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Sample records for brain iron accumulation

  1. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview

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    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni SH, Mollamohammadi M. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4: 1-8.AbstractObjectiveNeurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a group of neurodegenerative disorder with deposition of iron in the brain (mainly Basal Ganglia leading to a progressive Parkinsonism, spasticity, dystonia, retinal degeneration, optic atrophy often accompanied by psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline. 8 of the 10 genetically defined NBIA types are inherited as autosomal recessive and the remaining two by autosomal dominant and X-linked dominant manner. Brain MRI findings are almost specific and show abnormal brain iron deposition in basal ganglia some other related anatomicallocations. In some types of NBIA cerebellar atrophy is the major finding in MRI.ReferencesShevel M. Racial hygiene, activeeuthanasia, and Julius Hallervorden. Neurology 1992;42:2214-2219.HayflickSJ. Neurodegeneration with brain Iron accumulation: from genes to pathogenesis.Semin Pediatr Neurol 2006;13:182-185.Zhou B, Westawy SK, Levinson B, et al. A novel pantothenate kinase gene(PANK2 is defective in Hallervorden-Spatzsyndrome. Nat Genet 2001;28:345- 349.www.ncbi.nlm.nihgov/NBK111Y/university of Washington, seattle. Allison Gregory and Susan Hayflick.Paisan-Ruiz C, Li A, Schneider SA, et al. Widesread Levy body and tau accumulation in childhood and adult onset dystonia-parkinsonism cases with PLA2G6 mutations. Neurobiol Aging 2012;33:814-823.Dick KJ, Eckhardt M, Paison-Ruiz C, et al. Mutation of FA2H underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia(SPG 35. Hum Mutat 31: E1251-E1260.Edvardson S, Hama H, Shaag A, et al. Mutation in the fatty acid 2-Hydroxylase gene are associated with leukodystrophy with spastic paraparesis and dystonia. Am I Hum Genet 2008;83:647-648.Schneider SA, Aggarwal A, Bhatt m, et al. Severe tongue protrusion dystonia: clinical syndromes

  2. Hepcidin Suppresses Brain Iron Accumulation by Downregulating Iron Transport Proteins in Iron-Overloaded Rats.

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    Du, Fang; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Luo, Qianqian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2015-08-01

    Iron accumulates progressively in the brain with age, and iron-induced oxidative stress has been considered as one of the initial causes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Based on the role of hepcidin in peripheral organs and its expression in the brain, we hypothesized that this peptide has a role to reduce iron in the brain and hence has the potential to prevent or delay brain iron accumulation in iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of hepcidin expression adenovirus (ad-hepcidin) and hepcidin peptide on brain iron contents, iron transport across the brain-blood barrier, iron uptake and release, and also the expression of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons. We demonstrated that hepcidin significantly reduced brain iron in iron-overloaded rats and suppressed transport of transferrin-bound iron (Tf-Fe) from the periphery into the brain. Also, the peptide significantly inhibited expression of TfR1, DMT1, and Fpn1 as well as reduced Tf-Fe and non-transferrin-bound iron uptake and iron release in cultured microvascular endothelial cells and neurons, while downregulation of hepcidin with hepcidin siRNA retrovirus generated opposite results. We concluded that, under iron-overload, hepcidin functions to reduce iron in the brain by downregulating iron transport proteins. Upregulation of brain hepcidin by ad-hepcidin emerges as a new pharmacological treatment and prevention for iron-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Self-mutilation in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation

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    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is the term applied to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in iron deposition in the basal ganglia. Well-known phenotypic features are progressive regression with extra pyramidal involvement and a variable course. A 10-year-old child born to consanguineous parents presented with progressive generalized opisthotonic dystonia, retrocollis, oromandibular dyskinesias, apraxia for swallowing, optic atrophy and severe self-mutilation of lips. MR imaging showed brain iron accumulation. Other causes of self-mutilation were excluded. Early infantile onset, ophisthotonic dystonia with oromandibular dyskinesias and characteristic MR images are suggestive of NBIA. There is only one case reported in the literature of self-mutilation in this condition.

  4. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: update on pathogenic mechanisms.

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    Sonia eLevi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Perturbation of iron distribution is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, but the comprehension of the metal role in the development and progression of such disorders is still very limited. The combination of more powerful brain imaging techniques and faster genomic DNA sequencing procedures has allowed the description of a set of genetic disorders characterized by a constant and often early accumulation of iron in specific brain regions and the identification of the associated genes; these disorders are now collectively included in the category of Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA. So far 10 different genetic forms have been described but this number is likely to increase in short time. Two forms are linked to mutations in genes directly involved in iron metabolism: Neuroferritinopathy, associated to mutations in the FTL gene and Aceruloplasminaemia, where the ceruloplasmin gene product is defective. In the other forms the connection with iron metabolism is not evident at all and the genetic data let infer the involvement of other pathways: Pank2, COASY,Pla2G6, C19orf12, and FA2H genes seem to be related to lipid metabolism and to mitochondria functioning, WDR45 and ATP13A2 genes are implicated in lysosomal and autophagosome activity, while the C2orf37 gene encodes a nucleolar protein of unknown function. There is much hope in the scientific community that the study of the NBIA forms may provide important insight as to the link between brain iron metabolism and neurodegenerative mechanisms and eventually pave the way for new therapeutic avenues also for the more common neurodegenerative disorders. In this work we will review the most recent findings in the molecular mechanisms underlining the most common forms of NBIA and analyze their possible link with brain iron metabolism.

  5. Dystonia in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation : outcome of bilateral pallidal stimulation

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    Timmermann, L.; Pauls, K. A. M.; Wieland, K.; Jech, R.; Kurlemann, G.; Sharma, N.; Gill, S. S.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Hayflick, S. J.; Hogarth, P.; Leenders, K. L.; Limousin, P.; Malanga, C. J.; Moro, E.; Ostrem, J. L.; Revilla, F. J.; Santens, P.; Schnitzler, A.; Tisch, S.; Valldeoriola, F.; Vesper, J.; Volkmann, J.; Woitalla, D.; Peker, S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation encompasses a heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Severe generalized dystonia is frequently a prominent symptom and can be very disabling, causing gait impairment, difficulty

  6. Late Onset Neurodegeneration with Brain-Iron Accumulation Presenting as Parkinsonism

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    Robert Fekete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with brain-iron accumulation (NBIA encompasses a family of neurodegenerative disorders connected by evidence of abnormal brain iron deposition. Advances in imaging and genetic testing expanded the clinical spectrum of these disorders. Here, a case of parkinsonism and dystonia with orofacial stereotypies is presented. While the patient was initially diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and placed on levodopa therapy, dopamine transporter imaging via (123I-FP-CIT SPECT (DaTSCAN was normal. MRI brain showed “eye of the tiger” sign on T2 weighted imaging. NBIA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical parkinsonism.

  7. [The nucleolus of the cell is the site of iron accumulation in the substantia nigra neurons of the human brain].

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    Sukhorukova, Ye G; Grigoriev, I P; Kolos, Ye A; Korzhenevskiy, D E

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of iron in the substantia nigra of the human brain (10 men and women aged 27-78 years) was studied using Perls' histochemical method. Iron ions were demonstrated in the nigral neuropil and melanin-containing neurons. For the first time the nuclei of some neurons were found to contain iron accumulations. The intranuclear iron inclusions correspond to the nucleolus according to their sharp outline and sizes. Detection of iron in the neuronal nucleolus may contribute to the understanding of mechanisms of iron neurotoxicity for nigral dopaminergic neurons.

  8. Mitochondria: A crossroads for lipid metabolism defect in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation diseases.

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    Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of brain iron deposition syndromes that lead to mixed extrapyramidal features and progressive dementia. Exact pathologic mechanism of iron deposition in NBIA remains unknown. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are hallmarked by metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid profile. Among the identified disease genes, four encode for proteins localized in mitochondria, which are directly or indirectly implicated in lipid metabolism: PANK2, CoASY, PLA2G6 and C19orf12. Mutations in PANK2 and CoASY, both implicated in CoA biosynthesis that acts as a fatty acyl carrier, lead, respectively, to PKAN and CoPAN forms of NBIA. Mutations in PLA2G6, which plays a key role in the biosynthesis and remodeling of membrane phospholipids including cardiolipin, lead to PLAN. Mutations in C19orf12 lead to MPAN, a syndrome similar to that caused by mutations in PANK2 and PLA2G6. Although the function of C19orf12 is largely unknown, experimental data suggest its implication in mitochondrial homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Altogether, the identified mutated proteins localized in mitochondria and associated with different NBIA forms support the concept that dysfunctions in mitochondria and lipid metabolism play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  9. Late-Onset Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation with Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Syed Omar Shah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neuroferritinopathy is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that includes a movement disorder, cognitive decline, and characteristic findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI due to abnormal iron deposition. Here, we present a late-onset case, along with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Case Presentation: We report the case of a 74-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history who presented for evaluation of orofacial dyskinesia, suspected to be edentulous dyskinesia given her history of ill-fitting dentures. She had also developed slowly progressive dysarthria, dysphagia, visual hallucinations as well as stereotypic movements of her hands and feet. Results: The eye-of-the-tiger sign was demonstrated on T2 MRI. Increased fractional anisotropy and T2 hypointensity were observed in the periphery of the globus pallidus, putamen, substantia nigra, and dentate nucleus. T2 hyperintensity was present in the medial dentate nucleus and central globus pallidus. Discussion: The pallidal MRI findings were more typical of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN, but given additional dentate and putamenal involvement, lack of retinopathy, and advanced age of onset, PKAN was less likely. Although the patient’s ferritin levels were within low normal range, her clinical and imaging features led to a diagnosis of neuroferritinopathy. Conclusion: Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a rare cause of orofacial dyskinesia. DTI MRI can confirm abnormal iron deposition. The location of abnormal iron deposits helps in differentiating NBIA subtypes. Degeneration of the dentate and globus pallidus may occur via an analogous process given their similar T2 and DTI MRI appearance.

  10. Alteration of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation syndromes.

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    Venco, Paola; Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-08-01

    NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation) comprises a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases having as a common denominator, iron overload in specific brain areas, mainly basal ganglia and globus pallidus. In the past decade a bunch of disease genes have been identified, but NBIA pathomechanisms are still not completely clear. PKAN (pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration), an autosomal recessive disorder with progressive impairment of movement, vision and cognition, is the most common form of NBIA. It is caused by mutations in the PANK2 (pantothenate kinase 2) gene, coding for a mitochondrial enzyme that phosphorylates vitamin B5 in the first reaction of the CoA (coenzyme A) biosynthetic pathway. A distinct form of NBIA, denominated CoPAN (CoA synthase protein-associated neurodegeneration), is caused by mutations in the CoASY (CoA synthase) gene coding for a bifunctional mitochondrial enzyme, which catalyses the final steps of CoA biosynthesis. These two inborn errors of CoA metabolism further support the concept that dysfunctions in CoA synthesis may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA.

  11. Defective lipid metabolism in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) syndromes: not only a matter of iron.

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    Colombelli, Cristina; Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of devastating and life threatening rare diseases. Adult and early-onset NBIA syndromes are inherited as X-chromosomal, autosomal dominant or recessive traits and several genes have been identified as responsible for these disorders. Among the identified disease genes, only two code for proteins directly involved in iron metabolism while the remaining NBIA genes encode proteins with a wide variety of functions ranging from fatty acid metabolism and autophagy to still unknown activities. It is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are associated with metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid metabolism. This is not surprising since neurons have a peculiar and heterogeneous lipid composition critical for the development and correct functioning of the nervous system. This review will focus on specific NBIA forms, namely PKAN, CoPAN, PLAN, FAHN and MPAN, which display an interesting link between neurodegeneration and alteration of phospholipids and sphingolipids metabolism, mitochondrial morphology and membrane remodelling.

  12. Brain iron accumulation in unexplained fetal and infant death victims with smoker mothers-The possible involvement of maternal methemoglobinemia

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    Corna Melissa F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is involved in important vital functions as an essential component of the oxygen-transporting heme mechanism. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether oxidative metabolites from maternal cigarette smoke could affect iron homeostasis in the brain of victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death, maybe through the induction of maternal hemoglobin damage, such as in case of methemoglobinemia. Methods Histochemical investigations by Prussian blue reaction were made on brain nonheme ferric iron deposits, gaining detailed data on their localization in the brainstem and cerebellum of victims of sudden death and controls. The Gless and Marsland's modification of Bielschowsky's was used to identify neuronal cell bodies and neurofilaments. Results Our approach highlighted accumulations of blue granulations, indicative of iron positive reactions, in the brainstem and cerebellum of 33% of victims of sudden death and in none of the control group. The modified Bielschowsky's method confirmed that the cells with iron accumulations were neuronal cells. Conclusions We propose that the free iron deposition in the brain of sudden fetal and infant death victims could be a catabolic product of maternal methemoglobinemia, a biomarker of oxidative stress likely due to nicotine absorption.

  13. Brain iron homeostasis.

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    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  14. The presence of serum alters the properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and lowers their accumulation by cultured brain astrocytes

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    Geppert, Mark; Petters, Charlotte [University of Bremen, Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen (Germany); Thiel, Karsten [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials (Germany); Dringen, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.dringen@uni-bremen.de [University of Bremen, Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Such particles are able to cross the blood-brain barrier and are taken up into brain cells. To test whether serum components affect the properties of IONPs and/or their uptake into brain cells, we have incubated dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic IONPs without and with fetal calf serum (FCS) and have exposed cultured brain astrocytes with IONPs in the absence or presence of FCS. Incubation with FCS caused a concentration-dependent increase in the average hydrodynamic diameter of the particles and of their zeta-potential. In the presence of 10 % FCS, the diameter of the IONPs increased from 57 {+-} 2 to 107 {+-} 6 nm and the zeta-potential of the particles from -22 {+-} 5 to -9 {+-} 1 mV. FCS affected also strongly the uptake of IONPs by cultured astrocytes. The efficient time- and temperature-dependent cellular accumulation of IONPs was lowered with increasing concentration of FCS by up to 90 %. In addition, in the absence of serum, endocytosis inhibitors did not alter the IONP accumulation by astrocytes, while chlorpromazine or wortmannin lowered significantly the accumulation of IONPs in the presence of FCS, suggesting that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis are involved in astrocytic IONP uptake from serum-containing medium. These data demonstrate that the presence of FCS strongly affects the properties of IONPs as well as their accumulation by cultured brain cells.

  15. Exome sequence reveals mutations in CoA synthase as a cause of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

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    Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Haack, Tobias B; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Venco, Paola; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Goffrini, Paola; Tigano, Marco; Demchenko, Nikita; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Invernizzi, Federica; Garavaglia, Barbara; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Hamada, Jeffrey; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zorzi, Giovanna; Kurian, Manju A; Nardocci, Nardo; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan; Gout, Ivan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-02

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive extrapyramidal signs and neurological deterioration, characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Exome sequencing revealed the presence of recessive missense mutations in COASY, encoding coenzyme A (CoA) synthase in one NBIA-affected subject. A second unrelated individual carrying mutations in COASY was identified by Sanger sequence analysis. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the final steps of CoA biosynthesis by coupling phosphopantetheine with ATP to form dephospho-CoA and its subsequent phosphorylation to generate CoA. We demonstrate alterations in RNA and protein expression levels of CoA synthase, as well as CoA amount, in fibroblasts derived from the two clinical cases and in yeast. This is the second inborn error of coenzyme A biosynthesis to be implicated in NBIA.

  16. Dementia means number of things - the overlap of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) and Alzheimer changes: an autopsy case.

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    Dziewulska, Dorota; Domitrz, Izabela; Domzał-Stryga, Anna

    2010-01-01

    In humans overlap between various neurodegenerative disorders is a well known phenomenon. We reported a case of a 77-year-old woman with parkinsonism, dystonia, psychiatric symptoms and progressing dementia misdiagnosed at the age of 51 years as Parkinson's disease. Histopathological examination of the patient's brain performed 26 years after the disease onset revealed numerous axonal spheroids and iron deposits in structures of the nigro-pallido-striatal system that enabled to diagnose neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) (former Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome), and changes characteristic for Alzheimer's disease (AD). NBIA is a group of rare clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases of the extrapyramidal system which common feature is abnormal iron storage in the basal ganglia. Disturbed iron metabolism is also one of the hypothetical patho-mechanisms of AD. A coexistence of morphological changes characteristic for AD and NBIA in our patient suggests that similar molecular mechanisms may be involved in pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative processes, especially in disorders with iron dyshomeostasis. This case contributes also to the increasing evidence of NBIA heterogeneity.

  17. C19orf12 and FA2H mutations are rare in Italian patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

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    Panteghini, Celeste; Zorzi, Giovanna; Venco, Paola; Dusi, Sabrina; Reale, Chiara; Brunetti, Dario; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zibordi, Federica; Siegel, Birgit; Siegel, Brigitte; Garavaglia, Barbara; Simonati, Alessandro; Bertini, Enrico; Nardocci, Nardo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) defines a wide spectrum of clinical entities characterized by iron accumulation in specific regions of the brain, predominantly in the basal ganglia. We evaluated the presence of FA2H and C19orf12 mutations in a cohort of 46 Italian patients with early onset NBIA, which were negative for mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Follow-up molecular genetic and in vitro analyses were then performed. We did not find any mutations in the FA2H gene, although we identified 3 patients carrying novel mutations in the C19orf12 gene. The recent discovery of new genes responsible for NBIA extends the spectrum of the genetic investigation now available for these disorders and makes it possible to delineate a clearer clinical-genetic classification of different forms of this syndrome. A large fraction of patients still remain without a molecular genetics diagnosis, suggesting that additional NBIA genes are still to be discovered.

  18. NEURODEGENERATION WITH IRON ACCUMULATION TYPE1

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    Shrikhande D Y

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1 is a rare degenerative disorder presenting with dementia and progressive extrapyramidal dysfunction. A 10 yrs old girl reported with complaints of difficulty in speech and involuntary movements. MRI Brain showed ‘eye of tiger appearance’ which is suggestive of neurodegeneration with iron accumulation type 1. Treatment is symptomatic and chelating agents have no effect. The disease is progressivelyfatal

  19. Iron accumulates in Huntington's disease neurons: protection by deferoxamine.

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    Jianfang Chen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine-encoding CAG expansion in the huntingtin gene. Iron accumulates in the brains of HD patients and mouse disease models. However, the cellular and subcellular sites of iron accumulation, as well as significance to disease progression are not well understood. We used independent approaches to investigate the location of brain iron accumulation. In R6/2 HD mouse brain, synchotron x-ray fluorescence analysis revealed iron accumulation as discrete puncta in the perinuclear cytoplasm of striatal neurons. Further, perfusion Turnbull's staining for ferrous iron (II combined with transmission electron microscope ultra-structural analysis revealed increased staining in membrane bound peri-nuclear vesicles in R6/2 HD striatal neurons. Analysis of iron homeostatic proteins in R6/2 HD mice revealed decreased levels of the iron response proteins (IRPs 1 and 2 and accordingly decreased expression of iron uptake transferrin receptor (TfR and increased levels of neuronal iron export protein ferroportin (FPN. Finally, we show that intra-ventricular delivery of the iron chelator deferoxamine results in an improvement of the motor phenotype in R6/2 HD mice. Our data supports accumulation of redox-active ferrous iron in the endocytic / lysosomal compartment in mouse HD neurons. Expression changes of IRPs, TfR and FPN are consistent with a compensatory response to an increased intra-neuronal labile iron pool leading to increased susceptibility to iron-associated oxidative stress. These findings, together with protection by deferoxamine, support a potentiating role of neuronal iron accumulation in HD.

  20. Measuring brain manganese and iron accumulation in rats following 14 weeks of low-dose manganese treatment using atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A; Zhang, Na; Anderson, Joel G; Erikson, Keith M; Avison, Malcolm J; Gore, John C; Aschner, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) may lead to a movement disorder due to preferential Mn accumulation in the globus pallidus and other basal ganglia nuclei. Iron (Fe) deficiency also results in increased brain Mn levels, as well as dysregulation of other trace metals. The relationship between Mn and Fe transport has been attributed to the fact that both metals can be transported via the same molecular mechanisms. It is not known, however, whether brain Mn distribution patterns due to increased Mn exposure vs. Fe deficiency are the same, or whether Fe supplementation would reverse or inhibit Mn deposition. To address these questions, we utilized four distinct experimental populations. Three separate groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats on different diets (control diet [MnT], Fe deficient [FeD], or Fe supplemented [FeS]) were given weekly intravenous Mn injections (3 mg Mn/kg body mass) for 14 weeks, whereas control (CN) rats were fed the control diet and received sterile saline injections. At the conclusion of the study, both blood and brain Mn and Fe levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The data indicate that changes in dietary Fe levels (either increased or decreased) result in regionally specific increases in brain Mn levels compared with CN or MnT animals. Furthermore, there was no difference in either Fe or Mn accumulation between FeS or FeD animals. These data suggest that dietary Fe manipulation, whether increased or decreased, may contribute to brain Mn deposition in populations vulnerable to increased Mn exposure.

  1. [Adult-onset case of idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation without mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes].

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    Saiki, Shinji; Sekine, Takeshi; Ueno, Yuji; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Takahashi, Junko; Tani, Yoshihiko; Kambe, Yasunori; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2009-08-01

    A 47-year-old man with a 15-year history of bipolar disorder treated with anti-depressants, lithium carbonate or neuroleptics was admitted because of marked difficulty in gait and speech. At the age 45, he was unable to walk without bilateral assists and became a wheel-chair state. There was no family history and his mother, father and younger sister were neurologically free. General physical examinations revealed no abnormalities. Neurologically, he was moderately demented (mini mental state examination: 18/30) and showed bilateral horizontal gaze nystagmus, parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and moderate spastic paraparesis. No involuntary movements were noted. Wet blood smear showed acanthocytes, while blood chemistries revealed no abnormalities including levels of serum creatine kinase, hepatic enzymes and blood beta-lipoprotein. Kell antigen expressions of the red blood cells were within normal limit. Western blot analysis with anti-chorein antibody detected normal chorein expression levels of the red blood cells. Cranial MRI showed severe symmetric atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes, caudate nuclei, putamen, and brainstem. Also, MRI-gradient echo showed symmetric iron accumulation in the medial portion of the globus pallidus without surrounding high intensity areas, so called "eye-of-the-tiger sign". Genetic analyses revealed no mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Therefore, he was diagnosed as idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). These findings suggest that NBIA is heterogeneous and other additional genes remain to be found.

  2. Absence of an orphan mitochondrial protein, c19orf12, causes a distinct clinical subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

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    Hartig, Monika B; Iuso, Arcangela; Haack, Tobias; Kmiec, Tomasz; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Heim, Katharina; Roeber, Sigrun; Tarabin, Victoria; Dusi, Sabrina; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Hempel, Maja; Winkelmann, Juliane; Elstner, Matthias; Oexle, Konrad; Klopstock, Thomas; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Gasser, Thomas; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Tiranti, Valeria; Kretzschmar, Hans; Schmitz, Gerd; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger

    2011-10-07

    The disease classification neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by brain iron deposits in the basal ganglia. For about half of the cases, the molecular basis is currently unknown. We used homozygosity mapping followed by candidate gene sequencing to identify a homozygous 11 bp deletion in the orphan gene C19orf12. Mutation screening of 23 ideopathic NBIA index cases revealed two mutated alleles in 18 of them, and one loss-of-function mutation is the most prevalent. We also identified compound heterozygous missense mutations in a case initially diagnosed with Parkinson disease at age 49. Psychiatric signs, optic atrophy, and motor axonal neuropathy were common findings. Compared to the most prevalent NBIA subtype, pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), individuals with two C19orf12 mutations were older at age of onset and the disease progressed more slowly. A polyclonal antibody against the predicted membrane spanning protein showed a mitochondrial localization. A histopathological examination in a single autopsy case detected Lewy bodies, tangles, spheroids, and tau pathology. The mitochondrial localization together with the immunohistopathological findings suggests a pathomechanistic overlap with common forms of neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

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    ... of dystonia and spasticity, including oral medications, intrathecal baclofen pump (in which a small pump is implanted ... of dystonia and spasticity, including oral medications, intrathecal baclofen pump (in which a small pump is implanted ...

  4. Brain, blood, and iron : Perspectives on the roles of erythrocytes and iron in neurodegeneration

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    Prohaska, Rainer; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Rudnicki, Dobrila D.; Danek, Adrian; Hayflick, Susan J.; Verhaag, Esther M.; Vonk, Jan J.; Margolis, Russell L.; Walker, Ruth H.

    2012-01-01

    The terms "neuroacanthocytosis" (NA) and "neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation" (NBIA) both refer to groups of genetically heterogeneous disorders, classified together due to similarities of their phenotypic or pathological findings. Even collectively, the disorders that comprise these set

  5. Dissociation between iron accumulation and ferritin upregulation in the aged substantia nigra: attenuation by dietary restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas; Michaelides, Christos; Ekonomou, Antigoni; Geraki, Kalotina; Parkes, Harold G; Suessmilch, Maria; Herlihy, Amy H; Crum, William R; So, Po-Wah

    2016-01-01

    Despite regulation, brain iron increases with aging and may enhance aging processes including neuroinflammation. Increases in magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation rates, R2 and R2*, in the brain have been observed during aging. We show R2 and R2* correlate well with iron content via direct correlation to semi-quantitative synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence iron mapping, with age-associated R2 and R2* increases reflecting iron accumulation. Iron accumulation was concomitant with increased ferritin immunoreactivity in basal ganglia regions except in the substantia nigra (SN). The unexpected dissociation of iron accumulation from ferritin-upregulation in the SN suggests iron dyshomeostasis in the SN. Occurring alongside microgliosis and astrogliosis, iron dyshomeotasis may contribute to the particular vulnerability of the SN. Dietary restriction (DR) has long been touted to ameliorate brain aging and we show DR attenuated agerelated in vivo R2 increases in the SN over ages 7 – 19 months, concomitant with normal iron-induction of ferritin expression and decreased microgliosis. Iron is known to induce microgliosis and conversely, microgliosis can induce iron accumulation, which of these may be the initial pathological aging event warrants further investigation. We suggest iron chelation therapies and anti-inflammatory treatments may be putative ‘antibrain aging’ therapies and combining these strategies may be synergistic. PMID:27743512

  6. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huiying; Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-24

    Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH+RR, and SAH+Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron-sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  7. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Huiying [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Kuanyu, E-mail: likuanyu@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu Province (China); Hang, Chun-Hua, E-mail: hang_neurosurgery@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  8. Iron Accumulation Is Not Homogenous among Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khashayar Dashtipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Iron is considered to lead to neurodegeneration and has been hypothesized as a possible cause of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI is a powerful tool to measure phase related iron content of brain. Methods. Twelve de novo patients with PD were recruited from the Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Loma Linda University. Twelve age- and sex-matched non-PD subjects were recruited from neurology clinic as controls. Using SWI, the phase related iron content was estimated from different brain regions of interest (ROIs. Results. There was a trend between increasing age and iron accumulation in the globus pallidus and putamen in all subjects. Iron accumulation was not significant in different ROIs in PD patients compared to controls after adjustment for age. Our data revealed heterogeneity of phase values in different brain ROIs among all subjects with an exaggerated trend at SN in PD patients. Conclusions. Our data suggest a nonhomogeneous pattern of iron accumulation in different brain regions among PD patients. Further studies are needed to explore whether this may correlate to the progression of PD. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the heterogeneity of iron accumulation in the brain, among patients with PD.

  9. Manganese accumulation in the brain: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Nomiyama, K.; Takase, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Nojiri, J.; Kudo, S. [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, T. [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    Manganese (Mn) accumulation in the brain is detected as symmetrical high signal intensity in the globus pallidi on T1-weighted MR images without an abnormal signal on T2-weighted images. In this review, we present several cases of Mn accumulation in the brain due to acquired or congenital diseases of the abdomen including hepatic cirrhosis with a portosystemic shunt, congenital biliary atresia, primary biliary cirrhosis, congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunt without liver dysfunction, Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome with a diffuse intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and patent ductus venosus. Other causes of Mn accumulation in the brain are Mn overload from total parenteral nutrition and welding-related Mn intoxication. (orig.)

  10. Decreased serum hepcidin concentration correlates with brain iron deposition in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. METHODS: Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional

  11. Iron biomineralization of brain tissue and neurodegenerative disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova (Mikhailova), Albina

    The brain is an organ with a high concentration of iron in specific areas, particularly in the globus pallidus, the substantia nigra, and the red nucleus. In certain pathological states, such as iron overload disease and neurodegenerative disorders, a disturbed iron metabolism can lead to increased accumulation of iron not only in these areas, but also in the brain regions that are typically low in iron content. Recent studies of the physical and magnetic properties of metalloproteins, and in particular the discovery of biogenic magnetite in human brain tissue, have raised new questions about the role of biogenic iron formations in living organisms. Further investigations revealed the presence of magnetite-like crystalline structures in human ferritin, and indicated that released ferritin iron might act as promoter of oxidative damage to tissue, therefore contributing to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The purpose of this work was to examine the elemental composition and structure of iron deposits in normal brain tissue as well as tissue affected by neurodegenerative disorders. Employing the methods of X-ray microfocus fluorescence mapping, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (XAFS), and light and electron microscopic examinations allows one to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative data with respect to the cellular distribution and chemical state of iron at levels not detected previously. The described tissue preparation technique allows not only satisfactory XAS iron elemental imaging in situ but also multimodal examination with light and electron microscopes of the same samples. The developed protocol has assured consistent and reproducible results on relatively large sections of flat-embedded tissue. The resulting tissue samples were adequate for XAS examination as well as sufficiently well-preserved for future microscopy studies

  12. Transcranial sonography in brain disorders with trace metal accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial sonography (TCS) can detect trace metal accumulation in deep brain structures with higher sensitivity than conventional MRI. Especially, increased iron content in the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease, increased copper content in the lenticular nucleus (LN) in Wilson's disease and idiopathic dystonia, and increased manganese content in the LN in manganese-induced Parkinsonism were detected with TCS, even in subjects with normal MRI. TCS, therefore, might be useful to detect an increased risk of developing neurological symptoms in relatives of patients with Parkinson's or Wilson's disease. The exact mechanism of how an elevated trace metal content leads to an increased echogenicity needs to be further elucidated.

  13. Accumulation of iron in the putamen predicts its shrinkage in healthy older adults: A multi-occasion longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Ana M; Raz, Naftali

    2016-03-01

    Accumulation of non-heme iron is believed to play a major role in neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia. In healthy aging, however, the temporal relationship between change in brain iron content and age-related volume loss is unclear. Here, we present the first long-term longitudinal multi-occasion investigation of changes in iron content and volume in the neostriatum in a sample of healthy middle-aged and older adults (N=32; ages 49-83years at baseline). Iron content, estimated via R2* relaxometry, increased in the putamen, but not the caudate nucleus. In the former, the rate of accumulation was coupled with change in volume. Moreover, greater baseline iron content predicted faster shrinkage and smaller volumes seven years later. Older age partially accounted for individual differences in neostriatal iron content and volume, but vascular risk did not. Thus, brain iron content may be a promising biomarker of impending decline in normal aging.

  14. Iron accumulation with age, oxidative stress and functional decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Xu

    Full Text Available Identification of biological mediators in sarcopenia is pertinent to the development of targeted interventions to alleviate this condition. Iron is recognized as a potent pro-oxidant and a catalyst for the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems. It is well accepted that iron accumulates with senescence in several organs, but little is known about iron accumulation in muscle and how it may affect muscle function. In addition, it is unclear if interventions which reduced age-related loss of muscle quality, such as calorie restriction, impact iron accumulation. We investigated non-heme iron concentration, oxidative stress to nucleic acids in gastrocnemius muscle and key indices of sarcopenia (muscle mass and grip strength in male Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL or a calorie restricted diet (60% of ad libitum food intake starting at 4 months of age at 8, 18, 29 and 37 months of age. Total non-heme iron levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats increased progressively with age. Between 29 and 37 months of age, the non-heme iron concentration increased by approximately 200% in AL-fed rats. Most importantly, the levels of oxidized RNA in gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats were significantly increased as well. The striking age-associated increase in non-heme iron and oxidized RNA levels and decrease in sarcopenia indices were all attenuated in the calorie restriction (CR rats. These findings strongly suggest that the age-related iron accumulation in muscle contributes to increased oxidative damage and sarcopenia, and that CR effectively attenuates these negative effects.

  15. Age, gender, and hemispheric differences in iron deposition in the human brain: an in vivo MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Qidong; Zhang, Minming

    2008-03-01

    It is well known that iron accumulates in the brains of patients with various neurodegenerative diseases. To better understand disease-related iron changes, it is necessary to know the physiological distribution and accumulation of iron in the human brain. Studies have shown that brain iron levels increase with aging. However, the effects of gender and hemispheric laterality on iron accumulation and distribution are not well established. In this study, we estimated the brain iron levels in vivo in 78 healthy adults ranging in age 22 to 78 years using magnetic susceptibility-weighted phase imaging. The effects of age, gender, and hemispheric location on brain iron levels were evaluated within the framework of a general linear model. We found that the left hemisphere had higher iron levels than the right in the putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, thalamus, and frontal white matter. We argue that the hemispheric asymmetry of iron content may underlie that of the dopaminergic system and may be related to motor lateralization in humans. In addition, significant age-related iron accumulation occurred in the putamen, red nucleus, and frontal white matter, but no gender-related differences in iron levels were detected. The results of this study extend our knowledge of the physiological distribution and accumulation of iron in the human brain.

  16. Intestinal HIF2α promotes tissue-iron accumulation in disorders of iron overload with anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erik R; Taylor, Matthew; Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Martin, Angelical; Xie, Liwei; Bredell, Bryce X; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2013-12-10

    Several distinct congenital disorders can lead to tissue-iron overload with anemia. Repeated blood transfusions are one of the major causes of iron overload in several of these disorders, including β-thalassemia major, which is characterized by a defective β-globin gene. In this state, hyperabsorption of iron is also observed and can significantly contribute to iron overload. In β-thalassemia intermedia, which does not require blood transfusion for survival, hyperabsorption of iron is the leading cause of iron overload. The mechanism of increased iron absorption in β-thalassemia is unclear. We definitively demonstrate, using genetic mouse models, that intestinal hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF2α) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) are activated early in the pathogenesis of β-thalassemia and are essential for excess iron accumulation in mouse models of β-thalassemia. Moreover, thalassemic mice with established iron overload had significant improvement in tissue-iron levels and anemia following disruption of intestinal HIF2α. In addition to repeated blood transfusions and increased iron absorption, chronic hemolysis is the major cause of tissue-iron accumulation in anemic iron-overload disorders caused by hemolytic anemia. Mechanistic studies in a hemolytic anemia mouse model demonstrated that loss of intestinal HIF2α/DMT1 signaling led to decreased tissue-iron accumulation in the liver without worsening the anemia. These data demonstrate that dysregulation of intestinal hypoxia and HIF2α signaling is critical for progressive iron overload in β-thalassemia and may be a novel therapeutic target in several anemic iron-overload disorders.

  17. Characterization of accumulated precipitates during subsurface iron removal

    KAUST Repository

    Van Halem, Doris

    2011-01-01

    The principle of subsurface iron removal for drinking water supply is that aerated water is periodically injected into the aquifer through a tube well. On its way into the aquifer, the injected O2-rich water oxidizes adsorbed Fe 2+, creating a subsurface oxidation zone. When groundwater abstraction is resumed, the soluble Fe 2+ is adsorbed and water with reduced Fe concentrations is abstracted for multiple volumes of the injection water. In this article, Fe accumulation deposits in the aquifer near subsurface treatment wells were identified and characterized to assess the sustainability of subsurface iron removal regarding clogging of the aquifer and the potential co-accumulation of other groundwater constituents, such as As. Chemical extraction of soil samples, with Acid-Oxalate and HNO3, showed that Fe had accumulated at specific depths near subsurface iron removal wells after 12 years of operation. Whether it was due to preferred flow paths or geochemical mineralogy conditions; subsurface iron removal clearly favoured certain soil layers. The total Fe content increased between 11.5 and 390.8 mmol/kg ds in the affected soil layers, and the accumulated Fe was found to be 56-100% crystalline. These results suggest that precipitated amorphous Fe hydroxides have transformed to Fe hydroxides of higher crystallinity. These crystalline, compact Fe hydroxides have not noticeably clogged the investigated well and/or aquifer between 1996 and 2008. The subsurface iron removal wells even need less frequent rehabilitation, as drawdown increases more slowly than in normal production wells. Other groundwater constituents, such as Mn, As and Sr were found to co-accumulate with Fe. Acid extraction and ESEM-EDX showed that Ca occurred together with Fe and by X-ray Powder Diffraction it was identified as calcite. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Disposition, accumulation and toxicity of iron fed as iron (II) sulfate or as sodium iron EDTA in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel, M.J.; Kuper, C.F.; Woutersen, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    A study was performed to provide data on the disposition, accumulation and toxicity of sodium iron EDTA in comparison with iron (II) sulfate in rats on administration via the diet for 31 and 61 days. Clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, food conversion efficiency, hematology, clinical che

  19. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Eric M; Wang, Jianmin; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan; Yan, Wengui; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2015-08-01

    Effects of soil-arsenic (As), phosphorus and iron oxide on As accumulation in rice grain were investigated. Cultivars that have significantly different sensitivity to As, straighthead-resistant Zhe 733 and straighthead-susceptible Cocodrie, were used to represent different cultivar varieties. The grain accumulation of other elements of concern, selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) was also monitored. Results demonstrated that high soil-As not only resulted in high grain-As, but could also result in high grain-Se, and Zhe 733 had significantly less grain-As than Cocodrie did. However, soil-As did not impact grain-Mo and Cd. Among all elements monitored, iron oxide amendment significantly reduced grain-As for both cultivars, while the phosphate application only reduced grain-Se for Zhe 733. Results also indicated that cultivar type significantly impacted grain accumulation of all monitored trace elements. Therefore, applying iron oxide to As-contaminated land, in addition to choosing appropriate rice cultivar, can effectively reduce the grain accumulation of As.

  20. Iron uptake and transport at the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    . The mRNA expression of the iron-related molecules was also investigated in isolated brain capillaries from iron deficiency, iron reversible and normal rats. We also performed iron transport studies to analyze the routes by which iron is transported through the brain capillary endothelial cells: i) We......The mechanism by which iron is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains controversial, and in this study we aimed to further clarify mechanisms by which iron is transported into the brain. We analyzed and compared the mRNA and protein expression of a variety of proteins involved...... in the transport of iron (transferrin receptor, divalent metal transporter I (DMT1), steap 2, steap 3, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and ferroportin) in both primary rat brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) and immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (RBE4) grown in co-culture with defined polarity...

  1. R2* mapping for brain iron: associations with cognition in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadery, Christine; Pirpamer, Lukas; Hofer, Edith; Langkammer, Christian; Petrovic, Katja; Loitfelder, Marisa; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Seiler, Stephan; Duering, Marco; Jouvent, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Fazekas, Franz; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin; Ropele, Stefan; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2015-02-01

    Brain iron accumulates during aging and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Magnetic resonance (MR)-based R2* mapping enables the in vivo detection of iron content in brain tissue. We investigated if during normal brain aging iron load relates to cognitive impairment in region-specific patterns in a community-dwelling cohort of 336 healthy, middle aged, and older adults from the Austrian Stroke Prevention Family Study. MR imaging and R2* mapping in the basal ganglia and neocortex were done at 3T. Comprehensive neuropsychological testing assessed memory, executive function, and psychomotor speed. We found the highest iron concentration in the globus pallidus, and pallidal and putaminal iron was significantly and inversely associated with cognitive performance in all cognitive domains, except memory. These associations were iron load dependent. Vascular brain lesions and brain volume did not mediate the relationship between iron and cognitive performance. We conclude that higher R2*-determined iron in the basal ganglia correlates with cognitive impairment during brain aging independent of concomitant brain abnormalities. The prognostic significance of this finding needs to be determined.

  2. Hypoxia-Induced Iron Accumulation in Oligodendrocytes Mediates Apoptosis by Eliciting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Murugan, Madhuvika; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the role of increased iron accumulation in oligodendrocytes and its role in their apoptosis in the periventricular white matter damage (PWMD) following a hypoxic injury to the neonatal brain. In response to hypoxia, in the PWM, there was increased expression of proteins involved in iron acquisition, such as iron regulatory proteins (IRP1, IRP2) and transferrin receptor in oligodendrocytes. Consistent with this, following a hypoxic exposure, there was increased accumulation of iron in primary cultured oligodendrocytes. The increased concentration of iron within hypoxic oligodendrocytes was found to elicit ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression, and the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers such as binding-immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE)-1α. Associated with ER stress, there was reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels within hypoxic oligodendrocytes. However, treatment with deferoxamine reduced the increased expression of RyR, BiP, and IRE-1α and increased ATP levels in hypoxic oligodendrocytes. Parallel to ER stress there was enhanced reactive oxygen species production within mitochondria of hypoxic oligodendrocytes, which was attenuated when these cells were treated with deferoxamine. At the ultrastructural level, hypoxic oligodendrocytes frequently showed dilated ER and disrupted mitochondria, which became less evident in those treated with deferoxamine. Associated with these subcellular changes, the apoptosis of hypoxic oligodendrocytes was evident with an increase in p53 and caspase-3 expression, which was attenuated when these cells were treated with deferoxamine. Thus, the present study emphasizes that the excess iron accumulated within oligodendrocytes in hypoxic PWM could result in their death by eliciting ER stress and mitochondrial disruption.

  3. Iron plaque decreases cadmium accumulation in Oryza sativa L. and serves as a source of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, A; Prasad, M N V

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination occurs in paddy soils; hence it is necessary to reduce Cd content of rice. Application and mode of action of ferrous sulphate in minimizing Cd in rice was monitored in the present study. Pot culture with Indian rice variety Swarna (MTU 7029) was maintained in Cd-spiked soil containing ferrous sulphates, which is expected to reduce Cd accumulation in rice. Responses in rhizosphere pH, root surface, metal accumulation in plant and molecular physiological processes were monitored. Iron plaque was induced on root surfaces after FeSO4 application and the amount of Fe in plaque reduced with increases in Cd in the soil. Rhizosphere pH decreased during plaque formation and became more acidic due to secretion of organic acids from the roots under Cd treatment. Moreover, iron chelate reductase activity increased with Cd treatment, but in the absence of Cd, activity of this enzyme increased in plaque-induced plants. Cd treatment caused expression of OsYSL18, whereas OsYSL15 was expressed only in roots without iron plaque. Fe content of plants increased during plaque formation, which protected plants from Cd-induced Fe deficiency and metal toxicity. This was corroborated with increased biomass, chlorophyll content and quantum efficiency of photo-synthesis among plaque-induced plants. We conclude that ferrous sulphate-induced iron plaque prevents Cd accumulation and Fe deficiency in rice. Iron released from plaque via organic acid mediated dissolution during Cd stress.

  4. Coexistence of Copper in the Iron-Rich Particles of Aceruloplasminemia Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kunihiro; Hayashi, Hisao; Wakusawa, Shinya; Shigemasa, Ryota; Koide, Ryoji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Kato, Koichi; Ohara, Shinji; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between iron and copper has been discussed in association with human health and diseases for many years. Ceruloplasmin, a multi-copper oxidase, is mainly involved in iron metabolism and its genetic defect, aceruloplasminemia (ACP), shows neurological disorders and diabetes associated with excessive iron accumulation, but little is known about the state of copper in the brain. Here, we investigated localization of these metals in the brains of three patients with ACP using electron microscopes equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray analyzer. Histochemically, iron deposition was observed mainly in the basal ganglia and dentate nucleus, and to lesser degree in the cerebral cortex of the patients, whereas copper grains were not detected. X-ray microanalysis identified two types of iron-rich particles in their brains: dense bodies, namely hemosiderins, and their aggregated inclusions. A small number of hemosiderins and most inclusions contained a significant amount of copper which was enough for distinct Cu x-ray images. These copper-containing particles were observed more frequently in the putamen and dentate nucleus than the cerebral cortex. Coexistence of iron and copper was supported by good correlations in the molecular ratios between these two metals in iron-rich particles with Cu x-ray image. Iron-dependent copper accumulation in iron-rich particles may suggest that copper recycling is enhanced to meet the increased requirement of cuproproteins in iron overload brain. In conclusion, the iron-rich particles with Cu x-ray image were found in the ACP brain.

  5. The Oral Iron Chelator, Deferasirox, Reverses the Age-Dependent Alterations in Iron and Amyloid-β Homeostasis in Rat Brain: Implications in the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Anand, Shruti; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2016-01-01

    The altered metabolism of iron impacts the brain function in multiple deleterious ways during normal aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease. We have shown in this study that chelatable iron accumulates in the aged rat brain along with overexpression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin, accompanied by significant alterations in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide homeostasis in the aging brain, such as an increased production of the amyloid-β protein precursor, a decreased level of neprilysin, and increased accumulation of Aβ42. When aged rats are given daily the iron chelator, deferasirox, over a period of more than 4 months starting from the 18th month, the age-related accumulation of iron and overexpression of TfR1 and ferritin in the brain are significantly prevented. More interestingly, the chelator treatment also considerably reverses the altered Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain implying a significant role of iron in the latter phenomenon. Further, other results indicate that iron accumulation results in oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB in the aged rat brain, which are also reversed by the deferasirox treatment. The analysis of the results together suggests that iron accumulation and oxidative stress interact at multiple levels that include transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to bring about changes in the expression levels of TfR1 and ferritin and also alterations in Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging rat brain. The efficacy of deferasirox in preventing age-related changes in iron and Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain, as shown here, has obvious therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Iron accumulates in the lavage and explanted lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Oxidative stress participates in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An underlying disruption in iron homeostasis can frequently be demonstrated in injuries and diseases associated with an oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that iron accumulation and ...

  7. 26Al uptake and accumulation in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26Al incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26Al was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26Al entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26Al level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26Al in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26Al taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.

  8. Relationship between Iron Accumulation and White Matter Injury in Multiple Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Eytan; Branson, Brittany; Jensen, Jens H.; Bester, Maxim; Babb, James S.; Herbert, Joseph; Grossman, Robert I.; Inglese, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the increasing development and applications of iron imaging, the pathophysiology of iron accumulation in multiple sclerosis (MS), and its role in disease progression and development of clinical disability, is poorly understood. The aims of our study were to determine the presence and extent of iron in T2 visible lesions and gray and white matter using magnetic field correlation (MFC) MRI and correlate with microscopic white matter (WM) injury as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a case-control study incuding a series of 31 patients with clinically definite MS. The mean age was 39 years [standard deviation (SD)=9.55], they were 11 males and 20 females, with a disease duration average of 3 years (range 0-13) and a median EDSS of 2 (0-4.5). Seventeen healthy volunteers (6 males and 11 females) with a mean age of 36 years (SD=11.4) were recruited. All subjects underwent MR imaging on a 3T scanner using T2-weighted sequence, 3D T1 MPRAGE, MFC, single-shot DTI and postcontrast T1. T2-lesion volumes, brain volumetry, DTI parameters and iron quantification were calculated and multiple correlations were exploited. RESULTS Increased MFC was found in the putamen (p=0.061), the thalamus (p=0.123), the centrum semiovale (p=0.053), globus pallidus (p=0.008) and gray matter (GM) (p=0.004) of MS patients compared to controls. The mean lesional MFC was 121 s−2 (SD=67), significantly lower compared to the GM MFC (<0.0001). The GM mean diffusivity (MD) was inversely correlated with the MFC in the centrum semiovale (p<0.001), and in the splenium of the corpus callosum (p<0.001). CONCLUSION Patients with MS have increased iron in the globus pallidus, putamen and centrum with a trend toward increased iron in all the brain structures. Quantitative iron evaluation of WM and GM may improve the understanding of MS pathophysiology, and might serve as a surrogate marker of disease progression. PMID:25416468

  9. Determinants of iron accumulation in deep grey matter of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropele, Stefan; Kilsdonk, Iris D; Wattjes, Mike P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Iron accumulation in deep grey matter (GM) structures is a consistent finding in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This study focused on the identification of independent determinants of iron accumulation using R2* mapping. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ninety-seven MS patients and 81 healthy...

  10. Uptake and metabolism of iron oxide nanoparticles in brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petters, Charlotte; Irrsack, Ellen; Koch, Michael; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are used for various applications in biomedicine, for example as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, for cell tracking and for anti-tumor treatment. However, IONPs are also known for their toxic effects on cells and tissues which are at least in part caused by iron-mediated radical formation and oxidative stress. The potential toxicity of IONPs is especially important concerning the use of IONPs for neurobiological applications as alterations in brain iron homeostasis are strongly connected with human neurodegenerative diseases. Since IONPs are able to enter the brain, potential adverse consequences of an exposure of brain cells to IONPs have to be considered. This article describes the pathways that allow IONPs to enter the brain and summarizes the current knowledge on the uptake, the metabolism and the toxicity of IONPs for the different types of brain cells in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Mini-review: the morphology, mineralogy and microbiology of accumulated iron corrosion products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Brenda J; Gerke, Tammie L; Lee, Jason S

    2014-09-01

    Despite obvious differences in morphology, substratum chemistry and the electrolyte in which they form, accumulations of iron corrosion products have the following characteristics in common: stratification of iron oxides/hydroxides with a preponderance of α-FeOOH (goethite) and accumulation of metals. Bacteria, particularly iron-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria have been identified in some accumulations. Both biotic and abiotic mechanisms have been used to rationalize observations for particular sets of environmental data. This review is the first to compare observations and interpretations.

  12. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leskovjan, Andreana C.; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late stage human Alzheimer’s disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher th...

  13. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, A.C.; Zheng, W.; Haacke, E.M.; Webb, S.; Nichol, H.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  14. Cell Wall Targeted in planta Iron Accumulation Enhances Biomass Conversion and Seed Iron Concentration in Arabidopsis and Rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haibing; Wei, Hui; Ma, Guojie; Antunes, Mauricio S.; Vogt, Stefan; Cox, Joseph; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Xiping; Bu, Lintao; Gleber, S. Charlotte; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Makowski, Lee; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin P.; McCann, Maureen C.; Murphy, Angus S.; Peer, Wendy A.

    2016-10-01

    Conversion of nongrain biomass into liquid fuel is a sustainable approach to energy demands as global population increases. Previously, we showed that iron can act as a catalyst to enhance the degradation of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production. However, direct addition of iron catalysts to biomass pretreatment is diffusion-limited, would increase the cost and complexity of biorefinery unit operations and may have deleterious environmental impacts. Here, we show a new strategy for in planta accumulation of iron throughout the volume of the cell wall where iron acts as a catalyst in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. We engineered CBM-IBP fusion polypeptides composed of a carbohydrate-binding module family 11 (CBM11) and an iron-binding peptide (IBP) for secretion into Arabidopsis and rice cell walls. CBM-IBP transformed Arabidopsis and rice plants show significant increases in iron accumulation and biomass conversion compared to respective controls. Further, CBM-IBP rice shows a 35% increase in seed iron concentration and a 40% increase in seed yield in greenhouse experiments. CBM-IBP rice potentially could be used to address iron deficiency, the most common and widespread nutritional disorder according to the World Health Organization.

  15. Iron and ferritin accumulate in separate cellular locations in Phaseolus seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair Matthew W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an important micronutrient for all living organisms. Almost 25% of the world population is affected by iron deficiency, a leading cause of anemia. In plants, iron deficiency leads to chlorosis and reduced yield. Both animals and plants may suffer from iron deficiency when their diet or environment lacks bioavailable iron. A sustainable way to reduce iron malnutrition in humans is to develop staple crops with increased content of bioavailable iron. Knowledge of where and how iron accumulates in seeds of crop plants will increase the understanding of plant iron metabolism and will assist in the production of staples with increased bioavailable iron. Results Here we reveal the distribution of iron in seeds of three Phaseolus species including thirteen genotypes of P. vulgaris, P. coccineus, and P. lunatus. We showed that high concentrations of iron accumulate in cells surrounding the provascular tissue of P. vulgaris and P. coccineus seeds. Using the Perls' Prussian blue method, we were able to detect iron in the cytoplasm of epidermal cells, cells near the epidermis, and cells surrounding the provascular tissue. In contrast, the protein ferritin that has been suggested as the major iron storage protein in legumes was only detected in the amyloplasts of the seed embryo. Using the non-destructive micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission technique we show that the tissue in the proximity of the provascular bundles holds up to 500 μg g-1 of iron, depending on the genotype. In contrast to P. vulgaris and P. coccineus, we did not observe iron accumulation in the cells surrounding the provascular tissues of P. lunatus cotyledons. A novel iron-rich genotype, NUA35, with a high concentration of iron both in the seed coat and cotyledons was bred from a cross between an Andean and a Mesoamerican genotype. Conclusions The presented results emphasize the importance of complementing research in model organisms with analysis in

  16. α-Synuclein Over-Expression Induces Increased Iron Accumulation and Redistribution in Iron-Exposed Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard; Carmona, Asuncion; Roudeau, Stéphane; Perrin, Laura; Dučić, Tanja; Carboni, Eleonora; Bohic, Sylvain; Cloetens, Peter; Lingor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common α-synucleinopathy, and increased levels of iron are found in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients, but the potential interlink between both molecular changes has not been fully understood. Metal to protein binding assays have shown that α-synuclein can bind iron in vitro; therefore, we hypothesized that iron content and iron distribution could be modified in cellulo, in cells over-expressing α-synuclein. Owing to particle-induced X-ray emission and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence chemical nano-imaging, we were able to quantify and describe the iron distribution at the subcellular level. We show that, in neurons exposed to excess iron, the mere over-expression of human α-synuclein results in increased levels of intracellular iron and in iron redistribution from the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region within α-synuclein-rich inclusions. Reproducible results were obtained in two distinct recombinant expression systems, in primary rat midbrain neurons and in a rat neuroblastic cell line (PC12), both infected with viral vectors expressing human α-synuclein. Our results link two characteristic molecular features found in Parkinson's disease, the accumulation of α-synuclein and the increased levels of iron in the substantia nigra.

  17. The interplay between iron accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation during the execution step of neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Urrutia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A growing set of observations points to mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, oxidative damage and chronic inflammation as common pathognomonic signs of a number of neurodegenerative diseases that includes Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedrich’s ataxia and Parkinson’s disease. Particularly relevant for neurodegenerative processes is the relationship between mitochondria and iron. The mitochondrion upholds the synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme, the most abundant iron-containing prosthetic groups in a large variety of proteins, so a fraction of incoming iron must go through this organelle before reaching its final destination. In turn, the mitochondrial respiratory chain is the source of reactive oxygen species (ROS derived from leaks in the electron transport chain. The co-existence of both iron and ROS in the secluded space of the mitochondrion makes this organelle particularly prone to hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. In addition, a connection between the loss of iron homeostasis and inflammation is starting to emerge; thus, inflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha and IL-6 induce the synthesis of the divalent metal transporter 1 and promote iron accumulation in neurons and microglia. Here, we review the recent literature on mitochondrial iron homeostasis and the role of inflammation on mitochondria dysfunction and iron accumulation on the neurodegenerative process that lead to cell death in Parkinson’s disease. We also put forward the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation and inflammation are part of a synergistic self-feeding cycle that ends in apoptotic cell death, once the antioxidant cellular defense systems are finally overwhelmed.

  18. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. The manganese superoxide dismutase Ala16Val dimorphism modulates iron accumulation in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahon, Pierre; Charnaux, Nathalie; Friand, Véronique; Prost-Squarcioni, Catherine; Ziol, Marianne; Lièvre, Nicole; Trinchet, Jean-Claude; Beaugrand, Michel; Gattegno, Liliane; Pessayre, Dominique; Sutton, Angela

    2008-11-01

    The Ala/16Val dimorphism incorporates alanine (Ala) or valine (Val) in the mitochondrial targeting sequence of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), modifying MnSOD mitochondrial import and activity. In alcoholic cirrhotic patients, the Ala-MnSOD allele is associated with hepatic iron accumulation and an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The Ala-MnSOD variant could modulate the expression of proteins involved in iron storage (cytosolic ferritin), uptake (transferrin receptors, TfR-1 and-2), extrusion (hepcidin), and intracellular distribution (frataxin) to trigger hepatic iron accumulation. We therefore assessed the Ala/Val-MnSOD genotype and the hepatic iron score in 162 alcoholic cirrhotic patients. In our cohort, this hepatic iron score increased with the number of Ala-MnSOD alleles. We also transfected Huh7 cells with Ala-MnSOD-or Val-MnSOD-encoding plasmids and assessed cellular iron, MnSOD activity, and diverse mRNAs and proteins. In Huh7 cells, MnSOD activity was higher after Ala-MnSOD transfection than after Val-MnSOD transfection. Additionally, iron supplementation decreased transfected MnSOD proteins and activities. Ala-MnSOD transfection increased the mRNAs and proteins of ferritin, hepcidin, and TfR2, decreased the expression of frataxin, and caused cellular iron accumulation. In contrast, Val-MnSOD transfection had limited effects. In conclusion, the Ala-MnSOD variant favors hepatic iron accumulation by modulating the expression of proteins involved in iron homeostasis.

  20. IRON, ZINC, AND FERRITIN ACCUMULATION IN COMMON BEANS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian; Sørensen, Kirsten; Jurkiewicz, Anna Malgorzata

      that the distribution of iron is dependant on the genotype. Using immunolocalization, we visualized the localization of  ferritin in mature common bean seeds.   This knowledge can contribute to the discovery of factors that affect the bioavailability of micronutrients and  can contribute to breeding common beans...

  1. Augmenting Iron Accumulation in Cassava by the Beneficial Soil Bacterium Bacillus subtilis (GBO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica A Freitas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta, a major staple food in the developing world, provides a basic carbohydrate diet for over half a billion people living in the tropics. Despite the iron abundance in most soils, cassava provides insufficient iron for humans as the edible roots contain 3-12 times less iron than other traditional food crops such as wheat, maize, and rice. With the recent identification that the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (strain GB03 activates iron acquisition machinery to increase metal ion assimilation in Arabidopsis, the question arises as to whether this plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR also augments iron assimilation to increase endogenous iron levels in cassava. Biochemical analyses reveal that shoot-propagated cassava with GB03-inoculation exhibit elevated iron accumulation after 140 days of plant growth as determined by X-ray microanalysis and total foliar iron analysis. Growth promotion and increased photosynthetic efficiency were also observed for greenhouse-grown plants with GB03-exposure. These results demonstrate the potential of microbes to increase iron accumulation in an important agricultural crop and is consistent with idea that microbial signaling can regulate plant photosynthesis.

  2. Iron Overload Coordinately Promotes Ferritin Expression and Fat Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haizhen; Jiang, Xue; Wu, Jieyu; Zhang, Linqiang; Huang, Jingfei; Zhang, Yuru; Zou, Xiaoju; Liang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The trace element iron is crucial for living organisms, since it plays essential roles in numerous cellular functions. Systemic iron overload and the elevated level of ferritin, a ubiquitous intracellular protein that stores and releases iron to maintain the iron homeostasis in cells, has long been epidemiologically associated with obesity and obesity-related diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that iron overload induces the expression of sgk-1, encoding the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase, to promote the level of ferritin and fat accumulation. Mutation of cyp-23A1, encoding a homolog of human cytochrome P450 CYP7B1 that is related to neonatal hemochromatosis, further enhances the elevated expression of ftn-1, sgk-1, and fat accumulation. sgk-1 positively regulates the expression of acs-20 and vit-2, genes encoding homologs of the mammalian FATP1/4 fatty acid transport proteins and yolk lipoproteins, respectively, to facilitate lipid uptake and translocation for storage under iron overload. This study reveals a completely novel pathway in which sgk-1 plays a central role to synergistically regulate iron and lipid homeostasis, offering not only experimental evidence supporting a previously unverified link between iron and obesity, but also novel insights into the pathogenesis of iron and obesity-related human metabolic diseases.

  3. Using iron fertilizer to control Cd accumulation in rice plants: A new promising technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Effects of two kinds of iron fertilizer, FeSO4 and EDTA·Na2Fe were studied on cadmium accumulation in rice plants with two rice genotypes, Zhongzao 22 and Zhongjiazao 02, with soil culture systems. The results showed that application of iron fertilizers could hardly make adverse effects on plant growth and rice grain yield. Soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe significantly reduced the Cd accumulation in rice roots, shoots and rice grain. Cd concentration in white rice of both rice genotypes in the treatment of soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe was much lower than 0.2 mg/kg, the maximal Cd permission concentra- tion in cereal crop foods in State standard. However, soil application of FeSO4 or foliar application of FeSO4 or EDTA·Na2Fe resulted in the significant increase of Cd accumulation in rice plants including rice grain compared with the control. The results also showed iron fertilizers increased the concentra- tion of iron, copper and manganese element in rice grain and also affected zinc concentration in plants. It may be a new promising way to regulate Cd accumulation in rice grain in rice production through soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe fertilizers to maintain higher content of available iron and ferrous iron in soils.

  4. Using iron fertilizer to control Cd accumulation in rice plants: a new promising technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, GuoSheng; Chen, MingXue; Wang, DanYing; Xu, ChunMei; Mou, RenXiang; Cao, ZhaoYun; Zhang, XiuFu

    2008-03-01

    Effects of two kinds of iron fertilizer, FeSO4 and EDTA.Na2Fe were studied on cadmium accumulation in rice plants with two rice genotypes, Zhongzao 22 and Zhongjiazao 02, with soil culture systems. The results showed that application of iron fertilizers could hardly make adverse effects on plant growth and rice grain yield. Soil application of EDTA.Na2Fe significantly reduced the Cd accumulation in rice roots, shoots and rice grain. Cd concentration in white rice of both rice genotypes in the treatment of soil application of EDTA.Na2Fe was much lower than 0.2 mg/kg, the maximal Cd permission concentration in cereal crop foods in State standard. However, soil application of FeSO4 or foliar application of FeSO4 or EDTA.Na2Fe resulted in the significant increase of Cd accumulation in rice plants including rice grain compared with the control. The results also showed iron fertilizers increased the concentration of iron, copper and manganese element in rice grain and also affected zinc concentration in plants. It may be a new promising way to regulate Cd accumulation in rice grain in rice production through soil application of EDTA.Na2Fe fertilizers to maintain higher content of available iron and ferrous iron in soils.

  5. Using iron fertilizer to control Cd accumulation in rice plants: A new promising technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO GuoSheng; CHEN MingXue; WANG DanYing; XU ChunMei; MOU RenXiang; CAO ZhaoYun; ZHANG XiuFu

    2008-01-01

    Effects of two kinds of iron fertilizer, FeSO4 and EDTA·Na2Fe were studied on cadmium accumulation in rice plants with two rice genotypes, Zhongzao 22 and Zhongjiazao 02, with soil culture systems. The results showed that application of iron fertilizers could hardly make adverse effects on plant growth and rice grain yield. Soil application of EDTA.Na=Fe significantly reduced the Cd accumulation in rice roots, shoots and rice grain. Cd concentration in white rice of both rice genotypes in the treatment of soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe was much lower than 0.2 mg/kg, the maximal Cd permission concentration in cereal crop foods in State standard. However, soil application of FeSO4 or foliar application of FeSO4 or EDTA·Na2Fe resulted in the significant increase of Cd accumulation in rice plants including rice grain compared with the control. The results also showed iron fertilizers increased the concentration of iron, copper and manganese element in rice grain and also affected zinc concentration in plants.It may be a new promising way to regulate Cd accumulation in rice grain in rice production through soil application of EDTA·Na2Fe fertilizers to maintain higher content of available iron and ferrous iron in soils.

  6. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40–50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6–8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain. PMID:27941952

  7. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-12-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40-50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6-8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain.

  8. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  9. The effects of sex on brain iron status in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Qian; CHANG Yanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Iron plays essential roles in the human body. Studies have shown that iron is dis-tributed differently in male and female Rats in liver, spleen, bone marrow, kidney, heart. However, the effects of sex on iron distribution in central nervous system are not well established. Methods:To explore the effects of the above mentioned, in this study, female and male Sprague Dawley rats were used at 4 months of age. The synthesis of ferritin light chain (FTL), transferrin receptor1 (TfR1), ferroportin 1 (FPN1), divalent metal transporter 1 ( DMT1) in the cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb was determined by Western blot a-nalysis. Results:The results showed that the levels of FTL protein in the cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebel-lum, and olfactory bulb were higher in female rats than in male rats, but the levels of TfR1 protein were lower in female rats than in male rats. There was no significant change in FPN1 and DMT1 expression in brain. Conclu-sions:These data suggest that sex have effects on brain iron status. Iron is distributed differently in central nervous system in male and female rats. However, the precise mechanisms need further study.

  10. Acetamiprid Accumulates in Different Amounts in Murine Brain Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Terayama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids such as acetamiprid (ACE belong to a new and widely used single class of pesticides. Neonicotinoids mimic the chemical structure of nicotine and share agonist activity with the nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAchR. Neonicotinoids are widely considered to be safe in humans; however, they have recently been implicated in a number of human health disorders. A wide range of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders associated with high doses of neonicotinoids administered to animals have also been reported. Consequently, we used a mouse model to investigate the response of the central nervous system to ACE treatment. Our results show that exposure to ACE-containing water for three or seven days (decuple and centuple of no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL/day caused a decrease in body weight in 10-week old A/JJmsSlc (A/J mice. However, the treatments did not affect brain histology or expression of CD34. ACE concentrations were significantly higher in the midbrain of ACE-treated mice than that of the normal and vehicle groups. Expression levels of α7, α4, and β2 nAChRs were found to be low in the olfactory bulb and midbrain of normal mice. Furthermore, in the experimental group (centuple ACE-containing water for seven days, β2 nAChR expression decreased in many brain regions. Information regarding the amount of accumulated ACE and expression levels of the acetylcholine receptor in each region of the brain is important for understanding any clinical symptoms that may be associated with ACE exposure.

  11. Acetamiprid Accumulates in Different Amounts in Murine Brain Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Hayato; Endo, Hitoshi; Tsukamoto, Hideo; Matsumoto, Koichi; Umezu, Mai; Kanazawa, Teruhisa; Ito, Masatoshi; Sato, Tadayuki; Naito, Munekazu; Kawakami, Satoshi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Tatemichi, Masayuki; Sakabe, Kou

    2016-01-01

    Neonicotinoids such as acetamiprid (ACE) belong to a new and widely used single class of pesticides. Neonicotinoids mimic the chemical structure of nicotine and share agonist activity with the nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAchR). Neonicotinoids are widely considered to be safe in humans; however, they have recently been implicated in a number of human health disorders. A wide range of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders associated with high doses of neonicotinoids administered to animals have also been reported. Consequently, we used a mouse model to investigate the response of the central nervous system to ACE treatment. Our results show that exposure to ACE-containing water for three or seven days (decuple and centuple of no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL)/day) caused a decrease in body weight in 10-week old A/JJmsSlc (A/J) mice. However, the treatments did not affect brain histology or expression of CD34. ACE concentrations were significantly higher in the midbrain of ACE-treated mice than that of the normal and vehicle groups. Expression levels of α7, α4, and β2 nAChRs were found to be low in the olfactory bulb and midbrain of normal mice. Furthermore, in the experimental group (centuple ACE-containing water for seven days), β2 nAChR expression decreased in many brain regions. Information regarding the amount of accumulated ACE and expression levels of the acetylcholine receptor in each region of the brain is important for understanding any clinical symptoms that may be associated with ACE exposure. PMID:27669271

  12. Copper Deficiency in Sheep with High Liver Iron Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora Karolina Freitas de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of enzootic ataxia among sheep raised in the northeastern region of Brazil is described. Copper (Cu deficiency was diagnosed in a herd of 56 sheep, among which five presented characteristic clinical symptoms of enzootic ataxia. The symptoms began 30 days after birth, with a clinical condition that included locomotion difficulty, limb ataxia, tremors, and continual falls. Liver biopsies were performed and blood was collected to determine hepatic and plasmatic Cu, iron (Fe, and zinc (Zn concentration, respectively. The laboratory results showed that the animals presented low copper concentrations in the plasma and liver, without difference between the clinically healthy animals and those affected by enzootic ataxia. Even after supplementation with adequate Cu levels had been recommended, it was found on a new visit to the farm four months later that one animal still presented a clinical condition and that the hepatic Cu levels of the herd had not risen. Despite the low copper content of the diet, the high hepatic Fe levels found suggest that antagonism due to this element may have been an important factor in triggering copper deficiency in these animals, and thus, additional copper supplementation may be necessary for these animals.

  13. Effect of external phosphate addition on solid-phase iron distribution and iron accumulation in Mangrove Kandelia obovata (S. L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jingna; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Hansell, Dennis; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Wenyun; Yan, Chongling

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of phosphate (PO4 (3-)) addition on iron (Fe) cycling in mangrove ecosystem. Kandelia obovata (S. L.), one of the dominant mangrove species in the southeast of China, was cultivated in rhizoboxes under three different levels of P concentrations. Results showed the solid-phase Fe distribution and Fe(II)/Fe(III) values in both the root zone (rhizosphere) and bulk soil (non-rhizosphere) were comparable among all P levels (p > 0.05); P addition significantly decreased the pore water Fe content both in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere zone (p iron plaque formation and iron accumulation in K. obovata (S. L.) tissues (p iron, higher abundance of root Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and together with higher amount of K. obovata (S. L.) root organic acids exudation result in a rapid Fe cycling in rhizosphere, which contribute to comparable solid-phase iron distribution among different P levels.

  14. Iron accumulation in deep cortical layers accounts for MRI signal abnormalities in ALS: correlating 7 tesla MRI and pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Kwan

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cortical and spinal motor neuron dysfunction. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies have previously shown hypointense signal in the motor cortex on T(2-weighted images in some ALS patients, however, the cause of this finding is unknown. To investigate the utility of this MR signal change as a marker of cortical motor neuron degeneration, signal abnormalities on 3T and 7T MR images of the brain were compared, and pathology was obtained in two ALS patients to determine the origin of the motor cortex hypointensity. Nineteen patients with clinically probable or definite ALS by El Escorial criteria and 19 healthy controls underwent 3T MRI. A 7T MRI scan was carried out on five ALS patients who had motor cortex hypointensity on the 3T FLAIR sequence and on three healthy controls. Postmortem 7T MRI of the brain was performed in one ALS patient and histological studies of the brains and spinal cords were obtained post-mortem in two patients. The motor cortex hypointensity on 3T FLAIR images was present in greater frequency in ALS patients. Increased hypointensity correlated with greater severity of upper motor neuron impairment. Analysis of 7T T(2(*-weighted gradient echo imaging localized the signal alteration to the deeper layers of the motor cortex in both ALS patients. Pathological studies showed increased iron accumulation in microglial cells in areas corresponding to the location of the signal changes on the 3T and 7T MRI of the motor cortex. These findings indicate that the motor cortex hypointensity on 3T MRI FLAIR images in ALS is due to increased iron accumulation by microglia.

  15. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko [Department of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Horie, Toshiharu, E-mail: t.horie@thu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  16. Increased sensitivity to iron deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana over-accumulating nicotianamine

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Nicotianamine (NA) is a non-protein amino acid derivative synthesized from S-adenosyl L-methionine able to bind several metal ions such as iron, copper, manganese, zinc, or nickel. In plants, NA appears to be involved in iron availability and is essential for the plant to complete its biological cycle. In graminaceous plants, NA is also the precursor in the biosynthesis of phytosiderophores. Arabidopsis lines accumulating 4- and 100-fold more NA than wild-type plants were used in order to eva...

  17. New findings about iron oxide nanoparticles and their different effects on murine primary brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Jenni; Wagner, Susanne; Kiwit, Jürgen; Bräuer, Anja U; Glumm, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) enable their application in the diagnostics and therapy of central nervous system diseases. However, since crucial information regarding side effects of particle-cell interactions within the central nervous system is still lacking, we investigated the influence of novel very small iron oxide particles or the clinically approved ferucarbotran or ferumoxytol on the vitality and morphology of brain cells. We exposed primary cell cultures of microglia and hippocampal neurons, as well as neuron-glia cocultures to varying concentrations of SPIOs for 6 and/or 24 hours, respectively. Here, we show that SPIO accumulation by microglia and subsequent morphological alterations strongly depend on the respective nanoparticle type. Microglial viability was severely compromised by high SPIO concentrations, except in the case of ferumoxytol. While ferumoxytol did not cause immediate microglial death, it induced severe morphological alterations and increased degeneration of primary neurons. Additionally, primary neurons clearly degenerated after very small iron oxide particle and ferucarbotran exposure. In neuron-glia cocultures, SPIOs rather stimulated the outgrowth of neuronal processes in a concentration- and particle-dependent manner. We conclude that the influence of SPIOs on brain cells not only depends on the particle type but also on the physiological system they are applied to.

  18. The distribution of iron in a soil chronosequence: the result of biological lifting and surficial accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M. S.; White, A. F.; Fitzpatrick, J.

    2007-12-01

    The abundance of iron increases with soil age in a marine terrace chronosequence (5 terraces aged from 65 to 226 Ka) located northwest of Santa Cruz, California. The iron has two distinct morphologies in the soils. At depths less than 1m on all terraces hard nodules are formed by Fe-oxides cementing and replacing sediment grains. At depths greater than 1m in the youngest terrace (T1), disseminated Fe forms coatings on sediment grains. In terraces 2 through 5 (depths greater than 1m) the disseminated iron becomes increasingly concentrated in mottles within the argillic horizon. Iron nodules do not occur at depths greater than 1m in any of the soils. Iron mineralogy of the nodules is generally goethite with a subset of nodules that are maghemite. Mass change calculations, reveal Fe concentration near the surface and Fe depletion at depth that cannot be accounted for by weathering and compaction of the profile or by the Fe content of eolian additions to the soils. The terrace regoliths are generally unsaturated and aerobic; thus lateral movement of large amounts of reduced Fe is unlikely. Iron as a plant nutrient, unlike other mineral nutrients, is relatively insoluble in aerobic soil solutions. We propose that plant roots and symbiotic fungi (mycorrhizae) transport Fe from deeper in the regolith through the process of biolifting. When released through plant decay, the Fe forms immobile oxides at shallow depths. Iron content of the current grassland vegetation was measured and yearly biomass input of Fe was calculated. The above ground cycling of plant iron when multiplied by the age of the terrace can account for the shallow Fe accumulation in these soils.

  19. Prion protein accumulation in lipid rafts of mouse aging brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Agostini

    Full Text Available The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrP(C. In old mice, this change favors PrP(C accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrP(C translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs, we looked at PrP(C compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM knockout (KO mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrP(C in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases.

  20. Size-Dependent Accumulation of PEGylated Silane-Coated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Murine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, T.; Wittenborn, T.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) can be used as contrast-enhancing agents to visualize tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we describe an easy synthesis method of magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and demonstrate size-dependent accumulation in murine tumors...... following intravenous injection. Biocompatible iron oxide MNPs coated with PEG were prepared by replacing oleic acid with a biocompatible and commercially available silane-PEG to provide an easy and effective method for chemical coating. The colloidal stable PEGylated MNPs were magnetically separated...... into two distinct size subpopulations of 20 and 40 nm mean diameters with increased phagocytic uptake observed for the 40 nm size range in vitro. MRI detection revealed greater iron accumulation in murine tumors for 40 nm nanoparticles after intravenous injection. The enhanced MRI contrast of the larger...

  1. Variation and inheritance of iron reductase activity in the roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and association with seed iron accumulation QTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Andrea C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anemia is a global problem which often affects women and children of developing countries. Strategy I plants, such as common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. take up iron through a process that involves an iron reduction mechanism in their roots; this reduction is required to convert ferric iron to ferrous iron. Root absorbed iron is critical for the iron nutrition of the plant, and for the delivery of iron to the shoot and ultimately the seeds. The objectives of this study were to determine the variability and inheritance for iron reductase activity in a range of genotypes and in a low × high seed iron cross (DOR364 × G19833, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for this trait, and to assess possible associations with seed iron levels. Results The experiments were carried out with hydroponically grown plants provided different amounts of iron varying between 0 and 20 μM Fe(III-EDDHA. The parents, DOR364 and G19833, plus 13 other cultivated or wild beans, were found to differ in iron reductase activity. Based on these initial experiments, two growth conditions (iron limited and iron sufficient were selected as treatments for evaluating the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred lines. A single major QTL was found for iron reductase activity under iron-limited conditions (1 μM Fe on linkage group b02 and another major QTL was found under iron sufficient conditions (15 μM Fe on linkage group b11. Associations between the b11 QTL were found with several QTL for seed iron. Conclusions Genes conditioning iron reductase activity in iron sufficient bean plants appear to be associated with genes contributing to seed iron accumulation. Markers for bean iron reductase (FRO homologues were found with in silico mapping based on common bean synteny with soybean and Medicago truncatula on b06 and b07; however, neither locus aligned with the QTL for iron reductase activity. In summary, the QTL for iron reductase activity

  2. Decrease of Cadmium Accumulation in Crops by Zero-valent Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murata, Yasutoshi; Sakai, Yuki; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination in soils is a serious problem for crop production in the world. Zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) is a reactive material with reducing power capable of stabilizing toxic elements, including heavy metals and metalloids, in a solution. In the present study, we examined the effect of Fe(0) application on Cd accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Kirara 397) and spinach (Pinacia oleracea L.) plants growing in Cd-contaminated soils under paddy and upland conditions, respective...

  3. Iron deposition and fat accumulation in dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Yang He; Wen-Hua Ge; Yuan Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if iron deposition and fat accumulation in the liver play a pathogenetic role in dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrosis in rat.METHODS: Thirty rats were treated with DMN at does consecutive days of 10 μL/kg daily, i.p., for 3 consecutive day each week for 4 wk. Rats (n = 30) were sacrificed on the first day (model group A) and 21st d (model group B) after cessation of DMN injection. The control group (n = 10) received an equivalent amount of saline. Liver tissues were stained with hematoxylin & eosin (HE) and Masson and Prussian blue assay and oberserved under electron microscopy. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT)and liver tissue hydroxyproline (Hyp) content were tested.RESULTS: The liver fibrosis did not automaticallyreverse, which was similar to previous reports, the perilobular deposition of iron accompanied with collagen showed marked characteristics at both the first and 21st d after cessation of DMN injection. However, fat accumulation in hepatocytes occurred only at the 21st d after cessation of DMN injection.CONCLUSION: Iron deposition and fat accumulation may play important roles in pathological changes in DMN-induced rat liver fibrosis. The detailed mechanisms of these characteristics need further research.

  4. Possible link between Hg and Cd accumulation in the brain of long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajdosechova, Zuzana [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Brownlow, Andrew [SAC Wildlife Unit, Inverness (United Kingdom); Cottin, Nicolas T.; Fernandes, Mariana [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Read, Fiona L. [Oceanlab, University of Aberdeen, Main Street, Newburgh AB41 6AA (United Kingdom); Urgast, Dagmar S.; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M. [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-01

    The bioaccumulation of metals was investigated by analysis of liver, kidney, muscle and brain tissue of a pod of 21 long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) of all ages stranded in Scotland, UK. The results are the first to report cadmium (Cd) passage through the blood–brain barrier of pilot whales and provide a comprehensive study of the long-term (up to 35 years) mammalian exposure to the environmental pollutants. Additionally, linear accumulation of mercury (Hg) was observed in all studied tissues, whereas for Cd this was only observed in the liver. Total Hg concentration above the upper neurochemical threshold was found in the sub-adult and adult brains and methylmercury (MeHg) of 2.2 mg/kg was found in the brain of one individual. Inter-elemental analysis showed significant positive correlations of Hg with selenium (Se) and Cd with Se in all studied tissues. Furthermore, differences in the elemental concentrations in the liver and brain tissues were found between juvenile, sub-adult and adult groups. The highest concentrations of manganese, iron, zinc, Se, Hg and MeHg were noted in the livers, whereas Cd predominantly accumulated in the kidneys. High concentrations of Hg and Cd in the tissues of pilot whales presented in this study reflect ever increasing toxic stress on marine mammals. - Highlights: • Trace elements were measured in a pod of 21 pilot whales stranded in Scotland. • Bioaccumulation of mercury and methyl mercury was found in all studied tissues. • Cadmium age related accumulation was observed in the liver and brain tissues. • Cadmium-selenium correlations suggest formation of cadmium-selenium complexes.

  5. Neuroprotective effect of the active components of three Chinese herbs on brain iron load in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xian-Hui; Gao, Wei-Juan; Kong, Wei-Na; Xie, Hong-Lin; Peng, Yan; Shao, Tie-Mei; Yu, Wen-Guo; Chai, Xi-Qing

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder and the most common cause of dementia. New treatments for AD are required due to its increasing prevalence in aging populations. The present study evaluated the effects of the active components of Epimedium, Astragalus and Radix Puerariae on learning and memory impairment, β-amyloid (Aβ) reduction and brain iron load in an APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of AD. Increasing evidence indicates that a disturbance of normal iron homeostasis may contribute to the pathology of AD. However, the underlying mechanisms resulting in abnormal iron load in the AD brain remain unclear. It has been hypothesized that the brain iron load is influenced by the deregulation of certain proteins associated with brain iron metabolism, including divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin 1 (FPN1). The present study investigated the effects of the active components of Epimedium, Astragalus and Radix Puerariae on the expression levels of DMT1 and FPN1. The treatment with the active components reduced cognitive deficits, inhibited Aβ plaque accumulation, reversed Aβ burden and reduced the brain iron load in AD model mice. A significant increase was observed in the levels of DMT1-iron-responsive element (IRE) and DMT1-nonIRE in the hippocampus of the AD mouse brain, which was reduced by treatment with the active components. In addition, the levels of FPN1 were significantly reduced in the hippocampus of the AD mouse brain compared with those of control mice, and these levels were increased following treatment with the active components. Thus, the present study indicated that the active components of Epimedium, Astragalus and Radix Puerariae may exert a neuroprotective effect against AD by reducing iron overload in the AD brain and may provide a novel approach for the development of drugs for the treatment of AD.

  6. Brain Iron Dysregulation and Central Nervous System Diseases%铁代谢异常与中枢神经系统疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林冬; 丁晶; 汪昕

    2011-01-01

    The presence of the blood-brain barrier explains the relative independence of the brain iron metabolism from circulatory iron homeostasis. Disturbances of brain iron metabolism can result in iron accumulation or deficiency in brain , which can impair cellular biological function and promote cell to die. Recent advances on brain iron metabolism have revealed the possible role of brain iron dysregulation in the development or pathogenesis of some central nervous system diseases, such as Alzheimer ' s disease, Parkinson ' s disease, epilepsy, and restless leg syndrome.%由于血脑屏障的存在,脑铁代谢与外周器官不同.铁在脑内代谢的异常可致脑铁沉积或脑内铁缺乏,导致细胞生理功能障碍,引起神经细胞的死亡.目前已经发现阿尔茨海默病、帕金森病、癫、不宁腿综合征的发病机制及疾病的发展与脑铁代谢异常有关.

  7. Accumulation and distribution of iron, cadmium, lead and nickel in cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing two different chelated iron supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csog, Árpád; Mihucz, Victor G; Tatár, Eniko; Fodor, Ferenc; Virág, István; Majdik, Cornelia; Záray, Gyula

    2011-07-01

    Cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II), and iron supplied as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations, were investigated by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with special emphasis on the determination of iron accumulation and distribution within the different plant compartments (root, stem, cotyledon and leaves). The extent of Cd, Ni and Pb accumulation and distribution were also determined. Generally, iron and heavy-metal contaminant accumulation was higher when Fe(III) citrate was used. The accumulation of nickel and lead was higher by about 20% and 100%, respectively, if the iron supply was Fe(III) citrate. The accumulation of Cd was similar. In the case of Fe(III) citrate, the total amounts of Fe taken up were similar in the control and heavy-metal-treated plants (27-31 μmol/plant). Further, the amounts of iron transported from the root towards the shoot of the control, lead- and nickel-contaminated plants were independent of the iron(III) form. Although Fe mobility could be characterized as being low, its distribution within the shoot was not significantly affected by the heavy metals investigated.

  8. Implication of eolian delivery and accumulation of highly reactive iron to the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. K.; Owens, J. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Iron, although abundant in the Earth's crust, is present at low concentrations in sea water and is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton. Eolian dust (loess) is a major source of this micronutrient, and its deposition has important implications for the global CO2 budget. In this study, we explore distributions of potentially bioreactive Fe, the soluble fraction required by phytoplankton for photosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation, in deep-sea sediments in the North and South Atlantic Oceans. We used a state-of-the-art Fe speciation technique to characterize Fe inputs from different source regions, specifically North Africa and Patagonia to address the patterns and implications across glacial-interglacial time scales. In many open-ocean regions the input of new iron to the surface waters is dominated by the atmospheric deposition of soluble iron in eolian dusts. Multiple records have shown dust accumulation is correlated with glacial-interglacial cycles - glacial periods are substantially dustier. Furthermore, the delivery of eolian dust to the North and South Atlantic Oceans are from two very different source regions and soil types. We analyzed IODP cores from these two regions and our preliminary data shows similar pattern of iron distribution from both the North and South Atlantic Oceans. To date we have found no simple global pattern of bioavailable iron distribution during glacial and interglacial periods. We have analyzed a range of size distributions to isolate the dust-dominated fraction and the data shows no size effects in bioavailable form of iron distribution. We will explore the role of deep-water dust dissolution and sedimentary redox implications and its role on the bioreactive Fe record in marine cores.

  9. Na+/H+ Exchanger 9 Regulates Iron Mobilization at the Blood Brain Barrier in Response to Iron Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, Rami; Hamood, Mohamed A; Gomez Zubeita, Daniela M; Kondapalli, Kalyan C

    2017-01-27

    Iron is essential for brain function, with loss of iron homeostasis in the brain linked to neurological diseases ranging from rare syndromes to more common disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Iron entry into the brain is regulated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Molecular mechanisms regulating this transport are poorly understood. Using an in vitro model of the BBB, we identify NHE9, an endosomal cation/proton exchanger, as a novel regulator of this system. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMVECs) that constitute the BBB receive brain-iron status information via paracrine signals from ensheathing astrocytes. In hBMVECs, we show that NHE9 expression is upregulated very early in a physiological response invoked by paracrine signals from iron-starved astrocytes. Ectopic expression of NHE9 in hBMVECs without external cues induced upregulation of the transferrin receptor (TfR) and downregulation of ferritin, leading to an increase in iron uptake. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that NHE9 localizes to recycling endosomes in hBMVECs where it raises the endosomal pH. The ensuing alkalization of the endosomal lumen increased translocation of TfRs to the hBMVEC membrane. TfRs on the membrane were previously shown to facilitate both recycling-dependent and independent iron uptake. We propose NHE9 regulates TfR-dependent, recycling-independent iron uptake in hBMVECs by fine-tuning the endosomal pH in response to paracrine signals and is therefore an important regulator in iron mobilization pathway at the BBB.

  10. Hypotensive Effect and Accumulation of Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes in Blood and Tissues after Intravenous and Subcutaneous Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshin, A A; Lakomkin, V L; Abramov, A A; Ruuge, E K; Vanin, A F

    2016-12-01

    Subcutaneous injection of Oxacom with glutathione-bound dinitrosyl iron complex as the active principle produced a slower drop of mean BP and longer accumulation of protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes in whole blood and tissues than intravenous injection of this drug, while durations of hypotensive effect in both cases were practically identical. In contrast to intravenous injection of the drug, its subcutaneous administration was not characterized by a high concentration of protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes in the blood at the onset of experiment; in addition, accumulation of these NO forms in the lungs was more pronounced after subcutaneous injection than after intravenous one.

  11. Evaluation of constitutive iron reductase (AtFRO2) expression on mineral accumulation and distribution in soybean (Glycine max. L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Marta W; Clemente, Thomas E; Grusak, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient in human and plant nutrition. Adequate iron nutrition during crop production is central for assuring appropriate iron concentrations in the harvestable organs, for human food or animal feed. The whole-plant movement of iron involves several processes, including the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron at several locations throughout the plant, prior to transmembrane trafficking of ferrous iron. In this study, soybean plants that constitutively expressed the AtFRO2 iron reductase gene were analyzed for leaf iron reductase activity, as well as the effect of this transgene's expression on root, leaf, pod wall, and seed mineral concentrations. High Fe supply, in combination with the constitutive expression of AtFRO2, resulted in significantly higher concentrations of different minerals in roots (K, P, Zn, Ca, Ni, Mg, and Mo), pod walls (Fe, K, P, Cu, and Ni), leaves (Fe, P, Cu, Ca, Ni, and Mg) and seeds (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ni). Leaf and pod wall iron concentrations increased as much as 500% in transgenic plants, while seed iron concentrations only increased by 10%, suggesting that factors other than leaf and pod wall reductase activity were limiting the translocation of iron to seeds. Protoplasts isolated from transgenic leaves had three-fold higher reductase activity than controls. Expression levels of the iron storage protein, ferritin, were higher in the transgenic leaves than in wild-type, suggesting that the excess iron may be stored as ferritin in the leaves and therefore unavailable for phloem loading and delivery to the seeds. Also, citrate and malate levels in the roots and leaves of transgenic plants were significantly higher than in wild-type, suggesting that organic acid production could be related to the increased accumulation of minerals in roots, leaves, and pod walls, but not in the seeds. All together, these results suggest a more ubiquitous role for the iron reductase in whole-plant mineral accumulation and distribution.

  12. Evaluation of constitutive iron reductase (AtFRO2 expression on mineral accumulation and distribution in soybean (Glycine max. L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wilton Vasconcelos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an important micronutrient in human and plant nutrition. Adequate iron nutrition during crop production is central for assuring appropriate iron concentrations in the harvestable organs, for human food or animal feed. The whole-plant movement of iron involves several processes, including the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron at several locations throughout the plant, prior to transmembrane trafficking of ferrous iron. In this study, soybean plants that constitutively expressed the AtFRO2 iron reductase gene were analyzed for leaf iron reductase activity, as well as the effect of this transgene's expression on root, leaf, pod wall, and seed mineral concentrations. High Fe supply, in combination with the constitutive expression of AtFRO2, resulted in significantly higher concentrations of different minerals in roots (K, P, Zn, Ca, Ni, Mg and Mo, pod walls (Fe, K, P, Cu and Ni, leaves (Fe, P, Cu, Ca, Ni and Mg and seeds (Fe, Zn, Cu and Ni. Leaf and pod wall iron concentrations increased as much as 500% in transgenic plants, while seed iron concentrations only increased by 10%, suggesting that factors other than leaf and pod wall reductase activity were limiting the translocation of iron to seeds. Protoplasts isolated from transgenic leaves had three-fold higher reductase activity than controls. Expression levels of the iron storage protein, ferritin, were higher in the transgenic leaves than in wild-type, suggesting that the excess iron may be stored as ferritin in the leaves and therefore unavailable for phloem loading and delivery to the seeds. Also, citrate and malate levels in the roots and leaves of transgenic plants were significantly higher than in wild-type, suggesting that organic acid production could be related to the increased accumulation of minerals in roots, leaves and pod walls, but not in the seeds. All together, these results suggest a more ubiquitous role for the iron reductase in whole-plant mineral accumulation and

  13. Legume seeds and cereal grains’ capacity to accumulate iron while sprouting in order to obtain food fortifi cant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Zielińska-Dawidziak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prepared sprouts, after culturing in a medium with an increased iron concentration, could become a benefi cial food iron fortifi cant. However, the effi cient iron accumulation depends on the plants genus, species and/or varieties. The aim of the study was to indicate the seeds or grains which accumulate iron most effi ciently during the sprouting process. Material and methods. Alfalfa, lentil, lupine and soybean seeds as well as wheat grains were sprouted in abiotic stress conditions induced by the excess of iron(II in culture media. The tolerance of these plants to iron concentration and its accumulation in the material obtained (with FAAS method were analyzed. Results. The smallest tolerance was noted for lentil seeds and wheat grains. Other plants developed in 25 mM solution of FeSO4. The highest accumulation of iron was observed in alfalfa sprouts. However, lupine and soybean seeds are the most recommended raw material for the production of the sprouts on an industrial scale.

  14. Spin valve effect of the interfacial spin accumulation in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lichuan; Zhang, Dainan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong; Fan, Xin; Xiao, John Q.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spin valve effect in yttrium iron garnet/platinum (YIG/Pt) bilayers. The spin Hall effect (SHE) generates spin accumulation at the YIG/Pt interface and can be opened/closed by magnetization switching in the electrical insulator YIG. The interfacial spin accumulation was measured in both YIG/Pt and YIG/Cu/Pt structures using a planar Hall configuration. The spin valve effect remained, even after a 2 nm thick Cu layer was inserted between the YIG and Pt layers, which aimed to exclude the induced magnetization at the YIG/Pt interface. The transverse Hall voltage and switching field were dependent on the applied charge current density. The origin of this behavior can be explained by the SHE induced torque exerted on the domain wall, caused by the transfer of the spin angular momentum from the spin-polarized current to the YIG magnetic moment.

  15. Nanoparticle accumulation and transcytosis in brain endothelial cell layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Dong; Raghnaill, Michelle Nic; Bramini, Mattia; Mahon, Eugene; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier, which controls and limits access to the central nervous system (CNS). The selectivity of the BBB relies on specialized characteristics of the endothelial cells that line the microvasculature, including the expression of intercellular tight juncti

  16. Regulation of quinolinic acid neosynthesis in mouse, rat and human brain by iron and iron chelators in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski, Erin K; Schwarcz, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that excess iron may play an etiologically significant role in neurodegenerative disorders. This idea is supported, for example, by experimental studies in animals demonstrating significant neuroprotection by iron chelation. Here, we tested whether this effect might be related to a functional link between iron and the endogenous excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN), a presumed pathogen in several neurological disorders. In particular, the present in vitro study was designed to examine the effects of Fe(2+), a known co-factor of oxygenases, on the activity of QUIN's immediate biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid dioxygenase (3HAO), in the brain. In crude tissue homogenate, addition of Fe(2+) (2-40 μM) stimulated 3HAO activity 4- to 6-fold in all three species tested (mouse, rat and human). The slope of the iron curve was steepest in rat brain where an increase from 6 to 14 μM resulted in a more than fivefold higher enzyme activity. In all species, the Fe(2+)-induced increase in 3HAO activity was dose-dependently attenuated by the addition of ferritin, the main iron storage protein in the brain. The effect of iron was also readily prevented by N,N'-bis(2-hydroxybenzyl) ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED), a synthetic iron chelator with neuroprotective properties in vivo. All these effects were reproduced using neostriatal tissue obtained postmortem from normal individuals and patients with end-stage Huntington's disease. Our results suggest that QUIN levels and function in the mammalian brain might be tightly controlled by endogenous iron and proteins that regulate the bioavailability of iron.

  17. Alzheimer's disease therapeutics targeted to the control of amyloid precursor protein translation: maintenance of brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Rogers, Jack T

    2014-04-15

    The neurotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ), a major cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is enhanced by iron, as found in the amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. By contrast, the long-known neuroprotective activity of APP is evident after α-secretase cleavage of the precursor to release sAPPα, and depends on the iron export actions of APP itself. The latter underlie its neurotrophic and protective effects in facilitating the homeostatic actions of ferroportin mediated-iron export. Thus APP-dependent iron export may alleviate oxidative stress by minimizing labile iron thus protecting neurons from iron overload during stroke and hemorrhage. Consistent with this, altered phosphorylation of iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) and its signaling processes play a critical role in modulating APP translation via the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of its transcript. The APP 5'UTR region encodes a functional iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop that represents a potential target for modulating APP production. Targeted regulation of APP gene expression via the modulation of 5'UTR sequence function represents a novel approach for the potential treatment of AD since altering APP translation can be used to improve both the protective brain iron balance and provide anti-amyloid efficacy. Approved drugs including paroxetine and desferrioxamine and several novel compounds have been identified that suppress abnormal metal-promoted Aβ accumulation with a subset of these acting via APP 5'UTR-dependent mechanisms to modulate APP translation and cleavage to generate the non-toxic sAPPα.

  18. Interaction between cadmium and iron. Accumulation and distribution of metals and changes in growth parameters of Phaseolus vulgaris L. seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Siedlecka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between cadmium, one of the most toxic heavy metals, and iron, an essential plant nutritional element, was investigated in Phaseolus vulgaris L. (cv. Słowianka seedlings. The interaction was externally induced by changing the content of both metals in the nutrient medium. Under iron deficiency conditions (0 and 0.5 of normal dose of this element, the toxic effects of cadmium on plant growth parameters, like fresh and dry weight accumulation, primary leaves area, etc., were generally much more pronounced than under normal iron supply. At normal and excess iron supply (1, 2 and 4 doses cadmium diminished iron accumulation in roots and primary leaves, but on the other hand excess iron decreased cadmium level, preventing plants from extreme toxicity of very high cadmium concentrations in the growth environment. It is to be noted that iron is classified also as a heavy metal, and its excess may become toxic, e.g. decreasing root dry weight or diminishing leaf area, especially at the highest dose. The detoxication role of iron against cadmium, and possibly other toxic metals is, however, limited to concentrations of this element in the nutrient solution which themselves are not toxic for the organism.

  19. Age-related changes of brain iron load changes in the frontal cortex in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian-hui, Dong; Wei-juan, Gao; Tie-mei, Shao; Hong-lin, Xie; Jiang-tao, Bai; Jing-yi, Zhao; Xi-qing, Chai

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a neurodegenerative brain disorder is a devastating pathology leading to disastrous cognitive impairments and dementia, associated with major social and economic costs to society. Iron can catalyze damaging free radical reactions. With age, iron accumulates in brain frontal cortex regions and may contribute to the risk of AD. In this communication, we investigated the age-related brain iron load changes in the frontal cortex of 6- and 12-month-old C57BL/6J (C57) and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) double transgenic mouse by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and Perls' reaction. In the present study, we also evaluated the age-related changes of DMT1 and FPN1 by using Western blot and qPCR. We found that compared with 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice and the 12-month-old C57 mice, the 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice had increased iron load in the frontal cortex. The levels of DMT1 were significantly increased and the FPN1 were significantly reduced in the frontal cortex of the 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice than that in the 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice and 12-month-old C57 mice. We conclude that in AD damage occurs in conjunction with iron accumulation, and the brain iron load associated with loss control of the brain iron metabolism related protein DMT1 and FPN1 expressions.

  20. Recent studies of iron deficiency during brain development in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Mari S

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of the effects of developmental iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia in nonhuman primates have provided new insights into this widespread and well-recognized human nutritional deficiency. The rhesus monkey was the animal model in these experiments, which used extensive hematological and behavioral evaluations in addition to noninvasive brain measures. Two important findings were as follows: 1) different behavioral consequences depending on the timing of ID relative to brain developmental stages and 2) the potential for long-lasting changes in brain iron regulatory systems. Further work in this model, including integration with studies in humans and in laboratory rodents, is ongoing.

  1. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead......Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation...... to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1...

  2. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L(2,3) absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  3. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  4. Brain iron deficiency and excess; cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration with involvement of striatum and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdim, M B H

    2008-08-01

    While iron deficiency is not perceived as a life threatening disorder, it is the most prevalent nutritional abnormality in the world, and a better understanding of modes and sites of action, can help devise better treatment programs for those who suffer from it. Nowhere is this more important than in infants and children that make up the bulk of iron deficiency in society. Although the effects of iron deficiency have been extensively studied in systemic organs, until very recently little attention was paid to its effects on brain function. The studies of Oski at Johns Hopkin Medical School in 1974, demonstrating the impairment of learning in young school children with iron deficiency, prompted us to study its relevance to brain biochemistry and function in an animal model of iron deficiency. Indeed, rats made iron deficient have lowered brain iron and impaired behaviours including learning. This can become irreversible especially in newborns, even after long-term iron supplementation. We have shown that in this condition it is the brain striatal dopaminergic-opiate system which becomes defective, resulting in alterations in circadian behaviours, cognitive impairment and neurochemical changes closely associated with them. More recently we have extended these studies and have established that cognitive impairment may be closely associated with neuroanatomical damage and zinc metabolism in the hippocampus due to iron deficiency, and which may result from abnormal cholinergic function. The hippocampus is the focus of many studies today, since this brain structure has high zinc concentration and is highly involved in many forms of cognitive deficits as a consequence of cholinergic deficiency and has achieved prominence because of dementia in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, it is now apparent that cognitive impairment may not be attributed to a single neurotransmitter, but rather, alterations and interactions of several systems in different brain regions. In animal

  5. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins at the Neurovascular Unit Supports Reduction and Reoxidation of Iron for Transport Through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhart, Annette; Skjørringe, Tina; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix;

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms for iron transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain a controversy. We analyzed for expression of mRNA and proteins involved in oxidation and transport of iron in isolated brain capillaries from dietary normal, iron-deficient, and iron-reverted rats. The expression...... was also investigated in isolated rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) and in immortalized rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells grown as monoculture or in hanging culture inserts with defined BBB properties. Transferrin receptor 1, ferrireductases Steap 2 and 3, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1...... cells provide the machinery for receptor-mediated uptake of ferric iron-containing transferrin. Ferric iron can then undergo reduction to ferrous iron by ferrireductases inside endosomes followed by DMT1-mediated pumping into the cytosol and subsequently cellular export by ferroportin. The expression...

  6. Susceptibility Contrast in High Field MRI of Human Brain as a Function of Tissue Iron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bing; Li, Tie-Qiang; van Gelderen, Peter; Shmueli, Karin; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility provides an important contrast mechanism for MRI. Increasingly, susceptibility-based contrast is being exploited to investigate brain tissue microstructure and to detect abnormal levels of brain iron as these have been implicated in a variety of neuro-degenerative diseases. However, it remains unclear to what extent magnetic susceptibility-related contrast at high field relates to actual brain iron concentrations. In this study, we performed susceptibility weighted imaging as a function of field strength on healthy brains in vivo and post-mortem brain tissues at 1.5T, 3T and 7T. Iron histology was performed on the tissue samples for comparison. The calculated susceptibility-related parameters R2* and signal frequency shift in four iron-rich regions (putamen, globus pallidus, caudate, and thalamus) showed an almost linear dependence (r=0.90 for R2*; r=0.83 for phase, p<0.01) on field strength, suggesting that potential ferritin saturation effects are not relevant to susceptibility-weighted contrast for field strengths up to 7T. The R2* dependence on the putative (literature-based) iron concentration was 0.048 Hz/Tesla/ppm. The histological data from brain samples confirmed the linear dependence of R2* on field strength and showed a slope against iron concentration of 0.0099 Hz/Tesla/ppm dry-weight, which is equivalent to 0.05 Hz/Tesla/ppm wet-weight and closely matched the calculated value in vivo. These results confirm the validity of using susceptibility-weighted contrast as an indicator of iron content in iron-rich brain regions. The absence of saturation effects opens the way to exploit the benefits of MRI at high field strengths for the detection of iron distributions with high sensitivity and resolution. PMID:19027861

  7. Recent studies of iron deficiency during brain development in nonhuman primates

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Mari S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of the effects of developmental iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in nonhuman primates have provided new insights into this widespread and well-recognized human nutritional deficiency. The rhesus monkey was the animal model in these experiments which used extensive hematological and behavioral evaluations in addition to noninvasive brain measures. Two important findings were (1) different behavioral consequences depending on the timing of iron deficiency relative to br...

  8. Accumulation and Toxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Cells and Experimental Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Jarockyte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The uptake and distribution of negatively charged superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles (SPIONs in mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH3T3, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI signal influenced by SPIONs injected into experimental animals, were visualized and investigated. Cellular uptake and distribution of the SPIONs in NIH3T3 after staining with Prussian Blue were investigated by a bright-field microscope equipped with digital color camera. SPIONs were localized in vesicles, mostly placed near the nucleus. Toxicity of SPION nanoparticles tested with cell viability assay (XTT was estimated. The viability of NIH3T3 cells remains approximately 95% within 3–24 h of incubation, and only a slight decrease of viability was observed after 48 h of incubation. MRI studies on Wistar rats using a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner were showing that SPIONs give a negative contrast in the MRI. The dynamic MRI measurements of the SPION clearance from the injection site shows that SPIONs slowly disappear from injection sites and only a low concentration of nanoparticles was completely eliminated within three weeks. No functionalized SPIONs accumulate in cells by endocytic mechanism, none accumulate in the nucleus, and none are toxic at a desirable concentration. Therefore, they could be used as a dual imaging agent: as contrast agents for MRI and for traditional optical biopsy by using Prussian Blue staining.

  9. Brain burdens of aluminum, iron, and copper and their relationships with amyloid-β pathology in 60 human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Esiri, Margaret M

    2012-01-01

    The deposition in the brain of amyloid-β as beta sheet conformers associated with senile plaques and vasculature is frequently observed in Alzheimer’s disease. While metals, primarily aluminum, iron, zinc, and copper, have been implicated in amyloid-β deposition in vivo, there are few data specifically relating brain metal burden with extent of amyloid pathologies in human brains. Herein brain tissue content of aluminum, iron, and copper are compared with burdens of amyloid-β, as senile plaques and as congophilic amyloid angiopathy, in 60 aged human brains. Significant observations were strong negative correlations between brain copper burden and the degree of severity of both senile plaque and congophilic amyloid angiopathy pathologies with the relationship with the former reaching statistical significance. While we did not have access to the dementia status of the majority of the 60 brain donors, this knowledge for just 4 donors allowed us to speculate that diagnosis of dementia might be predicted by a combination of amyloid pathology and a ratio of the brain burden of copper to the brain burden of aluminum. Taking into account only those donor brains with either senile plaque scores ≥4 and/or congophilic amyloid angiopathy scores ≥12, a Cu:Al ratio of <20 would predict that at least 39 of the 60 donors would have been diagnosed as suffering from dementia. Future research should test the hypothesis that, in individuals with moderate to severe amyloid pathology, low brain copper is a predisposition to developing dementia.

  10. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of brain iron: birth of a biomarker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, John F; Zimmerman, Earl A

    2004-11-01

    The brain has an unusually high concentration of iron, which is distributed in an unusual pattern unlike that in any other organ. The physiological role of this iron and the reasons for this pattern of distribution are not yet understood. There is increasing evidence that several neurodegenerative diseases are associated with altered brain iron metabolism. Understanding these dysmetabolic conditions may provide important information for their diagnosis and treatment. For many years the iron distribution in the human brain could be studied effectively only under postmortem conditions. This situation was changed dramatically by the finding that T2-weighted MR imaging at high field strength (initially 1.5 T) appears to demonstrate the pattern of iron distribution in normal brains and that this imaging technique can detect changes in brain iron concentrations associated with disease states. Up to the present time this imaging capability has been utilized in many research applications but it has not yet been widely applied in the routine diagnosis and management of neurodegenerative disorders. However, recent advances in the basic science of brain iron metabolism, the clinical understanding of neurodegenerative diseases and in MRI technology, particularly in the availability of clinical scanners operating at the higher field strength of 3 T, suggest that iron-dependent MR imaging may soon provide biomarkers capable of characterizing the presence and progression of important neurological disorders. Such biomarkers may be of crucial assistance in the development and utilization of effective new therapies for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, multiple sclerosis and other iron-related CNS disorders which are difficult to diagnose and treat.

  11. Age dependent accumulation of N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids in ischemic rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, B.; Petersen, G.; Hansen, Harald S.;

    2000-01-01

    of various age (1, 6, 12, 19, 30, and ~70 days) by the use of P NMR spectroscopy of lipid extracts. This ability to accumulate NAPE was compared with the activity of N-acyltransferase and of NAPE-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in brain microsomes. These two enzymes are involved in the formation...... and degradation of NAPE, respectively. The results showed that 1) the ability to accumulate NAPE during post-decapitative ischemia is especially high in the youngest rats and is markedly reduced in older brains [in 1-day-old rat brains NAPE accumulated to 1.5% of total phospholipids, while in 30-day-old rat......N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids (NAPE) can be formed as a stress response during neuronal injury, and they are precursors for N-acyl- ethanolamines (NAE), some of which are endocannabinoids. The levels of NAPE accumulated during post-decapitative ischemia (6 h at 37°C) were studied in rat brains...

  12. Iron and ferritin accumulate in separate cellular locations in Phaseolus seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J; Urbanski, Dorian Fabian;

    2010-01-01

    Background Iron is an important micronutrient for all living organisms. Almost 25% of the world's population is affected by iron deficiency, a leading cause of anemia. In plants, iron deficiency leads to chlorosis and reduced yield. Both animals and plants may suffer from iron deficiency when...

  13. Are Lotus species good models for studying iron accumulation in common beans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta; Laszcyca, Katarzyna Malgorzata; Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

      Iron is an important micronutrient for all living organisms. Although iron is abundant in the Earth's crust, iron deficiency is a common problem throughout the food chain. Legume seeds have relatively high but also highly variable iron content. Little is known about the mechanisms controlling...

  14. Accumulation of 23 kDa lipocalin during brain development and injury in Hyphantria cunea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Ja; Je, Hyun Jeong; Cheon, Hyang Mi; Kong, Sun Young; Han, JikHyun; Yun, Chi Young; Han, Yeon Su; Lee, In Hee; Kang, Young Jin; Seo, Sook Jae

    2005-10-01

    The cDNA corresponding to a novel lipocalin was identified from the fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea. This lipocalin cDNA encodes a 194 residue protein with a calculated molecular mass of 23 kDa. Sequence analyses revealed that the 23 kDa lipocalin cDNA is most similar to Drosophila lazarillo, human apolipoprotein D, and Bombyrin. Northern blot analyses showed that 23 kDa lipocalin transcript is expressed in the whole body only in 4- and 6-day-old pupae. By Western blot analysis it was confirmed that 23 kDa lipocalin is mainly accumulated in brain and subesophageal ganglion, though it is detected in a small amount in fat body and epidermis of Hyphantria cunea. The accumulation of 23 kDa lipocalin in brain tissue was upregulated in response to injury. The putative function of 23 kDa lipocalin in brain is discussed.

  15. The Effects of Dietary Fat and Iron Interaction on Brain Regional Iron Contents and Stereotypical Behaviors in Male C57BL/6J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumei Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adequate brain iron levels are essential for enzyme activities, myelination, and neurotransmitter synthesis in the brain. Although systemic iron deficiency has been found in genetically or dietary-induced obese subjects, the effects of obesity-associated iron dysregulation in brain regions have not been examined. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of dietary fat and iron interaction on brain regional iron contents and regional-associated behavior patterns in a mouse model. Thirty C57BL/6J male weanling mice were randomly assigned to six dietary treatment groups (n=5 with varying fat (control/high and iron (control/high/low contents. The stereotypical behaviors were measured during the 24th week. Blood, liver, and brain tissues were collected at the end of the 24th week. Brains were dissected into the hippocampus, midbrain, striatum, and thalamus regions. Iron contents and ferritin-H (FtH protein and mRNA expressions in these regions were measured. Correlations between stereotypical behaviors and brain regional iron contents were analyzed at the 5% significance level. Results showed that high-fat diet altered the stereotypical behaviors such as inactivity and total distance traveled (P<0.05. The high-fat diet altered brain iron contents and ferritin-H (FtH protein and mRNA expressions in a regional-specific manner: 1 high-fat diet significantly decreased the brain iron content in the striatum (P<0.05, but not other regions; and 2 thalamus has a more distinct change in FtH mRNA expression compared to other regions. Furthermore, high-fat diet resulted in a significant decreased total distance traveled and a significant correlation between iron content and sleeping in midbrain (P<0.05. Dietary iron also decreased brain iron content and FtH protein expression in a regionally specific manner. The effect of interaction between dietary fat and iron was observed in brain iron content and behaviors. All these findings will lay

  16. Cellular distribution and localisation of iron in adult rat brain (substantia nigra)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinecke, Ch. [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Faculty for Physics and Geosciences, University of Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)]. E-mail: meinecke@physik.uni-leipzig.de; Morawski, M. [Paul-Flechsig-Institute for Brain research, University of Leipzig, Jahnallee 59, D-04109 Leipzig (Germany); Reinert, T. [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Faculty for Physics and Geosciences, University of Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Arendt, T. [Paul-Flechsig-Institute for Brain research, University of Leipzig, Jahnallee 59, D-04109 Leipzig (Germany); Butz, T. [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Faculty for Physics and Geosciences, University of Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Iron appears to be one of the main factors in the metal induced neurodegeneration. Quantitative information on cellular, sub-cellular and cell specific distributions of iron is therefore important to assess. The investigations reported here were carried out on a brain from an adult rat. Therefore, 6 {mu}m thick embedded, unstained brain sections containing the midbrain (substantia nigra, SN) were analysed. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) using a focussed proton beam (beam - diameter app. 1 {mu}m) was performed to determine the quantitative iron content on a cellular and sub-cellular level. The integral analysis shows that the iron content in the SN pars reticulata is twice as high than in the SN pars compacta. The analysis of the iron content on the cellular level revealed no remarkable differences between glia cells and neurons. This is in contrast to other studies using staining techniques.

  17. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eSkjørringe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers i.e. the blood-brain barrier (BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCB have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead to altered copper homeostasis in the brain. Similarly, changes in dietary copper affect the brain-iron homeostasis. Moreover, the uptake routes of iron and copper overlap each other which affect the interplay between the concentrations of the two metals in the brain. The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1 is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1 and ferroportin, all highly involved in iron transport. Iron and copper are mainly taken up at the BBB, but the BCB also plays a vital role in the homeostasis of the two metals, in terms of sequestering, uptake and efflux of iron and copper from the brain. Inside the brain, iron and copper are taken up by neurons and glia cells that express various transporters

  18. Distribution of iron in the parrot brain: conserved (pallidal) and derived (nigral) labeling patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T F; Brauth, S E; Hall, W S

    2001-12-01

    The distribution of iron in the brain of a vocal learning parrot, the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus), was examined using iron histochemistry. In mammals, iron is a highly specific stain for the dorsal and ventral pallidal subdivision as well as specific cell groups in the brainstem, including the substantia nigra pars reticulata [Neuroscience 11 (1984) 595-603]. The purpose of this study was to compare the distribution of iron in the mammalian and avian brain focusing on pallidal and nigral cell groups. The results show that in the avian brain, iron stains oligodendrocytes, neurons and the neuropil. Cell staining changes dramatically along the rostrocaudal axis, with neuronal labeling confined to regions caudal to the thalamus and oligodendrocyte labeling denser in regions rostral to the dorsal thalamus. Many sensory forebrain regions contain appreciable iron labeling, including telencephalic vocal control nuclei. The dorsal and ventral subdivision of the avian pallidum, along with the basal ganglia component of the vocal control circuit, the magnicellular nucleus of the lobus parolfactorius, stain heavily for iron. Several brainstem regions, including nucleus rotundus, the medial spiriform nucleus (SpM), the principle nucleus of the trigeminal nerve, nucleus laminaris and scattered cell groups throughout the isthmus and pontine reticular formation stain intensely for iron. Within SpM neuronal labeling is more intense in the medial division while oligodendrocyte labeling is more intense in the lateral division. surprisingly no nigral iron staining was observed. Our results imply that iron is a conserved marker for the pallidum in birds and mammals, but that patterns of nigral staining have diverged in birds and mammals. Differences in iron staining patterns between birds and mammals may also reflect the relatively greater importance of the collothalamic visual pathways, pretectal-cerebellar pathways and specialized vocal learning circuitry in avian sensory

  19. Brain beta-amyloid accumulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bradley J; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Atkin, Julie D; Cheema, Surindar S

    2004-12-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both the deposition and pathogenesis of beta-amyloid (Abeta) protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in neuronal cells and transgenic AD mice reduces Abeta toxicity and accumulation. In contrast, mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) confer enhanced pro-oxidative enzyme activities. We therefore examined whether ALS-linked mutant SOD1 overexpression in motor neuronal cells or transgenic ALS mice modulates Abeta toxicity or its accumulation in the brain. Aggregated, but not freshly solubilised, substrate-bound Abeta peptides induced degenerative morphology and cytotoxicity in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. Transfection of NSC-34 cells with human wild-type SOD1 attenuated Abeta-induced toxicity, however this neuroprotective effect was also observed for ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Analysis of the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum and olfactory bulb from transgenic SOD1G93A mice using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of acid-guanidine extracts revealed age-dependent elevations in Abeta levels, although not significantly different from wild-type mouse brain. In addition, brain amyloid protein precursor (APP) levels remained unaltered as a consequence of mutant SOD1 expression. We therefore conclude that mutant SOD1 overexpression promotes neither Abeta toxicity nor brain accumulation in these ALS models.

  20. Overexpression of Arabidopsis VIT1 increases accumulation of iron in cassava roots and stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is extremely abundant in the soil, but its uptake in plants is limited due to low solubility in neutral or alkaline soils. Plants can rely on rhizosphere acidification to increase iron solubility. AtVIT1 was previously found to be involved in mediating vacuolar sequestration of iron, which indi...

  1. The Acute Effect of Humic Acid on Iron Accumulation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagin, Yasir Furkan; Sahin, N; Polat, A; Erdogan, M A; Atayan, Y; Eyol, E; Bilgic, Y; Seckin, Y; Colak, C

    2016-05-01

    Free iron leads to the formation of pro-oxidant reactive oxygen species (ROS). Humic acids (HAs) enhance permeability of cellular wall and act as a chelator through electron transferring. This study was designed to test chelator effect of HA on iron as well as its anti-oxidant effect against the iron-induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. The rats used were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8/group): group I (the control group); group II (the HA group), humic acid (562 mg/kg) was given over 10 days by oral gavage; group III (the iron group), iron III hydroxide polymaltose (250 mg/kg) was given over 10 days by intraperitoneal route; and group IV (the HA plus iron group), received the iron (similar to group II) plus humic acid (similar to those in groups II and III) group. Blood and two tissue samples both from liver and heart were obtained for biochemical and histopathological evaluations. Iron deposition, the iron-induced hepatotoxicity, and cardiotoxicity were demonstrated by histopathological and biochemical manner. However, no significant differences were observed in the serum biochemical values and the histopathological results among the iron and the HA plus iron groups in the liver tissue but not in the heart tissue. The protective effects of humic acid against iron-induced cardiotoxicity were shown but not against hepatotoxicity in our study.

  2. Overexpression of Arabidopsis VIT1 increases accumulation of iron in cassava roots and stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Narayanan; Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Gaitán-Solis, Eliana; Grusak, Michael A; Taylor, Nigel; Anderson, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Iron is extremely abundant in the soil, but its uptake in plants is limited due to low solubility in neutral or alkaline soils. Plants can rely on rhizosphere acidification to increase iron solubility. AtVIT1 was previously found to be involved in mediating vacuolar sequestration of iron, which indicates a potential application for iron biofortification in crop plants. Here, we have overexpressed AtVIT1 in the starchy root crop cassava using a patatin promoter. Under greenhouse conditions, iron levels in mature cassava storage roots showed 3-4 times higher values when compared with wild-type plants. Significantly, the expression of AtVIT1 showed a positive correlation with the increase in iron concentration of storage roots. Conversely, young leaves of AtVIT1 transgenic plants exhibit characteristics of iron deficiency such as interveinal chlorosis of leaves (yellowing) and lower iron concentration when compared with the wild type plants. Interestingly, the AtVIT1 transgenic plants showed 4 and 16 times higher values of iron concentration in the young stem and stem base tissues, respectively. AtVIT1 transgenic plants also showed 2-4 times higher values of iron content when compared with wild-type plants, with altered partitioning of iron between source and sink tissues. These results demonstrate vacuolar iron sequestration as a viable transgenic strategy to biofortify crops and to help eliminate micronutrient malnutrition in at-risk human populations.

  3. Calorie restriction down-regulates expression of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin in normal and D-galactose-induced aging mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shougang; Shi, Wenli; Li, Man; Gao, Qian

    2014-02-01

    It has been shown that iron progressively accumulates in the brain with age. Calorie restriction (CR) may allay many of the adverse effects of aging on the brain, yet the underlying mechanisms, in particular in relation to brain iron metabolism, remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of CR in the regulation of cerebral cellular iron homeostasis. C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups of eight. The control group was fed a conventional diet ad libitum; the CR group received 70% of the calories of the control mouse intake per day; the D-galactose (D-gal) group received subcutaneous injection of D-gal at a dose of 100 mg/kg once daily to produce mouse model of aging; the D-gal plus CR group received both of the two interventions for 14 weeks. The Morris water maze (MWM) was employed to test the cognitive performance of all animals, and the expression of iron regulatory genes, ferroportin and hepcidin, in the cortex and hippocampus were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared to the controls, the D-gal group mice showed significant spatial reference memory deficits in the MWM test, whereas the D-gal-CR group mice exhibited almost normal cognitive function, indicating that CR protects against D-gal-induced learning and memory impairment. Hepcidin mRNA expression was increased in the D-gal group, decreased in the CR group, and was basically unchanged in the D-gal-CR group. There was no statistical difference in the transmembrane iron exporter ferroportin expression between control and any of the experimental groups. The results suggest that the anti-aging effects of CR might partially lie in its capacity to reduce or avoid age-related iron accumulation in the brain through down-regulating expression of brain hepcidin--the key negative regulator for intracellular iron efflux--and that facilitating the balance of brain iron metabolism may be a promising anti-aging measure.

  4. Iron and ferritin accumulate in separate cellular locations in Phaseolus seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J; Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

    2010-01-01

    Background Iron is an important micronutrient for all living organisms. Almost 25% of the world's population is affected by iron deficiency, a leading cause of anemia. In plants, iron deficiency leads to chlorosis and reduced yield. Both animals and plants may suffer from iron deficiency when the...... and a Mesoamerican genotype. Conclusions The presented results emphasize the importance of complementing research in model organisms with analysis in crop plants and they suggest that iron distribution criteria should be integrated into selection strategies for bean biofortification....

  5. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with epidermal growth factor (SPION–EGF for targeting brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevtsov MA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxim A Shevtsov,1,2 Boris P Nikolaev,3 Ludmila Y Yakovleva,3 Yaroslav Y Marchenko,3 Anatolii V Dobrodumov,4 Anastasiya L Mikhrina,5 Marina G Martynova,1 Olga A Bystrova,1 Igor V Yakovenko,2 Alexander M Ischenko31Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, 2AL Polenov Russian Scientific Research Institute of Neurosurgery, 3Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, 4Institute of Macromolecular Compounds of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, 5IM Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, St Petersburg, RussiaAbstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs conjugated with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (SPION–EGF were studied as a potential agent for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement of malignant brain tumors. Synthesized conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry. The interaction of SPION–EGF conjugates with cells was analyzed in a C6 glioma cell culture. The distribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in an orthotopic model of C6 gliomas. SPION–EGF nanosuspensions had the properties of a negative contrast agent with high coefficients of relaxation efficiency. In vitro studies of SPION–EGF nanoparticles showed high intracellular incorporation and the absence of a toxic influence on C6 cell viability and proliferation. Intravenous administration of SPION–EGF conjugates in animals provided receptor-mediated targeted delivery across the blood–brain barrier and tumor retention of the nanoparticles; this was more efficient than with unconjugated SPIONs. The accumulation of conjugates in the glioma was revealed as hypotensive zones on T2-weighted images with a twofold reduction in T2 relaxation time in comparison to unconjugated SPIONs (P<0.001. SPION

  6. Increased brain iron deposition is a risk factor for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis: a combined study of quantitative susceptibility mapping and whole brain volume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Chao; Zhang, Mengjie; Long, Miaomiao; Chu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Tong; Wang, Lijun; Guo, Yu; Yan, Shuo; Haacke, E Mark; Shen, Wen; Xia, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    To explore the correlation between increased brain iron deposition and brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis and their correlation with clinical biomarkers and neuropsychological test. Forty two patients with haemodialysis and forty one age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this prospective study. 3D whole brain high resolution T1WI and susceptibility weighted imaging were scanned on a 3 T MRI system. The brain volume was analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in patients and to compare with that of healthy controls. Quantitative susceptibility mapping was used to measure and compare the susceptibility of different structures between patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between the brain volume, iron deposition and neuropsychological scores. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to explore the effect of clinical biomarkers on the brain volumes in patients. Compared with healthy controls, patients with haemodialysis showed decreased volume of bilateral putamen and left insular lobe (All P putamen, substantia nigra, red nucleus and dentate nucleus were significantly higher (All P putamen (P putamen (P < 0.05). Our study indicated increased brain iron deposition and dialysis duration was risk factors for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis. The decreased gray matter volume of the left insular lobe was correlated with neurocognitive impairment.

  7. Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Hypointensity of the Pulvinar Nucleus of Patients with Alzheimer Disease: Its Possible Association with Iron Accumulation as Evidenced by the T2 Map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Won Jin; Roh, Hong Gee; Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jin [Dept. of Neurology, Hanyang University Medical Center, Hanyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seol Heui [Center for Geriatric Neuroscience Research, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    We hypothesized that prominent pulvinar hypointensity in brain MRI represents the disease process due to iron accumulation in Alzheimer disease (AD). We aimed to determine whether or not the pulvinar signal intensity (SI) on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at 3.0T MRI differs between AD patients and normal subjects, and also whether the pulvinar SI is correlated with the T2 map, an imaging marker for tissue iron, and a cognitive scale. Twenty one consecutive patients with AD and 21 age-matched control subjects were prospectively included in this study. The pulvinar SI was assessed on the FLAIR image. We measured the relative SI ratio of the pulvinar to the corpus callosum. The T2 values were calculated from the T2 relaxometry map. The differences between the two groups were analyzed, by using a Student t test. The correlation between the measurements was assessed by the Pearson's correlation test. As compared to the normal white matter, the FLAIR signal intensity of the pulvinar nucleus was significantly more hypointense in the AD patients than in the control subjects (p < 0.01). The pulvinar T2 was shorter in the AD patients than in the control subjects (51.5 {+-} 4.95 ms vs. 56.5 {+-} 5.49 ms, respectively, p = 0.003). The pulvinar SI ratio was strongly correlated with the pulvinar T2 (r = 0.745, p < 0.001). When controlling for age, only the pulvinar-to-CC SI ratio was positively correlated with that of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (r = 0.303, p < 0.050). Conversely, the pulvinar T2 was not correlated with the MMSE score (r = 0.277, p = 0.080). The FLAIR hypointensity of the pulvinar nucleus represents an abnormal iron accumulation in AD and may be used as an adjunctive finding for evaluating AD.

  8. Adenosine receptors as markers of brain iron deficiency: Implications for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Gulyani, Seema; Ruiqian, Wan; Bonaventura, Jordi; Cutler, Roy; Pearson, Virginia; Allen, Richard P; Earley, Christopher J; Mattson, Mark P; Ferré, Sergi

    2016-12-01

    Deficits of sensorimotor integration with periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and hyperarousal and sleep disturbances in Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) constitute two pathophysiologically distinct but interrelated clinical phenomena, which seem to depend mostly on alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, respectively. Brain iron deficiency is considered as a main pathogenetic mechanism in RLS. Rodents with brain iron deficiency represent a valuable pathophysiological model of RLS, although they do not display motor disturbances. Nevertheless, they develop the main neurochemical dopaminergic changes found in RLS, such as decrease in striatal dopamine D2 receptor density. On the other hand, brain iron deficient mice exhibit the characteristic pattern of hyperarousal in RLS, providing a tool to find the link between brain iron deficiency and sleep disturbances in RLS. The present study provides evidence for a role of the endogenous sleep-promoting factor adenosine. Three different experimental preparations, long-term (22 weeks) severe or moderate iron-deficient (ID) diets (3- or 7-ppm iron diet) in mice and short-term (3 weeks) severe ID diet (3-ppm iron diet) in rats, demonstrated a significant downregulation (Western blotting in mouse and radioligand binding saturation experiments in rat brain tissue) of adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) in the cortex and striatum, concomitant to striatal D2R downregulation. On the other hand, the previously reported upregulation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) was only observed with severe ID in both mice and rats. The results suggest a key role for A1R downregulation in the PLMS and hyperarousal in RLS.

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate reduces calcium accumulation in rat brain endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cells expend large amounts of energy sequestering calcium (Ca2+, while loss of Ca2+ compartmentalization leads to cell damage or death. Upon cell entry, glucose is converted to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P, a parent substrate to several metabolic major pathways, including glycolysis. In several tissues, G6P alters the ability of the endoplasmic reticulum to sequester Ca2+. This led to the hypothesis that G6P regulates Ca2+ accumulation by acting as an endogenous ligand for sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA. Whole brain ER microsomes were pooled from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using radio-isotopic assays, 45Ca2+ accumulation was quantified following incubation with increasing amounts of G6P, in the presence or absence of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA inhibitor. To qualitatively assess SERCA activity, the simultaneous release of inorganic phosphate (Pi coupled with Ca2+ accumulation was quantified. Addition of G6P significantly and decreased Ca2+ accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion (1-10 mM. The reduction in Ca2+ accumulation was not significantly different that seen with addition of thapsigargin. Addition of glucose-1-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, or other glucose metabolic pathway intermediates, had no effect on Ca2+ accumulation. Further, the release of Pi was markedly decreased, indicating G6P-mediated SERCA inhibition as the responsible mechanism for reduced Ca2+ uptake. Simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and G6P did decrease inorganic phosphate in comparison to either treatment alone, which suggests that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, G6P may be a novel, endogenous regulator of SERCA activity. Additionally, pathological conditions observed during disease states that disrupt glucose homeostasis, may be attributable to Ca2+ dystasis caused by altered G6P regulation of SERCA activity

  10. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  11. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E; Humphrey, Daniel M; Wang, Shirley L; Kiselyov, Kirill I; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1(-/-) brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1(-/-) and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development.

  12. The influence of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia on the brain iron metabolism in adult Sprague dawley rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Qiong; Li Yaru; Chang Yanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Iron is an essential element in all living organisms and is required as a cofactor for oxygen-binding proteins. Iron metabolism, oxygen homeostasis and erythropoiesis are consequently strongly inter-connected. In mammalian cells, exposure to a low-oxygen environment triggers a hypoxic response pathway cen-tered on the regulated expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ( HIF) . Hypoxia has been shown to increase the expression of a variety of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. However, little is known about brain iron metabolism after intermittent hypobaric hypoxia ( IHH) treatment. In this study, adult Sprague dawley ( SD) rats were treated with IHH for 28 days, 8h per day and then we detected iron homeostasis in different brain areas of SD rats. Results:The protein level of hippocampus transferrin receptor 1 ( TfR1 ) , divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) with IRE, DMT1 (-IRE), ferritin-H, iron regulatory protein (IRP) 2 and ceruloplasmin (CP) is ele-vated significantly while ferritin-L decreased. We have also found the down regulation of IRP1. We observe the same results in the cerebral cortex in the brain. Conclusions:We first discover that IHH has an influence on the brain iron homeostasis and the decreased ferritin-L corresponds to the down regulation of IRP1 indicating hypoxia can affect the expression of ferritin-L through IRE/IRP system. Although there is a marked increase in TfR1 ex-pression that would lead to the raised level of LIP in cells. It can finally result in the higher ROS which can damage the cells. The concerned mechanisms involved in it remain to be deliberated.

  13. Oxidative damage to rat brain in iron and copper overloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Semprine, Jimena; Fuda, Julián; Torti, Horacio; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2014-08-01

    This study reports on the acute brain toxicity of Fe and Cu in male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) that received 0 to 60 mg kg(-1) (ip) FeCl2 or CuSO4. Brain metal contents and time-responses were determined for rat survival, in situ brain chemiluminescence and phospholipid and protein oxidation products. Metal doses hyperbolically defined brain metal content. Rat survival was 91% and 60% after Fe and Cu overloads. Brain metal content increased from 35 to 114 μg of Fe per g and from 3.6 to 34 μg of Cu per g. Brain chemiluminescence (10 cps cm(-2)) increased 3 and 2 times after Fe and Cu overloads, with half maximal responses (C50) of 38 μg of Fe per g of brain and 15 μg of Cu per g of brain, and with half time responses (t1/2) of 12 h for Fe and 20 h for Cu. Phospholipid peroxidation increased by 56% and 31% with C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 20 μg of Cu per g and with t1/2 of 9 h and 14 h. Protein oxidation increased by 45% for Fe with a C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 18% for Cu with a C50 of 10 μg of Cu per g and a t1/2 of 12 h for both metals. Fe and Cu brain toxicities are likely mediated by Haber-Weiss type HO˙ formation with subsequent oxidative damage.

  14. Comparison of histological techniques to visualize iron in paraffin-embedded brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Sara; Nabuurs, Rob J A; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Natté, Remco

    2013-11-01

    Better knowledge of the distribution of iron in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients may facilitate the development of an in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) marker for AD and may cast light on the role of this potentially toxic molecule in the pathogenesis of AD. Several histological iron staining techniques have been used in the past but they have not been systematically tested for sensitivity and specificity. This article compares three histochemical techniques and ferritin immunohistochemistry to visualize iron in paraffin-embedded human AD brain tissue. The specificity of the histochemical techniques was tested by staining sections after iron extraction. Iron was demonstrated in the white matter, in layers IV/V of the frontal neocortex, in iron containing plaques, and in microglia. In our hands, these structures were best visualized using the Meguro iron stain, a method that has not been described for iron staining in human brain or AD in particular. Ferritin immunohistochemistry stained microglia and iron containing plaques similar to the Meguro method but was less intense in myelin-associated iron. The Meguro method is most suitable for identifying iron-positive structures in paraffin-embedded human AD brain tissue.

  15. Visualization of luminal thrombosis and mural Iron accumulation in giant aneurysms with Ex vivo 4.7T magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Honkanen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Better diagnostic tools to identify rupture-prone saccular intracranial aneurysms (sIA are needed. Inflammation and luminal thrombus associate with degeneration and rupture of the sIA wall. Iron-uptake has been detected in the inflammatory cells of the sIA wall and thrombus is the likely source of this iron. We investigated ex vivo the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to detect iron accumulation and luminal thrombus in giant sIAs. Methods: Giant sIAs (n = 3 were acquired from microsurgical operations, fixed with formalin, embedded in agar and imaged at 4.7T. Samples were sectioned maintaining the orientation of the axial plane of MRI scans, and stained (hematoxylin-eosin and Prussian blue. Results: All three giant sIAs showed a degenerated hypocellular wall with both mural and adventitial iron accumulation and displayed different degrees of luminal thrombus formation and thrombus organization. Signal intensity varied within the same sIA wall and associated with iron accumulation in all tested sequences. Wall areas with iron accumulation had significantly lower signal to noise ratio (SNR compared with areas without iron accumulation (P = 0.002. Fresh and organizing thrombus differed in their MRI presentation and differed in signal intensity of the aneurysm wall (P = 0.027. Conclusion: MRI can detect ex vivo the accumulation of iron in giant sIA wall, as well as fresh and organizing luminal thrombus. These features have been previously associated with fragile, rupture-prone aneurysm wall. Further studies of iron accumulation as a marker of rupture-prone aneurysm wall are needed.

  16. Mitochondrial ferritin in the regulation of brain iron homeostasis and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofen eGao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt is a novel iron-storage protein in mitochondria. Evidences have shown that FtMt is structurally and functionally similar to the cytosolic H-chain ferritin. It protects mitochondria from iron-induced oxidative damage presumably through sequestration of potentially harmful excess free iron. It also participates in the regulation of iron distribution between cytosol and mitochondrial contents. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed H-ferritin, FtMt is mainly expressed in testis and brain, which suggests its tissue-related roles. FtMt is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, as its increased expression has been observed in Alzheimer’s disease, restless legs syndrome and Friedreich’s ataxia. Studies from our laboratory showed that in Alzheimer’s disease, FtMt overexpression attenuated the β-amyloid induced neurotoxicity, which on the other hand increased significantly when FtMt expression was knocked down. It is also found that, by maintaining mitochondrial iron homeostasis, FtMt could prevent 6-hydroxydopamine induced dopaminergic cell damage in Parkinson’s disease. These recent findings on FtMt regarding its functions in regulation of brain iron homeostasis and its protective role in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases are summarized and reviewed.

  17. HFE gene variants, iron, and lipids: a novel connection in Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne; Connor, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulation and associated oxidative stress in the brain have been consistently found in several neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple genetic studies have been undertaken to try to identify a cause of neurodegenerative diseases but direct connections have been rare. In the iron field, variants in the HFE gene that give rise to a protein involved in cellular iron regulation, are associated with iron accumulation in multiple organs including the brain. There is also substantial epidemiolo...

  18. Assessment of heavy metal accumulation in macrophyte, agricultural soil, and crop plants adjacent to discharge zone of sponge iron factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Nayek, S.; Saha, R. N.; Satpati, S.

    2008-08-01

    The present study deals with the characterization of effluent released from sponge iron industries and distribution of heavy metals in soil and macrophytes near to effluent discharge channel. Apart from this, accumulation of heavy metals in nearby soil and vegetation system irrigated with effluent-contaminated water is also the subject of this study. Physico-chemical analysis of effluent reveals that the concentration of total suspended solids (TSS), total hardness (TH), iron (Fe2+), and oil and grease are greater than the IS (1981) norms for discharge of water into inland water body. The soil along the sides of the effluent channel also shows higher concentration of heavy metals than the background soil. The enrichment of the heavy metals are in the order of Chromium (Cr) > Iron (Fe) > Manganese (Mn) > Zinc (Zn) > Copper (Cu) > Cadmium (Cd). Macrophytes growing along the sides of the effluent channel also show significant accumulation of heavy metals almost in the same order as accumulated in soil. Higher uptake of heavy metals by these varieties reveals that these species can be used for future phytoremediation. The effluent as well as contaminated water is extensively used for irrigation for growing vegetables like tomato ( Lycopersicon esculatum) in the surrounding areas. Heavy metal accumulation in this agricultural soil are in the sequence of Cr > Fe > Mn > Zn > Cu > Cd. More or less similar type of accumulation pattern are also found in tomato plants except Fe and Zn exceeding Cr and Mn. Transfer Factor of heavy metals from soil to tomato plants (TFS) shows average value of <1, suggesting less uptake of heavy metals from soil. Among the plant parts studied, fruit shows least accumulation. Although tomato plants show some phenotypic changes, the survival of tomato plants as well as least accumulation of metals in fruit reveals their tolerance to heavy metals. Therefore it may be suggested that this plant can be grown successfully in the heavy metal

  19. Potential effect of sedimentary iron-phosphorus accumulation on frequent algal bloom in the Pearl River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on laboratory culture of harmful alga on iron and phosphorus uptake, and the study of accu-mulation of iron-phosphorus in cores and release of iron and phosphorus from surficial sediments collected in the Pearl River Estuary, the reasons of the high frequency of phytoplankton bloom therein are discussed. The results show that Fe starvation can make algal growth rate slow down and the peak of cell number decrease. Fe and P contents in algal cell bear a significant correlation and the molar ratio of P:Fe is ~356:1, suggesting that algal uptake of Fe and P is synergistic. Total Fe and total P in sediments are positively correlated and Fe-P is the main species of inorganic sedimentary P. Through continuous leaching with agitation, 34.26%―80.21% of exchangeable P and 4.04%―22.52% of ex-changeable Fe are released from surficial sediments, implying that the accumulation of Fe-P in sedi-ments is available for providing nutrients (P and essential Fe) for the demand of phytoplankton bloom. These factors might be responsible for a higher frequency of red tides than other marine regions.

  20. Chronic exposure of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to iron oxide nanoparticles: Effects of particle morphology on accumulation, elimination, hematology and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri; Kaya, Hasan; Yılmaz, Sevdan; Camas, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Effects of chronic exposure to alpha and gamma iron oxide nanoparticles (α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 NPs) were investigated through exposure of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0mg/L (9.2×10(-4), 4.6×10(-3) and 9.2×10(-3)mM) aqueous suspensions for 60days. Fish were then transferred to NP-free freshwater and allowed to eliminate ingested NPs for 30days. The organs, including gills, liver, kidney, intestine, brain, spleen, and muscle tissue of the fish were analyzed to determine the accumulation, physiological distribution and elimination of the Fe2O3 NPs. Largest accumulation occurred in spleen followed by intestine, kidney, liver, gills, brain and muscle tissue. Fish exposed to γ-Fe2O3 NPs possessed significantly higher Fe in all organs. Accumulation in spleen was fast and independent of NP concentration reaching to maximum levels by the end of the first sampling period (30th day). Dissolved Fe levels in water were very negligible ranging at 4-6μg/L for α-Fe2O3 and 17-21μg/L for γ-Fe2O3 NPs (for 1mg/L suspensions). Despite that, Fe levels in gills and brain reflect more dissolved Fe accumulation from metastable γ-Fe2O3 polymorph. Ingested NPs cleared from the organs completely within 30-day elimination period, except the liver and spleen. Liver contained about 31% of α- and 46% of γ-Fe2O3, while spleen retained about 62% of α- and 35% of the γ-polymorph. No significant disturbances were observed in hematological parameters, including hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell and white blood cell counts (p>0.05). Serum glucose (GLU) levels decreased in treatments exposed to 1.0mg/L of γ-Fe2O3 NPs at day 30 (p0.05), but increased significantly within elimination period due to mobilization of ingested NPs from liver and spleen to blood. Though respiratory burst activity was not affected (p>0.05), lysozyme activity (LA) was suppressed suggesting an immunosuppressive effects from both Fe2O3 NPs (pniloticus under chronic exposure.

  1. New findings about iron oxide nanoparticles and their different effects on murine primary brain cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubert J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jenni Neubert,1 Susanne Wagner,2 Jürgen Kiwit,3 Anja U Bräuer,1,* Jana Glumm1,3,* 1Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Center for Anatomy, 2Institute for Radiology, Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, 3Clinic for Neurosurgery, HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The physicochemical properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs enable their application in the diagnostics and therapy of central nervous system diseases. However, since crucial information regarding side effects of particle–cell interactions within the central nervous system is still lacking, we investigated the influence of novel very small iron oxide particles or the clinically approved ferucarbotran or ferumoxytol on the vitality and morphology of brain cells. We exposed primary cell cultures of microglia and hippocampal neurons, as well as neuron–glia cocultures to varying concentrations of SPIOs for 6 and/or 24 hours, respectively. Here, we show that SPIO accumulation by microglia and subsequent morphological alterations strongly depend on the respective nanoparticle type. Microglial viability was severely compromised by high SPIO concentrations, except in the case of ferumoxytol. While ferumoxytol did not cause immediate microglial death, it induced severe morphological alterations and increased degeneration of primary neurons. Additionally, primary neurons clearly degenerated after very small iron oxide particle and ferucarbotran exposure. In neuron–glia cocultures, SPIOs rather stimulated the outgrowth of neuronal processes in a concentration- and particle-dependent manner. We conclude that the influence of SPIOs on brain cells not only depends on the particle type but also on the physiological system they are applied to. Keywords: microglia, hippocampal neurons, degeneration, morphology, nanoparticles 

  2. Impact of two iron(III) chelators on the iron, cadmium, lead and nickel accumulation in poplar grown under heavy metal stress in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihucz, Victor G; Csog, Árpád; Fodor, Ferenc; Tatár, Enikő; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Luminiţa; Záray, Gyula

    2012-04-15

    Poplar (Populus jacquemontiana var. glauca cv. Kopeczkii) was grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) or Pb(II), and Fe as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations. The present study was designed to compare the accumulation and distribution of Fe, Cd, Ni and Pb within the different plant compartments. Generally, Fe and heavy-metal accumulation were higher by factor 2-7 and 1.6-3.3, respectively, when Fe(III) citrate was used. Iron transport towards the shoot depended on the Fe(III) chelate and, generally, on the heavy metal used. Lead was accumulated only in the root. The amounts of Fe and heavy metals accumulated by poplar were very similar to those of cucumber grown in an identical way, indicating strong Fe uptake regulation of these two Strategy I plants: a cultivar and a woody plant. The Strategy I Fe uptake mechanism (i.e. reducing Fe(III) followed by Fe(II) uptake), together with the Fe(III) chelate form in the nutrient solution had significant effects on Fe and heavy metal uptake. Poplar appears to show phytoremediation potential for Cd and Ni, as their transport towards the shoot was characterized by 51-54% and 26-48% depending on the Fe(III) supply in the nutrient solution.

  3. Measurement of helium production cross sections of iron for d-T neutrons by helium accumulation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, Yoshiyuki; Kanda, Yukinori; Nagae, Koji; Fujimoto, Toshihiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Ikeda, Yujiro

    1997-03-01

    Helium production cross sections of Iron were measured by helium accumulation method for neutron energies from 13.5 to 14.9 MeV. Iron samples were irradiated with FNS, an intense d-T neutron source of JAERI. As the neutron energy varies according to the emission angle at the neutron source, the samples were set around the neutron source and were irradiated by neutrons of different energy depending on each sample position. The amount of helium produced in a sample was measured by Helium Atoms Measurement System at Kyushu University. The results of this work are in good agreement with other experimental data in the literature and also compared with the evaluated values in JENDL-3. (author)

  4. Nitric oxide accumulation is required to protect against iron-mediated oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mariana; Colman, María José Rodríguez; Gómez-Casati, Diego F; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián

    2009-02-04

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that is conserved throughout evolution. In yeast and mammals, frataxin is essential for cellular iron (Fe) homeostasis and survival during oxidative stress. In plants, frataxin deficiency causes increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and high sensitivity to oxidative stress. In this work we show that a knock-down T-DNA frataxin-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (atfh-1) contains increased total and organellar Fe levels. Frataxin deficiency leads also to nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in both, atfh-1 roots and frataxin null mutant yeast. Abnormally high NO production might be part of the defence mechanism against Fe-mediated oxidative stress.

  5. Effect of cerebral amyloid angiopathy on brain iron, copper, and zinc in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Matthew; Crofton, Andrew; Zabel, Matthew; Jiffry, Arshad; Kirsch, David; Dickson, April; Mao, Xiao Wen; Vinters, Harry V; Domaille, Dylan W; Chang, Christopher J; Kirsch, Wolff

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a vascular lesion associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) present in up to 95% of AD patients and produces MRI-detectable microbleeds in many of these patients. It is possible that CAA-related microbleeding is a source of pathological iron in the AD brain. Because the homeostasis of copper, iron, and zinc are so intimately linked, we determined whether CAA contributes to changes in the brain levels of these metals. We obtained brain tissue from AD patients with severe CAA to compare to AD patients without evidence of vascular amyloid-β. Patients with severe CAA had significantly higher non-heme iron levels. Histologically, iron was deposited in the walls of large CAA-affected vessels. Zinc levels were significantly elevated in grey matter in both the CAA and non-CAA AD tissue, but no vascular staining was noted in CAA cases. Copper levels were decreased in both CAA and non-CAA AD tissues and copper was found to be prominently deposited on the vasculature in CAA. Together, these findings demonstrate that CAA is a significant variable affecting transition metals in AD.

  6. Blood-brain barrier to peptides: (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone accumulation by eighteen regions of the rat brain and by anterior pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermisch, A.; Ruehle, H.J. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Biowissenschaften); Klauschenz, E.; Kretzschmar, R. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Inst. fuer Wirkstofforschung)

    1984-01-01

    After intracarotid injection of (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone ((/sup 3/H)GnRH) the mean accumulation of radioactivity per unit wet weight of 18 brain samples investigated and the anterior pituitary was 0.38 +- 0.11% g/sup -1/ of the injected tracer dose. This indicates a low but measurable brain uptake of the peptide. The brain uptake of (/sup 3/H)GnRH in blood-brain barrier (BBB)-protected regions is 5% of that of separately investigated (/sup 3/H)OH. In BBB-free regions the accumulation of radioactivity was more than 25-fold higher than in BBB-protected regions. The accumulation of (/sup 3/H)GnRH among regions with BBB varies less than among regions with leaky endothelia. The data presented for (/sup 3/H)GnRH are similar to those for other peptides so far investigated.

  7. Exogenous iron redistribution between brain and spleen after the administration of the 57Fe3O4 ferrofluid into the ventricle of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbasov, Raul; Polikarpov, Dmitry; Cherepanov, Valery; Chuev, Michael; Mischenko, Ilya; Loginiva, Nadezhda; Loseva, Elena; Nikitin, Maxim; Panchenko, Vladislav

    2017-04-01

    Iron clearance pathways after the injection of 57Fe3O4-based dextran-stabilized ferrofluid into the brain ventricles were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and histologically. The nanoparticles appeared in spleen tissues within 3 h after transcranial injection. We separated and independently estimated concentrations of iron encapsulated in nanoparticles and iron encapsulated in proteins in the all rat organs. It was found that the dextran coated initial nanoparticles of the ferrofluid disintegrated in the brain into separate superparamagnetic nanoparticles within a week after the injection.The nanoparticles completely exited from the brain in a few weeks. The exogenous iron appeared in the spleen in 3 h after the injection and remained in the spleen for more than month. The appearance of additional component in Mössbauer spectra of spleen samples revealed a fundamental difference in the mechanisms of processing of iron nanoparticles in this organ, which was also confirmed by histological examination.

  8. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman’s rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region) with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1). Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding. PMID:27171423

  9. Comprehensive modeling and investigation of the effect of iron on the growth rate and lipid accumulation of Chlorella vulgaris cultured in batch photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concas, Alessandro; Steriti, Alberto; Pisu, Massimo; Cao, Giacomo

    2014-02-01

    Recent works have shown that specific strains of microalgae are capable to simultaneously increase their growth rate and lipid content when cultured under suitable concentrations of iron. While these results are promising in view of the exploitation of microalgae for producing biofuels, to the best of our knowledge, no mathematical model capable to describe the effect of iron on lipid accumulation in microalgae, has been so far proposed. A comprehensive mathematical model describing the effect of iron on chlorophyll synthesis, nitrogen assimilation, growth rate and lipid accumulation in a freshwater strain of Chlorella vulgaris is then proposed in this work. Model results are successfully compared with experimental data which confirm the positive effect of growing iron concentrations on lipid productivity of C. vulgaris. Thus, the proposed model might represent a useful tool to optimize iron-based strategies to improve the lipid productivity of microalgal cultures.

  10. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Grishchuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1. MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development.

  11. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  12. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  13. Deferoxamine inhibits iron induced hippocampal tau phosphorylation in the Alzheimer transgenic mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuang; Wang, Pu; Zhong, Man-Li; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xue-Shi; Li, Jia-Yi; Wang, Zhan-You

    2013-01-01

    Prior work has shown that iron interacts with hyperphosphorylated tau, which contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO) slows down the clinical progression of the cognitive decline associated with this disease. However, the effects of DFO on tau phosphorylation in the presence or absence of iron have yet to be determined. Using amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) double transgenic mouse brain as a model system, we investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of intranasal administration of DFO on iron induced abnormal tau phosphorylation. High-dose iron treatment markedly increased the levels of tau phosphorylation at the sites of Thr205, Thr231 and Ser396, whereas highly induced tau phosphorylation was abolished by intranasal administration of DFO in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Moreover, DFO intranasal administration also decreases Fe-induced the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which in turn suppressing tau phosphorylation. Cumulatively, our data show that intranasal DFO treatment exerts its suppressive effects on iron induced tau phosphorylation via CDK5 and GSK3β pathways. More importantly, elucidation of DFO mechanism in suppressing tau phosphorylation may provide insights for developing therapeutic strategies to combat AD.

  14. High relative air humidity influences mineral accumulation and growth in iron deficient soybean plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roriz, M.; Carvalho, S.M.P.; Wilton Vasconcelos, M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency chlorosis (IDC) in soybean results in severe yield losses. Cultivar selection is the most commonly used strategy to avoid IDC but there is a clear interaction between genotype and the environment; therefore, the search for quick and reliable tools to control this nutrient defici

  15. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with variably sized polyethylene glycol in murine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333–20 000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size...

  16. Investigation on positive correlation of increased brain iron deposition with cognitive impairment in Alzheimer disease by using quantitative MR R2' mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Wenzhen; Zhan, Chuanjia; Zhao, Lingyun; Wang, Jianzhi; Tian, Qing; Wang, Wei

    2011-08-01

    Brain iron deposition has been proposed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of brain iron accumulation with the severity of cognitive impairment in patients with AD by using quantitative MR relaxation rate R2' measurements. Fifteen patients with AD, 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and 30 healthy volunteers underwent 1.5T MR multi-echo T2 mapping and T2* mapping for the measurement of transverse relaxation rate R2' (R2'=R2*-R2). We statistically analyzed the R2' and iron concentrations of bilateral hippocampus (HP), parietal cortex (PC), frontal white matter (FWM), putamen (PU), caudate nucleus (CN), thalamus (TH), red nucleus (RN), substantia nigra (SN), and dentate nucleus (DN) of the cerebellum for the correlation with the severity of dementia. Two-tailed t-test, Student-Newman-Keuls test (ANOVA) and linear correlation test were used for statistical analysis. In 30 healthy volunteers, the R2' values of bilateral SN, RN, PU, CN, globus pallidus (GP), TH, and FWM were measured. The correlation with the postmortem iron concentration in normal adults was analyzed in order to establish a formula on the relationship between regional R2' and brain iron concentration. The iron concentration of regions of interest (ROI) in AD patients and controls was calculated by this formula and its correlation with the severity of AD was analyzed. Regional R2' was positively correlated with regional brain iron concentration in normal adults (r=0.977, PIron concentrations in bilateral HP, PC, PU, CN, and DN of patients with AD were significantly higher than those of the controls (Piron concentrations, especially in parietal cortex and hippocampus at the early stage of AD, were positively correlated with the severity of patients' cognitive impairment (Piron concentrations were, the more severe the cognitive impairment was. Regional R2' and iron concentration in parietal cortex and

  17. Aluminum induces neurodegeneration and its toxicity arises from increased iron accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhihao; Du, Yumei; Xue, Hua; Wu, Yongsheng; Zhou, Bing

    2012-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of aluminum (Al) - the most abundant metal element on earth - has been known for years. However, the mechanism of Al-induced neurodegeneration and its relationship to Alzheimer's disease are still controversial. In particular, in vivo functional data are lacking. In a Drosophila model with chronic dietary Al overloading, general neurodegeneration and several behavioral changes were observed. Al-induced neurodegeneration is independent of β-amyloid or tau-associated toxicity, suggesting they act in different molecular pathways. Interestingly, Drosophila frataxin (dfh), which causes Friedreich's ataxia if mutated in humans, displayed an interacting effect with Al, suggesting Friedreich's ataxia patients might be more susceptible to Al toxicity. Al-treated flies accumulated large amount of iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and exhibited elevated SOD2 activity. Genetic and pharmacological efforts to reduce ROS or chelate excess Fe significantly mitigated Al toxicity. Our results indicate that Al toxicity is mediated through ROS production and iron accumulation and suggest a remedial route to reduce toxicity due to Al exposure.

  18. Potential effect of sedimentary iron-phosphorus accumulation on frequent algal bloom in the Pearl River Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG HuanXin; SUN XiangWei; CHEN JingFeng; CHEN JianFang; CHEN LiHong; CHEN XiangHua; QIN YaChao

    2007-01-01

    Based on laboratory culture of harmful alga on iron and phosphorus uptake,and the study of accumulation of iron-phosphorus in cores and release of iron and phosphorus from surficial sediments collected in the Pearl River Estuary,the reasons of the high frequency of phytoplankton bloom therein are discussed.The results show that Fe starvation can make algal growth rate slow down and the peak of cell number decrease.Fe and P contents in algal cell bear a significant correlation and the molar ratio of P:Fe is~356:1,suggesting that algal uptake of Fe and P is synergistic.Total Fe and total P in sediments are positively correlated and Fe-P is the main species of inorganic sedimentary P.Through continuous leaching with agitation.34.26%-80.21% of exchangeable P and 4.04%-22.52% of exchangeable Fe are released from surficial sediments,implying that the accumuiation of Fe-P in sediments is available for providing nutrients (P and essential Fe)for the demand of phytoplankton bloom.These factors might be responsible for a higher frequency of red tides than other marine regions.

  19. Influence of iron plaque on uptake and accumulation of Cd by rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings grown in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Houjun; Zhang, Junling; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Fusuo

    2008-05-15

    Iron plaque is ubiquitously formed on the root surfaces of rice. However, little is known about the role of iron plaque in Cd movement from soil to the plant aboveground parts. A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of iron plaque in Cd uptake and accumulation by rice seedlings in soil. Rice seedlings were pre-cultivated in solution culture for 16 days. Two seedlings were transplanted in a nylon bag containing no substrate but surrounded by soil amended with Fe and Cd combined at rates of 0, 1, or 2 g Fe kg(-1) and 0, 2.0, or 10 mg Cd kg(-1) soil. Fe was added to induce different amounts of iron plaque, and Cd to simulate Cd-polluted soils. Plants were grown for a further 43 days and then harvested. The length of the longest leaf and SPAD values of the newly mature leaves were measured during plant growth. Fe and Cd concentrations were determined in dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) soil extracts and in plant roots and shoots. Shoot and root dry weights were significantly affected by Fe supply level but not by added Cd. Root dry weight declined with increasing Fe supply but shoot dry weight decreased at 2 g Fe kg(-1) and increased at 1 g Fe kg(-1) (except at 2 mg Cd kg(-1)). The length of the longest leaf and SPAD values of the newly mature leaves were significantly affected by plant growth stage and added Fe and Cd. Fe tended to diminish the negative effect of Cd on these two parameters. Cd concentrations in DCB extracts increased with increasing Cd and Fe supply. In contrast, external Fe supply markedly reduced shoot and root Cd concentrations and there was generally no significant difference between the two Fe supply levels. Shoot and root Cd concentrations increased with increasing Cd addition. Root Cd concentrations were negatively correlated with root Fe concentrations. The proportion of Cd in DCB extracts was significantly lower than in roots or shoots. The results indicate that enhanced Fe uptake by plants can diminish the negative

  20. Temporal course of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and amyloid accumulation in the aging rat brain from three to thirty months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid accumulation in the brain parenchyma is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD and is seen in normal aging. Alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics are also associated with normal aging and AD. This study analyzed CSF volume, production and turnover rate in relation to amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ accumulation in the aging rat brain. Methods Aging Fischer 344/Brown-Norway hybrid rats at 3, 12, 20, and 30 months were studied. CSF production was measured by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion with blue dextran in artificial CSF; CSF volume by MRI; and CSF turnover rate by dividing the CSF production rate by the volume of the CSF space. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations in the cortex and hippocampus were measured by ELISA. Results There was a significant linear increase in total cranial CSF volume with age: 3-20 months (p p p p -1 to 12 months (11.30 day-1 and then a decrease to 20 months (10.23 day-1 and 30 months (6.62 day-1. Aβ40 and Aβ42 concentrations in brain increased from 3-30 months (p Conclusions In young rats there is no correlation between CSF turnover and Aβ brain concentrations. After 12 months, CSF turnover decreases as brain Aβ continues to accumulate. This decrease in CSF turnover rate may be one of several clearance pathway alterations that influence age-related accumulation of brain amyloid.

  1. Age-associated iron accumulation in bone: implications for postmenopausal osteoporosis and a new target for prevention and treatment by chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Kenner, Gerry H; Miller, Scott C

    2006-06-01

    Iron accumulation in tissues is believed to be a characteristic of aged humans and a risk factor for some chronic diseases. However, it is not known whether age-associated iron accumulation is part of the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis that affects approximately one out three women worldwide. Here, we confirmed that this accumulation of iron was associated with osteopenia in ovariectomized (OVX) rats (a model of peri- and postmenopausal osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency). To further investigate whether the increased iron level plays a causal role in the onset of bone loss, we treated OVX rats with an orally active and bone targeted chelator that prevented iron accumulation in their skeletal tissues. The results showed that this treatment mitigated the loss of bone mass and the deterioration of bone micro-architecture. We also found that one possible mechanism of the protective action of iron chelation was to significantly reduce bone resorption. Thus, these findings provide a novel target and a potentially useful therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and perhaps other age-related diseases.

  2. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with variably sized polyethylene glycol in murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas; Rydtoft, Louise Munk; Lokanathan, Arcot R; Hansen, Line; Østergaard, Leif; Kingshott, Peter; Howard, Kenneth A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-04-07

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found widespread applications in different areas including cell separation, drug delivery and as contrast agents. Due to water insolubility and stability issues, nanoparticles utilized for biological applications require coatings such as the commonly employed polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333-20,000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size, lower surface charge, longer circulation half-life, and lower uptake in macrophage cells when the particles were coated with high molecular weight (M(w)) PEG molecules. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, we show coating-dependent in vivo uptake in murine tumors with an optimal coating M(w) of 10,000 Da.

  3. Differences on Brain Connectivity in Adulthood Are Present in Subjects with Iron Deficiency Anemia in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarin, Cecilia; Karunakaran, Keerthana Deepti; Reyes, Sussanne; Morales, Cristian; Lozoff, Betsy; Peirano, Patricio; Biswal, Bharat

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency continues to be the most prevalent micronutrient deficit worldwide. Since iron is involved in several processes including myelination, dopamine neurotransmission and neuronal metabolism, the presence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy relates to long-lasting neurofunctional effects. There is scarce data regarding whether these effects would extend to former iron deficient anemic human adults. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel technique to explore patterns of functional connectivity. Default Mode Network (DMN), one of the resting state networks, is deeply involved in memory, social cognition and self-referential processes. The four core regions consistently identified in the DMN are the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex and left and right inferior parietal cortex. Therefore to investigate the DMN in former iron deficient anemic adults is a particularly useful approach to elucidate de long term effects on functional brain. We conducted this research to explore the connection between IDA in infancy and altered patterns of resting state brain functional networks in young adults. Resting-state fMRI studies were performed to 31 participants that belong to a follow-up study since infancy. Of them, 14 participants were former iron deficient anemic in infancy and 17 were controls, with mean age of 21.5 years (±1.5) and 54.8% were males. Resting-state fMRI protocol was used and the data was analyzed using the seed based connectivity statistical analysis to assess the DMN. We found that compared to controls, former iron deficient anemic subjects showed posterior DMN decreased connectivity to the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), whereas they exhibited increased anterior DMN connectivity to the right PCC. Differences between groups were also apparent in the left medial frontal gyrus, with former iron deficient anemic participants having increased connectivity with areas included

  4. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin mimetic, crosses the blood-brain barrier and impairs iron-dependent hippocampal neuron dendrite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, T W; Duck, K A; Michalopoulos, G C; Chen, M J; Liu, Z-J; Connor, J R; Lanier, L M; Sola-Visner, M C; Georgieff, M K

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Potential neurodevelopmental side effects of thrombopoietin mimetics need to be considered. The effects of eltrombopag (ELT) on neuronal iron status and dendrite development were assessed. ELT crosses the blood-brain barrier and causes iron deficiency in developing neurons. ELT blunts dendrite maturation, indicating a need for more safety studies before neonatal use.

  5. Do radial oxygen loss and external aeration affect iron plaque formation and arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Ye, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Wu, Shengchun; Deng, Dan; Zhu, Yongguan; Wong, Minghung

    2012-05-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of radial oxygen loss (ROL) and external aeration on iron (Fe) plaque formation, and arsenic (As) accumulation and speciation in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The data showed that there were significant correlations between ROL and Fe concentrations in Fe plaque produced on different genotypes of rice. There were also significant differences in the amounts of Fe plaque formed between different genotypes in different positions of roots and under different aeration conditions (aerated, normal, and stagnant treatments). In aerated treatments, rice tended to have a higher Fe plaque formation than in a stagnant solution, with the greatest formation at the root tip decreasing with increasing distances away, in accordance with a trend of spatial ROL. Genotypes with higher rates of ROL induced higher degrees of Fe plaque formation. Plaques sequestered As on rice roots, with arsenate almost double that with arsenite, leading to decreased As accumulation in both roots and shoots. The major As species detected in roots and shoots was arsenite, ranging from 34 to 78% of the total As in the different treatments and genotypes. These results contribute to our understanding of genotypic differences in As uptake by rice and the mechanisms causing rice genotypes with higher ROL to show lower overall As accumulation.

  6. Exposure of aconitase to smoking-related oxidants results in iron loss and increased iron response protein-1 activity: potential mechanisms for iron accumulation in human arterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talib, Jihan; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN−, a preferred MPO...

  7. Iron and Mechanisms of Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A. Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of transition metals (e.g., copper, zinc, and iron and the dysregulation of their metabolism are a hallmark in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. This paper will be focused on the mechanism of neurotoxicity mediated by iron. This metal progressively accumulates in the brain both during normal aging and neurodegenerative processes. High iron concentrations in the brain have been consistently observed in Alzheimer's (AD and Parkinson's (PD diseases. In this connection, metalloneurobiology has become extremely important in establishing the role of iron in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed several protective mechanisms against oxidative stress, among them, the activation of cellular signaling pathways. The final response will depend on the identity, intensity, and persistence of the oxidative insult. The characterization of the mechanisms mediating the effects of iron-induced increase in neuronal dysfunction and death is central to understanding the pathology of a number of neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Age-associated changes of brain copper, iron, and zinc in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Stewart F; Nasaruddin, Muhammad Bin; Carey, Manus; Holscher, Christian; McGuinness, Bernadette; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth; Passmore, Peter; Elliott, Christopher T; Meharg, Andrew A; Green, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Disease-, age-, and gender-associated changes in brain copper, iron, and zinc were assessed in postmortem neocortical tissue (Brodmann area 7) from patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 14), severe AD (n = 28), dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 15), and normal age-matched control subjects (n = 26). Copper was lower (20%; p iron higher (10-16%; p iron, suggesting gradual age-associated decline of these metals in healthy non-cognitively impaired individuals. Zinc was unaffected in any disease pathologies and no age-associated changes were apparent. Age-associated changes in brain elements warrant further investigation.

  9. Hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of neurofilament proteins in Alzheimer brain and the possible mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    SMI34 were increased, and the elevated p-NF-H/M tended to be condensed in the proximal end of the cell processes after treated with 15 nmol/L OA. Further accumulation of p-NF-H/M to the cell plasma and parikarya was seen after increasing the concentration of OA to 30 nmol/L. On the other hand, the majority of np-NF-H/M bound to SMI32 and SMI33 were seen in the cell body although it was also detected in cell processes before OA treatment. The immunoreaction of np-NF-H/M was significantly decreased in the cell body and it became to be condensed in the proximal end of the cell processes after treatment of the cell by 15 nmol/L of OA. Further decreasing of the staining was observed when the concentration of OA was raised to 30 nmol/L. The data demonstrated that an Alzheimer-like inhibition of PP-2A and PP-1 induced hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of NF proteins as seen in AD brain, indicating that abnormality of NF might be involved in AD neurofibrillary degeneration. As SY5Y contains negligible amount of tau protein which was reported to cross-react with p-NF subunits, it might be served as a proper cell model for NF study.

  10. GENOTYPE SPECIFICITY OF WINTER WHEAT (TRITICUM AESTIVUM L. IN CADMIUM, ZINC AND IRON ACCUMULATION IN GRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrijana Eđed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the uptake, translocation, distribution and accumulation of Cd, Zn and Fe and the interaction of these elements in winter wheat. The objectives were: (1 to characterise specificity among winter wheat genotypes in terms of accumulation of Cd, Zn and Fe in various organs and identify genotypes combining low accumulation of Cd with high accumulation of Zn and/or Fe, (2 to determine genetic specificity of winter wheat genotypes in terms of translocation of Cd, Zn and Fe from the vegetative parts to the grain, and (3 elucidate an effect of soil cadmium contamination on the distribution and accumulation of Cd, Zn and Fe in various organs of wheat. In the 2007/2008 vegetation season, 52 winter wheat varieties (34 Croatian, 7 Austrian, 5 Hungarian, 3 French and one variety of Russian, Italian and German descent were investigated. The pots were arranged, according to a completely randomized design with two levels of soil Cd contamination (0 and 20 mg kg-1 soil in four replicates. In the vegetation season of 2008/2009 the experiment was set up to a completely randomized block design with 10 varieties of wheat and three levels of soil Cd contamination (0, 2 and 5 mg kg-1 soil in four replicates. The concentration of Cd, Zn and Fe in the solution of plant samples was determined by ICP-OES. The concentration of Cd, Zn and Fe was determined at the flowering stage in the root, stem,leaves, flag leaf and spike and in a full maturity in the straw, leaves, glumes and grain. Collected data were statistically analyzed with SAS software 9.1.3. Analysis of variance identified a statistically significant difference in the concentrations of Cd, Zn and Fe in vegetative parts and grain between the tested wheat varieties at all levels of soil Cd contamination. It was also found that the soil Cd contamination had a significant effect on the accumulation of Cd in grain while the accumulation of Zn and Fe in the grain hasn’t been influenced by soil Cd

  11. Mini-review: The Morphology, Mineralogy and Microbiology of Accumulated Iron Corrosion Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-11

    Arlington, VA 22203-1995 ONR Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. Despite obvious differences in morphology, substratum chemistry ...OH, USA (Received 23 June 2014; accepted 30 July 2014) Despite obvious differences in morphology, substratum chemistry and the electrolyte in which...rusticles. They further suggested that concentrations of accumulated metals could be used as a diagnostic tool for forensic analysis of ship cargo. For

  12. Genetic control and transgressive segregation of zinc, iron, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and sodium accumulation in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Santos, C A; Boiteux, L S

    2015-01-16

    Cowpea crop, through combining a range of essential minerals with high quality proteins, plays an important role in providing nutritional security to human population living in semi-arid regions. Studies on genetics of biofortification with essential minerals are still quite scarce, and the major objective of the present study was to provide genetic information on development of cowpea cultivars with high seed mineral contents. Genetic parameters heritability and minimum number of genes were estimated for seed accumulation of zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and sodium (Na). Generation mean and variance analyses were conducted using contrasting parental lines, F₁, F₂, and backcross populations derived from IT97K-1042-3 x BRS Tapaihum and IT97K-1042-3 x Canapu crosses. High narrow-sense heritability (h²) values were found for accumulation of Fe (65-86%), P (74-77%), and K (77-88%), whereas moderate h(2) values were observed for accumulation of Ca (41-56%), Zn (51-83%), and Na (50-55%) in seeds. Significant additive genetic effects as well as parental mean effects were detected in both crosses for all minerals, whereas epistasis was important genetic component in Zn content. The minimum number of genes controlling the accumulation of minerals ranged from two (K) to 11 (P). Transgressive segregation was observed in F2 populations of both crosses for all minerals analyzed. The results suggest that, although under either oligogenic or polygenic control, the seed content of these six minerals in cowpea can be improved via standard breeding methods largely used for self-pollinated crops.

  13. Magnesium and iron deficiencies alter Cd accumulation in Salix viminalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borišev, M; Pajević, S; Nikolić, N; Orlović, S; Župunski, M; Pilipović, A; Kebert, M

    2016-01-01

    Evidence exists that Cd and certain nutrient elements, such as Fe and Mg, could share similar mechanisms of plant uptake and accumulation. Here we report that Mg and Fe deficiency in mature plants of Salix viminalis, grown in hydroponic solutions containing 5 µg ml(-1) of Cd, caused a significant increase in Cd accumulation in roots, stems and leaves. Cd (µg g(-1) dry weight) was determined following three treatments: 1) Cd treatment in complete nutrient solution; 2) Cd treatment with Fe deficiency; and 3) Cd treatment with Mg deficiency, yielding, respectively: in young leaves (65.3, 76.1, and 92.2), mature leaves (51.5 to 76.3 and 87.1), upper stems (80.6, 116.8, and 130.6) lower stems (67.2, 119, and 102.3), roots (377.1, 744.8, and 442,5). Our results suggest that Cd utilizes the same uptake and transport pathways as Mg and Fe. Evidence exists that Mg and Fe uptake and translocation could be further facilitated by plants as an adaptive response to deficiency of these elements. Such physiological reaction could additionally stimulate Cd accumulation. Although Cd uptake was mostly confined in roots, high Cd content in aerial plant parts (51.5-130.6 µg g(-1)) indicates that the analysed Salix viminalis genotype is suitable for phytoextraction.

  14. Fish eyes and brain as primary targets for mercury accumulation - a new insight on environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia; Raimundo, Joana; Araújo, Olinda; Canário, João; Almeida, Armando; Pacheco, Mário

    2014-10-01

    Fish eyes and brain are highly susceptible to environmental Hg exposure but this issue is still scarcely investigated, mainly regarding methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation. Yet, Hg levels in fish lens have not been previously examined under field conditions. Total Hg (tHg), MeHg and inorganic Hg (iHg) levels were assessed in the brain, eye wall and lens of the golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) from an Hg contaminated area, both in winter and summer, together with water and sediment levels. Sampling was performed at Aveiro lagoon (Portugal) where a confined area (LAR) is severely contaminated by Hg. Fish brain, eye wall and lens accumulated higher levels of tHg, MeHg and iHg at LAR than the reference site, reflecting faithfully environmental spatial differences. The brain and eye wall responded also to the winter-summer changes found in water and sediment, accumulating higher levels of MeHg (and tHg) in winter. Contrarily, lens was unable to reflect seasonal changes, probably due to its composition and structural stability over time. The three neurosensory structures accumulated preferentially MeHg than iHg (MeHg was higher than 77% of tHg). Lens exhibited a higher retention capacity of MeHg (mean around 1 μg g(-1) at LAR), accumulating higher levels than the other two tissues. Interestingly, MeHg and iHg levels were significantly correlated for the brain and eye wall but poorly associated within the two analysed eye components. The high levels of MeHg found in the brain, eye wall and lens could compromise their functions and this needs further research.

  15. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Modified with Tween 80 Pass through the Intact Blood-Brain Barrier in Rats under Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yinping; Zhang, Baolin; Xie, Songbo; Yang, Boning; Xu, Qin; Tan, Jie

    2016-05-11

    The methods for the delivery of theranostic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are highly required. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with PEG (poly(ethylene glycol)), PEI (poly(ethylene imine)), and Tween 80 (polysorbate 80) (Tween-SPIONs) were prepared. We demonstrate the effective passage of tail-vein-injected Tween-SPIONs across normal BBB in rats under an external magnetic field (EMF). The quantitative analyses show significant accumulation of SPIONs in the cortex near the magnet, with progressively lower accumulation in brain tissues far from the magnet. A transmission electron microscopy picture of an ultrathin section of the rat brain displays Tween-SPIONs crossing the BBB. The comparative study confirms that both the Tween-80 modification and EMF play crucial roles in the effective passage of SPIONs across the intact BBB. However, the magnetic force alone cannot drag the SPIONs coated with PEI/PEG polymers through the BBB. The results indicate the Tween-SPIONs cross the BBB via an active penetration facilitated by EMF. This work is encouraging for further study on the delivery of drug or diagnostic agents into the parenchyma of the brain for dealing with neurological disorders by using Tween-SPIONs carriers under EMF.

  16. Study on accumulation ability of two lichen species Hypogymnia physodes and Usnea hirta at iron-steel factory site, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansaran-Duman, Demet

    2011-11-01

    The use of biological responses to contaminant exposure by lichen species has become a useful tool in environmental quality evaluation and risk assesment. Lichen Hypogymnia physodes and Usnea hirta samples were collected in 2006 from 10 sites around iron-steel factory in Karabük, Turkey. H. physodes and U. hirta samples from Yenice forest were used as a control. The aim of present study was to evaluate the bioaccumulation ability and to determine the environmental impact of an iron-steel factory in Karabük. Seven elements (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cr and Cd) were analysed by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The analytical results were compared statistically by using SPSS. As expected, the study area (Yenice forest, Karabük) chosen as control site (site no 11) showed significantly lower impact in comparison to other site (site no 1-10). Compared with the two lichen species, H. physodes showed highest metal accumulating capacity while U. hirta showed lowest. These criteria attested the best suitability for H. physodes, followed by U. hirta.

  17. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  18. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Anemia, Depletes Serum Iron Storage, and Alters Local Iron-Related and Adult Brain Gene Expression in Male INS-GAS Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Monika; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Wang, Timothy C; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Cunningham, Catriona; Ennis, Kathleen; Georgieff, Michael; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) affects > 500 million people worldwide, and is linked to impaired cognitive development and function in children. Helicobacter pylori, a class 1 carcinogen, infects about half of the world's population, thus creating a high likelihood of overlapping risk. This study determined the effect of H. pylori infection on iron homeostasis in INS-GAS mice. Two replicates of INS-GAS/FVB male mice (n = 9-12/group) were dosed with H. pylori (Hp) strain SS1 or sham dosed at 6-9 weeks of age, and were necropsied at 27-29 weeks of age. Hematologic and serum iron parameters were evaluated, as was gene expression in gastric and brain tissues. Serum ferritin was lower in Hp SS1-infected mice than uninfected mice (p in mice infected with Hp SS1 compared to sham-dosed controls (pin gastric tissue of Hp SS1-infected mice (pin myelination (myelin basic protein (Mbp) and proteolipid protein 2 (Plp2)) was downregulated in infected mice (p = 0.001 and p = 0.02). Expression of synaptic plasticity markers (brain derived neurotrophic factor 3 (Bdnf3), Psd95 (a membrane associated guanylate kinase), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1)) was also downregulated in Hp SS1-infected mice (p = 0.09, p = 0.04, p = 0.02 respectively). Infection of male INS-GAS mice with Hp SS1, without concurrent dietary iron deficiency, depleted serum ferritin, deregulated gastric and hepatic expression of iron regulatory genes, and altered iron-dependent neural processes. The use of Hp SS1-infected INS-GAS mice will be an appropriate animal model for further study of the effects of concurrent H. pylori infection and anemia on iron homeostasis and adult iron-dependent brain gene expression.

  19. Enhanced levels of nicotianamine promote iron accumulation and tolerance to calcareous soil in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozoye, Tomoko; Kim, Suyoen; Kakei, Yusuke; Takahashi, Michiko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient in both plants and humans. Fe deficiency on calcareous soil with low Fe availability is a major agricultural problem. Nicotianamine (NA) is one of the Fe chelator in plants, which is involved in metal translocation into seeds, and serves as an antihypertensive substance in humans. In this study, soybean plants overexpressing the barley NA synthase 1 (HvNAS1) gene driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter were produced using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transgenic soybean showed no growth defect and grew normally. The NA content of transgenic soybean seeds was up to four-fold greater than that of non-transgenic (NT) soybean seeds. The level of HvNAS1 expression was positively correlated with the amount of NA, and a high concentration of NA was maintained in the seeds in succeeding generations. The Fe concentration was approximately two-fold greater in transgenic soybean seeds than in NT soybean seeds. Furthermore, the transgenic soybeans showed tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soil. Our results suggested that increasing the NA content in soybean seeds by the overexpression of HvNAS1 offers potential benefits for both human health and agricultural productivity.

  20. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Yorka; Carrasco, Carlos M; Campos, Joaquín D; Aguirre, Pabla; Núñez, Marco T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences-mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage-generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation-by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways-is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle.

  1. Demystifying "free will": the role of contextual information and evidence accumulation for predictive brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Stefan; Murawski, Carsten; Soon, Chun Siong; Bode, Philipp; Stahl, Jutta; Smith, Philip L

    2014-11-01

    Novel multivariate pattern classification analyses have enabled the prediction of decision outcomes from brain activity prior to decision-makers' reported awareness. These findings are often discussed in relation to the philosophical concept of "free will". We argue that these studies demonstrate the role of unconscious processes in simple free choices, but they do not inform the philosophical debate. Moreover, these findings are difficult to relate to cognitive decision-making models, due to misleading assumptions about random choices. We review evidence suggesting that sequential-sampling models, which assume accumulation of evidence towards a decision threshold, can also be applied to free decisions. If external evidence is eliminated by the task instructions, decision-makers might use alternative, subtle contextual information as evidence, such as their choice history, that is not consciously monitored and usually concealed by the experimental design. We conclude that the investigation of neural activity patterns associated with free decisions should aim to investigate how decisions are jointly a function of internal and external contexts, rather than to resolve the philosophical "free will" debate.

  2. Exogenous Melatonin Improves Plant Iron Deficiency Tolerance via Increased Accumulation of Polyamine-Mediated Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has recently been demonstrated to play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, development, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, the possible involvement of melatonin in Fe deficiency responses and the underlying mechanisms remained elusive in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, Fe deficiency quickly induced melatonin synthesis in Arabidopsis plants. Exogenous melatonin significantly increased the soluble Fe content of shoots and roots, and decreased the levels of root cell wall Fe bound to pectin and hemicellulose, thus alleviating Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, melatonin treatments induced a significant increase of nitric oxide (NO accumulation in roots of Fe-deficient plants, but not in those of polyamine-deficient (adc2-1 and d-arginine-treated plants. Moreover, the melatonin-alleviated leaf chlorosis was blocked in the polyamine- and NO-deficient (nia1nia2noa1 and c-PTIO-treated plants, and the melatonin-induced Fe remobilization was largely inhibited. In addition, the expression of some Fe acquisition-related genes, including FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 were significantly up-regulated by melatonin treatments, whereas the enhanced expression of these genes was obviously suppressed in the polyamine- and NO-deficient plants. Collectively, our results provide evidence to support the view that melatonin can increase the tolerance of plants to Fe deficiency in a process dependent on the polyamine-induced NO production under Fe-deficient conditions.

  3. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Anemia, Depletes Serum Iron Storage, and Alters Local Iron-Related and Adult Brain Gene Expression in Male INS-GAS Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Burns

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA affects > 500 million people worldwide, and is linked to impaired cognitive development and function in children. Helicobacter pylori, a class 1 carcinogen, infects about half of the world's population, thus creating a high likelihood of overlapping risk. This study determined the effect of H. pylori infection on iron homeostasis in INS-GAS mice. Two replicates of INS-GAS/FVB male mice (n = 9-12/group were dosed with H. pylori (Hp strain SS1 or sham dosed at 6-9 weeks of age, and were necropsied at 27-29 weeks of age. Hematologic and serum iron parameters were evaluated, as was gene expression in gastric and brain tissues. Serum ferritin was lower in Hp SS1-infected mice than uninfected mice (p < 0.0001. Infected mice had a lower red blood cell count (p<0.0001, hematocrit (p < 0.001, and hemoglobin concentration (p <0.0001 than uninfected mice. Relative expression of gastric hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (Hamp was downregulated in mice infected with Hp SS1 compared to sham-dosed controls (p<0.001. Expression of bone morphogenic protein 4 (Bmp4, a growth factor upstream of hepcidin, was downregulated in gastric tissue of Hp SS1-infected mice (p<0.001. Hp SS1-infected mice had downregulated brain expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (Th (p = 0.02. Expression of iron-responsive genes involved in myelination (myelin basic protein (Mbp and proteolipid protein 2 (Plp2 was downregulated in infected mice (p = 0.001 and p = 0.02. Expression of synaptic plasticity markers (brain derived neurotrophic factor 3 (Bdnf3, Psd95 (a membrane associated guanylate kinase, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1 was also downregulated in Hp SS1-infected mice (p = 0.09, p = 0.04, p = 0.02 respectively. Infection of male INS-GAS mice with Hp SS1, without concurrent dietary iron deficiency, depleted serum ferritin, deregulated gastric and hepatic expression of iron regulatory genes, and altered iron-dependent neural processes. The use of Hp SS

  4. Overexpression of ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 Enhances Iron and Zinc Accumulation in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzhen Li

    Full Text Available Iron and zinc are important micronutrients for both the growth and nutrient availability of crop plants, and their absorption is tightly controlled by a metal uptake system. Zinc-regulated transporters, iron-regulated transporter-like proteins (ZIP, is considered an essential metal transporter for the acquisition of Fe and Zn in graminaceous plants. Several ZIPs have been identified in maize, although their physiological function remains unclear. In this report, ZmIRT1 was shown to be specifically expressed in silk and embryo, whereas ZmZIP3 was a leaf-specific gene. Both ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 were shown to be localized to the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ZmIRT1 or ZmZIP3 were generated, and the metal contents in various tissues of transgenic and wild-type plants were examined based on ICP-OES and Zinpyr-1 staining. The Fe and Zn concentration increased in roots and seeds of ZmIRT1-overexpressing plants, while the Fe content in shoots decreased. Overexpressing ZmZIP3 enhanced Zn accumulation in the roots of transgenic plants, while that in shoots was repressed. In addition, the transgenic plants showed altered tolerance to various Fe and Zn conditions compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, the genes associated with metal uptake were stimulated in ZmIRT1 transgenic plants, while those involved in intra- and inter- cellular translocation were suppressed. In conclusion, ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 are functional metal transporters with different ion selectivities. Ectopic overexpression of ZmIRT1 may stimulate endogenous Fe uptake mechanisms, which may facilitate metal uptake and homeostasis. Our results increase our understanding of the functions of ZIP family transporters in maize.

  5. Comparison of Histological Techniques to Visualize Iron in Paraffin-embedded Brain Tissue of Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    van Duijn, Sara; Rob J A Nabuurs; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Natté, Remco

    2013-01-01

    Better knowledge of the distribution of iron in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients may facilitate the development of an in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) marker for AD and may cast light on the role of this potentially toxic molecule in the pathogenesis of AD. Several histological iron staining techniques have been used in the past but they have not been systematically tested for sensitivity and specificity. This article compares three histochemical techniques and ferritin immunohi...

  6. Landslide-induced iron mobilisation shapes benthic accumulation of nutrients, trace metals and REE fractionation in an oligotrophic alpine stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Scott G.; Rose, Andrew L.; Burton, Edward D.; Webster-Brown, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Large alpine landslides that entrain substantial organic material below the water table and create suspended floodplains may have long-term consequences for the mobilisation of redox sensitive elements, such as Fe, into streamwaters. In turn, the cycling of iron in aquatic systems can influence the fate of nutrients, alter primary productivity, enhance accumulation of trace metals and induce fractionation of rare earth elements (REE). In this study we examine a reach of a pristine oligotrophic alpine stream bracketing a 30 year-old landslide and explore the consequences of landslide-induced Fe mobilisation for aqueous geochemistry and the composition of benthic stream cobble biofilm. Elevated Fe2+ and Mn in landslide zone stream waters reflect inputs of circumneutral groundwater from the landslide debris-zone floodplain. Geochemical characteristics are consistent with reductive dissolution being a primary mechanism of Fe2+ and Mn mobilisation. Stream cobble biofilm in the landslide zone is significantly (P extractable; Fe(III)Ab). While the landslide zone accounts for less than ∼9% of the total stream length, we estimate it is responsible for approximately 60-80% of the stream's benthic biofilm load of poorly crystalline Fe(III) and Mn. Biofilm Fe(III) precipitates are comprised mainly of ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite and an organic-Fe species, while precipitate samples collected proximal to hyporheic seeps contain abundant sheath structures characteristic of the neutrophilic Fe(II)-oxidising bacteria Leptothrix spp. Stream-cobble Fe(III)-rich biofilm is accumulating PO43- (∼3-30 times background) and behaving as a preferential substrate for photosynthetic periphyton, with benthic PO43-, chlorophyll a, organic carbonHCl and total N all significantly positively correlated with Fe(III)Ab and significantly elevated within the landslide zone (P transformed basis. Stream cobble biofilm also exhibits distinct REE fractionation along the flow path, with light REE (La

  7. Chemical speciation of arsenic-accumulating mineral in a sedimentary iron deposit by synchrotron radiation multiple X-ray analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoshi; Terada, Yasuko; Kato, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Izumi

    2008-10-01

    The comprehensive characterization of As(V)-bearing iron minerals from the Gunma iron deposit, which were probably formed by biomineralization, was carried out by utilizing multiple synchrotron radiation (SR)-based analytical techniques at BL37XU at SPring-8. SR microbeam X-ray fluorescence (SR-mu-XRF) imaging showed a high level of arsenic accumulation in the iron ore as dots of ca. 20 microm. Based on SEM observations and SR X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRD) analysis, it was found that arsenic is selectively accumulated in strengite (FePO4 x 2H2O) with a concentric morphology, which may be produced by a biologically induced process. Furthermore, the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis showed that arsenic in strengite exists in the arsenate (AsO4(3-)) form and is coordinated by four oxygen atoms at 1.68 angstroms. The results suggest that strengite accumulates arsenic by isomorphous substitution of AsO4(3-) for PO4(3-) to form a partial solid-solution of strengite and scorodite (FeAsO4 x 2H2O). The specific correlation between the distribution of As and biominerals indicates that microorganisms seems to play an important role in the mineralization of strengite in combination with an arsenic-accumulating process.

  8. Studies on accumulation of (14C)-mescaline in brain homogenates: effects of psychotropic and other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N S; Gulati, O D

    1975-01-01

    Incubation of rat brain homogenates or 14,500 g pellet isolated from the homogenate with (14C)-mescaline was associated with accumulation of (14C)-mescaline in the pellet. 1.33 mumol/ml of chlorpromazine, trifluoperazine, fluphenazine, imipramine, desmethylimipramine, nortriptyline and amitriptyline inhibited the accumulation of mescaline. Lower concentrations (0.133-0.44 mumol/ml) of the psychotropic drugs were less effective. The tricyclic antidepressants were less potent than the tranquilizers. Although the trimethoxyphenylacetic acid (TMPA) levels of the pellet were also reduced by the psychotropic drugs, the TMPA:mescaline ratios were unchanged indicating that the drugs had no effect on the metabolism of mescaline. The inhibition of accumulation of mescaline by the high concentrations of tranquilizers may divert more of the hallucinogen to the receptor site. Thus, an explanation for the reported worsening of clinical syndrome of hallucinogenic poisoning by tranquilizers is provided.

  9. Cellular distribution of ferric iron, ferritin, transferrin and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) in substantia nigra and basal ganglia of normal and β2-microglobulin deficient mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moos, Torben; Trinder, D.; Morgan, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus......beta-2-microglobulin, blood-brain barrier, gene knock out, iron, neurodegenerative disorders, oxidative damage, subthalamic nucleus...

  10. Tracking Iron in Multiple Sclerosis: A Combined Imaging and Histopathological Study at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, Francesca; Hametner, Simon; Yao, Bing; van Gelderen, Peter; Merkle, Hellmut; Cantor, Fredric K.; Lassmann, Hans; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous authors have shown that the transverse relaxivity R[subscript 2][superscript *] and frequency shifts that characterize gradient echo signal decay in magnetic resonance imaging are closely associated with the distribution of iron and myelin in the brain's white matter. In multiple sclerosis, iron accumulation in brain tissue may reflect a…

  11. Ammonium accumulation and cell death in a rat 3D brain cell model of glutaric aciduria type I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris Jafari

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type I (glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism that usually manifests in infancy by an acute encephalopathic crisis and often results in permanent motor handicap. Biochemical hallmarks of this disease are elevated levels of glutarate and 3-hydroxyglutarate in blood and urine. The neuropathology of this disease is still poorly understood, as low lysine diet and carnitine supplementation do not always prevent brain damage, even in early-treated patients. We used a 3D in vitro model of rat organotypic brain cell cultures in aggregates to mimic glutaric aciduria type I by repeated administration of 1 mM glutarate or 3-hydroxyglutarate at two time points representing different developmental stages. Both metabolites were deleterious for the developing brain cells, with 3-hydroxyglutarate being the most toxic metabolite in our model. Astrocytes were the cells most strongly affected by metabolite exposure. In culture medium, we observed an up to 11-fold increase of ammonium in the culture medium with a concomitant decrease of glutamine. We further observed an increase in lactate and a concomitant decrease in glucose. Exposure to 3-hydroxyglutarate led to a significantly increased cell death rate. Thus, we propose a three step model for brain damage in glutaric aciduria type I: (i 3-OHGA causes the death of astrocytes, (ii deficiency of the astrocytic enzyme glutamine synthetase leads to intracerebral ammonium accumulation, and (iii high ammonium triggers secondary death of other brain cells. These unexpected findings need to be further investigated and verified in vivo. They suggest that intracerebral ammonium accumulation might be an important target for the development of more effective treatment strategies to prevent brain damage in patients with glutaric aciduria type I.

  12. Comparison on cellular mechanisms of iron and cadmium accumulation in rice: prospects for cultivating Fe-rich but Cd-free rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Chang, Jiadong; Chen, Ruijie; Li, Hubo; Lu, Hongfei; Tao, Longxing; Xiong, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is essential for rice growth and humans consuming as their staple food but is often deficient because of insoluble Fe(III) in soil for rice growth and limited assimilation for human bodies, while cadmium (Cd) is non-essential and toxic for rice growth and humans if accumulating at high levels. Over-accumulated Cd can cause damage to human bodies. Selecting and breeding Fe-rich but Cd-free rice cultivars are ambitious, challenging and meaningful tasks for researchers. Although evidences show that the mechanisms of Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice are common to some extent as a result of similar entry routes within rice, an increasing number of researchers have discovered distinct mechanisms between Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice. This comprehensive review systematically elaborates and compares cellular mechanisms of Fe/Cd uptake and accumulation in rice, respectively. Mechanisms for maintaining Fe homeostasis and Cd detoxicification are also elucidated. Then, effects of different fertilizer management on Fe/Cd accumulation in rice are discussed. Finally, this review enumerates various approaches for reducing grain Cd accumulation and enhancing Fe content in rice. In summary, understanding of discrepant cellular mechanisms of Fe/Cd accumulation in rice provides guidance for cultivating Fe-fortified rice and has paved the way to develop rice that are tolerant to Cd stress, aiming at breeding Fe-rich but Cd-free rice.

  13. Mercury accumulation and its distribution to metallothionein in mouse brain after sub-chronic pulse exposure to mercury vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasutake, A. [Biochemistry Section, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata, Kumamoto 867-0008 (Japan); Sawada, M.; Shimada, A. [Department of Veterinary Pathology, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyamacho, Minami, Tottori 680-0945 (Japan); Satoh, M. [Department of Hygienics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 5-6-1 Mitahora-higashi, Gifu 502-8585 (Japan); Tohyama, C. [Environmental Health Sciences Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    Previously we found that exposure to mercury vapor effectively induced metallothionein (MT) biosynthesis in rat brain. Although the induction of not only MT-I/II but also MT-III was evident, the induction rate of the latter was much lower than that of the former. The brain of an MT-null mouse lacks MT-I/II, but has MT-III. Here we examined the effects of sub-chronic pulse exposure to mercury vapor on the brain MT in MT-null mice and their wild type controls. MT-null and wild type mice were preliminarily exposed to mercury vapor for 2 weeks at 0.1 mg Hg/m{sup 3} for 1 h/day for 3 days a week, and then exposed for 11 weeks at 4.1 mg Hg/m{sup 3} for 30 min/day for 3 days a week. This exposure caused no toxic signs such as abnormal behavior or loss of body weight gain in the mice of either strain throughout the experimental period. Twenty-four hours after the termination of the exposure, mice were sacrificed and brain samples were subjected to mercury analysis, MT assay, and pathological examination. The MT-null mice showed lower accumulation of mercury in the brain than the wild type mice. Mercury exposure resulted in a 70% increase of brain MT in the wild type mice, which was mostly accounted for by the increase in MT-I/II. On the other hand, the brain MT in the MT-null mice increased by 19%, suggesting less reactivity of the MT-III gene to mercury vapor. Although histochemical examination revealed silver-mercury grains in the cytoplasm of nerve cells and glial cells throughout the brains of both strains, no significant difference was observed between the two strains. (orig.)

  14. Reducing iron in the brain: a novel pharmacologic mechanism of huperzine A in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Tian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; He, Xuan; Gong, Qi; Wu, Ka-Chun; Jiang, Li-Rong; Lu, Li-Na; Zhu, Zhou-Jing; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2014-05-01

    Huperzine A (HupA), a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase derived from a plant, is a licensed anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug in China and a nutraceutical in the United States. In addition to acting as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, HupA possesses neuroprotective properties. However, the relevant mechanism is unknown. Here, we showed that the neuroprotective effect of HupA was derived from a novel action on brain iron regulation. HupA treatment reduced insoluble and soluble beta amyloid levels, ameliorated amyloid plaques formation, and hyperphosphorylated tau in the cortex and hippocampus of APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic AD mice. Also, HupA decreased beta amyloid oligomers and amyloid precursor protein levels, and increased A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease Domain 10 (ADAM10) expression in these treated AD mice. However, these beneficial effects of HupA were largely abolished by feeding the animals with a high iron diet. In parallel, we found that HupA decreased iron content in the brain and demonstrated that HupA also has a role to reduce the expression of transferrin-receptor 1 as well as the transferrin-bound iron uptake in cultured neurons. The findings implied that reducing iron in the brain is a novel mechanism of HupA in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Relationship between brain accumulation of manganese and aberration of hippocampal adult neurogenesis after oral exposure to manganese chloride in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchihara, Yoh; Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kato, Mizuho; Wang, Liyun; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-05-04

    We previously found persistent aberration of hippocampal adult neurogenesis, along with brain manganese (Mn) accumulation, in mouse offspring after developmental exposure to 800-ppm dietary Mn. Reduction of parvalbumin (Pvalb)(+) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus along with promoter region hypermethylation are thought to be responsible for this aberrant neurogenesis. The present study was conducted to examine the relationship between the induction of aberrant neurogenesis and brain Mn accumulation after oral Mn exposure as well as the responsible mechanism in young adult animals. We used two groups of mice with 28- or 56-day exposure periods to oral MnCl2·xH2O at 800 ppm as Mn, a dose sufficient to lead to aberrant neurogenesis after developmental exposure. A third group of mice received intravenous injections of Mn at 5-mg/kg body weight once weekly for 28 days. The 28-day oral Mn exposure did not cause aberrations in neurogenesis. In contrast, 56-day oral exposure caused aberrations in neurogenesis suggestive of reductions in type 2b and type 3 progenitor cells and immature granule cells in the dentate subgranular zone. Brain Mn accumulation in 56-day exposed cases, as well as in directly Mn-injected cases occurred in parallel with reduction of Pvalb(+) GABAergic interneurons in the dentate hilus, suggesting that this may be responsible for aberrant neurogenesis. For reduction of Pvalb(+) interneurons, suppression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated signaling of mature granule cells may occur via suppression of c-Fos-mediated neuronal plasticity due to direct Mn-toxicity rather than promoter region hypermethylation of Pvalb.

  16. Iron: a pathological mediator of Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Glenda M; Robinson, Stephen R; Liu, Quan; Perry, George; Atwood, Craig S; Smith, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    Brains from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) show a disruption in the metabolism of iron, such that there is an accumulation of iron in senile plaques, and an altered distribution of iron transport and storage proteins. One of the earliest events in AD is the generation of oxidative stress, which may be related to the generation of free radicals by the excess iron that is observed in the disease. Iron has also been shown to mediate the in vitro toxicity of amyloid-beta peptide, and the presence of iron in most in vitro systems could underlie the toxicity that is normally attributed to amyloid-beta in these studies. In contrast, several recent studies have suggested that amyloid-beta may decrease oxidative stress and decrease the toxicity of iron. Continued examination of the complex interactions that occur between iron and amyloid-beta may assist in the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegeneration that leads to dementia in AD.

  17. Comparison of five different targeting ligands to enhance accumulation of liposomes into the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooy, Inge; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2011-02-28

    In many different studies nanocarriers modified with targeting ligands have been used to target to the brain. Many ligands have been successful, but it is difficult to compare results from different studies to determine which targeting ligand is the best. Therefore, we selected five targeting ligands (transferrin, RI7217, COG133, angiopep-2, and CRM197) and compared their ability to target liposomes to the brain in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, only CRM197-modified liposomes were able to bind to murine endothelial cells (bEnd.3). Both CRM197 and RI7217-modified liposomes associated with human endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). In vivo, uptake of targeted liposomes was tested at 12h after iv injection. For some of the ligands, additional time points of 1 and 6h were tested. Only the RI7217 was able to significantly enhance brain uptake in vivo at all time points. Uptake in the brain capillaries was up to 10 times higher compared to untargeted liposomes, and uptake in the brain parenchyma was up to 4.3 times higher. Additionally, these results show that many targeting ligands that have been described for brain targeting, do not target to the brain in vivo when coupled to a liposomal delivery vehicle.

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate Reduces Calcium Accumulation in Rat Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    low millimolar range. Most Ca2+ is sequestered within organelles , including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, mitochondria , and nucleus (Carafoli...G6P and thapsigargin caused generalized reduction in Ca2+ accumulation in remarkably similar patterns with no apparent gray matter regional...with glucose-6-phosphate (10 mM) or thapsigargin (1 µM), revealed very similar pattern of generalized reduction in 45Ca2+ accumulation in gray and

  19. Sulfur and iron accumulation in three marine-archaeological shipwrecks in the Baltic Sea: The Ghost, the Crown and the Sword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Yvonne; Grudd, Håkan; Rindby, Anders; Jalilehvand, Farideh; Sandström, Magnus; Cato, Ingemar; Bornmalm, Lennart

    2014-02-01

    Sulfur and iron concentrations in wood from three 17th century shipwrecks in the Baltic Sea, the Ghost wreck, the Crown and the Sword, were obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning. In near anaerobic environments symbiotic microorganisms degrade waterlogged wood, reduce sulfate and promote accumulation of low-valent sulfur compounds, as previously found for the famous wrecks of the Vasa and Mary Rose. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analyses of Ghost wreck wood show that organic thiols and disulfides dominate, together with elemental sulfur probably generated by sulfur-oxidizing Beggiatoa bacteria. Iron sulfides were not detected, consistent with the relatively low iron concentration in the wood. In a museum climate with high atmospheric humidity oxidation processes, especially of iron sulfides formed in the presence of corroding iron, may induce post-conservation wood degradation. Subject to more general confirmation by further analyses no severe conservation concerns are expected for the Ghost wreck wood.

  20. Iron toxicity in diseases of aging: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, Sandro; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2009-01-01

    Excess free iron generates oxidative stress that hallmarks diseases of aging. The observation that patients with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease show a dramatic increase in their brain iron content has opened the possibility that disturbances in brain iron homeostasis may contribute to the pathogenesis of these disorders. While the reason for iron accumulation is unknown, iron localization correlates with the production of reactive oxygen species in those areas of the brain that are prone to neurodegeneration. A role for iron is also proposed in atherosclerosis, a further frequent disorder of aging. We will review experimental evidences for an involvement of iron in these diseases and discuss some mouse models with impairment in iron-related genes that may be useful to study the role of iron in these disorders.

  1. Blood-brain barrier flux of aluminum, manganese, iron and other metals suspected to contribute to metal-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, Robert A

    2006-11-01

    The etiology of many neurodegenerative diseases has been only partly attributed to acquired traits, suggesting environmental factors may also contribute. Metal dyshomeostasis causes or has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Metal flux across the blood-brain barrier (the primary route of brain metal uptake) and the choroid plexuses as well as sensory nerve metal uptake from the nasal cavity are reviewed. Transporters that have been described at the blood-brain barrier are listed to illustrate the extensive possibilities for moving substances into and out of the brain. The controversial role of aluminum in Alzheimer's disease, evidence suggesting brain aluminum uptake by transferrin-receptor mediated endocytosis and of aluminum citrate by system Xc;{-} and an organic anion transporter, and results suggesting transporter-mediated aluminum brain efflux are reviewed. The ability of manganese to produce a parkinsonism-like syndrome, evidence suggesting manganese uptake by transferrin- and non-transferrin-dependent mechanisms which may include store-operated calcium channels, and the lack of transporter-mediated manganese brain efflux, are discussed. The evidence for transferrin-dependent and independent mechanisms of brain iron uptake is presented. The copper transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B, and their roles in Menkes and Wilson's diseases, are summarized. Brain zinc uptake is facilitated by L- and D-histidine, but a transporter, if involved, has not been identified. Brain lead uptake may involve a non-energy-dependent process, store-operated calcium channels, and/or an ATP-dependent calcium pump. Methyl mercury can form a complex with L-cysteine that mimics methionine, enabling its transport by the L system. The putative roles of zinc transporters, ZnT and Zip, in regulating brain zinc are discussed. Although brain uptake mechanisms for some metals have been identified, metal efflux from the brain has received little attention, preventing integration of

  2. Aluminium, iron and copper in human brain tissues donated to the Medical Research Council's Cognitive Function and Ageing Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Emily; Esiri, Margaret; Forster, Gill; Ince, Paul G; Exley, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium, iron and copper are all implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. However, there are very few large cohort studies of the content of these metals in aged human brains. We have used microwave digestion and TH GFAAS to measure aluminium, iron and copper in the temporal, frontal, occipital and parietal lobes of 60 brains donated to the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. Every precaution was taken to reduce contamination of samples and acid digests to a minimum. Actual contamination was estimated by preparing a large number of (170+) method blanks which were interspersed within the full set of 700+ tissue digests. Subtraction of method blank values (MBV) from tissue digest values resulted in metal contents in all tissues in the range, MBV to 33 μg g(-1) dry wt. for aluminium, 112 to 8305 μg g(-1) dry wt. for iron and MBV to 384 μg g(-1) dry wt. for copper. While the median aluminium content for all tissues was 1.02 μg g(-1) dry wt. it was informative that 41 brains out of 60 included at least one tissue with an aluminium content which could be considered as potentially pathological (> 3.50 μg g(-1) dry wt.). The median content for iron was 286.16 μg g(-1) dry wt. and overall tissue iron contents were generally high which possibly reflected increased brain iron in ageing and in neurodegenerative disease. The median content for copper was 17.41 μg g(-1) dry wt. and overall tissue copper contents were lower than expected for aged brains but they were commensurate with aged brains showing signs of neurodegenerative disease. In this study we have shown, in particular, the value of carrying out significant numbers of method blanks to identify unknown sources of contamination. When these values are subtracted from tissue digest values the absolute metal contents could be considered as conservative and yet they may still reflect aspects of ageing and neurodegenerative disease in individual brains.

  3. Submyelin potassium accumulation may functionally block subsets of local axons during deep brain stimulation: a modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, S. C.; Miyazawa, G.; Steinmetz, P. N.

    2008-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been used for over a decade to relieve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, although its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. To better understand the direct effects of DBS on central neurons, a computational model of a myelinated axon has been constructed which includes the effects of K+ accumulation within the peri-axonal space. Using best estimates of anatomic and electrogenic model parameters for in vivo STN axons, the model predicts a functional block along the axon due to K+ accumulation in the submyelin space. The functional block occurs for a range of model parameters: high stimulation frequencies (>130 Hz); high extracellular K+ concentrations (>3 × 10-3 M); low maximum Na+/K+ ATPase current densities (stimulating frequency.

  4. Epidermal growth factor treatment of the adult brain subventricular zone leads to focal microglia/macrophage accumulation and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Olle R; Brederlau, Anke; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-04-01

    One of the major components of the subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenic niche is the specialized vasculature. The SVZ vasculature is thought to be important in regulating progenitor cell proliferation and migration. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogen with a wide range of effects. When stem and progenitor cells in the rat SVZ are treated with EGF, using intracerebroventricular infusion, dysplastic polyps are formed. Upon extended infusion, blood vessels are recruited into the polyps. In the current study we demonstrate how polyps develop through distinct stages leading up to angiogenesis. As polyps progress, microglia/macrophages accumulate in the polyp core concurrent with increasing cell death. Both microglia/macrophage accumulation and cell death peak during angiogenesis and subsequently decline following polyp vascularization. This model of inducible angiogenesis in the SVZ neurogenic niche suggests involvement of microglia/macrophages in acquired angiogenesis and can be used in detail to study angiogenesis in the adult brain.

  5. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R

    2003-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio...... young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P ...-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy...

  6. The abnormal isoform of the prion protein accumulates in late-endosome-like organelles in scrapie-infected mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J E; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Hope, J; Landon, M; Mayer, R J

    1995-08-01

    The prion encephalopathies are characterized by accumulation in the brain of the abnormal form PrPsc of a normal host gene product PrPc. The mechanism and site of formation of PrPsc from PrPc are currently unknown. In this study, ME7 scrapie-infected mouse brain was used to show, both biochemically and by double-labelled immunogold electron microscopy, that proteinase K-resistant PrPsc is enriched in subcellular structures which contain the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, ubiquitin-protein conjugates, beta-glucuronidase, and cathepsin B, termed late endosome-like organelles. The glycosylinositol phospholipid membrane-anchored PrPc will enter such compartment for normal degradation and the organelles may therefore act as chambers for the conversion of PrPc into infectious PrPsc in this murine model of scrapie.

  7. Changes in brain iron concentration after exposure to high-altitude hypoxia measured by quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Congbo; Yang, Tianhe; Lin, Jianzhong; Cai, Shuhui; Zhang, Jiaxing; Chen, Zhong

    2017-02-15

    Hypoxia can induce physiological changes. This study aims to explore effects of high-altitude (HA) hypoxia on cerebral iron concentration. Twenty-nine healthy sea-level participants were tested shortly before and after approximately 4-week adaptation to the HA environment at fQinghai-Tibet Plateau (4200m), and were re-investigated after re-adaptation to the sea-level environment one year later. Iron concentration was quantified with quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), and the results were compared with transverse relaxation rate (R(*)2) measurements. The variations of magnetic susceptibility indicate that the iron concentration in gray matter regions, especially in basal ganglia, including caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and substantia nigra, increases significantly after HA exposure. This increase appears consistent with the conclusion from R(*)2 value variations. However, unlike QSM, the R(*)2 value fails to demonstrate the statistical difference of iron content in red nucleus. The re-investigation results show that most variations are recovered after sea-level re-adaptation for one year. Additionally, hemisphere- and gender-related differences in iron concentration changes were analyzed among cerebral regions. The results show greater possibilities in the right hemisphere and females. Further studies based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) suggest that the fractional anisotropy increases and the mean diffusivity decreases after HA exposure in six deep gray matter nuclei, with linear dependence on iron concentration only in putamen. In conclusion, the magnetic susceptibility value can serve as a quantitative marker of brain iron, and variations of regional susceptibility reported herein indicate that HA hypoxia can result in significant iron deposition in most deep gray matter regions. Additionally, the linear dependence of DTI metrics on iron concentration in putamen indicates a potential relationship between ferritin and water diffusion.

  8. Effects of dietary cadmium exposure on tissue-specific cadmium accumulation, iron status and expression of iron-handling and stress-inducible genes in rainbow trout: Influence of elevated dietary iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwong, Raymond W.M. [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B3 (Canada); Andres, Jose A. [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5E2 (Canada); Niyogi, Som, E-mail: som.niyogi@usask.ca [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Recent evidences suggest that dietary cadmium (Cd) uptake likely occurs via the dietary iron (Fe) uptake pathway in freshwater fish, at least in part. The present study investigated the interactive effects of dietary Cd and Fe in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were treated for four weeks with four different diets: normal Fe, high Fe, normal Fe plus Cd, and high Fe plus Cd. Physiological parameters, tissue-specific Fe and Cd level, plasma Fe status, and tissue-specific mRNA expression of transferrin, metallothioneins (MT-A and MT-B) and heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70a and HSP70b) were analyzed. Exposure to dietary Cd increased Cd burden in the following order: intestine > kidney > stomach > liver > gill > carcass. Interestingly, high dietary Fe reduced Cd accumulation in the stomach and intestine as well as in the wholebody of fish. Dietary Cd increased hepatic transferrin mRNA expression and total Fe binding capacity in the plasma, indicating the effect of Cd on Fe handling in fish. The mRNA expression of MTs and HSP70s was also increased in various tissues following dietary Cd exposure, however the response profile of different MT and HSP70 genes was not consistent among different tissues. In general, MT-A was more responsive to Cd exposure in the intestine and liver, whereas MT-B was more responsive in the kidney. Similarly, HSP70a expression was more sensitive to Cd exposure than HSP70b, particularly in the intestine. Interestingly, high Fe diet suppressed Cd-induced induction of transferrin, MT and HSP70 genes in various tissues. Overall, our study suggests that elevated dietary Fe can reduce Cd accumulation and ameliorate Cd-induced stress responses in freshwater fish.

  9. Effects of dietary cadmium exposure on tissue-specific cadmium accumulation, iron status and expression of iron-handling and stress-inducible genes in rainbow trout: influence of elevated dietary iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Andrés, Jose A; Niyogi, Som

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidences suggest that dietary cadmium (Cd) uptake likely occurs via the dietary iron (Fe) uptake pathway in freshwater fish, at least in part. The present study investigated the interactive effects of dietary Cd and Fe in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fish were treated for four weeks with four different diets: normal Fe, high Fe, normal Fe plus Cd, and high Fe plus Cd. Physiological parameters, tissue-specific Fe and Cd level, plasma Fe status, and tissue-specific mRNA expression of transferrin, metallothioneins (MT-A and MT-B) and heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70a and HSP70b) were analyzed. Exposure to dietary Cd increased Cd burden in the following order: intestine>kidney>stomach>liver>gill>carcass. Interestingly, high dietary Fe reduced Cd accumulation in the stomach and intestine as well as in the wholebody of fish. Dietary Cd increased hepatic transferrin mRNA expression and total Fe binding capacity in the plasma, indicating the effect of Cd on Fe handling in fish. The mRNA expression of MTs and HSP70s was also increased in various tissues following dietary Cd exposure, however the response profile of different MT and HSP70 genes was not consistent among different tissues. In general, MT-A was more responsive to Cd exposure in the intestine and liver, whereas MT-B was more responsive in the kidney. Similarly, HSP70a expression was more sensitive to Cd exposure than HSP70b, particularly in the intestine. Interestingly, high Fe diet suppressed Cd-induced induction of transferrin, MT and HSP70 genes in various tissues. Overall, our study suggests that elevated dietary Fe can reduce Cd accumulation and ameliorate Cd-induced stress responses in freshwater fish.

  10. Construction of a standard reference for PET studies of methionine accumulation using a computerised brain atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanowski, C.A.J. [Department of Neuroradiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF (United Kingdom); Leslie, D.F. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Neuroradiology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Thurfjell, L. [Centre for Image Analysis, University of Uppsala (Sweden); Ericson, K. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Neuroradiology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Stone-Elander, S. [Karolinska Pharmacy, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is valuable for assessing the biochemistry and physiology of the human brain. A computerised brain atlas has been developed which allows demonstration of anatomical regions on PET images and manipulation of these images into a standardised anatomical space. Once the images are in this standardised three-dimensional space it is possible to make comparisons between individuals and groups of individuals. We describe the use of this atlas in the generation of a set of mean reference images using methionine PET images of normal volunteers. (orig.). With 5 figs.

  11. Pranlukast reduces neutrophil but not macrophage/microglial accumulation in brain after focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-sheng CHU; Er-qing WEI; Guo-liang YU; San-hua FANG; Yu ZHOU; Meng-ling WANG; Wei-ping ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To determine whether pranlukast.a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonist,exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on focal cerebral ischemia in mice.Methods:Focal cerebral ischemia in mice was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion(MCAO).In addition to neurological deficits,infarct volume,degenerated neurons and endogenous IgG exudation,we detected accumulation of neutrophils and macrophage/microglia in the ischemic brain tissue 72 h after MCAO.Pranlukast was iP injected 30 min before and after MCAO.Results:Pranlukast significantly attenuated neurological deficits,infarct volume,neuron degeneration and IgG exudation.Importantly,pranlukast(0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg) inhibited myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophil,but not CDllb-positive macrophage/microglial accumulation in the ischemic cortical tissue.Conclusion:Pranlukast exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on focal cerebral ischemia in the subacute phase that is limited to neutrophil recruitment through the disrupted blood-brain barrier.

  12. Traffic jam at the blood-brain barrier promotes greater accumulation of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β proteins in the cerebral vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Edward K; Leonard, Sarah R; Curran, Geoffry L; Yu, Caroline C; Lowe, Val J; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2013-05-06

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain vasculature results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which occurs in about 80% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. While Aβ42 predominates parenchymal amyloid plaques in AD brain, Aβ40 is prevalent in the cerebrovascular amyloid. Dutch mutation of Aβ40 (E22Q) promotes aggressive cerebrovascular accumulation and leads to severe CAA in the mutation carriers; knowledge of how DutchAβ40 drives this process more efficiently than Aβ40 could reveal various pathophysiological events that promote CAA. In this study we have demonstrated that DutchAβ40 shows preferential accumulation in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) endothelial cells due to its inefficient blood-to-brain transcytosis. Consequently, DutchAβ40 establishes a permeation barrier in the BBB endothelium, prevents its own clearance from the brain, and promotes the formation of amyloid deposits in the cerebral microvessels. The BBB endothelial accumulation of native Aβ40 is not robust enough to exercise such a significant impact on its brain clearance. Hence, the cerebrovascular accumulation of Aβ40 is slow and may require other copathologies to precipitate into CAA. In conclusion, the magnitude of Aβ accumulation in the BBB endothelial cells is a critical factor that promotes CAA; hence, clearing vascular endothelium of Aβ proteins may halt or even reverse CAA.

  13. Effect of Soil Moisture on Release of Low-MolecularWeight Organic Acids in Root Exudates and the Accumulation of Iron in Root Apoplasm of Peanut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A three-compartments rhizobox was designed and used to study the low-molecular-weight organic acids in root exudates and the root apoplastic iron of "lime-induced chlorosis" peanut grown on a calcareous soil in relation to different soil moisture conditions. Results showed that chlorosis of peanuts developed under condition of high soil moisture level (250 g kg-1), while peanuts grew well and chlorosis did not develop when soil moisture was managed to a normal level (150 g kg-1). The malic acid, maleic acid and succinic acid contents of chlorotic peanut increased by 108.723, 0.029 and 22.446μg cm-2, respectively,compared with healthy peanuts. The content of citric acid and fumaric acid also increased in root exudates of chlorotic peanuts. On Days 28 and 42 of peanut growth, the accumulation of root apoplastic iron in chlorotic peanuts was higher than that of healthy peanuts. From Day 28 to Day 42, the mobilization percentages of chlorotic peanuts and healthy peanuts to root apoplastic iron were almost the same, being 52.4% and 52.8%,respectively, indicating that the chlorosis might be caused by the inactivation of iron within peanut plant grown on a calcareous soil under high soil moisture conditions.

  14. Heavy metal accumulation in Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf from the Karabük iron-steel factory in Karabük, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansaran-Duman, Demet; Atakol, Orhan; Atasoy, Ilknur; Kahya, Didem; Aras, Sümer; Beyaztaş, Taylan

    2009-01-01

    Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf lichen specimens were collected every 5 km starting from around an iron-steel factory located in the central area of Karabük province, up to Yenice Forest. Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cd, Cr contents were analyzed in the samples collected from polluted and unpolluted areas. A Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf sample from Yenice Forest was used as a control. The reason for this choise was the abundance of species diversity, and therefore sample collection might cause a very low impact on natural population density. The forest is among the 100 forested areas that must be urgently taken under protection according to WWF (World Wildlife Fund) researches. Results of the current study manifested significant variations among the contents of these elements between stations. As expected, the pollution sources, such as iron-steel factory, roads and railroads, industry, heavy traffic, and waste treatment plants, have major impact on the heavy metal accumulation in P. furfuracea (L.) Zopf, and, in accordance to their location, samples 8 and 10 displayed high element accumulation. Surprisingly, although Yenice Forest is under protection, results of our study showed that the region is becoming polluted by the influence of many pollution sources in the area. The present study also confirms the efficient metal accumulation capacity of lichens.

  15. Accumulation of N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids in rat brains during post-decapitative ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, B.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jaroszewski, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The lower organic phases were isolated and evaporated to dryness under a stream of nitrogen and the lipids were redissolved in CDCl-CHOH-HO 100.0:29.9:5.2 (v/v/v) for NMR analysis. Increasing the period of post-decapitative ischemia resulted in an accumulation of two signals......-phospho(N-acyl)-ethanolamine (NAPE(PLAS)), respectively, by spiking with authentic materials. Additionally, the identification was verified by thin-layer chromatography, which also showed the accumulation of N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids. The use of K-EDTA instead of the commonly used Cs-EDTA...... in the preparation of the NMR samples allowed the separation of the chemical shifts of N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids from those of the ethanolamine phospholipids. Moreover, the chemical shift of cardiolipin was moved from 0.15 ppm observed with Cs-EDTA to about 0.31 ppm with K-EDTA. The present study...

  16. Dietary Deficiency of Calcium and/or Iron, an Age-Related Risk Factor for Renal Accumulation of Cadmium in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyong-Son; Sano, Erika; Ueda, Hidenori; Sakazaki, Fumitoshi; Yamada, Keita; Takano, Masaoki; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    The major route of cadmium (Cd) intake by non-smokers is through food ingestion. Cd is a non-essential metal absorbed through one or more transporters of essential metal ions. Expression of these transporters is affected by nutritional status. To investigate the risk factors for Cd toxicity, the effects of deficiency of essential metals on hepatic and renal accumulation of Cd were studied in mice of different ages. Mice were administered a control diet or one of the essential metal-deficient diets, administered Cd by gavage for 6 weeks, and killed; then, Cd accumulation was evaluated. Iron deficiency (FeDF) or calcium deficiency (CaDF) resulted in remarkable increases in hepatic and renal Cd accumulation compared with control-diet mice and other essential metal-deficient mice. Cd accumulation in hepatic and renal tissue was increased significantly at all ages tested in FeDF and CaDF mice. Renal Cd concentrations were higher in 4-week-old mice than in 8- and 25-week-old mice. Increase in intestinal mRNA expression of calcium transporter (CaT)1, divalent metal ion transporter-1, and metallothionein (MT)1 was also higher in 4-week-old mice than in other mice. Renal accumulation of Cd showed strong correlation with intestinal mRNA expression of CaT1 and MT1. These data suggest that CaDF and FeDF at younger ages can be a risk factor for Cd toxicity.

  17. Nitric oxide contributes to cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis by promoting cadmium accumulation in roots and by up-regulating genes related to iron uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson-Bard, Angélique; Gravot, Antoine; Richaud, Pierre; Auroy, Pascaline; Duc, Céline; Gaymard, Frédéric; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pugin, Alain; Wendehenne, David

    2009-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a cell-signaling molecule in plants. In particular, a role for NO in the regulation of iron homeostasis and in the plant response to toxic metals has been proposed. Here, we investigated the synthesis and the role of NO in plants exposed to cadmium (Cd(2+)), a nonessential and toxic metal. We demonstrate that Cd(2+) induces NO synthesis in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. This production, which is sensitive to NO synthase inhibitors, does not involve nitrate reductase and AtNOA1 but requires IRT1, encoding a major plasma membrane transporter for iron but also Cd(2+). By analyzing the incidence of NO scavenging or inhibition of its synthesis during Cd(2+) treatment, we demonstrated that NO contributes to Cd(2+)-triggered inhibition of root growth. To understand the mechanisms underlying this process, a microarray analysis was performed in order to identify NO-modulated root genes up- and down-regulated during Cd(2+) treatment. Forty-three genes were identified encoding proteins related to iron homeostasis, proteolysis, nitrogen assimilation/metabolism, and root growth. These genes include IRT1. Investigation of the metal and ion contents in Cd(2+)-treated roots in which NO synthesis was impaired indicates that IRT1 up-regulation by NO was consistently correlated to NO's ability to promote Cd(2+) accumulation in roots. This analysis also highlights that NO is responsible for Cd(2+)-induced inhibition of root Ca(2+) accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that NO contributes to Cd(2+) toxicity by favoring Cd(2+) versus Ca(2+) uptake and by initiating a cellular pathway resembling those activated upon iron deprivation.

  18. Burkholderia phytofirmans inoculation-induced changes on the shoot cell anatomy and iron accumulation reveal novel components of Arabidopsis-endophyte interaction that can benefit downstream biomass deconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai eZhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB elicit positive effects on plant growth and biomass yield. However, the actual mechanism behind the plant-PGPB interaction is poorly understood, and the literature is scarce regarding the thermochemical pretreatability and enzymatic degradability of biomass derived from PGPB-inoculated plants. Most recent transcriptional analyses of PGPB strain Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN inoculating potato in literature and Arabidopsis in our present study have revealed the expression of genes for ferritin and the biosynthesis and transport of siderophores (i.e. the molecules with high affinity for iron, respectively. The expression of such genes in the shoots of PsJN-inoculated plants prompted us to propose that PsJN-inoculation can improve the host plant’s iron uptake and accumulation, which facilitates the downstream plant biomass pretreatment and conversion to simple sugars. In this study, we employed B. phytofirmans PsJN to inoculate the Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and conducted the first investigation for its effects on the biomass yield, the anatomical organization of stems, the iron accumulation, and the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of harvested biomass. The results showed that the strain PsJN stimulated plant growth in the earlier period of plant development and enlarged the cell size of stem piths, and it also indeed enhanced the essential metals uptake and accumulation in host plants. Moreover, we found that the PsJN-inoculated plant biomass released more glucose and xylose after hot water pretreatment and subsequent co-saccharification, which provided a novel insight into development of lignocellulosic biofuels from renewable biomass resources.

  19. Sulfur and iron accumulation in three marine-archaeological shipwrecks in the Baltic Sea: The Ghost, the Crown and the Sword

    OpenAIRE

    Fors, Yvonne; Grudd, Håkan; Rindby, Anders; Jalilehvand, Farideh; Sandström, Magnus; Cato, Ingemar; Bornmalm, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur and iron concentrations in wood from three 17th century shipwrecks in the Baltic Sea, the Ghost wreck, the Crown and the Sword, were obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning. In near anaerobic environments symbiotic microorganisms degrade waterlogged wood, reduce sulfate and promote accumulation of low-valent sulfur compounds, as previously found for the famous wrecks of the Vasa and Mary Rose. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analyses of Ghost wreck wood...

  20. The accumulation of brain water-free sodium is associated with ischemic damage independent of the blood pressure in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Manabu; Kitazato, Keiko T; Yagi, Kenji; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kurashiki, Yoshitaka; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Kinouchi, Tomoya; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Satomi, Junichiro; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    Estrogen deficiency worsens ischemic stroke outcomes. In ovariectomized (OVX(+)) rats fed a high-salt diet (HSD), an increase in the body Na(+)/water ratio, which characterizes water-free Na(+) accumulation, was associated with detrimental vascular effects independent of the blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that an increase in brain water-free Na(+) accumulation is associated with ischemic brain damage in OVX(+)/HSD rats. To test our hypothesis we divided female Wistar rats into 4 groups, OVX(+) and OVX(-) rats fed HSD or a normal diet (ND), and subjected them to transient cerebral ischemia. The brain Na(+)/water ratio was increased even in OVX(+)/ND rats and augmented in OVX(+)/HSD rats. The increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio was positively correlated with expansion of the cortical infarct volume without affecting the BP. Interestingly, OVX(+) was associated with the decreased expression of ATP1α3, a subtype of the Na(+) efflux pump. HSD increased the expression of brain Na(+) influx-related molecules and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). The pretreatment of OVX(+)/HSD rats with the MR antagonist eplerenone reduced brain water-free Na(+) accumulation, up-regulated ATP1α3, down-regulated MR, and reduced the cortical infarct volume. Our findings show that the increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio elicited by estrogen deficiency or HSD is associated with ischemic brain damage BP-independently, suggesting the importance of regulating the accumulation of brain water-free Na(+). The up-regulation of ATP1α3 and the down-regulation of MR may provide a promising therapeutic strategy to attenuate ischemic brain damage in postmenopausal women.

  1. Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Oshiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of iron metabolism has been observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. Utilization of several importers and exporters for iron transport in brain cells helps maintain iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of iron homeostasis leads to the production of neurotoxic substances and reactive oxygen species, resulting in iron-induced oxidative stress. In Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD, circumstantial evidence has shown that dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis leads to abnormal iron accumulation. Several genetic studies have revealed mutations in genes associated with increased iron uptake, increased oxidative stress, and an altered inflammatory response in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here, we review the recent findings on brain iron metabolism in common NDs, such as AD, PD, and ALS. We also summarize the conventional and novel types of iron chelators, which can successfully decrease excess iron accumulation in brain lesions. For example, iron-chelating drugs have neuroprotective effects, preventing neural apoptosis, and activate cellular protective pathways against oxidative stress. Glial cells also protect neurons by secreting antioxidants and antiapoptotic substances. These new findings of experimental and clinical studies may provide a scientific foundation for advances in drug development for NDs.

  2. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different polymers and their MRI contrast effects in the mouse brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Songbo; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Xuan; Yang, Gao; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    PEG and PEG/PEI modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3) in poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) containing poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) (0 or 0.3 g). PEG/PEI-SPIONs were coated with Tween 80 (PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses indicated that PEG, PEG/PEI and PEG/PEI/Tween 80 were attached to the surfaces of the SPIONs. The PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs performed excellent colloidal stability in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and in deionized water with the mean hydrodynamic sizes of 19.5, 21.0, 24.0 nm and the zeta potentials of -5.0, 35.0, 19.0 mV, respectively. All the SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity assessed by the MTT assay. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the Kunming (KM) mouse brains were performed, the PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs exhibited vascular imaging effects in bulbus olfactorius, frontal cortex, temporal, thalamus and brain stem of the mouse brains after 24 h intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The SPIONs have potentials as MRI contrast agents in the mouse brains.

  3. Effects of dietary heme iron and exercise training on abdominal fat accumulation and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumura, Masanori; Takagi, Shoko; Oya, Hana; Tamura, Shohei; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-02

    Animal by-products can be recycled and used as sources of essential nutrients. Water-soluble heme iron (WSHI), a functional food additive for supplementing iron, is produced by processing animal blood. In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation of 3% WSHI and exercise training for 4 weeks on the accumulation of abdominal fat and lipid metabolism in mice fed high-fat diet. Exercise-trained mice had significantly less perirenal adipose tissue, whereas WSHI-fed mice tended to have less epididymal adipose tissue. In addition, total weight of abdominal adipose tissues was significantly decreased in the Exercise + WSHI group. Dietary WSHI significantly increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. WSHI-fed mice also tended to show increased mRNA levels of adipose triglyceride lipase in their epididymal adipose tissue. Dietary WSHI also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related enzymes in the liver, but did not influence levels in the Gastrocnemius muscle. Exercise training did not influence the mRNA levels of lipid metabolism-related enzymes in the epididymal adipose tissue, liver or the Gastrocnemius muscle. These findings suggest that the accumulation of abdominal fat can be efficiently decreased by the combination of dietary WSHI and exercise training in mice fed high-fat diet.

  4. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Treatment of the Adult Brain Subventricular Zone Leads to Focal Microglia/Macrophage Accumulation and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle R. Lindberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the major components of the subventricular zone (SVZ neurogenic niche is the specialized vasculature. The SVZ vasculature is thought to be important in regulating progenitor cell proliferation and migration. Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a mitogen with a wide range of effects. When stem and progenitor cells in the rat SVZ are treated with EGF, using intracerebroventricular infusion, dysplastic polyps are formed. Upon extended infusion, blood vessels are recruited into the polyps. In the current study we demonstrate how polyps develop through distinct stages leading up to angiogenesis. As polyps progress, microglia/macrophages accumulate in the polyp core concurrent with increasing cell death. Both microglia/macrophage accumulation and cell death peak during angiogenesis and subsequently decline following polyp vascularization. This model of inducible angiogenesis in the SVZ neurogenic niche suggests involvement of microglia/macrophages in acquired angiogenesis and can be used in detail to study angiogenesis in the adult brain.

  6. Mössbauer study of exogenous iron redistribution between the brain and the liver after administration of {sup 57}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ferrofluid in the ventricle of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polikarpov, Dmitry, E-mail: polikarpov.imp@gmail.com [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Russian National Research Medical University named after N.I.Pirogov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gabbasov, Raul; Cherepanov, Valery [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Loginova, Natalia; Loseva, Elena [Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikitin, Maxim [Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yurenia, Anton; Panchenko, Vladislav [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Iron clearance pathways after the injection of {sup 57}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based ferrofluid into the brain ventricles were studied histologically and by Mössbauer spectroscopy. It was found that the dextran coated initial nanobeads of the ferrofluid disintegrated in the brain into separate superparamagnetic nanoparticles within a week after the injection. The exogenous iron completely exited all ventricular cavities of the brain within a week after the injection but remained in the white matter for months. Kupffer cells with the exogenous iron appeared in the rat liver 2 hours after the injection. Their concentration reached its maximum on the third day and dropped to zero within a week. The exogenous iron appeared in the spleen a week after the injection and remained in the spleen for months.

  7. Characterization of natural variation for zinc, iron and manganese accumulation and zinc exposure response in Brassica rapa L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.; Schat, H.; Koornneef, M.; Wang, X.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Brassica rapa L. is an important vegetable crop in eastern Asia. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variation in leaf Zn, Fe and Mn accumulation, Zn toxicity tolerance and Zn efficiency in B. rapa. In total 188 accessions were screened for their Zn-related characteristics in

  8. Distribution of mercury in metallothionein-null mice after exposure to mercury vapor: amount of metallothionein isoform does not affect accumulation of mercury in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Akira; Yoshida, Minoru; Honda, Akiko; Watanabe, Chiho; Satoh, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    To examine the contribution of metallothionein (MT) to mercury accumulation in mouse tissues, 129 strain female mice and MT null mice were exposed to metallic mercury vapor at a sub-toxic level, and Hg levels in the brain, kidney and liver were determined on 1, 3 and 7 days after the exposure. After exposure to mercury vapor, significant Hg accumulation was observed in the brains of wild-type and MT-I/II null and MT-III null mice, as well as in the liver and kidneys. No strain difference was observed in the tissue Hg accumulations 24 hr after the exposure except for the kidneys, where the highest accumulation was found in MT-III null mice. Although the brains of MT-III null mice showed slightly higher Hg accumulation than the other two strains, no significant difference was observed except in the cerebrum on Day 7. Gel chromatograms of cerebrum soluble fractions revealed that a significant amount of Hg existed as an MT-bound form in all the mouse strains. On the other hand, MT-bound Hg was found as a minor fraction in soluble fractions of the kidneys and livers in wild-type and MT-III null mice. Despite a significant strain difference in total MT levels in the cerebrum, there was no difference among the three strains in the amount of Hg accumulated in the cerebrum and its distribution rates in MT fractions. The present study demonstrated that brain uptake of Hg(0) and its accumulation as Hg(2+) did not depend on the amount of MT isoform in the tissue, at least in the early phase.

  9. Evaluation of the Accumulation of Trace Metals (as, U, CR, CU, PB, Zn) on Iron-Manganese Coatings on in Situ Stream Pebbles and Emplaced Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, M. M.; Blake, J.; Crossey, L. J.; Ali, A.; Hansson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to trace metals (As, U, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn) has potential negative health effects on human populations and wildlife. Geothermal waters often have elevated concentrations of trace elements and understanding the geochemical cycling of these elements can be challenging. Previous studies have utilized in situ stream pebbles and glass or ceramic substrates with iron-manganese oxide coatings to understand contamination and or chemical cycling. This project's main focus is to develop an ideal tracing method using adsorption onto substrate surfaces and to define key parameters that are necessary for the phenomenon of adsorption between trace metals and these surface coatings to occur. Sampling locations include the Jemez River and Rio San Antonio in the Jemez mountains, northern New Mexico. Both streams have significant geothermal inputs. Pebbles and cobbles were gathered from the active stream channel and 6mm glass beads and 2 X1 in. ceramic plates were placed in streams for three weeks to allow for coating accumulation. Factors such as leachate type, water pH, substrate type, coating accumulation period and leach time were all considered in this experiment. It was found that of the three leachates (aqua regia, 10% aqua regia and hydroxylamine), hydroxylamine was the most effective at leaching coatings without dissolving substrates. Samples leached with aqua regia and 10% aqua regia were found to lose weight and mass over the following 5, 7, and 10 day measurements. Glass beads were determined to be more effective than in stream pebbles as an accumulation substrate: coatings were more easily controlled and monitored. Samples leached with hydroxylamine for 5 hours and 72 hours showed little difference in their leachate concentrations, suggesting that leach time has little impact on the concentration of leachate samples. This research aims to find the best method for trace metal accumulation in streams to aid in understanding geochemical cycling.

  10. Ferrous iron formation following the co-aggregation of ferric iron and the Alzheimer's disease peptide β-amyloid (1-42).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, J; Céspedes, E; Shelford, L R; Exley, C; Collingwood, J F; Dobson, J; van der Laan, G; Jenkins, C A; Arenholz, E; Telling, N D

    2014-06-06

    For decades, a link between increased levels of iron and areas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology has been recognized, including AD lesions comprised of the peptide β-amyloid (Aβ). Despite many observations of this association, the relationship between Aβ and iron is poorly understood. Using X-ray microspectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy and spectrophotometric iron(II) quantification techniques, we examine the interaction between Aβ(1-42) and synthetic iron(III), reminiscent of ferric iron stores in the brain. We report Aβ to be capable of accumulating iron(III) within amyloid aggregates, with this process resulting in Aβ-mediated reduction of iron(III) to a redox-active iron(II) phase. Additionally, we show that the presence of aluminium increases the reductive capacity of Aβ, enabling the redox cycling of the iron. These results demonstrate the ability of Aβ to accumulate iron, offering an explanation for previously observed local increases in iron concentration associated with AD lesions. Furthermore, the ability of iron to form redox-active iron phases from ferric precursors provides an origin both for the redox-active iron previously witnessed in AD tissue, and the increased levels of oxidative stress characteristic of AD. These interactions between Aβ and iron deliver valuable insights into the process of AD progression, which may ultimately provide targets for disease therapies.

  11. Ferrous iron formation following the co-aggregation of ferric iron and the Alzheimer's disease peptide β-amyloid (1–42)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, J.; Céspedes, E.; Shelford, L. R.; Exley, C.; Collingwood, J. F.; Dobson, J.; van der Laan, G.; Jenkins, C. A.; Arenholz, E.; Telling, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, a link between increased levels of iron and areas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology has been recognized, including AD lesions comprised of the peptide β-amyloid (Aβ). Despite many observations of this association, the relationship between Aβ and iron is poorly understood. Using X-ray microspectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy and spectrophotometric iron(II) quantification techniques, we examine the interaction between Aβ(1–42) and synthetic iron(III), reminiscent of ferric iron stores in the brain. We report Aβ to be capable of accumulating iron(III) within amyloid aggregates, with this process resulting in Aβ-mediated reduction of iron(III) to a redox-active iron(II) phase. Additionally, we show that the presence of aluminium increases the reductive capacity of Aβ, enabling the redox cycling of the iron. These results demonstrate the ability of Aβ to accumulate iron, offering an explanation for previously observed local increases in iron concentration associated with AD lesions. Furthermore, the ability of iron to form redox-active iron phases from ferric precursors provides an origin both for the redox-active iron previously witnessed in AD tissue, and the increased levels of oxidative stress characteristic of AD. These interactions between Aβ and iron deliver valuable insights into the process of AD progression, which may ultimately provide targets for disease therapies. PMID:24671940

  12. Regional distributions of manganese, iron, copper, and zinc in the brains of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarohda, Tohru; Ishida, Yasushi; Kawai, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Amano, Ryohei

    2005-09-01

    Time courses of changes in manganese, iron, copper, and zinc concentrations were examined in regions of the brain of a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concentrations were simultaneously determined in brain section at the level of the substantia nigra 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 days after the 6-OHDA treatment and compared with those of control rats. The distributions of these elements were obtained for 18 regions of the sagittal section (1-mm thick). The ICP-MS results indicated that Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn levels of the 6-OHDA-induced parkinsonian brain were observed to increase in all regions that lay along the dopaminergic pathway. In the substantia nigra, the increase in Mn level occurred rapidly from 3 to 7 days and preceded those in the other elements, reaching a plateau in the 6-OHDA brain. Iron and Zn levels increased gradually until 7 days and then increased rapidly from 7 to 10 days. The increase in the copper level was slightly delayed. In other regions, such as the globus pallidus, putamen, and amygdala, the levels of Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn increased with time after 6-OHDA treatment, although the time courses of their changes were region-specific. These findings contribute to our understanding of the roles of Mn and Fe in the induction of neurological symptoms and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the development of Parkinson's disease. Manganese may hold the key to disturbing cellular Fe homeostasis and accelerating Fe levels, which play the most important role in the development of Parkinson's disease.

  13. Comparison of mercury accumulation among the brain, liver, kidney, and the brain regions of rats administered methylmercury in various phases of postnatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, M.; Nakano, A. [National Institute for Minamata Disease, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Several animal studies have indicated that a developing organism in its prenatal and early postnatal stage may be at higher risk in toxic metal exposure than in adult stage. Many infants were congenitally affected by methylmercury in the epidemics in Japan and Iraq. The infants reported from Minamata, Japan, had severe cerebral palsy, whereas their mothers had mild or no manifestations of poisoning. Some of the high susceptibility in infants may resulted from the specific features of the methylmercury metabolism in the developing organisms. Prenatal or postnatal development is characterized by functional immaturity of organs, which may affect the mercury (Hg) accumulation among organs. It seems possible that the Hg distribution might, in fact, reflect the toxic effects of methylmercury during a given developing phase. Thus, its distribution deserves closer examination. In our previous study, when a toxic level of methylmercury was administered, the Hg distribution and its effects on body weight gain and neurological disorders were found to be different among the rat postnatal developing phases. In the present study the Hg distribution among organs and brain regions was investigated during the several development phases with a nontoxic level of methylmercury treatment. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Combined deficiency of iron and (n-3) fatty acids in male rats disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than iron deficiency or (n-3) fatty acid deficiency alone1-3

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, Jeannine; Smuts, Cornelius M; Malan, Linda; Arnold, Myrtha; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids (FA) [(n-3)FAD] may impair brain development and function through shared mechanisms. However, little is known about the potential interactions between these 2 common deficiencies. We studied the effects of ID and (n-3)FAD, alone and in combination, on brain monoamine pathways (by measuring monoamines and related gene expression) and spatial working and reference memory (by Morris water maze testing). Using a 2 × 2 design, male rats were fed...

  15. A comparison of MRI tissue relaxometry and ROI methods used to determine regional brain iron concentrations in restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon HJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hye-Jin Moon,1,* Yongmin Chang,2,* Yeong Seon Lee,1 Huijin Song,3 Hyuk Won Chang,4 Jeonghun Ku,5 Richard P Allen,6 Christopher J Earley,6 Yong Won Cho1 1Department of Neurology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Molecular Medicine, 3Department of Medical and Biological Engineering, Kyungpook National University and Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Radiology, 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 6Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging relaxometry studies differed on the relaxometry methods and their approaches to determining the regions of interest (ROIs in restless legs syndrome (RLS patients. These differences could account for the variable and inconsistent results found across these studies. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the different relaxometry methods and different ROI approaches using each of these methods on a single population of controls and RLS subjects. Methods: A 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging with the gradient-echo sampling of free induction decay and echo pulse sequence was used. The regional brainiron concentrations” were determined using three relaxometry metrics (R2, R2*, and R2' through two different ROI methods. The substantia nigra (SN was the primary ROI with red nucleus, caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus as the secondary ROIs. Results: Thirty-seven RLS patients and 40 controls were enrolled. The iron concentration as determined by R2 did not correlate with either of the other two methods, while R2* and R2' showed strong correlations, particularly for the substantia nigra and red nucleus. In the fixed-shape ROI method, the RLS group showed a lower iron index compared to the control

  16. Effects of carboxylic acids on the uptake of non-transferrin-bound iron by astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Belinda M; Robinson, Stephen R; Bishop, Glenda M

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of non-transferrin-bound iron are elevated in the brain during pathological conditions such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes are specialised for sequestering this iron, however little is known about the mechanisms involved. Carboxylates, such as citrate, have been reported to facilitate iron uptake by intestinal cells. Citrate binds iron and limits its redox activity. The presence of high citrate concentrations in the interstitial fluid of the brain suggests that citrate may be an important ligand for iron transport by astrocytes. This study investigates whether iron accumulation by cultured rat astrocytes is facilitated by citrate or other carboxylates. Contrary to expectations, citrate, tartrate and malate were found to block iron accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner; alpha-ketoglutarate had limited effects, while fumarate, succinate and glutarate had no effect. This blockade was not due to an inhibition of ferric reductase activity. Instead, it appeared to be related to the capacity of these carboxylates to bind iron, since phosphate, which also binds iron, diminished the capacity of citrate, tartrate and malate to block the cellular accumulation of iron. These findings raise the possibility that citrate may have therapeutic potential in the management of neurodegenerative conditions that involve cellular iron overload.

  17. Mapping and characterization of iron compounds in Alzheimer's tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collingwood, Joanna; Dobson, Jon [Keele

    2008-06-16

    Understanding the management of iron in the brain is of great importance in the study of neurodegeneration, where regional iron overload is frequently evident. A variety of approaches have been employed, from quantifying iron in various anatomical structures, to identifying genetic risk factors related to iron metabolism, and exploring chelation approaches to tackle iron overload in neurodegenerative disease. However, the ease with which iron can change valence state ensures that it is present in vivo in a wide variety of forms, both soluble and insoluble. Here, we review recent developments in approaches to locate and identify iron compounds in neurodegenerative tissue. In addition to complementary techniques that allow us to quantify and identify iron compounds using magnetometry, extraction, and electron microscopy, we are utilizing a powerful combined mapping/characterization approach with synchrotron X-rays. This has enabled the location and characterization of iron accumulations containing magnetite and ferritin in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue sections in situ at micron-resolution. It is hoped that such approaches will contribute to our understanding of the role of unusual iron accumulations in disease pathogenesis, and optimise the potential to use brain iron as a clinical biomarker for early detection and diagnosis.

  18. Combined deficiency of iron and (n-3) fatty acids in male rates disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than iron deficiency or (n-3) fatty acid deficiency alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, J.; Smuts, C.M.; Malan, L.; Arnold, M.; Yee, B.K.; Bianco, L.E.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Muller, M.R.; Langhans, W.; Hurrell, R.F.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids (FA) [(n-3)FAD] may impair brain development and function through shared mechanisms. However, little is known about the potential interactions between these 2 common deficiencies. We studied the effects of ID and (n-3)FAD, alone and in combination

  19. α7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-specific antibody induces inflammation and amyloid β42 accumulation in the mouse brain to impair memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Lykhmus

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs expressed in the brain are involved in regulating cognitive functions, as well as inflammatory reactions. Their density is decreased upon Alzheimer disease accompanied by accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ42, memory deficit and neuroinflammation. Previously we found that α7 nAChR-specific antibody induced pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 production in U373 glioblastoma cells and that such antibodies were present in the blood of humans. We raised a hypothesis that α7 nAChR-specific antibody can cause neuroinflammation when penetrating the brain. To test this, C57Bl/6 mice were either immunized with extracellular domain of α7 nAChR subunit α7(1-208 or injected with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS for 5 months. We studied their behavior and the presence of α3, α4, α7, β2 and β4 nAChR subunits, Aβ40 and Aβ42 and activated astrocytes in the brain by sandwich ELISA and confocal microscopy. It was found that either LPS injections or immunizations with α7(1-208 resulted in region-specific decrease of α7 and α4β2 and increase of α3β4 nAChRs, accumulation of Aβ42 and activated astrocytes in the brain of mice and worsening of their episodic memory. Intravenously transferred α7 nAChR-specific-antibodies penetrated the brain parenchyma of mice pre-injected with LPS. Our data demonstrate that (1 neuroinflammation is sufficient to provoke the decrease of α7 and α4β2 nAChRs, Aβ42 accumulation and memory impairment in mice and (2 α7(1-208 nAChR-specific antibodies can cause inflammation within the brain resulting in the symptoms typical for Alzheimer disease.

  20. Iron(III) accumulations in inland saline waterways, Hunter Valley, Australia: Mineralogy, micromorphology and pore-water geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacson, Lloyd S., E-mail: lisaac11@scu.edu.au [Southern Cross GeoSciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Burton, Edward D.; Bush, Richard T. [Southern Cross GeoSciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Mitchell, David R.G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Electron Microscope Unit, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Johnston, Scott G. [Southern Cross GeoSciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Macdonald, Bennett C.T. [The Fenner School for Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Sullivan, Leigh A. [Southern Cross GeoSciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); White, Ian [The Fenner School for Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia)

    2009-10-15

    Discharge of Fe(II)-rich groundwaters into surface-waters results in the accumulation of Fe(III)-minerals in salinized sand-bed waterways of the Hunter Valley, Australia. The objective of this study was to characterise the mineralogy, micromorphology and pore-water geochemistry of these Fe(III) accumulations. Pore-waters had a circumneutral pH (6.2-7.2), were sub-oxic to oxic (Eh 59-453 mV), and had dissolved Fe(II) concentrations up to 81.6 mg L{sup -1}. X-ray diffraction (XRD) on natural and acid-ammonium-oxalate (AAO) extracted samples indicated a dominance of 2-line ferrihydrite in most samples, with lesser amounts of goethite, lepidocrocite, quartz, and alumino-silicate clays. The majority of Fe in the samples was bound in the AAO extractable fraction (Fe{sup Ox}) relative to the Na-dithionite extractable fraction (Fe{sup Di}), with generally high Fe{sup Ox}:Fe{sup Di} ratios (0.52-0.92). The presence of nano-crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 5}HO{sub 3}.4H{sub 2}O) with lesser amounts of goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with selected area electron diffraction (SAED). In addition, it was found that lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), which occurred as nanoparticles as little as {approx}5 lattice spacings thick perpendicular to the (0 2 0) lattice plane, was also present in the studied Fe(III) deposits. Overall, the results highlight the complex variability in the crystallinity and particle-size of Fe(III)-minerals which form via oxidation of Fe(II)-rich groundwaters in sand-bed streams. This variability may be attributed to: (1) divergent precipitation conditions influencing the Fe(II) oxidation rate and the associated supply and hydrolysis of the Fe(III) ion, (2) the effect of interfering compounds, and (3) the influence of bacteria, especially Leptothrix ochracea.

  1. Optimizing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug carriers using an in vitro blood–brain barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Di; Mi, Gujie; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, an optimized in vitro blood–brain barrier (BBB) model was established using mouse brain endothelial cells (b.End3) and astrocytes (C8-D1A). Before measuring the permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) samples, the BBB was first examined and confirmed by an immunofluorescent stain and evaluating the transendothelial electrical resistance. After such confirmation, the permeability of the following five previously synthesized SPIONs was determined using this optimized BBB model: 1) GGB (synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid, and bovine serum albumin [BSA]), 2) GGC (glycine, glutamic acid, and collagen), 3) GGP (glycine, glutamic acid, and polyvinyl alcohol), 4) BPC (BSA, polyethylene glycol, and collagen), and 5) CPB (collagen, polyvinyl alcohol, and BSA). More importantly, after the permeability test, transmission electron microscopy thin section technology was used to investigate the mechanism behind this process. Transmission electron microscopy thin section images supported the hypothesis that collagen-coated CPB SPIONs displayed better cellular uptake than glycine and glutamine acid-coated GGB SPIONs. Such experimental data demonstrated how one can modify SPIONs to better deliver drugs to the brain to treat a wide range of neurological disorders.

  2. Development and Testing of Iron Based Phantoms as Standards for the Diagnosis of Microbleeds and Oxygen Saturation with Applications in Dementia, Stroke, and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    discrete Laplacian operator. [16] where is the phase value of the pixel at index (i,j,k), and for a right-handed system. The right hand side of Eq...1993; Dexter et al., 1991). Increased iron accumulation has been detected in chronic hem- orrhage,MS lesions, cerebral infarction, anemia , thalassemia

  3. In-situ Characterization and Mapping of Iron Compounds in Alzheimer's Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collingwood, J F; Mikhaylova, A; Davidson, M; Batich, C; Streit, W J; Terry, J; Dobson, J [IIT; (Keele); (Florida)

    2008-06-16

    There is a well-established link between iron overload in the brain and pathology associated with neurodegeneration in a variety of disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's (HD) diseases. This association was first discovered in AD by Goodman in 1953, where, in addition to abnormally high concentrations of iron in autopsy brain tissue, iron has also been shown to accumulate at sites of brain pathology such as senile plaques. However, since this discovery, progress in understanding the origin, role and nature of iron compounds associated with neurodegeneration has been slow. Here we report, for the first time, the location and characterization of iron compounds in human AD brain tissue sections. Iron fluorescence was mapped over a frontal-lobe tissue section from an Alzheimer's patient, and anomalous iron concentrations were identified using synchrotron X-ray absorption techniques at 5 {micro}m spatial resolution. Concentrations of ferritin and magnetite, a magnetic iron oxide potentially indicating disrupted brain-iron metabolism, were evident. These results demonstrate a practical means of correlating iron compounds and disease pathology in-situ and have clear implications for disease pathogenesis and potential therapies.

  4. Certain types of iron oxide nanoparticles are not suited to passively target inflammatory cells that infiltrate the brain in response to stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Christoph; Datwyler, Anna Lena; Wiekhorst, Frank; Trahms, Lutz; Lindquist, Randall; Schellenberger, Eyk; Mueller, Susanne; Schütz, Gunnar; Roohi, Farnoosh; Ide, Andreas; Füchtemeier, Martina; Gertz, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Ulrike; Endres, Matthias; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Farr, Tracy D

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous administration of iron oxide nanoparticles during the acute stage of experimental stroke can produce signal intensity changes in the ischemic region. This has been attributed, albeit controversially, to the infiltration of iron-laden blood-borne macrophages. The properties of nanoparticles that render them most suitable for phagocytosis is a matter of debate, as is the most relevant timepoint for administration. Both of these questions are examined in the present study. Imaging experiments were performed in mice with 30 minutes of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Iron oxide nanoparticles with different charges and sizes were used, and mice received 300 μmol Fe/kg intravenously: either superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), ultrasmall SPIOs, or very small SPIOs. The particles were administered 7 days before MCAO, at the time of reperfusion, or 72 hours after MCAO. Interestingly, there was no observable signal change in the ischemic brains that could be attributed to iron. Furthermore, no Prussian blue-positive cells were found in the brains or blood leukocytes, despite intense staining in the livers and spleens. This implies that the nanoparticles selected for this study are not phagocytosed by blood-borne leukocytes and do not enter the ischemic mouse brain. PMID:23443176

  5. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) transport afatinib and restrict its oral availability and brain accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoppe, Stéphanie; Sparidans, Rolf W; Wagenaar, Els; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2017-03-10

    Afatinib is a highly selective, irreversible inhibitor of EGFR and (HER)-2. It is orally administered for the treatment of patients with EGFR mutation-positive types of metastatic NSCLC. We investigated whether afatinib is a substrate for the multidrug efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 and whether these transporters influence oral availability and brain and other tissue accumulation of afatinib. We used in vitro transport assays to assess human (h)ABCB1-, hABCG2- or murine (m)Abcg2-mediated transport of afatinib. To study the single and combined roles of Abcg2 and Abcb1a/1b in oral afatinib disposition, we used appropriate knockout mouse strains. Afatinib was transported well by hABCB1, hABCG2 and mAbcg2 in vitro. Upon oral administration of afatinib, Abcg2(-/-), Abcb1a/1b(-/-) and Abcb1a/1b(-/-);Abcg2(-/-) mice displayed a 4.2-, 2.4- and 7-fold increased afatinib plasma AUC0-24 compared with wild-type mice. Abcg2-deficient strains also displayed decreased afatinib plasma clearance. At 2h, relative brain accumulation of afatinib was not significantly altered in the single knockout strains, but 23.8-fold increased in Abcb1a/1b(-/-);Abcg2(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. Abcg2 and Abcb1a/1b restrict oral availability and brain accumulation of afatinib. Inhibition of these transporters may therefore be of clinical importance for patients with brain (micro)metastases positioned behind an intact blood-brain barrier.

  6. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  7. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  8. Brain antioxidant responses to acute iron and copper intoxications in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprine, Jimena; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Fuda, Julián; Torti, Horacio; Castro-Parodi, Mauricio; Damiano, Alicia; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2014-11-01

    Dose- and time-dependent antioxidant responses to Fe (0-60 mg kg(-1)) and Cu overloads (0-30 mg kg(-1)) in rat brains are described by the C50 and the t1/2, the brain metal concentration and the time for half maximal oxidative responses. Brain GSH and the GSH/GSSG ratio markedly decreased after Fe and Cu treatments (50-80%) with a t1/2 of 9-10 h for GSH and of 4 h for GSH/GSSG for both metals. The GSH/GSSG ratio was the most sensitive indicator of brain oxidative stress. The decrease of GSH and the increase of in vivo chemiluminescence had similar time courses. The C50 for brain chemiluminescence, GSH and hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants were in similar ranges (32-36 μg Fe g(-1) brain and 10-18 μg Cu g(-1) brain), which indicated a unique free-radical mediated process for each metal. The brain concentration of hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants decreased after Fe and Cu loads; hydrophilic antioxidants decreased by 46-68% with a t1/2 of 10-11 h and lipophilic antioxidants decreased by 75-45% with a t1/2 of 10-12 h. Cu,Zn-SOD and CAT activities and the protein expression were adaptively increased (100-90% after Fe and Cu loads), with a t1/2 of 8-12 h. GPx-4 activity decreased after both metal loads by 73-27% with a t1/2 of 8-4 h with decreased protein expression.

  9. Heavy metal accumulation in the above-ground vegetation and soil around an iron smelting factory in Ile-Ife, southwestern Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel F. Isola; Olusanya A. Olatunji; Akinjide M. Afolabi; Ademayowa A. Omodara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the accumulation of heavy metals in the above-ground vegetation and soil around an iron smelting factory located at the Fashina Area, Ile-Ife, Osun State, southwestern Nigeria. This was with a view to establish baseline data which can be used for assessing the impact of the steel processing industry in the area. Samples of the two most common herbaceous species (Chromolaena odorataand Aspilia africana) around the factory were randomly collected at 10 m away from the wall of the factory, and soil samples were randomly collected at 0–15 cm depths in the same area. The plant species were oven-dried, put through a mixed acid digestion procedure, and, along with soil samples, were analyzed for N, P, K, C, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Cr using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The data obtained were subjected to appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. The results revealed that the soils were slightly acidic, with pH values of 6.23±0.24 in the dry season and 6.10±0.16 in the rainy season. There was a significant difference (P P > N in both Aspilia africana andChromolaena odorata. In the dry season, C percentage concentration was higher inAspilia africana, while the other elements followed the trend observed in the rainy season. The concentration of Zn was higher inAspilia af-ricana in both the polluted site and the control site in the rainy season, while the concentrations of the other heavy metals were higher inChromolaena odoratain the dry season. This study revealed that the heavy metal concentration varied with the plant species and also with the prevailing seasonal conditions. Also, the accumulation and concentration of heavy metals in both plant species and in the soil indicated a potential hazard of the factory to the local environment.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of post-ischemic blood-brain barrier damage with PEGylated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-Fang; Qian, Cheng; An, Yan-Li; Chang, Di; Ju, Sheng-Hong; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage during ischemia may induce devastating consequences like cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation. This study presents a novel strategy for dynamically imaging of BBB damage with PEGylated supermagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as contrast agents. The employment of SPIONs as contrast agents made it possible to dynamically image the BBB permeability alterations and ischemic lesions simultaneously with T2-weighted MRI, and the monitoring could last up to 24 h with a single administration of PEGylated SPIONs in vivo. The ability of the PEGylated SPIONs to highlight BBB damage by MRI was demonstrated by the colocalization of PEGylated SPIONs with Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection of SPION-PEG/Gd-DTPA into a mouse. The immunohistochemical staining also confirmed the leakage of SPION-PEG from cerebral vessels into parenchyma. This study provides a novel and convenient route for imaging BBB alteration in the experimental ischemic stroke model.

  11. Antioxidant and iron-binding properties of curcumin, capsaicin, and S-allylcysteine reduce oxidative stress in rat brain homogenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairam, Amichand; Fogel, Ronen; Daya, Santy; Limson, Janice L

    2008-05-14

    Research demonstrates that antioxidants and metal chelators may be of beneficial use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated the antioxidant and metal-binding properties of curcumin, capsaicin, and S-allylcysteine, which are major components found in commonly used dietary spice ingredients turmeric, chilli, and garlic, respectively. The DPPH assay demonstrates that these compounds readily scavenge free radicals. These compounds significantly curtail iron- (Fe2+) and quinolinic acid (QA)-induced lipid peroxidation and potently scavenge the superoxide anion generated by 1 mM cyanide in rat brain homogenate. The ferrozine assay was used to measure the extent of Fe2+ chelation, and electrochemistry was employed to measure the Fe3+ binding activity of curcumin, capsaicin, and S-allylcysteine. Both assays demonstrate that these compounds bind Fe2+ and Fe3+ and prevent the redox cycling of iron, suggesting that this may be an additional method through which these agents reduce Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates the antioxidant and metal-binding properties of these spice ingredients, and it is hereby postulate that these compounds have important implications in the prevention or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  12. Bio-accumulation of copper, zinc, iron and manganese in oyster Saccostrea cucullata, Snail Cerithium rubus and Clam Tellina angulata from the Bombay coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Nair, V.R.; Moraes, C.

    and C. rubus. Sexwise, iron content was high in male and manganese in female oysters. In T. angulata male specimens showed maximum zinc content. Stationwise, difference in copper and iron was significant in C. rubus. In general, copper and zinc...

  13. Specific accumulation of {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose in three-dimensional long-term cultures of human and rodent brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocke, C.; Prante, O.; Kuwert, T. [Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Bluemcke, I.; Jeske, I. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Romstoeck, J. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Stefan, H. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Aim: Organotypic slice cultures (OSC) of human brain specimens represent an intriguing experimental model for translational studies addressing, e.g., stem cell transplantation in neurodegenerative diseases or targeting invasion by malignant glioma ex vivo. However, long-term viability and phenomena of structural reorganization of human OSC remain to be further characterized. Here, we report the use of {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose (FDG) for evaluating the viability of brain slice preparations obtained either from postnatal rats or human hippocampal specimens. Methods: Anatomically well preserved human hippocampi obtained from epilepsy surgery and rat hippocampus slice cultures obtained from six day old Wistar rats were dissected into horizontal slices. The slices were incubated with FDG in phosphate buffered saline up to 1 h, either with or without supplementation of glucose at a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml. Radioactivity within the medium or slice cultures was measured using a gamma-counter. In addition, distribution of radioactivity was autoradiographically visualized and quantified as counts per mm{sup 2}. Results: In rat hippocampal slices, FDG accumulated with 1 300 000 {+-} 68 000 counts/mm{sup 2}, whereas the incorporation of the radioactive label in human slices was in the order of 1 500 000 {+-} 370 000 counts/mm{sup 2}. The elevation of glucose concentration within the medium led to a significant three-fold decrease of FDG accumulation in rat slices and to a 2.4-fold decrease in human specimens. Conclusions: FDG accumulated in organotypic brain cultures of human or rodent origin. FDG is thus suited to investigate the viability of OSC. Furthermore, these preparations open new ways to study the factors governing cerebral FDG uptake in brain tissue ex vivo. (orig.)

  14. Binary and nonbinary description of hypointensity in human brain MR images

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiaojing

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that iron is involved in the mechanism underlying many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. Abnormal (higher) iron accumulation has been detected in the brains of most neurodegenerative patients, especially in the basal ganglia region. Presence of iron leads to changes in MR signal in both magnitude and phase. Accordingly, tissues with high iron concentration appear hypo-intense (darker than usual) in MR contrasts. In this report, we proposed an improved binary hypointensity description and a novel nonbinary hypointensity description based on principle components analysis. Moreover, Kendall's rank correlation coefficient was used to compare the complementary and redundant information provided by the two methods in order to better understand the individual descriptions of iron accumulation in the brain.

  15. Recent advances in disorders of iron metabolism: mutations, mechanisms and modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, C N; Andrews, N C

    2001-10-01

    The spectrum of known disorders of iron metabolism has expanded dramatically over the past few years. Identification of HFE, the gene most commonly mutated in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, has allowed molecular diagnosis and paved the way for identification of other genes, such as TFR2, that are important in non-HFE-associated iron overload. There are clearly several other, unidentified, iron overload disease genes yet to be found. In parallel, our understanding of iron transport has expanded through identification of Fpn1/Ireg1/MTP1, Sfxn1 and DCYTB: Ongoing studies of Friedreich's ataxia, sideroblastic anemia, aceruloplasminemia and neurodegeneration with brain-iron accumulation are clarifying the role for iron in the nervous system. Finally, as the number of known iron metabolic genes increases and their respective functions are ascertained, new opportunities have arisen to identify genetic modifiers of iron homeostasis.

  16. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K; Benner, Eric J; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C

    2016-03-29

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice.

  17. The relationship between iron dyshomeostasis and amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease: Two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Douglas G; Connor, James R; Meadowcroft, Mark D

    2015-09-01

    The dysregulation of iron metabolism in Alzheimer's disease is not accounted for in the current framework of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that impaired iron homeostasis is an early event in Alzheimer's disease progression. Iron dyshomeostasis leads to a loss of function in several enzymes requiring iron as a cofactor, the formation of toxic oxidative species, and the elevated production of beta-amyloid proteins. Several common genetic polymorphisms that cause increased iron levels and dyshomeostasis have been associated with Alzheimer's disease but the pathoetiology is not well understood. A full picture is necessary to explain how heterogeneous circumstances lead to iron loading and amyloid deposition. There is evidence to support a causative interplay between the concerted loss of iron homeostasis and amyloid plaque formation. We hypothesize that iron misregulation and beta-amyloid plaque pathology are synergistic in the process of neurodegeneration and ultimately cause a downward cascade of events that spiral into the manifestation of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we amalgamate recent findings of brain iron metabolism in healthy versus Alzheimer's disease brains and consider unique mechanisms of iron transport in different brain cells as well as how disturbances in iron regulation lead to disease etiology and propagate Alzheimer's pathology.

  18. 富铁面包酵母的筛选及富集条件研究%Isolation and Accumulation Conditions of Iron-enrich Baker ’s Yeast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 谭海刚; 王滢雪

    2014-01-01

    本文探索获得富铁面包酵母的富集条件。筛选获得一株富铁能力较强的面包酵母菌株QN006。通过单因素实验确定该菌株富铁工艺条件为:铁盐种类为硫酸亚铁,亚铁离子浓度为900μg/mL,添加时间为0h,温度为28℃, pH为5.0。在此条件测得面包酵母QN006的铁富集量为13.92mg/g干菌体,不加糖面团发酵力达到623mL/h。%To explore the accumulation conditions of baker’s yeast which is able to enrich iron. The baker’s yeast strain QN006 with strong iron-rich ability was obtained. By the single factor test, the accumulation conditions of iron-rich were as follows: the inorganic ferrite was FeSO4, the content of Fe2+ was 900μg/mL, the adding time was 0h, the accumulation temperature was 28℃, and the accumulation pH was 5.0. Under these conditions, the iron content and the CO2 production in lean dough of QN006 reached 13.92mg/g (cell dry weight) and 623mL/h, re-spectively.

  19. Brain catalase in the streptozotocin-rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease treated with the iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofic, E; Salkovic-Petrisic, M; Tahirovic, I; Sapcanin, A; Mandel, S; Youdim, M; Riederer, P

    2015-04-01

    Low intracerebroventricular (icv) doses of streptozotocin (STZ) produce regionally specific brain neurochemical changes in rats that are similar to those found in the brain of patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD). Since oxidative stress is thought to be one of the major pathologic processes in sAD, catalase (CAT) activity was estimated in the regional brain tissue of animals treated intracerebroventricularly with STZ and the multitarget iron chelator, antioxidant and MAO-inhibitor M30 [5-(N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline]. Five-day oral pre-treatment of adult male Wistar rats with 10 mg/kg/day M30 dose was followed by a single injection of STZ (1 mg/kg, icv). CAT activity was measured colorimetrically in the hippocampus (HPC), brain stem (BS) and cerebellum (CB) of the control, STZ-, M30- and STZ + M30-treated rats, respectively, 4 weeks after the STZ treatment. STZ-treated rats demonstrated significantly lower CAT activity in all three brain regions in comparison to the controls (p iron chelators such as M30 might also have beneficial effects in this non-transgenic sAD model.

  20. Local neutrophil influx following lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in rats is associated with accumulation of complement activation fragments of the third component (C3) of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, K L; Hicks, R R; Mahesh, J; Billings, B B; Kotwal, G J

    2000-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury can lead to locally destructive secondary events mediated by several inflammatory components. Following lateral fluid-percussion (FP) brain injury in rats, we examined cortical and hippocampal sections for neutrophil infiltration and accumulation of complement component C3. Neutrophil influx into the brain after injury was detected by an improved myeloperoxidase (MPO) microassay and manual cell counting, while C3 accumulation was detected using immunocytochemistry. MPO levels were elevated in the injured cortical tissue, whereas C3 immunoreactivity was increased in both injured cortical and ipsilateral hippocampal sections. These results show that the FP model of head injury leads to an intense local inflammatory reaction and subsequent tissue destruction.

  1. Inorganic mercury accumulation in brain following waterborne exposure elicits a deficit on the number of brain cells and impairs swimming behavior in fish (white seabream-Diplodus sargus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia; Puga, Sónia; Cardoso, Vera; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa; Raimundo, Joana; Barata, Marisa; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Pacheco, Mário; Almeida, Armando

    2016-01-01

    The current study contributes to fill the knowledge gap on the neurotoxicity of inorganic mercury (iHg) in fish through the implementation of a combined evaluation of brain morphometric alterations (volume and total number of neurons plus glial cells in specific regions of the brain) and swimming behavior (endpoints related with the motor activity and mood/anxiety-like status). White seabream (Diplodus sargus) was exposed to realistic levels of iHg in water (2μgL(-1)) during 7 (E7) and 14 days (E14). After that, fish were allowed to recover for 28 days (PE28) in order to evaluate brain regeneration and reversibility of behavioral syndromes. A significant reduction in the number of cells in hypothalamus, optic tectum and cerebellum was found at E7, accompanied by relevant changes on swimming behavior. Moreover, the decrease in the number of neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the cerebellum was followed by a contraction of its volume. This is the first time that a deficit on the number of cells is reported in fish brain after iHg exposure. Interestingly, a recovery of hypothalamus and cerebellum occurred at E14, as evidenced by the identical number of cells found in exposed and control fish, and volume of cerebellum, which might be associated with an adaptive phenomenon. After 28 days post-exposure, the optic tectum continued to show a decrease in the number of cells, pointing out a higher vulnerability of this region. These morphometric alterations coincided with numerous changes on swimming behavior, related both with fish motor function and mood/anxiety-like status. Overall, current data pointed out the iHg potential to induce brain morphometric alterations, emphasizing a long-lasting neurobehavioral hazard.

  2. The Mammalian "Obesogen" Tributyltin Targets Hepatic Triglyceride Accumulation and the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid Metabolism in the Liver and Brain of Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Lyssimachou

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that different Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs interfere with lipid metabolic pathways in mammals and promote fat accumulation, a previously unknown site of action for these compounds. The antifoulant and environmental pollutant tributyltin (TBT, which causes imposex in gastropod snails, induces an "obesogenic" phenotype in mammals, through the activation of the nuclear receptors retinoid X receptor (RXR and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In teleosts, the effects of TBT on the lipid metabolism are poorly understood, particularly following exposure to low, environmental concentrations. In this context, the present work shows that exposure of zebrafish to 10 and 50 ng/L of TBT (as Sn from pre-hatch to 9 months of age alters the body weight, condition factor, hepatosomatic index and hepatic triglycerides in a gender and dose related manner. Furthermore, TBT modulated the transcription of key lipid regulating factors and enzymes involved in adipogenesis, lipogenesis, glucocorticoid metabolism, growth and development in the brain and liver of exposed fish, revealing sexual dimorphic effects in the latter. Overall, the present study shows that the model mammalian obesogen TBT interferes with triglyceride accumulation and the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism in zebrafish and indentifies the brain lipogenic transcription profile of fish as a new target of this compound.

  3. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  4. Delayed hyperoxic ventilation attenuates oxygen-induced free radical accumulation during early reperfusion after global brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yuan, Li; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Min

    2015-02-11

    To compare the effect of immediate and delayed administration of oxygen on the accumulation of free radicals in ischemia-reperfusion animal models. Thirty-two adult male Mongolian gerbils with microdialysis probes implanted in the right hippocampal CA1 were divided randomly into four groups (eight each). One group was sham-operated (Sham group) whereas the other three groups were subjected to 10 min bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). BCAO-treated animals were then subjected to the following: (a) immediate 30% O2 (near normoxia, NO group), (b) immediate 100% O2 (hyperoxia, HO group), and (c) 30% O2 for 60 min, followed by 100% O2 for 60 min (delayed hyperoxia, DHO group). Hippocampal accumulation of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) during reperfusion was estimated by measuring 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 2,5-DHBA in microdialysis perfusate. Hippocampi were removed 2 h after perfusion to measure malondialdehyde, pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, indices of lipid peroxidation, and cellular respiration. At 24 h after BCAO, the histology of hippocampi was analyzed to rate the injury. Immediately after the onset of reperfusion, all groups showed markedly elevated DHBA, which returned to baseline over 1-2 h. Compared with the NO group, the HO group showed significantly higher peak DHBA and slower recovery. In contrast, the DHO group was not significantly different from the NO group in terms of the DHBA level. DHO animals also showed significantly lower hippocampal malondialdehyde accumulation and higher pyruvate dehydrogenase activity at 2 h after reperfusion versus the HO group. Histology analysis also showed animals in the DHO group with ameliorated injury compared with the HO group. Hydroxyl radical accumulation was more sensitive to O2 during early reperfusion. Delayed hyperoxia may re-establish oxidative metabolism while minimizing oxidative stress after CA.

  5. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  6. Effects of cannabinoid receptor 1 (brain) on lipid accumulation by transcriptional control of CPT1A and CPT1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y-F; Yuan, Z-Q; Song, D-G; Zhou, X-H; Wang, Y-Z

    2014-02-01

    CB1 (also known as CNR1), a main receptor for cannabinoids acting at PPARs, can enhance fat deposition. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an enzyme responsible for the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation, is closely related to fat deposition. Whether CB1 can regulate intramuscular adipocytes lipid accumulation through regulation of CPT1 is unclear. Based on the investigation of tissue- and breed-specific CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA expression levels in Jinhua and Landrace pigs, we studied the effects of CB1 on lipid accumulation and CPT1B expression by treating porcine intramuscular adipocytes with CB1 antagonist Δ9-THC and antagonist SR141716. Results showed that muscle CPT1 mRNA was expressed at higher levels in the longissimus dorsi and subcutaneous fat. Liver CPT1A mRNA expression levels were higher in the pancreas, duodenum and liver. Compared with Landrace pigs, CPT1A and CPT1B in the longissimus dorsi of Jinhua pigs were significantly higher and positively correlated with intramuscular fat content. However, for subcutaneous fat, CPT1 levels were significantly lower and negatively correlated with body fat percentage. Δ9-THC significantly increased CB1 mRNA levels and lipid accumulation but decreased CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA levels. Conversely, SR141716 reduced CB1 mRNA levels but increased CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA levels, resulting in decreased lipid accumulation. The CPT1 antagonist etomoxir did not affect CB1 expression, suggesting that CB1 is likely upstream of CPT1A and CPT1B. Meanwhile, PPARA expression was greatly decreased when CPT1A and CPT1B were inhibited and enhanced when CPT1A and CPT1B were activated. Taken together, these data indicate that CB1 can affect intramuscular fat deposition by regulating both CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA expression, with the PPARA signal pathway likely playing a major role in this process.

  7. Accumulation of mercury, selenium and PCBs in domestic duck brain, liver and egg from a contaminated area with an investigation of their redox responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang; Wang, Qian; Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Wenhua

    2013-05-01

    PCBs and methylmercury (MeHg) are two of the most ubiquitous contaminants in the Qingzhen (QZ) area of Guizhou province. The estimated tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) of total mercury (T-Hg), MeHg, PCBs and Se from contaminated rice, eggs and fish by Chinese people in QZ showed that both MeHg and PCBs exceeded the corresponding safety limits. Pearson's correlation analyses of mercury and Se in all duck tissues showed that there were high correlations with T-Hg or MeHg and Se in QZ samples. However, the molar ratio between T-Hg and Se in brain tissues was close to 1, suggesting that Se is antagonistic to mercury toxicity only in brain tissues. Biochemical analyses showed that both superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase increased in the brain, whereas in the liver and egg these enzymes decreased. However, lipid peroxidation and H2O2 generation in liver and egg tissues showed contrary responses, where significant increases in these tissues were seen relative to controls. Mercury and PCBs co-accumulation in liver and egg tissues gave rise to large numbers of free radicals as well as aggravated alkyl free radicals, superoxide radical and nitric oxide, thereby resulting in oxidative stress in these tissues. It can be concluded that an adaptive response of the redox defense system is present in brain tissues, as opposed to a general break down of the redox defense system in liver and egg. The results obtained in this study will provide basic information on exposure and risk assessment in local residents.

  8. A method based on Monte Carlo simulations and voxelized anatomical atlases to evaluate and correct uncertainties on radiotracer accumulation quantitation in beta microprobe studies in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, F.; Dhenain, M.; Gurden, H.; Routier, A. L.; Lefebvre, F.; Mastrippolito, R.; Lanièce, P.

    2008-10-01

    The β-microprobe is a simple and versatile technique complementary to small animal positron emission tomography (PET). It relies on local measurements of the concentration of positron-labeled molecules. So far, it has been successfully used in anesthetized rats for pharmacokinetics experiments and for the study of brain energetic metabolism. However, the ability of the technique to provide accurate quantitative measurements using 18F, 11C and 15O tracers is likely to suffer from the contribution of 511 keV gamma rays background to the signal and from the contribution of positrons from brain loci surrounding the locus of interest. The aim of the present paper is to provide a method of evaluating several parameters, which are supposed to affect the quantification of recordings performed in vivo with this methodology. We have developed realistic voxelized phantoms of the rat whole body and brain, and used them as input geometries for Monte Carlo simulations of previous β-microprobe reports. In the context of realistic experiments (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; local glucose metabolic rate measurement with 18F-FDG and H2O15 blood flow measurements in the somatosensory cortex), we have calculated the detection efficiencies and corresponding contribution of 511 keV gammas from peripheral organs accumulation. We confirmed that the 511 keV gammas background does not impair quantification. To evaluate the contribution of positrons from adjacent structures, we have developed β-Assistant, a program based on a rat brain voxelized atlas and matrices of local detection efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several probe geometries. This program was used to calculate the 'apparent sensitivity' of the probe for each brain structure included in the detection volume. For a given localization of a probe within the brain, this allows us to quantify the different sources of beta signal. Finally, since stereotaxic accuracy is

  9. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Anemia, Depletes Serum Iron Storage, and Alters Local Iron-Related and Adult Brain Gene Expression in Male INS-GAS Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) affects > 500 million people worldwide, and is linked to impaired cognitive development and function in children. Helicobacter pylori, a class 1 carcinogen, infects about half of the world's population, thus creating a high likelihood of overlapping risk. This study determined the effect of H. pylori infection on iron homeostasis in INS-GAS mice. Two replicates of INS-GAS/FVB male mice (n = 9-12/group) were dosed with H. pylori (Hp) strain SS1 or sham dosed at 6-9...

  10. Iron, zinc and copper in the Alzheimer's disease brain: a quantitative meta-analysis. Some insight on the influence of citation bias on scientific opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Matthew; Mueller, Claudius; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Smith, Mark A; Kirsch, Wolff M

    2011-08-01

    Dysfunctional homeostasis of transition metals is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although questioned by some, brain copper, zinc, and particularly iron overload are widely accepted features of AD which have led to the hypothesis that oxidative stress generated from aberrant homeostasis of these transition metals might be a pathogenic mechanism behind AD. This meta-analysis compiled and critically assessed available quantitative data on brain iron, zinc and copper levels in AD patients compared to aged controls. The results were very heterogeneous. A series of heavily cited articles from one laboratory reported a large increase in iron in AD neocortex compared to age-matched controls (piron and this bias was particularly prominent among narrative review articles. Additionally, while zinc was not significantly changed in the neocortex (p=0.29), copper was significantly depleted in AD (p=0.0003). In light of these findings, it will be important to re-evaluate the hypothesis that transition metal overload accounts for oxidative injury noted in AD.

  11. Multicenter R2* mapping in the healthy brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropele, Stefan; Wattjes, Mike P; Langkammer, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The R2* relaxation rate constant has been suggested as a sensitive measure for iron accumulation. The aim of this multi-center study was to assess the inter-scanner and inter-subject variability of R2* mapping and to investigate the relationship between brain volume and R2* in specific...

  12. Calcium, potassium, iron, copper and zinc concentrations in the white and gray matter of the cerebellum and corpus callosum in brain of four genetic mouse strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Guillou, F.

    2005-04-01

    In the central nervous system, metallic cations are involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelinogenesis. Moreover, the metallic cations have been associated with pathogenesis, particularly multiple sclerosis and malignant gliomas. The brain is vulnerable to either a deficit or an excess of available trace elements. Relationship between trace metals and myelinogenesis is important in understanding a severe human pathology : the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. One approach to understand this disease has used mutant or transgenic mice presenting myelin deficiency or excess. But to date, the concentration of trace metals and mineral elements in white and gray matter areas in wild type brain is unknown. The aim of this study is to establish the reference concentrations of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) in the white and gray matter of the mouse cerebellum and corpus callosum. The brains of four different genetic mouse strains (C57Black6/SJL, C57Black6/D2, SJL and C3H) were analyzed. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow PIXE (Proton-induced X-ray emission) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. The results obtained give the first reference values. Furthermore, one species out of the fours testes exhibited differences in calcium, iron and zinc concentrations in the white matter.

  13. Evidence that the major metabolites accumulating in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency disturb mitochondrial energy homeostasis in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Ferreira, Gustavo da Costa; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Zanatta, Angela; Klamt, Fábio; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-11-03

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is an inherited metabolic disorder of fatty acid oxidation in which the affected patients predominantly present high levels of octanoic (OA) and decanoic (DA) acids and their glycine and carnitine by-products in tissues and body fluids. It is clinically characterized by episodic encephalopathic crises with coma and seizures, as well as by progressive neurological involvement, whose pathophysiology is poorly known. In the present work, we investigated the in vitro effects of OA and DA on various parameters of energy homeostasis in mitochondrial preparations from brain of young rats. We found that OA and DA markedly increased state 4 respiration and diminished state 3 respiration as well as the respiratory control ratio, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the matrix NAD(P)H levels. In addition, DA-elicited increase in oxygen consumption in state 4 respiration was partially prevented by atractyloside, indicating the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocator. OA and DA also reduced ADP/O ratio, CCCP-stimulated respiration and the activities of respiratory chain complexes. The data indicate that the major accumulating fatty acids in MCADD act as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and as metabolic inhibitors. Furthermore, DA, but not OA, provoked a marked mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release from mitochondria, reflecting a permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Taken together, these data suggest that OA and DA impair brain mitochondrial energy homeostasis that could underlie at least in part the neuropathology of MCADD.

  14. In Vivo Single Scan Detection of Both Iron-Labeled Cells and Breast Cancer Metastases in the Mouse Brain Using Balanced Steady-State Free Precession Imaging at 1.5 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribot, Emeline J.; Martinez-Santiesteban, Francisco M.; Simedrea, Carmen; Steeg, Patricia S.; Chambers, Ann F.; Rutt, Brian K.; Foster, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To simultaneously detect iron-labeled cancer cells and brain tumors in vivo in one scan, the balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) imaging sequence was optimized at 1.5 T on mice developing brain metastases subsequent to the injection of micron-sized iron oxide particle-labeled human breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods b-SSFP sequence parameters (repetition time, flip angle, and receiver bandwidth) were varied and the signal-to-noise ratio, contrast between the brain and tumors, and the number of detected iron-labeled cells were evaluated. Results Optimal b-SSFP images were acquired with a 26 msec repetition time, 35° flip angle, and bandwidth of ±21 kHz. b-SSFP images were compared with T2-weighted 2D fast spin echo (FSE) and 3D spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR) images. The mean tumor-brain contrast-to-noise ratio and the ability to detect iron-labeled cells were the highest in the b-SSFP images. Conclusion A single b-SSFP scan can be used to visualize both iron-labeled cells and brain metastases. PMID:21698713

  15. Brain accumulation of the EML4-ALK inhibitor ceritinib is restricted by P-glycoprotein (P-GP/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Anita; Sparidans, Rolf; Wagenaar, Els; Beijnen, Jacob; Schinkel, Alfred H.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to clarify the roles of the multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 in oral availability and brain accumulation of ceritinib, an oral anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor used to treat metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after progression on crizotinib. Importantly, NSCLC is

  16. N-CAM dysfunction and unexpected accumulation of PSA-NCAM in brain of adult-onset autosomal-dominant leukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Marco; Buccinnà, Barbara; De Marco, Giovanni; Lupino, Elisa; Ramondetti, Cristina; Grifoni, Silvia; Votta, Barbara; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Rinaudo, Maria Teresa

    2010-03-01

    Previously, myelin from cerebral white matter (CWM) of two subjects of a family with orthochromatic adult-onset autosomal-dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) was disclosed to exhibit defective large isoform of myelin-associated glycoprotein (L-MAG) and patchy distribution only in the elder subject. L-MAG and neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) (N-CAM 180, 140, and 120) are structurally related and concur to myelin/axon interaction. In early developmental stages, in neurons and glia N-CAM is converted into polysialylated (PSA)-NCAM by two sialyltransferases sialyltransferase-X (STX) and polysialyltransferase-1 (PST). Notably, PSA-NCAM disrupts N-CAM adhesive properties and is nearly absent in the adult brain. Here, CWM extracts and myelin of the two subjects were searched for the expression pattern of the N-CAM isoforms and PSA-NCAM, and their CWM was evaluated for N-CAM, STX and PST gene copy number and gene expression as mRNA. Biochemically, we disclosed that in CWM extracts and myelin from both subjects, PSA-NCAM accumulates, N-CAM 180 considerably increases, N-CAM 140 is modestly modified and N-CAM 120 remarkably decreases; duplication of genes encoding N-CAM, STX and PST was not revealed, whereas PST mRNA was clearly increased. Immunohistochemically, in CWM of both subjects, we found an unusually diffuse accumulation of PSA-NCAM without inflammation markers. PSA-NCAM persistence, up-regulated PST mRNA and previously uncovered defective L-MAG may be early pathogenetic events in this ADLD form.

  17. Effects on the accumulation of calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, copper and zinc of adding the two inorganic forms of selenium to solution cultures of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longchamp, M; Angeli, N; Castrec-Rouelle, M

    2016-01-01

    The addition of selenate or selenite to common fertilizers for crop production could be an effective way of producing selenium-rich food and feed. However, this would be feasible only if the increase in plant selenium (Se) content did not negatively influence the uptake of other essential elements. We therefore need to understand the interactions between Se and other major and trace elements during uptake by the plant. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of inorganic forms of Se on the accumulation of selected macronutrients (Ca and Mg) and micronutrients (Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu). Those essential elements are involved in the oxidative balance of cells. Zea mays seedlings were grown hydroponically in growth chambers in nutrient solutions to which we added 10, 50 or 1000 μg.L(-1) of selenate and/or selenite. Cation accumulation was significantly affected by the addition of 50 μg.L(-1) or 1000 μg.L(-1) Se, but not by the presence of 10 μg.L(-1) of Se in the nutrient solution. The highest concentration (1000 μg.L(-1)) of Se in the nutrient solution affected the accumulation of essential cations in Zea mays: selenate tended to increase the accumulation of Mg, Zn and Mn, whereas a selenate/selenite mixture tended to decrease the accumulation of Ca, Mg, Zn and Mn. Only Fe accumulation was unaffected by Se whatever its form or concentration. Selenium may also affect the distribution of cations on Zea mays. For example, levels of Mg and Zn translocation to the shoots were lower in the presence of selenite.

  18. Iron Chelation and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey J. Weigel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen.

  19. Significant glial alterations in response to iron loading in a novel organotypic hippocampal slice culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Sinead; McMahon, Jill; Owens, Peter; FitzGerald, Una

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant iron deposition in the brain is associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. To study the collective response to iron loading, we have used hippocampal organotypic slices as a platform to develop a novel ex vivo model of iron accumulation. We demonstrated differential uptake and toxicity of iron after 12 h exposure to 10 μM ferrous ammonium sulphate, ferric citrate or ferrocene. Having established the supremacy of ferrocene in this model, the cultures were then loaded with 0.1–100 μM ferrocene for 12 h. One μM ferrocene exposure produced the maximal 1.6-fold increase in iron compared with vehicle. This was accompanied by a 1.4-fold increase in ferritin transcripts and mild toxicity. Using dual-immunohistochemistry, we detected ferritin in oligodendrocytes, microglia, but rarely in astrocytes and never in neurons in iron-loaded slice cultures. Moreover, iron loading led to a 15% loss of olig2-positive cells and a 16% increase in number and greater activation of microglia compared with vehicle. However, there was no appreciable effect of iron loading on astrocytes. In what we believe is a significant advance on traditional mono- or dual-cultures, our novel ex vivo slice-culture model allows characterization of the collective response of brain cells to iron-loading. PMID:27808258

  20. In vivo assessment of iron content of the cerebral cortex in healthy aging using 7-Tesla T2*-weighted phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Mathijs; Doan, Nhat Trung; van Rooden, Sanneke; Versluis, Maarten J; van Lew, Baldur; Milles, Julien; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Buchem, Mark A

    2016-09-15

    Accumulation of brain iron has been suggested as a biomarker of neurodegeneration. Increased iron has been seen in the cerebral cortex in postmortem studies of neurodegenerative diseases and healthy aging. Until recently, the diminutive thickness of the cortex and its relatively low iron content have hampered in vivo study of cortical iron accumulation. Using phase images of a T2*-weighted sequence at ultrahigh field strength (7 Tesla), we examined the iron content of 22 cortical regions in 70 healthy subjects aged 22-80 years. The cortex was automatically segmented and parcellated, and phase shift was analyzed using an in-house developed method. We found a significant increase in phase shift with age in 20 of 22 cortical regions, concurrent with current understanding of cortical iron accumulation. Our findings suggest that increased cortical iron content can be assessed in healthy aging in vivo. The high spatial resolution and sensitivity to iron of our method make it a potentially useful tool for studying cortical iron accumulation in healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  2. "Effect of the drug transporters ABCB1, ABCC2, and ABCG2 on the disposition and brain accumulation of the taxane analog BMS-275,183".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Serena; Pluim, Dick; Beijnen, Jos H; Mazzanti, Roberto; van Tellingen, Olaf; Schellens, Jan H M

    2014-12-01

    BMS-275,183 is a novel oral C-4 methyl carbonate analogue of paclitaxel. Recently, a drug-drug interaction between BMS-275,183 and benzimidazole proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) was suggested in clinical trials resulting in elevated drug exposure and toxicity. We explored whether the interaction takes place at the level of P-glycoprotein (Pgp, MDR1, ABCB1), Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP, ABCG2) and MRP2 (ABCC2) using in vitro and in vivo models. In vitro cell survival, drug accumulation, efflux and transport studies with BMS-275,183 were performed employing MDCKII (wild-type, MDR1, BCRP, MRP2) and LLCPK (wild-type and MDR1) cells. In vivo the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of BMS-275,183 after p.o. and i.v. administration were explored in Mdr1a/1b(-/-) and wild-type mice, in presence or absence of the PPI pantoprazole. Results In vitro, BMS-275,183 was found to be a good substrate for MDR1, a moderate substrate for MRP2 and not a substrate for BCRP. In vivo, oral bioavailability, plasma AUC0-6h and brain concentrations were significantly 1.5-, 4-, and 2-fold increased, respectively, in Mdr1a/1b(-/-) compared with wild-type mice (p < 0.001). However, oral co-administration of pantoprazole (40 mg/kg) did not alter the pharmacokinetics of BMS-275,183 in wild-type mice. Conclusions BMS-275,183 is efficiently transported by Pgp and to a lesser extent by MRP2 in vitro. Genetic deletion of Pgp significantly altered the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of p.o. and i.v. administered BMS-275,183 in Mdr1a/1b-/- compared to wild-type mice. Oral co-administration of BMS-275,183 with pantoprazole did not affect the pharmacokinetics of BMS-275,183 in wild-type mice, suggesting no interaction with PPI at the dose employed.

  3. Ceruloplasmin and iron in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: a synopsis of recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, Jakob; Snaedal, Jón; Tórsdóttir, Gudlaug; Jóhannesson, Torkell

    2012-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) concentration and oxidative activity in serum are lowered in Parkinson's disease (PD). In most PD patients, iron increases in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. In PD, the low Cp concentration and activity in serum and the high iron amounts in the substantia nigra appears to be correlated. An hereditary background is common in PD and variations in the Cp gene that have been found in PD are associated with high iron levels in the substantia nigra. Variations in Cp synthesis and in the incorporation of copper into the Cp molecule are essential features of PD. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the Cp activity in serum is lowered but not the concentration, except in the advanced stages of the disease. Generally, iron is not increased in the AD brain. In the AD brain, iron accumulates in neuritic plaques and in neurofibrillary tangles. There is also increased risk of iron-mediated tissue damage, which may possibly be counteracted by Cp. At the same time, the AD brain is short in copper, which presumably results in the deficient activity of many copper enzymes in the brain, in addition to Cp. Lowered Cp activity in serum most likely stems from lessened incorporation of copper in the Cp molecule and similar incorporation defects might also apply to other copper enzymes in AD.

  4. Astrocytic and neuronal accumulation of elevated extracellular K+ with a 2/3 K+/Na+ flux ratio - consequences for energy metabolism, osmolarity and higher brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain excitation increases neuronal Na+ concentration by 2 major mechanisms: i Na+influx caused by glutamatergic synaptic activity; and ii action-potential-mediateddepolarization by Na+ influx followed by repolarizating K+ efflux, increasingextracellular K+ concentration. This review deals mainly with the latter and it concludesthat clearance of extracellular K+ is initially mainly effectuated by Na+,K+-ATPasemediatedK+ uptake into astrocytes, at K+ concentrations above ~10 mM aided by uptakeof Na+, K+ and 2 Cl- by the cotransporter NKCC1. Since operation of the astrocytic Na+,K+-ATPase requires K+-dependent glycogenolysis for stimulation of the intracellularATPase site, it ceases after normalization of extracellular K+ concentration. This allowsK+ release via the inward rectifying K+ channel Kir1.4, perhaps after trans-astrocyticconnexin- and/or pannexin-mediated K+ transfer, which would be a key candidate fordetermination by synchronization-based computational analysis and may have signalingeffects. Spatially dispersed K+ release would have little effect on extracellular K+concentration and allow K+ accumulation by the less powerful neuronal Na+,K+-ATPase,which is not stimulated by increases in extracellular K+. Since the Na+,K+-ATPaseexchanges 3 Na+ with 2 K+, it creates extracellular hypertonicity and cell shrinkage.Hypertonicity also stimulates NKCC1, which, aided by -adrenergic stimulation of theNa+,K+-ATPase, causes regulatory volume increase, furosemide-inhibited undershoot in[K+]e and perhaps facilitation of the termination of slow neuronal hyperpolarization(sAHP, with behavioral consequences. The ion transport processes involved minimizeionic disequilibria caused by the asymmetric Na+,K+-ATPase fluxes.

  5. Fetal and neonatal iron deficiency exacerbates mild thyroid hormone insufficiency effects on male thyroid hormone levels and brain thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas W; Prohaska, Joseph R; Georgieff, Michael K; Anderson, Grant W

    2014-03-01

    Fetal/neonatal iron (Fe) and iodine/TH deficiencies lead to similar brain developmental abnormalities and often coexist in developing countries. We recently demonstrated that fetal/neonatal Fe deficiency results in a mild neonatal thyroidal impairment, suggesting that TH insufficiency contributes to the neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with Fe deficiency. We hypothesized that combining Fe deficiency with an additional mild thyroidal perturbation (6-propyl-2-thiouracil [PTU]) during development would more severely impair neonatal thyroidal status and brain TH-responsive gene expression than either deficiency alone. Early gestation pregnant rats were assigned to 7 different treatment groups: control, Fe deficient (FeD), mild TH deficient (1 ppm PTU), moderate TH deficient (3 ppm PTU), severe TH deficient (10 ppm PTU), FeD/1 ppm PTU, or FeD/3 ppm PTU. FeD or 1 ppm PTU treatment alone reduced postnatal day 15 serum total T4 concentrations by 64% and 74%, respectively, without significantly altering serum total T3 concentrations. Neither treatment alone significantly altered postnatal day 16 cortical or hippocampal T3 concentrations. FeD combined with 1 ppm PTU treatment produced a more severe effect, reducing serum total T4 by 95%, and lowering hippocampal and cortical T3 concentrations by 24% and 31%, respectively. Combined FeD/PTU had a more severe effect on brain TH-responsive gene expression than either treatment alone, significantly altering Pvalb, Dio2, Mbp, and Hairless hippocampal and/or cortical mRNA levels. FeD/PTU treatment more severely impacted cortical and hippocampal parvalbumin protein expression compared with either individual treatment. These data suggest that combining 2 mild thyroidal insults during development significantly disrupts thyroid function and impairs TH-regulated brain gene expression.

  6. Iron Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Menu Donate Treatments Therapies Iron Chelation Iron chelation therapy is the main treatment ... have iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you ...

  7. Effects of digoxin on cardiac iron content in rat model of iron overload

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri, Hamid Reza; Shahouzehi, Beydolah; Masoumi-Ardakani, Yaser; Iranpour, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Plasma iron excess can lead to iron accumulation in heart, kidney and liver. Heart failure is a clinical widespread syndrome. In thalassemia, iron overload cardiomyopathy is caused by iron accumulation in the heart that leads to cardiac damage and heart failure. Digoxin increases the intracellular sodium concentration by inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase that affects Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX), which raises intracellular calcium and thus attenuates heart failure. The mechanism of iron upta...

  8. Influence of Iron Supplementation on DMT1 (IRE)-induced Transport of Lead by Brain Barrier Systems in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Dai Zhi; AI Jun Tao; FANG Hong Juan; SUN Ru Bao; SHI Yun; WANG Li Li; WANG Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential involvement of DMT1 (IRE) protein in the brain vascular system in vivo during Pb exposure. Methods Three groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Pb in drinking water, among which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once every other day as the low and high Fe treatment group, respectively, for 6 weeks. At the same time, the group only supplied with high Fe was also set as a reference. The animals were decapitated, then brain capillary-rich fraction was isolate from cerebral cortex. Western blot method was used to identify protein expression, and RT-PCR to detect the change of the mRNA. Results Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in cerebral cortex. Low Fe dose significantly reduced the cortex Pb levels, However, high Fe dose increased the cortex Pb levels. Interestingly, changes of DMT1 (IRE) protein in brain capillary-rich fraction were highly related to the Pb level, but those of DMT1 (IRE) mRNA were not significantly different. Moreover, the consistent changes in the levels of p-ERK1/2 or IRP1 with the changes in the levels of DMT1 (IRE). Conclusion These results suggest that Pb is transported into the brain through DMT1 (IRE), and the ERK MAPK pathway is involved in DMT1 (IRE)-mediated transport regulation in brain vascular system in vivo.

  9. Brain tumor magnetic targeting and biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles linked with 70-kDa heat shock protein study by nonlinear longitudinal response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, Maxim A.; Nikolaev, Boris P.; Ryzhov, Vyacheslav A.; Yakovleva, Ludmila Y.; Dobrodumov, Anatolii V.; Marchenko, Yaroslav Y.; Margulis, Boris A.; Pitkin, Emil; Guzhova, Irina V.

    2015-08-01

    Brain tumor targeting efficiency and biodistribution of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with heat shock protein Hsp70 (SPION-Hsp70) were evaluated in experimental glioma model. Synthesized conjugates were characterized using the method of longitudinal nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles to a weak ac magnetic field with measurements of second harmonic of magnetization (NLR-M2). Cellular interaction of magnetic conjugates was analyzed in 9L glioma cell culture. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors was assessed by the latter approach as well. The efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates for contrast enhancement in the orthotopic model of 9L glioma was assessed by MR imaging (11 T). Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with Hsp70 had the relaxivity properties of the MR-negative contrast agents. Morphological observation and cell viability test demonstrated good biocompatibility of Hsp70-conjugates. Analysis of the T2-weighted MR scans in tumor-bearing rats demonstrated the high efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates in contrast enhancement of the glioma in comparison to non-conjugated nanoparticles. High contrast enhancement of the glioma was provided by the accumulation of the SPION-Hsp70 particles in the glioma tissue (as shown by the histological assay). Biodistribution analysis by NLR-M2 measurements evidenced the many-fold increase (~40) in the tumor-to-normal brain uptake ratio in the Hsp70-conjugates treated animals. Biodistribution pattern of Hsp70-decorated nanoparticles differed from that of non-conjugated SPIONs. Coating of the magnetic nanoparticles with Hsp70 protein enhances the tumor-targeting ability of the conjugates that could be applied in the MR imaging of the malignant brain tumors.

  10. Thyroid hormone-dependent formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) in the neonatal brain is not exacerbated under conditions of low dietary iron (FeD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, S R; Bastian, T W; Wang, Y; Kosian, P; Anderson, G W; Gilbert, M E

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development and insufficiencies can lead to structural abnormalities in specific brain regions. Administration of the goitrogen propylthiouracil (PTU) reduces TH production by inhibiting thyroperoxidase (TPO), an enzyme that oxidizes iodide for the synthesis of TH. TPO activity is iron (Fe)-dependent and dietary iron deficiency (FeD) also reduces circulating levels of TH. We have previously shown that modest degrees of TH insufficiency induced in pregnant rat dams alters the expression of TH-responsive genes in the cortex and hippocampus of the neonate, and results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) in the corpus callosum (Royland et al., 2008, Bastian et al., 2014, Gilbert et al., 2014). The present experiment investigated if FeD alone was sufficient to induce a SBH or if FeD would augment SBH formation at lower doses of PTU. One set of pregnant rats was administered 0, 1, 3, or 10ppm of PTU via drinking water starting on gestational day (GD) 6. FeD was induced in a 2nd set of dams beginning on GD2. A third set of dams received the FeD diet from GD2 paired with either 1ppm or 3ppm PTU beginning on GD6. All treatments continued until the time of sacrifice. On PN18, one female pup from each litter was sacrificed and the brain examined for SBH. We observed lower maternal, PN2 and PN18 pup serum T4 in response to PTU. FeD reduced serum T4 in pups on PN16, but did not affect serum T4 in dams or PN2 pups. Neither did FeD in combination with PTU alter T4 levels in dams on PN18 or pups on PN2 compared to PTU treatment alone. By PN16, however more severe T4 reductions were observed in pups when FeD was combined with PTU. SBH increased with increasing dosage of PTU, but counter to our hypothesis, no SBH was detected in the offspring of FeD dams. As such, T4 levels in dams and newborn pups rather than older neonates appear to be a better predictor SBH associated with TH insufficiency. These data indirectly

  11. Disturbance of iron metabolism in brain and Alzheimer's disease%脑铁代谢紊乱与阿尔茨海默病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符敬坦; 王璞; 郭闯

    2013-01-01

    脑内铁代谢的异常和其所致的氧化应激与阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)的发病有关.AD是常见于老年人的一种神经退行性疾病,其特征性的病理改变主要是脑内神经细胞外β-淀粉样蛋白(β-amyloid,Aβ)的沉积形成老年斑(senile plague,SP)、胞内神经原纤维缠结(neurofibrillary tangles,NFTs)和胆碱能神经元丢失.研究证实,在普通老年人和AD患者脑内有铁沉积增多的趋势,且铁等过渡金属离子与APP、Aβ和Tau蛋白密切相关,提示铁可能参与了AD的发病和进展等病理生理过程.因此,深入探讨铁在AD发病中可能的作用,有利于了解AD的发病机制,从而为AD疾病的治疗提供新的靶点.%The dysregulation of iron homeostasis and consequential induction of oxidative stress in the brain were related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease(AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease often occurred in the old stage, with main pathologically features of the extracellular β-amyloid (A β) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and selective cholinergic neuronal loss in the brain. Recent studies have shown that Tau, APP and its proteolytic product A β are associated with metal homeostasis in the AD brain, suggesting that exposure to metals may potentially modulate AD pathology, either triggering or ameliorating disease progression. Exploring the effect of iron on the pathogenesis of AD may provide a new target for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  12. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  13. 医学综述杂志社铁离子对大脑毒性的研究进展%Research Progress of Toxicity of Iron Ion to Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐金

    2012-01-01

    铁离子广泛存在于脑组织各部位,基底神经节含量最高,红核、黑质和齿状核较多,大脑皮质和小脑相对较少.铁毒性作用主要基于芬顿化学作用,铁与活性氧中间物反应,可产生高反应的自由基.脑内不同的细胞对铁超载及血红蛋白的防御反应,都可引起对神经元的毒性作用.自由铁通过产生的自由基对脑有高度的毒性作用,然而,在脑损伤和脑出血中铁的浓度是否是导致神经元损伤和死亡的必然因素,血液是否是促使神经元死亡的原因尚不是很清楚.%Iron ion exists extensively in each part of brain tissue, mostly in basal ganglia, more in red nucleus , substantia nigra and dentate nucleus, less in cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Toxic effect of iron is mainly based on Fenton chemical actions,the actions of iron and reactive oxygen intermediates,generate highly-active free radicals. Various cells in brain have the defensive reaction against iron overloading and hemoglobin, which can all induce the toxicity effect in neuron. Free iron produced free radical has high toxicity to brain. Whether the density of iron is a necessary factor to induce neuron injuries and death and if cerebral hemorrhage can promote the neuron death is still not clear.

  14. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in l...

  15. Iron age: novel targets for iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Carla; Rivella, Stefano

    2014-12-05

    Excess iron deposition in vital organs is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients affected by β-thalassemia and hereditary hemochromatosis. In both disorders, inappropriately low levels of the liver hormone hepcidin are responsible for the increased iron absorption, leading to toxic iron accumulation in many organs. Several studies have shown that targeting iron absorption could be beneficial in reducing or preventing iron overload in these 2 disorders, with promising preclinical data. New approaches target Tmprss6, the main suppressor of hepcidin expression, or use minihepcidins, small peptide hepcidin agonists. Additional strategies in β-thalassemia are showing beneficial effects in ameliorating ineffective erythropoiesis and anemia. Due to the suppressive nature of the erythropoiesis on hepcidin expression, these approaches are also showing beneficial effects on iron metabolism. The goal of this review is to discuss the major factors controlling iron metabolism and erythropoiesis and to discuss potential novel therapeutic approaches to reduce or prevent iron overload in these 2 disorders and ameliorate anemia in β-thalassemia.

  16. In vivo tracing of superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplanted for traumatic brain injury by susceptibility weighted imaging in a rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jing-liang; YANG Yun-jun; LI Hua-li; WANG Juan; WANG Mei-hao; ZHANG Yong

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in vitro, and to monitor the survival and location of these labeled BMSCs in a rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI)sequence.Methods:BMSCs were cultured in vitro and then labeled with SPIO. Totally 24 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly divided into 4 groups: Groups A-D (n=6 for each group). Moderate TBI models of all the rats were developed in the left hemisphere following Feeney's method. Group A was the experimental group and stereotaxic transplantation of BMSCs labeled with SPIO into the region nearby the contusion was conducted in this group 24 hours after TBI modeling. The other three groups were control groups with transplantation of SPIO, unlabeled BMSCs and injection of nutrient solution respectively conducted in Groups B, C and D at the same time. Monitoring of these SPIO-labeled BMSCs by SWI was performed one day,one week and three weeks after implantation.Results: Numerous BMSCs were successfully labeled with SPIO. They were positive for Prussian blue staining and intracytoplasm positive blue stained particles were found under a microscope (×200). Scattered little iron particles were observed in the vesicles by electron microscopy (×5000). MRI of the transplantation sites of the left hemisphere demonstrated a low signal intensity on magnitude images,phase images and SWI images for all the test rats in Group A, and the lesion in the left parietal cortex demonstrated a semicircular low intensity on SWI images, which clearly showed the distribution and migration of BMSCs in the first and third weeks. For Group B, a low signal intensity by MRI was only observed on the first day but undetected during the following examination. No signals were observed in Groups C and D at any time points.Conclusion:SWI sequence in vivo can consecutively and noninvasively trace and demonstrate the

  17. Brain tumor magnetic targeting and biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles linked with 70-kDa heat shock protein study by nonlinear longitudinal response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, Maxim A., E-mail: shevtsov-max@mail.ru [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); A.L. Polenov Russian Research Scientific Institute of Neurosurgery, Mayakovsky str. 12, St. Petersburg 191014 (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, Boris P. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Ryzhov, Vyacheslav A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Yakovleva, Ludmila Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Dobrodumov, Anatolii V. [Institute of Macromolecular Compounds of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Bolshoi pr. 31, St. Petersburg 199004 (Russian Federation); Marchenko, Yaroslav Y. [Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, Pudozhskaya str. 12, St. Petersburg 197110 (Russian Federation); Margulis, Boris A. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Pitkin, Emil [The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 3730 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guzhova, Irina V. [Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Tikhoretsky Ave. 4, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Brain tumor targeting efficiency and biodistribution of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with heat shock protein Hsp70 (SPION–Hsp70) were evaluated in experimental glioma model. Synthesized conjugates were characterized using the method of longitudinal nonlinear response of magnetic nanoparticles to a weak ac magnetic field with measurements of second harmonic of magnetization (NLR-M{sub 2}). Cellular interaction of magnetic conjugates was analyzed in 9L glioma cell culture. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors was assessed by the latter approach as well. The efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates for contrast enhancement in the orthotopic model of 9L glioma was assessed by MR imaging (11 T). Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with Hsp70 had the relaxivity properties of the MR-negative contrast agents. Morphological observation and cell viability test demonstrated good biocompatibility of Hsp70-conjugates. Analysis of the T{sub 2}-weighted MR scans in tumor-bearing rats demonstrated the high efficacy of Hsp70-conjugates in contrast enhancement of the glioma in comparison to non-conjugated nanoparticles. High contrast enhancement of the glioma was provided by the accumulation of the SPION–Hsp70 particles in the glioma tissue (as shown by the histological assay). Biodistribution analysis by NLR-M{sub 2} measurements evidenced the many-fold increase (~40) in the tumor-to-normal brain uptake ratio in the Hsp70-conjugates treated animals. Biodistribution pattern of Hsp70-decorated nanoparticles differed from that of non-conjugated SPIONs. Coating of the magnetic nanoparticles with Hsp70 protein enhances the tumor-targeting ability of the conjugates that could be applied in the MR imaging of the malignant brain tumors. - Highlights: • Second-harmonic nonlinear magnetic response is used for biodistribution analysis. • NLR-M{sub 2} ensures high sensibility in detection of SPIONs in tissue. • SPION–Hsp70 conjugates

  18. International Brain Drain and China’ s Human Capital Accumulation:Based on the Perspective of Study Abroad%跨国人才外流与中国人力资本积累--基于出国留学的视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许家云; 李平; 王永进

    2016-01-01

    人才的跨国外流,究竟是促进了本国的人力资本积累,还是导致了本国人力资本的净损失?回答该问题,对中国在开放经济条件下实施合理的人才开放政策以推动经济增长具有重要意义。本文在开放经济框架内,将人才外流引入人力资本积累的内生决定模型,从理论上探讨了人才外流与本国人力资本积累的关系。在理论分析的基础上,本文进一步使用世界上60个国家和地区2000-2010年的面板数据进行了计量估计。实证结果表明:人才外流与中低收入国家和地区的人力资本积累呈倒“U”型关系,但与高收入国家和地区的人力资本积累线性负相关;人才外流对本国人力资本积累的影响受到本国技能劳动占比和其所生产产品替代弹性的影响。进一步鼓励和合理引导人才尤其是高层次人才的国际流动对提升中国的人力资本水平意义重大。%Whether brain outflow is beneficial to the home countries’ human capital accumulation, or is adverse to its human capital accumulation? Answering this question is of great importance for China to implement reasonable talent policy. This paper analyses the relationship between brain drain and home countries ’ human capital accumulation by taking the brain drain into the endogenously determined model of human capital accumulation in an open economy framework. Furthermore, we test the effects of the brain outflow on home countries’ human capital accumulation by using panel data of 60 countries or regions in the world from 2000-2010 . The results show that:There is an inverted “U” ⁃shaped relationship between brain outflow and the level of human capital for low and middle income countries or regions, but it shows a negative linear relationship with the human capital level in the high income countries or regions; The impact of brain drain on home countries’ human capital accumulation can be

  19. Longitudinal tracking of human fetal cells labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the brain of mice with motor neuron disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bigini

    Full Text Available Stem Cell (SC therapy is one of the most promising approaches for the treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS. Here we employed Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide nanoparticles (SPIOn and Hoechst 33258 to track human Amniotic Fluid Cells (hAFCs after transplantation in the lateral ventricles of wobbler (a murine model of ALS and healthy mice. By in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo approaches we found that: 1 the main physical parameters of SPIOn were maintained over time; 2 hAFCs efficiently internalized SPIOn into the cytoplasm while Hoechst 33258 labeled nuclei; 3 SPIOn internalization did not alter survival, cell cycle, proliferation, metabolism and phenotype of hAFCs; 4 after transplantation hAFCs rapidly spread to the whole ventricular system, but did not migrate into the brain parenchyma; 5 hAFCs survived for a long time in the ventricles of both wobbler and healthy mice; 6 the transplantation of double-labeled hAFCs did not influence mice survival.

  20. Longitudinal Tracking of Human Fetal Cells Labeled with Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in the Brain of Mice with Motor Neuron Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigini, Paolo; Diana, Valentina; Barbera, Sara; Fumagalli, Elena; Micotti, Edoardo; Sitia, Leopoldo; Paladini, Alessandra; Bisighini, Cinzia; De Grada, Laura; Coloca, Laura; Colombo, Laura; Manca, Pina; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Malvestiti, Francesca; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Forloni, Gianluigi; Morbidelli, Massimo; Salmona, Mario; Giardino, Daniela; Mennini, Tiziana; Moscatelli, Davide; Silani, Vincenzo; Cova, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Stem Cell (SC) therapy is one of the most promising approaches for the treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Here we employed Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide nanoparticles (SPIOn) and Hoechst 33258 to track human Amniotic Fluid Cells (hAFCs) after transplantation in the lateral ventricles of wobbler (a murine model of ALS) and healthy mice. By in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo approaches we found that: 1) the main physical parameters of SPIOn were maintained over time; 2) hAFCs efficiently internalized SPIOn into the cytoplasm while Hoechst 33258 labeled nuclei; 3) SPIOn internalization did not alter survival, cell cycle, proliferation, metabolism and phenotype of hAFCs; 4) after transplantation hAFCs rapidly spread to the whole ventricular system, but did not migrate into the brain parenchyma; 5) hAFCs survived for a long time in the ventricles of both wobbler and healthy mice; 6) the transplantation of double-labeled hAFCs did not influence mice survival. PMID:22384217

  1. 神经退行性疾病脑铁负荷的MRI测量研究%Correlation between changes of brain iron content on MRI and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴超; 夏爽; 沈文

    2015-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant metal in the human body, it plays a critical role in the normal functioning neuron. Iron deficiency and iron overload both involve neurodegenerative diseases. The iron deficiency can be seen in restless legs syndrome, while the iron overload may occur in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Understanding the brain iron content changes of neurodegenerative diseases has an important effect on early diagnosis and treatment planning. We reviewed the characteristics of spatial distribution of iron content change in various neurodegenerative diseases.%铁是人体内含量最多的金属元素,在正常功能的神经元中起关键作用. 铁缺乏与铁过载均可导致神经退行性疾病. 神经退行性疾病中的不宁腿综合征可发现脑铁含量的减低,而阿尔茨海默病、帕金森病、亨廷顿病、多发性硬化、肌萎缩脊髓侧索硬化症等疾病发病过程都伴有铁过载. 了解神经退行性疾病脑铁含量的变化对于早期疾病的诊断及临床治疗具有重要的指导意义. 综述不同神经退行性疾病的脑铁含量的空间变化特点.

  2. Increased iron and free radical generation in preclinical Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A; Zhu, Xiongwei; Tabaton, Massimo; Liu, Gang; McKeel, Daniel W; Cohen, Mark L; Wang, Xinglong; Siedlak, Sandra L; Dwyer, Barney E; Hayashi, Takaaki; Nakamura, Masao; Nunomura, Akihiko; Perry, George

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that oxidative stress is one of the earliest, if not the earliest, change that occurs in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Consistent with this, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the clinical precursor of AD, is also characterized by elevations in oxidative stress. Since such stress does not operate in vacuo, in this study we sought to determine whether redox-active iron, a potent source of free radicals, was elevated in MCI and preclinical AD as compared to cognitively-intact age-matched control patients. Increased iron was found at the highest levels both in the cortex and cerebellum from the pre-clinical AD/MCI cases. Interestingly, glial accumulations of redox-active iron in the cerebellum were also evident in preclinical AD patients and tended to increase as patients became progressively cognitively impaired. Our findings suggests that an imbalance in iron homeostasis is a precursor to the neurodegenerative processes leading to AD and that iron imbalance is not necessarily unique to affected regions. In fact, an understanding of iron deposition in other regions of the brain may provide insights into neuroprotective strategies. Iron deposition at the preclinical stage of AD may be useful as a diagnostic tool, using iron imaging methods, as well as a potential therapeutic target, through metal ion chelators.

  3. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delu eSong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich’s ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD.

  4. Brain region-specific perfluoroalkylated sulfonate (PFSA) and carboxylic acid (PFCA) accumulation and neurochemical biomarker Responses in east Greenland polar Bears (Ursus maritimus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kathrine Eggers; Basu, Niladri; Letcher, Robert;

    2015-01-01

    ), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutamine synthetase (GS)) and receptor density (dopamine-2 (D2), muscarinic cholinergic (mAChR) and gamma-butyric acid type A (GABA-A)) along with PFSA and PFCA concentrations. Average brain ∑PFSA concentration was 25ng/g ww where PFOS accounted for 91%. Average ∑PFCA concentration...

  5. Accumulation and aberrant composition of cholesteryl esters in Scrapie-infected N2a cells and C57BL/6 mouse brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Bari Michele A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Cholesterol changes have been described in prion-cell models and in experimental rodent scrapie; yet, the pattern of this association is still controversial. Methods To shed light on the matter, we analysed and compared cholesterol variations in ScN2a cells and in brains of Scrapie-infected C57Bl/6 mice, using two different methods: a fluorimetric-enzymatic cholesterol assay, and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS. Results Compared to uninfected controls, similar cholesterol metabolism anomalies were observed in infected cells and brains by both methods; however, only HPLC-MS revealed statistically significant cholesterol variations, particularly in the cholesteryl esters (CE fraction. HPLC-MS analyses also revealed different fatty acid composition of the CE fraction in cells and brains. In N2a cells, their profile reflected that of serum, while in normal brains cholesteryl-linoleate only was found at detectable levels. Following prion infection, most CE species were increased in the CE pool of ScN2a cells, whereas a conspicuous amount of cholesteryl-arachidonate only was found to contribute to the cerebral increase of CE. Of interest, oral pravastatin administration to Scrapie-infected mice, was associated with a significant reduction of cerebral free cholesterol (FC along with a concomitant further increase of the CE pool, which included increased amounts of both cholesteryl-linoleate and cholesteryl-arachidonate. Conclusion Although mechanistic studies are needed to establish the pathophysiological relevance of changes in cerebral CE concentrations, to the best of our knowledge this is the first report to provide evidence of increased cholesterol esterification in brains of prion-infected mice, untreated and treated with pravastatin.

  6. Ammonia inhibits the C-type natriuretic peptide-dependent cyclic GMP synthesis and calcium accumulation in a rat brain endothelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacka, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Recently we reported a decrease of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-dependent, natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP (cGMP) synthesis in a non-neuronal compartment of cerebral cortical slices of hyperammonemic rats [Zielińska, M., Fresko, I., Konopacka, A., Felipo, V., Albrecht, J., 2007. Hyperammonemia inhibits the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP synthesis in the astrocytic compartment of rat cerebral cortex slices. Neurotoxicology 28, 1260-1263]. Here we accounted for the possible involvement of cerebral capillary endothelial cells in this response by measuring the effect of ammonia on the CNP-mediated cGMP formation and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) accumulation in a rat cerebral endothelial cell line (RBE-4). We first established that stimulation of cGMP synthesis in RBE-4 cells was coupled to protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated Ca2+ influx from the medium which was inhibited by an L-type channel blocker nimodipine. Ammonia treatment (1h, 5mM NH4Cl) evoked a substantial decrease of CNP-stimulated cGMP synthesis which was related to a decreased binding of CNP to NPR2 receptors, and depressed the CNP-dependent [Ca2+]i accumulation in these cells. Ammonia also abolished the CNP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in the absence of Na+. In cells incubated with ammonia in the absence of Ca2+ a slight CNP-dependent increase of [Ca2+]i was observed, most likely representing Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Depression of CNP-dependent cGMP-mediated [Ca2+]i accumulation may contribute to cerebral vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with hyperammonemia or hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Nutritional iron deficiency: the role of oral iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz, J I; Nurchi, V M; Fanni, D; Gerosa, C; Peana, M; Zoroddu, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency represents a relevant health problem mainly in developing countries. Children and pregnant women represent the main target of this disease, and the low amount of bio-available iron mostly depends on plant-based diets. Iron deficiency may have serious consequences, with severe impairment of the immune function leading to infectious diseases. The brain development in embryos and fetuses during gestation can be greatly affected by iron deficiency of the mother with heavy outcomes on the cognition status of children. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in iron absorption and metabolism are the basis for new strategies for developing a therapy for iron deficiency. Different therapeutic strategies are summarized, and iron fortification appears the best tool.

  8. The role of the polymorphic efflux transporter P-glycoprotein on the brain accumulation of d-methylphenidate and d-amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao-Jie; Wang, Jun-Sheng; DeVane, C Lindsay; Williard, Robin L; Donovan, Jennifer L; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Gibson, Brian B; Patrick, Kennerly S; Markowitz, John S

    2006-07-01

    The psychostimulant medications methylphenidate (MPH) and amphetamine (AMP), available in various ratios or enantiopure formulations of their respective active dextrorotary isomers, constitute the majority of agents used in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Substantial interindividual variability occurs in their pharmacokinetics and tolerability. Little is known regarding the potential role of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in psychostimulant pharmacokinetics and response. Therefore, experiments were carried out in P-gp knockout (KO) mice versus wild-type (WT) mice after intraperitoneal dosing (2.5 mg/kg) of d-MPH or (3.0 mg/kg) of d-AMP. After the administration of each psychostimulant, locomotor activity was assessed at 30-min intervals for 2 h. Total brain-to-plasma drug concentration ratios were determined at 10-, 30-, and 80-min postdosing time-points. The results showed no statistically supported genotypic difference in d-AMP-induced locomotor activity stimulation or in brain-to-plasma ratio of d-AMP. As for d-MPH, the P-gp KO mice had 33% higher brain concentrations (p gp compared with that for WT mice. These data indicate that P-gp has no apparent effect on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of d-AMP. In addition, d-MPH is a relatively weak P-gp substrate, and its entry into the brain may be limited by P-gp. Furthermore, the mechanism by which d-MPH-induced locomotor activity was attenuated in P-gp KO mice remains to be elucidated.

  9. The effect of WIN 55,212-2 suggests a cannabinoid-sensitive component in the early toxicity induced by organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in related disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I N; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-12-01

    Several physiological processes in the CNS are regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists have been involved in the modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation. Glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids are endogenous metabolites produced and accumulated in the brain of children affected by severe organic acidemias (OAs) with neurodegeneration. Oxidative stress and excitotoxicity have been involved in the toxic pattern exerted by these organic acids. Studying the early pattern of toxicity exerted by these metabolites is crucial to explain the extent of damage that they can produce in the brain. Herein, we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) on early markers of GA-, 3-OHGA-, MMA- and PA-induced toxicity in brain synaptosomes from adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (30-day-old) rats. As pre-treatment, WIN exerted protective effects on the GA- and MMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation induced by all metabolites. Our findings support a protective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by toxic metabolites involved in OAs.

  10. Targeted Iron Chelation Will Improve Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    spinal cord injury there is limited improvement in locomotor function and increased spared of grey matter . Since iron accumulation occurs in a protracted...sparing, progenitor cell proliferation, oligodendrocyte genesis, neurons ( grey matter ), apoptosis, iron (months 3) We completed the...immunohistochemistry for white and grey matter tissue sparing, macrophage induced inflammation, oligodendrocyte genesis, iron accumulation, and neuron sparing. All

  11. 伴迟发性运动障碍精神分裂症患者脑铁沉积的对照研究%A comparative study of brain iron deposition in schizophrenia with and without tardive dyskinesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈方斌; 金梅; 徐乐平; 周菲菲; 汪莉; 纪菊英

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between brain iron deposition and pathogenesis of tardive dyskinesia (TD) in schizophrenia.Methods The corrected phase (CP) of basal ganglia was measured in schizophrenia with TD( n=18) and without TD( n =18 ) using susceptibility weighted imaging MRI.Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) was applied for clinical assessment of TD.Results After adjusting for age,sexual,and antipsychotic dosage,the mean CP of substantia nigra (SN) and caudate nucleus (CN) were significantly lower in schizophrenia patients with TD ( ( - 0.194 ± 0.040 ) rad,( - 0.089 ± 0.023 ) rad) than those without TD ( ( - 0.163 ± 0.033 ) rad,( - 0.076 ± 0.013 ) rad ; P =0.022,0.023 ).Lower mean CP in CN correlated with higher severity score of AIMS in TD patients ( r =- 0.468,P =0.034).Logistic regression analysis showed that the lower CP vaule in SN (β=-72.12,P=0.029) and CN(β=- 156.43,P=0.037),aging (β=0.379,P=0.042)were associated with the onset of TD.Conclusion The results imply that the excess iron accumulation in basal ganglia may be associated with pathogenesis of TD in schizophrenia.%目的 探讨脑铁沉积与迟发性运动障碍(TD)的关系.方法 利用磁敏感加权成像技术,测定伴TD(TD组,n=18)、不伴TD(非TD组,n=18)的精神分裂症患者基底节灰质核团的校正相位值(CP);采用异常不自主运动量表(AIMS)评定TD症状.结果 (1)调整年龄、性别、药物因素后,TD组黑质、尾状核CP值[分别(-0.194±0.040)rad,(-0.089±0.023)md]低于非TD组[分别(-0.163±0.033) rad,(-0.076 ±0.013)rad;P=0.022,0.023];(2)TD组尾状核CP值与AIMS严重程度评分负相关(r=-0.486,P=0.034);Logistic回归显示,黑质、尾状核CP值低(分别β=-72.12,- 156.43;P=0.029,0.037)、年龄高(β=0.370,P=0.042)与TD的发生有关.结论 TD患者基底节有脑铁过量沉积,并可能与TD的发生有关.

  12. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  13. β-Amyloid peptide increases levels of iron content and oxidative stress in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Nie, Guangjun; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Yunfeng; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Baolu

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the deposition of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD); however, the underlying mechanism is still not clear. The abnormal interactions of Aβ with metal ions such as iron are implicated in the process of Aβ deposition and oxidative stress in AD brains. In this study, we observed that Aβ increased the levels of iron content and oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) and in Caenorhabditis elegans Aβ-expressing strain CL2006. Intracellular iron and calcium levels and reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation significantly increased in APPsw cells compared to control cells. The activity of superoxide dismutase and the antioxidant levels of APPsw cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. Moreover, iron treatment decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and aggravated oxidative stress damage as well as the release of Aβ1-40 from the APPsw cells. The iron homeostasis disruption in APPsw cells is very probably associated with elevated expression of the iron transporter divalent metal transporter 1, but not transferrin receptor. Furthermore, the C. elegans with Aβ-expression had increased iron accumulation. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that Aβ accumulation in neuronal cells correlated with neuronal iron homeostasis disruption and probably contributed to the pathogenesis of AD.

  14. ALUMINUM STIMULATES UPTAKE OF NON-TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON AND TRANSFERRIN BOUND IRON IN HUMAN GLIAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Joseph P Bressler

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer’s Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer’s disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. ...

  15. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  16. Is aceruloplasminemia treatable? Combining iron chelation and fresh-frozen plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, L; Alberici, A; Buzzi, P; Marchina, E; Lanari, A; Arosio, C; Ciccone, A; Semeraro, F; Gasparotti, R; Padovani, A; Borroni, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of a patient with hereditary ceruloplasmin deficiency due to a novel gene mutation in ceruloplasmin gene (CP), treated with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and iron chelation therapy. A 59-year-old man with a past history of diabetes was admitted to our department due to progressive gait difficulties and cognitive impairment. Neurological examination revealed a moderate cognitive decline, with mild extrapyramidal symptoms, ataxia, and myoclonus. Brain T2-weighted MR imaging showed bilateral basal ganglia hypointensity with diffuse iron deposition. Increased serum ferritin, low serum copper concentration, undetectable ceruloplasmin, and normal urinary copper excretion were found. The genetic analysis of the CP (OMIM #604290) reported compound heterozygosity for two mutations, namely c.848G > A and c.2689_2690delCT. Treatment with FFP (500 mL i.v./once a week) and administration of iron chelator (Deferoxamine 1000 mg i.v/die for 5 days, followed by Deferiprone 500 mg/die per os) were undertaken. At the 6-month follow-up, clinical improvement of gait instability, trunk ataxia, and myoclonus was observed; brain MRI scan showed no further progression of basal ganglia T2 hypointensity. This case report suggests that the early initiation of combined treatment with FFP and iron chelation may be useful to reduce the accumulation of iron in the central nervous system and to improve the neurological symptoms.

  17. Metal ion toxins and brain aquaporin-4 expression: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eXimenes-Da-Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage.

  18. Iron metabolism in BeWo chorion carcinoma cells. Transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ende, A; du Maine, A; Simmons, C F; Schwartz, A L; Strous, G J

    1987-06-25

    Growing human choriocarcinoma BeWo b24 cells contain 1.5 X 10(6) functional cell surface transferrin binding sites and 2.0 X 10(6) intracellular binding sites. These cells rapidly accumulate iron at a rate of 360,000 iron atoms/min/cell. During iron uptake the transferrin and its receptor recycle at least each 19 min. The accumulated iron is released from the BeWo cells at a considerable rate. The time required to release 50% of previously accumulated iron into the extracellular medium is 30 h. This release process is cell line-specific as HeLa cells release very little if any iron. The release of iron by BeWo cells is stimulated by exogenous chelators such as apotransferrin, diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, desferral, and apolactoferrin. The time required to release 50% of the previously accumulated iron into medium supplemented with chelator is 15 h. In the absence of added chelators iron is released as a low molecular weight complex, whereas in the presence of chelator the iron is found complexed to the chelator. Uptake of iron is inhibited by 250 microM primaquine or 2.5 microM monensin. However, the release of iron is not inhibited by these drugs. Intracellular iron is stored bound to ferritin. A model for the release of iron by BeWo cells and its implication for transplacental iron transport is discussed.

  19. Imaging of activated complement using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO) - conjugated vectors: an in vivo in utero non-invasive method to predict placental insufficiency and abnormal fetal brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, G; Fraser, J; Lennen, R; Vontell, R; Jansen, M; Hutchison, G

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we have developed a magnetic resonance imaging-based method for non-invasive detection of complement activation in placenta and foetal brain in vivo in utero. Using this method, we found that anti-complement C3-targeted ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles bind within the inflamed placenta and foetal brain cortical tissue, causing a shortening of the T2* relaxation time. We used two mouse models of pregnancy complications: a mouse model of obstetrics antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB). We found that detection of C3 deposition in the placenta in the APS model was associated with placental insufficiency characterised by increased oxidative stress, decreased vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor levels and intrauterine growth restriction. We also found that foetal brain C3 deposition was associated with cortical axonal cytoarchitecture disruption and increased neurodegeneration in the mouse model of APS and in the PTB model. In the APS model, foetuses that showed increased C3 in their brains additionally expressed anxiety-related behaviour after birth. Importantly, USPIO did not affect pregnancy outcomes and liver function in the mother and the offspring, suggesting that this method may be useful for detecting complement activation in vivo in utero and predicting placental insufficiency and abnormal foetal neurodevelopment that leads to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25245499

  20. SWI research abnormal deposition of iron in brain in patients with hepatic encephalopathy detection%SWI检测肝性脑病患者脑内铁异常沉积

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄聪(综述); 赵新湘; 李迎春(审校)

    2016-01-01

    肝性脑病( hepatic encephathy ,HE)的发病机制目前尚不清楚,尤其是脑内铁离子的沉积在HE发生中扮演的角色依旧模糊,临床诊断尤其是亚临床型HE的诊断尚缺乏明确依据。本文对磁敏感加权成像( sus-ceptibility weighted imaging ,SWI)的基本原理及近年来在检测HE患者脑内铁异常沉积方面的应用作一综述。%The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is not clear, and especially the role of brain iron deposition in the diagnosis of clinical diagnosis of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy is still obscure.In this paper,the basic principle and applications of SWI in the hepatic encephalopathy patients with brain iron dep-osition were reviewed.

  1. Cristobalite and Hematite Particles in Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopani, Martin; Kopaniova, A; Trnka, M; Caplovicova, M; Rychly, B; Jakubovsky, J

    2016-11-01

    Foreign substances get into the internal environment of living bodies and accumulate in various organs. Cristobalite and hematite particles in the glial cells of pons cerebri of human brain with diagnosis of Behhet disease with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive microanalysis (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with diffraction were identified. SEM with EDX revealed the matter of irregular micrometer-sized particles sometimes forming polyhedrons with fibrilar or stratified structure. It was found in some particles Ti, Fe, and Zn. Some particles contained Cu. TEM and electron diffraction showed particles of cristobalite and hematite. The presence of the particles can be a result of environmental effect, disruption of normal metabolism, and transformation of physiologically iron-ferrihydrite into more stable form-hematite. From the size of particles can be drawn the long-term accumulation of elements in glial cells.

  2. Genetic and biochemical markers in patients with Alzheimer's disease support a concerted systemic iron homeostasis dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Ângela C; Silva, Bruno; Marques, Liliana; Marcelino, Erica; Maruta, Carolina; Costa, Sónia; Timóteo, Angela; Vilares, Arminda; Couto, Frederico Simões; Faustino, Paula; Correia, Ana Paula; Verdelho, Ana; Porto, Graça; Guerreiro, Manuela; Herrero, Ana; Costa, Cristina; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Costa, Luciana; Martins, Madalena

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly individuals, resulting from a complex interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Impaired brain iron homeostasis has been recognized as an important mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of this disease. Nevertheless, the knowledge gathered so far at the systemic level is clearly insufficient. Herein, we used an integrative approach to study iron metabolism in the periphery, at both genotypic and phenotypic levels, in a sample of 116 patients with AD and 89 healthy control subjects. To assess the potential impact of iron metabolism on the risk of developing AD, genetic analyses were performed along with the evaluation of the iron status profile in peripheral blood by biochemical and gene expression studies. The results obtained showed a significant decrease of serum iron, ferritin, and transferrin concentrations in patients compared with the control subjects. Also, a significant decrease of ferroportin (SLC40A1) and both transferrin receptors TFRC and TFR2 transcripts was found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients. At the genetic level, significant associations with AD were found for single nucleotide polymorphisms in TF, TFR2, ACO1, and SLC40A1 genes. Apolipoprotein E gene, a well-known risk factor for AD, was also found significantly associated with the disease in this study. Taken together, we hypothesize that the alterations on systemic iron status observed in patients could reflect an iron homeostasis dysregulation, particularly in cellular iron efflux. The intracellular iron accumulation would lead to a rise in oxidative damage, contributing to AD pathophysiology.

  3. The effects of iron supplementation on auditory brain-stem response with iron deficiency anemia in rats%缺铁性贫血治疗前后听性脑干反应的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周本忠; 王胜国; 王琼; 孙爱华; 马玉龙; 沈建军

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the therapeutic methods of sensorineural hearing loss with iron deficiency anemia and their effects. Method:Sixty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: Group A (iron deficiency group A) 24 rats, group B (iron deficiency group B) 24 rats and group C (control group) 20 rats. Group A and B were fed with iron deficiency diet for 6 weeks. By analyzing ABR and DPOAE, hearing loss was detected in group A and B. Then,group A was given iron supplementation diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapies. and group B was given iron supplementation diet only. Result:The auditory thresholds and period latencies (PL) of I waves of ABR and DPOAE amplitude in 2 kHz and 3kHz within group A and B were significantly different before and after treatment (P<0.05). But the effects of treatment between these two groups had not significant differences (P>0.05). Conclusion: It suggested that good results can be obtained by early iron supplementation in iron deficiency hearing loss cases. Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy may not be necessary.%目的:探讨缺铁性贫血导致感音神经性聋的治疗方法及疗效。方法:将68只Wistar大鼠分成3组:48只通过缺铁饮食制作缺铁性贫血模型,缺铁A组和B组各24只;另设标准对照C组正常大鼠20只。将A、B两组进行缺铁饲养6周,检测听性脑干反应(ABR),每组各随机取样10只检测畸变产物耳声发射(DPOAE),再分别给予铁剂加高压氧治疗和单纯铁剂治疗。结果:缺铁Wistar大鼠经6周饲养,较实验前ABR听觉阈值提高和Ⅰ波PL延长,经过两种不同方案治疗6周,均取得明显效果(P<0.05),但两组差异无显著性。结论:对于缺铁性贫血造成感音神经性耳聋,早期给予及时的铁剂治疗疗效好,而高压氧用于治疗此类耳聋并非必要。

  4. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  5. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development. Modest TH insufficiency in pregnant rats induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) results in formation of a structural abnormality, a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), in brains of offspring. PTU reduces TH by inhibiting the s...

  6. Nanoparticle iron chelators: a new therapeutic approach in Alzheimer disease and other neurologic disorders associated with trace metal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Harris, Peggy L R; Rolston, Raj K; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2006-10-09

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress may be a major etiologic factor in initiating and promoting neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease. Contributing to this, there is a dyshomeostasis of metal ions in Alzheimer disease with abnormally high levels of redox-active metals, particularly iron, in affected areas of the brain. Although it is unclear whether metal excesses are the sole cause of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration or a by-product of neuronal loss, the finding that metal chelators can partially solubilize amyloid-beta deposits in Alzheimer disease suggests a promising therapeutic role for chelating agents. However, the blood-brain barrier and toxicity of known chelators limit their utility. In this study, we suggest that covalent conjugation of iron chelators with nanoparticles may help overcome the limitations in blood-brain barrier permeability of existing chelation therapy. Using in vitro studies, we have shown that a chelator-nanoparticle system and the chelator-nanoparticle system complexed with iron, when incubated with human plasma, preferentially adsorb apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-I, that would facilitate transport into and out of the brain via mechanisms used for transporting low-density lipoprotein. Our studies suggest a unique approach, utilizing nanoparticles, to transport chelators and chelator-metal complexes in both directions across the blood-brain barrier, thus providing safer and more effective chelation treatment in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Variations in dietary iron alter behavior in developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, D; Jones, B; Beard, J

    2001-02-01

    Iron deficiency in children is associated with retardation in growth and cognitive development, and the effects on cognition may be irreversible, even with treatment. Excessive iron has also been associated with neurological disease, especially in reference to the increased iron content in the brains of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease patients. This study evaluated the effects of dietary iron deficiency and excess iron on physical activity in rats. The animal model used is developmentally sensitive and permits control of the timing as well as the duration of the nutritional insult. Hence, to study the effects of early, late and long-term iron deficiency or excess iron (supplementation), rats were either made iron deficient or supplemented on postnatal day (PND) 10-21, PND 21-35 and PND 10-35. Some iron-deficient rats were iron repleted between PND 21-35. Different measures of motor activity were taken at PND 14, 17, 20, 27 and 34. Iron-deficient and iron-supplemented rats showed decreased activity and stereotypic behavior; this was apparent for any onset and duration of the nutritional insult. Recovery from iron deficiency did not normalize these functional variables, showing that the deleterious effects of early iron deficiency persist despite subsequent adequate treatment. This study demonstrates that iron deficiency in early life leads to irreversible behavioral changes. The biological bases for these behavioral alterations are not readily apparent, because iron therapy rapidly reverses the iron losses in all brain regions.

  8. Chapter 5 - Development of iron chelator-nanoparticle conjugates as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a key role in the initiation and promotion of the neurodegeneration that characterizes the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). An accumulation of redox active transition metals, including iron and copper, is likely a major generator of reactive oxidative species and other free radicals and is thought to induce a detrimental cycle of oxidative stress, amyloid-beta aggregation, and neurodegeneration. As such, metal chelators may provide an alternative therapeutic approach to sequester redox active metals and prevent the onslaught of oxidative damage. Unfortunately, however, metal chelation approaches are currently limited in their potential, since many cannot readily pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB), due to their hydrophilicity, and many are neurotoxic at high concentrations. To circumvent such issues, here we describe the development of iron chelator-nanoparticle conjugation that allows delivery of target chelator to the brain in the absence of neurotoxicity. Such nanoparticle delivery of iron chelators will likely provide a highly advantageous mode of attack on the oxidative stress that plagues AD as well as other conditions characterized by excess metal accumulation.

  9. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Iron Chelation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Urru, Silvana Anna Maria; Pilo, Federica; Piperno, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Over recent decades we have been fortunate to witness the advent of new technologies and of an expanded knowledge and application of chelation therapies to the benefit of patients with iron overload. However, extrapolation of learnings from thalassemia to the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has resulted in a fragmented and uncoordinated clinical evidence base. We’re therefore forced to change our understanding of MDS, looking with other eyes to observational studies that inform us about the relationship between iron and tissue damage in these subjects. The available evidence suggests that iron accumulation is prognostically significant in MDS, but levels of accumulation historically associated with organ damage (based on data generated in the thalassemias) are infrequent. Emerging experimental data have provided some insight into this paradox, as our understanding of iron-induced tissue damage has evolved from a process of progressive bulking of organs through high-volumes iron deposition, to one of ‘toxic’ damage inflicted through multiple cellular pathways. Damage from iron may, therefore, occur prior to reaching reference thresholds, and similarly, chelation may be of benefit before overt iron overload is seen. In this review, we revisit the scientific and clinical evidence for iron overload in MDS to better characterize the iron overload phenotype in these patients, which differs from the classical transfusional and non-transfusional iron overload syndrome. We hope this will provide a conceptual framework to better understand the complex associations between anemia, iron and clinical outcomes, to accelerate progress in this area. PMID:28293409

  10. Iron-induced oxidative stress activates AKT and ERK1/2 and decreases Dyrk1B and PRMT1 in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Elizabeth; Vergara, Paula; Segovia, José

    2016-03-01

    Iron is essential for proper neuronal functioning; however, excessive accumulation of brain iron is reported in Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This indicates that dysregulated iron homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. To determinate the effect of iron on oxidative stress and on cell survival pathways, such as AKT, ERK1/2 and DyrK1B, neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to different concentration of FeCl2 (iron). We found that iron induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Detection of iNOS and 3-nitrotyrosine confirms the presence of increased nitrogen species. Furthermore, we found a decrease of catalase and protein arginine methyl-transferase 1 (PRMT1). Interestingly, iron increased the activity of ERK and AKT and reduced DyrK1B. Moreover, after FeCl2 treatment, the transcription factors c-Jun and pSmad1/5 were activated. These results indicate that the presence of high levels of iron increase the vulnerability of neurons to oxidative stress.

  11. Brain-Actuated Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Millán, José del R.; Renkens, F.; Mouriño, J.; Gerstner, W.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last years evidence has accumulated that shows the possibility to analyze human brain activity on-line and translate brain states into actions such as selecting a letter from a virtual keyboard or moving a robotics device. These initial results have been obtained with either invasive approaches (requiring surgical implantation of electrodes) or synchronous protocols (where brain signals are time-locked to external cues). In this paper we describe a portable noninvasive brain-computer...

  12. Cellular Imaging at 1.5 T: Detecting Cells in Neuroinflammation using Active Labeling with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman J. Oweida

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to visualize cell infiltration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a well-known animal model for multiple sclerosis in humans, was investigated using a clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner, a custom-built, high-strength gradient coil insert, a 3-D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA imaging sequence and a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. An “active labeling” approach was used with SPIO administered intravenously during inflammation in EAE. Our results show that small, discrete regions of signal void corresponding to iron accumulation in EAE brain can be detected using FIESTA at 1.5 T. This work provides early evidence that cellular abnormalities that are the basis of diseases can be probed using cellular MRI and supports our earlier work which indicates that tracking of iron-labeled cells will be possible using clinical MR scanners.

  13. 缺Fe/Zn及盐胁迫下苋菜对Cd及矿质元素的吸收与IRT1表达的关系%Cadmium and mineral element accumulation and IRT1 gene expression of Amaranth hybidus L. under iron/zinc deficiencies or salt stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余丹萍; 李取生; 王立立; 徐智敏; 郭世鸿; 胡妮; 陈惠君

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has showed that iron- regulated transporter 1(IRT1)gene plays an important role in the accumulation and transfer of metals in plants. Here a low Cd-accumulating cultivar Baigenjianye(B)and a high Cd-accumulating cultivar Huahong(H)were used to investigate the characteristics of mineral element and Cd accumulation by and IRT1 expression level in roots of Amaranth hybidus L. under iron(Fe)or zinc(Zn)deficiencies or salt stress. Quantitative PCR was used to determine the expression level of IRT1. Biomass of two cultivars obviously decreased in the treatments, with the greatest reduction observed in Fe deficiency. The accumulation of Cd and mineral elements significantly(P<0.05)increased under Fe and Zn deficiency treatments. However, salt stress showed a significant(P<0.05)in-hibiting effect on Cd accumulation but a significant (P<0.05)promotion on the accumulation of mineral elements. The concentrations of Cd, Fe, Zn and Mg, and the expression of gene IRT1 in root protoplasts were obviously higher in high Cd- accumulating cultivar Huahong(H) than those in low Cd-accumulating cultivar Baigenjianye(B). Furthermore, elevated expression levels of IRT1 promoted the concentrations of Cd, Fe, Zn and Mg in stems and leaves. Therefore, while Cd concentration in crops is concerned, the content of minerals in the soil should be paid attention to at the same time.%选用Cd低累积品种白梗尖叶苋菜(B)和高累积品种花红苋菜(H)2个苋菜品种,采用水培法分别研究了在缺Fe、缺Zn和盐胁迫3种处理条件下2个苋菜品种对矿质元素以及Cd的累积特征,并通过测定2个品种不同处理根部IRT1(铁离子转运蛋白)的表达量,建立了缺Fe/Zn及盐胁迫下苋菜对Cd及矿质元素的吸收与IRT1表达的关系。结果表明,3个处理组中2个苋菜品种生物量均显著低于对照组,缺Fe以及缺Zn处理显著促进了2个苋菜品种对Cd以及矿质元素的累积,而盐胁迫显

  14. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  15. Iron, zinc, and manganese distribution in mature soybean seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2009-01-01

    to reveal the distribution of iron, zinc, manganese and phosphorus within soybean seeds. We show that high concentrations of iron accumulate in the seed coats of mature soybean seeds. This iron accounted for 20 to 40% of the total seed iron. Furthermore, manganese and iron accumulated in close proximity...... to each other in the provascular tissue of the soybean radicle. No regions with increased accumulation of iron, zinc, or manganese were observed in the cotyledons. The concentrations of both phosphorus and zinc were higher in the radicle compared to the cotyledons, and zinc accumulated primarily near...... the radicle tip. Our study provides a thorough description of the distribution of important micronutrients within the mature soybean seed....

  16. Iron Biofortification and Homeostasis in Transgenic Cassava Roots Expressing the Algal Iron Assimilatory Gene, FEA1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory gene, FEA1, in its storage roots with the objective of enhancing the root nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 g meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 gene...

  17. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  18. 慢性肾病贫血铁治疗与脑铁沉积的研究进展%The research progress of iron therapy in the treatment of anemia and brain iron deposition in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 张孟杰; 柴超; 夏爽

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a rapidly growing global health burden, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is the most serious stage. Hemodialysis as treatment for final ESRD patients, easily leads to anemia, and the use of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent (ESA) that improves anemia should be added in the iron, but there is a risk of iron overload. The damage of small blood vessels in the brain tissue is still under study, which is important for the clinical development of the dialysis program. This article mainly reviews the effects of chronic kidney disease on the brain function and structure, and the progress of related MRI technology.%慢性肾病(CKD)已成为全球健康负担且增长迅速。其中,终末期肾病(ESRD)是其发展的最严重阶段。ESRD病人进行血液透析治疗易引发贫血,而使用红细胞生成刺激药物改善贫血的过程中需补充铁剂,但在此过程中存在铁过载风险。铁在脑组织的沉积对脑小血管的损害的研究对于临床制定透析方案有着重要的意义。综述CKD对脑组织功能、结构的影响及MRI技术用于脑铁沉积水平研究的进展。

  19. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  20. Slow expansion of multiple sclerosis iron rim lesions: pathology and 7 T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Bianco, Assunta; Grabner, Günther; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Weber, Michael; Höftberger, Romana; Berger, Thomas; Auff, Eduard; Leutmezer, Fritz; Trattnig, Siegfried; Lassmann, Hans; Bagnato, Francesca; Hametner, Simon

    2017-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), iron accumulates inside activated microglia/macrophages at edges of some chronic demyelinated lesions, forming rims. In susceptibility-based magnetic resonance imaging at 7 T, iron-laden microglia/macrophages induce a rim of decreased signal at lesion edges and have been associated with slowly expanding lesions. We aimed to determine (1) what lesion types and stages are associated with iron accumulation at their edges, (2) what cells at the lesion edges accumulate iron and what is their activation status, (3) how reliably can iron accumulation at the lesion edge be detected by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (4) if lesions with rims enlarge over time in vivo, when compared to lesions without rims. Double-hemispheric brain sections of 28 MS cases were stained for iron, myelin, and microglia/macrophages. Prior to histology, 4 of these 28 cases were imaged at 7 T using post-mortem susceptibility-weighted imaging. In vivo, seven MS patients underwent annual neurological examinations and 7 T MRI for 3.5 years, using a fluid attenuated inversion recovery/susceptibility-weighted imaging fusion sequence. Pathologically, we found iron rims around slowly expanding and some inactive lesions but hardly around remyelinated shadow plaques. Iron in rims was mainly present in microglia/macrophages with a pro-inflammatory activation status, but only very rarely in astrocytes. Histological validation of post-mortem susceptibility-weighted imaging revealed a quantitative threshold of iron-laden microglia when a rim was visible. Slowly expanding lesions significantly exceeded this threshold, when compared with inactive lesions (p = 0.003). We show for the first time that rim lesions significantly expanded in vivo after 3.5 years, compared to lesions without rims (p = 0.003). Thus, slow expansion of MS lesions with rims, which reflects chronic lesion activity, may, in the future, become an MRI marker for disease activity in MS.

  1. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored.

  2. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J. (IIT); (Keele); (Florida); (DRDC)

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  3. Sisters of The Iron Man Triathlon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    THE Iron Man Triathlon challenges even the most veteran athlete. Competitors swim 3,000 meters, followed by a 40 kilometer bike race and ending with a i0 kilometer cross-country run.The Iron Man allows athletes to display their utmost abilities. As of January 1997, triathlete Wang Dan had accumulated the highest number of points of Asian iron man triathletes, according to the Asian Iron Man Triathlon Federation. Following her lead is Chinese triathlete Xing Lin. Liu Xiaodan, Chinese third ranking triathlete, comes in 5th among Asian competitors. All three girls are just 17 years old and all natives of Shenyang, Liaoning

  4. Brain derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Gede, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies are curre......Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies...

  5. Hepcidin Plays a Key Role in 6-OHDA Induced Iron Overload and Apoptotic Cell Death in a Cell Culture Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elevated brain iron levels have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, the precise mechanism underlying abnormal iron accumulation in PD is not clear. Hepcidin, a hormone primarily produced by hepatocytes, acts as a key regulator in both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis. Objective. We investigated the role of hepcidin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA induced apoptosis in a cell culture model of PD. Methods. We downregulated hepcidin using siRNA interference in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells and made a comparison with control siRNA transfected cells to investigate the role of hepcidin in 6-OHDA induced neurodegeneration. Results. Hepcidin knockdown (32.3%, P<0.0001 upregulated ferroportin 1 expression and significantly (P<0.05 decreased intracellular iron by 25%. Hepcidin knockdown also reduced 6-OHDA induced caspase-3 activity by 42% (P<0.05 and DNA fragmentation by 29% (P=0.086 and increased cell viability by 22% (P<0.05. In addition, hepcidin knockdown significantly attenuated 6-OHDA induced protein carbonyls by 52% (P<0.05 and intracellular iron by 28% (P<0.01, indicating the role of hepcidin in oxidative stress. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin knockdown protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA induced apoptosis and that hepcidin plays a major role in reducing cellular iron burden and oxidative damage by possibly regulating cellular iron export mediated by ferroportin 1.

  6. Monoubiquitin-dependent endocytosis of the IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) transporter controls iron uptake in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Robert, Stéphanie; Conejero, Geneviève; Curie, Catherine; Friml, Jìrí; Vert, Grégory

    2011-01-01

    Plants take up iron from the soil using the IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) high-affinity iron transporter at the root surface. Sophisticated regulatory mechanisms allow plants to tightly control the levels of IRT1, ensuring optimal absorption of essential but toxic iron. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana IRT1 leads to constitutive IRT1 protein accumulation, metal overload, and oxidative stress. IRT1 is unexpectedly found in trans-Golgi network/early endosom...

  7. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  8. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  9. Development and Testing of Iron Based Phantoms as Standards for the Diagnosis of Microbleeds and Oxygen Saturation with Applications in Dementia, Stroke, and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    quantification, gel phantoms, simulated brain images, numerical models , nanoparticles, gadolinium, ferritin, calcium, multiple concentrations, multiple echo...the tSWI data, as can be seen from the minimum intensity projections (mIPs) in Fig. 7g,h. This nonlocal phase information used in SWI can lead to an...the SWI images than on the tSWI images, as indicated by the white arrows. This is due to the nonlocal phase informa- tion used in the conventional

  10. The neurotoxicity of iron, copper and manganese in Parkinson's and Wilson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Petr; Roos, Per M; Litwin, Tomasz; Schneider, Susanne A; Flaten, Trond Peder; Aaseth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Impaired cellular homeostasis of metals, particularly of Cu, Fe and Mn may trigger neurodegeneration through various mechanisms, notably induction of oxidative stress, promotion of α-synuclein aggregation and fibril formation, activation of microglial cells leading to inflammation and impaired production of metalloproteins. In this article we review available studies concerning Fe, Cu and Mn in Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease. In Parkinson's disease local dysregulation of iron metabolism in the substantia nigra (SN) seems to be related to neurodegeneration with an increase in SN iron concentration, accompanied by decreased SN Cu and ceruloplasmin concentrations and increased free Cu concentrations and decreased ferroxidase activity in the cerebrospinal fluid. Available data in Wilson's disease suggest that substantial increases in CNS Cu concentrations persist for a long time during chelating treatment and that local accumulation of Fe in certain brain nuclei may occur during the course of the disease. Consequences for chelating treatment strategies are discussed.

  11. Iron overload in very low birth weight infants: Serum Ferritin and adverse outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, M

    2011-11-01

    Adequate iron isessential for growth and haematpoiesis. Oral iron supplementation is the standard of care in VLBW infants. Post mortem evidence has confirmed significant iron overload. Excessive free iron has been associated with free radical formation and brain injury in term infants.

  12. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha eSpottiswoode

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to coinfections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world.

  13. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  14. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  15. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to iron dextran injection; any other iron injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other ...

  16. Iron biofortification and homeostasis in transgenic cassava roots expressing an algal iron assimilatory protein, FEA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoma eIhemere

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered the starchy root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory protein, FEA1, in roots to enhance its nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 gm meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 protein did not alter iron levels in leaves. Transgenic plants also had normal levels of zinc in leaves and roots consistent with the specific uptake of iron mediated by the FEA1 protein. Relative to wild-type plants, FEA1 expressing plants had reduced Fe(III chelate reductase activity and gene expression levels consistent with the more efficient uptake of iron in FEA1 transgenic plants. We also show that genes involved in iron homeostasis in cassava have altered tissue-specific patterns of expression in transgenic plants. Steady state transcript levels of the metal-chelate transporter MeYSL1, and the iron storage proteins, MeFER2 and MeFER6, were elevated in various tissues of FEA1 transgenic plants compared to wild-type plants. These results suggest that these gene products play a role in iron translocation and homeostasis in FEA1 transgenic cassava plants. These results are discussed in terms of enhanced strategies for the iron biofortification of plants.

  17. Role of iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    Currently, we still lack effective measures to modify disease progression in neurodegenerative diseases. Iron-containing proteins play an essential role in many fundamental biological processes in the central nervous system. In addition, iron is a redox-active ion and can induce oxidative stress in the cell. Although the causes and pathology hallmarks of different neurodegenerative diseases vary, iron dyshomeostasis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial injury constitute a common pathway to cell death in several neurodegenerative diseases. MRI is capable of depicting iron content in the brain, and serves as a potential biomarker for early and differential diagnosis, tracking disease progression and evaluating the effectiveness of neuroprotective therapy. Iron chelators have shown their efficacy against neurodegeneration in a series of animal models, and been applied in several clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent developments on iron dyshomeostasis in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Friedreich ataxia, and Huntington's disease.

  18. NCOA4 Deficiency Impairs Systemic Iron Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bellelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cargo receptor NCOA4 mediates autophagic ferritin degradation. Here we show that NCOA4 deficiency in a knockout mouse model causes iron accumulation in the liver and spleen, increased levels of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and liver hepcidin, and decreased levels of duodenal ferroportin. Despite signs of iron overload, NCOA4-null mice had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia. Under an iron-deprived diet (2–3 mg/kg, mice failed to release iron from ferritin storage and developed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis associated with increased erythropoietin levels. When fed an iron-enriched diet (2 g/kg, mice died prematurely and showed signs of liver damage. Ferritin accumulated in primary embryonic fibroblasts from NCOA4-null mice consequent to impaired autophagic targeting. Adoptive expression of the NCOA4 COOH terminus (aa 239–614 restored this function. In conclusion, NCOA4 prevents iron accumulation and ensures efficient erythropoiesis, playing a central role in balancing iron levels in vivo.

  19. Iron status as a covariate in methylmercury-associated neurotoxicity risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Márlon de Freitas; De Souza Hacon, Sandra; Grandjean, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine methylmercury exposure and prenatal iron deficiency negatively affect offspring's brain development. Since fish is a major source of both methylmercury and iron, occurrence of negative confounding may affect the interpretation of studies concerning cognition. We assessed relationship...

  20. 日本三陆沿岸白胸拟鼠海豚体内铁的蓄积%Accumulation of iron in Dall's porpoise Phocoenoides dalli off the Sanriku coast of Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨健; KUNITO Takashi; TANABE Shinsuke; MIYAZAKI Nobuyuki

    2003-01-01

    根据22头日本三陆沿岸白胸拟鼠海豚的检测结果,研究了必需元素铁在13种组织和器官中的蓄积特征.肺、肝脏和脾脏中铁的浓度显著高于其它脏器,铁在皮肤和鲸脂中的浓度却非常低.研究发现,鲸类肝脏中铁的平均浓度与其最大潜水持续时间有着极其显著的正相关(y=285.17x 0.5267;r2=0.92;y:a肝脏中铁的平均浓度,单位为μg@g-1干重;x:最大潜水持续时间,单位为min).利用该关系式,首次推测白胸拟鼠海豚的最大潜水持续时间为11.85min.%The 13 tissues (liver, kidney, muscle, bone, skin, heart, lung, intestine, blubber, spleen, pancreas, fore stomach and main stomach) of 22 Dall's porpoise ( Phocoenoides dalli) (11 ♂ and 11 ♀) off Sanriku coast of northern Japan were measured for iron (Fe) bioavailability. Particularly higher Fe concentrations were found in the lung, liver and spleen than the remains. Lower Fe concentrations were recorded in skin and blubber. Hepatic Fe concentration positively correlated with maximum duration of dives among cetacean species (y = 285. 17x0.5267; r2= 0. 92; y: average hepatic Fe concentrations in μg@g-1 dry weight; x: maximum diving duration in min). Using this correlation, the maximum duration of dives of Dall' s porpoise was estimated as 11.85 min.

  1. Iron source preference and regulation of iron uptake in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Hee Jung

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The level of available iron in the mammalian host is extremely low, and pathogenic microbes must compete with host proteins such as transferrin for iron. Iron regulation of gene expression, including genes encoding iron uptake functions and virulence factors, is critical for the pathogenesis of the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study, we characterized the roles of the CFT1 and CFT2 genes that encode C. neoformans orthologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-affinity iron permease FTR1. Deletion of CFT1 reduced growth and iron uptake with ferric chloride and holo-transferrin as the in vitro iron sources, and the cft1 mutant was attenuated for virulence in a mouse model of infection. A reduction in the fungal burden in the brains of mice infected with the cft1 mutant was observed, thus suggesting a requirement for reductive iron acquisition during cryptococcal meningitis. CFT2 played no apparent role in iron acquisition but did influence virulence. The expression of both CFT1 and CFT2 was influenced by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and the iron-regulatory transcription factor Cir1 positively regulated CFT1 and negatively regulated CFT2. Overall, these results indicate that C. neoformans utilizes iron sources within the host (e.g., holo-transferrin that require Cft1 and a reductive iron uptake system.

  2. Role of alcohol in the regulation of iron metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease frequently exhibit increased body iron stores, as reflected by elevated serum iron indices (transferrin saturation, ferritin) and hepatic iron concentration. Even mild to moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to increase the prevalence of iron overload. Moreover, increased hepatic iron content is associated with greater mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis, suggesting a pathogenic role for iron in alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol increases the severity of disease in patients with genetic hemochromatosis,an iron overload disorder common in the Caucasian population. Both iron and alcohol individually cause oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, which culminates in liver injury. Despite these observations, the underlying mechanisms of iron accumulation and the source of the excess iron observed in alcoholic liver disease remain unclear. Over the last decade, several novel iron-regulatory proteins have been identified and these have greatly enhanced our understanding of iron metabolism. For example, hepcidin, a circulatory antimicrobial peptide synthesized by the hepatocytes of the liver is now known to play a central role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review attempts to describe the interaction of alcohol and iron-regulatory molecules. Understanding these molecular mechanisms is of considerable clinical importance because both alcoholic liver disease and genetic hemochromatosis are common diseases, in which alcohol and iron appear to act synergistically to cause liver injury.

  3. [Genetics of hereditary iron overload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Fergelot, Patricia; Mosser, Jean; David, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    The classification of hereditary abnormalities of iron metabolism was recently expanded and diversified. Genetic hemochromatosis now corresponds to six diseases, namely classical hemochromatosis HFE 1; juvenile hemochromatosis HFE 2 due to mutations in an unidentified gene on chromosome 1; hemochromatosis HFE 3 due to mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2); hemochromatosis HFE 4 caused by a mutation in the H subunit of ferritin; and hemochromatosis HFE 6 whose gene is hepcidine (HAMP). Systemic iron overload is also associated with aceruloplasminemia, atransferrinemia and the "Gracile" syndrome caused by mutations in BCS1L. The genes responsible for neonatal and African forms of iron overload are unknown. Other genetic diseases are due to localized iron overload: Friedreich's ataxia results from the expansion of triple nucleotide repeats within the frataxin (FRDA) gene; two forms of X-linked sideroblastic anemia are due to mutations within the delta aminolevulinate synthetase (ALAS 2) or ABC-7 genes; Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is caused by a pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK-2) defect; neuroferritinopathies; and hyperferritinemia--cataract syndrome due to a mutation within the L-ferritin gene. In addition to this wide range of genetic abnormalities, two other features characterize these iron disorders: 1) most are transmitted by an autosomal recessive mechanism, but some, including hemochromatosis type 4, have dominant transmission; and 2) most correspond to cytosolic iron accumulation while some, like Friedreich's ataxia, are disorders of mitochondrial metabolism.

  4. Obesity Promotes Alterations in Iron Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Citelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a key hormone that induces the degradation of ferroportin (FPN, a protein that exports iron from reticuloendothelial macrophages and enterocytes. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate if the obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD modifies the expression of FPN in macrophages and enterocytes, thus altering the iron bioavailability. In order to directly examine changes associated with iron metabolism in vivo, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or a HFD. Serum leptin levels were evaluated. The hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1, FPN and ferritin genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of iron present in both the liver and spleen was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ferroportin localization within reticuloendothelial macrophages was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Obese animals were found to exhibit increased hepcidin gene expression, while iron accumulated in the spleen and liver. They also exhibited changes in the sublocation of splenic cellular FPN and a reduction in the FPN expression in the liver and the spleen, while no changes were observed in enterocytes. Possible explanations for the increased hepcidin expression observed in HFD animals may include: increased leptin levels, the liver iron accumulation or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Together, the results indicated that obesity promotes changes in iron bioavailability, since it altered the iron recycling function.

  5. 增施钾肥对冷浸田水稻生理及植株铁吸收累积的影响%Effects of Potassium Fertilizer Increasement on Rice Physiology and Iron Accumulation in Cold-waterlogged Paddy Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李清华; 王飞; 林诚; 何春梅; 李昱; 钟少杰; 林新坚

    2015-01-01

    有效钾缺乏、Fe2+毒害是影响冷浸田水稻产量的重要因素。通过田间试验,研究不同钾肥用量对冷浸田水稻生长生理、植株铁累积及产量的影响。结果表明:与不施钾肥相比,增施钾肥孕穗期水稻叶绿素 a+b 和光合速率分别增加10.27%~28.40%、11.40%~29.31%,孕穗期与成熟期根系活力分别提高10.53%~22.67%、27.71%~48.62%,成熟期稻谷产量增加4.93%~14.77%。施肥能促进植株体内钾的吸收和抑制根系对铁的累积。在水稻分蘖期、孕穗期与成熟期,根系铁含量分别降低0.04~0.73、0.33~0.95及0.62~0.82个百分点,此外在分蘖期水稻根系钾与铁含量呈极显著负相关(r =-0.86**)。增施钾肥能够提高根系活力,增强光合作用,促进碳水化合物合成与运输,同时较好地抑制铁的累积,因此增施钾肥是发挥冷浸田生产潜力的有效措施。%Shortage of effective potassium and toxicity of Fe2+ are important limited factors to rice yield in cold-waterlogged paddy field.Based on the field experiment,the effects of rice growth physiology,plant potassium iron nutrient accumulation and rice yield components were studied in cold-waterlogged paddy field under different potassium utilized in the paper.The results indicated that the content of chlorophyll a+b and photosynthetic ratio could respectively improve 10.53% ~ 22.67%、27.71% ~ 48.62% in booting stage under potassium fertilizer increasement,10.53%~22.67%、27.71 %~48.62% for root activity improved respectively in booting stage and mature stage.Meanwhile,rice yield could improve 4.93%~14.77%.Potassium fertilizer increased could not only promote the absorption and transportation of potassium,inhibit the iron accumulation of rice root,but only could reduce respectively 0.04~0.73、0.33 ~0.95 and 0.62 ~0.82 percentage point for the content of iron in tillering stage

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of iron deposition in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, Steven D; Chen, Nan-kuei; Mulkern, Robert V; Bakshi, Rohit

    2006-02-01

    Deposition of iron in the brain is proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology of the normal aging process and neurodegenerative diseases. Whereas iron is required for normal neuronal metabolism, excessive levels can contribute to the formation of free radicals, leading to lipid peroxidation and neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool to detect excessive iron in the brain and longitudinally monitor changes in iron levels. Iron deposition is associated with a reduction in the T2 relaxation time, leading to hypointensity on spin-echo and gradient-echo T2-weighted images. The MRI changes associated with iron deposition have been observed both in normal aging and in various chronic neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. Magnetic resonance imaging metrics providing information about iron concentrations include R2, R2', and R2*. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of iron and its detection by MRI in various neurological disorders. We will review the basic biochemical properties of iron and its influence on MRI signal. We will also summarize the sensitivity and specificity of MRI techniques in detecting iron. The MRI and pathological findings pertaining to brain iron will be reviewed with respect to normal aging and a variety of neurological disorders. Finally, the biochemistry and pathophysiology surrounding iron, oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation in the brain will be discussed, including therapeutic implications. The potential role of iron deposition and its assessment by MRI provides exciting potential applications to the diagnosis, longitudinal monitoring, and therapeutic development for disorders of the brain.

  7. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  8. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  9. Mitochondrial iron and energetic dysfunction distinguish fibroblasts and induced neurons from pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santambrogio, Paolo; Dusi, Sabrina; Guaraldo, Michela; Rotundo, Luisa Ida; Broccoli, Vania; Garavaglia, Barbara; Tiranti, Valeria; Levi, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration is an early onset autosomal recessive movement disorder caused by mutation of the pantothenate kinase-2 gene, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme involved in coenzyme A synthesis. The disorder is characterised by high iron levels in the brain, although the pathological mechanism leading to this accumulation is unknown. To address this question, we tested primary skin fibroblasts from three patients and three healthy subjects, as well as neurons induced by direct fibroblast reprogramming, for oxidative status, mitochondrial functionality and iron parameters. The patients' fibroblasts showed altered oxidative status, reduced antioxidant defence, and impaired cytosolic and mitochondrial aconitase activities compared to control cells. Mitochondrial iron homeostasis and functionality analysis of patient fibroblasts indicated increased labile iron pool content and reactive oxygen species development, altered mitochondrial shape, decreased membrane potential and reduced ATP levels. Furthermore, analysis of induced neurons, performed at a single cell level, confirmed some of the results obtained in fibroblasts, indicating an altered oxidative status and signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly due to iron mishandling. Thus, for the first time, altered biological processes have been identified in vitro in live diseased neurons. Moreover, the obtained induced neurons can be considered a suitable human neuronal model for the identification of candidate therapeutic compounds for this disease.

  10. Iron in haemoglobinopathies and rare anaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Porter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload in haemoglobinopathies and rare anaemias may develop from increased iron absorption secondary to hepcidin suppression, and/or from repeated blood transfusions. While the accumulation of body iron load from blood transfusion is inevitable and predictable from the variable rates of transfusion in the different conditions, there are some important differences in the distribution of iron overload and its consequences between these. Transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (TDT is the best described condition in which transfusional overload occurs. Initially iron loads into macrophages, subsquently hepatocytes, and then the endocrine system including the anterior pituiatry and finally the myocardium. The propensity to extrahepatic iron spread increases with rapid transfusion and with inadequate chelation therapy but there is considerable interpatient and interpopulation variability in this tendency. The conduits though which iron is delivered to tissues is through non transferrin iron species (NTBI which are taken into liver, endocrine tissues and myocardium through L-type calcium channells and possibly through other channells. Recent work by the MSCIO group1 suggests that levels of NTBI are determined by three mechanisms: i increasing with iron overload; ii increasing with ineffective erythropoieis; iii and decreasing when level of transferrin iron utilisation is high. In TDT all three mechanisms increase NTBI levels because transferrin iron utilisation is suppressed by hypertransfusion. It is hypothesized that the transfusion regimen and target mean Hb may have a key impact on NTBI levels because high transfusion regimes may suppress the ‘sink’ effect of the erythron though decreased clearance of transferrin iron. In sickle cell disease (SCD without blood transfusion the anaemia results mainly from haemolysis rather than from ineffective erythropoiesis.2 Thus there is a tendency to iron depletion because of urinary iron loss from

  11. Ironing out Tau's Role in Parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease affects more than five million people worldwide, yet no therapeutic has been identified that can slow or halt the progression of this debilitating disease. A new study in tau knockout mice suggests that tau deficiency causes impaired ferroportin-coupled iron export, by retention of the amyloid precursor protein, a neuronal ferroxidase partner, in the endoplasmic reticulum. This leads to parkinsonism through intracellular iron accumulation and degeneration of dopamine neurons (pages X-Y). PMID:22310680

  12. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to engineer this system are likely to

  13. Iron uptake and homeostasis related genes in potato cultivated in vitro under iron deficiency and overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legay, Sylvain; Guignard, Cédric; Ziebel, Johanna; Evers, Danièle

    2012-11-01

    Potato is one of the most important staple food in the world because it is a good source of vitamin C, vitamin B6 but also an interesting source of minerals including mainly potassium, but also magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, zinc and iron to a lesser extent. The lack of iron constitutes the main form of micronutrient deficiency in the world, namely iron deficiency anemia, which strongly affects pregnant women and children from developing countries. Iron biofortification of major staple food such as potato is thus a crucial issue for populations from these countries. To better understand mechanisms leading to iron accumulation in potato, we followed in an in vitro culture experiment, by qPCR, in the cultivar Désirée, the influence of media iron content on the expression of genes related to iron uptake, transport and homeostasis. As expected, plantlets grown in a low iron medium (1 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA) displayed a decreased iron content, a strong induction of iron deficiency-related genes and a decreased expression of ferritins. Inversely, plantlets grown in a high iron medium (120 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA) strongly accumulated iron in roots; however, no significant change in the expression of our set of genes was observed compared to control (40 mg L(-1) FeNaEDTA).

  14. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Nowik, I.

    1998-12-01

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be ~ 160 μg/g wet tissue and ~ 670 μg/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  15. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauminger, E.R.; Nowik, I. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    1998-12-15

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be {approx} 160 {mu}g/g wet tissue and {approx} 670 {mu}g/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  16. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  17. SALIVA IRON AND FERRITIN LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH THALASSEMIA AND IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duran Canatan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Most of the  techniques for measuring iron accumulation such as serum iron concentration, iron binding capacity, serum ferritin level, liver biopsy are invasive and hard methods for patients. The changes in trace element concentrations in saliva at different systemic diseases shows the quantity of the element at the body. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of iron and ferritin in saliva and serum in patients  with thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia. For this purpose, 35 healthy children as control group and 71 thalassemia major, 10 thalassemia intermedia and 15 thalassemia trait patients were involved. Their saliva  and serum iron and ferritin levels were measured.  There was no statistically difference between age and gender in all groups and control group (p>0.05.  In all groups saliva iron levels are higher than serum iron levels(p<0.05. Furthermore there was a positive correlation betwen serum and saliva  iron levels in thalassemia major, intermedia and trait groups ( p=0.000, r=0.972, r=0.720, r=0.955 and also there was a positive correlation between serum and saliva iron levels in control and iron deficiency group (p= 0.000, r= 0.885, r= 0.368.  In conclusion,  Saliva iron and ferritin levels increase  as well as serum in patients with thalassemia and decrease in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Saliva can be used for diagnosis routinely  to shows the iron overload  and deficiency of the body and its easy applicability and also a non-invasive procedure is important advantage.

  18. SALIVA IRON AND FERRITIN LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH THALASSEMIA AND IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duran Canatan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the  techniques for measuring iron accumulation such as serum iron concentration, iron binding capacity, serum ferritin level, liver biopsy are invasive and hard methods for patients. The changes in trace element concentrations in saliva at different systemic diseases shows the quantity of the element at the body. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of iron and ferritin in saliva and serum in patients  with thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia. For this purpose, 35 healthy children as control group and 71 thalassemia major, 10 thalassemia intermedia and 15 thalassemia trait patients were involved. Their saliva  and serum iron and ferritin levels were measured.  There was no statistically difference between age and gender in all groups and control group (p>0.05.  In all groups saliva iron levels are higher than serum iron levels(p<0.05. Furthermore there was a positive correlation betwen serum and saliva  iron levels in thalassemia major, intermedia and trait groups ( p=0.000, r=0.972, r=0.720, r=0.955 and also there was a positive correlation between serum and saliva iron levels in control and iron deficiency group (p= 0.000, r= 0.885, r= 0.368.  In conclusion,  Saliva iron and ferritin levels increase  as well as serum in patients with thalassemia and decrease in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Saliva can be used for diagnosis routinely  to shows the iron overload  and deficiency of the body and its easy applicability and also a non-invasive procedure is important advantage.

  19. Tissue Iron Distribution Assessed by MRI in Patients with Iron Loading Anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Lucía; House, Michael J.; Vasavda, Nisha; Drašar, Emma; Gonzalez-Gascon y Marin, Isabel; Kulasekararaj, Austin G.; St Pierre, Tim G.; Thein, Swee L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow, spleen, liver and kidney proton transverse relaxation rates (R2), together with cardiac R2* from patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and non-transfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT) have been compared with a control group. Increased liver and bone marrow R2 values for the three groups of patients in comparison with the controls have been found. SCD and PNH patients also present an increased spleen R2 in comparison with the controls. The simultaneous measurement of R2 values for several tissue types by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has allowed the identification of iron distribution patterns in diseases associated with iron imbalance. Preferential liver iron loading is found in the highly transfused SCD patients, while the low transfused ones present a preferential iron loading of the spleen. Similar to the highly transfused SCD group, PNH patients preferentially accumulate iron in the liver. A reduced spleen iron accumulation in comparison with the liver and bone marrow loading has been found in NTDT patients, presumably related to the differential increased intestinal iron absorption. The correlation between serum ferritin and tissue R2 is moderate to good for the liver, spleen and bone marrow in SCD and PNH patients. However, serum ferritin does not correlate with NTDT liver R2, spleen R2 or heart R2*. As opposed to serum ferritin measurements, tissue R2 values are a more direct measurement of each tissue’s iron loading. This kind of determination will allow a better understanding of the different patterns of tissue iron biodistribution in diseases predisposed to tissue iron accumulation. PMID:26406992

  20. Management of transfusional iron overload – differential properties and efficacy of iron chelating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwiatkowski JL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Janet L Kwiatkowski The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Hematology and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Regular red cell transfusion therapy ameliorates disease-related morbidity and can be lifesaving in patients with various hematological disorders. Transfusion therapy, however, causes progressive iron loading, which, if untreated, results in endocrinopathies, cardiac arrhythmias and congestive heart failure, hepatic fibrosis, and premature death. Iron chelation therapy is used to prevent iron loading, remove excess accumulated iron, detoxify iron, and reverse some of the iron-related complications. Three chelators have undergone extensive testing to date: deferoxamine, deferasirox, and deferiprone (although the latter drug is not currently licensed for use in North America where it is available only through compassionate use programs and research protocols. These chelators differ in their modes of administration, pharmacokinetics, efficacy with regard to organ-specific iron removal, and adverse-effect profiles. These differential properties influence acceptability, tolerability and adherence to therapy, and, ultimately, the effectiveness of treatment. Chelation therapy, therefore, must be individualized, taking into account patient preferences, toxicities, ongoing transfusional iron intake, and the degree of cardiac and hepatic iron loading. Keywords: transfusion, iron, chelation, magnetic resonance imaging

  1. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  2. H-和L-铁蛋白在脑膜炎中抑制由于自由铁增高造成的脑损伤%The Inhibitory Effect of H-and L-ferritin on Increased free Iron-induced Brain Damage in Experimental Meningitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任昊; 翟效月

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of ferritin and free iron in brains of meningitis,and to investigate the protective effect of ferritin against inflammatory brain injuries.Methods Forty Wistar rats were used as models of meningitis,which were divided into two groups randomly with equal number of both sexes.Brain samples were extracted according to the requirements of morphological and quantitative analysis.Cerebral free iron was measured with Ferene-S method,and expression of ferritin was measured by western blot.Confocal microscopy was applied for the detection of RNA peroxidation product 8-hydroxy-guanosine(8-OHdG).Results Compared with control group,cerebral free iron levels in the infected brains were significantly increased,as well as H- and L-ferritin levels.Ferritin expression coexisted with cerebral iron in terms of cell types.Brain RNA peroxidation indicator of 8-OhdG didn't increase significantly.Conclusion Pneumococcal meningitis was associated with an increase of cerebral iron level in rats, but without an increase of brain oxidation.H-and L-ferritin could combine with the free iron and thus protected the brain from oxidative damage.%目的 检测铁蛋白与自由铁在脑膜炎大鼠大脑中的改变.探讨H-和L-型铁蛋白对该炎性病变脑损伤的保护作用.方法 40只新生Wistar大鼠作脑膜炎动物模型,雌雄各半,随机分组.大脑材料分别按形态学石蜡切片和定量分析的要求进行取材.利用Ferene-S方法测脑自由铁,免疫印迹测铁蛋白的表达,共聚焦显微镜观察RNA过氧化产物8-羟基鸟苷酸荧光信号.结果 与对照组比较,脑自由铁在感染组中显著上升.H-和L-铁蛋白水平同时增加,且在大脑皮质与脑铁有共存关系.RNA过氧化指标8-羟基鸟苷酸无显著增加.结论 大鼠脑膜炎病变过程伴随着脑自由铁的增加,但并未发生脑的过氧化损伤.H-和L-铁蛋白的表达能够结合自由铁从而保护大脑.

  3. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. APP expression, distribution and accumulation are altered by aluminum in a rodent model for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J R; Wang, M-X

    2009-11-01

    Up-regulated expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) occurs early in the cascade of events that leads to amyloid plaque formation in the human brain. APP gene up-regulation, mediated by activated NF-kappaB, is a response to stress from nM concentrations of aluminum ions, aluminum-disregulated iron ions, reactive-oxygen species, cytokines, and physical trauma. We examined in vivo effects of aluminum on APP in aged rats, obtained from previously-reported longitudinal studies, that chronically ingested aluminum in amounts equivalent to total dietary aluminum levels that Americans routinely ingest. These rats exhibited two outcomes: one group remained cognitively-intact, scoring as well on a memory-discrimination task in old age as in middle age. The other developed cognitive deterioration, obtaining significantly lower mean performance scores in old age than in middle age and exhibiting abnormal behaviors associated with dementia. We compared the expression, distribution and accumulation of APP in hippocampal and cortical tissue of these two rat groups. Compared to results from cognitively-intact rats, hippocampal and cortical tissue from the cognitively-deteriorated rats showed elevated APP gene expression, significantly more dense APP deposits in cytoplasm of neural cells, and APP-immunoreactive neurites that were swollen and varicose. This study shows aluminum routinely derived from chronic oral ingestion, that gradually accumulates in brain regions important for memory-processing, is sufficient to increase APP levels in neural cells of those regions. Aluminum may thus launch the cascade that results in the formation of amyloid plaques in human brain.

  5. Speciation of iron in mouse liver during development, iron deficiency, IRP2 deletion and Inflammatory hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Cockrell, Allison L.; Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P.; Lindahl, Lora S.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The iron content of livers from 57Fe-enriched C57BL/6 mice of different ages were investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electronic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). About 80% of the Fe in an adult liver was due to blood; thus removal of blood by flushing with buffer was essential to observe endogenous liver Fe. Even after exhaustive flushing, ca. 20% of the Fe in anaerobically dissected livers was typical of deoxy-hemoglobin. The concentration of Fe in newborn livers was the highest of any developmental stage (~ 1.2 mM). Most was stored as ferritin, with little mitochondrial Fe (consisting primarily of Fe/S clusters and haems) evident. Within the first few weeks of life, about half of ferritin Fe was mobilized and exported, illustrating the importance of Fe release as well as Fe storage in liver function. Additional ferritin Fe was used to generate mitochondrial Fe centres. From ca. 4 weeks of age to the end of the mouse’s natural lifespan, the concentration of mitochondrial Fe in liver was essentially invariant. A minor contribution from nonhaem high-spin FeII was observed in most liver samples and was also invariant with age. Some portion of these species may constitute the labile iron pool. Livers from mice raised on an Fe-deficient diet were highly Fe depleted; they were devoid of ferritin and contained 1/3 as much mitochondrial Fe as found in Fe-sufficient livers. In contrast, brains of the same Fe-deficient mice retained normal levels of mitochondrial Fe. Livers from mice with inflammatory hepatitis and from IRP2(−/−) mice hyper-accumulated Fe. These livers had high ferritin levels but low levels of mitochondrial Fe. PMID:25325718

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  8. Iron: the Redox-active center of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J; Moreira, Paula I; Liu, Gang; Dobson, Jon; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2007-10-01

    Although iron is essential in maintaining the function of the central nervous system, it is a potent source of reactive oxygen species. Excessive iron accumulation occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, raising the possibility that oxidative stress is intimately involved in the neurodegenerative process. AD in particular is associated with accumulation of numerous markers of oxidative stress; moreover, oxidative stress has been shown to precede hallmark neuropathological lesions early in the disease process, and such lesions, once present, further accumulate iron, among other markers of oxidative stress. In this review, we discuss the role of iron in the progression of AD.

  9. Effect of bacoside A on brain antioxidant status in cigarette smoke exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarasi, K; Vani, G; Balakrishna, K; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2006-02-16

    Free radicals mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of smoking-related diseases and antioxidant nutrients are reported to prevent the oxidative damage induced by smoking. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant role of bacoside A (triterpenoid saponin isolated from Bacopa monniera) against chronic cigarette smoking induced oxidative damage in rat brain. Adult male albino rats were exposed to cigarette smoke for a period of 12 weeks and simultaneously administered with bacoside A (10 mg/kg b.w./day, p.o.). Antioxidant status of the brain was assessed from the levels of reduced glutathione, vitamin C, vitamin E, and vitamin A and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. The levels of copper, iron, zinc and selenium in brain and serum ceruloplasmin activity were also measured. Oxidative stress was evident from the diminished levels of both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Alterations in the levels of trace elements with accumulation of copper and iron, and depletion of zinc and selenium were also observed. Bacoside A administration improved the antioxidant status and maintained the levels of trace elements. These results suggest that chronic cigarette smoke exposure enhances oxidative stress, thereby disturbing the tissue defense system and bacoside A protects the brain from the oxidative damage through its antioxidant potential.

  10. Iron neurochemistry in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: targets for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaidi, Abdel A; Bush, Ashley I

    2016-10-01

    Brain iron homeostasis is increasingly recognized as a potential target for the development of drug therapies for aging-related disorders. Dysregulation of iron metabolism associated with cellular damage and oxidative stress is reported as a common event in several neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Indeed, many proteins initially characterized in those diseases such as amyloid-β protein, α-synuclein, and huntingtin have been linked to iron neurochemistry. Iron plays a crucial role in maintaining normal physiological functions in the brain through its participation in many cellular functions such as mitochondrial respiration, myelin synthesis, and neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolism. However, excess iron is a potent source of oxidative damage through radical formation and because of the lack of a body-wide export system, a tight regulation of its uptake, transport and storage is crucial in fulfilling cellular functions while keeping its level below the toxicity threshold. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on iron homeostasis in the brain and explore how alterations in brain iron metabolism affect neuronal function with emphasis on iron dysregulation in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Finally, we discuss recent findings implicating iron as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Iron plays a fundamental role in maintaining the high metabolic and energetic requirements of the brain. However, iron has to be maintained in a delicate balance as both iron overload and iron deficiency are detrimental to the brain and can trigger neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss the current knowledge on brain iron homeostasis and its involvement in major aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  11. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...

  12. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra iron in their diets. People following a vegetarian diet might also need additional iron. What's Iron ... as Whole Milk? About Anemia Minerals What's a Vegetarian? Word! Anemia Anemia Food Labels Vitamins and Minerals ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  14. Oral Iron Prophylaxis in Pregnancy: Not Too Little and Not Too Much!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Milman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate supply of iron is essential for normal development of the fetus and newborn child. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA during pregnancy increase the risk of preterm birth and low birth weight. Iron is important for development of the fetal brain and cognitive abilities of the newborn. Children born to iron-deficient mothers will start their lives suffering from iron deficiency or even IDA. Oral iron prophylaxis to pregnant women improves iron status and prevents development of IDA. The Danish National Board of Health has since 1992 recommended prophylactic oral iron supplements to all pregnant women and the currently advocated dose is 40–50 mg ferrous iron taken between meals from 10 weeks gestation to delivery. However, 30–40 mg ferrous iron is probably an adequate dose in most affluent societies. In developed countries, individual iron prophylaxis guided by iron status (serum ferritin has physiological advantages compared to general iron prophylaxis. In contrast, in most developing countries, general iron prophylaxis is indicated, and higher doses of oral iron, for example, 60 mg ferrous iron or even more should be recommended, according to the present iron status situation in the specific populations of women of fertile age and pregnant women.

  15. Secondary Hemochromatosis due to Chronic Oral Iron Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isang, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Iron may accumulate in excess due to a mutation in the HFE gene that upregulates absorption or when it is ingested or infused at levels that exceed the body's ability to clear it. Excess iron deposition in parenchymal tissue causes injury and ultimately organ dysfunction. Diabetes mellitus and hepatic cirrhosis due to pancreas and liver damage are just two examples of diseases that result from iron overload. Despite the rapid growth of information regarding iron metabolism and iron overload states, the most effective treatment is still serial phlebotomies. We present a patient who developed iron overload due to chronic ingestion of oral ferrous sulfate. This case illustrates the importance of querying geriatric patients regarding their use of nonprescription iron products without a medical indication. PMID:28133557

  16. Mapping of cellular iron using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Min

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantianigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy and with 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells. The cells were exposed to iron by treatment with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM) for up to 6 hours. The hyperspectral fluorescence imaging signal of iron was examined usinga high- resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/ near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. The 6-hour group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the small amount of iron accumulation in the 1-hour group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small, particulate form, whereas extracellular iron was detected in an aggregated form. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The cellular iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN in PD. This direct iron imaging methodology could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron in PD, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving other metals, such as copper, manganese or zinc.

  17. Long-term air pollution exposure is associated with neuroinflammation, an altered innate immune response, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, ultrafine particulate deposition, and accumulation of amyloid beta-42 and alpha-synuclein in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Solt, Anna C; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Nuse, Bryan; Herritt, Lou; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Stone, Ida; García, Raquel; Brooks, Diane M; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Reed, William

    2008-02-01

    Air pollution is a serious environmental problem. We investigated whether residency in cities with high air pollution is associated with neuroinflammation/neurodegeneration in healthy children and young adults who died suddenly. We measured mRNA cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in target brain regions from low (n = 12) or highly exposed residents (n = 35) aged 25.1 +/- 1.5 years. Upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1beta, and CD14 in olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, substantia nigrae and vagus nerves; disruption of the blood-brain barrier; endothelial activation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory cell trafficking were seen in highly exposed subjects. Amyloid beta42 (Abeta42) immunoreactivity was observed in 58.8% of apolipoprotein E (APOE) 3/3 Parkinson's diseases, and carriers of the APOE 4 allele could have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease if they reside in a polluted environment.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  19. Seasonal Arsenic Accumulation in Stream Sediments at a Groundwater Discharge Zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKay, Allison A.; Gan, Ping; Yu, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal changes in arsenic and iron accumulation rates were examined in the sediments of a brook that receives groundwater discharges of arsenic and reduced iron. Clean glass bead columns were deployed in sediments for known periods over the annual hydrologic cycle to monitor changes in arsenic...

  20. Using skin to assess iron accumulation in human metabolic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinote, I. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Fleming, R. [Imunohaemotherapy Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Silva, R. [Dermatology Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Filipe, P. [Dermatology Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Silva, J.N. [Dermatology Department, Hospital de St. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Verissimo, A. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Napoleao, P. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisbon (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisbon (Portugal); Pinheiro, T. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal) and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: murmur@itn.pt

    2006-08-15

    The distribution of Fe in skin was assessed to monitor body Fe status in human hereditary hemochromatosis. The paper reports on data from nine patients with hemochromatosis that were studied along the therapeutic programme. Systemic evaluation of Fe metabolism was carried out by measuring with PIXE technique the Fe concentration in plasma and blood cells, and by determining with biochemical methods the indicators of Fe transport in serum (ferritin and transferrin). The Fe distribution and concentration in skin was assessed by nuclear microscopy and Fe deposits in liver estimated through nuclear magnetic resonance. Elevated Fe concentrations in skin were related to increased plasma Fe (p < 0.004), serum ferritin content (p < 0.01) and Fe deposits in liver (p < 0.004). The relationship of Fe deposits in organs and metabolism markers may help to better understand Fe pools mobilisation and to establish the quality of skin as a marker for the disease progression and therapy efficacy.

  1. Application of novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles to sentinel lymph node identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Aidan; Howard, Douglas; Henning, Anna M.; Nelson, Melanie R. M.; Tilley, Richard D.; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Current `gold standard' staging of breast cancer and melanoma relies on accurate in vivo identification of the sentinel lymph node. By replacing conventional tracers (dyes and radiocolloids) with magnetic nanoparticles and using a handheld magnetometer probe for in vivo identification, it is believed the accuracy of sentinel node identification in nonsuperficial cancers can be improved due to increased spatial resolution of magnetometer probes and additional anatomical information afforded by MRI road-mapping. By using novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles, the sensitivity of sentinel node mapping via MRI can be increased due to an increased magnetic saturation compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. A series of in vitro magnetic phantoms (iron core vs. iron oxide nanoparticles) were prepared to simulate magnetic particle accumulation in the sentinel lymph node. A novel handheld magnetometer probe was used to measure the relative signals of each phantom, and determine if clinical application of iron core particles can improve in vivo detection of the sentinel node compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. The findings indicate that novel iron core nanoparticles above a certain size possess high magnetic saturation, but can also be produced with low coercivity and high susceptibility. While some modification to the design of handheld magnetometer probes may be required for particles with large coercivity, use of iron core particles could improve MRI and magnetometer probe detection sensitivity by up to 330 %.

  2. Biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in idiopathic hemochromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultcrantz, R.; Angelin, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.E.; Ewerth, S.; Einarsson, K.

    1989-06-01

    The role of biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in iron overload was studied and evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis and two groups of controls (14 gallstone patients and 16 healthy subjects) were included. Liver tissue (obtained by percutaneous or operative biopsy) was investigated with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray microanalysis. Fasting bile samples were obtained through duodenal aspiration or at cholecystectomy. Iron was determined in liver tissue and bile using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and ferritin was determined in serum and bile with a radioimmunoassay technique. All patients with hemochromatosis had iron-positive staining as seen in light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed iron-containing proteins in the lysosomes and cytosol of liver parenchymal cells, and this observation was supported by x-ray microanalysis. Hepatic iron concentration was increased about eightfold in the patients with hemochromatosis (p less than 0.001). Biliary iron concentration, expressed per millimole of bile acid, was increased about twofold (p less than 0.05) and biliary ferritin concentration about fivefold (p less than 0.001) in hemochromatosis. Four of the patients with hemochromatosis were reexamined after completed treatment with venesection; this resulted in normalized biliary concentrations of iron and ferritin. We conclude that biliary secretion of ferritin occurs in humans and that both iron and ferritin excretion are enhanced in hepatic iron overload. The apparently limited capacity of biliary iron excretion may be of importance for the hepatic iron accumulation in hemochromatosis.

  3. Iron distribution and histopathological study of the effects of deferoxamine and deferiprone in the kidneys of iron overloaded β-thalassemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatmark, Paranee; Morales, Noppawan Phumala; Chaisri, Urai; Wichaiyo, Surasak; Hemstapat, Warinkarn; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Svasti, Saovaros; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2016-09-01

    Renal glomerular and tubular dysfunctions have been reported with high prevalence in β-thalassemia. Iron toxicity is implicated in the kidney damage, which may be reversed by iron chelation therapy. To mimic heavy iron overload and evaluate the efficacy of iron chelators in the patients, iron dextran (180mg iron/mouse) was intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected in heterozygous β-globin knockout mice ((muβth-3/+), BKO) and wild type mice (C57BL/6J, WT) over a period of 2 weeks, followed by daily i.p. injection of deferoxamine (DFO) or deferiprone (L1) for 1 week. In BKO mice, iron preferentially accumulated in the proximal tubule with a grading score of 0-1 and increased to grade 3 after iron loading. In contrast, iron mainly deposited in the glomerulus and interstitial space in iron overloaded WT mice. Increased levels of kidney lipid peroxidation, glomerular and medullar damage and fibrosis in iron overloaded mice were reversed by treatment with iron chelators. L1 showed higher efficacy than DFO in reduction of glomerular iron, which was supported by a significantly decreased the amount of glomerular damage. Notably, DFO and L1 demonstrated a distinct pattern of iron distribution in the proximal tubule of BKO mice. In conclusion, chelation therapy has beneficial effects in iron-overloaded kidneys. However, the defect of kidney iron metabolism in thalassemia may be a determining factor of the treatment outcome in individual patients.

  4. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  5. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  6. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  7. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization.

  8. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  9. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  10. Obesity alters adipose tissue macrophage iron content and tissue iron distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Jeb S; Kennedy, Arion; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Webb, Corey D; Fordahl, Steve C; Erikson, Keith M; Zhang, Yaofang; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2014-02-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion is accompanied by the infiltration and accumulation of AT macrophages (ATMs), as well as a shift in ATM polarization. Several studies have implicated recruited M1 ATMs in the metabolic consequences of obesity; however, little is known regarding the role of alternatively activated resident M2 ATMs in AT homeostasis or how their function is altered in obesity. Herein, we report the discovery of a population of alternatively activated ATMs with elevated cellular iron content and an iron-recycling gene expression profile. These iron-rich ATMs are referred to as MFe(hi), and the remaining ATMs are referred to as MFe(lo). In lean mice, ~25% of the ATMs are MFe(hi); this percentage decreases in obesity owing to the recruitment of MFe(lo) macrophages. Similar to MFe(lo) cells, MFe(hi) ATMs undergo an inflammatory shift in obesity. In vivo, obesity reduces the iron content of MFe(hi) ATMs and the gene expression of iron importers as well as the iron exporter, ferroportin, suggesting an impaired ability to handle iron. In vitro, exposure of primary peritoneal macrophages to saturated fatty acids also alters iron metabolism gene expression. Finally, the impaired MFe(hi) iron handling coincides with adipocyte iron overload in obese mice. In conclusion, in obesity, iron distribution is altered both at the cellular and tissue levels, with AT playing a predominant role in this change. An increased availability of fatty acids during obesity may contribute to the observed changes in MFe(hi) ATM phenotype and their reduced capacity to handle iron.

  11. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...

  12. Gut microbiota: the brain peacekeeper

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulates intestinal and extraintestinal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the gut microbiota may also regulate brain function and behavior. Results from animal models indicate that disturbances in the composition and functionality of some microbiota members are associated with neurophysiological disorders, strengthening the idea of a microbiota-gut-brain axis and the role of microbiota as a peacekeeper in the brain health. Here, we review recent discoveries on t...

  13. Moessbauer studies of frataxin role in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and dysfunction-related disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Serres, Ricardo [Universite Joseph Fourier (France); Clemancey, Martin [CNRS, UMR5249 (France); Oddou, Jean-Louis [Universite Joseph Fourier (France); Pastore, Annalisa [Medical Research Council National Institute for Medical Research (United Kingdom); Lesuisse, Emmanuel [Laboratoire Mitochondries, Metaux et Stress oxydant, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris (France); Latour, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.latour@cea.fr [CEA, iRTSV, LCBM (France)

    2012-03-15

    Friedreich ataxia is a disease that is associated with defects in the gene coding for a small protein frataxin. Several different roles have been proposed for the protein, including iron chaperoning and iron storage. Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to probe these hypotheses. Iron accumulation in mutant mitochondria unable to assemble iron sulfur clusters proved to be insensitive to overexpression of frataxin, ruling out its potential involvement as an iron storage protein similar to ferritin. Rather, it was found that frataxin negatively regulates iron sulfur cluster assembly.

  14. Prevention of Glutamate Accumulation and Upregulation of Phospho-Akt may Account for Neuroprotection Afforded by Bergamot Essential Oil against Brain Injury Induced by Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amantea, Diana; Fratto, Vincenza; Maida, Simona; Rotiroti, Domenicantonio; Ragusa, Salvatore; Nappi, Giuseppe; Bagetta, Giacinto; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana

    2009-01-01

    The effects of bergamot essential oil (BEO; Citrus bergamia, Risso) on brain damage caused by permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rat were investigated. Administration of BEO (0.1-0.5 ml/kg but not 1 ml/kg, given intraperitoneally 1 h before occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, MCAo) significantly reduced infarct size after 24 h permanent MCAo. The most effective dose (0.5 ml/kg) resulted in a significant reduction of infarct extension throughout the brain, especially in the medial striatum and the motor cortex as revealed by TTC staining of tissue slices. Microdialysis experiments show that BEO (0.5 ml/kg) did not affect basal amino acid levels, whereas it significantly reduced excitatory amino acid, namely aspartate and glutamate, efflux in the frontoparietal cortex typically observed following MCAo. Western blotting experiments demonstrated that these early effects were associated, 24 h after permanent MCAo, to a significant increase in the phosphorylation and activity of the prosurvival kinase, Akt. Indeed, BEO significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of the deleterious downstream kinase, GSK-3beta, whose activity is negatively regulated via phosphorylation by Akt.

  15. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  16. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  17. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  18. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  19. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura,Ikuro

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  20. Effects of various principles from Chinese herbal medicine on rhodamine123 accumulation in brain capillary endothelial cells%多种中草药单体对脑微血管内皮细胞内罗丹明123积累的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何玲; 刘国卿

    2002-01-01

    目的:寻找新型有效的血脑屏障P-糖蛋白逆转剂.方法:通过测定各化合物对牛脑微血管内皮细胞内罗丹明123积累的影响来考查它们对P-糖蛋白的功能性作用,以此筛选血脑屏障上的P-糖蛋白逆转剂.结果:各化合物浓度依赖性地增加胞内Rh123的累积浓度,作用强弱顺序为:环孢素A(CsA)>粉防己碱(Tet)>长春新碱(VCR)≈氟桂利嗪(Flu)>延胡索乙素(dl-THP)>蝙蝠葛碱(DRC)>阿齐霉素(Azi)>维拉帕米(Vet)≈小檗胺(BBM)>蝙蝠葛苏林碱(DRS)>小檗碱(BBR)>阿霉素(Dox)>左旋四氢巴马汀(l-THP)>川芎嗪(TMP).其中CsA、Tet、Ver、Flu、Azi和dl-THP对胞内罗丹明123的累积的影响是可逆的.结论:多种中药单体,如某些异喹啉类生物碱能逆转血脑屏障上P-糖蛋白的功能,而不使血脑屏障上P-糖蛋白的固有水平发生永久性改变.%AIM: To search for novel effective P-glycoprotein (P-gp) reversal agents in the blood-brain barrier (BBB).METHODS: Using rhodamine123 (Rh123) to examine the functional activity of P-gp in cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) and screen various principles on P-gp modulation in BBB. RESULTS:All of tested compounds ( 1 - 10μmol/L) increased the intracellular accumulation of Rh123 in a concentrationdependent manner. The rank order of these agents in increasing Rh123 accumulation in BCEC was: cyclosporin A (CsA) > tetrandrine (Tet) > vincrinstine (VCR) ≈ flunarizine (Flu) > dl-tetrahydropalmatine (dl-THP) > dauricine (DRC) > azithromycin (Azi)> verapamil (Ver) ≈ berbamine (BBM) > daurisoline (DRS) > berberine (BBR) ≈ doxorubicin (Dox) >l-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) > tetramethylpyrazine (TMP). These agents at concentration of 10 μmol/L increased Rh123 accumulation by 346 %, 203 %,136%, 129 %, 115 %, 103 %, 92 %, 87 %,81%, 75 %, 67 %, 67 %, 63 %, and 54 %,respectively. The effects of CsA, Tet, Ver, Flu, Azi,and dl-THP on cellular accumulation

  1. Accumulate information based on DGMM for brain-computer interface%基于判别混合高斯模型的信息积累方法及在脑机接口中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓源; 吴健康; 程义民

    2007-01-01

    设计有效的学习算法快速准确地对脑电信号(eelectroencephalogram,EEG)进行连续预测是脑机接口(brain-computer interface,BCI)研究的关键之一.本文提出了一种新颖的基于判别混合高斯模型(discriminative gaussian mixture model,DGMM)的信息积累方法.该方法通过区分度权值对分类器在各时段的输出进行积累,从而达到提高脑电信号分类精度的作用.在两个运动想象数据集上的实验结果表明该方法能够提高BCI系统的性能,具有较好的实用性.

  2. Accumulation by Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büscher, Bram; Fletcher, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Following the financial crisis and its aftermath, it is clear that the inherent contradictions of capitalist accumulation have become even more intense and plunged the global economy into unprecedented turmoil and urgency. Governments, business leaders and other elite agents are frantically searchin

  3. Hydrogenation of iron in the early stage of Earth's evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka-Oku, Riko; Yagi, Takehiko; Gotou, Hirotada; Okuchi, Takuo; Hattori, Takanori; Sano-Furukawa, Asami

    2017-01-01

    Density of the Earth's core is lower than that of pure iron and the light element(s) in the core is a long-standing problem. Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the solar system and thus one of the important candidates. However, the dissolution process of hydrogen into iron remained unclear. Here we carry out high-pressure and high-temperature in situ neutron diffraction experiments and clarify that when the mixture of iron and hydrous minerals are heated, iron is hydrogenized soon after the hydrous mineral is dehydrated. This implies that early in the Earth's evolution, as the accumulated primordial material became hotter, the dissolution of hydrogen into iron occurred before any other materials melted. This suggests that hydrogen is likely the first light element dissolved into iron during the Earth's evolution and it may affect the behaviour of the other light elements in the later processes.

  4. 智力外流、人力资本积累与经济增长——基于我国省级面板数据的实证研究%Brain Drain, Human Capital Accumulation and Economic Growth --An Empirical Study Based on Chinese Provincial Panel Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李平; 张玉; 许家云

    2012-01-01

    Based on Chinese provincial panel data from 2001 to 2010, this paper tests the effect of brain drain on Chinese economic growth with human capital mechanism by adopting the GMM as the analysis method. Such results are drawn: (1) Chinese brain drain significantly improves domestic economic growth by stimulating the formation and accumulation of human capital; (2) marginal utility of human capital stimulation mechanism is bigger in inland less developed regions, while the effect of human capital on economic growth is better in coastal developed regions. All in all, the influence of brain drain on economic growth is more powerful; (3) by introducing the interaction term, the authors also find that the economic effect of brain drain increases with the expansion of the scale of intelligence flow by human capital stimulation mechanism. This paper will lead to further thinking of Chinese optimal level of brain drain.%本文利用2001—2010年的中国省级面板数据,采用系统广义矩估计的方法,就智力外流通过作用于人力资本积累对流出国经济增长的影响进行实证检验。研究结果显示:(1)中国智力外流通过激励人力资本形成与积累显著促进了国内的经济增长;(2)内陆欠发达地区智力外流的人力资本激励效应的边际作用比较大,而沿海发达地区人力资本影响经济增长的效果更强,总体来看,智力外流的经济增长效应在沿海发达地区更加明显;(3)通过引入交互项,本文还发现智力外流通过人力资本激励效应对经济增长的影响随智力流动规模的扩大而提高,进一步引发对中国最优智力外流水平的思考。

  5. Effect of excess iron and copper on physiology of aquatic plant Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Huang, Wenmin; Liu, Guihua

    2010-04-01

    To elucidate effect of chemical reagents addition on growth of aquatic plants in restoration of aquatic ecosystem, Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid was used to evaluate its physiological responses to excess iron (Fe(3+)) and copper (Cu(2+)) in the study. Results showed that accumulation of iron and copper both reached maximum at 100 mg L(-1) iron or copper after 24 h short-term stress, but excess iron and copper caused plants necrosis or death and colonies disintegration as well as roots abscission at excess metal concentrations except for 1 mg L(-1) iron. Significant differences in chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) were observed at 1-100 mg L(-1) iron or copper. The synthesis of chlorophyll and protein as well as carbohydrate and the uptake of phosphate and nitrogen were inhibited seriously by excess iron and copper. Proline content decreased with increasing iron or copper concentration, however, MDA content increased with increasing iron or copper concentration.

  6. Mosses accumulate heavy metals from the substrata of coal ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukojević Vanja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants that are able to accumulate and tolerate extraordinarily high concentrations of heavy metals (hyperaccumulators can be used for phytoremediation (removal of contaminants from soils or phytomining (growing a crop of plants to harvest the metals. Two moss species, Bryum capillare Hedw. and Ceratodon purpureus Hedw., were tested as potential phytoremedies under in vivo conditions on a coal ash disposal site in the surroundings of Obrenovac (NW Serbia. The content of various heavy metals (iron, manganese zinc, lead, nickel, cadmium, and copper in the mosses and substrata were investigated over a period of three years. Iron and zinc were found to have the highest concentration in the mosses.

  7. Tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient or iron-deficient rats after stainless steel welding-fume exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Duck; Kim, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Won; Choi, Seong-Jin; Choi, Byung-Sun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Han, Jeong Hee; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Kwon, Il Hoon; Mun, Je-Hyeok; Yu, Il Je

    2007-05-01

    Welders can be exposed to high levels of manganese through welding fumes. Although it has already been suggested that excessive manganese exposure causes neurotoxicity, called manganism, the pathway of manganese transport to the brain with welding-fume exposure remains unclear. Iron is an essential metal that maintains a homeostasis in the body. The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) transports iron and other divalent metals, such as manganese, and the depletion of iron is known to upregulate DMT1 expression. Accordingly, this study investigated the tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats after welding-fume exposure. The feeding of an iron-deficient diet for 4 wk produced a depletion of body iron, such as decreased iron levels in the serum and tissues, and upregulated the DMT1 expression in the rat duodenum. The iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats were then exposed to welding fumes generated from manual metal arc stainless steel at a concentration of 63.5 +/- 2.3 mg/m3 for 2 h per day over a 30-day period. Animals were sacrificed on days 1, 15, and 30. The level of body iron in the iron-deficient rats was restored to the control level after the welding-fume exposure. However, the tissue distributions of manganese after the welding-fume exposure showed similar patterns in both the iron-sufficient and iron-deficient groups. The concentration of manganese increased in the lungs and liver on days 15 and 30, and increased in the olfactory bulb on day 30. Slight and heterogeneous increases of manganese were observed in different brain regions. Consequently, these findings suggest that the presence of Fe in the inhaled welding fumes may not have a significant effect on the uptake of Mn into the brain. Thus, the condition of iron deficiency did not seem to have any apparent effect on the transport of Mn into the brain after the inhalation of welding fumes.

  8. Tenellin acts as an iron chelator to prevent iron-generated reactive oxygen species toxicity in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirakkakul, Jiraporn; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Punya, Juntira; Chutrakul, Chanikul; Senachak, Jittisak; Buajarern, Taridaporn; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life. However, the iron overload can be toxic. Here, we investigated the significant increase of tenellin and iron-tenellin complex production in ferricrocin-deficient mutants of Beauveria bassiana. Our chemical analysis indicated that the ferricrocin-deficient mutants T1, T3 and T5 nearly abolished ferricrocin production. In turn, these mutants had significant accumulation of iron-tenellin complex in their mycelia at 247-289 mg g(-1) cell dry weight under iron-replete condition. Both tenellin and iron-tenellin complex were not detected in the wild-type under such condition. Mass analysis of the mutants' crude extracts demonstrated that tenellin formed a 3:1 complex with iron in the absence of ferricrocin. The unexpected link between ferricrocin and tenellin biosynthesis in ferricrocin-deficient mutants could be a survival strategy during iron-mediated oxidative stress.

  9. Brain susceptibility to oxidative stress in the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Serafina; Tataranno, Luisa M; Stazzoni, Gemma; Ramenghi, Luca; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) occurs at birth in all newborns as a consequence of the hyperoxic challenge due to the transition from the hypoxic intrauterine environment to extrauterine life. Free radical (FRs) sources such as inflammation, hyperoxia, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion, neutrophil and macrophage activation, glutamate and free iron release, all increases the OS during the perinatal period. Newborns, and particularly preterm infants, have reduced antioxidant defences and are not able to counteract the harmful effects of FRs. Energy metabolism is central to life because cells cannot exist without an adequate supply of ATP. Due to its growth, the mammalian brain can be considered as a steady-state system in which ATP production matches ATP utilisation. The developing brain is particularly sensitive to any disturbances in energy generation, and even a short-term interruption can lead to long-lasting and irreversible damage. Whenever energy failure develops, brain damage can occur. Accumulating evidence indicates that OS is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological diseases, such as intraventricular haemorrhage, hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and epilepsy.

  10. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  11. The role of iron as a mediator of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J; Moreira, Paula I; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2012-01-01

    Iron is both essential for maintaining a spectrum of metabolic processes in the central nervous system and elsewhere, and potent source of reactive oxygen species. Redox balance with respect to iron, therefore, may be critical to human neurodegenerative disease but is also in need of better understanding. Alzheimer disease (AD) in particular is associated with accumulation of numerous markers of oxidative stress; moreover, oxidative stress has been shown to precede hallmark neuropathological lesions early in the disease process, and such lesions, once present, further accumulate iron, among other markers of oxidative stress. In this review, we discuss the role of iron in the progression of AD.

  12. Virtual iron concentration imaging based on dual-energy CT for noninvasive quantification and grading of liver iron content: An iron overload rabbit model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xian Fu; Yang, Yi; Xie, Xue Qian; Zhang, Huan; Chai, Wei Min; Yan, Fu Hua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Yan, Jing [Siemens Shanghai Medical Equipment Ltd., Shanghai (China); Wang, Li [Fudan University, Center of Analysis and Measurement, Shanghai (China); Schmidt, Bernhard [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    To assess the accuracy of liver iron content (LIC) quantification and grading ability associated with clinical LIC stratification using virtual iron concentration (VIC) imaging on dual-energy CT (DECT) in an iron overload rabbit model. Fifty-one rabbits were prepared as iron-loaded models by intravenous injection of iron dextran. DECT was performed at 80 and 140 kVp. VIC images were derived from an iron-specific algorithm. Postmortem LIC assessments were conducted on an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometer. Correlation between VIC and LIC was analyzed. VIC were stratified according to the corresponding clinical LIC thresholds of 1.8, 3.2, 7.0, and 15.0 mg Fe/g. Diagnostic performance of stratification was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analysis. VIC linearly correlated with LIC (r = 0.977, P < 0.01). No significant difference was observed between VIC-derived LICs and ICP (P > 0.05). For the four clinical LIC thresholds, the corresponding cutoff values of VIC were 19.6, 25.3, 36.9, and 61.5 HU, respectively. The highest sensitivity (100 %) and specificity (100 %) were achieved at the threshold of 15.0 mg Fe/g. Virtual iron concentration imaging on DECT showed potential ability to accurately quantify and stratify hepatic iron accumulation in the iron overload rabbit model. (orig.)

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  14. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalography (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain.

  15. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  16. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  17. The relevance of iron in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sian-Hülsmann, Jeswinder; Mandel, Silvia; Youdim, Moussa B H; Riederer, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Alterations of iron levels in the brain has been observed and documented in a number of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD). The elevated nigral iron levels observed in PD may reflect a dysfunction of brain iron homeostasis. Under normal physiological conditions excess iron can be sequestrated in ferritin and neuromelanin. Alternatively, the excess iron may represent a component of brain iron deposition associated with ageing. The aetiology of idiopathic PD largely remains an enigma. However, intensive investigations have provided a host of putative mechanisms that might contribute to the pathogenesis underlying the characteristic degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). The mechanisms proposed include oxidative (and nitrative) stress, inflammation, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered proteolysis and finally apoptotic induced cell death. Iron-mediated cellular destruction is mediated primarily via reactive oxygen or/and nitrogen species induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, these pathogenic mechanisms appear to be closely interlinked to the cascade of events leading to cellular death. There are conflicting reports about the stage during disease progression at which nigral iron change occurs in PD. Some have found that there are no changes in iron content SN in asymptomatic incidental Lewy body disease, suggesting it may represent a secondary event in the cascade of neuronal degeneration. In contrast, others have found an elevation of iron in SN in pre-clinical stages. These discrepancies may be attributed to the occurrence of different sub-groups of the disease. This concurs with the notion that PD represents a group of related diseases with a number of potential pathogenic pathways.

  18. Serum Iron Parameters, HFE C282Y Genotype, and Cognitive Performance in Older Adults: Results From the FACIT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiepers, O.J.G.; Boxtel, van M.P.J.; Groot, R.H.M.; Jolles, J.; Kort, de W.L.A.M.; Swinkels, D.W.; Kok, F.J.; Verhoef, P.; Durga, J.

    2010-01-01

    Although iron homeostasis is essential for brain functioning, the effects of iron levels on cognitive performance in older individuals have scarcely been investigated. In the present study, serum iron parameters and hemochromatosis (HFE) C282Y genotype were determined in 818 older individuals who pa

  19. Iron overload and cofactors with special reference to alcohol, hepatitis C virus infection and steatosis/insulin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka Kohgo; Katsuya Ikuta; Takaaki Ohtake; Yoshihiro Torimoto; Junji Kato

    2007-01-01

    There are several cofactors which affect body iron metabolism and accelerate iron overload. Alcohol and hepatic viral infections are the most typical examples for clarifying the role of cofactors in iron overload. In these conditions, iron is deposited in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced through Fenton reaction have key role to facilitate cellular uptake of transferrin-bound iron. Furthermore,hepcidin, antimicrobial peptide produced mainly in the liver is also responsible for intestinal iron absorption and reticuloendothelial iron release. In patients with ceruloplasmin deficiency, anemia and secondary iron overload in liver and neurodegeneration are reported.Furthermore, there is accumulating evidence that fatty acid accumulation without alcohol and obesity itself modifies iron overload states. Ineffective erythropoiesis is also an important factor to accelerate iron overload,which is associated with diseases such as thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. When this condition persists, the dietary iron absorption is increased due to the increment of bone marrow erythropoiesis and tissue iron overload will thereafter occurs. In porphyria cutanea tarda, iron is secondarily accumulated in the liver.

  20. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron ... can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin ...

  2. The Organization of Controller Motifs Leading to Robust Plant Iron Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Agafonov

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential element needed by all organisms for growth and development. Because iron becomes toxic at higher concentrations iron is under homeostatic control. Plants face also the problem that iron in the soil is tightly bound to oxygen and difficult to access. Plants have therefore developed special mechanisms for iron uptake and regulation. During the last years key components of plant iron regulation have been identified. How these components integrate and maintain robust iron homeostasis is presently not well understood. Here we use a computational approach to identify mechanisms for robust iron homeostasis in non-graminaceous plants. In comparison with experimental results certain control arrangements can be eliminated, among them that iron homeostasis is solely based on an iron-dependent degradation of the transporter IRT1. Recent IRT1 overexpression experiments suggested that IRT1-degradation is iron-independent. This suggestion appears to be misleading. We show that iron signaling pathways under IRT1 overexpression conditions become saturated, leading to a breakdown in iron regulation and to the observed iron-independent degradation of IRT1. A model, which complies with experimental data places the regulation of cytosolic iron at the transcript level of the transcription factor FIT. Including the experimental observation that FIT induces inhibition of IRT1 turnover we found a significant improvement in the system's response time, suggesting a functional role for the FIT-mediated inhibition of IRT1 degradation. By combining iron uptake with storage and remobilization mechanisms a model is obtained which in a concerted manner integrates iron uptake, storage and remobilization. In agreement with experiments the model does not store iron during its high-affinity uptake. As an iron biofortification approach we discuss the possibility how iron can be accumulated even during high-affinity uptake.

  3. 磁敏感加权成像评估阿尔茨海默病脑内铁沉积的临床意义%Clinical significance of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in the evaluation of brain iron deposition in alzheimer disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莹

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the difference of brain iron contents between patients with alzheimer disease(AD) and normal control group by SWI technology,to explore the correlation between the phase value and the MMSE score.Methods:31 patients with AD(the AD group) and 10 healthy elderly people(the NC group) were given hippocampus and caudate nucleus SWI scan.The correlation between the various brain regions phase values of AD group and the MMSE score were compared.Results:The left and right sides of hippocampus and caudate nucleus in the AD group had different degrees of iron deposition.AD group were significantly higher than the control group(P<0.05).The left and right hippocampus angle values had correlation with MMSE score,and the correlation coefficents were respectively 0.43 and 0.45(P<0.05).Conclusion:The phase value can be used as a sensitive and effective method to evaluate the abnormal brain iron deposition in AD patients. The phase value of hippocampus is closely related to the progression of AD disease.%目的:用SWI技术观察阿尔茨海默病(AD)患者与正常对照组脑内铁含量的差异,探讨相位值与MMSE评分的相关性。方法:对31例AD患者(AD组)及10例健康老年人(NC组)进行海马及尾状核SWI扫描。比较AD组各脑区相位值与MMSE评分的相关性。结果:AD组海马及尾状核左侧及右侧均有不同程度的铁沉积。AD组均较对照组均显著增高(P<0.05)。左右两侧海马角弧度值与 MMSE 评分均具有相关性,相关系数分别为0.43和0.45(P<0.05)。结论:相位值可作为评价AD患者脑内铁沉积异常的敏感而有效的手段。海马相位值与AD疾病进展关系密切。

  4. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  5. Brain components

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make complex movements without thinking. The brain stem connects the brain with the spinal cord and is composed of ... structures: the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brain stem provides us with automatic functions that are necessary ...

  6. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  7. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  13. The effect of iron ion on the specificity of photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Hayashi

    Full Text Available Recently, photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-PDT has been widely used in cancer therapy. ALA administration results in tumor-selective accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX via the heme biosynthetic pathway. Although ALA-PDT has selectivity for tumor cells, PpIX is accumulated into cultured normal cells to a small extent, causing side effects. The mechanism of tumor-selective PpIX accumulation is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to identify the mechanism of tumor-selective PpIX accumulation after ALA administration. We focused on mitochondrial labile iron ion, which is the substrate for metabolism of PpIX to heme. We investigated differences in iron metabolism between tumor cells and normal cells and found that the amount of mitochondrial labile iron ion in cancer was lower than that in normal cells. This finding could be because of the lower expression of mitoferrins, which are the mitochondrial iron transporters. Accordingly, we added sodium ferrous citrate (SFC with ALA as a source of iron. As a result, we observed the accumulation of PpIX only in tumor cells, and only these cells showed sensitivity to ALA-PDT. Taken together, these results suggest that the uptake abilities of iron ion into mitochondria play a key role in tumor-selective PpIX accumulation. Using SFC as a source of iron might thus increase the specificity of ALA-PDT effects.

  14. The effect of iron ion on the specificity of photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Maiko; Fukuhara, Hideo; Inoue, Keiji; Shuin, Taro; Hagiya, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-PDT) has been widely used in cancer therapy. ALA administration results in tumor-selective accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) via the heme biosynthetic pathway. Although ALA-PDT has selectivity for tumor cells, PpIX is accumulated into cultured normal cells to a small extent, causing side effects. The mechanism of tumor-selective PpIX accumulation is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to identify the mechanism of tumor-selective PpIX accumulation after ALA administration. We focused on mitochondrial labile iron ion, which is the substrate for metabolism of PpIX to heme. We investigated differences in iron metabolism between tumor cells and normal cells and found that the amount of mitochondrial labile iron ion in cancer was lower than that in normal cells. This finding could be because of the lower expression of mitoferrins, which are the mitochondrial iron transporters. Accordingly, we added sodium ferrous citrate (SFC) with ALA as a source of iron. As a result, we observed the accumulation of PpIX only in tumor cells, and only these cells showed sensitivity to ALA-PDT. Taken together, these results suggest that the uptake abilities of iron ion into mitochondria play a key role in tumor-selective PpIX accumulation. Using SFC as a source of iron might thus increase the specificity of ALA-PDT effects.

  15. Plasma protein haptoglobin modulates renal iron loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Gburek, Jakub; Hirsch, Emilio

    2005-01-01

    Haptoglobin is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for hemoglobin. The strength of hemoglobin binding and the existence of a specific receptor for the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex in the monocyte/macrophage system clearly suggest that haptoglobin may have a crucial role in heme...... distribution of hemoglobin in haptoglobin-deficient mice resulted in abnormal iron deposits in proximal tubules during aging. Moreover, iron also accumulated in proximal tubules after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury or after an acute plasma heme-protein overload caused by muscle injury, without affecting...... morphological and functional parameters of renal damage. These data demonstrate that haptoglobin crucially prevents glomerular filtration of hemoglobin and, consequently, renal iron loading during aging and following acute plasma heme-protein overload....

  16. Lutein and Brain Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Erdman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated as macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Recently, interest in lutein has expanded beyond the retina to its possible contributions to brain development and function. Only primates accumulate lutein within the brain, but little is known about its distribution or physiological role. Our team has begun to utilize the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta model to study the uptake and bio-localization of lutein in the brain. Our overall goal has been to assess the association of lutein localization with brain function. In this review, we will first cover the evolution of the non-human primate model for lutein and brain studies, discuss prior association studies of lutein with retina and brain function, and review approaches that can be used to localize brain lutein. We also describe our approach to the biosynthesis of 13C-lutein, which will allow investigation of lutein flux, localization, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Lastly, we describe potential future research opportunities.

  17. Cardiac protection by preconditioning is generated via an iron-signal created by proteasomal degradation of iron proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruch E Bulvik

    Full Text Available Ischemia associated injury of the myocardium is caused by oxidative damage during reperfusion. Myocardial protection by ischemic preconditioning (IPC was shown to be mediated by a transient 'iron-signal' that leads to the accumulation of apoferritin and sequestration of reactive iron released during the ischemia. Here we identified the source of this 'iron signal' and evaluated its role in the mechanisms of cardiac protection by hypoxic preconditioning. Rat hearts were retrogradely perfused and the effect of proteasomal and lysosomal protease inhibitors on ferritin levels were measured. The iron-signal was abolished, ferritin levels were not increased and cardiac protection was diminished by inhibition of the proteasome prior to IPC. Similarly, double amounts of ferritin and better recovery after ex vivo ischemia-and-reperfusion (I/R were found in hearts from in vivo hypoxia pre-conditioned animals. IPC followed by normoxic perfusion for 30 min ('delay' prior to I/R caused a reduced ferritin accumulation at the end of the ischemia phase and reduced protection. Full restoration of the IPC-mediated cardiac protection was achieved by employing lysosomal inhibitors during the 'delay'. In conclusion, proteasomal protein degradation of iron-proteins causes the generation of the 'iron-signal' by IPC, ensuing de-novo apoferritin synthesis and thus, sequestering reactive iron. Lysosomal proteases are involved in subsequent ferritin breakdown as revealed by the use of specific pathway inhibitors during the 'delay'. We suggest that proteasomal iron-protein degradation is a stress response causing an expeditious cytosolic iron release thus, altering iron homeostasis to protect the myocardium during I/R, while lysosomal ferritin degradation is part of housekeeping iron homeostasis.

  18. Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes showed differential expression in poplar trees under iron or zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danqiong; Dai, Wenhao

    2015-08-15

    Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes were cloned from the iron chlorosis resistant (PtG) and susceptible (PtY) Populus tremula 'Erecta' lines. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed no significant difference between PtG and PtY. The predicted proteins contain a conserved ZIP domain with 8 transmembrane (TM) regions. A ZIP signature sequence was found in the fourth TM domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PtIRT1 was clustered with tomato and tobacco IRT genes that are highly responsible to iron deficiency. The PtIRT3 gene was clustered with the AtIRT3 gene that was related to zinc and iron transport in plants. Tissue specific expression indicated that PtIRT1 only expressed in the root, while PtIRT3 constitutively expressed in all tested tissues. Under iron deficiency, the expression of PtIRT1 was dramatically increased and a significantly higher transcript level was detected in PtG than in PtY. Iron deficiency also enhanced the expression of PtIRT3 in PtG. On the other hand, zinc deficiency down-regulated the expression of PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 in both PtG and PtY. Zinc accumulated significantly under iron-deficient conditions, whereas the zinc deficiency showed no significant effect on iron accumulation. A yeast complementation test revealed that the PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 genes could restore the iron uptake ability under the iron uptake-deficiency condition. The results will help understand the mechanisms of iron deficiency response in poplar trees and other woody species.

  19. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  20. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging for cellular iron mapping in the in vitro model of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eung Seok; Heo, Chaejeong; Kim, Ji Seon; Suh, Minah; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jong-Min

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and elevated iron levels demonstrated by autopsy. Direct visualization of iron with live imaging techniques has not yet been successful. The aim of this study is to visualize and quantify the distribution of cellular iron using an intrinsic iron hyperspectral fluorescence signal. The 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cellular model of PD was established in SHSY5Y cells exposed to iron with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, 100 μM). The hyperspectral fluorescence signal of iron was examined using a high-resolution dark-field optical microscope system with signal absorption for the visible/near infrared spectral range. The 6-h group showed heavy cellular iron deposition compared with the 1-h group. The cellular iron was dispersed in a small particulate form, whereas the extracellular iron was aggregated. In addition, iron particles were found to be concentrated on the cell membrane/edge of shrunken cells. The iron accumulation readily occurred in MPP+-induced cells, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating elevated iron levels in the SN. This direct iron imaging could be applied to analyze the physiological role of iron, and its application might be expanded to various neurological disorders involving metals, such as copper, manganese, or zinc.

  1. Update on the use of deferasirox in the management of iron overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Ali Taher,1 Maria Domenica Cappellini21American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Universitá di Milano, Policlinico Foundation IRCCS, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Regular blood transfusions as supportive care for patients with chronic anemia inevitably lead to iron overload as humans cannot actively remove excess iron. The cumulative effects of iron overload cause significant morbidity and mortality if not effectively treated with chelation therapy. Based on a comprehensive clinical development program, the once-daily, oral iron chelator deferasirox (Exjade® is approved for the treatment of transfusional iron overload in adult and pediatric patients with various transfusion-dependent anemias, including β-thalassemia and the myelodysplastic syndromes. Deferasirox dose should be titrated for each individual patient based on transfusional iron intake, current iron burden and whether the goal is to decrease or maintain body iron levels. Doses of >30 mg/kg/day have been shown to be effective with a safety profile consistent with that observed at doses <30 mg/kg/day. Recent data have highlighted the ability of deferasirox to decrease cardiac iron levels and to prevent the accumulation of iron in the heart. The long-term efficacy and safety of deferasirox for up to 5 years of treatment have now been established. The availability of this effective and generally well tolerated oral therapy represents a significant advance in the management of transfusional iron overload. Keywords: deferasirox, Exjade, oral, iron chelation, iron overload, cardiac iron 

  2. The Relationship between Iron Dyshomeostasis and Amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer’s Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Douglas G.; Connor, James R.; Meadowcroft, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The dysregulation of iron metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease is not accounted for in the current framework of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that impaired iron homeostasis is an early event in Alzheimer’s disease progression. Iron dyshomeostasis leads to a loss of function in several enzymes requiring iron as a cofactor, the formation of toxic oxidative species, and the elevated production of beta-amyloid proteins. Several common genetic polymorphisms that cause...

  3. 阿尔茨海默病采用磁敏感加权成像相位值对脑内铁沉积的评估研究%Evaluation of Alzheimer's Disease Using SWI Phase Values for Brain Iron Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷萍; 魏亚芬; 卢冲; 王全; 臧召霞

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the phase value of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) for iron deposition in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients evaluated value. Methods AD 30 patients (A group) and 30 cases of healthy el-derly (group B), respectively, SWI inspection application, comparative analysis of the correlation between the two groups in each region of the brain phase values its relationship with MMSE scores between. Results Phase value of each brain region A group were significantly lower than in group B (P<0.05);the left hippocampus and the bilateral putamen, globus pallidus bilaterally, the right caudate nucleus, the left prefrontal cortex and the right phase values side dentate nucleus were associ-ated with MMSE scores were significantly correlated (P<0.05). Conclusion SWI can reflect the sensitivity of iron deposits in the brain of AD patients abnormal signs, for AD diagnosis and condition assessment is important.%目的:探讨磁敏感加权成像相位值(SWI)对于阿尔茨海默病(AD)患者脑内铁沉积的评价价值。方法随机选取AD患者30例(A组)和健康体检老年人30例(B组),分别应用SWI检查,比较分析两组的各大脑区域内相位值及其与MMSE评分间的相关性。结果 A组各大脑区域内的相位值均显著低于B组(P<0.05);左侧海马、双侧壳核、双侧苍白球、右侧尾状核、左侧额叶皮质以及右侧齿状核的相位值均与MMSE评分呈显著相关性(P<0.05)。结论SWI能够敏感性的反映AD患者的脑内沉积铁异常征象,对于AD的诊断与病情评估具有重要意义。

  4. Cerebral ammonia uptake and accumulation during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Dalsgaard, Mads K.; Steensberg, Adam

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated whether peripheral ammonia production during prolonged exercise enhances the uptake and subsequent accumulation of ammonia within the brain. Two studies determined the cerebral uptake of ammonia (arterial and jugular venous blood sampling combined with Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebra...

  5. The multicopper ferroxidase hephaestin enhances intestinal iron absorption in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brie K Fuqua

    Full Text Available Hephaestin is a vertebrate multicopper ferroxidase important for the transfer of dietary iron from intestinal cells to the blood. Hephaestin is mutated in the sex-linked anemia mouse, resulting in iron deficiency. However, sex-linked anemia mice still retain some hephaestin ferroxidase activity. They survive, breed, and their anemia improves with age. To gain a better understanding of the role of hephaestin in iron homeostasis, we used the Cre-lox system to generate knockout mouse models with whole body or intestine-specific (Villin promoter ablation of hephaestin. Both types of mice were viable, indicating that hephaestin is not essential and that other mechanisms, multicopper ferroxidase-dependent or not, must compensate for hephaestin deficiency. The knockout strains, however, both developed a microcytic, hypochromic anemia, suggesting severe iron deficiency and confirming that hephaestin plays an important role in body iron acquisition. Consistent with this, the knockout mice accumulated iron in duodenal enterocytes and had reduced intestinal iron absorption. In addition, the similarities of the phenotypes of the whole body and intestine-specific hephaestin knockout mice clarify the important role of hephaestin specifically in intestinal enterocytes in maintaining whole body iron homeostasis. These mouse models will serve as valuable tools to study the role of hephaestin and associated proteins in iron transport in the small intestine and other tissues.

  6. The multicopper ferroxidase hephaestin enhances intestinal iron absorption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuqua, Brie K; Lu, Yan; Darshan, Deepak; Frazer, David M; Wilkins, Sarah J; Wolkow, Natalie; Bell, Austin G; Hsu, JoAnn; Yu, Catherine C; Chen, Huijun; Dunaief, Joshua L; Anderson, Gregory J; Vulpe, Chris D

    2014-01-01

    Hephaestin is a vertebrate multicopper ferroxidase important for the transfer of dietary iron from intestinal cells to the blood. Hephaestin is mutated in the sex-linked anemia mouse, resulting in iron deficiency. However, sex-linked anemia mice still retain some hephaestin ferroxidase activity. They survive, breed, and their anemia improves with age. To gain a better understanding of the role of hephaestin in iron homeostasis, we used the Cre-lox system to generate knockout mouse models with whole body or intestine-specific (Villin promoter) ablation of hephaestin. Both types of mice were viable, indicating that hephaestin is not essential and that other mechanisms, multicopper ferroxidase-dependent or not, must compensate for hephaestin deficiency. The knockout strains, however, both developed a microcytic, hypochromic anemia, suggesting severe iron deficiency and confirming that hephaestin plays an important role in body iron acquisition. Consistent with this, the knockout mice accumulated iron in duodenal enterocytes and had reduced intestinal