygen containing organic molecules which move with the Li{sup +} ions. This paper calculates the binding energies of some of these solvents to Li{sup +} using molecular quantum mechanics (MQM) techniques. The binding energies of the various solvents to Li{sup +} may determine which solvents will be preferentially bound to the ion. In liquid organic electrolytes, then, it will be the identity of the solvent and the coordination number which most affect the conductivity; the binding energies determine both of these properties. Carbonyl oxygens which occur in formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate have different Li{sup +} bonding properties than do the ether oxygens which occur in water, dimethyl ether and diethyl ether. Polymer solvents for the lithium salts such as the polyethers have chains which are too long to move with the binding energies then serve as the basis for a different Li{sup +} transport. Dimethyl ether and diethyl ether serve both as solvents and models for the polyethers.

  12. Enhanced response of microbial fuel cell using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone membrane as a biochemical oxygen demand sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyaru, Sivasankaran; Dharmalingam, Sangeetha, E-mail: sangeetha@annauniv.edu

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane in SCMFC used to determine the BOD. • The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm. • This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion{sup ®}. • SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion{sup ®}. • Nafion{sup ®} shows high anodic internal resistance (67 Ω) than the SPEEK (39 Ω). - Abstract: The present study is focused on the development of single chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane to determine the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) matter present in artificial wastewater (AW). The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm when using artificial wastewater. This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion{sup ®}. The most serious problem in using MFC as a BOD sensor is the oxygen diffusion into the anode compartment, which consumes electrons in the anode compartment, thereby reducing the coulomb yield and reducing the electrical signal from the MFC. SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion{sup ®}, resulting in low internal resistance and substrate loss, thus improving the sensing range of BOD. The system was further improved by making a double membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an increased electrode surface area which provide high surface area for electrically active bacteria.

  13. Modified nanocrystal cellulose/fluorene-containing sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) composites for proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingcong; Shang, Yabei; Ni, Chuangjiang; Zhang, Hanyu; Li, Xiaobai; Liu, Baijun; Men, Yongfeng; Zhang, Mingyao; Hu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Highly sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SFPEEKKs) with sulfonation degrees of 2.34 (SFPEEKK5) and 2.48 (SFPEEKK10) were synthesized through the direct sulfonation of a fluorene-containing poly(ether ether ketone ketone) under a relatively mild reaction condition. Using the solution blending method, sulfonated nanocrystal cellulose (sNCC)-enhanced SFPEEKK composites (SFPEEKK/sNCC) were successfully prepared for investigation as proton exchange membranes. Transmission electron microscopy showed that sNCC was uniformly distributed in the composite membranes. The properties of the composite membranes, including thermal stability, mechanical properties, water uptake, swelling ratio, oxidative stability and proton conductivity were thoroughly evaluated. Results indicated that the insertion of sNCC could contribute to water management and improve the mechanical performance of the membranes. Notably, the proton conductivity of SFPEEKK5/sNCC-5 was as high as 0.242 S cm-1 at 80 °C. All data proved the potential of SFPEEKK/sNCC composites for proton exchange membranes in medium-temperature fuel cells.

  14. A mild and efficient procedure for the synthesis of ethers from various alkyl halides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosstafa Kazemi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A simple, mild and practical procedure has been developed for the synthesis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical ethers by using DMSO, TBAI in the presence of K2CO3. We extended the utility of Potassium carbonate as an efficient base for the preparation of ethers. A wide range of alkyl aryl and dialkyl ethers are synthezied from treatment of aliphatic alcohols and phenols with various alkyl halides in the prescence of efficient base Potassium carbonate. Secondary alkyl halides were easily converted to corresponding ethers in releatively good yields . This is a mild, simple and practical procedure for the preparation of ethers in high yields and suitable times under mild condition.

  15. Biodegradability of fuel-ethers in environment; Biodegradabilite des ethers-carburants dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayolle-Guichard, F.

    2005-04-01

    Fuel ethers (methyl tert-butyl ether or MTBE, ethyl tert-butyl ether or ETBE and tert-amyl methyl ether or TAME have been used as gasoline additives since about twenty years in order to meet the requirements for the octane index and to limit the polluting emission in exhaust pipe gas (unburnt hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide). The high water solubility and the poor biodegradability of these compounds make them pollutants frequently encountered in aquifers. The present manuscript summarizes the knowledge concerning the biodegradability of fuel ethers obtained both at IFP and during collaborations with the Pasteur Institute (Paris), the Biotechnology Research Institute (Montreal, Canada) and the Center for Environmental Biotechnology (University of Tennessee, USA). Rhodococcus ruber IFP 2001 and Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2012, two microorganisms isolated at IFP for their ability to grow, respectively, on ETBE and MTBE, were studied in order to determine the intermediates produced during MTBE and ETBE biodegradation and the enzymes required for each biodegradation step, thus allowing us to propose MTBE and ETBE catabolic pathways. A proteomic approach, from the protein induced during the degradation of ETBE or MTBE to the genes encoding these different enzymes, was carried out. The isolation of such genes is required:1) to use them for help in determining the bio-remediation capacities in polluted aquifers (DNA micro-arrays), 2) to monitor the microorganisms isolated for their degradative capacities during bio-remediation processes (fluorescent in situ hybridization or FISH) and 3) to create new tools for the detection and the quantification of ETBE or MTBE in contaminated aquifers (bio-sensor). The manuscript also describes the different ways for the adaptation of microorganisms to the presence of a xenobiotic compound. (author)

  16. Coal liquefaction model studies: free radical chain decomposition of diphenylpropane, dibenzyl ether, and phenyl ether via. beta. -scission reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, K.E.; Gajewski, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of 1,3-diphenylpropane (1), dibenzyl ether (2), and phenethyl phenyl ether (3) have been found to proceed by free radical chain processes. 1 gave toluene and styrene with a reaction order of 1.55, E/sub A/ = 51.4 kcal/mol, and log A = 12.5. The reaction could be initiated by benzyl phenyl ether but not by 1,2-diphenylethane. 2 gave toluene and benzaldehyde with a reaction order of 1.43, E/sub A/ = 48 kcal/mol, and log A = 12.6. The reaction could be initiated with benzyl phenyl ether. 3 gave phenol and styrene with a reaction order of 1.21, E/sub A/ = 50.3 kcal/mol, and log A = 12.3. The reaction could be initiated by benzyl phenyl ether. All of the data are consistent with free radical chain processes with the reaction order determined by the termination reaction. No evidence for concerted reactions has been found. The thermal chemistry of three-atom links is best described by free radical chain processes. The products are consistent with a free radical chain process involving a ..beta..-scission reaction, and the reaction orders range between first and three-halves order depending upon the nature of the chain termination reaction. Activation parameters are readily estimated from thermochemical kinetic data on the individual reactions with log A approx. = 12 and E/sub A/approx. = 50 kcal/mol. Unlike the one- and two-atom linkages, reactions of the three-atom linkages are promoted by free radical initiators. The potential for inhibition of free radical chains also exists and is currently being studied. 4 tables.

  17. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  18. 40 CFR 721.6980 - Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols polyglycidyl ethers (generic name). 721.6980... Substances § 721.6980 Dimer acids, polymer with polyalkylene glycol, bisphenol A-diglycidyl ether, and alky-lenepolyols polyglycidyl ethers (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to...

  19. Reduction of Ether-Type Glycerophospholipids, Plasmalogens, by NF-κB Signal Leading to Microglial Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Shamim; Abe, Yuichi; Ali, Fatma; Youssef, Mohammed; Honsho, Masanori; Fujiki, Yukio; Katafuchi, Toshihiko

    2017-04-12

    Neuroinflammation characterized by activation of glial cells is observed in various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the reduction of ether-type glycerophospholipids, plasmalogens (Pls), in the brain is reported in AD patients, the mechanism of the reduction and its impact on neuroinflammation remained elusive. In the present study, we found for the first time that various inflammatory stimuli reduced Pls levels in murine glial cells via NF-κB activation, which then downregulated a Pls-synthesizing enzyme, glycerone phosphate O-acyltransferase (Gnpat) through increased c-Myc recruitment onto the Gnpat promoter. We also found that systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide, aging, and chronic restraint stress reduced brain Pls contents that were associated with glial NF-κB activation, an increase in c-Myc expression, and downregulation of Gnpat in the mouse cortex and hippocampus. More interestingly, the reduction of Pls contents in the murine cortex itself could increase the activated phenotype of microglial cells and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting further acceleration of neuroinflammation by reduction of brain Pls. A similar mechanism of Gnpat reduction was also found in human cell lines, triple-transgenic AD mouse brain, and postmortem human AD brain tissues. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of neuroinflammation that may explain prolonged progression of AD and help us to explore preventive and therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ether-type glycerophospholipids, plasmalogens (Pls), are reduced in the brain of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. We found that inflammatory stimuli reduced Pls contents by downregulation of the Pls-synthesizing enzyme glycerone phosphate O-acyltransferase (Gnpat) through NF-κB-mediated recruitment of c-Myc onto the Gnpat promoter in both murine and human cell lines. Murine brains after systemic lipopolysaccharide

  20. Levels and distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in various tissues of birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorspoels, Stefan; Covaci, Adrian; Lepom, Peter; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Schepens, Paul

    2006-11-01

    In the present study, concentrations and tissue distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; IUPAC # 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, and 209) were examined in brain, adipose tissue, liver, muscle, and serum of birds of prey. Median SigmaPBDE levels (BDE 28-183) in the tissues of sparrowhawks ranged from 360 to 1900 ng/g lipid weight (lw), which was in general one order of magnitude higher than in the tissues of common buzzards (26-130 ng/g lw). There were no differences in PBDE congener patterns between the various tissues within individuals of a certain species. Inter-species differences in PBDE patterns and in particular the percentage of BDE 99, 100 and 153 were, however, pronounced between sparrowhawk and common buzzard. BDE 209 was detected in nearly all serum and in some liver samples, but not in any other tissues. This observation suggests that exposure to BDE 209 is low or that this congener is poorly accumulated. Passive (lipid content related) diffusion could not completely describe the PBDE tissue distribution, e.g. the lowest PBDE-load was measured in brain, a fairly lipid rich tissue.

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies ... medication. This information may someday make it possible to predict who ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ...

  4. Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Brain lesions By Mayo Clinic Staff A brain lesion is an abnormality seen on a brain-imaging test, such as ... tomography (CT). On CT or MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don' ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  6. [Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol ethers - Reproductive and developmental toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starek-Świechowicz, Beata; Starek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Both ethylene and propylene glycol alkyl ethers (EGAEs and PGAEs, respectively) are widely used, mainly as solvents, in industrial and household products. Some EGAEs demonstrate gonadotoxic, embriotoxic, fetotoxic and teratogenic effects in both humans and experimental animals. Due to the noxious impact of these ethers on reproduction and development of organisms EGAEs are replaced for considerably less toxic PGAEs. The data on the mechanisms of testicular, embriotoxic, fetotoxic and teratogenic effects of EGAEs are presented in this paper. Our particular attention was focused on the metabolism of some EGAEs and their organ-specific toxicities, apoptosis of spermatocytes associated with changes in the expression of various genes that code for oxidative stress factors, protein kinases and nuclear hormone receptors. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. SYNTHESIS OF ALLYL PHENYL ETHER AND CLAISEN REARRANGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Torosyan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been established the possibility for phenol allylation on natural zeolites and them analogs. Here is demonstrated the synthesis of allyl phenol, which has wide industrial applications. The offered method in comparison with the traditional methods has more advantages – higher selectivity, smaller material and power resources consumption. It has been obtained the mixture of allylating phenols (30% in general with allyl phenyl ether (1 with 80% yields. At 600 K is obtained allylphenyl ether, at 700 K beginning the formation of allyl phenols, which is the result of direct C-allylation of the aromatic ring. It has been investigated the possibility of Claisen rearrangement in the same conditions. All of that are established by gas-liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography data.

  8. Ether and ester derivatives of the perborate icosahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Peymann, Toralf; Maderna, Andreas

    2003-12-16

    New boron icosahedral ethers and esters formed from Cs.sub.2 [closo-B.sub.12 (OH).sub.12 ],; Cs[closo-1-H-1-CB.sub.11 (OH).sub.11 ]; and closo-1,12-H.sub.2 -1,12-C.sub.2 B.sub.10 (OH).sub.10 are disclosed. Also set forth are their preparation by reacting the icosahedral boranes [closo-B.sub.12 H.sub.12 ].sup.2-, [closo-1-CB.sub.11 H.sub.12 ].sup.- and closo-1,12-(CH.sub.2 OH).sub.2 -1,12-C.sub.2 B.sub.10 H.sub.10 with an acid anhdride or acid chloride to form the ester or an alkylating agent to form the ether.

  9. SYNTHESIS OF ALLYL PHENYL ETHER AND CLAISEN REARRANGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Gagik Torosyan; Dezy Hovhannisyan

    2011-01-01

    It has been established the possibility for phenol allylation on natural zeolites and them analogs. Here is demonstrated the synthesis of allyl phenol, which has wide industrial applications. The offered method in comparison with the traditional methods has more advantages – higher selectivity, smaller material and power resources consumption. It has been obtained the mixture of allylating phenols (30%) in general with allyl phenyl ether (1) with 80% yields. At 600 K is obtained allylphenyl e...

  10. Solution of a gallstone with methyl-tertiary butyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambs, H.J.; Roeren, T.; Holstege, A.; Raedecke, J.

    1987-08-01

    Methyl-t-butyl ether is a new agent to dissolve gallstones. The substance proves to be very successful and acts very rapidly. A percutaneous transhepatic drainage supplies an adequate access route to dissolve calculi within the bile ducts. We report the case of a patient where before insertion of an internal stent a stone in the common bile duct was dissolved within 3 1/2 hours.

  11. Patch test with ether extracts in salicaceae allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 23 cases suggestive of airborne contact dermatitis were patch tested with ether extracts of flowers and leaves of populus sp. and salix sp. in a study conducted in Ladakh at an altitude of 3445 meters above sea level. Overall positivity was found in 12 (52.17%, with populus sp. alone in 7 (30. 43%, salix sp. alone in 4 17.39% and to both in one (8.33%.

  12. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion of Dimethyl Ether

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is based on experimental and numerical studies on the use of dimethyl ether (DME) in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process. The first paper in this thesis was published in 2007 and describes HCCI combustion of pure DME in a small diesel engine. The tests were designed to investigate the effect of engine speed, compression ratio and equivalence ratio on the combustion timing and the engine performance. It was found that the required compression ratio...

  13. Numerical investigation on the effect of injection pressure on the internal flow characteristics for diethyl ether, dimethyl ether and diesel fuel injectors using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Thulasi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spray characteristics of the diesel fuel are greatly affected by the cavitation formed inside the injector due to the high pressure differential across the nozzle. Many researchers across the globe are exploring the potential of using diethyl ether and dimethyl ether as an alternate for diesel fuel to meet the strict emission norms. Due to the variation in the fuel properties the internal flow characteristics in injectors for ether fuels are expected to be different from that of the diesel fuel. In this paper computational technique is used to study and compare the internal flow characteristics of diethyl ether, dimethyl ether and diesel fuel. The two phase flow model considering the fuel as a mixture of liquid and vapor is adopted for the simulation study. The injection pressure is varied from 100 to 400 bar and the flow characteristics of all three fuels are simulated and compared. Results indicate that all three fuels have distinct cavitating patterns owing to different property values. The dimethyl ether is found to be more cavitating than diesel and diethyl ether fuels as expected. The mass of fuel injected are found to be decreasing for the ether fuels when compared with diesel fuel at all injection pressures.

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  15. Diethyl Ether Production Process with Various Catalyst Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widayat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several H-zeolite and HZSM-5 catalysts was preparated and their characters have also been investigated. H-zeolit Catalyst was preparated from Natural Zeolite that obtained from Malang District and Gunung Kidul District. Diethyl ether was produced by Ethanol with concentration of 95%. This research use fixed bed reactor that 1 gram of catalyst as bed catalyst, atmospheric pressure and temperature 140oC as the operating condition. Ethanol vapor from vaporization tank was driven by 200 ml/min Nitrogen stream. The responds in this research is liquid product concentration; diethyl ether, ethanol, methanol and water concentration. The results showed that the largest ethanol conversion was produced by the use of 56.44% HZSM-5 and the largest yield of diethyl ether diethyl was produced by the use of alumina and H-zeolite catalyst. The larger ratio between natural zeolite with HCl solvent will produce the larger surface area of catalyst and ethanol conversion. The largest ethanol conversion was produced at reactan ratio 1:20.

  16. Selective cytotoxic activity of new lipophilic hydroxytyrosol alkyl ether derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Madrona, Andrés; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Orta, Manuel Luis; Mateos, Santiago; Espartero, José Luis; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2013-05-29

    Recent data suggest that hydroxytyrosol, a phenolic compound of virgin olive oils, has anticancer activity. This communication reports the synthesis of decyl and hexadecyl hydroxytyrosyl ethers, as well as the cytotoxic activity of hydroxytyrosol and a series of seven hydroxytyrosol alkyl ether derivatives against A549 lung cancer cells and MRC5 non-malignant lung fibroblasts. Hydroxytyrosyl dodecyl ether (HTDE) showed the highest selective cytotoxicity, and possible mechanisms of action were investigated; results suggest that HTDE can moderately inhibit glycolysis, induce oxidative stress, and cause DNA damage in A549 cells. The combination of HTDE with the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil induced a synergistic cytotoxicity in A549 cancer cells but not in non-malignant MRC5 cells. HTDE also displayed selective cytotoxicity against MCF7 breast cancer cells versus MCF10 normal breast epithelial cells in the 1-30 μM range. These results suggest that the cytotoxicity of HTDE is more potent and selective than that of parent compound hydroxytyrosol.

  17. Quantum mechanistic insights on aryl propargyl ether Claisen rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasadesikan, Venkatesan; Dai, Jiun-Kuang; Lee, Shyi-Long

    2014-06-28

    The mechanism of aryl propargyl ether Claisen rearrangement in gas and solvent phase was investigated using DFT methods. Solvent phase calculations are carried out using N,N-diethylaniline as a solvent in the PCM model. The most favorable pathways involve a [3,3]-sigmatropic reaction followed by proton transfer in the first two steps and then deprotonation or [1,5]-sigmatropic reaction. Finally, cyclization yields benzopyran or benzofuran derivatives. The [3,3]-sigmatropic reaction is the rate-determining step for benzopyran and benzofuran with ΔG(‡) value of 38.4 and 37.9 kcal mol(-1) at M06/6-31+G**//B3LYP/6-31+G* level in gas and solvent phase, respectively. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, it is found that the derivatives of aryl propargyl ether proceeded Claisen rearrangement and the rate-determining step may be shifted from the [3,3]-sigmatropic reaction to the tautomerization step. The NBO analysis revealed that substitution of the methyl groups on the aliphatic segment has decreased the stabilization energy E(2) and favors the aryl propargyl ether Claisen rearrangement.

  18. Poly (ether ether ketone) membranes for fuel cells; Membranas de poli (eter eter cetona) sulfonado para celulas a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Jacqueline C.; Gomes, Ailton de S.; Filho, Jose C.D., E-mail: jacquecosta@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hui, Wang S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Vivianna S. de [Escola Tecnica Rezende-Rammel, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric membranes were developed using a SPEEK polymer matrix (sulphonated poly (ether ether ketone)), containing hygroscopic particles of zirconia (Zr) (incorporated by sol-gel method), for use as electrolyte membranes in fuel cells. SPEEK with different sulfonation degrees were used: 63 and 86%. The thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) was carried out to characterize the membranes and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to evaluating the proton conductivity of the membranes. Additional analysis were underway in order to characterize these membranes, which include: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to evaluate the influence of zirconia and sulfonation degree on the properties of the membranes. (author)

  19. Two-year drinking water carcinogenicity study of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Darol; Willson, Gabrielle; Parkinson, Horace; Bermudez, Edilberto

    2013-07-01

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to reduce tailpipe emissions and its use has been discontinued. There remains a concern that drinking water sources have been contaminated with MTBE. A two-year drinking water carcinogenicity study of MTBE was conducted in Wistar rats (males, 0, 0.5, 3, 7.5 mg ml(-1); and females, 0, 0.5, 3, and 15 mg ml(-1)). Body weights were unaffected and water consumption was reduced in MTBE-exposed males and females. Wet weights of male kidneys were increased at the end of two years of exposure to 7.5 mg ml(-1) MTBE. Chronic progressive nephropathy was observed in males and females, was more severe in males, and was exacerbated in the high MTBE exposure groups. Brain was the only tissue with a statistically significant finding of neoplasms. One astrocytoma (1/50) was found in a female rat (15 mg ml(-1)). The incidence of brain astrocytomas in male rats was 1/50, 1/50, 1/50 and 4/50 for the 0, 0.5, 3 and 7.5 mg ml(-1) exposure groups, respectively. This was a marginally significant statistical trend, but not statistically significant when pairwise comparisons were made or when multiple comparisons were taken into account. The incidence of astrocytoma fell within historical control ranges for Wistar rats, and the brain has not been identified as a target organ following chronic administration of MTBE, ethyl tert-butyl ether, or tertiary butyl alcohol (in drinking water) to mice and rats. We conclude that the astrocytomas observed in this study are not associated with exposure to MTBE. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Thermochemical properties and bond dissociation enthalpies of 3- to 5-member ring cyclic ether hydroperoxides, alcohols, and peroxy radicals: cyclic ether radical + (3)O(2) reaction thermochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzmendi-Murua, Itsaso; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2014-05-01

    The formation of cyclic ethers is a major product in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, and the oxidation of biomass derived alcohols. Cyclic ethers are formed in the initial reactions of alkyl radicals with dioxygen in combustion and precombustion processes that occur at moderate temperatures. They represent a significant part of the oxygenated pollutants found in the exhaust gases of engines. Cyclic ethers can also be formed from atmospheric reactions of olefins. Additionally, cyclic ethers have been linked to the formation of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. In combustion and thermal oxidation processes these cyclic ethers will form radicals that react with (3)O2 to form peroxy radicals. Density functional theory and higher level ab initio calculations are used to calculate thermochemical properties and bond dissociation enthalpies of 3 to 5 member ring cyclic ethers (oxirane, yC2O, oxetane, yC3O, and oxolane, yC4O), corresponding hydroperoxides, alcohols, hydroperoxy alkyl, and alkyl radicals which are formed in these oxidation reaction systems. Trends in carbon-hydrogen bond dissociation energies for the ring and hydroperoxide group relative to ring size and to distance from the ether group are determined. Bond dissociation energies are calculated for use in understanding effects of the ether oxygen in the cyclic ethers, their stability, and kinetic properties. Geometries, vibration frequencies, and enthalpies of formation, ΔH°f,298, are calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31G(2d,2p), the composite CBS-QB3, and G3MP2B3 methods. Entropy and heat capacities, S°(T) and Cp°(T) (5 K ≤ T ≤ 5000), are determined using geometric parameters and frequencies from the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculations. The strong effects of ring strain on the bond dissociation energies in these peroxy systems are also of fundamental interest. Oxetane and oxolane exhibit a significant stabilization, 10 kcal mol(-1), lower ΔfH°298 when an oxygen group is on

  1. Inactivation of ether lipid biosynthesis causes male infertility, defects in eye development and optic nerve hypoplasia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodemer, Claus; Thai, Thanh-Phuong; Brugger, Britta; Kaercher, Thomas; Werner, Hauke; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Wieland, Felix; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W

    2003-08-01

    Although known for almost 80 years, the physiological role of plasmalogens (PLs), the major mammalian ether lipids (ELs), is still enigmatic. Humans that lack ELs suffer from rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP), a peroxisomal disorder usually resulting in death in early childhood. In order to learn more about the functions of ELs, we generated a mouse model for RCDP by a targeted disruption of the dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene. The mutant mice revealed multiple abnormalities, such as male infertility, defects in eye development, cataract and optic nerve hypoplasia, some of which were also observed in RCDP. Mass spectroscopic analysis demonstrated the presence of highly unsaturated fatty acids including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in brain PLs and the occurrence of PLs in lipid raft microdomains (LRMs) isolated from brain myelin. In mutants, PLs were completely absent and the concentration of brain DHA was reduced. The marker proteins flotillin-1 and F3/contactin were found in brain LRMs in reduced concentrations. In addition, the gap junctional protein connexin 43, known to be recruited to LRMs and essential for lens development and spermatogenesis, was down-regulated in embryonic fibroblasts of the EL-deficient mice. Free cholesterol, an important constituent of LRMs, was found in these fibroblasts to be accumulated in a perinuclear compartment. These data suggest that the EL-deficient mice allow the identification of new phenotypes not related so far to EL-deficiency (male sterility, defects in myelination and optic nerve hypoplasia) and indicate that PLs are required for the correct assembly and function of LRMs.

  2. Correspondence by Charles T. Jackson containing the earliest known illustrations of a Morton ether inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Rajesh P; Bause, George S

    2013-11-01

    A letter, dated December 1, 1846, from Charles T. Jackson, MD, to Josiah D. Whitney contains a previously unreported description of a Morton ether inhaler and the only known contemporaneous hand-drawn illustrations of this type of ether inhaler. This letter and 2 other known letters on ether anesthesia were probably carried from Boston, MA, to Liverpool, United Kingdom, on the same paddle steamer (Acadia) that carried the well-known letter from Jacob Bigelow, MD, to Francis Boott, MD.

  3. Evaluation of alternariol and alternariol methyl ether for mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, V.M.; Stack, M.E. (Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-10-01

    Alternariol and alternariol methyl ether were tested in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay, and both were shown, with and without metabolic activation, to be nonmutagenic to strains TA98 and TA100. The finding of other investigators that alternariol methyl ether is weakly mutagenic to Ta98 without metabolic activation could have resulted from the presence of a small amount of one of the highly mutagenic altertoxins in the alternariol methyl ether originally tested. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Polyaza crown ether as non-nucleosidic building blocks in DNA-conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Madsen, Rasmus K

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of amphiphilic polyaza crown ether monomers X (palmityl-substituted), Y (cholesteryl-substituted) and Z (dipalmityl-subtituted) and their incorporation into oligonucleotides are described. Their effects on thermal duplex stability were investigated by UV melting curve analysis....... Thermal denaturation experiments showed remarkable stabilization of dsDNA by polyaza crown ether monomers when incorporated in opposite positions. The series of polyaza crown ether monomers (X, Y, and Z) with different lipophilicity showed a trend of increased stability of the corresponding ds......DNA with increasing lipophilicity of the polyaza crown ether monomer....

  5. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: ... of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  8. N–H•••O hydrogen bonding. An FT-IR, NIR study of N-methylformamide–ether systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANISLAV JOVIĆ

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of an FT-IR and NIR study of N-methylformamide in carbon tetrachloride solution in presence of ethers as the O--electron donors, i.e., diethyl ether (DEE, diisopropyl ether (DiPE, methyl t--butyl ether (MtBE, dibutyl ether (DBE, dipentyl ether (DPE, tetrahydro-furan (THF and tetrahydropyran (THP. The spectroscopic characteristics of the N–H•••O hydrogen bonded complexes are given. In addition, the equilibrium constants for 1:1 complex formation were determined at 25 °C using Mid-IR and NIR measurements.

  9. On the radiation stability of crown ethers in ionic liquids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkrob, I.; Marin, T.; Dietz, M. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Benedictine Univ.); (Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee)

    2011-04-14

    Crown ethers (CEs) are macrocyclic ionophores used for the separation of strontium-90 from acidic nuclear waste streams. Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are presently being considered as replacements for traditional molecular solvents employed in such separations. It is desirable that the extraction efficacy obtained with such solvents should not deteriorate in the strong radiation fields generated by decaying radionuclides. This deterioration will depend on the extent of radiation damage to both the IL solvent and the CE solute. While radiation damage to ILs has been extensively studied, the issue of the radiation stability of crown ethers, particularly in an IL matrix, has not been adequately addressed. With this in mind, we have employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study the formation of CE-related radicals in the radiolysis of selected CEs in ILs incorporating aromatic (imidazolium and pyridinium) cations. The crown ethers have been found to yield primarily hydrogen loss radicals, H atoms, and the formyl radical. In the low-dose regime, the relative yield of these radicals increases linearly with the mole fraction of the solute, suggesting negligible transfer of the excitation energy from the solvent to the solute; that is, the solvent has a 'radioprotective' effect. The damage to the CE in the loading region of practical interest is relatively low. Under such conditions, the main chemical pathway leading to decreased extraction performance is protonation of the macrocycle. At high radiation doses, sufficient to increase the acidity of the IL solvent significantly, such proton complexes compete with the solvent cations as electron traps. In this regime, the CEs will rapidly degrade as the result of H abstraction from the CE ring by the released H atoms. Thus, the radiation dose to which a CE/IL system is exposed must be maintained at a level sufficiently low to avoid this regime.

  10. Electrochemical Study of Diphenyl Ether Derivatives Used as Herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Zaouak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behaviour of five nitro diphenyl ethers used as herbicides is investigated in acetonitrile. A detailed study by cyclic voltammetry and exhaustive electrolysis is carried out for the anodic oxidation of 2-Chloro-6-nitro-3-phenoxyaniline (aclonifen and shows that the major oxidation product is a dimeric compound. A mechanistic scheme involving a coupling process is postulated for the electrochemical oxidation of this compound. Furthermore, the use of differential pulse voltammetry on a glassy carbon electrode permits the selective determination of aclonifen. The limit of detection is 0.6 μg/mL.

  11. Density measurements of compressed-liquid dimethyl ether + pentane mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Stephanie L; Lemmon, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Compressed-liquid densities of three compositions of the binary mixture dimethyl ether (CAS No. 115-10-6) + pentane (CAS No. 109-66-0) have been measured with a vibrating U-tube densimeter. Measurements were made at temperatures from 270 K to 390 K with pressures from 1.0 MPa to 50 MPa. The overall combined uncertainty (k=2) of the density data is 0.81 kg·m-3. Data presented here have been used to improve a previously formulated Helmholtz energy based mixture model. The newly derived parameters are given.

  12. Dimethyl ether production from methanol and/or syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagle, Robert A; Wang, Yong; Baker, Eddie G; Hu, Jianli

    2015-02-17

    Disclosed are methods for producing dimethyl ether (DME) from methanol and for producing DME directly from syngas, such as syngas from biomass. Also disclosed are apparatus for DME production. The disclosed processes generally function at higher temperatures with lower contact times and at lower pressures than conventional processes so as to produce higher DME yields than do conventional processes. Certain embodiments of the processes are carried out in reactors providing greater surface to volume ratios than the presently used DME reactors. Certain embodiments of the processes are carried out in systems comprising multiple microchannel reactors.

  13. A new diphenyl ether from Phoma sp. strain, SHZK-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M J; Fang, H; Li, W J; Huang, D M; Wu, Z; Zhao, Y F

    2012-01-01

    A new diphenyl ether methyl 2-(2-formyl-3-hydroxy-5-methylphenoxy)-5-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoate (3), together with four known compounds, asterric acid (1), methyl asterrate (2), 9(Z),12(Z)-nonadecadienoic acid (4) and orsellinic acid (5), were isolated from the Phoma sp. strain SHZK-2, which was isolated from a polluted environment in southern China. The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods. Cytotoxicities of compounds against HEPG2 cell and Raji cell lines were preliminarily evaluated by the MTT method.

  14. Chemistry and properties of new poly(arylene ether imidazoles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop high-temperature high-performance structural resins for aerospace applications, the chemistry and properties of new poly(arylene ether imidazoles) were investigated. The polymers were prepared by the nucleophilic displacement reaction of aromatic bis(imidazolephenols) with activated aromatic difluoro compounds. The amorphous thermoplastic polymers exhibited glass transition temperatures from 230 to 301 C, inherent viscosities from 0.46 to 1.46 dL/g, and number-average molecular weights as high as 59,300 g/mole. The polymers exhibit good toughness, adhesive, composite, and film properties. The chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of these materials are discussed.

  15. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  16. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain ... imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ... chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  10. Identification of [4-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyrimidinyl] amines and ethers as potent and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarbrick, Martin E; Beswick, Paul J; Gleave, Robert J; Green, Richard H; Bingham, Sharon; Bountra, Chas; Carter, Malcolm C; Chambers, Laura J; Chessell, Iain P; Clayton, Nick M; Collins, Sue D; Corfield, John A; Hartley, C David; Kleanthous, Savvas; Lambeth, Paul F; Lucas, Fiona S; Mathews, Neil; Naylor, Alan; Page, Lee W; Payne, Jeremy J; Pegg, Neil A; Price, Helen S; Skidmore, John; Stevens, Alexander J; Stocker, Richard; Stratton, Sharon C; Stuart, Alastair J; Wiseman, Joanne O

    2009-08-01

    A novel series of [4-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyrimidine-based cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, which have a different arrangement of substituents compared to the more common 1,2-diarylheterocycle based molecules, have been discovered. For example, 2-(butyloxy)-4-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (47), a member of the 2-pyrimidinyl ether series, has been shown to be a potent and selective inhibitor with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile, high brain penetration and good efficacy in rat models of hypersensitivity.

  11. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra O. Bhangale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson’s activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o. were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol were significantly (p<0.001 found to be reduced, with the PEFRE at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.. 6-OHDA significantly induced motor dysfunction (muscle rigidity and hypolocomotion. 6-OHDA administration showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and depleted superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress.

  12. Synthesis of hydroxy thio-ether derivatives of vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Brajendra K; Adhvaryu, A; Erhan, S Z

    2006-12-27

    Bio-based additives are desirable commodities due to their eco-friendly nature. These additives can demonstrate physical and chemical properties comparable to those of conventional mineral oil-based products. Sulfur incorporated triacylglycerol can function as an antiwear/antifriction additive for lubricants. The synthesis of four useful hydroxy thio-ether derivatives of vegetable oils, from commercially available epoxidized soybean oil and common organic thiols, is reported in this paper. The common thiols used herein were 1-butanethiol, 1-decanethiol, 1-octadecanethiol, and cyclohexyl mercaptan. Currently, there is no reported literature describing the synthesis of hydroxy thio-ether derivatives of vegetable oil. The reaction was monitored, and products were confirmed by NMR and FTIR spectroscopies. Experimental conditions involving various thiols, solvent, catalyst amount, time, and temperature were optimized for research quantity and laboratory scale-up. The synthetic process retains the vegetable oil structure, eliminates polyunsaturation in the molecule, and adds polar functional groups on triacylglycerol. These products can be used as agriculturally-based antiwear additives for lubricant applications.

  13. Direct dimethyl ether high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    A high temperature polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer fuel cell was fed with dimethyl ether (DME) and water vapour mixture on the anode at ambient pressure with air as oxidant. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was achieved at 200°C. A conventional polymer based direct DME fuel cell is liquid fed an......V higher than that of methanol, indicating less fuel crossover.......A high temperature polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer fuel cell was fed with dimethyl ether (DME) and water vapour mixture on the anode at ambient pressure with air as oxidant. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was achieved at 200°C. A conventional polymer based direct DME fuel cell is liquid fed...... and suffers from low DME solubility in water. When the DME - water mixture is fed as vapour miscibility is no longer a problem. The increased temperature is more beneficial for the kinetics of the direct oxidation of DME than of methanol. The Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) with DME operation was 50 to 100 m...

  14. Ether-Bond-Containing Ionic Liquids as Supercapacitor Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Anthony J R; Sanchez-Ramirez, Nédher; Torresi, Roberto M; Hall, Peter J

    2013-09-05

    Electrochemical capacitors (ECs) are electrical energy storage devices that have the potential to be very useful in a wide range of applications, especially where there is a large disparity between peak and average power demands. The use of ionic liquids (ILs) as electrolytes in ECs can increase the energy density of devices; however, the viscosity and conductivity of ILs adversely influence the power density of the device. We present experimental results where several ILs containing different cations have been employed as the electrolyte in cells containing mesoporous carbon electrodes. Specifically, the behavior of ILs containing an ether bond in an alkyl side chain are compared with those of a similar structure and size but containing purely alkyl side chains. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and constant current cycling, we show that the presence of the ether bond can dramatically increase the specific capacitance and reduce device resistance. These results have the important implication that such ILs can be used to tailor the physical properties and electrochemical performance of IL-based electrolytes.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of ether- and ester-linked phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruczek, James; Saunders, Matthew; Khosla, Meghna; Tu, Yicheng; Pandit, Sagar A

    2017-12-01

    Dissimilarities in the bulk structure of bilayers composed of ether- vs ester-linked lipids are well-established; however, the atomistic interactions responsible for these differences are not well known. These differences are important in understanding of why archaea have a different bilayer composition than the other domains of life and why humans have larger concentrations of plasmalogens in specialized membranes? In this paper, we simulate two lipid bilayers, the ester linked dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the ether lined dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), to study these variations. The structural analysis of the bilayers reveals that DPPC is more compressible than DHPC. A closer examination of dipole potential shows DHPC, despite having a smaller dipole potential of the bilayer, has a higher potential barrier than DPPC at the surface. Analysis of water order and dynamics suggests DHPC has a more ordered, less mobile layer of water in the headgroup. These results seem to resolve the issue as to whether the decrease in permeability of DHPC is due to of differences in minimum area per lipid (A0) or diffusion coefficient of water in the headgroup region (Dhead) (Guler et al., 2009) since we have shown significant changes in the order and mobility of water in that region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. a Physical Random Signal in Ether-Drift Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, M.; Pluchino, A.

    2015-01-01

    In ether-drift experiments, one usually assumes that the oscopic Earth's motion should be detectable in the laboratory from the time dependence of the data. Therefore a stochastic signal, which does not exhibit the smooth modulations expected from the Earth's rotation, tends to be considered as a spurious instrumental effect. The real situation, however, might be more subtle if the hypothetical ether (i.e. the physical vacuum) resembles a turbulent fluid where large-scale and small-scale motions are only indirectly related. In this case, the data might contain a genuine stochastic component. To test this scenario, a numerical simulation was performed to estimate the signal by assuming i) an `emergent-gravity' picture and ii) a simple model of statistically isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. In this framework, the present data become consistent with velocity fluctuations whose absolute scale is determined by the Earth's cosmic motion with respect to the CMB (projected in the plane of the interferometer at the latitude of the laboratory). Therefore the Earth's motion, although undetectable from the naive time dependence of the data, could nevertheless show up in their statistical distributions. In particular, the predicted non-gaussian nature of the instantaneous data could be tested with the forthcoming generation of precise cryogenic experiments, with potentially important implications for our understanding of both gravity and relativity.

  17. Synthesis of Novel Bibrachial Lariat Ethers (BiBLEs) Containing [1,2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Introduction. The first synthetic crown ether was discovered by Pederson.1. Since then, various structural changes have been made to the basic crown ether skeleton in an attempt to enhance the selectivity of these rings and the capacity of complexation with metal ions. When hard and soft donor atoms were added into the ...

  18. The kinetics of 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether crosslinking of dermal sheep collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, R.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; van Wachem, Pauline B.; van Luyn, Marja J.A.; Hendriks, Marc; Cahalan, Patrick T.; Feijen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Dermal sheep collagen was crosslinked with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE) or modified with glycidyl isopropyl ether (PGE). The reduction in amine groups as a function of time was followed to study the overall reaction kinetics of collagen with either BDDGE or PGE. Linearization of the

  19. The kinetics of 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether crosslinking of dermal sheep collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, R; Dijkstra, PJ; van Wachem, PB; van Luyn, MJA; Hendriks, M; Cahalan, PT; Feijen, J

    2000-01-01

    Dermal sheep collagen was crosslinked with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE) or modified with glycidyl isopropyl ether (PGE). The reduction in amine groups as a function of time was followed to study the overall reaction kinetics of collagen with either BDDGE or PGE;. Linearization of the

  20. IRON(III) NITRATE-CATALYZED FACILE SYNTHESIS OF DIPHENYLMETHYL (DPM) ETHERS FROM ALCOHOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diphenyl methyl (DPM) ethers constitute important structural portion of some pharmaceutical entities and also as protective group for hydroxyl groups in synthetic chemistry. DPM ethers are normally prepared using concentrated acids or base as catalysts, which may result in the fo...

  1. Inhibition of dimethyl ether and methane oxidation in Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R; Hou, C T; Felix, A

    1976-01-01

    Metal-chelating or -binding agents inhibited the oxidation of dimethyl ether and methane, but not methanol, by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporium. Evidence suggests that the involvement of metal-containing enzymatic systems in the initial step of oxidation of dimethyl ether and methane. PMID:4428

  2. Mild Ti-mediated transformation of t-butyl thio-ethers into thio-acetates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijper, Thomas C; Robertus, Jort; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-01-07

    We report a straightforward method for the rapid conversion of thio-ethers to thio-acetates using TiCl4, in good to excellent yields. The reaction conditions tolerate a variety of functional groups, including halide, nitro, ether, thiophene and acetylene functionalities. A catalytic variant of this reaction is also described.

  3. The antifungal activity of methanol and ether extracts of the leaves of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    extracts from the leaves of Leonotis nepetafolia showed that they contain quinones, saponosides, flavonoids and tannins. The high amount of quinones was remarked in both methanol and ether extracts while saponins were more well extracted by methanol compared to ether. Tannins and flavonoids found in methanol ...

  4. 40 CFR 721.7000 - Polymer of disodium maleate, allyl ether, and ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ether, and ethylene oxide. 721.7000 Section 721.7000 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ethylene oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polymer of disodium maleate, allyl ether, and ethylene oxide (P-91...

  5. Development and validation of a congener-specific photodegradation model for polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, X.; Simonich, S.L.M.; Robrock, K.R.; Korytar, P.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Barofsky, D.F.

    2008-01-01

    With the phaseout of the manufacture of some polybrominated diphenyl ether ( PBDE) formulations, namely penta-brominated diphenyl ether (BDE) and octa-BDE, and the continued use of the deca-BDE formulation, it is important to be able to predict the photodegradation of the more highly brominated

  6. 77 FR 39236 - Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether... ``Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether Flame... nanomaterial case study and the workshop process that the draft document will be used in for identifying and...

  7. Interactions between ether phospholipids and cholesterol as determined by scattering and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kučerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-12-27

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol's molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup's phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  8. Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Mostofian, Barmak [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  9. Crown ether activation of cross-linked subtilisin Carlsberg crystals in organic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Unen, D.J.; Sakodinskaya, I.K.; Sakodinskaya, Inna K.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    The activity of cross-linked subtilisin Carlsberg crystals in the catalysis of peptide bond formation can be significantly enhanced by pretreatment of the enzyme crystals with crown ethers. Soaking of the enzyme crystals in a solution of crown ether in acetonitrile followed by evaporation of the

  10. The antifungal activity of methanol and ether extracts of the leaves of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antifungal test of the crude methanol and the crude ether extracts was realized and revealed that crude methanol extract was more active than crude ether extract on Candida albicans and Malassezia fulfur growth. The minimum inhibitor concentration (MIC) of the crude methanol extract were 4.12 mg/ml and 2.38 mg/ml ...

  11. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone), an ion conducting polymer, as alternative polymeric membrane for the construction of anion-selective electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    González Bellavista, Anna; Macanás de Benito, Jorge; Muñoz Tapia, Maria; Fàbregas Martínez, Esteve

    2007-01-01

    A novel arrangement for polymeric membranes used in anion-selective electrodes is presented. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK), an ion conducting polymer has been used as a polymeric matrix to build an anion-selective electrode (ISE). A NO3--ISE has been chosen as a model electrode to study the efficiency of the polymeric membrane. The effect of membrane composition and polymer compatibility with the electro-active components was investigated. The polymer matrix showed good mechanic...

  12. Accumulation of long-chain bases in yeast promotes their conversion to a long-chain base vinyl ether[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Montañés, Fernando; Lone, Museer A.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Schneiter, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain bases (LCBs) are the precursors to ceramide and sphingolipids in eukaryotic cells. They are formed by the action of serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT), a complex of integral membrane proteins located in the endoplasmic reticulum. SPT activity is negatively regulated by Orm proteins to prevent the toxic overaccumulation of LCBs. Here we show that overaccumulation of LCBs in yeast results in their conversion to a hitherto undescribed LCB derivative, an LCB vinyl ether. The LCB vinyl ether is predominantly formed from phytosphingosine (PHS) as revealed by conversion of odd chain length tracers C17-dihydrosphingosine and C17-PHS into the corresponding LCB vinyl ether derivative. PHS vinyl ether formation depends on ongoing acetyl-CoA synthesis, and its levels are elevated when the LCB degradative pathway is blocked by deletion of the major LCB kinase, LCB4, or the LCB phosphate lyase, DPL1. PHS vinyl ether formation thus appears to constitute a shunt for the LCB phosphate- and lyase-dependent degradation of LCBs. Consistent with a role of PHS vinyl ether formation in LCB detoxification, the lipid is efficiently exported from the cells. PMID:27561298

  13. Degradation of Perfluorinated Ether Lubricants on Pure Aluminum Surfaces: Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaby, Scott M.; Ewing, David W.; Zehe, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The AM1 semiempirical quantum chemical method was used to model the interaction of perfluoroethers with aluminum surfaces. Perfluorodimethoxymethane and perfluorodimethyl ether were studied interacting with aluminum surfaces, which were modeled by a five-atom cluster and a nine-atom cluster. Interactions were studied for edge (high index) sites and top (low index) sites of the clusters. Both dissociative binding and nondissociative binding were found, with dissociative binding being stronger. The two different ethers bound and dissociated on the clusters in different ways: perfluorodimethoxymethane through its oxygen atoms, but perfluorodimethyl ether through its fluorine atoms. The acetal linkage of perfluorodimeth-oxymethane was the key structural feature of this molecule in its binding and dissociation on the aluminum surface models. The high-index sites of the clusters caused the dissociation of both ethers. These results are consistent with the experimental observation that perfluorinated ethers decompose in contact with sputtered aluminum surfaces.

  14. Oil recovery with sulfomethylated poly (lower alkyl vinyl ether/maleic anhydride)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, C.J.; Falk, D.O.

    1973-05-22

    Lower alkyl vinyl ether e.g., methyl vinyl ether, propyl vinyl ether, isopropyl vinyl ether, hexyl vinyl ether, is copolymerized conventionally with maleic anhydride, the resulting copolymer is treated with ammonia or ammonium hydroxide to form the partial amide-ammonium salt, and this salt is in turn treated with formaldehyde and thereafter or simultaneously with ammonium or alkali metal salt sulfite (including bisulfites, etc.) to form an at least partially sulfomethylated copolymer. Aqueous solutions of the sulfomethylated copolymer are useful in increasing the viscosity of drive fluids used in the supplemented recovery of petroleum from subterranean formations. In general, enhancing the polyionic character of mobility control agents used in supplemented recovery of petroleum provides enhanced recovery. Achieving this enhancement of polyionic character through use of sulfonate groups provides a mobility control agent with good ability to sustain viscosity in the presence of brine and lime, usually present in the connate waters of petroleum-bearing formations. (7 claims)

  15. Identification of oxygenated ions in premixed flames of dimethyl ether and oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig Østergaard, L.; Egsgaard, H.; Hammerum, S.

    2003-01-01

    The structure of characteristic flame-ions in premixed flames of dimethyl ether and oxygen was studied by ion-molecule reactions with ammonia and collision activation with argon. The results obtained show that the flame-ions m/z 45 and m/z 47 are the methoxymethyl cation, CH3OCH2+, and protonated...... dimethyl ether, (CH3)(2)OH+. The flame-ion m/z 61 is a mixture of the trimethyloxonium ion, (CH3)(3)O+ and lesser amounts of protonated methyl formate and/or protonated ethyl methyl ether. The viability of an ionic mechanism to soot formation for dimethyl ether-oxygen flames is discussed on the background...... of ions present in the dimethyl ether flames and the reactivity of the ions....

  16. Rational Design of Cesium-Selective Ionophores and Chemosensors: Dihydrocalix[4]arene Crown-6 Ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Engle, Nancy L.; Haverlock, Tamara J.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Urvoas, Agathe; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2003-12-15

    Molecular mechanics calculations performed on calix[4]arene crown-6 ethers predict that the 1,3-dihydro derivatives will exhibit greater complementarity for potassium and cesium ions than the parent 1,3-dialkoxy calix crowns. The X-ray crystal structures of 1,3-alt bis-octyloxycalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether, dihydrocalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether, and the cesium nitrate complex of dihydrocalix[4]arene benzocrown-6 ether were determined. The cesium complex structure corresponds closely to the structure predicted by molecular mechanics. The dihydrocalix[4]arene crown-6 ethers exhibit enhanced cesium selectivity in the extraction of alkali metal salts and provide a platform for a highly sensitive and selective cesium chemosensor.

  17. Effect of surface finishing on friction and wear of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK under oil lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Fontoura de Andrade

    Full Text Available Abstract The tribological properties of poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK containing 30% of carbon fiber were studied in an oil-lubricated environment and different surface finishing of the metallic counterbody. Four different finishing processes, commonly used in the automotive industry, were chosen for this study: turning, grinding, honing and polishing. The test system used was tri-pin on disc with pins made of PEEK and counterbody made of steel; they were fully immersed in ATF Dexron VI oil. Some test parameters were held constant, such as the apparent pressure of 2 MPa, linear velocity of 2 m/s, oil temperature at 85 °C, and the time - 120 minutes. The lubrication regime for the apparent pressure of 1 MPa to 7 MPa range was also studied at different sliding speeds. A direct correlation was found between the wear rate, friction coefficient and the lubrication regime, wherein wear under hydrodynamic lubrication was, on average, approximately 5 times lower, and the friction coefficient 3 times lower than under boundary lubrication.

  18. 3'-O-(5-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)ADP ether and ATP ether. Affinity reagents for labeling ATPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, H; Wang, J H

    1988-09-15

    The affinity reagents 3'-O-(5-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)ADP ether (FDNP-ADP) and 3'-O-(5-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)ATP ether (FDNP-ATP) were synthesized and characterized. FDNP[14C]ADP was found to label the active site of mitochondrial F1-ATPase slowly at room temperature but with high specificity. F1 was effectively protected from the labeling reagent by ATP or ADP. An average number of 1.3 covalent label per F1 is sufficient for 100% inhibition of the ATPase. About 73% of the radioactive label was found covalently attached to beta subunits, 9% on alpha, practically none on gamma, delta, and epsilon. Cleavage of the labeled enzyme by pepsin and sequencing of the major radioactive peptide showed that the labeled amino acid residue in beta subunit was Lys beta 162. These results show that Lys beta 162 is indeed at the active site of F1 as assumed in the recently proposed models (Fry, D. C., Kuby, S. A., and Mildvan, A. S. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 83, 907-911; Duncan, I. M., Parsonage, D., and Senior, A. E. (1986) FEBS Lett. 208, 1-6).

  19. Highly stable ionic-covalent cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Linfeng; Zhu, Xingye; Xu, Jianfeng; Qian, Huidong; Zou, Zhiqing; Yang, Hui

    2017-05-01

    A novel ionic cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) containing equal content of sulfonic acid and pendant tertiary amine groups (TA-SPEEK) has been initially synthesized for the application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). By adjusting the ratio of p-xylene dibromide to tertiary amine groups of TA-SPEEK, a series of ionic-covalent cross-linked membranes (C-SPEEK-x) with tunable degree of cross-linking are prepared. Compared with the pristine membrane, the ionic and ionic-covalent cross-linked proton exchange membranes (PEMs) exhibit reduced methanol permeability and improved mechanical properties, dimensional and oxidative stability. The proton conductivity and methanol selectivity of protonated TA-SPEEK and C-SPEEK-x at 25 °C is up to 0.109 S cm-1 and 3.88 × 105 S s cm-3, respectively, which are higher than that of Nafion 115. The DMFC incorporating C-SPEEK-25 exhibits a maximum power density as high as 35.3 mW cm-2 with 4 M MeOH at 25 °C (31.8 mW cm-2 for Nafion 115). Due to the highly oxidative stability of the membrane, no obvious performance degradation of the DMFC is observed after more than 400 h operation, indicating such cost-effective ionic-covalent cross-linked membranes have substantial potential as alternative PEMs for DMFC applications.

  20. Nanocomposite Based on Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles and Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone Membranes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Venditti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles, capped by 3-mercapto propane sulfonate (Au-3MPS, were synthesized inside a swollen sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone membrane (sPEEK. The formation of the Au-3MPS nanoparticles in the swollen sPEEK membrane was observed by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite containing the gold nanoparticles grown in the sPEEK membrane, showed the plasmon resonance λmax at about 520 nm, which remained stable over a testing period of three months. The size distribution of the nanoparticles was assessed, and the sPEEK membrane roughness, both before and after the synthesis of nanoparticles, was studied by AFM. The XPS measurements confirm Au-3MPS formation in the sPEEK membrane. Moreover, AFM experiments recorded in fluid allowed the production of images of the Au-3MPS@sPEEK composite in water at different pH levels, achieving a better understanding of the membrane behavior in a water environment; the dynamic hydration process of the Au-3MPS@sPEEK membrane was investigated. These preliminary results suggest that the newly developed nanocomposite membranes could be promising materials for fuel cell applications.

  1. Novel proton exchange membranes based on structure-optimized poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s and nanocrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chuangjiang; Wei, Yingcong; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Baijun; Sun, Zhaoyan; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Mingyao; Hu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Two sulfonated fluorenyl-containing poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SFPEEKKs) were synthesized as the matrix of composite proton exchange membranes by directly sulfonating copolymer precursors comprising non-sulfonatable fluorinated segments and sulfonatable fluorenyl-containing segments. Surface-modified nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was produced as the "performance-enhancing" filler by treating the microcrystalline cellulose with acid. Two families of SFPEEKK/NCC nanocomposite membranes with various NCC contents were prepared via a solution-casting procedure. Results revealed that the insertion of NCC at a suitable ratio could greatly enhance the proton conductivity of the pristine membranes. For example, the proton conductivity of SFPEEKK-60/NCC-4 (SFPEEKK with 60% fluorenyl segments in the repeating unit, and inserted with 4% NCC) composite membrane was as high as 0.245 S cm-1 at 90 °C, which was 61.2% higher than that of the corresponding pure SFPEEKK-60 membrane. This effect could be attributed to the formation of hydrogen bond networks and proton conduction paths through the interaction between -SO3H/-OH groups on the surface of NCC particles and -SO3H groups on the SFPEEKK backbones. Furthermore, the chemically modified NCC filler and the optimized chemical structure of the SFPEEKK matrix also provided good dimensional stability and mechanical properties of the obtained nanocomposites. In conclusion, these novel nanocomposites can be promising proton exchange membranes for fuel cells at moderate temperatures.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. ... specialized brain systems. We have many specialized brain systems that work ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which ...

  6. 40 CFR 721.7260 - Polymer of poly-ethylene-polyamine and alkanediol di-gly-cidyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alkanediol di-gly-cidyl ether. 721.7260 Section 721.7260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... di-gly-cidyl ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The... ether (PMN P-89-810) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  7. 40 CFR 721.522 - Oxirane, methyl-, polymer with oxirane, mono(3,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., mono(3,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether. 721.522 Section 721.522 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...,5,5,-trimethylhexyl) ether. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1...,-trimethylhexyl) ether (PMN P-99-0669; CAS No. 204336-40-3) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  8. Poly (ether imide sulfone) membranes from solutions in ionic liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2017-11-20

    A membrane manufacture method based on non-volatile solvents and a high performance polymer, poly (ether imide sulfone) (EXTEM™), is proposed, as greener alternative to currently industrial process. We dissolved EXTEM™ in pure ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidalzolium thiocyanate ([EMIM]SCN), 1-butyl-3-methylimidalzolium thiocyanate ([BMIM]SCN), and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidalzolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc). The following polymer solution parameters were evaluated to optimize the manufacture: Gibbs free energy of mixing (G), intrinsic viscosity ([]) and hydrodynamic diameter. Membranes with sponge-like structure and narrow pore size distribution were obtained from solutions in [EMIM]SCN. They were tested for separation of proteins and deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA). Due to the polymer stability, we foresee that applications in more demanding chemical separations would be possible. [EMIM]SCN was 96 % purified and recovered after the membrane fabrication, contributing to the sustainability of the whole manufacturing process.

  9. Probing supramolecular complexation of cetylpyridinium chloride with crown ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhadeep; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2017-11-01

    Supramolecular complexations of cetylpyridinium chloride with three comparable cavity dimension based crown ethers, namely, dibenzo-18-crown-6, 18-crown-6 and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 have been explored and adequately compared in acetonitrile with the help of conductivity in a series of temperatures to reveal the stoichiometry of the three host-guest complexes. Programme based mathematical treatment of the conductivity data affords association constants for complexations from which the thermodynamic parameters were derived for better comprehension about the process. The interactions at molecular level have been explained and decisively discussed by means of FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies that demonstrate H-bond type interactions as the primarily force of attraction for the investigated supramolecular complexations.

  10. Removal of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) with Nafion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Hsing-Lung; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2007-06-01

    A solid organic polymer, Nafion, is tested for the removal of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in water. Nafion with perfluorosulfonic acid backbone and terminal sulfonic acid groups has a surface acidity similar to 100% sulfuric acid, and has been commonly used as a strong-acid catalyst in many organic reactions. Sorption and subsequent transformation of MTBE were observed in batch experiments. The transformation of MTBE by porous nanocomposite Nafion SAC-13 to tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), acetone, isobutene and probably methanol was found. Subsequent transformation of TBA to acetone was also observed. Results suggest that transformational pathways may include hydrolysis, dehydrogenation and oxidation. Dissolved oxygen is needed for the oxidation of isobutene to acetone. As Nafion is insoluble in water, chemically stable, and regenerable, its use in packed-bed reactors for MTBE removal looks promising.

  11. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr

    an increase in engine power. The use of methanol for combustion phasing control was tested successfully in a large diesel engine with common rail, in which the piston bowls were widened to give a compression ratio of 14.5. This compression ratio still allows DI CI operation with DME, but requires...... in the combustion chamber and hence the noise emitted from the engine. The study showed that minimum exposure of the cylinder liner is critical in reducing the transmitted noise. The effect of splitting the chamber into smaller volumes was tested, by shaping piston crowns with cavities. It was found that piston......This thesis is based on experimental and numerical studies on the use of dimethyl ether (DME) in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process. The first paper in this thesis was published in 2007 and describes HCCI combustion of pure DME in a small diesel engine. The tests...

  12. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Mississippi River suspended sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raff, J.; Hites, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The Mississippi River Basin drains water from 41% of the conterminous U.S. and is a valuable resource that supplies food, transportation, and irrigation to more than 95 million people of the region. Discharge and runoff from industry, agriculture, and population centers have increased the loads of anthropogenic organic compounds in the river. There has been growing concern over the rising levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in air, sediment, biota, and humans, but there have been no studies to measure the concentrations of these chemicals in North America's largest river system. The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence of PBDEs (15 congeners including BDE-209) and to identify possible sources within the Mississippi River Basin. We found PBDEs to be widespread throughout the region, rivaling PCBs in their extent and magnitude of contamination. We have also calculated the total amount of PBDEs released to the Gulf of Mexico in 2002.

  13. (R,R-Disynephrine ether bis(hydrogen sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Arbuckle

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: (R,R-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl-N,N′-dimethyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diammonium bis(hydrogen sulfate], C18H26N2O32+·2HSO4−, contains one half-cation and one hydrogen sulfate anion. The cation has crystallographically imposed twofold symmetry with the rotation axis passing through the central ether O atom. Hydrogen bonds between the hydroxy group and amine H atoms of the cation to two hydrogen sulfate anions link the three ions in a ring motif. A three-dimensional network is accomplished by additional O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the anions and by N—H...O hydrogen bonds between the cations. Disorder with equally occupied sites affects the H-atom position in the anion.

  14. Poly(phenylene ether Based Amphiphilic Block Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward N. Peters

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenylene ether (PPE telechelic macromonomers are unique hydrophobic polyols which have been used to prepare amphiphilic block copolymers. Various polymer compositions have been synthesized with hydrophilic blocks. Their macromolecular nature affords a range of structures including random, alternating, and di- and triblock copolymers. New macromolecular architectures can offer tailored property profiles for optimum performance. Besides reducing moisture uptake and making the polymer surface more hydrophobic, the PPE hydrophobic segment has good compatibility with polystyrene (polystyrene-philic. In general, the PPE contributes to the toughness, strength, and thermal performance. Hydrophilic segments go beyond their affinity for water. Improvements in the interfacial adhesion between polymers and polar substrates via hydrogen bonding and good compatibility with polyesters (polyester-philic have been exhibited. The heterogeneity of domains in these PPE based block copolymer offers important contributions to diverse applications.

  15. Biosynthetic Origin of the Ether Ring in Platensimycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D; Dong, Liao-Bin; Manoogian, Karina; Shen, Ben

    2016-12-28

    Platensimycin (PTM) and platencin (PTN) are highly functionalized bacterial diterpenoid natural products that target bacterial and mammalian fatty acid synthases. PTM and PTN feature varying diterpene-derived ketolides that are linked to the same 3-amino-2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid moiety. As a result, PTM is a selective inhibitor for FabF/FabB, while PTN is a dual inhibitor of FabF/FabB and FabH. We previously determined that the PTM cassette, consisting of five genes found in the ptm, but not ptn, gene cluster, partitions the biosynthesis of the PTM and PTN diterpene-derived ketolides. We now report investigation of the PTM cassette through the construction of diterpene production systems in E. coli and genetic manipulation in the PTM-PTN dual overproducer Streptomyces platensis SB12029, revealing two genes, ptmT3 and ptmO5, that are responsible for the biosynthetic divergence between the PTM and PTN diterpene-derived ketolides. PtmT3, a type I diterpene synthase, was determined to be a (16R)-ent-kauran-16-ol synthase, the first of its kind found in bacteria. PtmO5, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, is proposed to catalyze the formation of the characteristic 11S,16S-ether ring found in PTM. Inactivation of ptmO5 in SB12029 afforded the ΔptmO5 mutant SB12036 that accumulated nine PTM and PTN congeners, seven of which were new, including seven 11-deoxy-16R-hydroxy-PTM congeners. The two fully processed PTM analogues showed antibacterial activities, albeit lower than that of PTM, indicating that the ether ring, or minimally the stereochemistry of the hydroxyl group at C-16, is crucial for the activity of PTM.

  16. The ether lipid precursor hexadecylglycerol protects against Shiga toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, Jonas; Skotland, Tore; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Simm, Roger; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Lindbäck, Toril; Sylvänne, Tuulia; Simolin, Helena; Ekroos, Kim; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2014-11-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli bacteria cause hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Currently, only supportive treatment is available for diagnosed patients. We show here that 24-h pretreatment with an ether lipid precursor, the alkylglycerol sn-1-O-hexadecylglycerol (HG), protects HEp-2 cells against Shiga toxin and Shiga toxin 2. Also the endothelial cell lines HMEC-1 and HBMEC are protected against Shiga toxins after HG pretreatment. In contrast, the corresponding acylglycerol, DL-α-palmitin, has no effect on Shiga toxicity. Although HG treatment provides a strong protection (~30 times higher IC₅₀) against Shiga toxin, only a moderate reduction in toxin binding was observed, suggesting that retrograde transport of the toxin from the plasma membrane to the cytosol is perturbed. Furthermore, endocytosis of Shiga toxin and retrograde sorting from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus remain intact, but transport from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum is inhibited by HG treatment. As previously described, HG reduces the total level of all quantified glycosphingolipids to 50-70% of control, including the Shiga toxin receptor globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), in HEp-2 cells. In accordance with this, we find that interfering with Gb3 biosynthesis by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Gb3 synthase for 24 h causes a similar cytotoxic protection and only a moderate reduction in toxin binding (to 70% of control cells). Alkylglycerols, including HG, have been administered to humans for investigation of therapeutic roles in disorders where ether lipid biosynthesis is deficient, as well as in cancer therapy. Further studies may reveal if HG can also have a therapeutic potential in Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections.

  17. Evaluating the swelling, erosion, and compaction properties of cellulose ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghori, Muhammad U; Grover, Liam M; Asare-Addo, Kofi; Smith, Alan M; Conway, Barbara R

    2018-02-01

    Swelling, erosion, deformation, and consolidation properties can affect the performance of cellulose ethers, the most commonly used matrix former in hydrophilic sustained tablet formulations. The present study was designed to comparatively evaluate the swelling, erosion, compression, compaction, and relaxation properties of the cellulose ethers in a comprehensive study using standardised conditions. The interrelationship between various compressional models and the inherent deformation and consolidation properties of the polymers on the derived swelling and erosion parameters are consolidated. The impact of swelling (K w ) on erosion rates (K E ) and the inter-relationship between Heckel and Kawakita plasticity constants was also investigated. It is evident from the findings that the increases in both substitution and polymer chain length led to higher K w , but a lower K E ; this was also true for all particle size fractions regardless of polymer grade. Smaller particle size and high substitution levels tend to increase the relative density of the matrix but reduce porosity, yield pressure (P y ), Kawakita plasticity parameter (b -1 ) and elastic relaxation. Both K W versus K E (R 2  = 0.949-0.980) and P y versus. b -1 correlations (R 2  = 0.820-0.934) were reasonably linear with regards to increasing hydroxypropyl substitution and molecular size. Hence, it can be concluded that the combined knowledge of swelling and erosion kinetics in tandem with the in- and out-of-die compression findings can be used to select a specific polymer grade and further to develop and optimize formulations for oral controlled drug delivery applications.

  18. EXPOSURE TO ETHYLENE GLYCOL MONOBUTYL ETHER AND RELATED WORKERS HABITS IN AN INK FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Lin, H. Y. Chang, F. H. Chang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty six workers from an ink factory were included in this study, in which, passive badge sampler and questionnaire interview were used to assess the concentrations of airborne exposure to ethylene glycol monobutyl ether during work shifts and to understand the subjects' working habits. The geometric mean value (95% confidence interval of the airborne ethylene glycol monobutyl ether concentrations was 0.12(0.08-0.19ppm, with a range of <0.02-1.82ppm. The exposure group was exposed to statistically significantly higher ethylene glycol monobutyl ether concentrations than the control group (geometric mean value: 0.14vs. 0.03ppm; P=0.017. Some chromatograms showed that subjects were co-exposed to m-xylene, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate. According to the completed questionnaires, subjects might also be exposed to 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene, propylene glycol ethers, ethanol, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, methanol and diisononyl phthalate. This study also suggests that, the Taiwan occupational time-weighted average level of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether be reconsidered with a view to being lowered.

  19. Alternariol 9-methyl ether from the endophytic fungus Alternaria sp. Samif01 and its bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jingfeng; Yu, Ruiting; Wang, Xiaohan; Mao, Ziling; Fu, Linyun; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Ligang

    2016-01-01

    One bioactive compound, identified as alternariol 9-methyl ether, was isolated from the crude extract of the endophytic fungus Alternaria sp. Samif01 residing in the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. Alternariol 9-methyl ether was active against bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 25 to 75μg/mL and median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 16.00 to 38.27μg/mL. The IC50 value of alternariol 9-methyl ether against spore germination of Magnaporthe oryzae was 87.18μg/mL. Alternariol 9-methyl ether also showed antinematodal activity against Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Caenorhabditis elegans with IC50 values of 98.17μg/mL and 74.62μg/mL, respectively. This work is the first report on alternariol 9-methyl ether and its biological activities from the endophytic fungus Alternaria sp. Samif01 derived from S. miltiorrhiza Bunge. The results indicate the potential of Alternaria sp. Samif01 as a source of alternariol 9-methyl ether and also support that alternariol 9-methyl ether is a natural compound with high potential bioactivity against microorganisms. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. The Preparation and Intramolecular Radical Cyclisation Reactions of Chiral Oxime Ethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Booth Susan E.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiral oxime ether 2 and Oxime ester 4 have been prepared by alkylation and esterification of the oxime 1. Racemic hydroxylamine 6 and chiral hydroxylamine 10 have been synthesised from N-hydroxysuccinimide and the corresponding alcohol in the presence of diethylazodicarboxylate, the two products were converted into the oxime ethers 7 and 11 respectively. The intramolecular radical cyclisation reactions of these oxime ethers and esters has been studied, successful reaction was observed to produce alkyl hydroxylamines 3, 8 and 12.

  1. FT-IR and NIR spectroscopic investigation of hydrogen bonding in indole-ether systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordić, B.; Kovačević, M.; Sloboda, T.; Vidović, A.; Jović, B.

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports FTIR and NIR spectroscopic study of hydrogen bonding between indole and different ethers in carbon tetrachloride. With increase in ether concentration increase in intensity of red-shifted band, and decrease of intensity of monomer band has been observed. The FTIR and NIR spectroscopic characteristics for N-H⋯O hydrogen bonded complexes and also the equilibrium constants for 1:1 complex formation are given. Influence of structural differences of ethers on hydrogen bonding was investigated using Taft equation. Good correlation has been obtained.

  2. Amination of ethers using chloramine-T hydrate and a copper(I) catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albone, David P; Challenger, Stephen; Derrick, Andrew M; Fillery, Shaun M; Irwin, Jacob L; Parsons, Christopher M; Takada, Hiroya; Taylor, Paul C; Wilson, D James

    2005-01-07

    Amination of C-H bonds activated by ether oxygen atoms is facile with chloramine-T as nitrene source and copper(I) chloride in acetonitrile as catalyst. For cyclic ethers the hemiaminal products are generally stable and can be isolated pure. For acyclic ethers, the hemiaminal products, as expected, fragment with elimination of alcohol to yield imines. When activation of benzylic positions is remote through a conjugated system, stable benzylamine derivatives are isolated. Mechanistic studies are consistent with concerted insertion of an electrophilic nitrenoid into the C-H bond in the rate-determining step, though in an asynchronous manner with a more activated substrate.

  3. State of the water in crosslinked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). Two-dimensional differential scanning calorimetry correlation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Lafi, Abdul G. [Department of Chemistry, Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Hay, James N., E-mail: cscientific9@aec.org.sy [The School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Physical Sciences and Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • 2D-DSC mapping was applied to analyze the heat flow responses of hydrated crosslinked sPEEK. • Two types of loosely bond water were observed. • The first was bond to the sulfonic acid groups and increased with ion exchange capacity. • The second was attributed to the polar groups introduced by ions irradiation and increased with crosslinking degree. • DSC combined with 2D mapping provides a powerful tool for polymer structural determination. - Abstract: This paper reports the first application of two-dimensional differential scanning calorimetry correlation mapping, 2D-DSC-CM to analyze the heat flow responses of sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone), sPEEK, films having different ion exchange capacity and degrees of crosslinks. With the help of high resolution and high sensitivity of 2D-DSC-CM, it was possible to locate two types of loosely bound water within the structure of crosslinked sPEEK. The first was bound to the sulfonic acid groups and dependent on the ion exchange capacity of the sPEEK. The second was bound to other polar groups, either introduced by irradiation with ions and dependent on the crosslinking degree or present in the polymer such as the carbonyl groups or terminal units. The results suggest that the ability of the sulfonic acid groups in the crosslinked sPEEK membranes to adsorb water molecules is increased by crosslinking, probably due to the better close packing efficiency of the crosslinked samples. DSC combined with 2D correlation mapping provides a fast and powerful tool for polymer structural determination.

  4. Dihydrogenimidazole modified silica-sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) hybrid materials as electrolyte membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Kimball S.; Hirth, Thomas [Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Nobelstr. 12, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schiestel, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Schiestel@igb.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Nobelstr. 12, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-05-25

    The present study reports on dihydrogenimidazole modified inorganic-organic mixed matrix membranes for possible application as a proton exchange membrane in direct ethanol fuel cells. The polymeric phase consisted mainly of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with a sulfonation degree of 55%. The inorganic phase was built up from hydrophilic fumed silica particles interconnected with partially hydrolyzed and condensed tetraethoxysilane with a total inorganic loading of 27.3%. This inorganic phase was further modified with N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole (DHIM), which consists of an hydrolyzable inorganic part and a functional organic group. The influence of the modifier on the mixed matrix system was studied by means of various modifier concentrations in various aqueous-ethanolic systems (water, 2 M and 4 M ethanol). Modifier concentration and ethanol concentration of the ethanol-water mixture exhibited significant but opposite effects on the liquid uptake of the mixed matrix membranes. The proton conductivity as well as the proton diffusion coefficient as a function of modifier content showed a linear decrease. The proton conductivity as a function of temperature showed Arrhenius behavior and the activation energy of the mixed matrix membranes was 43.9 {+-} 2.6 kJ mol{sup -1}. High selectivity of proton diffusion coefficient to ethanol permeability coefficient was obtained with high modifier concentrations. At low modifier concentrations, this selectivity was dominated by ethanol permeation and at high modifier concentrations by proton diffusion. The main electrolyte properties can be optimized by setting the DHIM content in mixed matrix membrane. With this approach, tailor-made membranes can be prepared for possible application in direct ethanol fuel cells.

  5. Ether-bond-containing ionic liquids and the relevance of the ether bond position to transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Marcelo J; Camilo, Fernanda F; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Torresi, Roberto M

    2010-10-07

    The ionic liquids (ILs) 1-ethoxyethyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [EtO(CH(2))(2)MMI][Tf(2)N], and N-(ethoxyethyl)-N-methylmorpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [EtO(CH(2))(2)MMor][Tf(2)N] were synthesized, and relevant properties, such as thermal stability, density, viscosity, electrochemical behavior, ionic conductivity, and self-diffusion coefficients for both ionic species, were measured and compared with those of their alkyl counterparts, 1-n-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [BMMI][Tf(2)N], and N-n-butyl-N-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [BMP][Tf(2)N] and N-n-butyl-N-methylmorpholinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [BMMor][Tf(2)N]. This comparison was done to evaluate the effects caused by the presence of the ether bond in either the side chain or in the organic cation ring. The salt, LiTf(2)N, was added to the systems to estimate IL behavior with regard to lithium cation transport. Pure [EtO(CH(2))(2)MMI][Tf(2)N] and their LiTf(2)N solutions showed low viscosity and the highest conductivity among the ILs studied. The H(R) (AC conductivity/NMR calculated conductivity ratio) values showed that, after addition of LiTf(2)N, ILs containing the ether bond seemed to have a greater number of charged species. Structural reasons could explain these high observed H(R) values for [EtO(CH(2))(2)MMor][Tf(2)N].

  6. Brain Basics

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  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... of contact for receiving impulses on a neuron, branching off from the cell body. dopamine —A neurotransmitter ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a major mood circuit called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain ... in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays ...

  3. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic- ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent from one neuron to ... of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ...

  9. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the brain (ventricles) or surrounding your brain and spinal cord to drain the excess fluid into an external bag. Sometimes it may then be necessary to introduce a shunt system — which consists of a ... brain and ending in your abdominal cavity. Rehabilitative therapy. ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  12. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  13. 3-Pyridyl ethers as SPECT radioligands for imaging nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, D.J.; Eberl, S.; Thomson, S.; Smith, A.; Allan, R.D.; Fulham, M.J.; Loiacono, R.; Kassiou, M. E-mail: mkassiou@med.usyd.edu.au

    2004-05-01

    To develop a suitable single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radioligand for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that displays faster in vivo kinetics than 5-[{sup 123}I]iodo-A-85380, we synthesised the radioiodinated analogue of A-84543. 5-[{sup 123}I]Iodo-A-84543 was prepared by electrophilic iododestannylation in a modest yield of 23%. In the baboon brain, 5-[{sup 123}I]iodo-A-85380 displayed a profile consistent with the known distribution of nAChRs, however, 5-[{sup 123}I]iodo-A-84543 displayed a homogenous uptake with no preferential localisation in regions known to contain nAChRs. To examine the effect of halogen substitution on the 3-pyridyl ether, A-84543, the 5-chloro, 5-bromo and 5-iodo analogues were synthesised and evaluated with respect to nAChR binding. In vitro binding data revealed that halogen substitution at the 5-position of A-84543 was not well tolerated with an increase in halogen size resulting in lower binding towards nAChRs. The 5-chloro analogue 4 displayed highest affinity, K{sub i}=1.3 nM, compared to the 5-bromo and 5-iodo compounds, 5 K{sub i}=3.3 nM and 3 K{sub i}=40.8 nM, respectively. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that 5-[{sup 123}I]iodo-A-84543 is not suitable for the study of nAChRs in vivo using SPECT.

  14. Human ether-à-go-go gene potassium channels are regulated by EGFR tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Dong, Ming-Qing; Wu, Xing-Gang; Sun, Hai-Ying; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lau, Chu-Pak; Li, Gui-Rong

    2012-02-01

    Human ether á-go-go gene potassium channels (hEAG1 or Kv10.1) are expressed in brain and various human cancers and play a role in neuronal excitement and tumor progression. However, the functional regulation of hEAG channels by signal transduction is not fully understood. The present study was therefore designed to investigate whether hEAG1 channels are regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in HEK 293 cells stably expressing hEAG1 gene using whole-cell patch voltage-clamp, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and mutagenesis approaches. We found that the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitor AG556 (10 μM), but not the platelet growth factor receptor (PDGFR) kinase inhibitor AG1295 (10 μM) or the Src-family inhibitor PP2 (10 μM), can inhibit hEAG1 current, and the inhibitory effect can be reversed by the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor orthovanadate. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation level of hEAG1 channels was reduced by AG556, and the reduction was significantly countered by orthovanadate. The hEAG1 mutants Y90A, Y344A and Y485A, but not Y376A and Y479A, exhibited reduced response to AG556. Interestingly, the inhibition effect of AG556 was lost in triple mutant hEAG1 channels at Y90, Y344, and Y485 with alanine. These results demonstrate for the first time that hEAG1 channel activity is regulated by EGFR kinase at the tyrosine residues Tyr90, Try344, and Try485. This effect is likely involved in regulating neuronal activity and/or tumor growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Flourimetric and prototropic studies on the inclusion complexation of 2-amino and 4-aminodiphenyl ethers with {beta}-cyclodextrin: Unusual behavior of 4-aminodiphenyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoch, Israel V. Muthu Vijayan [Department of Chemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Swaminathan, Meenakshisundaram [Department of Chemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India)], E-mail: chemsam@yahoo.com

    2007-12-15

    The fluorescence characteristics of diphenyl ether (DPE), 2-aminodiphenyl ether (2ADPE) and 4-aminodiphenyl ether (4ADPE) and prototropic behavior of 2ADPE and 4ADPE on inclusion complexation with {beta}-cyclodextrin have been investigated. DPE forms 1:1 complex whereas 2ADPE and 4ADPE form 1:2 complex with {beta}-CDx. The fluorimetric and prototropic behaviors of 4ADPE in {beta}-CDx are different from those in aqueous solution. The dual fluorescence of 4ADPE in {beta}-CDx is found to be due to twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) character induced by inclusion complexation. The two equilibria viz. monocation{r_reversible}monocation solvent exciplex{r_reversible}neutral reported for 4ADPE in aqueous solution are not observed in presence of {beta}-CDx. The ground and excited state pK{sub a} values for monocation-neutral equilibrium of 2ADPE and 4ADPE have been reported.

  16. ETHER: HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE IN SCIENCE AND APPROACH THE TEXTBOOK OF SECONDARY EDUCATION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. C. B. Soares; E. P. Soares; J. A. Pereira

    2016-01-01

    This article aimed to conduct a brief rereading as the importance of the ether, from its earliest conception to the present within a historical context to the current scientific knowledge development...

  17. Fluorinated 5- and 7-membered carbacycle motifs by reaction of difluorocarbene with acetylene ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Poh Wai; Bello, Davide; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; O'Hagan, David

    2013-03-18

    The reaction of acetylene ethers with difluorocarbene (CF(2)), generated from the Ruppert-Prakash reagent, unexpectedly gave rise to co-produced fluorinated bicyclic [2.1.1]-hex-2-ene and cyclohepta-1,4-diene ring products.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of arctigenin ester and ether derivatives as activators of AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Sida; Zhuang, Jingjing; Chen, Yijia; Lei, Min; Chen, Jing; Shen, Xu; Hu, Lihong

    2013-07-01

    A series of new arctigenin and 9-deoxy-arctigenin derivatives bearing different ester and ether side chains at the phenolic hydroxyl positions are designed, synthesized, and evaluated for activating AMPK potency in L6 myoblasts. Initial biological evaluation indicates that some alkyl ester and phenethyl ether arctigenin derivatives display potential activities in AMPK phosphorylation improvement. Further structure-activity relationship analysis shows that arctigenin ester derivatives 3a, 3h and 9-deoxy-arctigenin phenethyl ether derivatives 6a, 6c, 6d activate AMPK more potently than arctigenin. Moreover, the 2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl ether moiety of 6c has been demonstrated as a potential functional group to improve the effect of AMPK phosphorylation. The structural optimization of arctigenin leads to the identification of 6c as a promising lead compound that exhibits excellent activity in AMPK activation. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxime Ethers of (E)-11-Isonitrosostrychnine as Highly Potent Glycine Receptor Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohsen, Amal M Y; Mandour, Yasmine M; Sarukhanyan, Edita

    2016-01-01

    A series of (E)-11-isonitrosostrychnine oxime ethers, 2-aminostrychnine, (strychnine-2-yl)propionamide, 18-oxostrychnine, and N-propylstrychnine bromide were synthesized and evaluated pharmacologically at human α1 and α1β glycine receptors in a functional fluorescence-based and a whole-cell patch......-clamp assay and in [(3)H]strychnine binding studies. 2-Aminostrychnine and the methyl, allyl, and propargyl oxime ethers were the most potent α1 and α1β antagonists in the series, displaying IC50 values similar to those of strychnine at the two receptors. Docking experiments to the strychnine binding site...... of the crystal structure of the α3 glycine receptor indicated the same orientation of the strychnine core for all analogues. For the most potent oxime ethers, the ether substituent was accommodated in a lipophilic receptor binding pocket. The findings identify the oxime hydroxy group as a suitable attachment...

  20. Elton Romeo Smilie, the not-quite discoverer of ether anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Martha E; Meyer, Marlene R; Alston, Theodore A

    2010-01-01

    Like William T.G. Morton, Elton Romeo Smilie (1819-1889) was raised in Massachusetts, attended medical school in New England, practiced dentistry there, strove for clinical invention, and moved to Boston. In October 1846, both announced that inhaled ethereal preparations achieved reversible insensibility in surgical patients. Smilie published a report in the Boston Med Surg J 3 wk before Bigelow used that forum to broadcast Morton's Ether Day. Smilie's preparation was an ethereal tincture of opium, and, as he mistakenly believed the opium to be volatile and important, he ceded priority to Morton for ether anesthesia. The two authors collaborated on chloroform, but Smilie soon headed off in the Gold Rush to California. It is tempting to speculate that Charles T. Jackson and Morton were indebted in part to Smilie.

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethylene Glycol Mono-Butyl Ether (Egbe) (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  2. Santonic acid: Zn-HCl-ether reduction and ceric ammonium nitrate oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondekar, Kamlesh Pai; Malik, Bhiwa; Paknikar, Shashikumar Keshav

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of santonic acid using Zn-HCl-ether yielded succinic anhydride derivatives via pinacolisation followed by rearrangement, whereas oxidation of santonic acid using ceric ammonium nitrate afforded five oxidative decarboxylation products. Dedicated to Prof. TBH McMurry.

  3. Miconidin and miconidin methyl ether from Primula obconica Hance: new allergens in an old sensitizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2006-01-01

    Several chemical and clinical observations have suggested the presence of at least one more allergen in addition to primin in Primula obconica. The aim of this study was to investigate the allergenicity of the primin precursor miconidin and the related miconidin methyl ether, both isolated from P....... obconica. 12 primin-positive persons were patch tested with miconidin 0.01% petrolatum (pet.), miconidin in 96% ethanol incorporated into 0.01% pet., and miconidin methyl ether 1.0% pet. All persons were positive to miconidin 0.01% pet., with the strength of reactions very similar to those...... of the individual primin reactions, and remained inexplicably negative while testing with miconidin in 96% ethanol and pet., while miconidin methyl ether elicited 7 positive reactions. Although both miconidin and miconidin methyl ether may be allergenic only due to their conversion to primin in the skin...

  4. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and perfluorinated compounds in the atmosphere of North Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossi, Rossana; Vorkamp, Katrin; Skov, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and neutral per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been measured at Villum Research Station, Station Nord (North Greenland) in the period 2008–2013. Atmospheric concentrations of OCPs...

  5. Ethereal C–O Bond Cleavage Mediated by Ni(0)-Ate Complex: A DFT Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kojima, Kumiko; Yang, Ze-Kun; Wang, Chao; Uchiyama, Masanobu

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the mechanism of Ni-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions involving organo-lithium and -zinc reagents through ethereal C–O bond cleavage...

  6. Exposure of German residents to ethylene and propylene glycol ethers in general and after cleaning scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, H; Nitschke, L; Boehmer, S; Kiranoglu, M; Göen, T

    2013-03-01

    Glycol ethers are a class of semi-volatile substances used as solvents in a variety of consumer products like cleaning agents, paints, cosmetics as well as chemical intermediates. We determined 11 metabolites of ethylene and propylene glycol ethers in 44 urine samples of German residents (background level study) and in urine samples of individuals after exposure to glycol ethers during cleaning activities (exposure study). In the study on the background exposure, methoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid (PhAA) could be detected in each urine sample with median (95th percentile) values of 0.11 mgL(-1) (0.30 mgL(-1)) and 0.80 mgL(-1) (23.6 mgL(-1)), respectively. The other metabolites were found in a limited number of samples or in none. In the exposure study, 5-8 rooms were cleaned with a cleaner containing ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGBE), propylene glycol monobutyl ether (PGBE), or ethylene glycol monopropyl ether (EGPE). During cleaning the mean levels in the indoor air were 7.5 mgm(-3) (EGBE), 3.0 mgm(-3) (PGBE), and 3.3 mgm(-3) (EGPE), respectively. The related metabolite levels analysed in the urine of the residents of the rooms at the day of cleaning were 2.4 mgL(-1) for butoxyacetic acid, 0.06 mgL(-1) for 2-butoxypropionic acid, and 2.3 mgL(-1) for n-propoxyacetic acid. Overall, our study indicates that the exposure of the population to glycol ethers is generally low, with the exception of PhAA. Moreover, the results of the cleaning scenarios demonstrate that the use of indoor cleaning agents containing glycol ethers can lead to a detectable internal exposure of residents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbamate-directed benzylic lithiation for the diastereo- and enantioselective synthesis of diaryl ether atropisomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Page

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaryl ethers carrying carbamoyloxymethyl groups may be desymmetrised enantio- and diastereoselectively by the use of the sec-BuLi–(−-sparteine complex in diethyl ether. Enantioselective deprotonation of one of the two benzylic positions leads to atropisomeric products with ca. 80:20 e.r.; an electrophilic quench typically provides functionalised atropisomeric diastereoisomers in up to 97:3 d.r.

  8. Water-Filled Telescopes and the Pre-History of Fresnel's Ether Dragging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kurt Møller

    2000-01-01

    The idea of measuring stellar aberration with a water-filled telescope was entertained from the middle of the 18th century by Thomas Melvill, Patrick Wilson, Roger Joseph Boscovich, and John Robison. I shall discuss their ideas as well as those discussed by Thomas Young, Francois Arago, and Augus...... for the ether dragging, the ether being the very subtle medium through which light propagates....

  9. Metal ion complexation by ionizable crown ethers. Final report, January 1, 1988--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    During the report period a variety of new lipophilic ionizable crown ethers with pendent proton-ionizable groups has been synthesized. The ligands possess one or more ionizable group (carboxylic acid, phosphonic acid monoethyl ester, para-nitrophenol, phosphonic acid) attached to crown ether, monoazacrown ether or diazacrown ether frameworks. These novel chelating agents have either pendent or inward-facing proton-ionizable groups. Such lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ethers are designed for use in multiphase metal ion separations (solvent extraction, liquid membrane transport). In addition a series of proton-ionizable crown ethers without lipophilic groups was prepared to study how structural variations within the ligand influence metal ion complexation in homogeneous media as assessed by NMR spectroscopy or titration calorimetry. A third class of new metal ion-complexing agents is a series of lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids. Competitive solvent extractions of alkali metal and alkaline earth cations and of the mixed species have been conducted to reveal the influence of ring size, nature and attachment site of the lipophilic group, sidearm length, and proton-ionizable group identity and location upon the selectivity and efficiency of metal ion complexation. In addition to such studies of structural variation within the lipophilic proton-ionizable crown ether, the effect of changing the organic solvent and variation of the stripping conditions have been assessed. The influence of structural variations within lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids upon competitive solvent extraction of alkaline earth cations has been probed. Also a new chromogenic, di-ionizable crown ether with extremely high selectivity for Hg{sup 2+} has been discovered.

  10. Safety Assessment of Alkyl PEG/PPG Ethers as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel assessed the safety of 131 alkyl polyethylene glycol (PEG)/polypropylene glycol ethers as used in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment when formulated to be nonirritating. Most of the alkyl PEG/PPG ethers included in this review are reported to function in cosmetics as surfactants, skin-conditioning agents, and/or emulsifying agents. The alkyl PEG/PPG ethers share very similar physiochemical properties as the alkyl PEG ethers, which were reviewed previously by the CIR Expert Panel and found safe when formulated to be nonirritating. The alkyl PEG ethers differ by the inclusion of PPG repeat units, which are used to fine-tune the surfactant properties of this group. The Panel relied heavily on data on analogous ingredients, extracted from the alkyl PEG ethers and PPG reports, when making its determination of safety. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Determination of fuel ethers in water by membrane extraction ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Sanna; Nousiainen, Marjaana; Sillanpää, Mika

    2013-03-15

    Fuel oxygenates are environmentally detrimental compounds due to their rapid migration to groundwater. Fuel oxygenates have been reported to cause taste and odour problems in drinking water, and they also have long-term health effects. Feasible analytical methods are required to observe the presence of fuel oxygenates in drinking and natural water. The authors studied ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to determinate isomeric fuel ether oxygenates; ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), diisopropyl ether (DIPE), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME), separated from aqueous matrices with a pervaporation membrane module. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was also membrane extracted and detected with IMS. The authors demonstrated that fuel ethers (MTBE, ETBE, DIPE, and TAME) can be quantified at μg/L level with membrane extraction IMS. A membrane extraction module coupled to IMS is a time and cost effective analysis method because sampling can be performed in a single procedure and from different natural water matrices within a few minutes. Consequently, IMS combined with membrane extraction is suitable not only for waterworks and other online applications but also in the field monitoring the quality of drinking and natural water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rotational Spectra of Halogenated Ethers Used as Volatile Anaesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Toribio, Alicia; Lesarri, Alberto; Suenram, Richard D.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Following previous microwave investigations by Suenram et al., we will report on the rotational spectrum of several halogenated ethers used as volatile anaesthetics, including sevoflurane ((CF_3)_2CH-O-CH_2F), isoflurane (CF_3CHCl-O-CHF_2), enflurane (CHFClCF_2-O-CHF_2) and methoxyflurane (CHCl_2CF_2-O-CH_3). This study has been conducted in the 6-18 GHz centimetre-wave region using Balle-Flygare-type FT-microwave spectroscopy. The results will include the analysis of the rotational spectra of minor species in natural abundance (^{13}C and ^{18}O in some cases), structural calculations and auxiliary ab initio modelling. The conformational and structural conclusions will be compared with previous gas-phase electron diffraction and solid-state X-ray diffraction analysis. R. D. Suenram, D. J. Brugh, F. J. Lovas and C. Chu, 51st OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 1999, RB07

  13. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by Kocuria sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiković Dragan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE has been used to replace the toxic compounds from gasoline and to reduce emission of air pollutants. Due to its intensive use, MTBE has become one of the most important environment pollutants. The aim of this paper is isolation and identification of the bacteria from wastewater sample of “HIP Petrohemija” Pančevo (Serbia, capable of MTBE biodegradation. The results of the investigation showed that only the bacterial isolate 27/1 was capable of growth on MTBE. The result of sequence analyzes of 16S rDNA showed that this bacterial isolate belongs to the Kocuria sp. After the incubation period of 86 days, the degradation rates of initial MTBE concentration of 25 and 125 μg/ml were 55 and 36%, respectively. These results indicated that bacteria Kocuria sp. is successfully adapted on MTBE and can be potentially used in bioremediation of soils and waters contaminated with MTBE.

  14. Maternal-infant transfer of polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T.; Fujimine, Y.; Watanabe, S. [Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokushima (Japan); Nakamura, Y. [SRL Nishinihon, Fukuoka (Japan); Shimomura, H. [Shimomura OBGY Clinic, Fukuoka (Japan); Nagayama, J. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in plastics of automobiles, textile industry, television, personal computer, electronic appliances etc. The amount of production world-wide has reached 40,000 tons in 1992. In 1992 world-wide production of PBDEs reached 40,000 tons raising serious concern over the dangers of environmental pollution by BFRs. The toxicity of PBDEs was reported to be an antagonist of thyroid-hormone (T4) and inhibition to aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor. Since PBDEs are structurally similar to PCBs and therefore they work as an antagonist. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) demonstrate biological stability and high lipophilicity. As a result, PCBs used in the past and released into the environment, have been transmitted through the food chain and accumlated in the human body over time. In Japan, approximately 58,000 tons of PCBs were produced with the grade name of Kanechlor in between 1954 and 1971. In this study, all PCB congeners and 25 PBDE congeners (17, 25, 28, 30, 32, 33, 35, 37, 47, 49, 66, 71, 75, 77, 85, 99, 100, 116, 119, 126, 138, 153, 154, 155, 166) were analyzed by the method that combines high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether congener-specific PCBs and PBDEs were transferred from pregnant women to their infants.

  15. Phthalates and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in retail stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Yirui; Urquidi, Jorge R.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2014-04-01

    Retail stores contain a wide range of products that can emit a variety of indoor pollutants. Among these chemicals, phthalate esters and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are two important categories, because they are extensively used as additives in consumer products and associated with serious health concerns. This study measured six phthalate and 14 PBDE compounds inside of 12 retail stores in Texas and Pennsylvania, U.S. Phthalates and PBDEs were widely found in the retail environment, indicating that they are ubiquitous indoor air pollutants. DEP, DnBP, and DEHP were the most abundant phthalates, with DnBP showing the highest concentration (0.23 ± 0.36 μg m-3). PBDEs were dominated by BDE-28, -99, and -209, having concentrations as high as 0.85 ± 1.99 ng m-3 (BDE-99). The levels of phthalates and PBDEs measured in this study are comparable to concentrations found in previous investigations of residential buildings, with phthalates showing lower concentrations and PBDEs exhibiting higher concentrations in retail stores. The potential co-occurrence of phthalates was not as strong as that of PBDEs, suggesting that phthalates might have more diverse sources. Whole building emission rates were calculated and showed similar patterns of variations as indoor air concentrations, suggestion the diversity of indoor sources of phthalates and PBDEs in retail environments.

  16. The effect of ether anesthesia on fin-clipping rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschmeyer, Paul H.

    1953-01-01

    As part of an experimental program to learn the effects of stocking lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Superior, 141, 392 fingerlings were marked at the Charlevoix (Michigan) Station of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in October 1952. The adipose fin was removed from all fish, the right pelvic from the remainder. A random sample of 2, 417 of the fish showed an average total length of 4.0 inches (range, 2.7 to 5.4). The mean weight of all fish marked was slightly less than one-third ounce (49 fish per pound). The local women, none of whom had previous experience in the work, were employed to mark the fish. Bone-cutting forceps were used for excision of the fins, and each worker wore a bobbinet glove to facilitate handling of the fish. On alternate days the fish were anesthetized with ether before marking, to determine the effect of its use on the fin-clipping rate.

  17. Theoretical investigations on direct photolysis mechanisms of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Se; Hao, Ce; Gao, Zhanxian; Chen, Jingwen; Qiu, Jieshan

    2014-09-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are a focus of current environmental concern as a group of ubiquitous potential persistent organic pollutants. There are still significant gaps in our knowledge concerning the photolysis mechanisms of PCDEs. In this study, the direct photolysis mechanisms of PCDEs were investigated by density functional theory. The direct photolysis of PCDEs has three potential reaction pathways including photodechlorination, C-O bond photodissociation, and PCDFs formation. Taking a representative PCDE (i.e., CDE8) for example, we found that C-Cl bond dissociation is the rate-determining step for the photodechlorination. Chlorobenzene is predicted to be photoproduct of CDE8 through the photodissociation of the C-O bond. Furthermore, the calculated mean bond dissociation energies of both C-Cl and C-O bonds of 20 PCDEs decrease with the increased degree of chlorination. It is also found that the photoactivity of PCDEs increases with an increase of chlorination degree by evaluating the average charge of Cl atoms and mean bond dissociation energies of C-Cl and C-O bonds from reaction thermodynamics. Our findings provided a new insight into the mechanisms of direct photolysis of PCDEs, which may be useful in the future in utilizing quantum chemistry calculation in investigating the behavior and fate of organic pollutants in the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation of Ether-Resistant Enteroviruses from Sewage: Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Michael F.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether polio type 1 (Mahoney and coxsackie A8 viruses adsorb onto cotton fibers of sewer swabs. Negative results were obtained. It has been shown that viruses may exist in sewage as free virus particles or as bound (adsorbed) virus particles. The sewer-swab method of sampling is superior because it filters out the bound virus over several days; when collected, it represents a catch (grab) sample at that particular time which may or may not contain free virus. A simple method for the preparation of sewage inocula for virus isolations is described which samples the bound virus fraction. Only ether-resistant viruses can be isolated, and an ultracentrifuge is not required. By this method, an isolation rate between 60 and 80% of positive sewer swabs can be achieved. Corresponding figures of 84 and 96% were achieved by concentration of sewer-swab eluates with an ultracentrifuge. Quantitative studies showed that the virus concentration in raw sewage can be as high as one infectious particle per 0.5 ml. PMID:4313310

  19. Preparation and evaluation of some amide ether carboxylate surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.A. El-Sukkary

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A homologous series of new mild surfactants, namely: Alkyl amide ether carboxylates surfactants (AEC RCO–NHCH2CH2O (CH2CH2O6CH2COONa, were synthesized by esterification, amidation, ethoxylation and carboxymethylation reaction steps of fatty acids (Lauric, Myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic or linoleic. The chemical structures of the prepared compounds were confirmed using different spectroscopic techniques, FTIR spectroscopy, mass spectra and HNMR. The surface properties including surface and interfacial tensions, foaming height, emulsification power, calcium ion stability, stability to hydrolysis and critical micelle concentration (cmc were determined. The study of their surface properties showed their stability in hard water and in acidic and alkaline media. These compounds have high calcium ion stability. The low foaming power could have an application in the dyeing auxiliary industry. The lower values of the interfacial tension values indicate the ability of using these surfactants in several applications as corrosion inhibitors and biocides. The data revealed various advantages and potentials as a main surfactant as well as co- surfactants.

  20. Crown ethers and phase transfer catalysis in polymer science

    CERN Document Server

    Carraher, Charles

    1984-01-01

    Phase transfer catalysis or interfacial catalysis is a syn­ thetic technique involving transport of an organic or inorganic salt from a solid or aqueous phase into an organic liquid where reaction with an organic-soluble substrate takes place. Over the past 15 years there has been an enormous amount of effort invested in the development of this technique in organic synthe­ sis. Several books and numerous review articles have appeared summarizing applications in which low molecular weight catalysts are employed. These generally include either crown ethers or onium salts of various kinds. While the term phase transfer catalysis is relatively new, the concept of using a phasetrans­ fer agent (PTA) is much older~ Both Schnell and Morgan employed such catalysts in synthesis of polymeric species in the early 1950's. Present developments are really extensions of these early applications. It has only been within the last several years that the use of phase transfer processes have been employed in polymer synthesis...

  1. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  2. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1999-05-01

    Current law in the United States authorizes physicians to diagnose brain death by applying generally accepted neurologic criteria for determining loss of function of the entire brain. This article offers a medical-legal perspective on problems that may arise with respect to the determination of brain death. These include the possibility of diagnostic error, conceptual disagreements that may constrain the use of neurologic criteria to diagnose death, and the conflation of brain death and loss of consciousness. This article also addresses legal aspects of the debate over whether to expand the definition of brain death to include permanent unconsciousness. Although existing laws draw a clear distinction between brain death and the persistent vegetative state, many courts have authorized removal of life support from individuals whose unconsciousness is believed to be permanent on proof that removal accords with preferences expressed before sentience was lost.

  3. Effect of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) and dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE 15) on soil microbial activity and bacterial community composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lu, E-mail: liulu519@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Zhu Wei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Xiao Lin, E-mail: xiaolin@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Yang Liuyan, E-mail: yangly@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2011-02-15

    There is now increasing concern regarding the effect of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on the environment. These compounds are widely used as fire retardants and by the electronic industry. Our study examined the effects of adding different doses of BDE 15 and BDE 209 on the soil microbial activities and function by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and soil enzymatic activity analyses. Soils were spiked with 1, 10, and 100 mg kg{sup -1} BDE 209 and BDE 15, respectively, and incubated for up to 180 days. No degradation of BDE 209 was observed; however, about 40% of the added BDE 15 underwent declining extractable concentration. Bacterial counts were significantly higher in the microcosms amended with BDE 15, while the suppression effect increased as the BDE 209 concentration increased. Pseudomonas, Bacillus and uncultured bacteria dominated the bacterial communities in all soil treatments, and PCA analysis showed that high doses of BDE 209 and BDE 15 altered the soil microbial community structure. This study provides new information on the effect of higher and lower PBDEs on the soil microbial community in an aerobic environment.

  4. Preparing alkaline anion exchange membrane with enhanced hydroxide conductivity via blending imidazolium-functionalized and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Zhongyi; Tian, Huimin; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Bei; Cao, Ying; He, Guangwei; Li, Zongyu; Wu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    The development of alkaline anion exchange membrane (AEM) with both high ion conductivity and stabilities is of great significance for fuel cell applications. In this study, a facile acid-base blending method is designed to improve AEM performances. Basic imidazolium-functionalized poly (ether ether ketone) with a high functionalization degree is employed as polymer matrix to pursue high ion-exchange capacity (IEC) as well as high hydroxide conductivity, meanwhile acidic sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) is employed as the cross-linking agent to enhance the stabilities of the blend membranes. Particularly, an in-situ Menshutkin/crosslinking method is exploited to prevent the flocculation in the preparation process of blend membranes. As a result, dense and defect-free blend membranes are obtained. The blend membranes exhibit high level of IEC up to 3.15 mmol g-1, and consequently possess elevated hydroxide conductivity up to 31.59 mS cm-1 at 30 °C. In addition, benefiting from the strong electrostatic interaction introduced by the acid-base blending, the stabilities and methanol resistance of blend membranes are enhanced.

  5. Block copolymers of poly(vinyl ethers) and poly(ethylene glycol) by means of the living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loontjens, Ton; Derks, Frank; Kleuskens, Engelien

    1992-01-01

    If living poly(vinyl ethers) are terminated with a large excess of methanol, containing aqueous ammonia, well-defined products are obtained. If only a slight excess of methanol is used, aldehydes and coupling products are formed. However, termination with an excess of a hydroxy terminated polymer is

  6. Effects of anesthetics on piperidine levels in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, T; Okano, Y; Fukunaga, K; Takahama, K; Hitoshi, T; Kasé, Y

    1981-04-24

    Piperidine is one of the biogenic amines possessing potent pharmacological activity. Recent interest has focused on its possible role as an endogenous hypnogenic substance. Using a mass fragmentographic technique with deuterium-labelled piperidine as an internal standard, piperidine concentrations in brains of waking and deeply anesthetized mice were analyzed to compare piperidine levels in the brain under distinctly different states of consciousness. A rapid and significant increase in piperidine concentrations was found in the brain but not in blood of mice anesthetized with any one of pentobarbital, urethane, ether and halothane. The results, showing that CNS depression is accompanied by accumulation of piperidine in the brain, are consistent with the idea that piperidine may have a close connection with the mechanisms controlling the level of consciousness.

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ...

  8. Gold-catalyzed intermolecular coupling of sulfonylacetylene with allyl ethers: [3,3]- and [1,3]-rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Jun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Gold-catalyzed intermolecular couplings of sulfonylacetylenes with allyl ethers are reported. A cooperative polarization of alkynes both by a gold catalyst and a sulfonyl substituent resulted in an efficient intermolecular tandem carboalkoxylation. Reactions of linear allyl ethers are consistent with the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement mechanism, while those of branched allyl ethers provided [3,3]- and [1,3]-rearrangement products through the formation of a tight ion–dipole pair.

  9. Gold-catalyzed intermolecular coupling of sulfonylacetylene with allyl ethers: [3,3]- and [1,3]-rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jungho; Yeom, Hyu-Suk; An, Jun-Hyun; Shin, Seunghoon

    2013-01-01

    Gold-catalyzed intermolecular couplings of sulfonylacetylenes with allyl ethers are reported. A cooperative polarization of alkynes both by a gold catalyst and a sulfonyl substituent resulted in an efficient intermolecular tandem carboalkoxylation. Reactions of linear allyl ethers are consistent with the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement mechanism, while those of branched allyl ethers provided [3,3]- and [1,3]-rearrangement products through the formation of a tight ion-dipole pair.

  10. Effects of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel fuel properties and emissions in a diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Cuenca, F.; Gomez-Marin, M. [Compania Logistica de Hidrocarburos (CLH), Central Laboratory, Mendez Alvaro 44, 28045 Madrid (Spain); Folgueras-Diaz, M.B., E-mail: belenfd@uniovi.es [Department of Energy, University of Oviedo, Independencia 13, 33004 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel fuel properties. {yields} Effect of ethylene glycol ethers on diesel engine specific consumption and emissions. {yields} Blends with {<=}4 wt.% of oxygen do not change substantially diesel fuel quality. {yields} Blends with 1 and 2.5 wt.% of oxygen reduce CO and HC emissions, but not smoke. - Abstract: The effect of ethylene glycol ethers on both the diesel fuel characteristics and the exhaust emissions (CO, NO{sub x}, smoke and hydrocarbons) from a diesel engine was studied. The ethers used were monoethylene glycol ethyl ether (EGEE), monoethylene glycol butyl ether (EGBE), diethylene glycol ethyl ether (DEGEE). The above effect was studied in two forms: first by determining the modification of base diesel fuel properties by using blends with oxygen concentration around 4 wt.%, and second by determining the emission reductions for blends with low oxygen content (1 wt.%) and with 2.5 wt.% of oxygen content. The addition of DEGEE enhances base diesel fuel cetane number, but EGEE and EGBE decrease it. For concentrations of {>=}4 wt.% of oxygen, EGEE and diesel fuel can show immiscibility problems at low temperatures ({<=}0 {sup o}C). Also, every oxygenated compound, according to its boiling point, modifies the distillation curve at low temperatures and the distillate percentage increases. These compounds have a positive effect on diesel fuel lubricity, and slightly decrease its viscosity. Blends with 1 and 2.5 wt.% oxygen concentrations were used in order to determine their influence on emissions at both full and medium loads and different engine speeds. Generally, all compounds help to reduce CO, and hydrocarbon emissions, but not smoke. The best results were obtained for blends with 2.5 wt.% of oxygen. At this concentration, the additive efficiency in decreasing order was EGEE > DEGEE > EGBE for CO emissions and DGEE > EGEE > EGBE for hydrocarbon emissions. For NO{sub x}, both its behaviour and the

  11. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on

  12. Polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in the North American environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Robert C; Alaee, Mehran; Manchester-Neesvig, Jon B; Stapleton, Heather M; Ikonomou, Michael G

    2003-09-01

    North America consumes over half of the world's production of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. About 98% of global demand for the Penta-BDE mixture, the constituents of which are the most bioaccumulative and environmentally widespread, resides here. However, research on the environmental distribution of PBDEs in North America has lagged behind that in Northern Europe. Examination of available governmentally maintained release data suggests that Deca-BDE use in the US substantially exceeds that in Canada. Penta-BDE use probably follows a similar pattern. PBDE demand in Mexico is uncertain, but is assumed to be comparatively modest. Recent research examining air, water, sediment, sewage sludge and aquatic biota suggests that Penta-BDE constituents are present in geographically disparate locations in the US and Canada. The less brominated congeners have been observed in areas distant from their known use or production, e.g. the Arctic. PBDEs have been detected in low concentrations in North American air, water and sediment, but much higher levels in aquatic biota. Increased burdens as a function of position in the food web have been noted. PBDE concentrations in US and Canadian sewage sludges appear to be at least 10-fold greater than European levels and may be a useful barometer of release. In general, PBDE concentrations in environmental media reported in North America are comparable or exceed those observed elsewhere in the world. In contrast to Europe, environmental burdens are increasing over time here, consistent with the greater consumption of the commercial mixtures. However, data remain relatively scarce. Deca-BDE in the North American environment appears largely restricted to points of release, e.g. urban areas and those where PBDE-containing sewage sludges have been applied. This lack of redistribution is likely due to its extremely low volatility and water solubility. Penta-BDE and Deca-BDE products are used in different applications

  13. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of polyhydroxylated diphenyl ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fu; Zhang, Xuesheng; Qu, Ruijuan; Shi, Jiaqi; Wang, Zunyao, E-mail: wangzun315cn@163.com

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: • The experimental pK{sub a1} values of five synthesized PHODEs were determined. • The hydrogen bonds existed in PHODEs were investigated. • There exist close relationships between the thermodynamic properties and N{sub PHOS}. • The relative stability order of PHODE congeners was theoretically proposed. - Abstract: Five polyhydroxylated diphenyl ethers (PHODEs) were synthesized. The first ionization constants (pK{sub a1}) of the synthesized compounds and seven phenolic compounds were determined using potentiometric titration experiments, together with the software ACD/Labs pK{sub a} DB program (version 6.0). The compared results showed that the software could be used to predict the pK{sub a1} of all 209 PHODEs. The thermodynamic properties of 209 PHODEs were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G** level with Gaussian 09 program. The standard enthalpy of formation (Δ{sub f}H{sup θ}) and the standard Gibbs energy of formation (Δ{sub f}G{sup θ}) were obtained. Two types of hydrogen bond were found to exist in the PHODEs’ molecules. The intramolecular hydrogen bond energies were discussed. The relative stability of PHODEs isomers was proposed theoretically with the relative standard Gibbs energy of formation (Δ{sub f}G{sub R}{sup θ}). The relationships of S{sup θ}, Δ{sub f}H{sup θ} and Δ{sub f}G{sup θ} to the number and position of the hydroxyl substitution (N{sub PHOS}) were studied.

  14. Phospholipid ether analogs for the detection of colorectal tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin A Deming

    Full Text Available The treatment of localized colorectal cancer (CRC depends on resection of the primary tumor with adequate margins and sufficient lymph node sampling. A novel imaging agent that accumulates in CRCs and the associated lymph nodes is needed. Cellectar Biosciences has developed a phospholipid ether analog platform that is both diagnostic and therapeutic. CLR1502 is a near-infrared fluorescent molecule, whereas 124/131I-CLR1404 is under clinical investigation as a PET tracer/therapeutic agent imaged by SPECT. We investigated the use of CLR1502 for the detection of intestinal cancers in a murine model and 131I-CLR1404 in a patient with metastatic CRC. Mice that develop multiple intestinal tumors ranging from adenomas to locally advanced adenocarcinomas were utilized. After 96 hours post CLR1502 injection, the intestinal tumors were analyzed using a Spectrum IVIS (Perkin Elmer and a Fluobeam (Fluoptics. The intensity of the fluorescent signal was correlated with the histological characteristics for each tumor. Colon adenocarcinomas demonstrated increased accumulation of CLR1502 compared to non-invasive lesions (total radiant efficiency: 1.76×10(10 vs 3.27×10(9 respectively, p = 0.006. Metastatic mesenteric tumors and uninvolved lymph nodes were detected with CLR1502. In addition, SPECT imaging with 131I-CLR1404 was performed as part of a clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors. 131I-CLR1404 was shown to accumulate in metastatic tumors in a patient with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Together, these compounds might enhance our ability to properly resect CRCs through better localization of the primary tumor and improved lymph node identification as well as detect distant disease.

  15. Depositional characteristics of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers on tree barks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Young Chun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was conducted to determine the depositional characteristics of several tree barks, including Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba, Pine (Pinus densiflora, Platanus (Platanus, and Metasequoia (Metasequoia glyptostroboides. These were used as passive air sampler (PAS of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs. Methods Tree barks were sampled from the same site. PBDEs were analyzed by highresolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometer, and the lipid content was measured using the gravimetric method by n-hexane extraction. Results Gingko contained the highest lipid content (7.82 mg/g dry, whereas pine (4.85 mg/g dry, Platanus (3.61 mg/g dry, and Metasequoia (0.97 mg/g dry had relatively lower content. The highest total PBDEs concentration was observed in Metasequoia (83,159.0 pg/g dry, followed by Ginkgo (53,538.4 pg/g dry, Pine (20,266.4 pg/g dry, and Platanus (12,572.0 pg/g dry. There were poor correlations between lipid content and total PBDE concentrations in tree barks (R2=0.1011, p =0.682. Among the PBDE congeners, BDE 206, 207 and 209 were highly brominated PBDEs that are sorbed to particulates in ambient air, which accounted for 90.5% (84.3-95.6% of the concentration and were therefore identified as the main PBDE congener. The concentrations of particulate PBDEs deposited on tree barks were dependent on morphological characteristics such as surface area or roughness of barks. Conclusions Therefore, when using the tree barks as the PAS of the atmospheric PBDEs, samples belonging to same tree species should be collected to reduce errors and to obtain reliable data.

  16. CCQM-K102: polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Marina; Shegunova, Penka; Conneely, Patrick; Becker, Roland; Maldonado Torres, Mauricio; Arce Osuna, Mariana; On, Tang Po; Man, Lee Ho; Baek, Song-Yee; Kim, Byungjoo; Hopley, Christopher; Liscio, Camilla; Warren, John; Le Diouron, Véronique; Lardy-Fontan, Sophie; Lalere, Béatrice; Mingwu, Shao; Kucklick, John; Vamathevan, Veronica; Matsuyama, Shigetomo; Numata, Masahiko; Brits, Martin; Quinn, Laura; Fernandes-Whaley, Maria; Ceyhan Gören, Ahmet; Binici, Burcu; Konopelko, Leonid; Krylov, Anatoli; Mikheeva, Alena

    2017-01-01

    The key comparison CCQM-K102: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment was coordinated by the JRC, Directorate F - Health, Consumers & Reference Materials, Geel (Belgium) under the auspices of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM). Thirteen National Metrology institutes or Designated Institutes and the JRC participated. Participants were requested to report the mass fraction (on a dry mass basis) of BDE 47, 99 and 153 in the freshwater sediment study material. The sediment originated from a river in Belgium and contained PBDEs (and other pollutants) at levels commonly found in environmental samples. The comparison was designed to demonstrate participants' capability of analysing non-polar organic molecules in abiotic dried matrices (approximate range of molecular weights: 100 to 800 g/mol, polarity corresponding to pKow influence the accurate quantification of the PBDEs, if the analytical methodology applied is not appropriately adapted and optimised. This comparison shows that quantification of PBDEs at the μg/kg low-middle range in a challenging environmental abiotic dried matrix can be achieved with relative expanded uncertainties below 15 % (more than 70 % of participating laboratories), well in line with the best measurement performances in the environmental analysis field. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting in ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ... The brain's "fear hub," which helps activate the fight-or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to the front of the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in ... Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ... the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... our physical surroundings but also factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in ... Other medical professionals who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or ... gets "the blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ... imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation — ...

  16. Oxidation mechanism of aliphatic ethers: theoretical insights on the main reaction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, Stefania; Rotureau, Patricia; Adamo, Carlo

    2012-09-13

    This paper presents a quantum chemical study on oxidation process of a series of aliphatic ethers. On the basis of a detailed theoretical work on diethyl ether oxidation, the mechanism has been reduced at three competing reactions: the β-scission of the alkyl radical (R(I)OR(II)(•)) issued from the initiation step, the isomerization of the peroxy radical (R(I)OR(II)OO(•)) produced by reaction of the alkyl radical with molecular oxygen, and the hydroperoxide production, a bimolecular reaction between the peroxy radical and an ether molecule that also regenerates a R(I)OR(II)(•) radical. Results obtained from DFT calculations, including thermochemistry and rate constant evaluations, have been reported and discussed. The influence of the presence of the oxygen atom in the ether skeleton has been evaluated by making a comparison between some ethers and parent hydrocarbons. In particular, it has been found that oxygen increases the reactivity of vicinal sites by lowering activation barriers and favors the stabilization of radicals. Direct proportionality relationships have been searched between activation and reaction enthalpies of each class of competing reactions, but one has been found only for the isomerization reaction.

  17. [Determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ghengyun; Zhang, Weiya; Li, Lixia; Shen, Yalei; Lin, Junfeng; Xie, Tangtang; Chu, Naiqing

    2014-08-01

    An effective method was established for the simultaneous determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Glycol ethers in leather and leather products were ultrasonically extracted at 45 °C, using ethyl acetate as the extraction solvent. The extracts were purified by solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and then analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode. The content of each analyte was calibrated by external standard method. The limit of detection of ethylene glycol ethyl ether (EGEE) was 0. 10 mg/kg under the condition of signal to noise (S/N) of 3 and the limits of the other 11 glycol ethers were all less than 0.05 mg/kg. The spiked recoveries varied from 81. 2% to 95. 5% at three different spiked levels with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 1.4% to 6. 6%. The proposed method is simple, rapid and accurate, with the limits of detection much less than the requirements of the Regulation Concerning Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) of European Union. It is applicable to the determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products, and provides a reference for the relevant testing standards.

  18. Another case of diethyl ether intoxication?: a case report focusing on toxicological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticelli, Fabio; Kemmerling, Ralf; Schulz, Katja; Keller, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Diethyl ether was widely used as an anesthetic agent in many countries in the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. For this reason the majority of lethal cases involving diethyl ether reported during this period were associated with anesthesia. We present a case of asphyxial death by plastic-bag suffocation with additional detection of diethyl ether in autopsy specimens. Autopsy initially failed to reveal the cause of death. Macroscopic and microscopic findings as well as subsequent toxicological examination procedures and results are pointed out in the present case report. Headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) proved to be the method of choice for fast and reliable analysis of unknown highly volatile substances (other than blood alcohol). In this case the detection of diethyl ether in autopsy specimens led to further investigations by the police at the death scene. During these investigations a bottle bearing a diethyl ether label was found and confiscated, which proved the insufficiency of prior death scene investigation. In order to evaluate the case from every possible angle, in such cases, especially when plastic-bag suffocation is suspected, we strongly recommend the collection of postmortem specimens in gas-tight vessels as well as the presence of a forensic expert at the death scene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A theoretical investigation of the interaction between fluorinated dimethyl ethers and molecular chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Dipankar; Chandra, Asit K.; Zeegers-Huyskens, Therese

    2014-11-01

    Halogen bonds have received a great deal of attention in recent years. In this work, the interaction between fluorinated dimethyl ethers (nF = 0-4) and molecular chlorine has been investigated by the theoretical methods. The two molecules are bonded together by an O...Cl‒Cl halogen bond and the interaction energies calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level range between -15.5 (nF = 0) and -6.1 (nF = 4) kJ mol-1. The correlations between interaction energies and proton affinity or ionisation potential of the ethers are discussed. The interaction between the molecules results in a small contraction of the CH bond of ethers and an elongation of the Cl‒Cl bond. The data are analysed by a natural bond orbital analysis carried out at the wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level. The charge transfer from the ethers to Cl2 is weak, ranges between 0.044 and 0.008 e and occurs mainly to the external Cl atom. The elongation of the Cl‒Cl bond is related to the occupation of the σ*(Cl‒Cl) orbital and to the intermolecular hyperconjugation interaction between LP(O) and σ*(Cl‒Cl) orbitals. The interaction between the ethers and chlorine induces an enhancement of the infrared intensity and Raman scattering activity of the ν(Cl‒Cl) vibration.

  20. Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy as a Tool to Study Intermolecular Interactions in the Diphenyl Ether - Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Mariyam; Perez, Cristobal; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    Many biological processes, such as chemical recognition and protein folding, are mainly controlled by the interplay of hydrogen bonds and dispersive forces. This interplay also occurs between organic molecules and solvent water molecules. Broadband rotational spectroscopy studies of weakly bound complexes are able to accurately reveal the structures and internal dynamics of molecular clusters isolated in the gas phase. Amongst them, water clusters with organic molecules are of particular interest. In this work, we investigate the interplay between different types of weak intermolecular interactions and how it controls the preferred interaction sites of aromatic ethers, where dispersive interactions may play a significant role. We present our results on diphenyl ether (C_{12}H_{10}O, 1,1'-Oxydibenzene) complexed with up to three molecules of water. Diphenyl ether is a flexible molecule, and it offers two competing binding sites for water: the ether oxygen and the aromatic π system. In order to determine the structure of the diphenyl ether-water complexes, we targeted transitions in the 2-8 GHz range using broadband rotational spectroscopy. We identify two isomers with one water, one with two water, and one with three water molecules. Further analysis from isotopic substitution measurements provided accurate structural information. The preferred interactions, as well as the observed structural changes induced upon complexation, will be presented and discussed.

  1. {sup 13}C solution NMR spectra of poly(ether)urethanes. Technical memorandum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltz, J.A

    2002-11-15

    The {sup 13}C solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the 15 poly(ether)urethanes are presented. The poly(urethane)s were prepared using one of two diisocyanates, either methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) or hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), one of five poly(ether glycol)s, poly(tetramethylene ether glycol) of molecular weight 650, 1000, or 1400, or poly(ethylene glycol) of molecular weight 600 or 1000, and one of three chain extenders, 1,4-butanediol, 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol, or diethylene glycol. These polymers were prepared as part of a modelling study to determine if Group Contribution Theory and Group Interaction Modelling could be used to predict dynamic mechanical properties of poly(ether)urethanes on the basis of the structural fragments in the polymers. The chemical shifts of the unique carbons in each of the poly(urethane)s are assigned. They can be used to unambiguously identify the diisocyanate/diol/poly(ether glycol) used to prepare the various polyurethanes. For some compounds the spectra show resonances for terminal hydroxyl substituted carbons. These could provide a method, under the right experimental conditions, to compare molecular weights of batches of the same polymer. (author)

  2. Effects of Buffer Gas Composition on Autoignition of Dimethyl Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicheng Shi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies are conducted on the thermal, chemical and dilution effects of buffer gas composition on autoignition of dimethyl ether (DME. The buffer gases considered are nitrogen (N2, a mixture of N2 and argon (Ar at a mole ratio of 50%/50% and a mixture of Ar and carbon dioxide (CO2 at a mole ratio of 61.2%/38.8%. Experiments are performed using a rapid compression machine (RCM at compressed pressure of 10 bar, equivalence ratio (φ of 1, and compressed temperature from 670 K to 795 K. The N2 dilution ratio considered ranges from 36.31% to 55.04%. The experimental results show that buffer gas composition has little impact on the first-stage ignition delay. However, significant differences in the total ignition delay as a function of buffer gas composition are observed in the negative temperature coefficient (NTC region. Compared to N2, N2/Ar (50%/50% mixture decreases the total ignition delay by 31%. The chemical effects of buffer gas composition on the first-stage and total ignition delays are negligible. With increasing N2 dilution ratio, the first-stage ignition delay slightly increases, while a significant increase in the total ignition delay is observed. Moreover, the NTC behavior of total ignition delay is noted to become more pronounced at high N2 dilution ratio. The heat release during the first-stage ignition decreases as N2 dilution ratio increases. Results of numerical simulations with the Zhao DME mechanism over a wider range of temperature show good agreement with that of experiments. Further numerical simulations are conducted using pure N2, Ar and CO2 as buffer gases. Results indicate that the thermal effects are the dominant factor in low temperature and NTC regions. The chemical effects become pronounced in the NTC region, and the chemical effect of CO2 exceeds the thermal effect at the compressed temperature higher than 880 K.

  3. Reaction mechanism of dimethyl ether carbonylation to methyl acetate over mordenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Temel, B.

    2017-01-01

    concentrations in CO between 0.2 and 2.0%, and at a temperature of 438 K. The theoretical study showed that the reaction of CO with surface methyl groups, the rate-limiting step, is faster in the eight-membered side pockets than in the twelve-membered main channel of the zeolite; the subsequent reaction......The reaction mechanism of dimethyl ether carbonylation to methyl acetate over mordenite was studied theoretically with periodic density functional theory calculations including dispersion forces and experimentally in a fixed bed flow reactor at pressures between 10 and 100 bar, dimethyl ether...... of dimethyl ether with surface acetyl to form methyl acetate was demonstrated to occur with low energy barriers in both the side pockets and in the main channel. The present analysis has thus identified a path, where the entire reaction occurs favourably on a single site within the side pocket, in good...

  4. Interaction of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Aerobic Granular Sludge: Biosorption and Microbial Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Qing Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new category of persistent organic pollutants, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs have become ubiquitous global environmental contaminants. No literature is available on the aerobic biotransformation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209. Herein, we investigated the interaction of PBDEs with aerobic granular sludge. The results show that the removal of BDE-209 from wastewater is mainly via biosorption onto aerobic granular sludge. The uptake capacity increased when temperature, contact time, and sludge dosage increased or solution pH dropped. Ionic strength had a negative influence on BDE-209 adsorption. The modified pseudo first-order kinetic model was appropriate to describe the adsorption kinetics. Microbial debromination of BDE-209 did not occur during the first 30 days of operation. Further study found that aerobic microbial degradation of 4,4′-dibromodiphenyl ether happened with the production of lower BDE congeners.

  5. [Ether Day--no laughing matter. The birth of modern anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerig, Michael; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2013-10-01

    Since centuries the first public demonstration of the anaesthetic properties of ether by William Thomas Green Morton at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston on October 16th 1846 is celebrated as "Ether Day" world-wide. The news of the beneficial effects, primarily disposed as a "Yankee Invention", spread over all continents quickly. This was the result of an article, published in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal on November 18th, 1846. It is mentioning worth that this article was written when Morton had disclosed that the used "preparation", later named as "Nostrum" or "Letheon", was sulphuric ether. The important discovery later became a patent case and was overshadowed by a long lasting priority claim. Nevertheless the readers of the New England Journal of Medicine voted in a survey that this article was the most important publication in the 200 years journals history ever. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  6. [Questions on the first operation with ethyl ether as anaesthetic by Dr. Peter Parker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q

    2017-01-28

    Ethyl ether was the first accepted effective general anaesthetic. It was introduced into China by an America missionary, Dr. Peter Parker. This was one of the historical events of medical communication between China and the West. In the records of the first operation with ether, however, Dr. Parker unusually omitted the patient's medical record number and the date of the operation, while those of other operations with ether anesthetics were all available. This was very unusual for a doctor like Peter Parker who always recorded every important case in detail in the hospital reports. It seems that he deliberately rather than carelessly omitted the information for some reasons. Based on the analysis of Parker's reports, a conclusion is made that the anesthetic effect of the case was actually ineffective. Furthermore, possible answers to this are outlined and question by discussion based on the situation that Parker faced in the late Qing era.

  7. The hydrolysis of geminal ethers: a kinetic appraisal of orthoesters and ketals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia L. Repetto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to protecting jet fuel against the effects of water contamination is predicated upon the coupling of the rapid hydrolysis reactions of lipophilic cyclic geminal ethers, with the concomitant production of a hydrophilic acyclic hydroxyester with de-icing properties (Fuel Dehydrating Icing Inhibitors - FDII. To this end, a kinetic appraisal of the hydrolysis reactions of representative geminal ethers was undertaken using a convenient surrogate for the fuel–water interface (D2O/CD3CN 1:4. We present here a library of acyclic and five/six-membered cyclic geminal ethers arranged according to their hydroxonium catalytic coefficients for hydrolysis, providing for the first time a framework for the development of FDII. A combination of 1H NMR, labelling and computational studies was used to assess the effects that may govern the observed relative rates of hydrolyses.

  8. Arginine-responsive terbium luminescent hybrid sensors triggered by two crown ether carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Lasheng [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Ke; Ding, Xiaoping [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou, Zhan; Xiao, Rui [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Crown ether carboxylic acids constitute main building blocks for the synthesis of terbium containing covalent cross-linked luminescent materials. Both the complexes and the hybrid nanomaterials could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water. More importantly, they were found to have a profound effect on the luminescence responses to arginine compared with glutamic acid, histidine, tryptophan, threonine, tyrosine and phenylalanine in aqueous environment. The present study provided the possibility of using a host–guest mechanism as a way of signal transduction based on lanthanide supramolecular hybrid materials. - Highlights: • Crown ether carboxylic acids were found to sensitize terbium ions among a group of ethers. • The complexes and silica hybrid materials were both prepared and characterized. • They could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water.

  9. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilised by cellulose ethers: stability, structure and in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreani, Jennifer; Espert, María; Salvador, Ana; Sanz, Teresa; Quiles, Amparo; Hernando, Isabel

    2017-04-19

    The effect of cellulose ethers in oil-in-water emulsions on stability during storage and on texture, microstructure and lipid digestibility during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was investigated. All the cellulose ether emulsions showed good physical and oxidative stability during storage. In particular, the methylcellulose with high methoxyl substituents (HMC) made it possible to obtain emulsions with high consistency which remained almost unchanged during gastric digestion, and thus could enhance fullness and satiety perceptions at gastric level. Moreover, the HMC emulsion slowed down lipid digestion to a greater extent than a conventional protein emulsion or the emulsions stabilised by the other cellulose ethers. Therefore, HMC emulsions could be used in weight management to increase satiation capacity and decrease lipid digestion.

  10. Electron stimulated desorption of anions and cations from condensed allyl glycidyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Y; Balcan, M; Bass, A D; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L

    2010-07-28

    We report measurements of the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions and cations from thin films of allyl glycidyl ether (AGE), formed by condensation onto multilayer Kr and Pt substrates using a high sensitivity time of flight mass analyser. Measurements were performed as a function of film thickness, incident electron energy (E(i)) and effective incident current. Below incident electron energies of 20 eV the desorption of anions is dominated by the process of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) via several transient negative ions at E(i) between 5.5 and 16.5 eV. Comparisons between measurements for AGE and ethyl oxirane show that the ESD of anions is essentially that of the glycidyl (epoxide) ring, though DEA occurring at the ether, within the linear part of the AGE molecule is also observed. Cation yields are dominated by the desorption of small fragments formed via scission of the same ether bond.

  11. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment of a West Virginia chemical spill mixture involving 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol and propylene glycol phenyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alice A; Fabyanic, Emily B; Miller, Julie V; Prediger, Maren S; Prince, Nicole; Mouch, Julia A; Boyd, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Thousands of gallons of industrial chemicals, crude 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (MCHM) and propylene glycol phenyl ether (PPh), leaked from industrial tanks into the Elk River in Charleston, West Virginia, USA, on January 9, 2014. A considerable number of people were reported to exhibit symptoms of chemical exposure and an estimated 300,000 residents were advised not to use or drink tap water. At the time of the spill, the existing toxicological data of the chemicals were limited for a full evaluation of the health risks, resulting in concern among those in the impacted regions. In this preliminary study, we assessed cell viability and plasma membrane degradation following a 24-h exposure to varying concentrations (0-1000 μM) of the two compounds, alone and in combination. Evaluation of different cell lines, HEK-293 (kidney), HepG2 (liver), H9c2 (heart), and GT1-7 (brain), provided insight regarding altered cellular responses in varying organ systems. Single exposure to MCHM or PPh did not affect cell viability, except at doses much higher than the estimated exposure levels. Certain co-exposures significantly reduced metabolic activity and increased plasma membrane degradation in GT1-7, HepG2, and H9c2 cells. These findings highlight the importance of examining co-exposures to fully understand the potential toxic effects.

  12. Methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) is anti- angiogenic in both in vitro and in vivo mammalian model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlosky, John; Bonventre, Josephine; Cooper, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a well known gasoline oxygenate, and FDA approved gallstone treatment, has been previously shown to specifically target teleost embryonic angiogenesis. The studies reported here were to determine if similar vascular disrupting effects occurred in higher vertebrate models. Rat brain endothelial cells were isolated and allowed to form microcapillary-like tubes on Matrigel. MTBE (0.34–34.0 mM) exposure resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of tube formation, with the LOAEL at 0.34 mM, while MTBE’s primary metabolite, tertiary butyl alcohol had no effect on tube formation. HUVECs, a primary cell line representing macrovascular cells, were able to form tubes on Matrigel in the presence of MTBE (1.25 – 80 mM), but the tubes were narrower than those formed in the absence of MTBE. In a mouse Matrigel plug implantation assay, 34.0 mM MTBE completely inhibited vessel invasion into plugs containing Endothelial Cell Growth Supplement (ECGS) compared to control plugs with ECGS alone. When timed-pregnant Fisher 344 rats were gavaged with MTBE (500–1500 mg/kg) from day 6 of organogenesis through 10 days post parturition, no organ toxicity or histological changes in pup vasculature were observed. Therefore, MTBE is anti-angiogenic at mM concentrations and therefore a potential use as an anti-angiogenic treatment for solid tumors with minimal toxicity. PMID:22407988

  13. Phenyl Ether- and Aniline-Containing 2-Aminoquinolines as Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Maris A; Li, Huiying; Pensa, Anthony V; Kang, Soosung; Roman, Linda J; Martásek, Pavel; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-11-12

    Excess nitric oxide (NO) produced by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. As a result, inhibition of nNOS and reduction of NO levels is desirable therapeutically, but many nNOS inhibitors are poorly bioavailable. Promising members of our previously reported 2-aminoquinoline class of nNOS inhibitors, although orally bioavailable and brain-penetrant, suffer from unfavorable off-target binding to other CNS receptors, and they resemble known promiscuous binders. Rearranged phenyl ether- and aniline-linked 2-aminoquinoline derivatives were therefore designed to (a) disrupt the promiscuous binding pharmacophore and diminish off-target interactions and (b) preserve potency, isoform selectivity, and cell permeability. A series of these compounds was synthesized and tested against purified nNOS, endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS) enzymes. One compound, 20, displayed high potency, selectivity, and good human nNOS inhibition, and retained some permeability in a Caco-2 assay. Most promisingly, CNS receptor counterscreening revealed that this rearranged scaffold significantly reduces off-target binding.

  14. [Brain concussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pälvimäki, Esa-Pekka; Siironen, Jari; Pohjola, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Brain concussion is a common disturbance caused by external forces or acceleration affecting the head. It may be accompanied by transient loss of consciousness and amnesia. Typical symptoms include headache, nausea and dizziness; these may remain for a week or two. Some patients may experience transient loss of inability to create new memories or other brief impairment of mental functioning. Treatment is symptomatic. Some patients may suffer from prolonged symptoms, the connection of which with brain concession is difficult to show. Almost invariably the prognosis of brain concussion is good.

  15. The action of ether and methoxyflurane on synaptic transmission in isolated preparations of the mammalian cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, C D; Russell, W J; Smaje, J C

    1975-06-01

    1. The actions of ether and methoxyflurane on the evoked potentials of in vitro preparations of the guinea-pig olfactory cortex were studied. Following stimulation of the lateral olfactory tract (l.o.t.) evoked potentials could be recorded from the cortical surface; these potentials consisted of an initial wave (the compound action potential of the l.o.t.) followed by a negative field potential which was associated with the synchronous excitation of many superficial excitatory synapses (population e.p.s.p.). Superimposed on the population e.p.s.p. was a number of positive peaks. These positive peaks reflect the synchronous discharge of many neurones and so have been called population spikes. 2. When ether or methoxyflurane was added to the gas stream that superfused the surface of the preparations, the population e.p.s.p.s. and population spikes were depressed at lower concentrations than those required to depress the compound action potential of the afferent fibres. 3. The evoked activity of individual cells in the cortex was depressed by ether and methoxyflurane. However, five of the twelve cells tested in ether showed an increase in their evoked activity at concentrations below 4-5%, but at higher concentrations these cells also became depressed. 4. Both ether and methoxyflurane depressed the sensitivity of cortical neurones to iontophoretically applied L-glutamate and may similarly depress the sensitivity of the post-synaptic membrane to the released transmitter substance. 5. Neither anaesthetic appeared to increase the threshold depolarization required for nerve impulse generation. Thus, the decrease of the discharge of the post-synaptic cells was primarily caused by a depression of chemical transmission. 6. Ether caused some cells in the cortex to alter their normal pattern of synaptically evoked discharge and both anaesthetics induced similar changes during excitation by glutamate.

  16. Sulfoglucosides as Novel Modified Forms of the Mycotoxins Alternariol and Alternariol Monomethyl Ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Sebastian T; Kohn, Beate N; Pfeiffer, Erika; Geisen, Rolf; Metzler, Manfred; Bunzel, Mirko; Kulling, Sabine E

    2016-11-23

    The mycotoxins alternariol and alternariol-9-O-methyl ether have recently been reported to be extensively conjugated with glucose and malonyl glucose in tobacco suspension cells. However, only trace amounts of glucosylated conjugates were detected in tomatoes inoculated with Alternaria alternata in the present study. Instead, mostly sulfate conjugates were observed. In studies using cultures of A. alternata and incubations of alternariol and alternariol-9-O-methyl ether with tomato tissue in the absence of the fungus, it was clarified that sulfate conjugates were produced by the fungus, whereas tomato tissues converted alternariol and alternariol-9-O-methyl ether to glucosylated metabolites. Alternariol-3-sulfate, alternariol-9-sulfate, and alternariol-9-O-methyl ether-3-sulfate were unambiguously identified as fungal metabolites using MS and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. When these sulfate conjugates were incubated with tobacco suspension cells or ex planta tomato tissues, three sulfoglucosides of alternariol and one sulfoglucoside of alternariol-9-O-methyl ether were formed. Using NMR spectroscopy, the chemical structures of alternariol-3-sulfate-9-glucoside, alternariol-9-sulfate-3-glucoside, and alternariol-9-O-methyl ether-3-sulfate-7-glucoside were established. These conjugates were also detected in the A. alternata-inoculated tomato. This is the first report on a mixed sulfate/glucoside diconjugate of a mycotoxin. Diconjugates of this novel type may be formed by all mycotoxins and their phase I metabolites with two or more hydroxyl groups and should be taken into account in the future analysis of modified mycotoxins.

  17. EFFECTS OF STIMULATOR SUBSTANCES ON AEROBIC METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER BIODEGRADATION BY MICROBIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farrokhi ، S. Ahmadizad

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study dissolved humic substances and yeast extract were tested in different concentrations for enhancing methyl tert-butyl ether mineralization by isolated microorganisms from a variety of sources. All experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 25ºC. Vials of 50 mL and 125 mL volume sealed with Teflon-lined Mini-Nert caps was used for microcosm experiments. In all experiments 1% sodium azide were used as control. Samples of bacterial cultures that metabolize methyl tert-butyl ether have been analysed by direct GC analysis using flame ionization detector. Cultures able to metabolize have been found in activated sludge and soils. These microorganisms weregram-positive bacterium. An aerobic microbial consortium was enriched in laboratory for four months. Methyl tert-butyl ether has been shown to biodegrade under aerobic and co-metabolic conditions. A microbial consortium isolated from activated sludges was identified as Cocobacillus. The concentration of the initial attached biomass was about 0.11 g/L of dry weight. The maximum mineralization rate and beneficial effects of stimulator substances on aerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether occurred with the culture by combined concentrations of 500 mg/L of yeast extract and 20 mg/L of peat humic growth support of microbial consortium within 216 h and in presence of high oxygen levels and well mixing conditions. It was shown that adding, peat humic and yeast extract together, had better stimulatory effect on methyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation. Results clearly showed a stimulatory effect on methyl tert-butyl ether consumption higher than 20%. Consortium was capable of degrading concentrations of ≤1000 mg/L, whereas concentrations of >1000 mg/L, were not degraded.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of a new antitumor semisynthetic ether phospholipid, 14C-labeled plasmanyl-(N-acyl)ethanolamine, in mice bearing sarcoma Mc11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kára, J; Zimakova, N I; Serebryakova, E A; Dĕdková, V; Zolotaryov, A E

    1994-01-01

    New natural and semisynthetic antitumor ether phospholipids PNAE and PNAE(s) [plasmanyl-(N-acyl)ethanolamines] and their selective antitumor activity in vivo have been described previously. We are now presenting the pharmacokinetics, in vivo metabolism and distribution of a [14C]PNAE(s) preparation (1-O-octadecyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(N-[U-14C]palmitoyl) ethanolamine in the intact or Mc11-tumor-bearing BDF1 mice. Only partial degradation (about 50%-60%) of [14C]PNAE(s) was observed in vivo 24 h after i.v. administration, as detected by TLC analysis of phospholipids extracted from the blood, liver, tumor and brain of animals. Pharmacokinetic curves of [14C]PNAE(s) and its metabolites were fitted with a two-compartment model (t alpha 1/2 = 2.5 h, t beta 1/2 = 61.6 h). After repeated i.v. doses of [14C]PNAE(s) (administered on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) accumulation of [14C]PNAE(s) and lyso-[14C]PNAE(s) in tumor tissue was detected. High levels of [14C]PNAE(s) were also detected in the liver, lung and spleen of animals. After i.v. administration of [14C]PNAE(s) the ether phospholipid was also detected in the brain tissue. The parmacokinetic data indicate that repeated parenteral doses of PNAE(s) are necessary to attain therapeutic concentrations in tumor tissue. The very high accumulation of [14C]PNAE(s) in the liver of animals after repeated i.v. doses, and the absence of toxic side-effects in vivo indicate a possible clinical therapeutic use of PNAE(s), especially in the treatment of tumor metastases in liver as well as in the prophylaxis of liver metastases after surgical removal of primary tumors.

  19. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  20. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  1. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  2. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis ...

  3. The screening of microorganisms capable of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Andrzej; Przybulewska, Krystyna; Karpowicz, Katarzyna; Nowak, Maciej J

    2013-01-01

    As a result of examinations carried out, 16 strains of microorganisms able to grow on mineral media with methyl tert-butyl ether as the sole source of carbon and energy were isolated. Bacteria prevailed among the isolated microorganisms. The growth of microorganisms under laboratory conditions was long and accompanied by low biomass increase. Under the conditions of the experiment, the isolated microorganisms did not show any quantitatively measurable biodegradability of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under aerobic conditions. This requires far-reaching caution with respect to trading in MTBE-modified petrols in order to protect the natural environment in Poland against contamination with that hard-to-biodegrade substance.

  4. Positron Lifetime Study of the Transition from Glassy to Normal Liquid State for Two Phenyl Ethers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pethrick, R. A.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1980-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements are reported as a function of temperature for bis[m-(m-phenoxyphenoxy)phenyl] ether and m-phenoxyphenyl-m-(m-phenoxyphenoxy)phenyl ether. The decay curves were analysed in terms of three lifetime components; two short lifetimes of typically 200 and 500 ps associated......, which may be slightly enlarged due to the presence of Ps. Above 313 K Ps is apparently localized in a thermal equilibrated bubble. The size of the bubble is probably independent of the size of the pre-existing holes, as described by the “bubble model”. The transition between those two cases occurs...

  5. The Kinetics of the Trimethoxyboroxine-Induced Thermal Polymerization of Phenyl Glycidyl Ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Eugene S.; Riccitiello, Salvatore R.

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of the bulk thermal polymerization of phenyl glycidyl ether induced by trimethoxyboroxine were investigated. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography were used to follow the course of polymerization, while proton and boron-2 NMR spectroscopy were used to support the kinetic model developed. The postulated mechanism involves a fast-initiated, non-stationary cationic polymerization with five elementary steps, including spontaneous and monomer transfer as well as a termination reaction. The trimethoxyboroxine was found to be incorporated into the structure of the cured polymer. Tile polymerization was followed at several temperatures and with several ratios of initial concentrations of trimethoxyboroxine to phenyl glycidyl ether.

  6. FTIR cryospectroscopic and ab initio studies of desflurane-dimethyl ether H-bonded complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikova, S. M.; Rutkowski, K. S.; Rospenk, M.

    2017-09-01

    The IR spectra of mixtures of desflurane and dimethyl ether are studied with the help of FTIR cryospectroscopy in liquefied Kr at T 118-158 K. Comparative analysis of the experimental data and results of ab initio calculations show that either of the two C-H groups of desflurane is involved in heterodimer formation of comparable strengths. The blue frequency shift is found for stretching vibrations of those C-H donors which directly participate in H-bond formation. Additionally the complexes are stabilized by weaker contacts between hydrogen atoms of dimethyl ether and fluorine atoms of desflurane.

  7. Catalyst system and process for benzyl ether fragmentation and coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-04-28

    Dibenzyl ether can be readily cleaved to form primarily benzaldehyde and toluene as products, along with minor amounts of bibenzyl and benzyl benzoate, in the presence of a catalyst system comprising a Group 6 metal, preferably molybdenum, a salt, and an organic halide. Although useful synthetically for the cleavage of benzyl ethers, this cleavage also represents a key model reaction for the liquefaction of coal; thus this catalyst system and process should be useful in coal liquefaction with the advantage of operating at significantly lower temperatures and pressures.

  8. Alkyl aryl ethers in lignite solubilization 1. Study of the process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Cebolla, V.L.; Gavilan, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    The chemistry of solubilization of a lignite has been investigated with anisole, 3-methyl anisole and 1,3dimethoxybenzene catalysed by SbCl/sub 3/, ZnCl/sub 2/, AlCl/sub 3/ and BF/sub 3/ as boron trifluoride etherate, at atmospheric pressure and temperatures <220/sup 0/C. 60% of lignite was solubilized in a toluene-ethanol azeotropic mixture. During the process, the solvent is incorporated as an alkylated substratum. The yield increased with activity of the aromatic ether ring and catalyst acidity.

  9. Alkyl aryl ethers in lignite solubilization. 1. Study of the process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Cebolla, V.L.; Gavilan, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    The chemistry of solubilization of a lignite has been investigated with anisole, 3-methyl anisole and 13-dimethoxybenzene catalysed by SbCl/sub 3/, ZnCl/sub 2/, AlCl/sub 3/ and BF/sub 3/ as boron trifluoride etherate, at atmospheric pressure and temperatures <220 C. 60% of lignite was solubilized in a toluene-ethanol azeotropic mixture. During the process, the solvent is incorporated as an alkylated substratum. The yield increased with activity of the aromatic ether ring and catalyst acidity. 14 references.

  10. Gold( i )-catalysed dehydrative formation of ethers from benzylic alcohols and phenols

    KAUST Repository

    Veenboer, Richard M. P.

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. We report the cross-dehydrative reaction of two alcohols to form unsymmetrical ethers using NHC-gold(i) complexes (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene). Our progress in developing this reaction into a straightforward procedure is discussed in detail. The optimised methodology proceeds under mild reaction conditions and produces water as the sole by-product. The synthetic utility of this environmentally benign methodology is exemplified by the formation of a range of new ethers from readily available phenols bearing electron withdrawing substituents and secondary benzylic alcohols with various substituents. Finally, we present experimental results to account for the chemoselectivity obtained in these reactions.

  11. Ring-opening of cyclic ethers with carbon–carbon bond formation by Grignard reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stig Holden; Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The ring-opening of cyclic ethers with concomitant C–C bond formation was studied with a number of Grignard reagents. The transformation was performed in a sealed vial by heating to ∼160 °C in an aluminum block or at 180 °C in a microwave oven. Good yields of the product alcohols were obtained...... with allyl- and benzylmagnesium halides when the ether was tetrahydrofuran or 3,3-dimethyloxetane. Lower yields were obtained with substituted tetrahydrofurans while no ring-opening was observed with tetrahydropyran. Only highly reactive allyl and benzyl Grignard reagents participated in the transformation...

  12. Shifting from hydrogen bond network to π-π stacking: a key mechanism for reversible thermochromic sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarumaneeroj, Chatchai; Tashiro, Kohji; Chirachanchai, Suwabun

    2014-08-01

    Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) thin film performs reversible thermochromic property by developing the color to be yellowish at the temperature above 190 °C. The detailed analyses based on temperature-dependent techniques suggest the thermal treatment inducing the shifting of the hydrogen bond network between the sulfonated group and the hydrated water molecules to the π-π stacking among aromatic rings in SPEEK chains. Although it is general that the polymer chain packing is unfavorable at high temperature, the present work shows a good example that when the polymer chains can form specific molecular interaction, such as π-π stacking, even in harsh thermal treatment, a rearrangement will effectively occur, which leads to an external stimuli-responsive property. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol)/sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) blend membranes for fuel cell applications - Surface energy characteristics and proton conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanakasabai, P.; Vijay, P.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Varughese, Susy [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2011-02-01

    Ionic polymers, their blends and composites are considered potential candidates for application as electrolytes in fuel cells. While developing new materials for membranes, it is important to understand the interactions of these electrolytic materials with electrodes/catalysts and with reactants/products. Some of these interactions can be understood by estimating the surface energy and wettability of the membrane materials. In this work, polyvinyl alcohol with varying degrees of sulfonation and its blend with sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) are prepared and studied for their wettability characteristics using goniometry. The surface energy and its components are estimated using different approaches and compared. Properties such as the ion-exchange capacity, the proton conductivity and the water sorption/desorption behaviour are also investigated to understand the relationship with wettability and surface energy and its components. Among the different methods, the van Oss acid-base and the modified Berthelot approaches yield comparable estimates for the total surface energy. (author)

  14. Crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol)/sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) blend membranes for fuel cell applications-Surface energy characteristics and proton conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakasabai, P.; Vijay, P.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Varughese, Susy

    Ionic polymers, their blends and composites are considered potential candidates for application as electrolytes in fuel cells. While developing new materials for membranes, it is important to understand the interactions of these electrolytic materials with electrodes/catalysts and with reactants/products. Some of these interactions can be understood by estimating the surface energy and wettability of the membrane materials. In this work, polyvinyl alcohol with varying degrees of sulfonation and its blend with sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) are prepared and studied for their wettability characteristics using goniometry. The surface energy and its components are estimated using different approaches and compared. Properties such as the ion-exchange capacity, the proton conductivity and the water sorption/desorption behaviour are also investigated to understand the relationship with wettability and surface energy and its components. Among the different methods, the van Oss acid-base and the modified Berthelot approaches yield comparable estimates for the total surface energy.

  15. Thermodynamic modeling of ternary and quaternary (liquid + liquid) systems containing water, FeCl3, HCl and diisopropyl ether

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milosevic, M.; Hendriks, I.; Smits, R.E.R.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid–liquid extraction using ethers as solvents is a potentially energy saving alternative for the concentration of aqueous ferric chloride solutions. Adequate thermodynamic models that describe the behavior of the resulting quaternary systems (FeCl3, ether, acid and water) are not available in

  16. 40 CFR 63.63 - Deletion of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether from the list of hazardous air pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deletion of ethylene glycol monobutyl... Quantity Designations, Source Category List § 63.63 Deletion of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether from the list of hazardous air pollutants. The substance ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGBE,2-Butoxyethanol...

  17. DFT study on the adsorption of diethyl, ethyl methyl, and dimethyl ethers on the surface of gallium doped graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokuhi Rad, Ali, E-mail: a.shokuhi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sani, Emad; Binaeian, Ehsan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Peyravi, Majid; Jahanshahi, Mohsen [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Adsorption of three ether molecules on the surface of Ga-doped graphene has been investigated. • High degree of adsorption for all analytes is found. • Ga-doped graphene shows p-type semiconductor property upon adsorption of ether molecules. - Abstract: In this study, we used density functional theory (DFT) to search on the adsorption properties of three important compounds of ether family; diethyl ether (DEE), ethyl methyl ether (EME), and dimethyl ether (DME) on the surface of Gallium doped graphene (GaG). We used three functionals (B3LYP, wb97xd, and MPW1PW91) for optimization and calculation of adsorption energy. After fully optimization, we scrutinized on the charge allocations on the adsorbed ethers as well as GaG (at the area of interaction) based on natural bond orbitals (NBO). Besides, we have calculated the amount of charge transfer upon adsorption of each analyte. We revel that GaG is an ideal adsorbent for chemisorption of all above-mentioned ethers. There is a little difference between the values of adsorption; −123.5, −120, and −118.3 kJ/mol (based on wb97xd) for DEE, EME, and DME, respectively. We found significant changes in the electronic structure of both adsorbent and adsorbate upon adsorption. Moreover, results of charge analyses confirm GaG is a p-type semiconductor.

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    ... including those with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Patient ...

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