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Sample records for brain inflammatory response

  1. Fetal Inflammatory Response and Brain Injury in the Preterm Newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Malaeb, Shadi; Dammann, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Preterm birth can be caused by intrauterine infection and maternal/fetal inflammatory responses. Maternal inflammation (chorioamnionitis) is often followed by a systemic fetal inflammatory response characterized by elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the fetal circulation. The inflammation signal is likely transmitted across the blood-brain barrier, and initiates a neuroinflammatory response. Microglial activation has a central role in this process, and triggers excitotoxic, infl...

  2. Influence of age on brain edema formation, secondary brain damage and inflammatory response after brain trauma in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Timaru-Kast

    Full Text Available After traumatic brain injury (TBI elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months and old (21 months male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2% compared to young (0%. This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral

  3. Acetylcholinesterase loosens the brain's cholinergic anti-inflammatory response and promotes epileptogenesis

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    Yehudit eGnatek

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show a key role of brain inflammation in epilepsy. However, the mechanisms controlling brain immune response are only partly understood. In the periphery, acetylcholine (ACh release by the vagus nerve restrains inflammation by inhibiting the activation of leukocytes. Recent reports suggested a similar anti-inflammatory effect for ACh in the brain. Since brain cholinergic dysfunction are documented in epileptic animals, we explored changes in brain cholinergic gene expression and associated immune response during pilocarpine-induced epileptogenesis. Levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and inflammatory markers were measured using real-time RT-PCR, in-situ hybridization and immunostaining in wild type (WT and transgenic mice over-expressing the "synaptic" splice variant AChE-S (TgS. One month following pilocarpine, mice were video-monitored for spontaneous seizures. To test directly the effect of ACh on the brain's innate immune response, cytokines expression levels were measured in acute brain slices treated with cholinergic agents. We report a robust upregulation of AChE as early as 48 hrs following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE. AChE was expressed in hippocampal neurons, microglia and endothelial cells but rarely in astrocytes. TgS mice overexpressing AChE showed constitutive increased microglial activation, elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines 48 hrs after SE and accelerated epileptogenesis compared to their WT counterparts. Finally we show a direct, muscarine-receptor dependant, nicotine-receptor independent anti-inflammatory effect of ACh in brain slices maintained ex vivo. Our work demonstrates for the first time, that ACh directly suppresses brain innate immune response and that AChE up-regulation after SE is associated with enhanced immune response, facilitating the epileptogenic process. Our results highlight the cholinergic system as a potential new target for the prevention of seizures and epilepsy.

  4. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    R, Namas; A, Ghuma; L, Hermus; R, Zamora; DO Okonkwo; TR, Billiar; Y, Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and rege...

  5. Inflammatory cytokines in the brain: does the CNS shape immune responses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Renno, T; Taupin, V;

    1994-01-01

    Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been regarded as representing the intrusion of an unruly, ill-behaved mob of leukocytes into the well-ordered and organized domain of thought and reason. However, results accumulated over the past few years suggest that, far ...... may be subverted to autoimmunity, they suggest that the study of inflammatory autoimmune disease in the brain may shed light on the ability of the local environment to regulate immune responses....

  6. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI. Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherentlydetrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partiallypropagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP’s.DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and nonhumanprimates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS andTBI in the near future.

  7. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (pmicrowave exposed groups (pmicrowave exposed animal (pmicrowave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (pmicrowave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect. The study also indicates that increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response might be the factors involved in DNA damage following low intensity microwave exposure.

  8. Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in induction of apoptosis and inflammatory response in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ever increasing applications of engineered nanoparticles in 21st century cause serious concern about its potential health risks on living being. Regulatory health risk assessment of such particles has become mandatory for the safe use of nanomaterials in consumer products and medicines. In order to study the mechanism underlying the effects of nano-TiO2 (TiO2 nanoparticles) on the brain, wistar rats were administrated intravenously with various doses of nano-TiO2 (21 nm) through the caudal vein, once a week for 4 weeks and different parameters such as bioaccumulation of nano-TiO2, oxidative stress-mediated response, level of inflammatory markers such as NF-κB (p65), HSP 60, p38, nitric oxide, IFN-γ and TNF-α, and level of neurochemicals in brain as well as DNA damage and expression of apoptosis markers (p53, Bax, Bcl-2, and cyto c) were evaluated. Results show that the concentration of nano-TiO2 in the brain increased with increasing the doses of nano-TiO2. Oxidative stress and injury of the brain occurred as nano-TiO2 appeared to trigger a cascade of reactions such as inflammation, lipid peroxidation, decreases the activities of antioxidative enzymes and melatonin level, the reduction of glutamic acid, downregulated levels of acetylcholinesterase activities, and the increase in caspase-3 activity (a biomarker of apoptosis), DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis. It may be concluded that nano-TiO2 induces oxidative stress that leads to activation of inflammatory cytokines and an alteration in the level of neurotransmitters resulted in the induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis

  9. Post-treatment vascular leakage and inflammatory responses around brain cysts in porcine neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanty, Siddhartha; Orrego, Miguel Angel; Mayta, Holger; Marzal, Miguel; Cangalaya, Carla; Paredes, Adriana; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Arroyo, Gianfranco; Gonzalez, Armando E; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2015-03-01

    Cysticidal treatment of neurocysticercosis, an infection of humans and pig brains with Taenia solium, results in an early inflammatory response directed to cysts causing seizures and focal neurological manifestations. Treatment-induced pericystic inflammation and its association with blood brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, as determined by Evans blue (EB) extravasation, was studied in infected untreated and anthelmintic-treated pigs. We compared the magnitude and extent of the pericystic inflammation, presence of EB-stained capsules, the level of damage to the parasite, expression of genes for proinflammatory and regulatory cytokines, chemokines, and tissue remodeling by quantitative PCR assays between treated and untreated infected pigs and between EB-stained (blue) and non stained (clear) cysts. Inflammatory scores were higher in pericystic tissues from EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts from untreated pigs and also from anthelmintic-treated pigs 48 hr and 120 hr after treatment. The degree of inflammation correlated with the severity of cyst wall damage and both increased significantly at 120 hours. Expression levels of the proinflammatory genes for IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α were higher in EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts and unaffected brain tissues, and were generally highest at 120 hr. Additionally, expression of some markers of immunoregulatory activity (IL-10, IL-2Rα) were decreased in EB-stained capsules. An increase in other markers for regulatory T cells (CTLA4, FoxP3) was found, as well as significant increases in expression of two metalloproteases, MMP1 and MMP2 at 48 hr and 120 hr post-treatment. We conclude that the increase in severity of the inflammation caused by treatment is accompanied by both a proinflammatory and a complex regulatory response, largely limited to pericystic tissues with compromised vascular integrity. Because treatment induced inflammation occurs in porcine NCC similar to that in human cases, this model can be used to

  10. Post-treatment vascular leakage and inflammatory responses around brain cysts in porcine neurocysticercosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Mahanty

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cysticidal treatment of neurocysticercosis, an infection of humans and pig brains with Taenia solium, results in an early inflammatory response directed to cysts causing seizures and focal neurological manifestations. Treatment-induced pericystic inflammation and its association with blood brain barrier (BBB dysfunction, as determined by Evans blue (EB extravasation, was studied in infected untreated and anthelmintic-treated pigs. We compared the magnitude and extent of the pericystic inflammation, presence of EB-stained capsules, the level of damage to the parasite, expression of genes for proinflammatory and regulatory cytokines, chemokines, and tissue remodeling by quantitative PCR assays between treated and untreated infected pigs and between EB-stained (blue and non stained (clear cysts. Inflammatory scores were higher in pericystic tissues from EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts from untreated pigs and also from anthelmintic-treated pigs 48 hr and 120 hr after treatment. The degree of inflammation correlated with the severity of cyst wall damage and both increased significantly at 120 hours. Expression levels of the proinflammatory genes for IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α were higher in EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts and unaffected brain tissues, and were generally highest at 120 hr. Additionally, expression of some markers of immunoregulatory activity (IL-10, IL-2Rα were decreased in EB-stained capsules. An increase in other markers for regulatory T cells (CTLA4, FoxP3 was found, as well as significant increases in expression of two metalloproteases, MMP1 and MMP2 at 48 hr and 120 hr post-treatment. We conclude that the increase in severity of the inflammation caused by treatment is accompanied by both a proinflammatory and a complex regulatory response, largely limited to pericystic tissues with compromised vascular integrity. Because treatment induced inflammation occurs in porcine NCC similar to that in human cases, this model

  11. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  12. Strongly compromised inflammatory response to brain injury in interleukin-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Moos, T; Carrasco, J;

    1999-01-01

    response in the brain following disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we examined the effects of a focal cryo injury to the fronto-parietal cortex in interleukin-6-deficient (IL-6-/-) and normal (IL-6+/+) mice. In IL-6+/+ mice, brain injury resulted in the appearance of brain macrophages......-monocytes and activation of glial cells following brain injury with disrupted BBB. Furthermore, our results suggest IL-6 is important for neuroprotection and the induction of GM-CSF and MT expression. The opposing effect of IL-6 on MT-I+II and MT-III levels in the damaged brain suggests MT isoform-specific functions....

  13. Inhibitory Effect on Cerebral Inflammatory Response following Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats: A Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism of N-Acetylcysteine

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    Gang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although N-acetylcysteine (NAC has been shown to be neuroprotective for traumatic brain injury (TBI, the mechanisms for this beneficial effect are still poorly understood. Cerebral inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after TBI. However, it has not been investigated whether NAC modulates TBI-induced cerebral inflammatory response. In this work, we investigated the effect of NAC administration on cortical expressions of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 after TBI. As a result, we found that NF-κB, proinflammatory cytokines, and ICAM-1 were increased in all injured animals. In animals given NAC post-TBI, NF-κB, IL-1β, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 were decreased in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. Measures of IL-6 showed no change after NAC treatment. NAC administration reduced brain edema, BBB permeability, and apoptotic index in the injured brain. The results suggest that post-TBI NAC administration may attenuate inflammatory response in the injured rat brain, and this may be one mechanism by which NAC ameliorates secondary brain damage following TBI.

  14. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:26498936

  15. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  16. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  17. Effect of glutamate on inflammatory responses of intestine and brain after focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Jie Sun; Ran Lu; Qing Ji; Jian-Guo Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the modulation of glutamate on post-ischemic intestinal and cerebral inflammatory responses in a ischemic and excitotoxic rat model.METHODS: Adult male rats were subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 15 min and injection of monosodium glutamate intraperitoneally, to decapitate them at selected time points. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), respectively.Hemodynamic parameters were monitored continuously during the whole process of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.RESULTS: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) treated rats displayed statistically significant high levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissuess within the first 6 h of ischemia. The rats with cerebral ischemia showed a minor decrease of TNF-α production in cerebral and intestinal tissuess. The rats with cerebral ischemia and treated with MSG displayed statistically significant low levels of TNF-α in cerebral and intestinal tissues. These results correlated significantly with NF-κB production calculated at the same intervals. During experiment, the mean blood pressure and heart rates in all groups were stable.CONCLUSION: Glutamate is involved in the mechanism of intestinal and cerebral inflammation responses. The effects of glutamate on cerebral and intestinal inflammatory responses after ischemia are up-regulated at the transcriptional level,through the NF-κB signal transduction pathway.

  18. Titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in induction of apoptosis and inflammatory response in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meena, Ramovatar, E-mail: rammeenarv@gmail.com; Kumar, Sumit; Paulraj, R., E-mail: paulrajr@hotmail.com [Jawaharlal Nehru University, School of Environmental Sciences (India)

    2015-01-15

    The ever increasing applications of engineered nanoparticles in 21st century cause serious concern about its potential health risks on living being. Regulatory health risk assessment of such particles has become mandatory for the safe use of nanomaterials in consumer products and medicines. In order to study the mechanism underlying the effects of nano-TiO{sub 2} (TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles) on the brain, wistar rats were administrated intravenously with various doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} (21 nm) through the caudal vein, once a week for 4 weeks and different parameters such as bioaccumulation of nano-TiO{sub 2}, oxidative stress-mediated response, level of inflammatory markers such as NF-κB (p65), HSP 60, p38, nitric oxide, IFN-γ and TNF-α, and level of neurochemicals in brain as well as DNA damage and expression of apoptosis markers (p53, Bax, Bcl-2, and cyto c) were evaluated. Results show that the concentration of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the brain increased with increasing the doses of nano-TiO{sub 2}. Oxidative stress and injury of the brain occurred as nano-TiO{sub 2} appeared to trigger a cascade of reactions such as inflammation, lipid peroxidation, decreases the activities of antioxidative enzymes and melatonin level, the reduction of glutamic acid, downregulated levels of acetylcholinesterase activities, and the increase in caspase-3 activity (a biomarker of apoptosis), DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis. It may be concluded that nano-TiO{sub 2} induces oxidative stress that leads to activation of inflammatory cytokines and an alteration in the level of neurotransmitters resulted in the induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

  19. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Raj K; Bhattacharya Bhaskar; Sharma Anuj; Maheshwari Radha K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated...

  20. Inflammatory responses in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fudong; McCullough, Louise D.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a critical role in mediating brain injury induced by neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The mechanisms underlying inflammatory responses to ischemia may be shared by neonatal and adult brains; however, HIE exhibits a unique inflammation phenotype that results from the immaturity of the neonatal immune system. This review will discuss the current knowledge concerning systemic and local inflammatory responses in the acute and subacute stages of HIE. The key compo...

  1. Comparison of Inflammatory and Acute-Phase Responses in the Brain and Peripheral Organs of the ME7 Model of Prion Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Colm; Wilcockson, David C.; Boche, Delphine; Perry, V. Hugh

    2005-01-01

    Chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are reported to be associated with microglial activation and increased brain and serum cytokines and acute-phase proteins (APPs). Unlike AD, prion disease is also associated with a peripheral component in that the presumed causative agent, PrPSc, also accumulates in the spleen and other lymphoreticular organs. It is unclear whether the reported systemic acute-phase response represents a systemic inflammatory...

  2. Inflammatory neuroprotection following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Matthew V; McGavern, Dorian B

    2016-08-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits an inflammatory response in the central nervous system (CNS) that involves both resident and peripheral immune cells. Neuroinflammation can persist for years following a single TBI and may contribute to neurodegeneration. However, administration of anti-inflammatory drugs shortly after injury was not effective in the treatment of TBI patients. Some components of the neuroinflammatory response seem to play a beneficial role in the acute phase of TBI. Indeed, following CNS injury, early inflammation can set the stage for proper tissue regeneration and recovery, which can, perhaps, explain why general immunosuppression in TBI patients is disadvantageous. Here, we discuss some positive attributes of neuroinflammation and propose that inflammation be therapeutically guided in TBI patients rather than globally suppressed. PMID:27540166

  3. STAT1 signaling modulates HIV-1–induced inflammatory responses and leukocyte transmigration across the blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Yang, Bo; Gendelman, Howard E; Persidsky, Yuri; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship among neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, and progressive HIV-1 infection as they affect the onset and development of neuroAIDS is incompletely understood. One possible link is signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) pathways. These respond to proinflammatory and regulatory factors and could affect neuroinflammatory responses induced from infected cells and disease-affected brain tissue. Our previous works demonstrated that HIV-1 activ...

  4. Zinc or copper deficiency-induced impaired inflammatory response to brain trauma may be caused by the concomitant metallothionein changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, M.; Thomsen, Pernille Sjølin;

    2001-01-01

    the number of apoptotic cells. Metallothioneins (MTs) are important zinc- and copper-binding proteins in the CNS, which could influence significantly the brain response to TBI because of their putative roles in metal homeostasis and antioxidant defenses. MT-I+II expression was dramatically increased by TBI...

  5. NLRP3-inflammasome activating DAMPs stimulate an inflammatory response in glia in the absence of priming which contributes to brain inflammation after injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Diane Savage

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation in the absence of infection (sterile inflammation contributes to acute injury and chronic disease. Cerebral ischaemia is a devastating condition in which the primary injury is caused by reduced blood supply and is therefore sterile. The cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β is a key contributor to ischaemic brain injury and central inflammatory responses. The release of IL-1β is regulated by the protease caspase-1, and its activating complex, the inflammasome. Of the known inflammasomes the best characterised, and one that is perceived to sense sterile injury is formed by a pattern recognition receptor called NLRP3. A key feature of NLRP3-inflammasome dependent responses in vitro in macrophages is the requirement of an initial priming stimulus by a pathogen (PAMP, or damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP respectively. We sought to determine the inflammatory responses of NLRP3-activating DAMPs on brain derived mixed glial cells in the absence of an initial priming stimulus in vitro. In cultured mouse mixed glia the DAMPs ATP, MSU and CPPD crystals had no effect on the expression of IL-1α or IL-1β and induced release only when the cells were primed with a PAMP. In the absence of priming, these DAMPs did however induce inflammation via the production of IL-6 and CXCL1, and the release of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Furthermore, the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA acted as a priming stimulus on glial cells resulting in levels of IL-1 expression comparable to those induced by the PAMP LPS. In vivo, after cerebral ischaemia, IL-1 production contributed to increased IL-6 and CXCL1 since these cytokines were profoundly reduced in the ischaemic hemispheres from IL-1α/β double KO mice, although injury-induced cytokine responses were not abolished. Thus, DAMPs augment brain inflammation by directly stimulating production of glial derived inflammatory mediators. This is markedly enhanced by DAMP-induced IL-1-release

  6. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

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    J. Garcia-Leme

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormonal functions accounts for recognized pro- and anti-inflammatory effects exerted by these substances. Most hormone systems are capable of influencing inflammatory events. Insulin and glucocorticoids, however, exert direct regulatory effects at concentrations usually found in plasma. Insulin is endowed with facilitatory actions on vascular reactivity to inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell functions. Increased concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids at the early stages of inflammation results in downregulation of inflammatory responses. Oestrogens markedly reduce the response to injury in a variety of experimental models. Glucagon and thyroid hormones exert indirect anti-inflammatory effects mediated by the activity of the adrenal cortex. Accordingly, inflammation is not only merely a local response, but a hormone-controlled process.

  7. Impaired inflammatory response and increased oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after brain injury in interleukin-6-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Carrasco, J;

    2000-01-01

    freeze lesion. In normal mice, the brain injury was followed by reactive astrogliosis and recruitment of macrophages from 1 day postlesion (dpl), peaking at 3-10 dpl, and by 20 dpl the transient immunoreactions were decreased, and a glial scar was present. In IL-6KO mice, the reactive astrogliosis...... and recruitment of macrophages were decreased throughout the experimental period. The expression of the antioxidant and anti-apoptotic factors metallothionein I+II (MT-I+II) was increased prominently by the freeze lesion, but this response was significantly reduced in the IL-6 KO mice. By contrast, the expression...... of the antioxidants Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), Mn-SOD, and catalase remained unaffected by the IL-6 deficiency. The lesioned mice showed increased oxidative stress, as judged by malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrotyrosine (NITT) levels and by formation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). IL-6KO mice...

  8. Chemotactic and inflammatory responses in the liver and brain are associated with pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever virus infection in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly K Gray

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a major human and animal pathogen associated with severe disease including hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but there is significant concern regarding its introduction into non-endemic regions and the potentially devastating effect to livestock populations with concurrent infections of humans. To date, there is little detailed data directly comparing the host response to infection with wild-type or vaccine strains of RVFV and correlation with viral pathogenesis. Here we characterized clinical and systemic immune responses to infection with wild-type strain ZH501 or IND vaccine strain MP-12 in the C57BL/6 mouse. Animals infected with live-attenuated MP-12 survived productive viral infection with little evidence of clinical disease and minimal cytokine response in evaluated tissues. In contrast, ZH501 infection was lethal, caused depletion of lymphocytes and platelets and elicited a strong, systemic cytokine response which correlated with high virus titers and significant tissue pathology. Lymphopenia and platelet depletion were indicators of disease onset with indications of lymphocyte recovery correlating with increases in G-CSF production. RVFV is hepatotropic and in these studies significant clinical and histological data supported these findings; however, significant evidence of a pro-inflammatory response in the liver was not apparent. Rather, viral infection resulted in a chemokine response indicating infiltration of immunoreactive cells, such as neutrophils, which was supported by histological data. In brains of ZH501 infected mice, a significant chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine response was evident, but with little pathology indicating meningoencephalitis. These data suggest that RVFV pathogenesis in mice is associated with a loss of liver function due to liver necrosis and hepatitis yet the long-term course of disease for those that

  9. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Leme, J.; Farsky, Sandra P

    1993-01-01

    Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormon...

  10. Gene expression profiling in brain of mice exposed to the marine neurotoxin ciguatoxin reveals an acute anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan James C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciguatoxins (CTXs are polyether marine neurotoxins and potent activators of voltage-gated sodium channels. This toxin is carried by multiple reef-fish species and human consumption of ciguatoxins can result in an explosive gastrointestinal/neurologic illness. This study characterizes the global transcriptional response in mouse brain to a symptomatic dose of the highly toxic Pacific ciguatoxin P-CTX-1 and additionally compares this data to transcriptional profiles from liver and whole blood examined previously. Adult male C57/BL6 mice were injected with 0.26 ng/g P-CTX-1 while controls received only vehicle. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 4 and 24 hrs and transcriptional profiling was performed on brain RNA with Agilent whole genome microarrays. RT-PCR was used to independently validate gene expression and the web tool DAVID was used to analyze gene ontology (GO and molecular pathway enrichment of the gene expression data. Results A pronounced 4°C hypothermic response was recorded in these mice, reaching a minimum at 1 hr and lasting for 8 hrs post toxin exposure. Ratio expression data were filtered by intensity, fold change and p-value, with the resulting data used for time course analysis, K-means clustering, ontology classification and KEGG pathway enrichment. Top GO hits for this gene set included acute phase response and mono-oxygenase activity. Molecular pathway analysis showed enrichment for complement/coagulation cascades and metabolism of xenobiotics. Many immediate early genes such as Fos, Jun and Early Growth Response isoforms were down-regulated although others associated with stress such as glucocorticoid responsive genes were up-regulated. Real time PCR confirmation was performed on 22 differentially expressed genes with a correlation of 0.9 (Spearman's Rho, p Conclusions Many of the genes differentially expressed in this study, in parallel with the hypothermia, figure prominently in protection against

  11. Attenuation of Brain Inflammatory Response after Focal Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion with Xuesaitong Injection(血塞通注射液) in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei; XU Xiao-jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the neuro-protective effect of Xuesaitong Injection ( 血塞通注射液 ,XST) on brain inflammatory response after transient focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Methods:Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models of male rats were induced by transient occlusion for 2 h of middle cerebral artery (MCA) which was followed by 24 h reperfusion. XST was administered through intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg at 4 h after the onset of ischemia. After reperfusion for 24 h, the neurological function score was evaluated, the brain edema was detected with dry-wet weight method, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) of ischemic cerebral cortex and caudate putamen was determined by spectrophotometry and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: XST not only lowered neurological function score at the dose of 50 mg/kg, but reduced brain edema and inhibited MPO activity and ICAM-1 expression as compared with the ischemia/reperfusion model group ( P<0.01 ). Conclusion: XST has a definite effect on inhibiting the expression of ICAM-1 and neutrophil infiltration in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion when treatment started at 4 h after ischemia onset, and also attenuates inflammation in the infarcted cerebral area.neutrophil, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 of ischemic cerebral cortex and caudate putamen was determined by spectrophotometry and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: XST not only lowered neurological function score at the dose of 50 mg/kg, but reduced brain edema and inhibited MPO activity and ICAM-1 expression as compared with the ischemia/reperfusion model group ( P<0.01 ). Conclusion: XST has a definite effect on inhibiting the expression of ICAM-1 and neutrophil infiltration in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion when treatment started at 4 h after ischemia onset, and also attenuates inflammation in the infarcted cerebral area.

  12. Silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles alter oxidative/inflammatory response and renin-angiotensin system in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyńska, Agata; Dziendzikowska, Katarzyna; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna; Lankoff, Anna; Herman, Andrzej Przemysław; Oczkowski, Michał; Królikowski, Tomasz; Wilczak, Jacek; Wojewódzka, Maria; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    The study was designed to examine the effects of silver AgNPs, 20 nm) and titanium dioxide (Aeroxide(®) P25 TiO2NPs, 21 nm) nanoparticles on brain oxidative stress parameters, its antioxidant potential and brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in vivo. The analysis was performed 28 days after single dose injection of TiO2NPs and AgNPs (10 or 5 mg/kg body weight, respectively). The AgNPs, but not TiO2NPs, administration resulted in decreased lipid and cholesterol peroxidation. Antioxidant enzymes gene expression and/or activity were changed differently for TiO2NPs and AgNPs group. The TiO2NPs decreased aromatase gene expression, and glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities. In AgNPs group the sodium dismutase 1 and glutathione reductase mRNA levels were decreased as opposed to their activities. Both NPs altered the expression of brain RAS genes (angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin I converting enzyme 1 and 2), but only TiO2NPs caused similar changes on protein level. The expression of amyloid beta precursor protein gene was not altered by any kind of injected NPs. The TiO2NPs were more potent modulator of gene expression in the brain than AgNPs, despite the two times lower dosage. These results suggest that AgNPs and TiO2NPs exposure may modulate the brain function, but with different strength.

  13. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) to describe the complex pathophysiologic response to an insult such as infection, trauma, burns, pancreatitis, or a variety of other injuries came from a 1991 consensus conference charged with the task of developing an easy-to-apply set of clinical parameters to aid in the early identification of potential candidates to enter into clinical trials to evaluate new treatments for sepsis. There was recognition that a diverse group of...

  14. Enhanced microglial pro-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide correlates with brain infiltration and blood-brain barrier dysregulation in a mouse model of telomere shortening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, Divya D.A.; Moser, Jill; van der Pol, Susanne M. A.; van Os, Ronald P.; Holtman, Inge R.; Brouwer, Nieske; Oeseburg, Hisko; Schaafsma, Wandert; Wesseling, Evelyn M.; Dunnen, den Wilfred; Biber, Knut P. H.; de Vries, Helga E.; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are a proliferative population of resident brain macrophages that under physiological conditions self-renew independent of hematopoiesis. Microglia are innate immune cells actively surveying the brain and are the earliest responders to injury. During aging, microglia elicit an enhanced inn

  15. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome following burns is mediated by brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide A receptor-induced shock factor 1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang-Cheng; Luo, Cheng-Qun; Li, Xiong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in burn patients is mediated by the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)/natriuretic peptide A receptor (NPRA)-induced heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) signalling pathway. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) that were isolated from patients with burn injuries and SIRS mouse models and a RAW264.7 cell line were treated with normal serum or serum obtained from animals with burn injuries. In parallel, small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against BNP or NPRA were transfected in both cell types. Western blotting (WB) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect protein expression and inflammatory factor levels, respectively. We found that interleukin (IL)-12, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), and BNP levels were increased and IL-10 levels were decreased in the plasma and MNCs in vivo in the animal model of SIRS. Additionally, NPRA was upregulated, whereas HSF-1 was downregulated in monocytes in vivo. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with burn serum or BNP induced IL-12, TNF-α, and CRP secretion as well as HSF-1 expression. Finally, silencing BNP with shRNA interrupted the effect of burn serum on RAW264.7 cells, and silencing NPRA blocked burn serum- and BNP-mediated changes in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that the interaction of NPRA with BNP secreted from circulatory MNCs as well as mononuclear macrophages leads to inflammation via HSF-1 during SIRS development following serious burn injury.

  16. Inflammatory response and extracorporeal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation (EC) frequently develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Surgical trauma, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, endotoxaemia and blood contact to nonendothelial circuit compounds promote the activation of coagulation pathways, complement factors and a cellular immune response. This review discusses the multiple pathways leading to endothelial cell activation, neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. All these factors may induce cellular damage and subsequent organ injury. Multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery with EC is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. In addition to the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction after EC, this review deals with different therapeutic interventions aiming to alleviate the inflammatory response and consequently multiple organ dysfunction after cardiac surgery. PMID:26060024

  17. Transcompartmental Inflammatory Responses in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G; Evans, Kevin A;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcompartmental signaling during early inflammation may lead to propagation of disease to other organs. The time course and the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We aimed at comparing acute transcompartmental inflammatory responses in humans following lipopolysacchar......OBJECTIVES: Transcompartmental signaling during early inflammation may lead to propagation of disease to other organs. The time course and the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We aimed at comparing acute transcompartmental inflammatory responses in humans following...... or endobronchially on two different study days. Groups were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage at baseline (0 hr) and 2, 4, 6, 8, or 24 hours postchallenge. Cardiorespiratory variables were continuously recorded throughout the study day, and plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid markers of inflammation were......-α, interleukin-6, and albumin (all p Acute lung or systemic inflammation in humans is followed by a transcompartmental proinflammatory response, the degree and differential...

  18. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Dolapcioglu; Hatice; Dolapcioglu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) complications or manifes-tations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic me-chanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mecha-nisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebro-vascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment.

  19. The Inflammatory Response in Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in non-infectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement ac...

  20. Melatonin Counteracts at a Transcriptional Level the Inflammatory and Apoptotic Response Secondary to Ischemic Brain Injury Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Blockade in Aging Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes, Sergio D.; Rancan, Lisa; Kireev, Roman; González, Alberto; Louzao, Pedro; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Tresguerres, Jesús A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging increases oxidative stress and inflammation. Melatonin counteracts inflammation and apoptosis. This study investigated the possible protective effect of melatonin on the inflammatory and apoptotic response secondary to ischemia induced by blockade of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) in aging male Wistar rats. Animals were subjected to MCA obstruction. After 24 h or 7 days of procedure, 14-month-old nontreated and treated rats with a daily dose of 10 mg/kg melatonin were s...

  1. The choroid plexus response to a repeated peripheral inflammatory stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palha Joana A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic systemic inflammation triggers alterations in the central nervous system that may relate to the underlying inflammatory component reported in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from being understood whether and how peripheral inflammation contributes to induce brain inflammatory response in such illnesses. As part of the barriers that separate the blood from the brain, the choroid plexus conveys inflammatory immune signals into the brain, largely through alterations in the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid. Results In the present study we investigated the mouse choroid plexus gene expression profile, using microarray analyses, in response to a repeated inflammatory stimulus induced by the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide every two weeks for a period of three months; mice were sacrificed 3 and 15 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection. The data show that the choroid plexus displays a sustained response to the repeated inflammatory stimuli by altering the expression profile of several genes. From a total of 24,000 probes, 369 are up-regulated and 167 are down-regulated 3 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection, while at 15 days the number decreases to 98 and 128, respectively. The pathways displaying the most significant changes include those facilitating entry of cells into the cerebrospinal fluid, and those participating in the innate immune response to infection. Conclusion These observations contribute to a better understanding of the brain response to peripheral inflammation and pave the way to study their impact on the progression of several disorders of the central nervous system in which inflammation is known to be implicated.

  2. Sphingosine 1 Phosphate at the Blood Brain Barrier: Can the Modulation of S1P Receptor 1 Influence the Response of Endothelial Cells and Astrocytes to Inflammatory Stimuli?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona F Spampinato

    Full Text Available The ability of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB to maintain proper barrier functions, keeping an optimal environment for central nervous system (CNS activity and regulating leukocytes' access, can be affected in CNS diseases. Endothelial cells and astrocytes are the principal BBB cellular constituents and their interaction is essential to maintain its function. Both endothelial cells and astrocytes express the receptors for the bioactive sphingolipid S1P. Fingolimod, an immune modulatory drug whose structure is similar to S1P, has been approved for treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS: fingolimod reduces the rate of MS relapses by preventing leukocyte egress from the lymph nodes. Here, we examined the ability of S1P and fingolimod to act on the BBB, using an in vitro co-culture model that allowed us to investigate the effects of S1P on endothelial cells, astrocytes, and interactions between the two. Acting selectively on endothelial cells, S1P receptor signaling reduced cell death induced by inflammatory cytokines. When acting on astrocytes, fingolimod treatment induced the release of a factor, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF that reduced the effects of cytokines on endothelium. In an in vitro BBB model incorporating shear stress, S1P receptor modulation reduced leukocyte migration across the endothelial barrier, indicating a novel mechanism that might contribute to fingolimod efficacy in MS treatment.

  3. Visfatin induces sickness responses in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byong Seo Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Visfatin, also known as nicotiamide phosphoribosyltransferase or pre-B cell colony enhancing factor, is a pro-inflammatory cytokine whose serum level is increased in sepsis and cancer as well as in obesity. Here we report a pro-inflammatory role of visfatin in the brain, to mediate sickness responses including anorexia, hyperthermia and hypoactivity. METHODOLOGY: Rats were intracerebroventricularly (ICV injected with visfatin, and changes in food intake, body weight, body temperature and locomotor activity were monitored. Real-time PCR was applied to determine the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, proopiomelanocortin (POMC and prostaglandin-synthesizing enzymes in their brain. To determine the roles of cyclooxygenase (COX and melanocortin in the visfatin action, rats were ICV-injected with visfatin with or without SHU9119, a melanocortin receptor antagonist, or indomethacin, a COX inhibitor, and their sickness behaviors were evaluated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Administration of visfatin decreased food intake, body weight and locomotor activity and increased body temperature. Visfatin evoked significant increases in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, prostaglandin-synthesizing enzymes and POMC, an anorexigenic neuropeptide. Indomethacin attenuated the effects of visfatin on hyperthermia and hypoactivity, but not anorexia. Further, SHU9119 blocked visfatin-induced anorexia but did not affect hyperthermia or hypoactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Visfatin induced sickness responses via regulation of COX and the melanocortin pathway in the brain.

  4. Pronounced inflammatory response to endotoxaemia during nighttime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Bendtzen, Klaus; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    endotoxaemia model. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-over study, where 12 healthy young men received E. coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) 0.3 ng/kg at 12 noon and, on another day, at 12 midnight. Blood samples were analysed for pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, soluble......-night difference in the acute phase response to endotoxaemia exists in healthy volunteers with a more pronounced inflammatory response during the night time. This circadian difference in the response to endotoxaemia may play an important role in the clinical setting and should be investigated further....

  5. Microvascular inflammatory response in the skin

    OpenAIRE

    Evilevitch, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    This thesis examines the microvascular inflammatory response in the skin. The microvascular response includes vasodilatation and plasma exudation. In the first three studies, the combined response was measured in guinea pig skin with a technique based on detection of radiolabelled protein. Transferrin was labelled in vivo by injection of 113mIn and the conversion electrons detected over the skin using a plastic scintillator. The duration of the microvascular response after histamine an...

  6. Systemic inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu FANG; Xiao-Lei Moore; Anthony M Dart; Le-Min WANG

    2015-01-01

    Acute cardiomyocyte necrosis in the infarcted heart generates damage-associated molecular patterns, activating complement and toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 signaling, and triggering an intense inflammatory response. Inflammasomes also recognize danger signals and mediate sterile inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Inflammatory response serves to repair the heart, but excessive inflammation leads to adverse left ventricular remodeling and heart failure. In addition to local inflammation, profound systemic inflammation response has been documented in patients with AMI, which includes elevation of circulating inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cell adhesion molecules, and activation of peripheral leukocytes and platelets. The excessive inflammatory response could be caused by a deregulated immune system. AMI is also associated with bone marrow activation and spleen monocytopoiesis, which sustains a continuous supply of monocytes at the site of inflammation. Accumulating evidence has shown that systemic inflammation aggravates atherosclerosis and markers for systemic inflammation are predictors of adverse clinical outcomes (such as death, recurrent myocardial in-farction, and heart failure) in patients with AMI.

  7. JAK2/STAT3 pathway mediating inflammatory responses in heatstroke-induced rats

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Zhen; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Shu-Cai; Lv, Wei; Hu, Huai-Qiang; Li, Chuan-Fen; Cao, Bing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Heatstroke not only directly induces cell injury, but also causes large amounts of inflammatory mediators release and cells with extensive biological activities to induce a systemic inflammatory response and immune dysfunction. This study aimed to observe the effects of JAK2 inhibitor AG490 on the brain injury and inflammatory responses of rats with systemic heatstroke. Under the light microscope, the hippocampus tissues of rat with heatstroke were edema and apoptotic rate was increased. Up-r...

  8. Inflammatory response and the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroni, P L; Borghi, M O; Raschi, E; Ventura, D; Sarzi Puttini, P C; Atzeni, F; Lonati, L; Parati, G; Tincani, A; Mari, D; Tedesco, F

    2004-01-01

    Antiphospholipid-mediated endothelium perturbation plays a role in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)-associated vasculopathy. Antiphospholipid antibodies activate endothelium both in vitro and in vivo experimental models by inducing a pro-inflammatory/-coagulant phenotype; the antibodies recognize beta2 glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) on human endothelial cells (EC) from different parts of the vasculature. In spite of such large in vitro evidence, few studies have addressed the issue whether or not a comparable endothelial perturbation might be detectable in vivo. We investigated several indirect ex vivo parameters of endothelial dysfunction: plasma levels of soluble adhesion molecules (sADM), soluble thrombomodulin (sTM), von Willebrand factor (vWF) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) by solid-phase assays. The study included: patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (n=32), with the syndrome secondary to non-active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n=10), six patients with persistent antiphospholipid positivity at medium/high titre without any clinical manifestation of the syndrome. Fifty-two age and sex matched healthy subjects have been enrolled as controls. In addition, circulating endothelial cells identified by flow cytometry and the brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMV) were evaluated in 26 patients (20 primary and 6 lupus syndromes) and 30 healthy controls. Plasma levels of soluble adhesion molecules did not differ from controls, while a significant increase in von Willebrand factor titres (P<0.05) was found. No significant difference was found regarding the number of circulating endothelial cells and flow-mediated vasodilation. As a whole, these findings do suggest that antiphospholipid antibodies per se are not able to support a full-blown endothelial perturbation in vivo. As shown in antiphospholipid syndrome experimental animal models, a two-hit hypothesis is suggested.

  9. Inflammatory disease of the brain diagnosed by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory disease of the brain, particularly of pyogenic etiology, may be most accurately assessed by the use of computed tomography and contrast enhancement. Examples of cerebritis, evolving and mature intracerebral abcesses, and inflammatory extracerebral collections are presented and discussed, particularly with reference to differential diagnosis and the problem of infectious versus neoplastic etiology. Ancillary studies, particulary selective arteriography, are reviewed where appropriate. The residual changes of inflammatory disease of the brain after medical and/or surgical therapy are illustrated, and the value of serial examinations is emphasized. The rural indigent patient population (American Indian) served by the University of New Mexico Medical Center is a source of case material providing several examples of severe and untreated intracerebral infectious processes heretofore not described in the literature. (orig.)

  10. Cardiovascular disease management through restrained inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Nasimudeen R; Tabrez, Shams

    2016-01-01

    Cardio vascular disease (CVD) is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the coronary arteries and remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Vascular inflammation and associated ongoing inflammatory responses have been considered as the critical culprits in the pathogenesis of CVD. Moreover, the activation of inflammatory pathways is not confined to coronary lesions only but involves the activation of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In view of high mortality rate associated with this devastated disease, it is essential that CVD and related complications should be taken care off at its earliest. To achieve that goal, some inflammatory mediators could be potentially targeted. In the current article, we will highlight targeting some inflammatory mediators viz. IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α etc for CVD management. As far as our knowledge goes, we are for the first time reporting the targeting inflammatory mediators especially IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α together in a single article. Based on our review, we believe that scientific community will come up with certain anti-inflammatory agents against atherosclerosis in near future and hopefully that will be used for the successful management of CVD patients.

  11. Reduced inflammatory phenotype in microglia derived from neonatal rat spinal cord versus brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Joshva Baskar Jesudasan

    Full Text Available Microglia are the primary immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS. Membrane bound sensors on their processes monitor the extracellular environment and respond to perturbations of the CNS such as injury or infection. Once activated, microglia play a crucial role in determining neuronal survival. Recent studies suggest that microglial functional response properties vary across different regions of the CNS. However, the activation profiles of microglia derived from the spinal cord have not been evaluated against brain microglia in vitro. Here, we studied the morphological properties and secretion of inflammatory and trophic effectors by microglia derived from the brain or spinal cord of neonatal rats under basal culture conditions and after activation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Our results demonstrate that spinal microglia assume a less inflammatory phenotype after LPS activation, with reduced release of the inflammatory effectors tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and nitric oxide, a less amoeboid morphology, and reduced phagocytosis relative to brain-derived microglia. Phenotypic differences between brain and spinal microglia are an important consideration when evaluating anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory therapies for brain versus spinal injury.

  12. Lateral fluid percussion injury of the brain induces CCL20 inflammatory chemokine expression in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Mahasweta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI evokes a systemic immune response including leukocyte migration into the brain and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, the mechanisms underlying TBI pathogenesis and protection are poorly understood. Due to the high incidence of head trauma in the sports field, battlefield and automobile accidents identification of the molecular signals involved in TBI progression is critical for the development of novel therapeutics. Methods In this report, we used a rat lateral fluid percussion impact (LFPI model of TBI to characterize neurodegeneration, apoptosis and alterations in pro-inflammatory mediators at two time points within the secondary injury phase. Brain histopathology was evaluated by fluoro-jade (FJ staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL assay, polymerase chain reaction (qRT PCR, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunohistochemistry were employed to evaluate the CCL20 gene expression in different tissues. Results Histological analysis of neurodegeneration by FJ staining showed mild injury in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic cells and CD11b+ microglia indicated initiation of an inflammatory reaction leading to secondary damage in these areas. Analysis of spleen mRNA by PCR microarray of an inflammation panel led to the identification of CCL20 as an important pro-inflammatory signal upregulated 24 h after TBI. Although, CCL20 expression was observed in spleen and thymus after 24h of TBI, it was not expressed in degenerating cortex or hippocampal neurons until 48 h after insult. Splenectomy partially but significantly decreased the CCL20 expression in brain tissues. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the systemic inflammatory reaction to TBI starts earlier than the local brain response and suggest that spleen- and/ or thymus-derived CCL20 might play a role in

  13. Pharmacologic Strategies for Combating the Inflammatory Response

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Clive

    2007-01-01

    The “systemic inflammatory response” is a multifaceted defensive reaction of the body to surgical trauma and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), characterized by systemic activation of fibrinolysis, coagulation, complement, immune cells, platelets, and oxidative pathways, all overlaid onto localized trauma to the grafted vessel or vascular beds susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion. There is going to be no single magic bullet to diminish such a broad host defense response to surgery. The best chance ...

  14. Markers of systemic inflammatory response in coxarthrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Korshunov G.V.; Shakhmartova S.G.; Puchinyan D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to detect markers of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in patients with coxarthrosis by means of assessment of the status of the hemostasis system, endothelium function and inflammation intensity. Material and Methods. The indices of the plasmatic hemostasis, levels of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, ELAM-1, VEGF-A, neop-terin were analyzed. Results. It has been found that among the patients with hip coxarthrosis a group of patients (47%) with endothelium dysfunction, cellular immunity a...

  15. Markers of systemic inflammatory response in coxarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korshunov G.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to detect markers of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in patients with coxarthrosis by means of assessment of the status of the hemostasis system, endothelium function and inflammation intensity. Material and Methods. The indices of the plasmatic hemostasis, levels of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, ELAM-1, VEGF-A, neop-terin were analyzed. Results. It has been found that among the patients with hip coxarthrosis a group of patients (47% with endothelium dysfunction, cellular immunity activation, a high content of Soluble Fibrin Monomer Complex and D-dimers and a group of patients (53% without any abnormalities in these parameters should be differentiated. Conclusion. Among the patients with hip coxarthrosis a group with signs of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (occurrence of endothelium dysfunction, cellular immunity activation, a high content of Soluble Fibrin Monomer Complex and D-dimers and a group of patients with reference values of these parameters can be determined. The markers of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in cases with hip osteoarthrosis are Soluble Fibrin Monomer Complex and D-dimers, high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (slCAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-2 (sVCAM-1, cell adhesion E-selectin-1 (ELAM-1 and Neopterin (Np.

  16. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex inter

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Progesterone on Inflammatory Factors After Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in young people. Inflammatory cytokines play an important part in the pathophysiology of TBI. Recent studies demonstrate that progesterone significantly reduces cerebral edema and enhances functional recovery from TBI and stroke in several animal models. This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of progesterone on inflammatory response after traumatic brain injury. Methods Progesterone was injected intraperitoneally using rats as a model of traumatic brain injury,and Western blot technique was applied to detect the expression of three inflammation-related factors:nuclear factor kappa B p65 (NFk B p65),glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP),and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The water content of injured brain was also examined. A neurological severity score was recorded to evaluate the effect of progesterone on neurodeficit recovery. Results NFk B p65,GFAP,and TNF-α were increased in all injured animals. In rats treated with progesterone,the expression level of NFkB p65 and TNF-α were reduced significantly in comparison with vehicle-treated rats. However,progesterone did not alter the expression of GFAP in the injured rats. Progesterone also reduced the water content of injured brain and the lesion volume. In addition,progesterone-treated injured rats showed significant improvements in the Neurological Severity Score test,compared with vehicle-treated ones.Conclusions Progesterone inhibits the inflammatory response after experimental traumatic brain injury and mitigates the severity of brain damage.

  18. Puerarin partly counteracts the inflammatory response after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion via activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojie Liu; Zhigang Mei; Jingping Qian; Yongbao Zeng; Mingzhi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb radix puerariae (Gegen), has been reported to inhibit neuronal apoptosis and play an anti-inflammatory role in focal cerebral ischemia model rats. Recent findings regarding stroke pathophysiology have recognized that an-ti-inflammation is an important target for the treatment of ischemic stroke. The cholinergic an-ti-inflammatory pathway is a highly robust neural-immune mechanism for inflammation control. This study was to investigate whether activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be in-volved in the mechanism of inhibiting the inflammatory response during puerarin-induced cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Results showed that puerarin pretreatment (intravenous injection) re-duced the ischemic infarct volume, improved neurological deficit after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and decreased the levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-αin brain tissue. Pretreatment with puerarin (intravenous injection) attenuated the inflammatory response in rats, which was accompanied by janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibition. These observa-tions were inhibited by the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) antagonistα-bungarotoxin (α-BGT). In addition, puerarin pretreatment increased the expression of α7nAchR mRNA in ischemic cerebral tissue. These data demonstrate that puerarin pretreatment strongly protects the brain against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammatory re-sponse. Our results also indicated that the anti-inflammatory effect of puerarin may partly be me-diated through the activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

  19. The Pro-inflammatory Effects of Glucocorticoids in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Erica de Almeida; Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones derived from cholesterol. Their actions are mediated by the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors, which, once bound to their ligands, act as transcription factors that can directly modulate gene expression. Through protein-protein interactions with other transcription factors, they can also regulate the activity of many genes in a composite or tethering way. Rapid non-genomic signaling was also demonstrated since glucocorticoids can act through membrane receptors and activate signal transduction pathways, such as protein kinases cascades, to modulate other transcriptions factors and activate or repress various target genes. By all these different mechanisms, glucocorticoids regulate numerous important functions in a large variety of cells, not only in the peripheral organs but also in the central nervous system during development and adulthood. In general, glucocorticoids are considered anti-inflammatory and protective agents due to their ability to inhibit gene expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and other possible damaging molecules. Nonetheless, recent studies have uncovered situations in which these hormones can act as pro-inflammatory agents depending on the dose, chronicity of exposure, and the structure/organ analyzed. In this review, we will provide an overview of the conditions under which these phenomena occur, a discussion that will serve as a basis for exploring the mechanistic foundation of glucocorticoids pro-inflammatory gene regulation in the brain. PMID:27445981

  20. Vascular and inflammatory factors in the pathophysiology of blast-induced brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Elder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI has received much recent attention because of its frequency in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This renewed interest has led to a rapid expansion of clinical and animal studies related to blast. In humans, high-level blast exposure is associated with a prominent hemorrhagic component. In animal models, blast exerts a variety of effects on the nervous system including vascular and inflammatory effects that can be seen with even low-level blast exposures which produce minimal or no neuronal pathology. Acutely, blast exposure in animals causes prominent vasospasm and decreased cerebral blood flow along with blood-brain barrier breakdown and increased vascular permeability. Besides direct effects on the CNS, evidence supports a role for a thoracically mediated effect of blast whereby pressure waves transmitted through the systemic circulation damage the brain. Chronically, a vascular pathology has been observed that is associated with alterations of the vascular extracellular matrix. Sustained microglial and astroglial reactions occur after blast exposure. Markers of a central and peripheral inflammatory response are found for sustained periods after blast injury and include elevation of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. At low levels of blast exposure, a microvascular pathology has been observed in the presence of an otherwise normal brain parenchyma, suggesting that the vasculature may be selectively vulnerable to blast injury. Chronic immune activation in brain following vascular injury may lead to neurobehavioral changes in the absence of direct neuronal pathology. Strategies aimed at preventing or reversing vascular damage or modulating the immune response may improve the chronic neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with blast-related TBI.

  1. Cytokines in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffer, U; Wade, R G; Gourlay, T

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Patients subject to major surgery, suffering sepsis, major trauma, or following cardiopulmonary bypass exhibit a systemic inflammatory response. This inflammatory response involves a complex array of inflammatory polypeptide molecules known as cytokines. It is well accepted that the loss of local control of the release of these cytokines leads to systemic inflammation and potentially deleterious consequences including the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Multi-Organ Dysfu...

  2. Scorpion Venom and the Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera L. Petricevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion venoms consist of a complex of several toxins that exhibit a wide range of biological properties and actions, as well as chemical compositions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. These venoms are associated with high morbility and mortality, especially among children. Victims of envenoming by a scorpion suffer a variety of pathologies, involving mainly both sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation as well as central manifestations such as irritability, hyperthermia, vomiting, profuse salivation, tremor, and convulsion. The clinical signs and symptoms observed in humans and experimental animals are related with an excessive systemic host inflammatory response to stings and stings, respectively. Although the pathophysiology of envenomation is complex and not yet fully understood, venom and immune responses are known to trigger the release of inflammatory mediators that are largely mediated by cytokines. In models of severe systemic inflammation produced by injection of high doses of venom or venoms products, the increase in production of proinflammatory cytokines significantly contributes to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction and death. The cytokines initiate a cascade of events that lead to illness behaviors such as fever, anorexia, and also physiological events in the host such as activation of vasodilatation, hypotension, and increased of vessel permeability.

  3. Using optogenetics to translate the "inflammatory dialogue" between heart and brain in the context of stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinbo Cheng; Jie Zhang; Caiyi Lu; Liping Wang

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory processes are an integral part of the stress response and are likely to result from a programmed adaptation that is vital to the organism's survival and well-being.The whole inflammatory response is mediated by largely overlapping circuits in the limbic forebrain,hypothalamus and brainstem,but is also under the control of the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems.Genetically predisposed individuals who fail to tune the respective contributions of the two systems in accordance with stressor modality and intensity after adverse experiences can be at risk for stress-related psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular diseases.Altered glucocorticoid (GC) homeostasis due to GC resistance leads to the failure of neural and negative feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during chronic inflammation,and this might be the mechanism underlying the ensuing brain and heart diseases and the high prevalence of co-morbidity between the two systems.By the combined use of light and genetically-encoded lightsensitive proteins,optogenetics allows cell-type-specific,fast (millisecond-scale) control of precisely defined events in biological systems.This method is an important breakthrough to explore the causality between neural activity patterns and behavioral profiles relevant to anxiety,depression,autism and schizophrenia.Optogenetics also helps to understand the "inflammatory dialogue",the inflammatory processes in psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular diseases,shared by heart and brain in the context of stress.

  4. Transport induced inflammatory responses in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely-Szponder, J; Bełkot, Z; Bobowiec, R; Kosior-Korzecka, U; Wójcik, M

    2015-01-01

    Deleterious response to road transport is an important problem in equine practice. It determines different physiological, immunological and metabolic changes which lead to increased susceptibility to several disorders such as pneumonia, diarrhea, colics, laminitis, injuries and rhabdomyolisis. The aim of our study was to look for possible relationships between transportation of female young and older horses over a long and short distance and an inflammatory state reflected by an increase of acute phase protein concentration, oxidative stress and muscle injury. The study was conducted on 24 cold-blooded female horses divided into four groups. Six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 550 km, six fillies aged 6-18 months and six mares aged 10-12 years were transported over the distance of about 50 km. Plasma and serum were obtained from blood samples taken before transportation (T0), immediately after transportation (T1) and at an abattoir during slaughter (T2). In these samples fibrinogen, MDA, AST and CK were assessed. Fibrinogen increased in all studied groups especially in fillies after long distance transportation, where it reached 205±7.07 mg/dl before transportation, 625±35.35 mg/dl after transportation, and 790±14.14 mg/dl during slaughter. MDA concentrations rose after transportation and reached the maximal level during slaughter. CK activity was more elevated after short transportation in younger horses, whereas initial activity of AST was higher in older horses. We estimated that intensified responses from acute phase, oxidative stress and muscle injury parameters indicated an inflammatory state. PMID:26172192

  5. Divergent responses of inflammatory mediators within the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Haley A; Gandhi, Chaitanya P; Gray, J Megan; Morena, Maria; Hassan, Kowther I; Hill, Matthew N

    2016-01-01

    There is now a growing body of literature that indicates that stress can initiate inflammatory processes, both in the periphery and brain; however, the spatiotemporal nature of this response is not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an acute psychological stress on changes in mRNA and protein levels of a wide range of inflammatory mediators across a broad temporal range, in key corticolimbic brain regions involved in the regulation of the stress response (amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, medial prefrontal cortex). mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators were analyzed immediately following 30min or 120min of acute restraint stress and protein levels were examined 0h through 24h post-termination of 120min of acute restraint stress using both multiplex and ELISA methods. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that exposure to acute psychological stress results in an increase in the protein level of several inflammatory mediators in the amygdala while concomitantly producing a decrease in the protein level of multiple inflammatory mediators within the medial prefrontal cortex. This pattern of changes seemed largely restricted to the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, with stress producing few changes in the mRNA or protein levels of inflammatory mediators within the hippocampus or hypothalamus. Consistent with previous research, stress resulted in a general elevation in multiple inflammatory mediators within the circulation. These data indicate that neuroinflammatory responses to stress do not appear to be generalized across brain structures and exhibit a high degree of spatiotemporal specificity. Given the impact of inflammatory signaling on neural excitability and emotional behavior, these data may provide a platform with which to explore the importance of inflammatory signaling within the prefrontocortical-amygdala circuit in the regulation of the neurobehavioral responses to stress.

  6. Pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major accidental trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Brøchner Anne; Toft Palle

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of the present study was to describe the pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major trauma and the timing of final reconstructive surgery. Methods An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to the inflammatory response to trauma were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. Discussion The inflammatory response consists of hormonal metabolic...

  7. Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Juan M

    2012-11-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT(1) receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT(1) receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood-brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurodegerative, mood and traumatic brain disorders, and cognitive decline. In rodents, ARBs (AT(1) receptor blockers) ameliorate stress-induced disorders, anxiety and depression, protect cerebral blood flow during stroke, decrease brain inflammation and amyloid-β neurotoxicity and reduce traumatic brain injury. Direct anti-inflammatory protective effects, demonstrated in cultured microglia, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, neurons and human circulating monocytes, may result not only in AT(1) receptor blockade, but also from PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) stimulation. Controlled clinical studies indicate that ARBs protect cognition after stroke and during aging, and cohort analyses reveal that these compounds significantly reduce the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease. ARBs are commonly used for the therapy of hypertension, diabetes and stroke, but have not been studied in the context of neurodegenerative, mood or traumatic brain disorders, conditions lacking effective therapy. These compounds are well-tolerated pleiotropic neuroprotective agents with additional beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic profiles, and their use in central nervous system disorders offers a novel therapeutic approach of immediate translational value. ARBs should be tested for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease, affective disorders, such as co-morbid cardiovascular disease and depression, and traumatic

  8. Tempol modulates changes in xenobiotic permeability and occludin oligomeric assemblies at the blood-brain barrier during inflammatory pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lochhead, Jeffrey J; McCaffrey, Gwen; Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Finch, Jessica D.; DeMarco, Kristin M; Quigley, Colleen E.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ronaldson, Patrick T

    2011-01-01

    Our laboratory has shown that λ-carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammatory pain (CIP) can alter tight junction (TJ) protein expression and/or assembly leading to changes in blood-brain barrier xenobiotic permeability. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative stress during CIP is unknown. ROS (i.e., superoxide) are known to cause cellular damage in response to pain/inflammation. Therefore, we examined oxidative stress-associated effects at the blood-brain ba...

  9. [Therapeutic responsiveness in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    CIDP is autoimmune-associated peripheral neuropathy characterized by motor and sensory disturbances in each limb. While various phenotypes have been reported in CIDP, the essential pathogenesis is not elucidated yet. Clinicopathological study indicated axonal dysfunction (muscle atrophy and decreased compound muscular action potentials) is one of the most important factors in IVIg Non-responders. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype/diplotype analysis within a linkage disequilibrium block indicates transient axonal glycoprotein 1 (TAG-1), which controls proper distribution of potassium channels in juxtaparanode, is an important factor for IVIg responsiveness. Gene expression analysis of biopsied nerves supported the hypothesis that CIDP pathogenesis is involved in humoral and cellular immune system. With respect to IVIg responsiveness, expression profiles indicate whole CIDP patients need conventional immune-modulating therapies in somewhat, while we should re-consider how to use them. From aspects of gene expression results, Non-responders need not only conventional immune-modulating therapies but also other original modalities which could intervene the pathogenesis except Schwann/inflammatory cells while Responders with IVIg dependence should need stronger and longer immune-suppression.

  10. Alert cell strategy: mechanisms of inflammatory response and organ protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Noboru; Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is triggered by various factors such as surgical operation, trauma, burn injury, ischemia, pancreatitis and bacterial translocation. Sepsis is a SIRS associated with bacterial infection. SIRS and sepsis tend to trigger excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory molecules and induce multiple organ failure, such as acute lung injury, acute kidney injury and inflammatory cardiac injury. Epithelial and endothelial cells in some major organs express inflammatory receptors on the plasma membrane and work as alert cells for inflammation, and regulation of these alert cells could have a relieving effect on the inflammatory response. In inflammatory conditions, initial cardiac dysfunction is mediated by decreased preload and adequate infusion therapy is required. Tachyarrhythmia is a complication of inflammatory conditions and early control of the inflammatory reaction would prevent the structural remodeling that is resistant to therapies. Furthermore, there seems to be crosstalk between major organs with a central focus on the kidneys in inflammatory conditions. As an alert cell strategy, volatile anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, seem to have anti-inflammatory effects, and both experimental and clinical studies have shown the beneficial effects of these drugs in various settings of inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, in terms of intravenous anesthetics, propofol and ketamine, their current status is still controversial as there is a lack of confirmatory evidence on whether they have an organ-protective effect in inflammatory conditions. The local anesthetic lidocaine suppressed inflammatory responses upon both systemic and local administration. For the control of inflammatory conditions, anesthetic agents may be a target of drug development in accordance with other treatments and drugs. PMID:25229471

  11. The influence of biomaterials on inflammatory responses to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, J M; Matata, B M; Yin, H Q; Esposito, A; Mahiout, A; Taggart, D P; Lowe, G D

    1996-05-01

    The nature of cardiopulmonary bypass and the complexity of the inflammatory response make the detection and interpretation of a biomaterial influence difficult. However, if mediation of the inflammatory response is considered to be an appropriate clinical goal, alteration to the biomaterial influence merits further investigation.

  12. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair.......The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair....

  13. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome in surgical patients with sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Milić Dragan J.; Pejić Miljko A.; Živić Saša S.; Karanikolić Aleksandar D.; Jovanović Slobodan; Radojković Milan

    2004-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis are common in surgically treated patients. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome represents a major factor of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The pathogenesis of these syndromes has been increasingly clarified. The objective of this review is to present an overview of our current understanding of the physiology underlying these conditions.

  14. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chia Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates proteaseactivated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study.

  15. Inflammatory injury to the neonatal brain – what can we do?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa eOfek-shlomai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Perinatal brain damage is one of the leading causes of life long disability. This damage could be hypoxic-ischemic, inflammatory or both.This mini-review discusses different interventions aiming at minimizing inflammatory processes in the neonatal brain, both before and after insult. Current options of anti-inflammatory measures for neonates remain quite limited. We describe current anti-inflammatory intervention strategies such as avoiding perinatal infection and inflammation, and reducing exposure to inflammatory processes. We describe the known effects of anti-inflammatory drugs such as steroids, antibiotics, and indomethacin, and the possible anti-inflammatory role of other substances such as IL-1receptor antagonists, erythropoietin, caffeine, estradiol, insulin like growth factor and melatonin as well as endogenous protectors, and genetic regulation of inflammation. If successful, these may decrease mortality and long term morbidity among term and preterm infants.

  16. Systemic inflammatory challenges compromise survival after experimental stroke via augmenting brain inflammation, blood- brain barrier damage and brain oedema independently of infarct size

    OpenAIRE

    Dénes Ádám; Ferenczi Szilamér; Kovács Krisztina J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Systemic inflammation impairs outcome in stroke patients and experimental animals via mechanisms which are poorly understood. Circulating inflammatory mediators can activate cerebrovascular endothelium or glial cells in the brain and impact on ischaemic brain injury. One of the most serious early clinical complications of cerebral ischaemia is brain oedema, which compromises survival in the first 24-48 h. It is not understood whether systemic inflammatory challenges impair...

  17. Inflammatory Response to Cardiac Surgery and Strategies to Overcome it.

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor Mukul; Ramachandran T

    2004-01-01

    A general activation of the immune system is observed during any operative procedure as a physiological response to the surgical trauma. Cardiopulmonary bypass may directly activate the inflammatory response by three distinct mechanisms: direct ′contact activation′ of the immune system following exposure of blood to the foreign surfaces, ischaemia-reperfusion injury to vital organs and systemic endotoxaemia resulting from gut translocation of endotoxin. The inflammatory response...

  18. Diverse inflammatory responses in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and the effect of immunotherapy on these responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Colton

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available While the presence of an inflammatory response in AD (Alzheimer's disease is well known, the data on inflammation are conflicting, suggesting that inflammation either attenuates pathology, exacerbates it or has no effect. Our goal was to more fully characterize the inflammatory response in APP (amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice with and without disease progression. In addition, we have examined how anti-Aβ (amyloid β-peptide immunotherapy alters this inflammatory response. We have used quantitative RT–PCR (reverse transcription–PCR and protein analysis to measure inflammatory responses ranging from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory and repair factors in transgenic mice that develop amyloid deposits only (APPSw and amyloid deposits with progression to tau pathology and neuron loss [APPSw/NOS2−/− (nitric oxide synthase 2−/−]. We also examined tissues from previously published immunotherapy studies. These studies were a passive immunization study in APPSw mice and an active vaccination study in APPSw/NOS2−/− mice. Both studies have already been shown to lower amyloid load and improve cognition. We have found that amyloid deposition is associated with high expression of alternative activation and acquired deactivation genes and low expression of pro-inflammatory genes, whereas disease progression is associated with a mixed phenotype including increased levels of some classical activation factors. Immunotherapy targeting amyloid deposition in both mouse models resulted in decreased alternative inflammatory markers and, in the case of passive immunization, a transient increase in pro-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest that an alternative immune response favours retention of amyloid deposits in the brain, and switching away from this state by immunotherapy permits removal of amyloid.

  19. The Role of Cytokines and Inflammatory Cells in Perinatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. McAdams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain injury frequently complicates preterm birth and leads to significant long-term morbidity. Cytokines and inflammatory cells are mediators in the common pathways associated with perinatal brain injury induced by a variety of insults, such as hypoxic-ischemic injury, reperfusion injury, toxin-mediated injury, and infection. This paper examines our current knowledge regarding cytokine-related perinatal brain injury and specifically discusses strategies for attenuating cytokine-mediated brain damage.

  20. Pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major accidental trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brøchner Anne

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the present study was to describe the pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major trauma and the timing of final reconstructive surgery. Methods An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to the inflammatory response to trauma were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. Discussion The inflammatory response consists of hormonal metabolic and immunological components and the extent correlates with the magnitude of the tissue injury. After trauma and uncomplicated surgery a delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators is observed. Trauma patients are, however, often exposed, not only to the trauma, but to several events in the form of initial surgery and later final reconstructive surgery. In this case immune paralysis associated with increased risk of infection might develop. The inflammatory response is normalized 3 weeks following trauma. It has been proposed that the final reconstructive surgery should be postponed until the inflammatory response is normalized. This statement is however not based on clinical trials. Conclusion Postponement of final reconstructive surgery until the inflammatory is normalized should be based on prospective randomized trials.

  1. Sex differences in the effects of adolescent stress on adult brain inflammatory markers in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pyter, Leah M.; Kelly, Sean D.; Harrell, Constance S; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2013-01-01

    Both basic and clinical research indicates that females are more susceptible to stress-related affective disorders than males. One of the mechanisms by which stress induces depression is via inflammatory signaling in the brain. Stress during adolescence, in particular, can also disrupt the activation and continued development of both the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) and –gonadal (HPG) axes, both of which modulate inflammatory pathways and brain regions involved in affective behavior. ...

  2. Clarithromycin attenuates mastectomy-induced acute inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Louis W. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Wei, William I.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the observation that administration of clarithromycin led to an attenuation of the inflammatory response induced by surgical trauma in a guinea pig model, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of clarithromycin on the local and systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing mastectomy in an open-label prospective study. During a 16-month period, 54 patients who underwent mastectomy were randomly divided into two groups. In one group, the patients received oral clari...

  3. Inflammatory response to strenuous muscular exercise in man

    OpenAIRE

    Camus, G.; Deby-Dupont, G; Deby, C.; A. Juchmés-Ferir; J. Pincemail; Lamy, M.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the humoral and cellular changes occurring during strenuous muscular work in humans, the concept of inflammatory response to exercise (IRE) is developed. The main indices of IRE consist of signs of an acute phase response, leucocytosis and leucocyte activation, release of inflammatory mediators, tissue damage and cellular infiltrates, production of free radicals, activation of complement, and coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. Depending on exercise intensity and duration, it seem...

  4. The systemic inflammatory response in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson

    2000-09-01

    The physiologic diagnosis of heart failure has changed very little over the past several decades: heart failure is the inability of the cardiac output to meet the metabolic demands of the organism. The clinical definition of heart failure (also relatively unchanged) describes it as ventricular dysfunction that is accompanied by reduced exercise tolerance. Our understanding of the true pathophysiologic processes involved in heart failure have, however, changed. We have moved from thinking of heart failure as primarily a circulatory phenomenon to seeing it as a pathophysiologic state under the control of multiple complex systems. Over the past several years the dramatic explosion of research in the fields of immunology and immunopathology have added an additional piece to the puzzle that defines heart failure and have lead to an understanding of heart failure, at least in some part, as an 'inflammatory disease'. In this review we will examine several of the key inflammatory mediators as they relate to heart failure while at the same time attempting to define the source(s) of these mediators. We will examine key elements of the inflammatory cascade as they relate to heart failure such as: cytokines, 'proximal mediators' (e.g. NF-kappaB), and distal mediators (e.g. nitric oxide). We will end with a discussion of the potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory strategies in the future treatment of heart failure. Also, throughout the review we will examine the potential pitfalls encountered in applying bench discoveries to the bedside as have been learned in the field of septic shock research. PMID:10978715

  5. Macrophage Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Response to EMCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary R. Shaheen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expression and production of type 1 interferon is the classic cellular response to virus infection. In addition to this antiviral response, virus infection also stimulates the production of proinflammatory mediators. In this review, the pathways controlling the induction of inflammatory genes and the roles that these inflammatory mediators contribute to host defense against viral pathogens will be discussed. Specific focus will be on the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5, as a signaling receptor controlling the activation of pathways leading to virus-induced inflammatory gene expression.

  6. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates MicroRNA-155-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Ischemic Cerebral Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Ya; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Cong; Zhu, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses play a critical role in ischemic brain injury. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and acetylbritannilactone (ABL) exerts potent antiinflammatory actions by inhibiting expression of inflammation-related genes. However, the functions of miR-155 and the actual relationship between ABL and miR-155 in ischemia-induced cerebral inflammation remain unclear. In this study, cerebral ischemia of wild-type (WT) and miR-155−/− mice was induced ...

  7. [Effect of local anesthetics on the postoperative inflammatory response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloeil, H; Mazoit, J-X

    2009-03-01

    Current knowledge suggests that peripheral inflammation following surgery activates and sensitizes both peripheral and central nervous system. These phenomena involved in the maintenance of the inflammatory response lead to hypersensibility, hyperalgesia and allodynia. Hyperalgesia participates in the general experience of postoperative pain and ALo in the development of chronic pain. A correlation between the ability of treatments to reduce areas of hypersensitivity surrounding the wound after surgery and their ability to reduce the incidence of chronic pain has been shown. For a long time, local anaesthetics have been used for their capacity to block nociceptive input. They can ALo modulate the inflammatory response following a surgical trauma. By inhibiting the nervous conductivity at the site of the trauma, local anesthetics attenuate the sensitization of the nervous system and therefore the inflammatory phenomena. They ALo exert intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties by modulating the local and systemic liberation of inflammatory mediators. The mechanisms involved are not clearly elucidated. Local, systemic, and spinal inflammatory mechanisms may be influenced by local anesthetics through multiple different mechanisms. The therapeutic implications of effects of local anesthetics on local, systemic, and spinal inflammatory responses merit further study. PMID:19297121

  8. Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress response in orofacial inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun Sun; Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Yun Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Bae, Yong Chul

    2014-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in many neurological diseases and inflammatory responses. Inflammatory mediators induce neuronal damage and trigger the neuropathic or inflammatory pain. But there is very little data on the role of the ER stress response in pain mechanisms. In this study, we explored whether the ER stress response is involved in orofacial inflammatory pain by using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-injected rat model. The thermal pain hypersensitivity increased significantly after CFA injection. We found that the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress response genes, GRP78/Bip and p-eIF2α, increased significantly in trigeminal ganglion (TG) of CFA-injected rats compared to control animals. In immunofluorescence analysis, a significant increase of GRP78 and p-eIF2α immunopositive neurons was observed in CFA-injected TG compared to control TG. When we administered an ER stress modulator, salubrinal, CFA-induced thermal pain hypersensitivity was temporally reduced. Thus, our study suggests that ER stress responses in TG neurons contribute to CFA-induced inflammatory pain, and may comprise an important molecular mechanism underlying the orofacial inflammatory pain pathway. PMID:25548537

  9. Inflammatory responses to Hydroxyapatite implants in middle ear in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Qing; JIANG Yi; WANG Xiao-yan; ZHENG Ke-fei

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study local inflammatory response after implantation of hydroxyapatite synthetic ossicular prosthesis. Methods Hydroxyapatite gantries were implanted in the bulla in 32 rats. Sham surgical procedures were performed in 10 rats as the control. Animals were sacrificed at 1 to 300 days after surgery. Bulla sections, stained with HE and Mallory's azan, were examined for numbers and percentages of various inflammatory cell types. Results Slightly more inflammatory reaction was seen in animals with the implant than in the controls, mostly during the early stage following the implantation procedure. Few inflammatory cells were observed at later times. There were satisfactory fibrosis in both implanted and control ears. Conclusion The results indicate that hydroxyapatite synthetic prosthesis is a biocompatible implantation material in the middle ear. Nonetheless, the presence of inflammatory reaction immediately following implantation implies that control of infection is important in the early times after the implantation procedure.

  10. Who fans the flames of Alzheimer's disease brains? Misfolded tau on the crossroad of neurodegenerative and inflammatory pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilka Norbert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurodegeneration, induced by misfolded tau protein, and neuroinflammation, driven by glial cells, represent the salient features of Alzheimer's disease (AD and related human tauopathies. While tau neurodegeneration significantly correlates with disease progression, brain inflammation seems to be an important factor in regulating the resistance or susceptibility to AD neurodegeneration. Previously, it has been shown that there is a reciprocal relationship between the local inflammatory response and neurofibrillary lesions. Numerous independent studies have reported that inflammatory responses may contribute to the development of tau pathology and thus accelerate the course of disease. It has been shown that various cytokines can significantly affect the functional and structural properties of intracellular tau. Notwithstanding, anti-inflammatory approaches have not unequivocally demonstrated that inhibition of the brain immune response can lead to reduction of neurofibrillary lesions. On the other hand, our recent data show that misfolded tau could represent a trigger for microglial activation, suggesting the dual role of misfolded tau in the Alzheimer's disease inflammatory cascade. On the basis of current knowledge, we can conclude that misfolded tau is located at the crossroad of the neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathways. Thus disease-modified tau represents an important target for potential therapeutic strategies for patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Amniotic fluid protein profiles of intraamniotic inflammatory response to Ureaplasma spp. and other bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Kacerovsky

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the amniotic fluid protein profiles and the intensity of intraamniotic inflammatory response to Ureaplasma spp. and other bacteria, using the multiplex xMAP technology. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was undertaken in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic. A total of 145 pregnant women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes between gestational age 24+0 and 36+6 weeks were included in the study. Amniocenteses were performed. The presence of Ureaplasma spp. and other bacteria was evaluated using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The levels of specific proteins were determined using multiplex xMAP technology. RESULTS: The presence of Ureaplasma spp. and other bacteria in the amniotic fluid was associated with increased levels of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, brain-derived neurotropic factor, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1, and matrix metalloproteinasis-9. Ureaplasma spp. were also associated with increased levels of neurotropin-3 and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of Ureaplasma spp. in the amniotic fluid is associated with a slightly different protein profile of inflammatory response, but the intensity of inflammatory response to Ureaplasma spp. is comparable with the inflammatory response to other bacteria.

  12. Short and Long-Term Analysis and Comparison of Neurodegeneration and Inflammatory Cell Response in the Ipsilateral and Contralateral Hemisphere of the Neonatal Mouse Brain after Hypoxia/Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Shrivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolution of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic is essential for novel neuroprotective approaches. We describe the neuropathology and glial/inflammatory response, from 3 hours to 100 days, after carotid occlusion and hypoxia (8% O2, 55 minutes to the C57/BL6 P7 mouse. Massive tissue injury and atrophy in the ipsilateral (IL hippocampus, corpus callosum, and caudate-putamen are consistently shown. Astrogliosis peaks at 14 days, but glial scar is still evident at day 100. Microgliosis peaks at 3–7 days and decreases by day 14. Both glial responses start at 3 hours in the corpus callosum and hippocampal fissure, to progressively cover the degenerating CA field. Neutrophils increase in the ventricles and hippocampal vasculature, showing also parenchymal extravasation at 7 days. Remarkably, delayed milder atrophy is also seen in the contralateral (CL hippocampus and corpus callosum, areas showing astrogliosis and microgliosis during the first 72 hours. This detailed and long-term cellular response characterization of the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere after H/I may help in the design of better therapeutic strategies.

  13. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the respon...

  14. Relaxin augments the inflammatory IL6 response in the choriodecidua

    OpenAIRE

    JS, Horton; SY, Yamamoto; GD, Bryant-Greenwood

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine infection frequently leads to preterm birth (PTB), with the pathophysiology involving activation of the innate immune system and its associated inflammatory response. The choriodecidua produces relaxin (RLN) and elevated levels are associated with preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes. However, it is not increased in bacterially-mediated PTB, but may act as an endogenous sterile inflammatory mediator. Elevated systemic RLN levels from the corpus luteum are also associa...

  15. Reduced Acute Inflammatory Responses to Microgel Conformal Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, Amanda W.; Singh, Neetu; Burns, Kellie L.; Babensee, Julia E.; Lyon, L. Andrew; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into the body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. This inflammatory cascade involves protein adsorption, leukocyte recruitment and activation, cytokine release, and fibrous encapsulation of the implant. We present a coating strategy based on thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel microparticles (i.e. microgels) cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. These particles we...

  16. Insulin attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to thermal trauma.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Einspanier, Ralf; Klein, Dagmar; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin has been recently shown to decrease mortality and prevent the incidence of multi-organ failure in critically ill patients. The molecular mechanisms by which insulin improves survival have not been defined. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of insulin therapy on the systemic inflammatory response. In vivo we determined the effect of insulin therapy on the inflammatory cascade, which was induced by thermal injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thermally i...

  17. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Chia Chen; Sun-Sang Wang; Fa-Yauh Lee

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week) due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted tha...

  18. Law, Responsibility, and the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Dean; Lau, Hakwan C.; Jones, Owen D.; Frith, Chris D.

    In perhaps the first attempt to link the brain to mental illness, Hippocrates elegantly wrote that it is the brain that makes us mad or delirious. Epitomizing one of the fundamental assumptions of contemporary neuroscience, Hippocrates' words resonate far beyond the classic philosophical puzzle of mind and body and posit that our behavior, no matter how monstrous, lies at the mercy of our brain's integrity. While clinicopathological observations have long pointed to several putative neurobiological systems as important in antisocial and violent criminal behavior, recent advances in brain-imaging have the potential to provide unparalleled insight. Consequently, brain-imaging studies have reinvigorated the neurophilosophical and legal debate of whether we are free agents in control of our own actions or mere prisoners of a biologically determined brain. In this chapter, we review studies pointing to brain dysfunction in criminally violent individuals and address a range of philosophical and practical issues concerning the use of brainimaging in court. We finally lay out several guidelines for its use in the legal system.

  19. Anti-inflammatory response of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Torre, D; Tambini, R; Aristodemo, S; Gavazzeni, G; Goglio, A.; Cantamessa, C; Pugliese, A; Biondi, G.

    2000-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an inflammatory process seen in association with a large number of clinical infective and non-infective conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Serum levels of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta were determined in 45 patients with SIRS: 38 patients had SIRS of infectious origin, whereas seven pati...

  20. Auraptene Acts as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent in the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Okuyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory activity of auraptene (AUR, a citrus coumarin, in peripheral tissues is well-known, and we previously demonstrated that AUR exerts anti-inflammatory effects in the ischemic brain; the treatment of mice with AUR for eight days immediately after ischemic surgery suppressed demise and neuronal cell death in the hippocampus, possibly through its anti-inflammatory effects in the brain. We suggested that these effects were at least partly mediated by the suppression of inflammatory mediators derived from astrocytes. The present study showed that (1 AUR, as a pretreatment for five days before and another three days after ischemic surgery, suppressed microglial activation, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression in astrocytes, and COX-2 mRNA expression in the hippocampus; (2 AUR suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of COX-2 mRNA and the mRNA of pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultured astrocytes; (3 AUR was still detectable in the brain 60 min after its intraperitoneal administration. These results support our previous suggestion that AUR directly exerts anti-inflammatory effects on the brain.

  1. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar J Evani

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation.

  2. Pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major accidental trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Toft, Palle

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Purpose of the present study was to describe the pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major trauma and the timing of final reconstructive surgery. Methods: An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to the in......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Purpose of the present study was to describe the pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response after major trauma and the timing of final reconstructive surgery. Methods: An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining...... to the inflammatory response to trauma were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. Discussion: The inflammatory response consists of hormonal metabolic and immunological components and the extent correlates with the magnitude of the tissue injury. After trauma...... and uncomplicated surgery a delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators is observed.Trauma patients are, however, often exposed, not only to the trauma, but to several evens in the form of initial surgery and later final reconstructive surgery. In this case immune paralysis associated...

  3. Pinoresinol from the fruits of Forsythia koreana inhibits inflammatory responses in LPS-activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyo Won; Mahesh, Ramalingam; Lee, Jong Gu; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Young Shik; Park, Yong-Ki

    2010-08-23

    The activation of microglia plays an important role in a variety of brain disorders by the excessive production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and proinflammatory cytokines. We investigated here whether pinoresinol isolated from the fruits of Forsythia koreana Nakai inhibits the inflammatory responses in LPS-activated microglia. Pinoresinol inhibited the production of NO, PGE(2), TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6 in LPS-activated primary microglia. Also, pinoresinol attenuated mRNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and proinflammatory cytokines in LPS-activation. However, most of these inhibitory effects of pinoresinol have been mediated by extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and the NF-kappaB dependent. The results suggest that pinoresinol attenuates inflammatory responses of microglia and could be potentially useful in modulation of inflammatory status in brain disorders.

  4. Lipotoxic brain microvascular injury is mediated by activating transcription factor 3-dependent inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Hnin Hnin; Altman, Robin; Nyunt, Tun; Kim, Jeffrey; Nuthikattu, Saivageethi; Budamagunta, Madhu; Voss, John C; Wilson, Dennis; Rutledge, John C; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2016-06-01

    Dysfunction of the cerebrovasculature plays an important role in vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Lipotoxic injury of the systemic endothelium in response to hydrolyzed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs; TGRL lipolysis products) or a high-fat Western diet (WD) suggests similar mechanisms may be present in brain microvascular endothelium. We investigated the hypothesis that TGRL lipolysis products cause lipotoxic injury to brain microvascular endothelium by generating increased mitochondrial superoxide radical generation, upregulation of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-dependent inflammatory pathways, and activation of cellular oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells were treated with human TGRL lipolysis products that induced intracellular lipid droplet formation, mitochondrial superoxide generation, ATF3-dependent transcription of proinflammatory, stress response, and oxidative stress genes, as well as activation of proapoptotic cascades. Male apoE knockout mice were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol WD for 2 months, and brain microvessels were isolated by laser capture microdissection. ATF3 gene transcription was elevated 8-fold in the hippocampus and cerebellar brain region of the WD-fed animals compared with chow-fed control animals. The microvascular injury phenotypes observed in vitro and in vivo were similar. ATF3 plays an important role in mediating brain microvascular responses to acute and chronic lipotoxic injury and may be an important preventative and therapeutic target for endothelial dysfunction in VCI. PMID:27087439

  5. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARō) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPARō activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)ō agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1β and TNF-α message levels. This occured, in part, through PPARō-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPARō inhibited NF-κB via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPARō activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in

  6. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  7. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  8. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT1 receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT1 receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood–brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurod...

  9. Obese mice exhibit an altered behavioural and inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine B. Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increase in the prevalence and severity of infections. Genetic animal models of obesity (ob/ob and db/db mice display altered centrally-mediated sickness behaviour in response to acute inflammatory stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. However, the effect of diet-induced obesity (DIO on the anorectic and febrile response to LPS in mice is unknown. This study therefore determined how DIO and ob/ob mice respond to a systemic inflammatory challenge. C57BL/6 DIO and ob/ob mice, and their respective controls, were given an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of LPS. Compared with controls, DIO and ob/ob mice exhibited an altered febrile response to LPS (100 μg/kg over 8 hours. LPS caused a greater and more prolonged anorexic effect in DIO compared with control mice and, in ob/ob mice, LPS induced a reduction in food intake and body weight earlier than it did in controls. These effects of LPS in obese mice were also seen after a fixed dose of LPS (5 μg. LPS (100 μg/kg induced Fos protein expression in several brain nuclei of control mice, with fewer Fos-positive cells observed in the brains of obese mice. An altered inflammatory response to LPS was also observed in obese mice compared with controls: changes in cytokine expression and release were detected in the plasma, spleen, liver and peritoneal macrophages in obese mice. In summary, DIO and ob/ob mice displayed an altered behavioural response and cytokine release to systemic inflammatory challenge. These findings could help explain why obese humans show increased sensitivity to infections.

  10. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides perturb lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells: Implications for inflammatory demyelinating disease

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Clayton W.; Foster, Scott C.; Itakura, Asako; Matsumoto, Steven G.; Asari, Akira; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Sherman, Larry S.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the central nervous system. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan and its receptor, CD44, are implicated in the initiation and progression of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Digestion of hyaluronan tethered to brain vascular endothelial cells by a hyaluronidase blocks the slow rolling of lymphocytes along activated brain vascular ...

  11. Additional Clues for a Protective Role ofVitamin D in Neurodegenerative Diseases: 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Triggers an Anti-Inflammatory Response in BrainPericytes

    OpenAIRE

    Nissou, Marie-France; Guttin, Audrey; Zenga, Cyril; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul; Wion, Didier

    2014-01-01

    International audience Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) plays a neuroprotectiverole in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Most of the experimental data regarding the genes regulatedby this hormone in brain cells have been obtained with neuron and glial cells. Pericytes play a critical role in brain function thatencompasses their classical function in blood-brain barrier control and maintenance. However, the gene r...

  12. Autoimmune Responses to Brain Following Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Kyra

    2012-01-01

    This review provides a synthesis of the work done by our laboratory that demonstrates the presence of cellular immune responses directed towards brain antigens in animals following experimental stroke as well as in patients following ischemic stroke. These responses include both antigenspecific Th1(+) responses, which are associated with worse stroke outcome, and antigen-specific Treg responses, which are associated with better stroke outcome. The likelihood of developing a detrimental Th1(+)...

  13. A MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO ANTHRAX INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rukmini; Chow, Carson C; Bartels, John D.; Clermont, Gilles; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) can trigger an acute inflammatory response that results in multisystem organ failure and death. Previously, we developed a mathematical model of acute inflammation after gram-negative infection that had been matched qualitatively to literature data. We modified the properties of the invading bacteria in that model to those specific to B. anthracis and simulated the host response to anthrax infection. We simulated treatment strategies against anthrax in a genetical...

  14. Attachment avoidance predicts inflammatory responses to marital conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Glaser, Ronald; Loving, Timothy J.; Malarkey, William B.; Stowell, Jeffrey; Houts, Carrie; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2008-01-01

    Marital stress has been associated with immune dysregulation, including increased production of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Attachment style, one’s expectations about the availability and responsiveness of others in intimate relationships, appears to influence physiological stress reactivity and thus could influence inflammatory responses to marital conflict. Thirty-five couples were invited for two 24-hour admissions to a hospital research unit. The first visit included a structured social support...

  15. microRNA-155 Regulates Alpha-Synuclein-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Models of Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Aaron D; Harms, Ashley S; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A; Standaert, David G

    2016-02-24

    Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and widespread aggregates of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn). Recently, microRNAs, small, noncoding RNAs involved in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, have been recognized as important regulators of the inflammatory environment. Using an array approach, we found significant upregulation of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in an in vivo model of PD produced by adeno-associated-virus-mediated expression of α-syn. Using a mouse with a complete deletion of miR-155, we found that loss of miR-155 reduced proinflammatory responses to α-syn and blocked α-syn-induced neurodegeneration. In primary microglia from miR-155(-/-) mice, we observed a markedly reduced inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils, with attenuation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment of these microglia with a synthetic mimic of miR-155 restored the inflammatory response to α-syn fibrils. Our results suggest that miR-155 has a central role in the inflammatory response to α-syn in the brain and in α-syn-related neurodegeneration. These effects are at least in part due to a direct role of miR-155 on the microglial response to α-syn. These data implicate miR-155 as a potential therapeutic target for regulating the inflammatory response in PD. PMID:26911687

  16. Correlated Inflammatory Responses and Neurodegeneration in Peptide-Injected Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. McLarnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which emphasize activation of microglia may have particular utility in correlating proinflammatory activity with neurodegeneration. This paper reviews injection of amyloid-β (Aβ into rat brain as an alternative AD animal model to the use of transgenic animals. In particular, intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 peptide demonstrates prominent microglial mobilization and activation accompanied by a significant loss of granule cell neurons. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory reactivity is demonstrated by a broad spectrum of drugs with a common endpoint in conferring neuroprotection in peptide-injected animals. Peptide-injection models provide a focus on glial cell responses to direct peptide injection in rat brain and offer advantages in the study of the mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in AD brain.

  17. Application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the differentiation of high-grade brain neoplasm and inflammatory brain lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz-Filho, Jose Roberto Lopes; Santana-Netto, Pedro Vieira; Sgnolf, Aline [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Image Dept.], e-mail: jrl.ferraz@terra.com.br; Rocha-Filho, Jose Alves; Mauad, Fernando [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Radiology Dept.; Sanches, Rafael Angelo [FAMERP Medical School, Sao Jose do Rio Preto SP (Brazil). Imaging Dept.

    2009-06-15

    This study aims at evaluating the application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the differential diagnosis of brain tumors and inflammatory brain lesions. The examinations of 81 individuals, who performed brain MRS and were retrospectively analyzed. The patients with ages between 10 and 80 years old, were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 42 individuals with diagnoses of cerebral toxoplasmosis and Group B was formed of 39 individuals with diagnosis of glial neoplasms. On analyzing the ROC curve, the discriminatory boundary for the Cho/Cr ratio between inflammatory lesions and tumors was 1.97 and for the NAA/Cr ratio it was 1.12. RMS is an important method useful in the distinction of inflammatory brain lesions and high-degree tumors when the Cho/Cr ratio is greater than 1.97 and the NAA/Cr ratio is less than 1.12. And so this method is important in the planning of treatment and monitoring of the therapeutic efficiency. (author)

  18. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  19. Photic memory for executive brain responses

    OpenAIRE

    Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi; Ly, Julien; Meyer, Christelle; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Cooper, Howard; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Light is a powerful stimulant for human alertness and cognition that can be easily administered to improve performance or counteract the negative impact of sleepiness, even during the day. Here, we show that prior exposure to longer wavelength light (orange), relative to shorter wavelength (blue), enhances the subsequent impact of light on executive brain responses. These findings emphasize the importance of light for human cognitive brain function and constitute compelling evidence in favor ...

  20. Carvacrol Exerts Neuroprotective Effects Via Suppression of the Inflammatory Response in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlan; Hua, Cong; Pan, Xiaoqiang; Fu, Xijia; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that inflammation plays an important role in cerebral ischemia. Carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, is naturally occurring in various plants belonging to the family Lamiaceae and exerts protective effects in a mice model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by reducing infarct volume and decreasing the expression of cleaved caspase-3. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms by which carvacrol protect the brain have yet to be fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of carvacrol on inflammatory reaction and inflammatory mediators in middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The results of the present study showed that carvacrol inhibited the levels of inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2. It also increased SOD activity and decreased MDA level in ischemic cortical tissues. In addition, carvacrol treatment suppressed the ischemia/reperfusion-induced increase in the protein expression of nuclear NF-kB p65. In conclusion, we have shown that carvacrol inhibits the inflammatory response via inhibition of the NF-kB signaling pathway in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Therefore, carvacrol may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27324156

  1. New means to assess neonatal inflammatory brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Chen; Londono, Irene; Mallard, Carina; Lodygensky, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants are especially vulnerable to infection-induced white matter injury, associated with cerebral palsy, cognitive and psychomotor impairment, and other adverse neurological outcomes. The etiology of such lesions is complex and multifactorial. Furthermore, timing and length of exposure to infection also influence neurodevelopmental outcomes. Different mechanisms have been posited to mediate the observed brain injury including microglial activation followed by subsequent release of ...

  2. Modulation of Hemostatic and Inflammatory Responses by Leptospira Spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Mônica L.; Naudin, Clément; Mörgelin, Matthias; Romero, Eliete C.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.; Herwald, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic and neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern that is caused by pathogenic Leptospira species. In severe infections, hemostatic impairments such as coagulation/fibrinolysis dysfunction are frequently observed. These complications often occur when the host response is controlled and/or modulated by the bacterial pathogen. In the present investigation, we aimed to analyze the modulation of the hemostatic and inflammatory host responses by the bacterial pathogen Leptospira. The effects of leptospires and their secreted products on stimulation of human intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation were investigated by means of altered clotting times, assembly and activation of contact system and induction of tissue factor. We show that both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation cascades are modulated in response to Leptospira or leptospiral secreted proteins. We further find that the pro-inflammatory mediator bradykinin is released following contact activation at the bacterial surface and that pro-coagulant microvesicles are shed from monocytes in response to infection. Also, we show that human leptospirosis patients present higher levels of circulating pro-coagulant microvesicles than healthy individuals. Here we show that both pathways of the coagulation system are modulated by leptospires, possibly leading to altered hemostatic and inflammatory responses during the disease. Our results contribute to the understanding of the leptospirosis pathophysiological mechanisms and may open new routes for the discovery of novel treatments for the severe manifestations of the disease. PMID:27167223

  3. Modulation of Hemostatic and Inflammatory Responses by Leptospira Spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Mônica L; Naudin, Clément; Mörgelin, Matthias; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T O; Herwald, Heiko

    2016-05-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic and neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern that is caused by pathogenic Leptospira species. In severe infections, hemostatic impairments such as coagulation/fibrinolysis dysfunction are frequently observed. These complications often occur when the host response is controlled and/or modulated by the bacterial pathogen. In the present investigation, we aimed to analyze the modulation of the hemostatic and inflammatory host responses by the bacterial pathogen Leptospira. The effects of leptospires and their secreted products on stimulation of human intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation were investigated by means of altered clotting times, assembly and activation of contact system and induction of tissue factor. We show that both extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation cascades are modulated in response to Leptospira or leptospiral secreted proteins. We further find that the pro-inflammatory mediator bradykinin is released following contact activation at the bacterial surface and that pro-coagulant microvesicles are shed from monocytes in response to infection. Also, we show that human leptospirosis patients present higher levels of circulating pro-coagulant microvesicles than healthy individuals. Here we show that both pathways of the coagulation system are modulated by leptospires, possibly leading to altered hemostatic and inflammatory responses during the disease. Our results contribute to the understanding of the leptospirosis pathophysiological mechanisms and may open new routes for the discovery of novel treatments for the severe manifestations of the disease. PMID:27167223

  4. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: Identification of cell-type specific inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the ...

  5. Quercetin Reduces Inflammatory Responses in LPS-Stimulated Cardiomyoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Angeloni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids possess several biological and pharmacological activities. Quercetin (Q, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been shown to downregulate inflammatory responses and provide cardioprotection. However, the mechanisms behind the anti-inflammatory properties of Q in cardiac cells are poorly understood. In inflammation, nitric oxide (NO acts as a proinflammatory mediator and is synthesized by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in response to pro-inflammatory agents such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a causative agent in myocardial depression during sepsis. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effect of Q on rat cardiac dysfunction during sepsis induced by LPS. Pretreatment of H9c2 cardiomyoblasts with Q inhibited LPS-induced iNOS expression and NO production and counteracted oxidative stress caused by the unregulated NO production that leads to the generation of peroxynitrite and other reactive nitrogen species. In addition, Q pretreatment significantly counteracted apoptosis cell death as measured by immunoblotting of the cleaved caspase 3 and caspase 3 activity. Q also inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of the stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPK and p38 MAP kinase that are involved in the inhibition of cell growth as well as the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q might serve as a valuable protective agent in cardiovascular inflammatory diseases.

  6. Comorbidity between depression and inflammatory bowel disease explained by immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress; tryptophan catabolite; and gut-brain pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Subero, Marta; Anderson, George; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The nature of depression has recently been reconceptualized, being conceived as the clinical expression of activated immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways, including tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT), autoimmune, and gut-brain pathways. IO&NS pathways are similarly integral to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The increased depression prevalence in IBD associates with a lower quality of life and increased morbidity in IBD, highlighting the role of depression in modulating the pathophysiology of IBD.This review covers data within such a wider conceptualization that better explains the heightened co-occurrence of IBD and depression. Common IO&NS underpinning between both disorders is evidenced by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, eg, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 trans-signalling; Th-1- and Th-17-like responses; neopterin and soluble IL-2 receptor levels; positive acute phase reactants (haptoglobin and C-reactive protein); lowered levels of negative acute phase reactants (albumin, transferrin, zinc) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β); increased O&NS with damage to lipids, proteinsm and DNA; increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase; lowered plasma tryptophan but increased TRYCAT levels; autoimmune responses; and increased bacterial translocation. As such, heightened IO&NS processes in depression overlap with the biological underpinnings of IBD, potentially explaining their increased co-occurrence. This supports the perspective that there is a spectrum of IO&NS disorders that includes depression, both as an emergent comorbidity and as a contributor to IO&NS processes. Such a frame of reference has treatment implications for IBD when "comorbid" with depression.

  7. Comorbidity between depression and inflammatory bowel disease explained by immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress; tryptophan catabolite; and gut-brain pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Subero, Marta; Anderson, George; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The nature of depression has recently been reconceptualized, being conceived as the clinical expression of activated immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways, including tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT), autoimmune, and gut-brain pathways. IO&NS pathways are similarly integral to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The increased depression prevalence in IBD associates with a lower quality of life and increased morbidity in IBD, highlighting the role of depression in modulating the pathophysiology of IBD.This review covers data within such a wider conceptualization that better explains the heightened co-occurrence of IBD and depression. Common IO&NS underpinning between both disorders is evidenced by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, eg, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6 trans-signalling; Th-1- and Th-17-like responses; neopterin and soluble IL-2 receptor levels; positive acute phase reactants (haptoglobin and C-reactive protein); lowered levels of negative acute phase reactants (albumin, transferrin, zinc) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β); increased O&NS with damage to lipids, proteinsm and DNA; increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and inducible NO synthase; lowered plasma tryptophan but increased TRYCAT levels; autoimmune responses; and increased bacterial translocation. As such, heightened IO&NS processes in depression overlap with the biological underpinnings of IBD, potentially explaining their increased co-occurrence. This supports the perspective that there is a spectrum of IO&NS disorders that includes depression, both as an emergent comorbidity and as a contributor to IO&NS processes. Such a frame of reference has treatment implications for IBD when "comorbid" with depression. PMID:26307347

  8. Affective and inflammatory responses among orchestra musicians in performance situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilger, Alexander; Haslacher, Helmuth; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Perkmann, Thomas; Böhm, Karl; Budinsky, Alexandra; Girard, Angelika; Klien, Katharina; Jordakieva, Galateja; Pezawas, Lukas; Wagner, Oswald; Godnic-Cvar, Jasminka; Winker, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A number of studies have shown that mental challenge under controlled experimental conditions is associated with elevations in inflammatory markers such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, relatively little work has been done on the effects of 'naturalistic' stressors on acute changes in inflammatory markers. The present study examined whether perceived arousal, valence and dominance in musicians are associated with pro-inflammatory and oxidative responses to a concert situation. Blood and salivary samples obtained from 48 members of a symphony orchestra on the day of rehearsal (i.e., control situation) and on the following day of premiere concert (i.e., test situation) were used to determine changes in salivary cortisol, pro-inflammatory markers (plasma myeloperoxidase, serum CRP, plasma IL-6), oxidative stress markers (paraoxonase1 activity and malondialdehyde), and homocysteine, a risk factor for vascular disease. Results of regression analyses showed a significant trend to increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) response in individuals with low valence score. Both affective states, valence and arousal, were identified as significant predictors of cortisol response during concert. In addition, control levels of plasma malondialdehyde were positively correlated with differences in IL-6 levels between premiere and rehearsal (r=.38, p=.012), pointing to higher oxidative stress in individuals with pronounced IL-6 response. Our results indicate that stress of public performance leads to increased concentrations of plasma MPO (20%), IL-6 (27%) and salivary cortisol (44%) in musicians. The decreasing effect of pleasantness on the MPO response was highly pronounced in non-smokers (r=-.60, p<.001), suggesting a significant role of emotional valence in stress-induced secretion of MPO. Additional studies are needed to assess the generalizability of these findings to other 'naturalistic' stress situations.

  9. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro;

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair. METHODS: All patients, undergoing elective primary endovascular repair of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurys...... in the groups (3% in the SIRS group vs. none in the non-SIRS group). CONCLUSION: The high incidence of SIRS after EVAR is unexpected considering the minimally invasive procedure. Further studies on the cause of this response and measures to attenuate the response seem appropriate....

  10. The inflammatory response to vaccination is altered in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yousfi, Mimoun; Mercier, Sabine; Breuillé, Denis; Denis, Philippe; Papet, Isabelle; Mirand, Philippe Patureau; Obled, Christiane

    2005-08-01

    To further explore whether immune function and acute phase response are altered during ageing, the response to a mild inflammatory stress (DT-Polio-Typhim vaccination) was studied in elderly and young subjects. Cytokine production (IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10) by whole blood cultures, circulating cytokines and acute phase proteins were analysed before and 2 days after vaccination. Prior to vaccination, only IFN-gamma production was lower in the elderly than in the young subjects due to a lower mononuclear cell number. In the same time, although in the normal range, several acute phase proteins were greater in elderly than in young subjects, suggesting a low-grade inflammatory state in the elderly. After vaccination, IFN-gamma production remained lower in the elderly than in the young, supporting an altered cell-mediated immunity with advancing age. TNF-alpha production was unaffected by either ageing or vaccination. IL-6 production was stimulated by vaccination in young subjects but not significantly in the elderly. IL-10 production was inhibited by vaccination in the elderly but not in the young. Acute phase proteins were less increased in elderly than in young subjects. Taken together, these results support a general lack of inflammatory response in the elderly exposed to an immune challenge and suggest that immune deficiency may concern both Th1 and Th2 responses. However, the interpretation must respect the limitation of small subjects number.

  11. How stem cells speak with host immune cells in inflammatory brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2013-09-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases.

  12. Fetal cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway and necrotizing enterocolitis: the brain-gut connection begins in utero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eGarzoni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is an acute neonatal inflammatory disease that affects the intestine and may result in necrosis, systemic sepsis and multisystem organ failure. NEC affects 5-10% of all infants with birth weight ≤ 1500 g or gestational age less than 30 weeks. Chorioamnionitis (CA is the main manifestation of pathological inflammation in the fetus and is strongly associated with NEC. CA affects 20% of full-term pregnancies and up to 60% of preterm pregnancies and, notably, is often an occult finding. Intrauterine exposure to inflammatory stimuli may switch innate immunity cells such as macrophages to a reactive phenotype (‘priming’. Confronted with renewed inflammatory stimuli during labour or postnatally, such sensitized cells can sustain a chronic or exaggerated production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with NEC (two-hit hypothesis. Via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a neurally mediated innate anti-inflammatory mechanism, higher levels of vagal activity are associated with lower systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This effect is mediated by the α7 subunit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR on macrophages. The gut is the most extensive organ innervated by the vagus nerve; it is also the primary site of innate immunity in the newborn. Here we review the mechanisms of possible neuroimmunological brain-gut interactions involved in the induction and control of antenatal intestinal inflammatory response and priming. We propose a neuroimmunological framework to 1 study the long-term effects of perinatal intestinal response to infection and 2 to uncover new targets for preventive and therapeutic intervention.

  13. Benfotiamine Attenuates Inflammatory Response in LPS Stimulated BV-2 Microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Laketa, Danijela; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Milenkovic, Ivan; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), recognized as key elements in the regulation of neural homeostasis and the response to injury and repair. As excessive activation of microglia may lead to neurodegeneration, therapeutic strategies targeting its inhibition were shown to improve treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Benfotiamine is a synthetic vitamin B1 (thiamine) derivate exerting potentially anti-inflammatory effects. Despite the encouraging results regarding benfotiamine potential to alleviate diabetic microangiopathy, neuropathy and other oxidative stress-induced pathological conditions, its activities and cellular mechanisms during microglial activation have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of benfotiamine were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine BV-2 microglia. We determined that benfotiamine remodels activated microglia to acquire the shape that is characteristic of non-stimulated BV-2 cells. In addition, benfotiamine significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO; cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor alpha α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), whereas it increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) production in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia. Moreover, benfotiamine suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and protein kinase B Akt/PKB. Treatment with specific inhibitors revealed that benfotiamine-mediated suppression of NO production was via JNK1/2 and Akt pathway, while the cytokine suppression includes ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt pathways. Finally, the potentially protective effect is mediated by the suppression of translocation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the nucleus. Therefore, benfotiamine may

  14. The relationship between inflammatory activity and brain atrophy in natalizumab treated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magraner, M., E-mail: majomagbe@ono.com [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Bulevar Sur s/n, 46026 Valencia (Spain); Coret, F., E-mail: coret_fra@gva.es [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clinic de Valencia, Avda Blasco Ibanez 17, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Casanova, B., E-mail: Casanova_bon@gva.es [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Bulevar Sur s/n, 46026 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To assess the evolution of brain atrophy and its relationship with inflammatory activity in RRMS patients treated with natalizumab. Methods: Eighteen RRMS patients were prospectively followed up for 18 months after starting natalizumab therapy. Patients were monitored monthly and assessed for signs of relapses, adverse events or disability increase. MRI scans were performed before starting natalizumab and every six months. Cross-sectional T2 lesion volume (T2LV) and the normalized brain volume (NBV) at baseline and 18 months MRI scans were calculated using the Steronauta{sup Registered-Sign} and SIENAx softwares, respectively. Longitudinal Percentage of Brain Volume Change (PBVC) was estimated with SIENA. Linkage between inflammatory activity and brain atrophy was studied. Results: Natalizumab reduced ARR by 67% and cumulative CEL by 87.5%. T2 lesion volume decreased from 1000 mm{sup 3}, to 960 mm{sup 3} (p = 0.006) and NBV decreased from 1.55 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} mm{sup 3} to 1.42 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} mm{sup 3} (p = 0.025). Global PBVC from baseline to 18 months was -2.5%, predominantly during the first six months (0-6 months PBVC -1.7%; 6-12 months PBVC -0.74%; 12-18 months PBVC -0.50%). The number of relapses before treatment was correlated to the PBVC during the first semester (Pearson's coefficient -0.520, p = 0.003), while the number of basal CEL or baseline T2LV did not correlate with brain atrophy rate. During follow-up, nine patients had clinical or radiological inflammatory activity. Their PBVC was significantly higher in the first semester (-2.3% to -1.1%, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Natalizumab reduced relapse rate and CEL in MRI. Brain atrophy predominated in the first semester and was related to previous inflammatory activity.

  15. Propolis derivatives inhibit the systemic inflammatory response and protect hepatic and neuronal cells in acute septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Abdelhamid Korish

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe pathogenic infection triggers excessive release of cytokines as part of the massive inflammatory response associated with septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the protective effect of caffeic acid phenethye ester (CAPE against lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced endotoxemia, hepatic and neuronal damage and the associated systemic inflammatory response (SIR. METHODS: Fifty male Wister rats were divided into: control, LPS, and CAPE+LPS groups. Plasma concentrations of various cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-4, IL-10, and sICAM-1 were evaluated. In addition, the histopathological changes in the hepatic and neural cells were assessed. RESULTS: The LPS group showed high inflammatory cytokines and sICAM-1 levels reflecting the presence of SIR. Hepatocyte necrosis, apoptosis, extensive hemorrhage and inflammatory cellular infiltration together with brain astrocytes swelling, early neuron injury and presence of inflammatory foci confirmed the toxic tissue damage. Use of CAPE decreased the inflammatory cytokines and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokines levels. This biochemical evidence of decreased SIR was confirmed histologically by decreased cellular infiltration in the liver and brain tissue which coincides with preserved structure and protection of the liver and brain cells from the toxic effects of LPS. CONCLUSION: The ability of CAPE to alleviate the SIR, hepatic and neuronal cell damage induced by LPS and galactosamine could be attributed to its ability to reverse the imbalance of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which may lead to the inhibition of adhesion molecules' expression. CAPE is a promising agent that could help in the prophylaxis and treatment of septic shock.

  16. Circulating Mitochondrial DAMPs Cause Inflammatory Responses to Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qin; Raoof, Mustafa; Chen, Yu; Sumi, Yuka; Sursal, Tolga; Junger, Wolfgang; Brohi, Karim; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J.

    2010-01-01

    Injury causes a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) clinically much like sepsis 1. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activate innate immunocytes through pattern recognition receptors 2. Similarly, cellular injury can release endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that activate innate immunity 3. Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts that were derived from bacteria 4 and so might bear bacterial molecular motifs. We show here that injury ...

  17. Itch expression by Treg cells controls Th2 inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Hyung-Seung; Park, Yoon; Elly, Chris; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain immune homeostasis by limiting autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Treg differentiation, maintenance, and function are controlled by the transcription factor Foxp3. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying Treg cell regulation remain elusive. Here, we show that Treg cell–specific ablation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch in mice caused massive multiorgan lymphocyte infiltration and skin lesions, chronic T cell activation, and the development of s...

  18. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke ou...

  19. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a case of septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Gentiloni Silveri

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available An elderly, diabetic male, with severe sepsis, swiftly treated with antibiotics that were efficacious in vitro against the E. Coli isolated in his blood, rapidly slides into multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and dies of septic shock after a month in intensive care, despite receiving appropriate pain relief and aetiopathogenetic therapy. This event provides us with the opportunity to take a new look at systemic inflammatory response syndrome and a critical review of the relative therapy

  20. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a case of septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolò Gentiloni Silveri; Luigi Carbone

    2008-01-01

    An elderly, diabetic male, with severe sepsis, swiftly treated with antibiotics that were efficacious in vitro against the E. Coli isolated in his blood, rapidly slides into multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and dies of septic shock after a month in intensive care, despite receiving appropriate pain relief and aetiopathogenetic therapy. This event provides us with the opportunity to take a new look at systemic inflammatory response syndrome and a critical review of the relative therapy

  1. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  2. Berberine inhibits inflammatory activation of rat brain microglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyong Nyon Nam; Jae-Hong Kim; Hoon-Ji Jung; Jung-Mi Park; Sang-Kwan Moon; Young-Suk Kim; Sun Yeou Kim; Eunjoo H.Lee

    2010-01-01

    Chronic activation of microglial cells endangers neuronal survival through the release of various proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors.Berberine,the effective ingredient of Coptidis Rhizoma and Cortex Phellodendri,has a wide range of pharmacological functions,including anti-inflammatory,anti-atherosclerotic and anti-cancer effects.The neuroprotective potential of berberine has previously been demonstrated.The present study aimed to examine whether berberine could repress microglial activation and can be considered a potential therapeutic candidate to target neurodegenerative diseases.Primary microglial cells and BV2 microglial cells were cultured and stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide(LPS).Berberine chloride was treated prior to LPS or simultaneously with LPS stimulation.Results revealed that berberine was effective at inhibiting nitric oxide release from primary microglial cells when cells were exposed to the compound prior to LPS or simultaneously with LPS.It also reduced the LPS-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor-α,interleukin-1β,prostaglandin E2,and intracellular reactive oxygen species and nuclear factor-kappa activation.Additionally,berberine reduced nitric oxide release from microglia stimulated with interferon-γ and amyloid β.These results suggest that berberine provides neuroprotection by reducing the production of various neurotoxic molecules from activated microglia.

  3. Exercise-induced hippocampal anti-inflammatory response in aged rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; Simões, Priscila Santos Rodrigues; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; da Graça Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive decline, memory impairment and an increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders. Most of these age-related alterations have been associated with deleterious processes such as changes in the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Indeed, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lower levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines are found in the aged brain. This perturbation in pro- and anti-inflammatory balance can represent one of the mechanism...

  4. The Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) in acutely hospitalised medical patients: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comstedt, Pal; Storgaard, Merete; Lassen, Annmarie T

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sepsis is an infection which has evoked a systemic inflammatory response. Clinically, the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is identified by two or more symptoms including fever or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnoea and change in blood leucocyte count. The...

  5. Systemic inflammatory responses during laparoscopic and open inguinal hernia repair: a randomised prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; Schultz, Karen; Bendtzen, K;

    2000-01-01

    To see if the inflammatory responses during and after laparoscopic and open inguinal hernia repairs differed.......To see if the inflammatory responses during and after laparoscopic and open inguinal hernia repairs differed....

  6. Inflammatory Biomarkers as Differential Predictors of Antidepressant Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hashimoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although antidepressants are generally effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, it can still take weeks before patients feel the full antidepressant effects. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, approximately two-thirds of patients with MDD fail to respond to pharmacotherapy. Therefore, the identification of blood biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to antidepressants would be highly useful in order to improve this situation. This article discusses inflammatory molecules as predictive biomarkers for antidepressant responses to several classes of antidepressants, including the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine.

  7. Defining the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in Equine Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David M; Wilkins, Pamela A

    2015-12-01

    Defining and describing the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis facilitated recognition and investigation of the complex disease processes involving the host response to infection and trauma. Over the years a variety of definitions of SIRS have been examined and applied to numerous research studies to improve critical care in both human and veterinary clinical practice. This article summarizes the history of the development of the SIRS definition, outlines the pathophysiologic processes that are involved in SIRS, and provides a specific definition for use in foal medicine. PMID:26612743

  8. Inflammatory response to strenuous muscular exercise in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Camus

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the humoral and cellular changes occurring during strenuous muscular work in humans, the concept of inflammatory response to exercise (IRE is developed. The main indices of IRE consist of signs of an acute phase response, leucocytosis and leucocyte activation, release of inflammatory mediators, tissue damage and cellular infiltrates, production of free radicals, activation of complement, and coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. Depending on exercise intensity and duration, it seems likely that muscle and/or associated connective tissue damage, contact system activation due to shear stress on endothelium and endotoxaemia could be the triggering mechanisms of IRE. Although this phenomenon can be considered in most cases as a physiological process associated with tissue repair, exaggerated IRE could have physiopathological consequences. On the other hand, the influence of several factors such as age, sex, training, hormonal status, nutrition, anti-inflammatory drugs, and the extent to which IRE could be a potential risk for subjects undergoing intense physical training require further study.

  9. DMPD: Cytokine signaling modules in inflammatory responses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18400190 Cytokine signaling modules in inflammatory responses. O'Shea JJ, Murray PJ.... Immunity. 2008 Apr;28(4):477-87. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cytokine signaling modules in inflammatory... responses. PubmedID 18400190 Title Cytokine signaling modules in inflammatory responses. Authors O'Shea

  10. Effects of resistance training on the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Mariana C; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2010-08-01

    Resistance training (RT) is associated with reduced risk of low grade inflammation related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The majority of the data studying cytokines and exercise comes from endurance exercise. In contrast, evidence establishing a relationship between RT and inflammation is more limited. This review focuses on the cytokine responses both following an acute bout, and after chronic RT. In addition, the effect of RT on low grade systemic inflammation such as individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes is reviewed. Cytokines are secreted proteins that influence the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of immune cells and other organ systems. Cytokines function as intracellular signals and almost all cells in the body either secrete them or have cytokine receptors. Thus, understanding cytokine role in a specific physiological situation such as a bout of RT can be exceedingly complex. The overall effect of long term RT appears to ameliorate inflammation, but the specific effects on the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha are not clear, requiring further research. Furthermore, it is critical to differentiate between chronically and acute Interleukin-6 levels and its sources. The intensity of the RT and the characteristics of the training protocol may exert singular cytokine responses and as a result different adaptations to exercise. More research is needed in the area of RT in healthy populations, specifically sorting out gender and age RT acute responses. More importantly, studies are needed in obese individuals who are at high risk of developing low grade systemic inflammatory related diseases. Assuring adherence to the RT program is essential to get the benefits after overcoming the first acute RT responses. Hence RT could be an effective way to prevent, and delay low grade systemic inflammatory related diseases. PMID:20827340

  11. Effects of realgar on stress proteins, inflammatory mediators, and complement in brain tissue and serum of rats with inflammatory brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yishan Tang; Ningsheng Wang; Yinqing Zhang; Shaomei Ye; Weiping Ou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Chinese herbal compound realgar exerts detoxification effects as an adjuvant. It is suggested that realgar exerts detoxification via the following pathways: in the pathological state, realgar corrects the oxidative stress state by increasing stress levels, activating some endogenous protective factors and antagonizing the excessive release of inflammatory factors, as well as inhibiting complement activation.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes in stress proteins, inflammatory mediators, and complement in the brain tissue and serum of rats with inflammatory brain injury, which have been treated with thc Chinese herbal compound Angong Niuhuang, and to compare the efficacy of Angong Niuhuang with that of realgar,to verify the mechanism of action of realgar.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled, cytological experiment, performed in the Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in March 2006.MATERIALS: Thirty-six healthy, male, Sprague Dawley rats received 250 U/kg Bordetella pertussis via the common carotid artery within 15 seconds to induce inflammatory brain injury. Reagents and kits were as follows: Realgar and Angong Niuhuang powder (Foshan Second Pharmaceutical Factory, China), Bordetella pertussis diagnostic antigen (National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products,China), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit (Stressgen, USA),tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) ELISA kit (Biosource, USA), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) kit,Coomassie brilliant blue protein kit (Nanjing Jiancheng Bioengineering Co.,Ltd., China), and complements C3 and C4 (Shanghai Kehua Dongling Diagnositic Products Co.,Ltd., China),METHODS: Thirty-six rats were randomly and evenly divided into the following six groups: normal control,model, high-, middle-, and low-dose realgar-treated, and Angong Niuhuang-treated groups. At one hour prior to establishing the model

  12. Successful use of inhaled nitric oxide to decrease intracranial pressure in a patient with severe traumatic brain injury complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome: a role for an anti-inflammatory mechanism?

    OpenAIRE

    Medhkour Azedine; Papadimos Thomas J; Yermal Sooraj

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Use of inhaled nitric oxide in humans with traumatic brain injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome has twice previously been reported to be beneficial. Here we report a third case. We propose that INO may decrease the inflammatory response in patients with increased intracranial pressure caused by traumatic brain injury accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome thereby contributing to improved outcomes.

  13. Benfotiamine attenuates inflammatory response in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Bozic

    Full Text Available Microglial cells are resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS, recognized as key elements in the regulation of neural homeostasis and the response to injury and repair. As excessive activation of microglia may lead to neurodegeneration, therapeutic strategies targeting its inhibition were shown to improve treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Benfotiamine is a synthetic vitamin B1 (thiamine derivate exerting potentially anti-inflammatory effects. Despite the encouraging results regarding benfotiamine potential to alleviate diabetic microangiopathy, neuropathy and other oxidative stress-induced pathological conditions, its activities and cellular mechanisms during microglial activation have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of benfotiamine were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated murine BV-2 microglia. We determined that benfotiamine remodels activated microglia to acquire the shape that is characteristic of non-stimulated BV-2 cells. In addition, benfotiamine significantly decreased production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and NO; cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70, tumor necrosis factor alpha α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, whereas it increased anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10 production in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia. Moreover, benfotiamine suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and protein kinase B Akt/PKB. Treatment with specific inhibitors revealed that benfotiamine-mediated suppression of NO production was via JNK1/2 and Akt pathway, while the cytokine suppression includes ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt pathways. Finally, the potentially protective effect is mediated by the suppression of translocation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB in the nucleus. Therefore

  14. Platelets in Pulmonary Immune Responses and Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A

    2016-10-01

    Platelets are essential for physiological hemostasis and are central in pathological thrombosis. These are their traditional and best known activities in health and disease. In addition, however, platelets have specializations that broaden their functional repertoire considerably. These functional capabilities, some of which are recently discovered, include the ability to sense and respond to infectious and immune signals and to act as inflammatory effector cells. Human platelets and platelets from mice and other experimental animals can link the innate and adaptive limbs of the immune system and act across the immune continuum, often also linking immune and hemostatic functions. Traditional and newly recognized facets of the biology of platelets are relevant to defensive, physiological immune responses of the lungs and to inflammatory lung diseases. The emerging view of platelets as blood cells that are much more diverse and versatile than previously thought further predicts that additional features of the biology of platelets and of megakaryocytes, the precursors of platelets, will be discovered and that some of these will also influence pulmonary immune defenses and inflammatory injury. PMID:27489307

  15. Non inflammatory boronate based glucose-responsive insulin delivery systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Boronic acids, known to bind diols, were screened to identify non-inflammatory cross-linkers for the preparation of glucose sensitive and insulin releasing agglomerates of liposomes (Agglomerated Vesicle Technology-AVT. This was done in order to select a suitable replacement for the previously used cross-linker, ConcanavalinA (ConA, a lectin known to have both toxic and inflammatory effects in vivo. Lead-compounds were selected from screens that involved testing for inflammatory potential, cytotoxicity and glucose-binding. These were then conjugated to insulin-encapsulating nanoparticles and agglomerated via sugar-boronate ester linkages to form AVTs. In vitro, the particles demonstrated triggered release of insulin upon exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of glucose (10 mmoles/L-40 mmoles/L. The agglomerates were also shown to be responsive to multiple spikes in glucose levels over several hours, releasing insulin at a rate defined by the concentration of the glucose trigger.

  16. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  17. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  18. Endotoxin-induced monocytic microparticles have contrasting effects on endothelial inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beryl Wen

    Full Text Available Septic shock is a severe disease state characterised by the body's life threatening response to infection. Complex interactions between endothelial cells and circulating monocytes are responsible for microvasculature dysfunction contributing to the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Here, we intended to determine whether microparticles derived from activated monocytes contribute towards inflammatory processes and notably vascular permeability. We found that endotoxin stimulation of human monocytes enhances the release of microparticles of varying phenotypes and mRNA contents. Elevated numbers of LPS-induced monocytic microparticles (mMP expressed CD54 and contained higher levels of transcripts for pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-6 and IL-8. Using a prothrombin time assay, a greater reduction in plasma coagulation time was observed with LPS-induced mMP than with non-stimulated mMP. Co-incubation of mMP with the human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 triggered their time-dependent uptake and significantly enhanced endothelial microparticle release. Unexpectedly, mMP also modified signalling pathways by diminishing pSrc (tyr416 expression and promoted endothelial monolayer tightness, as demonstrated by endothelial impedance and permeability assays. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that LPS-induced mMP have contrasting effects on the intercellular communication network and display a dual potential: enhanced pro-inflammatory and procoagulant properties, together with protective function of the endothelium.

  19. Attachment avoidance predicts inflammatory responses to marital conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Glaser, Ronald; Loving, Timothy J; Malarkey, William B; Stowell, Jeffrey; Houts, Carrie; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2009-10-01

    Marital stress has been associated with immune dysregulation, including increased production of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Attachment style, one's expectations about the availability and responsiveness of others in intimate relationships, appears to influence physiological stress reactivity and thus could influence inflammatory responses to marital conflict. Thirty-five couples were invited for two 24-h admissions to a hospital research unit. The first visit included a structured social support interaction, while the second visit comprised the discussion of a marital disagreement. A mixed effect within-subject repeated measure model indicated that attachment avoidance significantly influenced IL-6 production during the conflict visit but not during the social support visit. Individuals with higher attachment avoidance had on average an 11% increase in total IL-6 production during the conflict visit as compared to the social support visit, while individuals with lower attachment avoidance had, on average, a 6% decrease in IL-6 production during the conflict visit as compared to the social support visit. Furthermore, greater attachment avoidance was associated with a higher frequency of negative behaviors and a lower frequency of positive behaviors during the marital interaction, providing a mechanism by which attachment avoidance may influence inflammatory responses to marital conflict. In sum, these results suggest that attachment avoidance modulates marital behavior and stress-induced immune dysregulation. PMID:18952163

  20. Sex differences in the inflammatory response of primary astrocytes to lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos-Galindo María

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders show sex differences in incidence, age of onset, symptomatology or outcome. Astrocytes, one of the glial cell types of the brain, show sex differences in number, differentiation and function. Since astrocytes are involved in the response of neural tissue to injury and inflammation, these cells may participate in the generation of sex differences in the response of the brain to pathological insults. To explore this hypothesis, we have examined whether male and female astrocytes show a different response to an inflammatory challenge and whether perinatal testosterone influences this response. Methods Cortical astrocyte cultures were prepared from postnatal day 1 (one day after birth male or female CD1 mice pups. In addition, cortical astrocyte cultures were also prepared from female pups that were injected at birth with 100 μg of testosterone propionate or vehicle. Cultures were treated for 5 hours with medium containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS or with control medium. The mRNA levels of IL6, interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP10, TNFα, IL1β, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and translocator protein were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Statistical significance was assessed by unpaired t-test or by one-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey post hoc test. Results The mRNA levels of IL6, TNFα and IL1β after LPS treatment were significantly higher in astrocytes derived from male or androgenized females compared to astrocytes derived from control or vehicle-injected females. In contrast, IP10 mRNA levels after LPS treatment were higher in astrocytes derived from control or vehicle-injected females than in those obtained from males or androgenized females. The different response of male and female astrocytes to LPS was due neither to differences in the basal expression of the inflammatory molecules nor to

  1. Perivascular Spaces--MRI Marker of Inflammatory Activity in the Brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerfel, Jens; Haertle, Mareile; Waiczies, Helmar; Tysiak, Eva; Bechmann, Ingo; Wernecke, Klaus D.; Zipp, Frauke; Paul, Friedemann

    2008-01-01

    The Virchow-Robin spaces (VRS), perivascular compartments surrounding small blood vessels as they penetrate the brain parenchyma, are increasingly recognized for their role in leucocyte trafficking as well as for their potential to modulate immune responses. In the present study, we investigated VRS numbers and volumes in different brain regions…

  2. BRAIN STEM EVOKED RESPONSE AUDIOMETRY A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem evoked response audiometry (BERA is a useful objective assessment of hearing. Major advantage of this procedure is its ability to test even infants in whom conventional audiometry may not be useful. This investigation can be used as a screening test for deafness in high risk infants. Early diagnosis and rehabilitation will reduce disability in these children. This article attempts to review the published literature on this subject.

  3. Auditory brain-stem responses in syphilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenhall, U; Roupe, G

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of auditory brain-stem electrical responses (BSER) provides an effective means of detecting lesions in the auditory pathways. In the present study the wave patterns were analysed in 11 patients with secondary or latent syphilis with no clinical symptoms referrable to the central nervous system and in two patients with congenital syphilis and general paralysis. Decreased amplitudes and prolonged latencies occurred frequently in patients with secondary and with advanced syphilis. This ...

  4. The burn wound inflammatory response is influenced by midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, George F; Hernandez, Laura; Yadav, Ekta; Schwemberger, Sandy; Dugan, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Burn patients requiring hospitalization are often treated for anxiety with benzodiazepines (BDZs). Benzodiazepines are reported to influence immune system function. Immune system alterations are a major cause of burn-induced mortality. We wanted to determine whether the BDZ, midazolam given daily at an anxiolytic dose, had any influence on the burn injury-induced inflammatory response in the blood and wound. Mice received a 15% total body surface area flame burn and received either midazolam 1 mg/kg i.p. or saline 0.1 ml daily. Blood and skin wounds were harvested 24 h after injection on post-burn day 2, 3, 7, or 8. Mice treated with midazolam had significantly lower serum IL-1β (p=0.002), TNF-α (p=0.002), IL-6 (p=0.016), IL-10 (p=0.009), and TGF-β (p=0.004) than saline-treated mice, with little impact on serum chemokine levels. In the wound, TNF-α and IL-10 were the only cytokines significantly influenced by the drug, being lower (p=0.018) and higher (p=0.006), respectively. The chemokines in the wound influenced significantly by midazolam were MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and MIP-2 while MCP-1 and KC were not. There were more inflammatory cells at the burn wound margin in midazolam-treated mice on post-burn day 3. Although serum nitrate/nitrite was significantly increased by midazolam (p=0.03), both eNOS and iNOS mRNA expression in the wound were similar to the saline group. We found that midazolam given daily after burn injury significantly influenced the inflammatory response. The clinical implications of these findings on wound healing and shock following burn injury, especially larger burns, deserve further investigation.

  5. Inflammatory and Bone Remodeling Responses to the Cytolethal Distending Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios N. Belibasakis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs are a family of exotoxins produced by a wide range of Gram-negative bacteria. They are known for causing genotoxic stress to the cell, resulting in growth arrest and eventually apoptotic cell death. Nevertheless, there is evidence that CDTs can also perturb the innate immune responses, by regulating inflammatory cytokine production and molecular mediators of bone remodeling in various cell types. These cellular and molecular events may in turn have an effect in enhancing local inflammation in diseases where CDT-producing bacteria are involved, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus ducreyi, Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter hepaticus. One special example is the induction of pathological bone destruction in periodontitis. The opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibatcer actinoycemetemcomitans, which is involved in the aggressive form of the disease, can regulate the molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling in a manner that favors bone resorption, with the potential involvement of its CDT. The present review provides an overview of all known to-date inflammatory or bone remodeling responses of CDTs produced by various bacterial species, and discusses their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of the associated diseases.

  6. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; González-Canudas, Jorge; Alba, Erika; Santillán-Ballesteros, René; Morales-Barquet, Deneb; Sandoval-Plata, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age). A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators), and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines) were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines) were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation. PMID:27293317

  7. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Segura-Cervantes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age and very preterm (VPT neonates (<32 weeks of gestational age. A cross-sectional study was designed to prospectively follow PT and VPT neonates at risk of developing sepsis. Plasma concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 were detected using flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP and the complex SC5b-9 were detected in the plasma using commercial kits. A total of 83 patients were included. The laboratory results and clinical histories showed that 26 patients had sepsis; 14 were VPT, and 12 were PT. The levels of C-RP, SC5b-9 (innate immune response mediators, and IL-10 or IL-4 (anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated during sepsis in both groups. IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6 (proinflammatory cytokines were differentially elevated only in PT neonates. The VPT neonates with sepsis presented increases in C-RP, SC5b-9, and anti-inflammatory cytokines but not in proinflammatory cytokines, whereas PT neonates showed increases in all studied mediators of inflammation.

  8. Iodinated contrast media alter immune responses in pro-inflammatory states.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Hypertonic saline causes a transient elevation of blood osmolality and has been shown to alter cellular inflammatory responses in pro-inflammatory states. Intravascular administration of iodine contrast media also causes a transient elevation of blood osmolarity.

  9. The impact of intermittent umbilical cord occlusions on the inflammatory response in pre-term fetal sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Prout

    Full Text Available Fetal hypoxic episodes may occur antepartum with the potential to induce systemic and cerebral inflammatory responses thereby contributing to brain injury. We hypothesized that intermittent umbilical cord occlusions (UCOs of sufficient severity but without cumulative acidosis will lead to a fetal inflammatory response. Thirty-one chronically instrumented fetal sheep at ∼0.85 of gestation underwent four consecutive days of hourly UCOs from one to three minutes duration for six hours each day. Maternal and fetal blood samples were taken for blood gases/pH and plasma interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 levels. Animals were euthanized at the end of experimental study with brain tissue processed for subsequent counting of microglia and mast cells. Intermittent UCOs resulted in transitory fetal hypoxemia with associated acidemia which progressively worsened the longer umbilical blood flow was occluded, but with no cumulative blood gas or pH changes over the four days of study. Fetal arterial IL-1β and IL-6 values showed no significant change regardless of the severity of the UCOs, nor was there any evident impact on the microglia and mast cell counts for any of the brain regions studied. Accordingly, intermittent UCOs of up to three minutes duration with severe, but limited fetal hypoxemia and no cumulative acidemia, do not result in either a systemic or brain inflammatory response in the pre-term ovine fetus. However, fetal IL-1B and IL-6 values were found to be well correlated with corresponding maternal values supporting the placenta as a primary source for these cytokines with related secretion into both circulations. Female fetuses were also found to have higher IL-1β levels than males, indicating that gender may impact on the fetal inflammatory response to various stimuli.

  10. Inflammatory response in laparoscopic vs. open surgery for gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Cecilie; Goetze, Jens Peter; Svendsen, Lars Bo;

    2014-01-01

    lead to an increased susceptibility to complications and morbidity. The aim of this review was to investigate if laparoscopic surgery reduces the immunological response compared to open surgery in gastric cancer. METHODS: We conducted a literature search identifying relevant studies comparing...... laparoscopy or laparoscopic-assisted surgery with open gastric surgery. The main outcome was postoperative immunological status defined as surgical stress parameters, including inflammatory cytokines and blood parameters. RESULTS: We identified seven studies that addressed the immunological status in patients...... laparotomy. Finally, most studies reported lower levels of white blood cell count in laparoscopic patients, although this result did not reach statistical significance in a small number of studies. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy-assisted gastric surgery seems to attenuate the immune response compared to open...

  11. Clinical significance of scoring system for systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jian; LIANG Hua-ping

    2006-01-01

    The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and scoring system were defined by the journal of Bone in 1992. SIRS was described as occurrence of two or more clinical criteria in four ones (fever or hypothermia, tachypnea, tachycardia, and leukocytosis).An early diagnosis and estimation of systemic inflammation in patients is helpful for treatment selection. This paper reviews the application of SIRS scoring system, which has been extensively validated for large groups of critical care patients with severe injury and critical surgical diseases.Recent studies have documented SIRS score as a significant predictive parameter of adverse outcome in critical care patients. Furthermore, some studies also give us a suggestion on how to reduce the overload systemic response.

  12. Fracture initiates systemic inflammatory response syndrome through recruiting polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Liu, Jia; Yao, Jianhua; Zhong, Jianfeng; Guo, Lei; Sun, Tiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Fracture, a common type injury in trauma patients, often results in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Though the mechanism of the fracture-initiated SIRS still remains not well characterized, it is well documented that the polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) play an important role in the inflammatory process. We hypothesize that fractures recruit PMN to the local tissue, which is followed by an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and initiation of SIRS. In the current study, we established a closed femoral fracture rat model. We evaluated the levels of MPO, IL-1β and CINC-1 in fractured tissue homogenate, and we measured the levels of IL-6 and IL-10, the biomarkers for systemic inflammatory response, in the rat sera. In clinical part of the study, we collected blood from patients with isolated closed femoral fractures and evaluated PMN-related chemoattractants (IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF) and the number of peripheral PMN. We further evaluated the level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of the patients with fracture. In the animal model of closed femoral fracture, we found a significant recruitment of PMN to the local tissue after fracture, which correlates with the elevated MPO level. We also showed that the concentration of IL-1β and CINC-1 in local tissue is significantly increased and might be responsible for the PMN recruitment. Recruitment of PMN to the local tissue was accompanied with a significant increase in the systemic levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in serum. In the patients with closed femoral fracture, we observed an increase in the number of peripheral PMN and PMN-related chemoattractants, including IL-8, IL-1β and G-CSF. The level of mitochondrial DNA in the local haematoma of fracture and the circulating plasma of patients were significantly higher compared to the healthy volunteers. Our data suggest that fracture released mitochondrial DNA into the local haematoma of

  13. Hyaluronidase modulates inflammatory response and accelerates the cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F; Leite, Marcel N; Bitencourt, Claudia S; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Andrade, Thiago A M; Frade, Marco A C; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  14. Androgen deprivation modulates the inflammatory response induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether radiation (RT)-induced inflammatory responses and organ damage might be modulated by androgen deprivation therapies. The mRNA and tissue sections obtained from the lungs, intestines and livers of irradiated mice with or without androgen deprivation were analyzed by real-time PCR and histological analysis. Activation of NF-kappa B was examined by measuring nuclear protein levels in the intestine and lung 24 h after irradiation. We also examined the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), TGF-β1 and p-AKT to elucidate the related pathway responsible to irradiation (RT) -induced fibrosis. We found androgen deprivation by castration significantly augmented RT-induced inflammation, associated with the increase NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. However, administration of flutamide had no obvious effect on the radiation-induced inflammation response in the lung and intestine. These different responses were probably due to the increase of RT-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression by castration or lupron treatment. In addition, our data suggest that TGF-β1 and the induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to RT-induced fibrosis. When irradiation was given to patients with total androgen deprivation, the augmenting effects on the RT-induced inflammation and fibrosis should take into consideration for complications associated with radiotherapy

  15. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I–IV. Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6 in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses.

  16. Regulation of inflammatory responses by IL-17F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuexian O.; Chang, Seon Hee; Park, Heon; Nurieva, Roza; Shah, Bhavin; Acero, Luis; Wang, Yi-Hong; Schluns, Kimberly S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhu, Zhou; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Although interleukin (IL) 17 has been extensively characterized, the function of IL-17F, which has an expression pattern regulated similarly to IL-17, is poorly understood. We show that like IL-17, IL-17F regulates proinflammatory gene expression in vitro, and this requires IL-17 receptor A, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6, and Act1. In vivo, overexpression of IL-17F in lung epithelium led to infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages and mucus hyperplasia, similar to observations made in IL-17 transgenic mice. To further understand the function of IL-17F, we generated and analyzed mice deficient in IL-17F or IL-17. IL-17, but not IL-17F, was required for the initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Mice deficient in IL-17F, but not IL-17, had defective airway neutrophilia in response to allergen challenge. Moreover, in an asthma model, although IL-17 deficiency reduced T helper type 2 responses, IL-17F–deficient mice displayed enhanced type 2 cytokine production and eosinophil function. In addition, IL-17F deficiency resulted in reduced colitis caused by dextran sulfate sodium, whereas IL-17 knockout mice developed more severe disease. Our results thus demonstrate that IL-17F is an important regulator of inflammatory responses that seems to function differently than IL-17 in immune responses and diseases. PMID:18411338

  17. Androgen deprivation modulates the inflammatory response induced by irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Paul-Yang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether radiation (RT-induced inflammatory responses and organ damage might be modulated by androgen deprivation therapies. Methods The mRNA and tissue sections obtained from the lungs, intestines and livers of irradiated mice with or without androgen deprivation were analyzed by real-time PCR and histological analysis. Activation of NF-kappa B was examined by measuring nuclear protein levels in the intestine and lung 24 h after irradiation. We also examined the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, TGF-β1 and p-AKT to elucidate the related pathway responsible to irradiation (RT -induced fibrosis. Results We found androgen deprivation by castration significantly augmented RT-induced inflammation, associated with the increase NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. However, administration of flutamide had no obvious effect on the radiation-induced inflammation response in the lung and intestine. These different responses were probably due to the increase of RT-induced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression by castration or lupron treatment. In addition, our data suggest that TGF-β1 and the induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may contribute to RT-induced fibrosis. Conclusion When irradiation was given to patients with total androgen deprivation, the augmenting effects on the RT-induced inflammation and fibrosis should take into consideration for complications associated with radiotherapy.

  18. Brain Activity in Response to Visual Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bertamini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have explored visual symmetry processing by measuring event related potentials and neural oscillatory activity. There is a sustained posterior negativity (SPN related to the presence of symmetry. There is also functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI activity in extrastriate visual areas and in the lateral occipital complex. We summarise the evidence by answering six questions. (1 Is there an automatic and sustained response to symmetry in visual areas? Answer: Yes, and this suggests automatic processing of symmetry. (2 Which brain areas are involved in symmetry perception? Answer: There is an extended network from extrastriate areas to higher areas. (3 Is reflection special? Answer: Reflection is the optimal stimulus for a more general regularity-sensitive network. (4 Is the response to symmetry independent of view angle? Answer: When people classify patterns as symmetrical or random, the response to symmetry is view-invariant. When people attend to other dimensions, the network responds to residual regularity in the image. (5 How are brain rhythms in the two hemispheres altered during symmetry perception? Answer: Symmetry processing (rather than presence produces more alpha desynchronization in the right posterior regions. Finally, (6 does symmetry processing produce positive affect? Answer: Not in the strongest sense, but behavioural measures reveal implicit positive evaluation of abstract symmetry.

  19. TRAF-mediated regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family consists of six mammalian members,and is shown to participate in signal transduction of a large number of receptor families including TNF receptor family (TNFR) and Toll-like receptors-interleukin-1 receptors (TLR-IL-1R) family.Upon receptor activation,TRAFs are directly or indirectly recruited to the intracellular domains of these receptors.They subsequently engage other signaling proteins to activate inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) complex,TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and inducible I κB kinase (IKK-i) (also known as IKKε),ultimately leading to activation of transcription factors such as NF-κB and interferon-regulatory factor (IRF) to induce immune and inflammatory responses.

  20. Zinc and inflammatory/immune response in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasto, Sonya; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Malavolta, Marco; Cuppari, Irene; Listì, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Ditta, Vito; Candore, Giuseppina; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-04-01

    Life-long antigenic burden determines a condition of chronic inflammation, with increased lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. A large number of studies have documented changes in zinc metabolism in experimental animal models of acute and chronic inflammation and in human chronic inflammatory conditions. In particular, modification of zinc plasma concentration, as well as intracellular disturbance of antioxidant intracellular pathways, has been found in aging and in some age-related diseases. Zinc deficiency is diffused in aged individuals in order to avoid meat and other high zinc content foods due to fear of cholesterol. Rather, they increase the consumption of refined wheat products that lack zinc and other critical nutrients as a consequence of the refining process. On the other hand, plasma zinc concentration is influenced by proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and by metallothioneins (MT) homeostasis, which is in turn affected by proinflammatory cytokines. MT increase in aging and chronic inflammation allowing a continuous sequestration of intracellular zinc with subsequent low zinc ion availability against stressor agents and inflammation. This phenomenon leads to an impaired inflammatory/immune response in the elderly. A major target of zinc is NF-kappaB, a transcription factor critical for the expression of proinflammatory cytokines whose production is regulated by extra- and intracellular activating and inhibiting factors interacting with the regulatory elements on cytokine genes. Effects of zinc on translocation of NF-kappaB have been attributed to the suppression of phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitory proteins (A20) that normally sequester it in the cytoplasm. Moreover, this factor and A20 are regulated by specific genes involved in inflammation and by intracellular zinc ion availability. So, it is not so surprising that zinc deficiency is constantly observed in chronic inflammation, such as in old

  1. Triggering of inflammasome by aggregated α-synuclein, an inflammatory response in synucleinopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Codolo

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. It is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the brain. Another feature is represented by the formation in these cells of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB, principally constituted by fibrillar α-synuclein (αSyn. This protein is considered a key element in the aetiology of a group of neurodegenerative disorders termed synucleinopathies, which include PD, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved are not completely clear. It is established that the inflammatory process plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis and/or progression of PD; moreover, it is known that aggregated αSyn, released by neurons, activates microglia cells to produce pro-inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β. IL-1β is one of the strongest pro-inflammatory cytokines; it is produced as an inactive mediator, and its maturation and activation requires inflammasome activation. In particular, the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by a wide variety of stimuli, among which are crystallized and particulate material. In this work, we investigated the possibility that IL-1β production, induced by fibrillar αSyn, is involved the inflammasome activation. We demonstrated the competence of monomeric and fibrillar αSyn to induce synthesis of IL-1β, through TLR2 interaction; we found that the secretion of the mature cytokine was a peculiarity of the fibrillated protein. Moreover, we observed that the secretion of IL-1β involves NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The latter relies on the phagocytosis of fibrillar αSyn, followed by increased ROS production and cathepsin B release into the cytosol. Taken together, our data support the notion that fibrillar αSyn, likely released by neuronal degeneration, acts as an endogenous trigger inducing a strong inflammatory response in PD.

  2. IL-35 is a novel responsive anti-inflammatory cytokine--a new system of categorizing anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyuan; Mai, Jietang; Virtue, Anthony; Yin, Ying; Gong, Ren; Sha, Xiaojin; Gutchigian, Stefanie; Frisch, Andrew; Hodge, Imani; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    It remains unknown whether newly identified anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-35 (IL-35) is different from other anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in terms of inhibition of inflammation initiation and suppression of full-blown inflammation. Using experimental database mining and statistical analysis methods we developed, we examined the tissue expression profiles and regulatory mechanisms of IL-35 in comparison to other anti-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that in contrast to TGF-β, IL-35 is not constitutively expressed in human tissues but it is inducible in response to inflammatory stimuli. We also provide structural evidence that AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins and microRNAs target IL-35 subunit transcripts, by which IL-35 may achieve non-constitutive expression status. Furthermore, we propose a new system to categorize anti-inflammatory cytokines into two groups: (1) the house-keeping cytokines, such as TGF-β, inhibit the initiation of inflammation whereas (2) the responsive cytokines including IL-35 suppress inflammation in full-blown stage. Our in-depth analyses of molecular events that regulate the production of IL-35 as well as the new categorization system of anti-inflammatory cytokines are important for the design of new strategies of immune therapies.

  3. Effect of Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation on Early Inflammatory Responses during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na-Young Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory response is considered the most important period that regulates the entire healing process. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, a class of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, is well known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that dietary CLA supplementation accelerates cutaneous wound healing by regulating antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. To investigate wound closure rates and inflammatory responses, we used a full-thickness excisional wound model after 2-week treatments with control, 0.5%, or 1% CLA-supplemented diet. Mice fed dietary CLA supplementation had reduced levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. Moreover, the wound closure rate was improved significantly in mice fed a 1% CLA-supplemented diet during early stage of wound healing (inflammatory stage. We conclude that dietary CLA supplementation enhances the early stage of cutaneous wound healing as a result of modulating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  4. Burn size determines the inflammatory and hypermetabolic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Norbury, William B; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Kulp, Gabriela A; Herndon, David N

    2007-01-01

    Background Increased burn size leads to increased mortality of burned patients. Whether mortality is due to inflammation, hypermetabolism or other pathophysiologic contributing factors is not entirely determined. The purpose of the present study was to determine in a large prospective clinical trial whether different burn sizes are associated with differences in inflammation, body composition, protein synthesis, or organ function. Methods Pediatric burned patients were divided into four burn size groups: 80% TBSA burn. Demographic and clinical data, hypermetabolism, the inflammatory response, body composition, the muscle protein net balance, serum and urine hormones and proteins, and cardiac function and changes in liver size were determined. Results One hundred and eighty-nine pediatric patients of similar age and gender distribution were included in the study (80% TBSA burn, n = 21). Patients with larger burns had more operations, a greater incidence of infections and sepsis, and higher mortality rates compared with the other groups (P 80% TBSA group, followed by the 60–79% TBSA burn group (P 80% burns lost the most body weight, lean body mass, muscle protein and bone mineral content (P < 0.05). The urine cortisol concentration was highest in the 80–99% and 60–79% TBSA burn groups, associated with significant myocardial depression and increased change in liver size (P < 0.05). The cytokine profile showed distinct differences in expression of IL-8, TNF, IL-6, IL-12p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (P < 0.05). Conclusion Morbidity and mortality in burned patients is burn size dependent, starts at a 60% TBSA burn and is due to an increased hypermetabolic and inflammatory reaction, along with impaired cardiac function. PMID:17716366

  5. Modulation of inflammatory response of wounds by antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mrinalini; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Management of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is becoming difficult due to the rapid emergence of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) has a lot of potential as an alternative approach for inactivation of antibiotic resistant bacteria. In this study we report results of our investigations on the effect of poly-L-lysine conjugate of chlorine p6 (pl-cp6) mediated APDT on the healing of P.aeruginosa infected wounds and the role of Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) induced inflammatory response in this process. Materials and method: Excisional wounds created in Swiss albino mice were infected with ∼107 colony forming units of P.aeruginosa. Mice with wounds were divided into three groups: 1) Uninfected, 2) Infected, untreated control (no light, no pl-cp6), 3) Infected, APDT. After 24 h of infection (day 1 post wounding), the wounds were subjected to APDT [pl-cp6 applied topically and exposed to red light (660 ± 25 nm) fluence of ∼ 60 J/cm2]. Subsequent to APDT, on day 2 and 5 post wounding (p.w), measurements were made on biochemical parameters of inflammation [toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4), NF-kB, Inteleukin (IL)-[1α, IL-β, and IL-2)] and cell proliferation [(fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)]. Results: In comparison with untreated control, while expression of TLR-4, NF-kB (p105 and p50), and proinflammatory interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β,IL-2) were reduced in the infected wounds subjected to APDT, the levels of FGF-2 and ALP increased, on day 5 p.w. Conclusion: The measurements made on the inflammatory markers and cell proliferation markers suggest that APDT reduces inflammation caused by P.aeruginosa and promotes cell proliferation in wounds. PMID:26557735

  6. Persistent infiltration and pro-inflammatory differentiation of monocytes cause unresolved inflammation in brain arteriovenous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Han, Zhenying; Degos, Vincent; Shen, Fanxia; Choi, Eun-Jung; Sun, Zhengda; Kang, Shuai; Wong, Michael; Zhu, Wan; Zhan, Lei; Arthur, Helen M; Oh, S Paul; Faughnan, Marie E; Su, Hua

    2016-10-01

    An abnormally high number of macrophages are present in human brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVM) with or without evidence of prior hemorrhage, causing unresolved inflammation that may enhance abnormal vascular remodeling and exacerbate the bAVM phenotype. The reasons for macrophage accumulation at the bAVM sites are not known. We tested the hypothesis that persistent infiltration and pro-inflammatory differentiation of monocytes in angiogenic tissues increase the macrophage burden in bAVM using two mouse models and human monocytes. Mouse bAVM was induced through deletion of AVM causative genes, Endoglin (Eng) globally or Alk1 focally, plus brain focal angiogenic stimulation. An endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cell co-culture system was used to analyze monocyte differentiation in the angiogenic niche. After angiogenic stimulation, the Eng-deleted mice had fewer CD68(+) cells at 2 weeks (P = 0.02), similar numbers at 4 weeks (P = 0.97), and more at 8 weeks (P = 0.01) in the brain angiogenic region compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Alk1-deficient mice also had a trend toward more macrophages/microglia 8 weeks (P = 0.064) after angiogenic stimulation and more RFP(+) bone marrow-derived macrophages than WT mice (P = 0.01). More CD34(+) cells isolated from peripheral blood of patients with ENG or ALK1 gene mutation differentiated into macrophages than those from healthy controls (P < 0.001). These data indicate that persistent infiltration and pro-inflammatory differentiation of monocytes might contribute to macrophage accumulation in bAVM. Blocking macrophage homing to bAVM lesions should be tested as a strategy to reduce the severity of bAVM. PMID:27325285

  7. Tourniquet-induced systemic inflammatory response in extremity surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury in animals produces significant systemic inflammatory effects. This study investigated whether a biologic response occurs in a clinically relevant model of tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective knee arthroscopy were prospectively randomized into controls (no tourniquet) and subjects (tourniquet-controlled). The effects of tourniquet-induced reperfusion on monocyte activation state, neutrophil activation state, and transendothelial migration (TEM) were studied. Changes in the cytokines implicated in reperfusion injury, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-10 were also determined. RESULTS: After 15 minutes of reperfusion, neutrophil and monocyte activation were significantly increased. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pooled subject (ischemia-primed) plasma significantly increased TEM. In contrast, TEM was not significantly altered by ischemia-primed plasma pretreatment of the endothelial monolayer. Significant elevation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1beta were observed in subjects compared with controls after 15 minutes of reperfusion. There was no significant difference in serum IL-10 levels between the groups at all the time points studied. CONCLUSION: These results indicate a transient neutrophil and monocyte activation after tourniquet-ischemia that translates into enhanced neutrophil transendothelial migration with potential for tissue injury.

  8. Is leptin related to systemic inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrés Duarte-Rojo; Ana Lezama-Barreda; Mar(i)a Teresa Ram(i)rez-lglesias; Mario Peláez Luna; Guillermo Robles-Diaz

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between leptin and systemic inflammation in acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis were included. Body mass index and serum samples were obtained at admission. Leptin, TNF-α, IL-6, -8and -10 levels were determined by ELISA. Severity was defined according to Atlanta criteria.RESULTS: Fifty-two (29 females) patients were studied.Overall body mass index was similar between mild and severe cases, although women with severe pancreatitis had lower body mass index (P = 0.04) and men showed higher body mass index (P = 0.05). No difference was found in leptin levels regarding the severity of pancreatitis, but higher levels tended to appear in male patients with increased body mass index and severe pancreatitis (P = 0.1). A multivariate analysis showed no association between leptin levels and severity. The strongest cytokine associated with severity was IL-6.Correlations of leptin with another cytokines only showed a trend for IL-8 (P = 0.058).CONCLUSION: High body mass index was associated with severity only in males, which may be related to android fat distribution. Serum leptin seems not to play a role on the systemic inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis and its association with severe outcome in males might represent a marker of increased adiposity.

  9. Increased mortality in systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients with high levels of coagulation factor VIIa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyseni, A.; Kemperman, H.; De Lange, D. W.; de Groot, P. G.; Linssen, M.; Kesecioglu, J.; Lisman, T.; Roest, M.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundThe tissue factor (TF)- Factor VIIa (FVIIa) complex has a pivotal role in inflammatory and coagulation responses in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Because zymogen FVII (FVII) and FVIIa compete for binding to TF, their plasma levels determine if a c

  10. CD40/CD40L Dyad in the Inflammatory and Immune Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keqiang Chen; Jian Huang; Wanghua Gong; Lingzhi Zhang; Peichu Yu; Ji Ming Wang

    2006-01-01

    CD40 and its cognate ligand (CD40L) are a pair of regulators of pro-inflammatory and immune responses. In the central nervous system (CNS), CD40 is expressed on a variety of cells, including vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes and microglia (the brain macrophages, being the most sensitive cell type to respond to CD40 ligand). Interaction between CD40 on microglia and CD40L presented by infiltrating T lymphocytes and other resident CNS cells triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that promote the production of a wide array of cytokines, chemokines and neurotoxins. Thus, both molecules serve as amplifiers of pro-inflammatory and immune responses in the CNS and constitute important molecular targets for therapeutic intervention of diseases.

  11. Naoxintong dose effects on inflammatory factor expression in the rat brain following focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangjian Zhang; Li Xü; Zuoran Chen; Shuchao Hu; Liying Zhang; Haiyan Li; Ruichun Liu

    2008-01-01

    well as the high-dose, moderate-dose, and low-dose Naoxintong groups at 24 hours, which reached a peak at 48 hours. At 6, 24, 48, 72 hours, and 7 days, brain water content was greater in the ischemic hemisphere of rats from the saline, as well as the high-dose, moderate-dose, and low-dose Naoxintong groups, compared with the sham operation group (P < 0.05). At 24 and 48 hours, brain water content was reduced in the high-dose and moderate-dose Naoxintong groups, compared to the saline and low-dose Naoxintong groups (P < 0.05). In the saline, as well as high-dose, moderate-dose, and low-dose Naoxintong groups, neuronal edema was observed at 6 hours surrounding the ischemic sites. Inflammatory cells appeared at 24 hours, reached a peak at 48 hours, and gradually diminished. A small amount of glial cell proliferation and neuronal degeneration were observed in the hippocampus at 72 hours following infarction. Microglial proliferation and aggregation were detected at 7 days after infarction. Expression of nuclear factor-κB, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor- α, and complement 3 was significantly less in the high-dose, moderate-dose, and low-dose Naoxintong groups, compared to the sham operation group (P < 0.05). Expression of the above-mentioned inflammatory cytokines was lower in rat brain tissues of the high-dose Naoxintong group, compared to the low-dose Naoxintong group (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: High-dose Naoxintong and moderate-dose Naoxintong significantly alleviated rat brain edema and decreased expression of nuclear factor- κB, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor- α, and complement 3 in brain tissues. The protective effect of high-dose Naoxintong was most significant.

  12. Helicobacter hepaticus induces an inflammatory response in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Kleine

    effect of a Helicobacter spp. on human liver cells, resulting in an inflammatory response with increased synthesis of inflammatory mediators and consecutive monocyte activation.

  13. Effects of blood products on inflammatory response in endothelial cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Urner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transfusing blood products may induce inflammatory reactions within the vascular compartment potentially leading to a systemic inflammatory response. Experiments were designed to assess the inflammatory potential of different blood products in an endothelial cell-based in vitro model and to compare baseline levels of potentially activating substances in transfusion products. METHODS: The inflammatory response from pre-activated (endotoxin-stimulated and non-activated endothelial cells as well as neutrophil endothelial transmigration in response to packed red blood cells (PRBC, platelet concentrates (PC and fresh frozen plasma (FFP was determined. Baseline inflammatory mediator and lipid concentrations in blood products were evaluated. RESULTS: Following incubation with all blood products, an increased inflammatory mediator release from endothelial cells was observed. Platelet concentrates, and to a lesser extent also FFP, caused the most pronounced response, which was accentuated in already pre-stimulated endothelial cells. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells as well as blood product-induced migration of neutrophils through the endothelium was in good agreement with the lipid content of the according blood product. CONCLUSION: Within the group of different blood transfusion products both PC and FFP have a high inflammatory potential with regard to activation of endothelial cells. Inflammation upon blood product exposure is strongly accentuated when endothelial cells are pre-injured. High lipid contents in the respective blood products goes along with an accentuated inflammatory reaction from endothelial cells.

  14. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Nak Yoon; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum i...

  15. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  16. Enriched environment decreases microglia and brain macrophages inflammatory phenotypes through adiponectin-dependent mechanisms: Relevance to depressive-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabry, Joëlle; Nicolas, Sarah; Cazareth, Julie; Murris, Emilie; Guyon, Alice; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Heurteaux, Catherine; Petit-Paitel, Agnès

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of neuroinflammation by glial cells plays a major role in the pathophysiology of major depression. While astrocyte involvement has been well described, the role of microglia is still elusive. Recently, we have shown that Adiponectin (ApN) plays a crucial role in the anxiolytic/antidepressant neurogenesis-independent effects of enriched environment (EE) in mice; however its mechanisms of action within the brain remain unknown. Here, we show that in a murine model of depression induced by chronic corticosterone administration, the hippocampus and the hypothalamus display increased levels of inflammatory cytokines mRNA, which is reversed by EE housing. By combining flow cytometry, cell sorting and q-PCR, we show that microglia from depressive-like mice adopt a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by higher expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IκB-α mRNAs. EE housing blocks pro-inflammatory cytokine gene induction and promotes arginase 1 mRNA expression in brain-sorted microglia, indicating that EE favors an anti-inflammatory activation state. We show that microglia and brain-macrophages from corticosterone-treated mice adopt differential expression profiles for CCR2, MHC class II and IL-4recα surface markers depending on whether the mice are kept in standard environment or EE. Interestingly, the effects of EE were abolished when cells are isolated from ApN knock-out mouse brains. When injected intra-cerebroventricularly, ApN, whose level is specifically increased in cerebrospinal fluid of depressive mice raised in EE, rescues microglia phenotype, reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by microglia and blocks depressive-like behavior in corticosterone-treated mice. Our data suggest that EE-induced ApN increase within the brain regulates microglia and brain macrophages phenotype and activation state, thus reducing neuroinflammation and depressive-like behaviors in mice.

  17. Diffusion Based Modeling of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Namazi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Human brain response is the overall ability of the brain in analyzing internal and external stimuli in the form of transferred energy to the mind/brain phase-space and thus, making the proper decisions. During the last decade scientists discovered about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research there was less effort which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling of human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, due to receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equation. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus, this model can be used as a strong representative of the human brain activity.

  18. 重组人脑利钠肽对体外循环心脏瓣膜置换术患者血浆内毒素及全身炎性反应的影响%The effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on the plasma endotoxin and systemic inflammatory response in patients with cardiac valve replacement during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林国强; 罗万俊; 李迎秋; 蒋海河

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on the plasma endotoxin and systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and to explore its mechanism.Methods 32 patients with elective heart valve replacement surgery during cardiopulmonary bypass were divided into a control group and a treatment group randomly.The patients of treatment group were recievel rhBN (1.5 μg · kg-1 · min-1 bolus intravenous injection before aortic cross-clamping followed by 0.0075 μg · kg-1 · min-1 for 24 hours),while the patients of control group received the same volume of 0.9% sodium chloride.The plasma levels of endothelin -1 ( ET-1 ),diamine oxidase(DAO),lipopolysaccharide ( LPS),tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) before skin incision ( T1 ),the end of CPB ( T2 ),4 h after the end of CPB ( T3 ),8 h after the end of CPB (T4),24h after the end of CPB (T5) respectively.Results Before skin incision ( T1 ),plasma ET-1,DAO,LPS,TNF-α of two group patients showed no significant difference ( P > 0.05 ) ; At each time point after the end of CPB ( T2,T3,T4,T5 ) Plasma DAO,LPS,TNF-α levels of two groups patients were significantly higher than before skin incision ( T1 ) levels ( P < 0.01 ).There was no significant difference of the plasma levels of ET-1 between T5 and T1 in treatment group patients ( P =0.24).At each time point after the end of CPB ( T2,T3,T4,T5 ),treatment group patients'plasma ET-1,DAO,LPS,TNF-α levels were significantly lower than the control group respectively (P <0.01 ).The increase in blood ET-1 was highly positive correlated with the increase in blood DAO (r=0.51,P <0.01 ).The increase in blood DAO was highly positive correlated with the increase in blood LPS (r =0.77,P < 0.01 ).The increase in blood LPS was significantly positive correlated with the increase in blood TNF-α ( r =0.48,P <0.01 ).Conclusion Recombinant human brain natriuretic

  19. Inflammatory response and cardioprotection during open-heart surgery: the importance of anaesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Suleiman, M-S; Zacharowski, K; Angelini, G. D.

    2007-01-01

    Open-heart surgery triggers an inflammatory response that is largely the result of surgical trauma, cardiopulmonary bypass, and organ reperfusion injury (e.g. heart). The heart sustains injury triggered by ischaemia and reperfusion and also as a result of the effects of systemic inflammatory mediators. In addition, the heart itself is a source of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species that are likely to contribute to the impairment of cardiac pump function. Formulating strategies ...

  20. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf;

    2015-01-01

    , following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. METHODS: In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface...

  1. Inflammatory cause of metabolic syndrome via brain stress and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a network of medical disorders that greatly increase the risk for developing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, has reached epidemic levels in many areas of today's world. Despite this alarming medicare situation, scientific understandings on the root mechanisms of metabolic syndrome are still limited, and such insufficient knowledge contributes to the relative lack of effective treatments or preventions for related diseases. Recent interdisciplinary studies from neuroendocrinology and neuroimmunology fields have revealed that overnutrition can trigger intracellular stresses to cause inflammatory changes mediated by molecules that control innate immunity. This type of nutrition-related molecular inflammation in the central nervous system, particularly in the hypothalamus, can form a common pathogenic basis for the induction of various metabolic syndrome components such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Proinflammatory NF-κB pathway has been revealed as a key molecular system for pathologic induction of brain inflammation, which translates overnutrition and resulting intracellular stresses into central neuroendocrine and neural dysregulations of energy, glucose, and cardiovascular homeostasis, collectively leading to metabolic syndrome. This article reviews recent research advances in the neural mechanisms of metabolic syndrome and related diseases from the perspective of pathogenic induction by intracellular stresses and NF-κB pathway of the brain. PMID:22328600

  2. Imaging of an inflammatory injury in the newborn rat brain with photoacoustic tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Guevara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The precise assessment of cerebral saturation changes during an inflammatory injury in the developing brain, such as seen in periventricular leukomalacia, is not well defined. This study investigated the impact of inflammation on locoregional cerebral oxygen saturation in a newborn rodent model using photoacoustic imaging. METHODS: 1 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide(LPS diluted in saline or saline alone was injected under ultrasound guidance directly in the corpus callosum of P3 rat pups. Coronal photoacoustic images were carried out 24 h after LPS exposure. Locoregional oxygen saturation (SO2 and resting state connectivity were assessed in the cortex and the corpus callosum. Microvasculature was then evaluated on cryosection slices by lectin histochemistry. RESULTS: Significant reduction of SO2 was found in the corpus callosum; reduced SO2 was also found in the cortex ipsilateral to the injection site. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis showed that bilateral connectivity was not affected by LPS exposure. Changes in locoregional oxygen saturation were accompanied by a significant reduction in the average length of microvessels in the left cortex but no differences were observed in the corpus callosum. CONCLUSION: Inflammation in the developing brain induces marked reduction of locoregional oxygen saturation, predominantly in the white matter not explained by microvascular degeneration. The ability to examine regional saturation offers a new way to monitor injury and understand physiological disturbance non-invasively.

  3. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Madera; Anna Greenshields; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated...

  4. THE REACTION OF SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE IN PREMATURE DETACHMENT OF NORMALLY SITUATED PLACENTA

    OpenAIRE

    KOMILOVA MASTURA SAFAROVNA; PAKHOMOVA ZHANNA EVGENEVNA

    2015-01-01

    The basis of the development of abruption placentas in iparous women without hypertensive response syndrome is a systemic inflammatory response. Reaction of systemic inflammatory response characterized by increased TNF-α enhance in 2,6raz, IL-1β in 3 times, IL-6, 8-fold, as well as index ratios TNFa/IL-10 at 4.1 times and reduces IL-10 in 1,5 times.

  5. Principal component analysis of the cytokine and chemokine response to human traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Helmy

    Full Text Available There is a growing realisation that neuro-inflammation plays a fundamental role in the pathology of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. This has led to the search for biomarkers that reflect these underlying inflammatory processes using techniques such as cerebral microdialysis. The interpretation of such biomarker data has been limited by the statistical methods used. When analysing data of this sort the multiple putative interactions between mediators need to be considered as well as the timing of production and high degree of statistical co-variance in levels of these mediators. Here we present a cytokine and chemokine dataset from human brain following human traumatic brain injury and use principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis to demonstrate the pattern of production following TBI, distinct phases of the humoral inflammatory response and the differing patterns of response in brain and in peripheral blood. This technique has the added advantage of making no assumptions about the Relative Recovery (RR of microdialysis derived parameters. Taken together these techniques can be used in complex microdialysis datasets to summarise the data succinctly and generate hypotheses for future study.

  6. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates MicroRNA-155-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Ischemic Cerebral Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ya; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Cong; Zhu, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses play a critical role in ischemic brain injury. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and acetylbritannilactone (ABL) exerts potent antiinflammatory actions by inhibiting expression of inflammation-related genes. However, the functions of miR-155 and the actual relationship between ABL and miR-155 in ischemia-induced cerebral inflammation remain unclear. In this study, cerebral ischemia of wild-type (WT) and miR-155(-/-) mice was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). pAd-miR-155 was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle 24 h before MCAO to induce miR-155 overexpression. MCAO mice and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated BV2 cells were used to examine the effects of ABL and miR-155 overexpression or deletion on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. We demonstrated that ABL treatment significantly reduced neurological deficits and cerebral infarct volume by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression in ischemic cerebral tissue and OGD-treated BV2 cells. Mechanistic studies suggested that the observed decrease in TNF-α and IL-1β expression was attributable to the ABL-induced suppression of the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We further found that miR-155 promoted TNF-α and IL-1β expression by upregulating TLR4 and downregulating the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), while ABL exerted an inhibitory effect on miR-155-mediated gene expression. In conclusion, miR-155 mediates inflammatory responses in ischemic cerebral tissue by modulating TLR4/MyD88 and SOCS1 expression, and ABL exerts its antiinflammatory action by suppressing miR-155 expression, suggesting a novel miR-155-based therapy for ischemic stroke. PMID:25811992

  7. Neuroendocrine modulation of the inflammatory response in common carp: adrenaline regulates leukocyte profile and activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kepka, M.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Chadzinska, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory responses have to be carefully controlled, as high concentrations and/or prolonged action of inflammation-related molecules (e.g. reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines) can be detrimental to host tissue and organs. One of the potential regulators of the in

  8. A new role for T cells in dampening innate inflammatory responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The inflammatory response is an attempt by a host to protect itself against injurious stimuli and initiate the tissue healing process [1,2]. Although the production of both pro-and anti-inflammatory mediators which occurs mainly within tissues is a systemic process,

  9. No inflammatory gene-expression response to acute exercise in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Fredberg, Ulrich; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer;

    2013-01-01

    Although histology data favour the view of a degenerative nature of tendinopathy, indirect support for inflammatory reactions to loading in affected tendons exists. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate whether inflammatory signalling responses after acute mechanical loading were more...

  10. Dissemination of Orientia tsutsugamushi and inflammatory responses in a murine model of scrub typhus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Keller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Central aspects in the pathogenesis of scrub typhus, an infection caused by Orientia (O. tsutsugamushi, have remained obscure. Its organ and cellular tropism are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinetics of bacterial dissemination and associated inflammatory responses in infected tissues in an experimental scrub typhus mouse model, following infection with the human pathogenic strain Karp. We provide a thorough analysis of O. tsutsugamushi infection in inbred Balb/c mice using footpad inoculation, which is close to the natural way of infection. By a novel, highly sensitive qPCR targeting the multi copy traD genes, we quantitatively monitored the spread of O. tsutsugamushi Karp from the skin inoculation site via the regional lymph node to the internal target organs. The highest bacterial loads were measured in the lung. Using confocal imaging, we also detected O. tsutsugamushi at the single cell level in the lung and found a predominant macrophage rather than endothelial localization. Immunohistochemical analysis of infiltrates in lung and brain revealed differently composed lesions with specific localizations: iNOS-expressing macrophages were frequent in infiltrative parenchymal noduli, but uncommon in perivascular lesions within these organs. Quantitative analysis of the macrophage response by immunohistochemistry in liver, heart, lung and brain demonstrated an early onset of macrophage activation in the liver. Serum levels of interferon (IFN-γ were increased during the acute infection, and we showed that IFN-γ contributed to iNOS-dependent bacterial growth control. Our data show that upon inoculation to the skin, O. tsutsugamushi spreads systemically to a large number of organs and gives rise to organ-specific inflammation patterns. The findings suggest an essential role for the lung in the pathogenesis of scrub typhus. The model will allow detailed studies on host-pathogen interaction and provide further

  11. Metallic gold treatment reduces proliferation of inflammatory cells, increases expression of VEGF and FGF, and stimulates cell proliferation in the subventricular zone following experimental traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Østergaard; Larsen, Agnete; Pedersen, Dan Sonne;

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury represents a leading cause of morbidity in young individuals and there is an imperative need for neuroprotective treatments limiting the neurologic impairment following such injury. It has recently been demonstrated that bio-liberated gold ions liberated from small metallic...... increase in cell proliferation in both the ipsilateral and the contralateral subventricular zone was found in response to gold-treatment. In conclusion: we confirmed the previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory effect of bio-liberated gold ions, and further show that metallic gold increases growth factor...

  12. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    OpenAIRE

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional MRI, with a focus on the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is a brain area of particular interest because of its central role in the regulation of food intake. Two earlier studies showed that one long ...

  13. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION AND NASAL INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AMONG YOUNG ASTHMATICS EXPOSED TO HIGH LEVELS OF OZONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Recent studies examining the inflammatory response in atopic asthma to ozone suggest a release of soluble mediators of inflammation factors that might be related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Antioxidant could prove useful in subjects exposed to additional oxidati...

  14. Managing the Inflammatory Response after Cardiopulmonary Bypass : Review of the Studies in Animal Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liguori, Gabriel Romero; Kanas, Alexandre Fligelman; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review studies performed in animal models that evaluated therapeutic interventions to inflammatory response and microcirculatory changes after cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: It was used the search strategy ("Cardiopulmonary Bypass" (MeSH)) and ("Microcirculation" (MeSH) or "Inflammat

  15. Dexamethason-21-isonicotinat als Begleittherapie bei Kühen mit Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pevec, Till

    2007-01-01

    Dexamethason-21-isonicotinat als Begleittherapie bei Kühen mit Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Schlüsselwörter: Dexamethason, SIRS, Phagozytoseaktivität/Burstaktivität von Monozyten und neutrophilen Granulozyten, Tumornekrose Faktor alpha

  16. Expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in brain of atherosclerotic rats and effects of Ginkgo biloba extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-bin JIAO; Yao-cheng RUI; Tie-jun LI; Peng-yuan YANG; Yan QIU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the protein and mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines in the brain of rats with atherosclerosis (AS) and the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) on expressions of cytokines.Methods:The experimental model of AS in rats were established by intraperitioneal injection of vitamin D3 with high fat/cholesterol diet.GbE 100 mg/kg was administered to rats by ig.After 8 weeks, the expressions of IL- 1β, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-10R in the brain tissues of AS rats were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay,immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.Results: The protein and mRNA expressions of IL-1 β, TNF-α, and IL-10 in the brains were markedly higher in AS groups than that in control groups (6.11±0.15, 1.55±0.14, 0.54±0.04 ng/g wet weight vs 0.80±0.14, 0.33±0.09, and 0.33±0.02 ng/g wet weight, respectively).The protein and mRNA expressions of IL-1β and TNF-α in the brains were markedly lower in GbE groups (3.82±0.54, 0.95±0.08 ng/g wet weight) than that in AS groups, the protein and mRNA expressions of IL-10 and IL-10R in the brains were markedly higher in GbE groups (0.85±0.06 ng/g wet weight) than that in AS groups.Conclusion: GbE inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 β and TNF-α, but upregulated the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and IL-1 0R in brain,which might be related with its anti-AS actions.

  17. Value of systemic inflammatory response syndrome corrected score and differential leukocyte monitoring in the diagnosis of stress response and early infection in patients with brain trauma%全身炎症反应综合征修正评分及白细胞监测鉴别脑外伤患者应激反应与早期感染的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志强; 司金春; 许志杰; 申明峰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application value of systemic inflammatory response syndrome corrected score (ASS) and leukocyte differential stress response and infection monitoring in patients with brain trauma. Methods Total of 80 patients with brain trauma from June 2009 to June 2012 in our hospital were divided into early infection group and non-infection group according to whether had infection (40 cases in each group). After admission, the WBC and the highest temperature of the patients were monitored at the ifrst 7 days and the at the 10th, 14th and 21st days, respectively. Results The average ASS score of the infected patients was (8.873 ± 2.366) points;in non-infected group, the average score was (3.896 ± 1.350) points, with signiifcant difference (t=12.347, P<0.05). First day after injury, the anormal of body temperature and peripheral leukocytes which caused by stress response was most obvious, then they had a downward trend. In infection group, they will rised again after a fall. Conclusions Among 14-21 d after injury, body temperature and white blood cell movements in the early diagnosis of infection with a direction sense, ASS score predictive value of early infection, could help identify stress response and early infection.%目的:探讨全身炎症反应综合征修正(ASS)评分及白细胞监测鉴别应激反应和感染的应用价值。方法选择性分析2009年6月至2012年6月于本院接受治疗的脑外伤患者80例,根据是否发生早期感染分为感染组和非感染组,每组各40例。在入院7 d内对患者进行ASS评分,并于入院后前7 d以及第10、14、21 d对患者进行外周WBC监测并记录最高体温。结果感染组患者ASS平均得分(8.873±2.366)分;非感染组平均得分为(3.896±1.350)分,感染组ASS评分显著高于未感染组(t=12.347,P<0.05);应激反应所致体温及外周白细胞水平异常在伤后第1天最为明显,以后呈下降趋势,感染组

  18. Brain Responses Differ to Faces of Mothers and Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsalidou, Marie; Barbeau, Emmanuel J.; Bayless, Sarah J.; Taylor, Margot J.

    2010-01-01

    We encounter many faces each day but relatively few are personally familiar. Once faces are familiar, they evoke semantic and social information known about the person. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate differential brain activity to familiar and non-familiar faces; however, brain responses related to personally familiar faces have been more rarely…

  19. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional M

  20. Nutrition before and during Surgery and the Inflammatory Response of the Heart: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Marlieke Visser; Niessen, Hans W M; Kok, Wouter E. M.; Riccardo Cocchieri; Willem Wisselink; Paul A. M. van Leeuwen; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Major surgery induces a long fasting time and provokes an inflammatory response which increases the risk of infections. Nutrition given before and during surgery can avoid fasting and has been shown to increase the arginine/asymmetric dimetlhylarginine ratio, a marker of nitric oxide availability, in cardiac tissue and increased concentrations of branched chain amino acids in blood plasma. However, the effect of this new nutritional strategy on organ inflammatory response is unknown. Therefor...

  1. The Inflammatory Response to Miniaturised Extracorporeal Circulation: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Vohra, Hunaid A.; Robert Whistance; Amit Modi; Ohri, Sunil K.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional cardiopulmonary bypass can trigger a systemic inflammatory response syndrome similar to sepsis. Aetiological factors include surgical trauma, reperfusion injury, and, most importantly, contact of the blood with the synthetic surfaces of the heart-lung machine. Recently, a new cardiopulmonary bypass system, mini-extracorporeal circulation (MECC), has been developed and has shown promising early results in terms of reducing this inflammatory response. It has no venous reservoir, a ...

  2. The Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) in acutely hospitalised medical patients: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Storgaard Merete; Comstedt Pål; Lassen Annmarie T

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sepsis is an infection which has evoked a systemic inflammatory response. Clinically, the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is identified by two or more symptoms including fever or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnoea and change in blood leucocyte count. The relationship between SIRS symptoms and morbidity and mortality in medical emergency ward patients is unknown. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of the frequency of SIRS and its relationship t...

  3. Rosmarinus officinalis Extract Suppresses Propionibacterium acnes–Induced Inflammatory Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes–induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of pro...

  4. The effects of levan on the acute inflammatory response.

    OpenAIRE

    Sedgwick, A D; Rutman, A.; Sin, Y. M.; Mackay, A. R.; Willoughby, D A

    1984-01-01

    The fructose polymer levan has been shown to affect the accumulation of leucocytes in inflammatory lesions. The present study has investigated the effect of levan on experimental pleurisy induced by carrageenan and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals. Total pleural polymorphonuclear leucocyte counts and exudate volumes were significantly reduced by levan treatment. We were, however, unable to detect any effect on mononuclear cell numbers. Furthermore, levan treatment significantly...

  5. 5-Aminolevulinic acid regulates the inflammatory response and alloimmune reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Masayuki; Nishio, Yoshiaki; Ito, Hidenori; Tanaka, Tohru; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid and precursor of heme and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Exogenously administrated 5-ALA increases the accumulation of PpIX in tumor cells specifically due to the compromised metabolism of 5-ALA to heme in mitochondria. PpIX emits red fluorescence by the irradiation of blue light and the formation of reactive oxygen species and singlet oxygen. Thus, performing a photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-ALA have given rise to a new strategy for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In addition to the field of tumor therapy, 5-ALA has been implicated in the treatment of inflammatory disease, autoimmune disease and transplantation due to the anti-inflammation and immunoregulation properties that are elicited with the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, an inducible enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the oxidative degradation of heme to free iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO), in combination with sodium ferrous citrate (SFC), because an inhibitor of HO-1 abolishes the effects of 5-ALA. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and heme are involved in the HO-1 expression. Biliverdin and CO are also known to have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions. We herein review the current use of 5-ALA in inflammatory diseases, transplantation medicine, and tumor therapy. PMID:26643355

  6. Citral reduces nociceptive and inflammatory response in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucindo J. Quintans-Júnior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Citral (CIT, which contains the chiral enantiomers, neral (cis and geranial (trans, is the majority monoterpene from Lippia alba and Cymbopogon citratus. The present study aimed to evaluate CIT for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in rodents. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects were studied by measuring nociception through acetic acid and formalin tests, while inflammation was verified by inducing peritonitis and paw edema with carrageenan. All tested doses of CIT had significant protection (p<0.001 against acetic acid (0.8% induced nociceptive behavior and the effects were also similar to morphine while formalin induced nociception was significantly protected (p<0.05 only at higher dose (200 mg/kg of CIT in the first phase of the test. CIT significantly reduce (p<0.001 nociceptive behavior emanating from inflammation in second phase at all the doses.The pretreatment with CIT (100 and 200 mg/kg significantly reduced the paw edema induced by carrageenan. Moreover, systemic treatment with CIT (100 and 200 mg/kg significantly reduced (p<0.001 the leukocyte migration in the carrageenan-induced migration to the peritoneal cavity. Our investigation shows that CIT possess significant central and peripheral antinociceptive effects. It was also verified an anti-inflammatory activity. All together these results suggest that CIT might represent important tool for treatment of painful conditions.

  7. Benevolent sexism alters executive brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardenne, Benoit; Dumont, Muriel; Sarlet, Marie; Phillips, Christophe; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Salmon, Eric; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2013-07-10

    Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported in the literature. In this experiment, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to identify whether being the target of (sexist) benevolence induces changes in brain activity associated with a working memory task. Participants were confronted by benevolent, hostile, or neutral comments before and while performing a reading span test in an fMRI environment. fMRI data showed that brain regions associated previously with intrusive thought suppression (bilateral, dorsolateral, prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortex) reacted specifically to benevolent sexism compared with hostile sexism and neutral conditions during the performance of the task. These findings indicate that, despite being subjectively positive, benevolence modifies task-related brain networks by recruiting supplementary areas likely to impede optimal cognitive performance. PMID:23660680

  8. Benevolent sexism alters executive brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardenne, Benoit; Dumont, Muriel; Sarlet, Marie; Phillips, Christophe; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Salmon, Eric; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2013-07-10

    Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported in the literature. In this experiment, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to identify whether being the target of (sexist) benevolence induces changes in brain activity associated with a working memory task. Participants were confronted by benevolent, hostile, or neutral comments before and while performing a reading span test in an fMRI environment. fMRI data showed that brain regions associated previously with intrusive thought suppression (bilateral, dorsolateral, prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortex) reacted specifically to benevolent sexism compared with hostile sexism and neutral conditions during the performance of the task. These findings indicate that, despite being subjectively positive, benevolence modifies task-related brain networks by recruiting supplementary areas likely to impede optimal cognitive performance.

  9. Attenuating the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Adult Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Critical Review of the Evidence Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, R Clive; Brown, Jeremiah R; Fitzgerald, David; Likosky, Donald S; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Hammon, John W

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of pharmacological, surgical, and mechanical pump approaches have been studied to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass, yet no systematically based review exists to cover the scope of anti-inflammatory interventions deployed. We therefore conducted an evidence-based review to capture "self-identified" anti-inflammatory interventions among adult cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. To be included, trials had to measure at least one inflammatory mediator and one clinical outcome, specified in the "Outcomes 2010" consensus statement. Ninety-eight papers satisfied inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the review. The review identified 33 different interventions and approaches to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response. However, only a minority of papers (35 of 98 [35.7%]) demonstrated any clinical improvement to one or more of the predefined outcome measures (most frequently myocardial protection or length of intensive care unit stay). No single intervention was supported by strong level A evidence (multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs] or meta-analysis) for clinical benefit. Interventions at level A evidence included off-pump surgery, minimized circuits, biocompatible circuit coatings, leukocyte filtration, complement C5 inhibition, preoperative aspirin, and corticosteroid prophylaxis. Interventions at level B evidence (single RCT) for minimizing inflammation included nitric oxide donors, C1 esterase inhibition, neutrophil elastase inhibition, propofol, propionyl-L-carnitine, and intensive insulin therapy. A secondary analysis revealed that suppression of at least one inflammatory marker was necessary but not sufficient to confer clinical benefit. The most effective interventions were those that targeted multiple inflammatory pathways. These observations are consistent with a "multiple hit" hypothesis, whereby clinically effective suppression of the systemic inflammatory response requires hitting multiple

  10. Brain response abnormalities during verbal learning among patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Eyler, Lisa T; Jeste, Dilip V.; Brown, Gregory G.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia often show verbal learning deficits that have been linked to the pathophysiology of the disorder and result in functional impairment. This study examined the biological basis of these deficits by comparing the brain response of patients with schizophrenia (n=17) to that of healthy comparison participants (n=14) during a verbal paired-associates learning task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Brain response during new word learning was examined wit...

  11. Biological toxicity and inflammatory response of semi-single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Park

    Full Text Available The toxicological studies on carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been urgently needed from the emerging diverse applications of CNTs. Physicochemical properties such as shape, diameter, conductance, surface charge and surface chemistry of CNTs gained during manufacturing processes play a key role in the toxicity. In this study, we separated the semi-conductive components of SWCNTs (semi-SWCNTs and evaluated the toxicity on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 after intratracheal instillation in order to determine the role of conductance. Exposure to semi-SWCNTs significantly increased the growth of mice and significantly decreased the relative ratio of brain weight to body weight. Recruitment of monocytes into the bloodstream increased in a time-dependent manner, and significant hematological changes were observed 28 days after exposure. In the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, secretion of Th2-type cytokines, particularly IL-10, was more predominant than Th1-type cytokines, and expression of regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, p53, transforming growth factor (TGF-β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS increased in a time-dependent manner. Fibrotic histopathological changes peaked on day 7 and decreased 14 days after exposure. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, mesothelin, and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3 also peaked on day 7, while that of TGF-β peaked on days 7 and 14. Secretion of histamine in BAL fluid decreased in a time-dependent manner. Consequently, we suggest that the brain is the target organ of semi-SWCNTs brought into the lung, and conductance as well as length may be critical factors affecting the intensity and duration of the inflammatory response following SWCNT exposure.

  12. Inhibition of inflammatory mediator release from microglia can treat ischemic/hypoxic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaibo Wang; Weitao Guo; Hongliang Liu; Rong Zeng; Mingnan Lu; Ziqiu Chen; Qixian Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β aggravate neuronal injury by mediating the inflammatory reaction following ischemic/hypoxic brain injury. It remains unclear whether interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β are released by microglia or astrocytes. This study prepared hippocampal slices that were subsequently subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining verified that neurons exhibited hypoxic changes. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found that interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β participated in this hypoxic process. Moreover, when hypoxic injury occurred in the hippocampus, the release of interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β was mediated by the P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that during ischemia/hypoxia, the P2X4 receptor, P2X7 receptor, interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β expression was detectable in rat hippocampal microglia, but only P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor expression was detected in astrocytes. Results suggested that the P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor, respectively, mediated interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β released by microglia, resulting in hippocampal ischemic/hypoxic injury. Astrocytes were activated, but did not synthesize or release interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β.

  13. Neutralizing effects of polyvalent antivenom on severe inflammatory response induced by Mesobuthus eupeus scorpion venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayerzadeh1 E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of Mesobuthus eupeus (Me scorpion venom on inflammatory response following injection. Additionally, the present study examined whether immunotherapy at specific time intervals would be effective on inflammatory response after Me venom inoculation. Animals were divided randomly into four groups: the first group received LD50 of venom and the second and third groups of animals; immunotherapy was performed in different time intervals and fourth group was considered as control group. Me venom inoculation is caused respiratory perturbations such as respiratory distress, respiration with open mouth, crepitation and finally respiratory arrest. Me inoculation is resulted in increased pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1. Venom injection also induced inflammatory response, characterized by significant increase in serum white blood cells and neutrophils at 30, 60 and 180 min following envenomation. Simultaneous administration of antivenom and venom prevented entirely clinical sings, cytokines and hematological changes. Delayed immunotherapy gradually ameliorated clinical features, cytokines changes and hematological abnormalities related to the envenomation. In conclusion, our observations indicate injection of M. eupeus scorpion venom induces severe inflammatory response which can be one of the causes of clinical complications. Additionally, immunotherapy beyond 1 h after envenomation with appropriate dose and route in victims with severe inflammatory response related to the M.eupeus scorpion envenomation is beneficial.

  14. Nutrition before and during Surgery and the Inflammatory Response of the Heart: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Marlieke; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Kok, Wouter E. M.; Cocchieri, Riccardo; Wisselink, Willem; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Major surgery induces a long fasting time and provokes an inflammatory response which increases the risk of infections. Nutrition given before and during surgery can avoid fasting and has been shown to increase the arginine/asymmetric dimetlhylarginine ratio, a marker of nitric oxide availability, in cardiac tissue and increased concentrations of branched chain amino acids in blood plasma. However, the effect of this new nutritional strategy on organ inflammatory response is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effect of nutrition before and during cardiac surgery on myocardial inflammatory response. In this trial, 32 patients were randomised between enteral, parenteral, and no nutrition supplementation (control) from 2 days before, during, up to 2 days after coronary artery bypass grafting. Both solutions included proteins or amino acids, glucose, vitamins, and minerals. Myocardial atrial tissue was sampled before and after revascularization and was analysed immunohistochemically, subdivided into cardiomyocytic, fatty, and fibrotic areas. Inflammatory cells, especially leukocytes, were present in cardiac tissue in all study groups. No significant differences were found in the myocardial inflammatory response between the enteral, parenteral, and control groups. In conclusion, nutrition given before and during surgery neither stimulates nor diminishes the myocardial inflammatory response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The trial was registered in Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2183. PMID:26294967

  15. Nutrition before and during Surgery and the Inflammatory Response of the Heart: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlieke Visser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Major surgery induces a long fasting time and provokes an inflammatory response which increases the risk of infections. Nutrition given before and during surgery can avoid fasting and has been shown to increase the arginine/asymmetric dimetlhylarginine ratio, a marker of nitric oxide availability, in cardiac tissue and increased concentrations of branched chain amino acids in blood plasma. However, the effect of this new nutritional strategy on organ inflammatory response is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effect of nutrition before and during cardiac surgery on myocardial inflammatory response. In this trial, 32 patients were randomised between enteral, parenteral, and no nutrition supplementation (control from 2 days before, during, up to 2 days after coronary artery bypass grafting. Both solutions included proteins or amino acids, glucose, vitamins, and minerals. Myocardial atrial tissue was sampled before and after revascularization and was analysed immunohistochemically, subdivided into cardiomyocytic, fatty, and fibrotic areas. Inflammatory cells, especially leukocytes, were present in cardiac tissue in all study groups. No significant differences were found in the myocardial inflammatory response between the enteral, parenteral, and control groups. In conclusion, nutrition given before and during surgery neither stimulates nor diminishes the myocardial inflammatory response in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The trial was registered in Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2183.

  16. The Teenage Brain: The Stress Response and the Adolescent Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo, Russell D.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of many psychosocial and physiological changes. One such change is how an individual responds to stressors. Specifically, adolescence is marked by significant shifts in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity, resulting in heightened stress-induced hormonal responses. It is presently unclear what mediates these changes in stress reactivity and what impacts they may have on an adolescent individual. However, stress-sensitive limbic and corti...

  17. Prior exposure to glucocorticoids sensitizes the neuroinflammatory and peripheral inflammatory responses to E. coli lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthew G; Miguel, Zurine D; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    Acute and chronic stress has been found to sensitize or prime the neuroinflammatory response to both peripheral and central immunologic challenges. Several studies suggest that stress-induced sensitization of neuroinflammatory processes may be mediated by the glucocorticoid (GC) response to stress. GCs, under some conditions, exhibit pro-inflammatory properties, however whether GCs are sufficient to prime neuroinflammatory responses has not been systematically investigated. In the present investigation, we tested whether acute administration of exogenous GCs would be sufficient to reproduce the stress-induced sensitization of neuroinflammatory responses under a number of different timing relationships between GC administration and immune challenge (lipopolysaccharide; LPS). We demonstrate here that GCs potentiate both the peripheral (liver) and central (hippocampus) pro-inflammatory response (e.g. TNFalpha, IL-1beta, IL-6) to a peripheral immune challenge (LPS) if GCs are administered prior (2 and 24h) to challenge. Prior exposure (24h) to GCs also potentiated the pro-inflammatory response of hippocampal microglia to LPS ex vivo. In contrast, when GCs are administered after (1h) a peripheral immune challenge, GCs suppress the pro-inflammatory response to LPS in both liver and hippocampus. GCs also up-regulated microglial activation markers including Toll-like Receptor 2. The present data suggest that the temporal relationship between GC treatment and immune challenge may be an important factor determining whether GCs exhibit pro- or anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. Reduced tonicity stimulates an inflammatory response in nucleus pulposus tissue that can be limited by a COX-2-specific inhibitor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Bart; Potier, Esther; van Dijk, Maarten; Langelaan, Marloes; Papen-Botterhuis, Nicole; Ito, K

    2015-01-01

    In intervertebral disc herniation with nucleus pulposus (NP) extrusion, the elicited inflammatory response is considered a key pain mechanism. However, inflammatory cytokines are reported in extruded herniated tissue, even before monocyte infiltration, suggesting that the tissue itself initiates the

  19. Reduced Tonicity Stimulates an Inflammatory Response in Nucleus Pulposus Tissue That Can Be Limited by a COX-2-Specific Inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B. van; Potier, E.; Dijk, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Papen-Botterhuis, N.E.; Ito, K.

    2015-01-01

    In intervertebral disc herniation with nucleus pulposus (NP) extrusion, the elicited inflammatory response is considered a key pain mechanism. However, inflammatory cytokines are reported in extruded herniated tissue, even before monocyte infiltration, suggesting that the tissue itself initiates the

  20. MicroRNA-155 in exosomes secreted from helicobacter pylori infection macrophages immunomodulates inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Deng, Zhiyong; Wang, Zeyou; Wu, Jianhong; Gu, Tao; Jiang, Yibiao; Li, Guangxin

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes containing microRNA-155 act as molecule carriers during immune cell-cell communication and play an important role in the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages. Previous reports have found that miR-155 was over-expressed in H. pylori infection macrophages, but the significance of which is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the impact of miR-155 loaded in exosomes derived from macrophages to the inflammatory response of H. pylori infection macrophages and possible mechanisms. We found that miR-155 promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-a, IL-6, IL-23, but also increased the expression of CD40, CD63, CD81, and MCH-I. Meanwhile, inflammatory signal pathways proteins, such as MyD88, NF-κB in H. pylori infection macrophages were down-regulated due to the over-expression of miR-155. Experiments in vitro or in vivo revealed that miR-155 promoted macrophages to inhibit or kill H. pylori by regulating the inflammatory response of cells to prevent the gastritis caused by H. pylori infection. These findings contribute to the understanding of miR-155 contained in exosomes in inflammatory responses of H. pylori infection macrophages. PMID:27725852

  1. ω-3多不饱和脂肪酸对重型颅脑损伤患者伤后炎症反应和神经损害的影响%Effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the inflammatory response and nerve damage in severe traumatic brain injury patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英杰; 谢良杰; 庄耀东; 郭森仁

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨ω-3多不饱和脂肪酸对重型颅脑损伤患者炎症反应、神经损害及预后的影响.方法 2013年1月至2014年9月福建中医药大学附属晋江中医院收治的重型颅脑损伤患者120例,随机数字表法随机分为试验组(添加ω-3脂肪酸脑损伤组60例)和对照组(未添加ω-3脂肪酸脑损伤组60例).另选择60份健康体检血液标本作为健康人群组.利用酶联免疫吸附测定法检测血清肿瘤坏死因子(TNF)-α、白细胞介素(IL)-I、IL-6、S100B蛋白和神经元特异性烯醇化酶(NSE)浓度,比较两组患者格拉斯哥昏迷指数评分(GCS评分)、急性生理学及慢性健康状况(APACHEⅡ)评分和预后.结果 重型颅脑损伤患者伤后各时点血清TNF-α、IL-1、IL-6和神经损伤标志物S100B和NSE蛋白表达明显高于健康人群组(均P<0.05).试验组患者在干预3d后TNF-α、IL-1、IL-6表达明显低于对照组患者[(213.81 ±29.33)μg/L比(267.76 ±31.35) μg/L, (121.81±10.63) μg/L比(152.60±11.45)μg/L, (81.89 ±8.34) μg/L比(106.62±10.35)μg/L,均P<0.05],S100B和NSE蛋白表达在干预7d后表达低于对照组[(1.32±0.09) μg/L比(1.67±0.12) μg/L,(12.57±1.53) μg/L比(17.57±2.30) μg/L,均P<0.05];在干预第14天时,试验组GCS评分高于对照组[(9.32±1.64)分比(7.14±1.30)分,P=0.02],APACHEⅡ评分低于对照组[(14.37±2.27)分比(17.00±1.85)分,P=0.04].随访1个月时,试验组病死率低于对照组[11.7% (7/60)比15.0% (9/60)],但差异无统计学意义(P=0.49).结论 对重型颅脑损伤患者,ω-3不饱和脂肪酸可通过减轻伤后炎症反应,减少神经胶质和神经元细胞损害,起到神经保护作用,值得临床推广应用.%Objective To investigate the effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on inflammatory response,nerve damage,and outcomes in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI).Methods Altogether 120 sTBI patients were selected from January 2013 to

  2. Arctigenin Treatment Protects Against Brain Damage Through an Anti-inflammatory and Anti-apoptotic Mechanism After Needle Insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Song; Na Li; Xia Yang; Zhong Gao; Liang Kong; Yingjia Yao; Yanan Jiao; Yuhui Yan; Shaoheng Li; Zhenyu Tao; Guan Lian; Jingxian Yang; Tingguo Kang

    2016-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) infuses drugs directly into brain tissue. Needle insertion is required and results in a stab wound injury (SWI). Subsequent secondary injury involves the release of inflammatory and apoptotic cytokines, which have dramatic consequences on the integrity of damaged tissue, leading to the evolution of a pericontusional-damaged area minutes to days after in the initial injury. The present study investigated the capacity for arctigenin (ARC) to prevent secondary ...

  3. Arctigenin Treatment Protects against Brain Damage through an Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanism after Needle Insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jie; Li, Na; Xia, Yang; Gao, Zhong; Zou, Sa-feng; Kong, Liang; Yao, Ying-Jia; Jiao, Ya-Nan; Yan, Yu-Hui; Li, Shao-Heng; Tao, Zhen-Yu; Lian, Guan; Yang, Jing-xian; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) infuses drugs directly into brain tissue. Needle insertion is required and results in a stab wound injury (SWI). Subsequent secondary injury involves the release of inflammatory and apoptotic cytokines, which have dramatic consequences on the integrity of damaged tissue, leading to the evolution of a pericontusional-damaged area minutes to days after in the initial injury. The present study investigated the capacity for arctigenin (ARC) to prevent secondary ...

  4. Peripheral anti-inflammatory effects explain the ginsenosides paradox between poor brain distribution and anti-depression efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Kang An; Hao Haiping; Zheng Xiao; Liang Yan; Xie Yuan; Xie Tong; Dai Chen; Zhao Qijin; Wu Xiaolan; Xie Lin; Wang Guangji

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The effectiveness of ginseng in preventing and treating various central nervous system (CNS) diseases has been widely confirmed. However, ginsenosides, the principal components of ginseng, are characterized by poor accessibility to the brain, and this pharmacokinetic-pharmacological paradox remains poorly explained. Anti-inflammatory approaches are becoming promising therapeutic strategies for depression and other CNS diseases; however, previous studies have focused largel...

  5. The effects of levan on the acute inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, A. D.; Rutman, A.; Sin, Y. M.; Mackay, A. R.; Willoughby, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The fructose polymer levan has been shown to affect the accumulation of leucocytes in inflammatory lesions. The present study has investigated the effect of levan on experimental pleurisy induced by carrageenan and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals. Total pleural polymorphonuclear leucocyte counts and exudate volumes were significantly reduced by levan treatment. We were, however, unable to detect any effect on mononuclear cell numbers. Furthermore, levan treatment significantly reduced peripheral leucocyte numbers. The counter-irritant activity of levan was compared with that of a known counter-irritant, dextran. The ability of levan to reduce pleural polymorph numbers and exudate volume could not be accounted for totally by counter-irritation. Studies using an in-vitro leucocyte adhesion assay system indicate that levan affects leucocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium. PMID:6201184

  6. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiangtao [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Zheng, Yanping, E-mail: yanpingzheng@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  7. Weight cycling enhances adipose tissue inflammatory responses in male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Barbosa-da-Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation attributed to dysregulated production, release of cytokines and adipokines and to dysregulated glucose-insulin homeostasis and dyslipidemia. Nutritional interventions such as dieting are often accompanied by repeated bouts of weight loss and regain, a phenomenon known as weight cycling (WC. METHODS: In this work we studied the effects of WC on the feed efficiency, blood lipids, carbohydrate metabolism, adiposity and inflammatory markers in C57BL/6 male mice that WC two or three consecutive times by alternation of a high-fat (HF diet with standard chow (SC. RESULTS: The body mass (BM grew up in each cycle of HF feeding, and decreased after each cycle of SC feeding. The alterations observed in the animals feeding HF diet in the oral glucose tolerance test, in blood lipids, and in serum and adipose tissue expression of adipokines were not recuperated after WC. Moreover, the longer the HF feeding was (two, four and six months, more severe the adiposity was. After three consecutive WC, less marked was the BM reduction during SC feeding, while more severe was the BM increase during HF feeding. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that both the HF diet and WC are relevant to BM evolution and fat pad remodeling in mice, with repercussion in blood lipids, homeostasis of glucose-insulin and adipokine levels. The simple reduction of the BM during a WC is not able to recover the high levels of adipokines in the serum and adipose tissue as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokines enhanced during a cycle of HF diet. These findings are significant because a milieu with altered adipokines in association with WC potentially aggravates the chronic inflammation attributed to dysregulated production and release of adipokines in mice.

  8. Ethyl Pyruvate Prevents Inflammatory responses and Organ Damage During in Porcine Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Weihong; Cai, Bolin; Peña, Geber; Pisarenko, Vadim; Vida, Gergely; Doucet, Danielle; Lee, Marlon; Sharpe, Susan; Lu, Qi; Xu, Da-Zhong; Ramos, Laura; Deitch, Edwin A.; Ulloa, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Hemorrhage remains a common cause of death despite the recent advances in critical care, in part because conventional resuscitation fluids fail to prevent lethal inflammatory responses. Here, we analyzed whether ethyl pyruvate can provide a therapeutic anti-inflammatory potential to resuscitation fluids and prevent organ damage in porcine hemorrhage. Adult male Yorkshire swine underwent lethal hemorrhage with trauma and received no resuscitation treatment or resuscitation with Hextend alone, ...

  9. Role of histamine in the inhibitory effects of phycocyanin in experimental models of allergic inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    D. Remirez; N. Ledón; R. González

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been reported that phycocyanin, a biliprotein found in the blue-green microalgae Spirulina, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in some animal models of inflammation. Taking into account these findings, we decided to elucidate whether phycocyanin might exert also inhibitory effects in the induced allergic inflammatory response and on histamine release from isolated rat mast cells. In in vivo experiments, phycocyanin (100, 200 and 300mg/kg post-orally (p.o.)) was administered 1 h ...

  10. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Feng; Brown, Arthur; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Omana, Vanessa; Weaver, Lynne C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the spinal cord triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which inflammatory cells from the circulation invade organs such as the liver, lung and kidney, leading to damage of these organs. Our previous study (Gris, et al, Exp. Neurol, 2008) demonstrated that spinal cord injury (SCI) activates circulating neutrophils that then invade the lung and kidney from 2 to 24 h after injury, increasing myeloperoxidase activity, cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metallop...

  11. Gene expression pattern in human monocytes as a surrogate marker for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, G.; Selleng, K.; Gründling, M.; Jack, R S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a mild inflammatory episode which, in a minority of patients, may deteriorate into septic shock. In the mouse, injection of bacteria or bacterial endotoxin induces systemic inflammation through the activation of blood monocytes, which leads to lethal shock. A number of intervention strategies have been shown to prevent progression to shock in mouse model systems. However, recent clinical trials of a number of these therapeutic stra...

  12. Metabolism of Albumin after Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration in Patients with Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Chen; Jianan Ren; Xiaodong Qin; Guanwei Li; Bo Zhou; Guosheng Gu; Zhiwu Hong; JiYe Aa; Jieshou Li

    2015-01-01

    Background. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterized by a hypercatabolic state induced by inflammatory mediators. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) stabilizes the internal environment but also aggravates loss of amino acids. The effect of CVVH on protein dynamics is largely unknown. We adopted the stable isotopic tracer technology to investigate how CVVH changed serum albumin metabolism. Methods. Twenty SIRS patients were randomized into low- (2000 mL/h) a...

  13. Qingkailing Suppresses the Activation of BV2 Microglial Cells by Inhibiting Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Inflammatory Responses

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    Lulu Mana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Qingkailing (QKL is a well-known composite extract used in traditional Chinese medicine. This extract has been extensively administered to treat the acute phase of cerebrovascular disease. Our previous experiments confirmed that QKL exerts an inhibitory effect on cerebral ischemia-induced inflammatory responses. However, whether QKL suppresses the activation of microglia, the primary resident immune cells in the brain, has yet to be determined. In this study, BV2 microglial cells were used to validate the protective effects of QKL treatment following ischemia-reperfusion injury simulated via hypoxia/reoxygenation in vitro. Under these conditions, high expression levels of ROS, COX-2, iNOS, and p-p38 protein were detected. Following ischemia/reperfusion injury, QKL significantly increased the activity of BV2 cells to approximately the basal level by modulating microglial activation via inhibition of inflammatory factors, including TNF-α, COX-2, iNOS, and p-p38. However, QKL treatment also displayed dose-dependent differences in its inhibitory effects on p38 phosphorylation and inflammatory factor expression.

  14. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

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    Laurence Madera

    Full Text Available Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression.

  15. Potential use of salivary markers for longitudinal monitoring of inflammatory immune responses to vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Pei Wen; Garssen, Johan; Sandalova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination, designed to trigger a protective immune response against infection, is a trigger for mild inflammatory responses. Vaccination studies can address the question of inflammation initiation, levels, and resolution as well as its regulation for respective studied pathogens. Such studies larg

  16. Systemic Inflammatory Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury, Femur Fracture, and Shock: An Experimental Murine Polytrauma Model

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    C. Probst

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite broad research in neurotrauma and shock, little is known on systemic inflammatory effects of the clinically most relevant combined polytrauma. Experimental investigation in an animal model may provide relevant insight for therapeutic strategies. We describe the effects of a combined injury with respect to lymphocyte population and cytokine activation. Methods. 45 male C57BL/6J mice (mean weight 27 g were anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Animals were subjected to a weight drop closed traumatic brain injury (WD-TBI, a femoral fracture and hemorrhagic shock (FX-SH. Animals were subdivided into WD-TBI, FX-SH and combined trauma (CO-TX groups. Subjects were sacrificed at 96 h. Blood was analysed for cytokines and by flow cytometry for lymphocyte populations. Results. Mortality was 8%, 13% and 47% for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX groups (P<0.05. TNFα (11/13/139 for FX-SH/WD-TBI/CO-TX; P<0.05, CCL2 (78/96/227; P<0.05 and IL-6 (16/48/281; P=0.05 showed significant increases in the CO-TX group. Lymphocyte populations results for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX were: CD-4 (31/21/22; P= n.s., CD-8 (7/28/34, P<0.05, CD-4-CD-8 (11/12/18; P= n.s., CD-56 (36/7/8; P<0.05. Conclusion. This study shows that a combination of closed TBI and femur-fracture/ shock results in an increase of the humoral inflammation. More attention to combined injury models in inflammation research is indicated.

  17. Association between brain natriuretic peptide, markers of inflammation and the objective and subjective response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Versteeg, Henneke; Meine, Mathias;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can induce a decrease in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and systemic inflammation, which may be associated with CRT-response. However, the evidence is inconclusive. We examined levels of BNP and inflammatory markers from ...... is not automatically related to a stronger overall decrease in inflammation. Large-scale studies are warranted that further examine the relation between the clinical effects of CRT on inflammatory markers, as the latter have been associated with poor prognosis in heart failure....

  18. Wound trauma mediated inflammatory signaling attenuates a tissue regenerative response in MRL/MpJ mice

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    Elster Eric A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe trauma can induce pathophysiological responses that have marked inflammatory components. The development of systemic inflammation following severe thermal injury has been implicated in immune dysfunction, delayed wound healing, multi-system organ failure and increased mortality. Methods In this study, we examined the impact of thermal injury-induced systemic inflammation on the healing response of a secondary wound in the MRL/MpJ mouse model, which was anatomically remote from the primary site of trauma, a wound that typically undergoes scarless healing in this specific strain. Ear-hole wounds in MRL/MpJ mice have previously displayed accelerated healing and tissue regeneration in the absence of a secondary insult. Results Severe thermal injury in addition to distal ear-hole wounds induced marked local and systemic inflammatory responses in the lungs and significantly augmented the expression of inflammatory mediators in the ear tissue. By day 14, 61% of the ear-hole wounds from thermally injured mice demonstrated extensive inflammation with marked inflammatory cell infiltration, extensive ulceration, and various level of necrosis to the point where a large percentage (38% had to be euthanized early during the study due to extensive necrosis, inflammation and ear deformation. By day 35, ear-hole wounds in mice not subjected to thermal injury were completely closed, while the ear-hole wounds in thermally injured mice exhibited less inflammation and necrosis and only closed partially (62%. Thermal injury resulted in marked increases in serum levels of IL-6, TNFα, KC (CXCL1, and MIP-2α (CXCL2. Interestingly, attenuated early ear wound healing in the thermally injured mouse resulted in incomplete tissue regeneration in addition to a marked inflammatory response, as evidenced by the histological appearance of the wound and increased transcription of potent inflammatory mediators. Conclusion These findings suggest that the

  19. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications. PMID:26133961

  20. Brain Responses during the Anticipation of Dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, M Cornelia; Esser, Roland W; Gamer, Matthias; Büchel, Christian; von Leupoldt, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is common in many cardiorespiratory diseases. Already the anticipation of this aversive symptom elicits fear in many patients resulting in unfavorable health behaviors such as activity avoidance and sedentary lifestyle. This study investigated brain mechanisms underlying these anticipatory processes. We induced dyspnea using resistive-load breathing in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blocks of severe and mild dyspnea alternated, each preceded by anticipation periods. Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. The left insular, parietal opercular, and cerebellar cortices showed increased activation already during dyspnea anticipation. Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. Moreover, anticipatory fear was positively correlated with anticipatory activation in right insular and anterior cingulate cortex. The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. The involvement of emotion-related areas such as insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala during dyspnea anticipation most likely reflects anticipatory fear and might underlie the development of unfavorable health behaviors in patients suffering from dyspnea. PMID:27648309

  1. Brain Responses during the Anticipation of Dyspnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, M. Cornelia; Esser, Roland W.; Büchel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is common in many cardiorespiratory diseases. Already the anticipation of this aversive symptom elicits fear in many patients resulting in unfavorable health behaviors such as activity avoidance and sedentary lifestyle. This study investigated brain mechanisms underlying these anticipatory processes. We induced dyspnea using resistive-load breathing in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blocks of severe and mild dyspnea alternated, each preceded by anticipation periods. Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. The left insular, parietal opercular, and cerebellar cortices showed increased activation already during dyspnea anticipation. Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. Moreover, anticipatory fear was positively correlated with anticipatory activation in right insular and anterior cingulate cortex. The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. The involvement of emotion-related areas such as insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala during dyspnea anticipation most likely reflects anticipatory fear and might underlie the development of unfavorable health behaviors in patients suffering from dyspnea.

  2. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts.

  3. Rosmarinus officinalis extract suppresses Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chuang, Lu-Te; Lien, Tsung-Jung; Liing, Yau-Rong; Chen, Wei-Yu; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2013-04-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key pathogen involved in the progression of acne inflammation. The development of a new agent possessing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes is therefore of interest. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract on P. acnes-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that ethanolic rosemary extract (ERE) significantly suppressed the secretion and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in P. acnes-stimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. In an in vivo mouse model, concomitant intradermal injection of ERE attenuated the P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. Since ERE suppressed the P. acnes-induced nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation and mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, the suppressive effect of ERE might be due, at least partially, to diminished NF-κB activation and TLR2-mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, three major constituents of ERE, carnosol, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid, exerted different immumodulatory activities in vitro. In brief, rosmarinic acid significantly suppressed IL-8 production, while the other two compounds inhibited IL-1β production. Further study is needed to explore the role of bioactive compounds of rosemary in mitigation of P. acnes-induced inflammation. PMID:23514231

  4. Reduced stress and inflammatory responsiveness in experienced meditators compared to a matched healthy control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Melissa A; Lutz, Antoine; Perlman, David M; Bachhuber, David R W; Schuyler, Brianna S; MacCoon, Donal G; Davidson, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Psychological stress is a major contributor to symptom exacerbation across many chronic inflammatory conditions and can acutely provoke increases in inflammation in healthy individuals. With the rise in rates of inflammation-related medical conditions, evidence for behavioral approaches that reduce stress reactivity is of value. Here, we compare 31 experienced meditators, with an average of approximately 9000 lifetime hours of meditation practice (M age=51years) to an age- and sex-matched control group (n=37; M age=48years) on measures of stress- and inflammatory responsivity, and measures of psychological health. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was used to induce psychological stress and a neurogenic inflammatory response was produced using topical application of capsaicin cream to forearm skin. Size of the capsaicin-induced flare response and increase in salivary cortisol and alpha amylase were used to quantify the magnitude of inflammatory and stress responses, respectively. Results show that experienced meditators have lower TSST-evoked cortisol (62.62±2.52 vs. 70.38±2.33; presponse (81.55±4.6 vs. 96.76±4.26; p<.05), compared to the control group. Moreover, experienced meditators reported higher levels of psychological factors associated with wellbeing and resilience. These results suggest that the long-term practice of meditation may reduce stress reactivity and could be of therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory conditions characterized by neurogenic inflammation. PMID:26970711

  5. Cannabinoid Signaling and Neuroinflammatory Diseases: A Melting pot for the Regulation of Brain Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Leuti, Alessandro; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    The concept of the central nervous system (CNS) as an immune-privileged site, essentially due to the presence of the blood brain barrier, appears to be overly simplistic. Indeed, within healthy CNS immune activities are permitted and are required for neuronal function and host defense, not only due to the presence of the resident innate immune cells of the brain, but also by virtue of a complex cross-talk of the CNS with peripheral immune cells. Nonetheless, long-standing and persisting neuroinflammatory responses are most often detrimental and characterize several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A growing body of evidence suggests that Cannabis sativa-derived phytocannabinoids, as well as synthetic cannabinoids, are endowed with significant immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, both in peripheral tissues and in the CNS, through the activation of cannabinoid receptors. In this review, the immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoid signaling on the most relevant brain immune cells will be discussed. In addition, the impact of cannabinoid regulation on the overall integration of the manifold brain immune responses will also be highlighted, along with the implication of these compounds as potential agents for the management of neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:25601726

  6. An Update on the Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Arnaoutoglou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postimplantation syndrome (PIS is the clinical and biochemical expression of an inflammatory response following endovascular repair of an aortic aneurysm (EVAR. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the inflammatory response after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, discussing its causes and effects on the clinical outcome of the patient. PIS concerns nearly one-third of patients after EVAR. It is generally a benign condition, although in some patients it may negatively affect outcome. The different definitions and conclusions drawn from several studies reveal that PIS needs to be redefined with standardized diagnostic criteria. The type of the endograft’s material seems to play a role in the inflammatory response. Future studies should focus on a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, predictors, and risk factors as well as determining whether effective preventive strategies are necessary.

  7. Guggulsterone Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct-3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Goo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Jo, Il-Joo; Choi, Sun-Bok; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Jeong, Jun-Hyeok; Kang, Dae-Gil; Lee, Ho-Sub; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2016-02-01

    Guggulsterone (GS) is a phytosterol that has been used to treat inflammatory diseases such as colitis, obesity, and thrombosis. Although many previous studies have examined activities of GS, the effect of GS on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in mouse inner medullary collecting duct-3 (mIMCD-3) cells have not been examined. Therefore, here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory action of GS on mIMCD-3 cells exposed to LPS. LPS treatment on mIMCD-3 cells produced pro-inflammatory molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) significantly; however, GS treatment significantly inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, GS inhibited the degradation of Iκ-Bα and translocation of NF-κB on mIMCD-3 cells. These results suggest that GS could inhibit inflammatory responses in collecting duct cells which could contribute to kidney injury during systemic infection. PMID:26260258

  8. Fish and mammalian phagocytes differentially regulate pro-inflammatory and homeostatic responses in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aja M Rieger

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis is a cellular mechanism that is important to the early induction of antimicrobial responses and the regulation of adaptive immunity. At an inflammatory site, phagocytes serve as central regulators for both pro-inflammatory and homeostatic anti-inflammatory processes. However, it remains unclear if this is a recent evolutionary development or whether the capacity to balance between these two seemingly contradictory processes is a feature already displayed in lower vertebrates. In this study, we used murine (C57BL/6 and teleost fish (C. auratus in vitro and in vivo models to assess the evolutionary conservation of this dichotomy at a site of inflammation. At the level of the macrophage, we found that teleost fish already displayed divergent pro-inflammatory and homeostatic responses following internalization of zymosan or apoptotic bodies, respectively, and that these were consistent with those of mice. However, fish and mice displayed significant differences in vivo with regards to the level of responsiveness to zymosan and apoptotic bodies, the identity of infiltrating leukocytes, their rate of infiltration, and the kinetics and strength of resulting antimicrobial responses. Unlike macrophages, significant differences were identified between teleost and murine neutrophilic responses. We report for the first time that activated murine, but not teleost neutrophils, possess the capacity to internalize apoptotic bodies. This internalization translates into reduction of neutrophil ROS production. This may play an important part in the recently identified anti-inflammatory activity that mammalian neutrophils display during the resolution phase of inflammation. Our observations are consistent with continued honing of inflammatory control mechanisms from fish to mammals, and provide added insights into the evolutionary path that has resulted in the integrated, multilayered responses that are characteristic of higher vertebrates.

  9. Regulation of Toll-like receptors-dependent inflammatory response 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kowalczyk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a pivotal part of our innate immune response. They recognize a wide variety of pathogens and instigate an immune response, thus facilitating the removal of the disease-causing agent. Due to the intense nature of this response its strict control is of keyimportance, as a prolonged inflammatory signal leads to carcinogenesis and autoimmune disorders. The signaling cascade initiated by the activated TLR is complex and consists of multiple stages. It involves a variety of adaptor proteins, protein kinases and effector transcription factors. The number of stages in this process enables many possible checkpoints and ways of regulation. Signal modulation involves differentiated expression of TLRs, splicing variants of their adaptorproteins, enzymes modifying proteins engaged in the cascade and many more. This review focuses on endogenous factors responsible for controlling the TLR-dependent inflammatory response as well as on pharmacological therapies designed for regulating the innate immune response.  

  10. Immune-Manipulation of the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis. What Can Be Expected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinaldesi R

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis still has a high mortality rate and multiple organ failure is considered to be a severe complication of the disease. Activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes have an important role in the development of multiple organ failure which may result from acute pancreatitis and they are an important pathogenetic factor in the severity of this disease. Therefore, a logical therapeutic approach is to limit the organ damage by selective suppression of inflammatory mediators involved in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and protect against systemic complication. In this paper, we review the recent literature data on the possible manipulation of the immune response in acute pancreatitis.

  11. Interplay between pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain oxidative stress biomarkers: evidence of parallels between butyl paraben intoxication and the valproic acid brain physiopathology in autism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Hoda G; Ali, Elham H A; Elgoly, Amany H Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Butyl paraben is a preservative used in food, drugs and cosmetics. Neurotoxic effect was reported recently beside the potential estrogenic activity of parabens. There is controversy as to the potential harmful effects of butyl parabens, which are suspected to contribute to autism and learning disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the similarities between paraben intoxication signs in the rat brain and brain markers in an autistic like rat model. This study provides evidence of many parallels between the two, including (1) oxidative stress, (2) decreased reduced glutathione levels and elevated oxidised glutathione, (3) mitochondrial dysfunction, and (4) neuroinflammation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the brain (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1-beta, and interleukin-6). (5) Increased protein oxidation reported by a significant increase in 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT)/tyrosine ratio. (6) A marked disturbance was found in the production of energy carriers (AMP, ATP and AMP/ATP ratio) in comparison with the control. The evidence suggests that paraben may, to some extent, either cause or contribute to the brain physiopathology in ASDs or pathogens that produce the brain pathology observed in the diagnosed rat model of ASD.

  12. Global genetic variations predict brain response to faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, Erin W; Tahmasebi, Amir; French, Leon; Kovacevic, Natasa; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Garavan, Hugh; Gallinat, Juergen; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Nichols, Thomas; Lathrop, Mark; Loth, Eva; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcela; Smolka, Michal N; Ströhle, Andreas; Toro, Roberto; Schumann, Gunter; Paus, Tomáš

    2014-08-01

    Face expressions are a rich source of social signals. Here we estimated the proportion of phenotypic variance in the brain response to facial expressions explained by common genetic variance captured by ∼ 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using genomic-relationship-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML), we related this global genetic variance to that in the brain response to facial expressions, as assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a community-based sample of adolescents (n = 1,620). Brain response to facial expressions was measured in 25 regions constituting a face network, as defined previously. In 9 out of these 25 regions, common genetic variance explained a significant proportion of phenotypic variance (40-50%) in their response to ambiguous facial expressions; this was not the case for angry facial expressions. Across the network, the strength of the genotype-phenotype relationship varied as a function of the inter-individual variability in the number of functional connections possessed by a given region (R(2) = 0.38, p<0.001). Furthermore, this variability showed an inverted U relationship with both the number of observed connections (R2 = 0.48, p<0.001) and the magnitude of brain response (R(2) = 0.32, p<0.001). Thus, a significant proportion of the brain response to facial expressions is predicted by common genetic variance in a subset of regions constituting the face network. These regions show the highest inter-individual variability in the number of connections with other network nodes, suggesting that the genetic model captures variations across the adolescent brains in co-opting these regions into the face network.

  13. Global genetic variations predict brain response to faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin W Dickie

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Face expressions are a rich source of social signals. Here we estimated the proportion of phenotypic variance in the brain response to facial expressions explained by common genetic variance captured by ∼ 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using genomic-relationship-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML, we related this global genetic variance to that in the brain response to facial expressions, as assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in a community-based sample of adolescents (n = 1,620. Brain response to facial expressions was measured in 25 regions constituting a face network, as defined previously. In 9 out of these 25 regions, common genetic variance explained a significant proportion of phenotypic variance (40-50% in their response to ambiguous facial expressions; this was not the case for angry facial expressions. Across the network, the strength of the genotype-phenotype relationship varied as a function of the inter-individual variability in the number of functional connections possessed by a given region (R(2 = 0.38, p<0.001. Furthermore, this variability showed an inverted U relationship with both the number of observed connections (R2 = 0.48, p<0.001 and the magnitude of brain response (R(2 = 0.32, p<0.001. Thus, a significant proportion of the brain response to facial expressions is predicted by common genetic variance in a subset of regions constituting the face network. These regions show the highest inter-individual variability in the number of connections with other network nodes, suggesting that the genetic model captures variations across the adolescent brains in co-opting these regions into the face network.

  14. Inflammatory Response in Preterm and Very Preterm Newborns with Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique Segura-Cervantes; Javier Mancilla-Ramírez; Jorge González-Canudas; Erika Alba; René Santillán-Ballesteros; Deneb Morales-Barquet; Gabriela Sandoval-Plata; Norma Galindo-Sevilla

    2016-01-01

    The response of the adaptive immune system is usually less intense in premature neonates than term neonates. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether immunological parameters vary between preterm (PT) neonates (≥32 weeks of gestational age) and very preterm (VPT) neonates (

  15. Multi-session transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS elicits inflammatory and regenerative processes in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Adele Rueger

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is increasingly being used in human studies as an adjuvant tool to promote recovery of function after stroke. However, its neurobiological effects are still largely unknown. Electric fields are known to influence the migration of various cell types in vitro, but effects in vivo remain to be shown. Hypothesizing that tDCS might elicit the recruitment of cells to the cortex, we here studied the effects of tDCS in the rat brain in vivo. Adult Wistar rats (n = 16 were randomized to either anodal or cathodal stimulation for either 5 or 10 consecutive days (500 µA, 15 min. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU was given systemically to label dividing cells throughout the experiment. Immunohistochemical analyses ex vivo included stainings for activated microglia and endogenous neural stem cells (NSC. Multi-session tDCS with the chosen parameters did not cause a cortical lesion. An innate immune response with early upregulation of Iba1-positive activated microglia occurred after both cathodal and anodal tDCS. The involvement of adaptive immunity as assessed by ICAM1-immunoreactivity was less pronounced. Most interestingly, only cathodal tDCS increased the number of endogenous NSC in the stimulated cortex. After 10 days of cathodal stimulation, proliferating NSC increased by ∼60%, with a significant effect of both polarity and number of tDCS sessions on the recruitment of NSC. We demonstrate a pro-inflammatory effect of both cathodal and anodal tDCS, and a polarity-specific migratory effect on endogenous NSC in vivo. Our data suggest that tDCS in human stroke patients might also elicit NSC activation and modulate neuroinflammation.

  16. Dysregulation of mucosal immune response in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiao-rong; Liu, Chang-Qin; Feng, Bai-Sui; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The exact etiology and pathology of IBD remain unknown. Available evidence suggests that an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms in the intestine is responsible for the disease in genetically susceptible individuals. Dysregulation of immune response in the intestine plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of IBD, involving a wide range of molecules including cytokines. On the other hand, besides...

  17. Regional genome transcriptional response of adult mouse brain to hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Aigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since normal brain function depends upon continuous oxygen delivery and short periods of hypoxia can precondition the brain against subsequent ischemia, this study examined the effects of brief hypoxia on the whole genome transcriptional response in adult mouse brain. Result Pronounced changes of gene expression occurred after 3 hours of hypoxia (8% O2 and after 1 hour of re-oxygenation in all brain regions. The hypoxia-responsive genes were predominantly up-regulated in hindbrain and predominantly down-regulated in forebrain - possibly to support hindbrain survival functions at the expense of forebrain cognitive functions. The up-regulated genes had a significant role in cell survival and involved both shared and unshared signaling pathways among different brain regions. Up-regulation of transcriptional signaling including hypoxia inducible factor, insulin growth factor (IGF, the vitamin D3 receptor/retinoid X nuclear receptor, and glucocorticoid signaling was common to many brain regions. However, many of the hypoxia-regulated target genes were specific for one or a few brain regions. Cerebellum, for example, had 1241 transcripts regulated by hypoxia only in cerebellum but not in hippocampus; and, 642 (54% had at least one hepatic nuclear receptor 4A (HNF4A binding site and 381 had at least two HNF4A binding sites in their promoters. The data point to HNF4A as a major hypoxia-responsive transcription factor in cerebellum in addition to its known role in regulating erythropoietin transcription. The genes unique to hindbrain may play critical roles in survival during hypoxia. Conclusion Differences of forebrain and hindbrain hypoxia-responsive genes may relate to suppression of forebrain cognitive functions and activation of hindbrain survival functions, which may coordinately mediate the neuroprotection afforded by hypoxia preconditioning.

  18. Gut response induced by weaning in piglet features marked changes in immune and inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, Lorenzo; Minuti, Andrea; Moisá, Sonia J; Trevisi, Erminio; Eufemi, Elisa; Lizier, Michela; Chegdani, Fatima; Lucchini, Franco; Rzepus, Marcin; Prandini, Aldo; Rossi, Filippo; Mazza, Raffaele; Bertoni, Giuseppe; Loor, Juan J; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    At weaning, piglets are exposed to many stressors, such as separation from the sow, mixing with other litters, end of lactational immunity, and a change in their environment and gut microbiota. The sudden change of feeding regime after weaning causes morphological and histological changes in the small intestine which are critical for the immature digestive system. Sixteen female piglets were studied to assess the effect of sorbic acid supplementation on the small intestine tissue transcriptome. At weaning day (T0, piglet age 28 days), four piglets were sacrificed and ileal tissue samples collected. The remaining 12 piglets were weighed and randomly assigned to different postweaning (T5, piglet age 33 days) diets. Diet A (n = 6) contained 5 g/kg of sorbic acid. In diet B (n = 6), the organic acids were replaced by barley flour. Total RNA was isolated and then hybridized to CombiMatrix CustomArray™ 90-K platform microarrays, screening about 30 K genes. Even though diet had no detectable effect on the transcriptome during the first 5 days after weaning, results highlighted some of the response mechanisms to the stress of weaning occurring in the piglet gut. A total of 205 differentially expressed genes were used for functional analysis using the bioinformatics tools BLAST2GO, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis 8.0, and Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that apoptosis, RIG-I-like, and NOD-like receptor signaling were altered as a result of weaning. Interferons and caspases gene families were the most activated after weaning in response to piglets to multiple stressors. Results suggest that immune and inflammatory responses were activated and likely are a cause of small intestine atrophy as revealed by a decrease in villus height and villus/crypt ratio.

  19. Investigation of the acute inflammatory response in Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    MARKS, D. J. B.

    2006-01-01

    Most theories concerning the primary cause of Crohn's disease focus on over-activation of the immune response. Paradoxically, the defect may instead relate to diminished acute inflammation. Neutrophil accumulation to sites of dermal trauma has been shown to be reduced. Were the same phenomenon to occur in the gut, it might impair bacterial clearance thus provoking granuloma formation. In this thesis, a novel technique demonstrated attenuated neutrophil accumulation following trauma to the bow...

  20. Interaction of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in microglia by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bor-Ren [Department of Neurosurgery, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taichung Branch, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Cheng-Fang [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hsiao-Yun [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua County, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shiang-Suo [Department of Pharmacology and Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chi-Rei [Graduate Institute of Chinese Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chingju [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Wei-Lan [Cancer Research Center, Department of Medical Research, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lu, Dah-Yuu, E-mail: dahyuu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Neural and Cognitive Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-15

    We investigated the interaction between proinflammatory and inflammatory responses caused by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in primary cultured microglial cells and BV-2 microglia. LTA induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels increase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, LTA also increased nitric oxide (NO) and PGE{sub 2} production in microglia. Administration of TLR2 antagonist effectively inhibited LTA-induced NO, iNOS, and COX-2 expression. Moreover, treatment of cells with LTA caused a time-dependent activation of ERK, p38, JNK, as well as AKT. We also found that LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 up-regulation were attenuated by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. On the other hand, LTA-enhanced HO-1 expression was attenuated by p38 and PI3-kinase inhibitors. Treatment of cells with NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors antagonized LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression. However, only NF-κB inhibitors reduced LTA-induced HO-1 expression in microglia. Furthermore, stimulation of cells with LTA also activated IκBα phosphorylation, p65 phosphorylation at Ser{sup 536}, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, LTA-induced increases of κB-DNA and AP-1-DNA binding activity were inhibited by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. HO-1 activator CoPP IX dramatically reversed LTA-induced iNOS expression. Our results provided mechanisms linking LTA and inflammation/anti-inflammation, and indicated that LTA plays a regulatory role in microglia activation. - Highlights: • LTA causes an increase in iNOS, COX-2, and HO-1 expression in microglia. • LTA induces iNOS and COX-2 expression through TLR-2/NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. • HO-1 expression is regulated through p38, JNK, PI3K/AKT and AP-1 pathways. • Induced HO-1 reduces LTA-induced iNOS expression. • LTA plays a regulatory role on inflammatory/anti-inflammatory responses.

  1. Brain Connectivity Predicts Placebo Response across Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Pascal; Mansour, Ali; Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2016-01-01

    Placebo response in the clinical trial setting is poorly understood and alleged to be driven by statistical confounds, and its biological underpinnings are questioned. Here we identified and validated that clinical placebo response is predictable from resting-state functional magnetic-resonance-imaging (fMRI) brain connectivity. This also led to discovering a brain region predicting active drug response and demonstrating the adverse effect of active drug interfering with placebo analgesia. Chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain patients (n = 56) underwent pretreatment brain scans in two clinical trials. Study 1 (n = 17) was a 2-wk single-blinded placebo pill trial. Study 2 (n = 39) was a 3-mo double-blinded randomized trial comparing placebo pill to duloxetine. Study 3, which was conducted in additional knee OA pain patients (n = 42), was observational. fMRI-derived brain connectivity maps in study 1 were contrasted between placebo responders and nonresponders and compared to healthy controls (n = 20). Study 2 validated the primary biomarker and identified a brain region predicting drug response. In both studies, approximately half of the participants exhibited analgesia with placebo treatment. In study 1, right midfrontal gyrus connectivity best identified placebo responders. In study 2, the same measure identified placebo responders (95% correct) and predicted the magnitude of placebo’s effectiveness. By subtracting away linearly modeled placebo analgesia from duloxetine response, we uncovered in 6/19 participants a tendency of duloxetine enhancing predicted placebo response, while in another 6/19, we uncovered a tendency for duloxetine to diminish it. Moreover, the approach led to discovering that right parahippocampus gyrus connectivity predicts drug analgesia after correcting for modeled placebo-related analgesia. Our evidence is consistent with clinical placebo response having biological underpinnings and shows that the method can also reveal that active

  2. Intraperitoneal inflammatory response to water- and oil-based iodinated contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the early (24 hours) and delayed (7 and 30 days) inflammatory response of the peritoneal surface of guinea pigs to the intraperitoneal administration of water- and oil-based iodinated contrast material. The control group (Ringer's lactate) revealed no inflammatory reaction. Conray 60 (iothalamate meglumine) produced minimal reaction at 24 hours and no reaction at 7 or 30 days. Ioxitol (nonionic) yielded minimal inflammation at 24 hours and 30 days, with significant inflammation present only at 7 days. The greatest inflammation for a water soluble agent occurred with Hypaque 50 (diatrizoate sodium), with maximum inflammation identified at 7 days. The animals receiving Ethiodol (oil based) demonstrated minimal inflammation at 24 hours, with progressively increasing reaction at 7 and 30 days. The 30-day group showed a striking inflammatory response with granulamatous features and fibrosis

  3. The Inflammatory Response to Miniaturised Extracorporeal Circulation: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunaid A. Vohra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional cardiopulmonary bypass can trigger a systemic inflammatory response syndrome similar to sepsis. Aetiological factors include surgical trauma, reperfusion injury, and, most importantly, contact of the blood with the synthetic surfaces of the heart-lung machine. Recently, a new cardiopulmonary bypass system, mini-extracorporeal circulation (MECC, has been developed and has shown promising early results in terms of reducing this inflammatory response. It has no venous reservoir, a reduced priming volume, and less blood-synthetic interface. This review focuses on the inflammatory and clinical outcomes of using MECC and compares these to conventional cardio-pulmonary bypass (CCPB. MECC has been shown to reduce postoperative cytokines levels and other markers of inflammation. In addition, MECC reduces organ damage, postoperative complications and the need for blood transfusion. MECC is a safe and viable perfusion option and in certain circumstances it is superior to CCPB.

  4. Elevation in inflammatory serum biomarkers predicts response to trastuzumab-containing therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Alkhateeb

    Full Text Available Approximately half of all HER2/neu-overexpressing breast cancer patients do not respond to trastuzumab-containing therapy. Therefore, there remains an urgent and unmet clinical need for the development of predictive biomarkers for trastuzumab response. Recently, several lines of evidence have demonstrated that the inflammatory tumor microenvironment is a major contributor to therapy resistance in breast cancer. In order to explore the predictive value of inflammation in breast cancer patients, we measured the inflammatory biomarkers serum ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP in 66 patients immediately before undergoing trastuzumab-containing therapy and evaluated their progression-free and overall survival. The elevation in pre-treatment serum ferritin (>250 ng/ml or CRP (>7.25 mg/l was a significant predictor of reduced progression-free survival and shorter overall survival. When patients were stratified based on their serum ferritin and CRP levels, patients with elevation in both inflammatory biomarkers had a markedly poorer response to trastuzumab-containing therapy. Therefore, the elevation in inflammatory serum biomarkers may reflect a pathological state that decreases the clinical efficacy of this therapy. Anti-inflammatory drugs and life-style changes to decrease inflammation in cancer patients should be explored as possible strategies to sensitize patients to anti-cancer therapeutics.

  5. Exploring the risk factors for sudden infant deaths and their role in inflammatory responses to infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eBlackwell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The risk factors for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS parallel those associated with susceptibility to or severity of infectious diseases. There is no evidence that a single infectious agent is associated with SIDS; the common thread appears to be induction of inflammatory responses to infections. In this review, interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors for SIDS are assessed in relation to the hypothesis that many infant deaths result from dysregulation of inflammatory responses to minor infections. Risk factors are assessed in relation to three important stages of infection: 1 bacterial colonisation (frequency or density; 2 induction of temperature-dependent toxins; 3 induction or control of inflammatory responses.In this article we review the interactions among risk factors for SIDS for their effects on induction or control of inflammatory responses. The risk factors studied are genetic factors (sex, cytokine gene polymorphisms among ethnic groups at high or low risk of SID; developmental stage (changes in cortisol and testosterone levels associated with 2-4 month age range; environmental factors (virus infection, exposure to cigarette smoke. These interactions help to explain differences in the incidences of SIDS observed between ethnic groups prior to public health campaigns to reduce these infant deaths.

  6. Progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced by inflammatory responses to fipronil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Park, Youn Sun; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are involved in mechanisms of neuronal cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the mechanisms whereby inflammatory responses contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in fipronil (FPN)-treated rats. After stereotaxic injection of FPN in the substantia nigra (SN), the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons and the levels of TH expression in the SN decreased at 7days, and a significant decrease was observed at 14days with a subsequent reduction in striatal TH expression. Decreases in dopamine (DA) levels, however, began at 3days post-injection, preceding the changes in TH expression. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was significantly increased at 3days and persisted for up to 14days post-lesion; these changes in GFAP expression appeared to be inversely correlated with TH expression. Furthermore, we found that FPN administration induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which was mediated by activated microglia following infusion of FPN unilaterally into the SN. Intranigral injection of FPN underwent an inflammatory response with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, indicating that pesticides may have important implication for the study of PD. PMID:27313094

  7. Corticosterone treatment of pregnant low dose endotoxin-treated rats : Inhibition of the inflammatory response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Slot, K; Koiter, TR; Schuiling, GA

    2000-01-01

    PROBLEM: Can the endotoxin-induced inflammatory response, underlying experimental pre-eclampsia, in pregnant rats be inhibited by corticosterone? METHOD OF STUDY: On day 10 of pregnancy, rats were implanted with pellets containing 25% corticosterone and 75% cholesterol (n = 10) or with 100% choleste

  8. Considering depression as a consequence of activation of the inflammatory response system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J; Klein, HC; Versijpt, J; den Boer, J; ter Horst, GJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the possible interrelation between peripheral and/or cerebral inflammation and depression. Often, depression is regarded as a consequence of life events, including disabling diseases. The question addressed here is whether activation of the inflammatory response system (IRS) ca

  9. The levels of RAC3 expression are up regulated by TNF in the inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Viviana Alvarado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RAC3 is a coactivator of glucocorticoid receptor and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB that is usually over-expressed in tumors and which also has important functions in the immune system. We investigated the role of the inflammatory response in the control of RAC3 expression levels in vivo and in vitro. We found that inflammation regulates RAC3 levels. In mice, sub-lethal doses of lipopolysaccharide induce the increase of RAC3 in spleen and the administration of the synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid dexamethasone has a similar effect. However, the simultaneous treatment with both stimuli is mutually antagonistic. In vitro stimulation of the HEK293 cell line with tumor necrosis factor (TNF, one of the cytokines induced by lipopolysaccharide, also increases the levels of RAC3 mRNA and protein, which correlates with an enhanced transcription dependent on the RAC3 gene promoter. We found that binding of the transcription factor NF-κB to the RAC3 gene promoter could be responsible for these effects. Our results suggest that increase of RAC3 during the inflammatory response could be a molecular mechanism involved in the control of sensitivity to both pro- and anti-inflammatory stimuli in order to maintain the normal healthy course of the immune response.

  10. Biological response modifiers and their potential use in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Louise S; Skov, Lone; Baadsgaard, Ole

    2003-01-01

    and fewer side-effects than the current systemic therapies now used for severe psoriasis, contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. In the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases, the immune system plays a pivotal role, and this is where biological response modifiers such as monoclonal antibodies...

  11. Inflammatory responses to induced infectious endometritis in mares resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Woodward, Elizabeth; Bojesen, Anders Miki;

    2012-01-01

    inoculation of 105 colony forming units (CFU) Escherichia coli in mares. Before inoculation, mares were classified as resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis based on their uterine inflammatory response to infusion of 109 killed spermatozoa and histological assessment of the endometrial quality...

  12. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome predicts short-term outcome after transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, Thijs C D; Rigter, Sander; Nijenhuis, Vincent J.; Van Kuijk, Jan Peter; Ten Berg, Jurriën M.; Heijmen, Robin H.; Van De Garde, Ewoudt M W; Noordzij, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the minimally invasive nature of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality is of major concern. Several studies showed that outcome was influenced by the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in patients underg

  13. Association of HMGB1 polymorphisms with outcome in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Madsen, Hans O;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a pleiotropic cytokine, recently implicated in the pathophysiology of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Data from experimental sepsis models show that administration of anti-HMGB1 antibodies significantly...

  14. A biomarker panel to discriminate between systemic inflammatory response syndrome SIRS and sepsis and sepsis severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punyadeera, C.; Schneider, E. M.; Schaffer, D.; Hsu, H-Y.; Joos, T.O.; Kriebel, F; Weiss, M.; Verhaegh, W.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on initial efforts to discover putative biomarkers for differential diagnosis of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) vs. sepsis; and different stages of sepsis. In addition, we also investigated whether there are proteins that can discriminate between patients wh

  15. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infection associated with nodular skin lesions and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Sa-Hee; Kang, Min-Hee; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year-old Pekingese dog with atopic dermatitis was referred due to pyrexia, multiple skin nodules, anorexia, and depression. The dog was diagnosed as having systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by bacterial dermatitis. This case presents diagnosis and treatment of SIRS with staphylococcal skin infection in a dog that was immunosuppressed due to long-term use of corticosteroid.

  16. Prognostic Importance of Intraoperative Cultures for Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Bozkurt

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Postoperative infectious complications requiring additional antibiotic treatment and prolonged hospitalization can potentially be observed after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Postoperative infectious complications can occur despite a negative preoperative bladder urine culture (UC) and perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. In this study we prospectively evaluated the association of intraoperative cultures with post-PCNL systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Material and ...

  17. Injury-Induced Type I IFN Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Responses in the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Innate glial response is critical for the induction of inflammatory mediators and recruitment of leukocytes to sites of the injury in the CNS. We have examined the involvement of type I IFN signaling in the mouse hippocampus following sterile injury (transection of entorhinal afferents). Type I I...

  18. Necrotic cells trigger a sterile inflammatory response through the Nlrp3 inflammasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Iyer; W.P. Pulskens; J.J. Sadler; L.M. Butter; G.J. Teske; T.K. Ulland; S.C. Eisenbarth; S. Florquin; R.A. Flavell; J.C. Leemans; F.S. Sutterwala

    2009-01-01

    Dying cells are capable of activating the innate immune system and inducing a sterile inflammatory response. Here, we show that necrotic cells are sensed by the Nlrp3 inflammasome resulting in the subsequent release of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 beta. Necrotic cells produced by pressure disru

  19. Reduction of the inflammatory response in patients undergoing minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; Mariani, MA; van Oeveren, W; Grandjean, JG; Boonstra, PW

    1998-01-01

    Background. The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether the inflammation-associated clinical morbidity as well as the subclinical markers of the inflammatory response are reduced in patients who undergo minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass.

  20. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy drinks (EDs are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx and hippocampus (Hp of adult rats (90 days old. Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats.

  1. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Alfonso; Treviño, Samuel; Guevara, Jorge; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Brambila, Eduardo; Espinosa, Blanca; Moreno-Rodríguez, Albino; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Peña-Rosas, Ulises; Venegas, Berenice; Handal-Silva, Anabella; Morán-Perales, José Luis; Flores, Gonzalo; Aguilar-Alonso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis) at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx) and hippocampus (Hp) of adult rats (90 days old). Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats. PMID:27069534

  2. Global genetic variations predict brain response to faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickie, Erin W; Tahmasebi, Amir; French, Leon;

    2014-01-01

    Face expressions are a rich source of social signals. Here we estimated the proportion of phenotypic variance in the brain response to facial expressions explained by common genetic variance captured by ∼ 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using genomic-relationship-matrix restricted maximu...

  3. The role of intracellular calcium signals in inflammatory responses of polarised cystic fibrosis human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Carla Maria Pedrosa

    2006-01-01

    Hyperinflammatory host responses to bacterial infection have been postulated to be a key step in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Previous studies have indicated that the CF airway epithelium itself contributes to the hyperinflammation of CF airways via an excessive inflammatory response to bacterial infection. However, it has been controversial whether the hyperinflammation of CF epithelia results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and/or is a consequence of persistent airways infection. Recent studies have demonstrated that intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) signals consequent to activation of apical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by pro-inflammatory mediators are increased in CF airway epithelia. Because of the relationship between Ca2+i mobilisation and inflammatory responses, the mechanism for the increased Ca2+i signals in CF was investigated and found to result from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ store expansion. The ER Ca2+ store expansion imparts a hyperinflammatory phenotype to chronically infected airway epithelia as a result of the larger Ca2+i mobilisation coupled to an excessive inflammatory response following GPCR activation. The ER expansion is not dependent on ER retention of misfolded DeltaF508 CFTR, but reflects an epithelial response acquired following persistent luminal airway infection. With respect to the mechanism of ER expansion in CF, the current view is that chronic airway epithelial infection triggers an unfolded protein response as a result of the increased flux of newly synthesised inflammatory mediators and defensive factors into the ER compartment. This unfolded protein response is coupled to X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA splicing and transcription of genes associated with the expansion of the protein-folding capacity of the ER (e.g. increases in ER chaperones and ER membranes). These studies have revealed a novel adaptive response in chronically infected airway epithelia

  4. Antibody Response against Parvovirus in Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Raeisi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some viral infections have been suggested to trigger or cause autoimmune diseases. One of these viruses is parvovirus B19 which can have various rheumatologic manifestations. In this study we investigated the association between parvovirus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosis(SLE, systemic sclerosis(SSc and undifferentiated arthritis at the Rheumatological Clinic, Imam Khomeini hospital. Methods: In this sectional case-control study, IgM and IgG antibodies against parvovirus B19 were measured with ELISA in 41 patients with RA, 28 patients with SLE, 13 patients with SSc, 8 patients with undifferentiated arthritis as well as 90 healthy controls. The ELISA kit (DRG, Germany was semi-quantitative and qualititative. Results: Parvovirus B19 IgM was detected in one patient with RA, one with SSc and four in the control group. IgG anti- B19-specific antibody was detected in 58.5% of RA patients, 67.9% of SLE patients, 69. 2% of SSc patients, 87.5% of undifferentiated arthritis patients as compared to 53.3% of controls. The results were compared between the patient and control groups(p>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, there was no significant correlation for the antibody titer against parvovirus B19 in the patient and control group. The highly positive response of IgG against parvovirus in undifferentiated arthritis implies the need for more research.

  5. Infants' brain responses to speech suggest analysis by synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Patricia K; Ramírez, Rey R; Bosseler, Alexis; Lin, Jo-Fu Lotus; Imada, Toshiaki

    2014-08-01

    Historic theories of speech perception (Motor Theory and Analysis by Synthesis) invoked listeners' knowledge of speech production to explain speech perception. Neuroimaging data show that adult listeners activate motor brain areas during speech perception. In two experiments using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we investigated motor brain activation, as well as auditory brain activation, during discrimination of native and nonnative syllables in infants at two ages that straddle the developmental transition from language-universal to language-specific speech perception. Adults are also tested in Exp. 1. MEG data revealed that 7-mo-old infants activate auditory (superior temporal) as well as motor brain areas (Broca's area, cerebellum) in response to speech, and equivalently for native and nonnative syllables. However, in 11- and 12-mo-old infants, native speech activates auditory brain areas to a greater degree than nonnative, whereas nonnative speech activates motor brain areas to a greater degree than native speech. This double dissociation in 11- to 12-mo-old infants matches the pattern of results obtained in adult listeners. Our infant data are consistent with Analysis by Synthesis: auditory analysis of speech is coupled with synthesis of the motor plans necessary to produce the speech signal. The findings have implications for: (i) perception-action theories of speech perception, (ii) the impact of "motherese" on early language learning, and (iii) the "social-gating" hypothesis and humans' development of social understanding.

  6. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K Terra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT, as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  7. The role of multiple negative social relationships in inflammatory cytokine responses to a laboratory stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunmi Song

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the unique impact of perceived negativity in multiple social relationships on endocrine and inflammatory responses to a laboratory stressor. Via hierarchical cluster analysis, those who reported negative social exchanges across relationships with a romantic partner, family, and their closest friend had higher mean IL-6 across time and a greater increase in TNF-α from 15 min to 75 min post stress. Those who reported negative social exchanges across relationships with roommates, family, and their closest friend showed greater IL-6 responses to stress. Differences in mean IL-6 were accounted for by either depressed mood or hostility, whereas differences in the cytokine stress responses remained significant after controlling for those factors. Overall, this research provides preliminary evidence to suggest that having multiple negative relationships may exacerbate acute inflammatory responses to a laboratory stressor independent of hostility and depressed mood.

  8. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago;

    2005-01-01

    signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...

  9. Modulatory Effect of Gliadin Peptide 10-mer on Epithelial Intestinal CACO-2 Cell Inflammatory Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Capozzi

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory enteropathy, triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by dietary gluten. Gluten is able to elicit proliferation of specific T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in the small intestine. In this study we investigated the possibility that p10-mer, a decapeptide from durum wheat (QQPQDAVQPF, which was previously shown to prevent the activation of celiac peripheral lymphocytes, may exert an inhibitory effect on peptic-tryptic digested gliadin (PT-Gly-stimulated intestinal carcinoma CACO-2 cells. In these cells, incubated with PT-Gly or p31-43 α-gliadin derived peptide in the presence or in the absence of p10-mer, IRAK1 activation and NF-kB, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting, Cyclooxigenase 2 (COX-2 activity by PGE-2 release assay, and production of cytokines in the cell supernatants by ELISA. Our results showed that pre-treatment of CACO-2 cells with p10-mer significantly inhibited IRAK1 activation and NF-kB, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, as well as COX-2 activity (i.e. PGE-2 release and production of the IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines, induced by gliadin peptides. These findings demonstrate the inhibitory effect of the p10-mer peptide on inflammatory response in CACO-2 cells. The results of the present study show that this p10-mer peptide can modulate "in vitro" the inflammatory response induced by gliadin peptides, allowing to move towards new therapeutic strategies. Turning off the inflammatory response, may in fact represent a key target in the immunotherapy of celiac disease.

  10. Cooperative dynamics in auditory brain response

    CERN Document Server

    Kwapien, J; Liu, L C; Ioannides, A A

    1998-01-01

    Simultaneous estimates of the activity in the left and right auditory cortex of five normal human subjects were extracted from Multichannel Magnetoencephalography recordings. Left, right and binaural stimulation were used, in separate runs, for each subject. The resulting time-series of left and right auditory cortex activity were analysed using the concept of mutual information. The analysis constitutes an objective method to address the nature of inter-hemispheric correlations in response to auditory stimulations. The results provide a clear evidence for the occurrence of such correlations mediated by a direct information transport, with clear laterality effects: as a rule, the contralateral hemisphere leads by 10-20ms, as can be seen in the average signal. The strength of the inter-hemispheric coupling, which cannot be extracted from the average data, is found to be highly variable from subject to subject, but remarkably stable for each subject.

  11. Cortisol and Inflammatory Biomarkers Predict Poor Treatment Response in First Episode Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mondelli, Valeria; Ciufolini, Simone; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Bonaccorso, Stefania; Di Forti, Marta; Giordano, Annalisa; Marques, Tiago R; Zunszain, Patricia A.; Morgan, Craig; MURRAY, Robin M.; Pariante, Carmine M.; Dazzan, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cortisol and inflammatory markers have been increasingly reported as abnormal at psychosis onset. The main aim of our study was to investigate the ability of these biomarkers to predict treatment response at 12 weeks follow-up in first episode psychosis.METHODS: In a longitudinal study, we collected saliva and blood samples in 68 first episode psychosis patients (and 57 controls) at baseline and assessed response to clinician-led antipsychotic treatment after 12 weeks. Moreover, w...

  12. The role of interpersonal processes in shaping inflammatory responses to social-evaluative threat

    OpenAIRE

    John-Henderson, NA; Stellar, JE; Mendoza-Denton, R; Francis, DD

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V.. In response to social-evaluative threat induced in the laboratory, lower (compared to higher) subjective social class of a participant predicts greater increases in the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). In spite of the interpersonal nature of social-evaluation, little work has explored whether characteristics of the evaluator shape physiological responses in this context. In the current study, in a sample of 190 college students (male = 66), we explored whether...

  13. Systemic Inflammatory Response to Smoking in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Evidence of a Gender Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Faner, Rosa; Gonzalez, Nuria; Cruz, Tamara; Kalko, Susana Graciela; Agustí, Alvar

    2014-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoking is the main risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but not all smokers develop the disease. An abnormal pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response to smoking is thought to play a major pathogenic role in COPD, but this has never been tested directly. Methods We studied the systemic biomarker and leukocyte transcriptomic response (Affymetrix microarrays) to smoking exposure in 10 smokers with COPD and 10 smokers with normal spirometry. We also ...

  14. Influence of DMT1 and iron status on inflammatory responses in the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jonghan; Molina, Ramon M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Buckett, Peter D.; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is the major iron transporter responsible for duodenal dietary iron absorption and is required for erythropoiesis. Recent studies suggest that loss of DMT1 activity could be involved in metal-related lung injury, but little is known about the effects of iron status and DMT1 function on pulmonary inflammation. To better define the role of DMT1 and iron status in pulmonary inflammatory responses, we performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) following intratrache...

  15. Wound trauma mediated inflammatory signaling attenuates a tissue regenerative response in MRL/MpJ mice

    OpenAIRE

    Elster Eric A; Anam Khairul; Amare Mihret F; Zins Stephen R; Davis Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Severe trauma can induce pathophysiological responses that have marked inflammatory components. The development of systemic inflammation following severe thermal injury has been implicated in immune dysfunction, delayed wound healing, multi-system organ failure and increased mortality. Methods In this study, we examined the impact of thermal injury-induced systemic inflammation on the healing response of a secondary wound in the MRL/MpJ mouse model, which was anatomically ...

  16. Effects of Immunosuppressants on Immune Response to Vaccine in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Cao; Di Zhao; An-Tao Xu; Jun Shen; Zhi-Hua Ran

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (nonimmunosuppressants and immunosuppressants). Data Sources: We completed an online systematic search using PubMed to identify all articles published in English between January 1990 and December 2013 assessing the effect of the response rate to vaccination in different treatment groups (with and without immunomodulators). The following terms were used: "inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)" OR "Crohn′s dise...

  17. The effect of dietary fatty acids on post-operative inflammatory response in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langerhuus, Sine Nygaard; Jensen, Karin Hjelholt; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine;

    2012-01-01

    ), sunflower oil (SO, n 28), or animal fat (AF, n 28) was evaluated with respect to post-operative responses in inflammatory markers in a porcine model on aortic vascular prosthetic graft infection. In the early post-operative period (0 ...The potential anti-inflammatory effects of dietary fish oil (FO) have been studied in numerous clinical trials. However, variation in lifestyle and morbidity among patients can be difficult to control. In the present study, the impact of a 3-week dietary pre-treatment with 10% (w/w) FO (n 28...

  18. Inflammatory response of a prostate stromal cell line induced by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, S J; Han, I H; Kim, J H; Gu, N Y; Seo, M Y; Chung, Y H; Ryu, J S

    2016-04-01

    While Trichomonas vaginalis, a cause of sexually transmitted infection, is known as a surface-dwelling protozoa, trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissue from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis by immunoperoxidase assay or PCR. However, the immune response of prostate stromal cells infected with T. vaginalis has not been investigated. Our objective was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce an inflammatory response in prostate stromal cells. Incubation of a human prostate stromal myofibroblast cells (WPMY-1) with live T. vaginalis T016 increased expression of the inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2. In addition, TLR4, ROS, MAPK and NF-κB expression increased, while inhibitors of TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB reduced CXCL8 and CCL2 production. Medium conditioned by incubation of WPMY-1 cells with T. vaginalis stimulated the migration of human neutrophils and monocytes (THP-1 cells). We conclude that T. vaginalis increases CXCL8 and CCL2 production by human prostate stromal cells by activating TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB, and this in turn attracts neutrophils and monocytes and leads to an inflammatory response. This study is the first attempt to demonstrate an inflammatory reaction in prostate stromal cells caused by T. vaginalis.

  19. The inflammatory response plays a major role in the acute radiation syndrome induced by fission radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agay, D.; Chancerelle, Y.; Hirodin, F.; Mathieu, J.; Multon, E.; Van Uye, A.; Mestries, J.C. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees Emile Parde, Departement de Radiologie, 38 - La Tronche (France)

    1997-03-01

    At high dose rates, both gamma and neutron irradiation induce an acute inflammatory syndrome with huge intercellular communication disorders. This inflammatory syndrome evolves in two phases, separated by a latency phase. During the prodromal phase, the molecular and cellular lesions induced by free radicals trigger an initial response which associates cellular repair and multicellular interactions involving both humoral and nervous communications. A large part of perturbations constitute a non specific inflammatory syndrome and clinically silent coagulation disorders which are linked by common intercellular mediators. All these perturbations are rapidly reversible and there is no correlation between the radiation dose and the severity of the response. During the manifest-illness phase, both inflammatory and coagulation disorders resume, slightly preceding the clinical symptoms. Biochemical symptoms are moderate in the animals which will survive, but they escape regulatory mechanisms in those which will die, giving rise to a vicious circle. These biochemical disorders are largely responsible for the death. With lower dose rates, it cannot be excluded that great cellular communication disorders take place at the tissue level, with limited blood modifications. This aspect should be taken into account for the optimization of cytokine therapies. (authors)

  20. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ae [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  1. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO2 or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% 239Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO2-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% 239Pu than for 70% 239Pu. (authors)

  2. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  3. Bioinformatics analysis of the early inflammatory response in a rat thermal injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthiaume Francois

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermal injury is among the most severe forms of trauma and its effects are both local and systemic. Response to thermal injury includes cellular protection mechanisms, inflammation, hypermetabolism, prolonged catabolism, organ dysfunction and immuno-suppression. It has been hypothesized that gene expression patterns in the liver will change with severe burns, thus reflecting the role the liver plays in the response to burn injury. Characterizing the molecular fingerprint (i.e., expression profile of the inflammatory response resulting from burns may help elucidate the activated mechanisms and suggest new therapeutic intervention. In this paper we propose a novel integrated framework for analyzing time-series transcriptional data, with emphasis on the burn-induced response within the context of the rat animal model. Our analysis robustly identifies critical expression motifs, indicative of the dynamic evolution of the inflammatory response and we further propose a putative reconstruction of the associated transcription factor activities. Results Implementation of our algorithm on data obtained from an animal (rat burn injury study identified 281 genes corresponding to 4 unique profiles. Enrichment evaluation upon both gene ontologies and transcription factors, verifies the inflammation-specific character of the selections and the rationalization of the burn-induced inflammatory response. Conducting the transcription network reconstruction and analysis, we have identified transcription factors, including AHR, Octamer Binding Proteins, Kruppel-like Factors, and cell cycle regulators as being highly important to an organism's response to burn response. These transcription factors are notable due to their roles in pathways that play a part in the gross physiological response to burn such as changes in the immune response and inflammation. Conclusion Our results indicate that our novel selection/classification algorithm has been

  4. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans.

  5. Gender Difference in Bacteria Endotoxin-Induced Inflammatory and Anorexic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-related anorexic response has been observed in systemic diseases as well as in localized infection and is an important issue in patient care. We tested the hypothesis that upon the same endotoxin exposure, males have more severe inflammatory responses and thus suffer from more negative effect on appetite. Ten-week old male and female mice were compared in their plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines after a body weight-based i.p. injection of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide. Male mice consistently showed significantly higher levels of IL6 and TNFα than female mice. The difference was observed starting at 3 hours after the systemic endotoxin exposure. It was independent of the level of endotoxin dosage and of the genotype of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL10. Interestingly, endotoxin-injected male mice also had significantly higher plasma IL10 levels compared to the female mice. Pre-puberty young mice showed no gender differences in the plasma levels of IL6, TNFα and IL10. Their cytokine levels were mostly between that of the adult males and females. Consistent with the higher inflammatory response in male mice, the endotoxin exposure also led to significantly more appetite loss in male mice at a range of doses in two strains of mice. Saline injection in the absence of endotoxin affected neither the cytokine levels nor the appetite. Although a direct mechanistic link between inflammation parameters and appetite was not addressed here, the results support that male gender could be a risk factor for higher pro-inflammatory cytokines and anorexic response after the endotoxin exposure. PMID:27631979

  6. Technical Approach Determines Inflammatory Response after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Erdoes

    Full Text Available To investigate the periprocedural inflammatory response in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI with different technical approaches.Patients were prospectively allocated to one of the following treatments: SAVR using conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC, n = 47 or minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC, n = 15, or TAVI using either transapical (TA, n = 15 or transfemoral (TF, n = 24 access. Exclusion criteria included infection, pre-procedural immunosuppressive or antibiotic drug therapy and emergency indications. We investigated interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR, white blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and soluble L-selectin (sCD62L levels before the procedure and at 4, 24, and 48 h after aortic valve replacement. Data are presented for group interaction (p-values for inter-group comparison as determined by the Greenhouse-Geisser correction.SAVR on CECC was associated with the highest levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP (p<0.017, and 0.007, respectively. SAVR on MECC showed the highest descent in levels of HLA-DR and sCD62L (both p<0.001 in the perioperative period. TA-TAVI showed increased intraprocedural concentration and the highest peak of IL-6 (p = 0.017. Significantly smaller changes in the inflammatory markers were observed in TF-TAVI.Surgical and interventional approaches to aortic valve replacement result in inflammatory modulation which differs according to the invasiveness of the procedure. As expected, extracorporeal circulation is associated with the most marked pro-inflammatory activation, whereas TF-TAVI emerges as the approach with the most attenuated inflammatory response. Factors such as the pre-treatment patient condition and the extent of myocardial injury also significantly affect inflammatory biomarker patterns. Accordingly, TA-TAVI is to be classified not

  7. GBA2-encoded β-glucosidase activity is involved in the inflammatory response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Loberto

    Full Text Available Current anti-inflammatory strategies for the treatment of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF are limited; thus, there is continued interest in identifying additional molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Given the emerging role of sphingolipids (SLs in various respiratory disorders, including CF, drugs that selectively target the enzymes associated with SL metabolism are under development. Miglustat, a well-characterized iminosugar-based inhibitor of β-glucosidase 2 (GBA2, has shown promise in CF treatment because it reduces the inflammatory response to infection by P. aeruginosa and restores F508del-CFTR chloride channel activity. This study aimed to probe the molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory activity of miglustat by examining specifically the role of GBA2 following the infection of CF bronchial epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa. We also report the anti-inflammatory activity of another potent inhibitor of GBA2 activity, namely N-(5-adamantane-1-yl-methoxypentyl-deoxynojirimycin (Genz-529648. In CF bronchial cells, inhibition of GBA2 by miglustat or Genz-529648 significantly reduced the induction of IL-8 mRNA levels and protein release following infection by P. aeruginosa. Hence, the present data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of miglustat and Genz-529648 are likely exerted through inhibition of GBA2.

  8. Sexually dimorphic myeloid inflammatory and metabolic responses to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C; Lanzetta, N; Eter, L; Singer, K

    2016-08-01

    It is well known in clinical and animal studies that women and men have different disease risk as well as different disease physiology. Women of reproductive age are protected from metabolic and cardiovascular disease compared with postmenopausal women and men. Most murine studies are skewed toward the use of male mice to study obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction because of similar protection in female mice. We have investigated dietary obesity in a mouse model and have directly compared inflammatory responses in males and females. In this review we will summarize what is known about sex differences in diet-induced inflammation and will summarize our data on this topic. It is clear that sex differences in high-fat diet-induced inflammatory activation are due to cell intrinsic differences in hematopoietic responses to obesogenic cues, but further research is needed to understand what leads to sexually dimorphic responses. PMID:27252473

  9. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J triggers caspase-1-mediated inflammatory response in chick livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-lan; Shan, Wen-jie; Jia, Li-juan; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Jin-jing; Wu, Ya-rong; Xu, Fa-zhi; Li, Jin-nian

    2016-04-01

    Many pathogens trigger caspase-1-mediated innate immune responses. Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) causes serious immunosuppression and diverse tumors in chicks. The caspase-1 inflammasome mechanism of response to ALV-J invading remains unclear. Here we investigated the expression of caspase-1, the inflammasome adaptor NLRP3, IL-1β and IL-18 in response to ALV-J infection in the liver of chick. We found caspase-1 mRNA expression was elevated at 5 dpi and peaked at 7 dpi in ALV-J infected animals. Corresponding to this, the expressions of NLRP3 and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were significantly increased at 5 or 7 dpi. In addition, caspase-1 protein expression and inflammatory cell infiltration were induced after virus infection. These results indicated that ALV-J infection could trigger the caspase-1- mediated inflammatory response in chicks. Thus, an understanding of the inflammatory responses can provide a better insight into the pathogenicity of ALV-J and a possible anti-virus target for ALV-J infection.

  10. Wild skylarks seasonally modulate energy budgets but maintain energetically costly inflammatory immune responses throughout the annual cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegemann, A.; Matson, K.D.; Versteegh, M.A.; Tieleman, B.I.

    2012-01-01

    A central hypothesis of ecological immunology is that immune defences are traded off against competing physiological and behavioural processes. During energetically demanding periods, birds are predicted to switch from expensive inflammatory responses to less costly immune responses. Acute phase res

  11. Wild Skylarks Seasonally Modulate Energy Budgets but Maintain Energetically Costly Inflammatory Immune Responses throughout the Annual Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D.; Versteegh, Maaike A.; Tieleman, B. Irene

    2012-01-01

    A central hypothesis of ecological immunology is that immune defences are traded off against competing physiological and behavioural processes. During energetically demanding periods, birds are predicted to switch from expensive inflammatory responses to less costly immune responses. Acute phase res

  12. An LPS based method to stimulate the inflammatory response in growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Knudsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliable indicators are needed to study the relationship between the inflammatory response of the growing rabbit and breeding factors such as feeding practices. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation of the inflammatory response is a valid model of bacterial infection in laboratory animals, but no data on the growing rabbit has yet been obtained. The aim of our study was to determine an adequate dose of LPS to inject in growing rabbits in order to elicit a measurable inflammatory response in terms of plasmatic TNF-α and rise in rectal temperature. Three trials were carried out in this study: 2 development trials, the first (n=18 testing 3 doses of LPS (2, 10, 50 μg/kg on the plasmatic TNF-α concentration at 90 and 180 min post injection, and the second trial (n=36 testing 4 doses of LPS (50, 75, 100 and 150 μg/kg on the TNF-α concentration 90 min post injection and the rectal temperature. The third trial was designed as an application of the method in a large number of animals (n=32 to study the effect of feed restriction and dietary increase in digestible fibre to starch ratio on the LPS inflammatory challenge response of growing rabbits. In development trials 1 and 2, animals had measurable TNF-α responses for doses higher than 10 μg/kg at 90 min post injection, with an increase in the number of responsive animals along with the dose. High variability was observed in TNF-α concentrations in responsive animals (coefficient of variation from 44 to 94%. Animals demonstrated an increase in rectal temperature for all doses injected in the range of 50-150 μg/kg from 90 min post injection with a peak at 180 min (ΔTr =1.9±0.7°C. Our observations led us to choose a dose of 100 μg/kg of LPS for our following studies, as the responses in terms of temperature and TNF-α were the most satisfactory. The application of our LPS injection protocol to our nutritional study enabled us to validate our protocol (ΔTr =1.1±0.7°C at 180 min and 15

  13. Evaluation of the effects of fructose on oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Abigail; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Taschetto, Luciane; Vuolo, Franciele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of fructose in tissues and biological fluids of patients. The disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, responsible for metabolizing fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on oxidative stress and neuroinflammatory parameters in the cerebral cortex of 30-day-old Wistar rats. Animals received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9 %) (control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g) (fructose group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex was isolated. Oxidative stress (levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), carbonyl content, nitrate and nitrite levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation, glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and neuroinflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity) were investigated. Acute fructose administration increased levels of TBA-RS and carbonyl content, indicating lipid peroxidation and protein damage. Furthermore, SOD activity increased, whereas CAT activity was decreased. The levels of GSH, nitrate, and nitrite and DCFH oxidation were not altered by acute fructose administration. Finally, cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α levels, as well as MPO activity, were not altered. Our present data indicate that fructose provokes oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex, which induces oxidation of lipids and proteins and changes of CAT and SOD activities. It seems therefore reasonable to propose that antioxidants may serve as an adjuvant therapy to diets or to other pharmacological agents used for these patients, to avoid oxidative damage to the brain.

  14. Submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli evoke electrical brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperdin, Holger F; Spierer, Lucas; Becker, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Landis, Theodor

    2015-04-01

    Subliminal perception is strongly associated to the processing of meaningful or emotional information and has mostly been studied using visual masking. In this study, we used high density 256-channel EEG coupled with an liquid crystal display (LCD) tachistoscope to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of the brain response to visual checkerboard stimuli (Experiment 1) or blank stimuli (Experiment 2) presented without a mask for 1 ms (visible), 500 µs (partially visible), and 250 µs (subliminal) by applying time-wise, assumption-free nonparametric randomization statistics on the strength and on the topography of high-density scalp-recorded electric field. Stimulus visibility was assessed in a third separate behavioral experiment. Results revealed that unmasked checkerboards presented subliminally for 250 µs evoked weak but detectable visual evoked potential (VEP) responses. When the checkerboards were replaced by blank stimuli, there was no evidence for the presence of an evoked response anymore. Furthermore, the checkerboard VEPs were modulated topographically between 243 and 296 ms post-stimulus onset as a function of stimulus duration, indicative of the engagement of distinct configuration of active brain networks. A distributed electrical source analysis localized this modulation within the right superior parietal lobule near the precuneus. These results show the presence of a brain response to submillisecond unmasked subliminal visual stimuli independently of their emotional saliency or meaningfulness and opens an avenue for new investigations of subliminal stimulation without using visual masking. PMID:25487054

  15. The Sbi Protein Contributes to Staphylococcus aureus Inflammatory Response during Systemic Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Daniela Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes infections that may present high morbidity and mortality. Among its many virulence factors protein A (SpA and Staphylococcal binding immunoglobulin protein (Sbi bind the Fc portion of IgG interfering with opsonophagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that SpA interacts with the TNF-α receptor (TNFR 1 through each of the five IgG binding domains and induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The IgG binding domains of Sbi are homologous to those of SpA, which allow us to hypothesize that Sbi might also have a role in the inflammatory response induced by S. aureus. We demonstrate that Sbi is a novel factor that participates in the induction of the inflammatory response during staphylococcal infections via TNFR1 and EGFR mediated signaling as well as downstream MAPKs. The expression of Sbi significantly contributed to IL-6 production and modulated CXCL-1 expression as well as neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection, thus demonstrating for the first time its relevance as a pro-inflammatory staphylococcal antigen in an in vivo model.

  16. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  17. Hippocampal structure, metabolism, and inflammatory response after a 6-week intense aerobic exercise in healthy young adults: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gerd; Herbsleb, Marco; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Schumann, Andy; Brünner, Franziska; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Gussew, Alexander; Puta, Christian; Smesny, Stefan; Gabriel, Holger W; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Interventional studies suggest that changes in physical fitness affect brain function and structure. We studied the influence of high intensity physical exercise on hippocampal volume and metabolism in 17 young healthy male adults during a 6-week exercise program compared with matched controls. We further aimed to relate these changes to hypothesized changes in exercised-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We show profound improvement of physical fitness in most subjects and a positive correlation between the degree of fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels. We unexpectedly observed an average volume decrease of about 2%, which was restricted to right hippocampal subfields CA2/3, subiculum, and dentate gyrus and which correlated with fitness improvement and increased BDNF levels negatively. This result indicates that mainly those subjects who did not benefit from the exercise program show decreased hippocampal volume, reduced BDNF levels, and increased TNF-α concentrations. While spectroscopy results do not indicate any neuronal loss (unchanged N-acetylaspartate levels) decreased glutamate-glutamine levels were observed in the right anterior hippocampus in the exercise group only. Responder characteristics need to be studied in more detail. Our results point to an important role of the inflammatory response after exercise on changes in hippocampal structure. PMID:26082010

  18. Maintaining Brain Health by Monitoring Inflammatory Processes: a Mechanism to Promote Successful Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Rosano, Caterina; Marsland, Anna L.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining brain health promotes successful aging. The main determinants of brain health are the preservation of cognitive function and remaining free from structural and metabolic abnormalities, including loss of neuronal synapses, atrophy, small vessel disease and focal amyloid deposits visible by neuroimaging. Promising studies indicate that these determinants are to some extent modifiable, even among adults seventy years and older. Converging animal and human evidence further suggests th...

  19. Identification of a common gene expression response in different lung inflammatory diseases in rodents and macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available To identify gene expression responses common to multiple pulmonary diseases we collected microarray data for acute lung inflammation models from 12 studies and used these in a meta-analysis. The data used include exposures to air pollutants; bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections; and allergic asthma models. Hierarchical clustering revealed a cluster of 383 up-regulated genes with a common response. This cluster contained five subsets, each characterized by more specific functions such as inflammatory response, interferon-induced genes, immune signaling, or cell proliferation. Of these subsets, the inflammatory response was common to all models, interferon-induced responses were more pronounced in bacterial and viral models, and a cell division response was more prominent in parasitic and allergic models. A common cluster containing 157 moderately down-regulated genes was associated with the effects of tissue damage. Responses to influenza in macaques were weaker than in mice, reflecting differences in the degree of lung inflammation and/or virus replication. The existence of a common cluster shows that in vivo lung inflammation in response to various pathogens or exposures proceeds through shared molecular mechanisms.

  20. The role of TLR2 in the acute inflammatory response induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Vanessa; Teixeira, Catarina; Borges da Silva, Henrique; D'Império Lima, Maria Regina; Dos-Santos, Maria Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Envenomation by snakes of the species Bothrops atrox induces local and systemic effects. Local effects include drastic tissue damage and a marked inflammatory response as a result of the synthesis and release of a variety of protein and lipid mediators. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways can play an important role in this response, leading to synthesis of these inflammatory mediators. This study investigated the influence of TLR2 on the acute inflammatory response induced by Bothrops atrox venom. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT) and TLR2 gene knockout mice (TLR2(-/-)) were injected with Bothrops atrox venom (BaV), and the following responses to the venom were assessed in peritoneal exudate: leukocyte accumulation; release of mediators, including CCL-2, IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6 and LTB4; protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2; and quantification of their products PGE2 and TXA2. After injection with BaV, the TLR2(-/-) mice (TLR2(-/-)BaV) had higher levels of IL-6 and CCL-2 than WT animals kept under the same conditions (WTBaV), together with an accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), inhibition of IL-1β and LTB4 and reduced mononuclear leukocyte influx. However, no significant differences in COX-2 protein expression or PGE2, TXA2 and IL-10 production between the TLR2(-/-)BaV and WTBav animals were observed. Together, these results indicate that the signaling pathway activated by TLR2 acts by modulating the induced inflammatory response to BaV through the direct action of venom-associated molecular patterns (VAMPs) or indirectly by forming damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and that this may have important therapeutic implications. PMID:27109323

  1. A New Experimental Polytrauma Model in Rats: Molecular Characterization of the Early Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weckbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The molecular mechanisms of the immune response after polytrauma are highly complex and far from fully understood. In this paper, we characterize a new standardized polytrauma model in rats based on the early molecular inflammatory and apoptotic response. Methods. Male Wistar rats (250 g, 6–10/group were anesthetized and exposed to chest trauma (ChT, closed head injury (CHI, or Tib/Fib fracture including a soft tissue trauma (Fx + STT or to the following combination of injuries: (1 ChT; (2 ChT + Fx + STT; (3 ChT + CHI; (4 CHI; (5 polytrauma (PT = ChT + CHI + Fx + STT. Sham-operated rats served as negative controls. The inflammatory response was quantified at 2 hours and 4 hours after trauma by analysis of “key” inflammatory mediators, including selected cytokines and complement components, in serum and bronchoalveolar (BAL fluid samples. Results. Polytraumatized (PT rats showed a significant systemic and intrapulmonary release of cytokines, chemokines, and complement anaphylatoxins, compared to rats with isolated injuries or selected combinations of injuries. Conclusion. This new rat model appears to closely mimic the early immunological response of polytrauma observed in humans and may provide a valid basis for evaluation of the complex pathophysiology and future therapeutic immune modulatory approaches in experimental polytrauma.

  2. Agent-based modeling of endotoxin-induced acute inflammatory response in human blood leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammation is a highly complex biological response evoked by many stimuli. A persistent challenge in modeling this dynamic process has been the (nonlinear nature of the response that precludes the single-variable assumption. Systems-based approaches offer a promising possibility for understanding inflammation in its homeostatic context. In order to study the underlying complexity of the acute inflammatory response, an agent-based framework is developed that models the emerging host response as the outcome of orchestrated interactions associated with intricate signaling cascades and intercellular immune system interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An agent-based modeling (ABM framework is proposed to study the nonlinear dynamics of acute human inflammation. The model is implemented using NetLogo software. Interacting agents involve either inflammation-specific molecules or cells essential for the propagation of the inflammatory reaction across the system. Spatial orientation of molecule interactions involved in signaling cascades coupled with the cellular heterogeneity are further taken into account. The proposed in silico model is evaluated through its ability to successfully reproduce a self-limited inflammatory response as well as a series of scenarios indicative of the nonlinear dynamics of the response. Such scenarios involve either a persistent (noninfectious response or innate immune tolerance and potentiation effects followed by perturbations in intracellular signaling molecules and cascades. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ABM framework developed in this study provides insight on the stochastic interactions of the mediators involved in the propagation of endotoxin signaling at the cellular response level. The simulation results are in accordance with our prior research effort associated with the development of deterministic human inflammation models that include transcriptional dynamics, signaling, and physiological

  3. Regional Brain Responses in Nulliparous Women to Emotional Infant Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya, Jessica L.; Nicole Landi; Hedy Kober; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Rutherford, Helena J. V.; W Einar Mencl; Mayes, Linda C.; POTENZA, MARC N.

    2012-01-01

    Infant cries and facial expressions influence social interactions and elicit caretaking behaviors from adults. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that neural responses to infant stimuli involve brain regions that process rewards. However, these studies have yet to investigate individual differences in tendencies to engage or withdraw from motivationally relevant stimuli. To investigate this, we used event-related fMRI to scan 17 nulliparous women. Participants were presented with novel infan...

  4. Globular adiponectin induces a pro-inflammatory response in human astrocytic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana [School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Klegeris, Andis [Department of Biology, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Little, Jonathan P., E-mail: jonathan.little@ubc.ca [School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC (Canada)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Adiponectin receptors are expressed in human astrocytes. • Globular adiponectin induces secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 from cultured astrocytes. • Adiponectin may play a pro-inflammatory role in astrocytes. - Abstract: Neuroinflammation, mediated in part by activated brain astrocytes, plays a critical role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine secreted from adipose tissue and has been reported to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects in peripheral tissues; however, the effects of adiponectin on astrocytes remain unknown. Shifts in peripheral concentrations of adipokines, including adiponectin, could contribute to the observed link between midlife adiposity and increased AD risk. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of globular adiponectin (gAd) on pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and secretion in human U373 MG astrocytic cells and to explore the potential involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3 K) signaling pathways in these processes. We demonstrated expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) and adipoR2 in U373 MG cells and primary human astrocytes. gAd induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and gene expression of IL-6, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-8 in U373 MG cells. Using specific inhibitors, we found that NF-κB, p38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in gAd-induced induction of cytokines with ERK1/2 contributing the most. These findings provide evidence that gAd may induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human astrocytes.

  5. Oxidative and pro-inflammatory impact of regular and denicotinized cigarettes on blood brain barrier endothelial cells: is smoking reduced or nicotine-free products really safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Both active and passive tobacco smoke (TS) potentially impair the vascular endothelial function in a causative and dose-dependent manner, largely related to the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nicotine, and pro-inflammatory activity. Together these factors can compromise the restrictive properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and trigger the pathogenesis/progression of several neurological disorders including silent cerebral infarction, stroke, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Based on these premises, we analyzed and assessed the toxic impact of smoke extract from a range of tobacco products (with varying levels of nicotine) on brain microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3), a well characterized human BBB model. Results Initial profiling of TS showed a significant release of reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in full flavor, nicotine-free (NF, “reduced-exposure” brand) and ultralow nicotine products. This release correlated with increased oxidative cell damage. In parallel, membrane expression of endothelial tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin were significantly down-regulated suggesting the impairment of barrier function. Expression of VE-cadherin and claudin-5 were also increased by the ultralow or nicotine free tobacco smoke extract. TS extract from these cigarettes also induced an inflammatory response in BBB ECs as demonstrated by increased IL-6 and MMP-2 levels and up-regulation of vascular adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1 and PECAM-1. Conclusions In summary, our results indicate that NF and ultralow nicotine cigarettes are potentially more harmful to the BBB endothelium than regular tobacco products. In addition, this study demonstrates that the TS-induced toxicity at BBB ECs is strongly correlated to the TAR and NO levels in the cigarettes rather than the nicotine content. PMID:24755281

  6. The inflammatory response in blood and in remote organs following acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Højberg-Holm, Jimmy;

    2014-01-01

    In patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) mortality remains high, despite the fact that the patients are treated with continuous renal replacement therapy. The interaction between the kidney and the immune system might explain the high mortality observed in AKI. In order to elucidate the...... interaction between the kidney and immune system we developed a two-hit model of AKI and endotoxemia. Our hypothesis was that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) of the kidney simultaneously with endotoxemia would generate a more extensive inflammatory response compared to I/R of the hind legs. Our expectation was....... The neutrophil infiltration of distant organs measured by the levels of MPO in the lung and liver also showed a significantly higher level in renal I/R compared to hind leg I/R. Renal I/R is associated with a more pronounced inflammatory response in blood and distant organs. The high cytokine levels...

  7. Ultrasonographic approach to diagnosis of fetal inflammatory response syndrome: a tool for at-risk fetuses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Erez, Offer; Loverro, Giuseppe; Di Naro, Edoardo; Weintraub, Adi Yehuda; Tirosh, Dan; Baron, Joel; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2016-07-01

    Preterm parturition is a syndrome that may result from many underlying mechanisms. Infection and inflammation are the prominent ones. Intrauterine infection and inflammation have an effect akin to sepsis, and that is similar to systemic inflammatory response in adults. Indeed, there is evidence to support the association of a fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) to systemic infection and inflammation. The utilization of invasive procedures for the prenatal diagnosis of FIRS is associated with a risk for complications resulting from the invasive method. The progress in the imaging quality of obstetrical ultrasound and the development of novel methods for functional anatomical assessment of the fetal organs may help to identify, noninvasively, fetuses at risk for FIRS in patients presenting with preterm labor. We review the studies describing advanced sonographic modalities and the imaging findings in the heart, thymus, kidney, adrenal glands, and spleen of these fetuses. PMID:26821337

  8. Brain involvement in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zikou, Anastasia K.; Astrakas, Loukas G.; Tzarouchi, Loukia C.; Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Kosmidou, Maria; Tsianos, Epameinondas [University of Ioannina, 1st Department of Internal Medicine (Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit), Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2014-10-15

    To investigate structural brain changes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 IBD patients (aged 45.16 ± 14.71 years) and 20 aged-matched control subjects. The imaging protocol consisted of a sagittal-FLAIR, a T1-weighted high-resolution three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and a multisession spin-echo echo-planar diffusion-weighted sequence. Differences between patients and controls in brain volume and diffusion indices were evaluated using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) methods, respectively. The presence of white-matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) was evaluated on FLAIR images. VBM revealed decreased grey matter (GM) volume in patients in the fusiform and the inferior temporal gyrus bilaterally, the right precentral gyrus, the right supplementary motor area, the right middle frontal gyrus and the left superior parietal gyrus (p < 0.05). TBSS showed decreased axial diffusivity (AD) in the right corticospinal tract and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus in patients compared with controls. A larger number of WMHIs was observed in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with IBD show an increase in WMHIs and GM atrophy, probably related to cerebral vasculitis and ischaemia. Decreased AD in major white matter tracts could be a secondary phenomenon, representing Wallerian degeneration. (orig.)

  9. Observation on the change of inflammatory stress and metabolic status of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during the perioperative period of standard large trauma craniotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Luan

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe and study the change state of inflammatory stress and metabolic status of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during the perioperative period of standard large trauma craniotomy. Methods:A total of 58 surgical patients with severe traumatic brain injury in our hospital from January 2013 to July 2015 were selected as the study object, and 29 cases of them were divided into control group (conventional craniotomy group) and other 29 cases into observation group (standard large trauma craniotomy group) by the differences of operation methods, then the cerebral metabolism, proteometabolism and inflammatory stress indexes of two groups before the surgery and at first, third and fifth day after the surgery were compared. Results:The cerebral metabolism, proteometabolism and inflammatory stress indexes of two groups before the surgery all had no significant differences, the cerebral metabolism, proteometabolism and inflammatory stress indexes of observation group at first, third and fifth day after the surgery were all better than those of control group, the differences of two groups at differences time after the surgery were all significant. Conclusion:The bad fluctuations of inflammatory stress and metabolic status of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during the perioperative period of standard large trauma craniotomy are smaller than those of conventional craniotomy, so the standard large trauma craniotomy are more suitable for the patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

  10. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook [College of Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, 1, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Youngsook, E-mail: ysson@khu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Biotechnology and Department of Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science, Kyung Hee University Global Campus, Seochun-dong, Kiheung-ku, Yong In 441-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  11. A role for autoantibodies in enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to a self-antigen, thyroid peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Leslie, R Graham Q;

    2009-01-01

    individuals with no familiar disposition to AITD, and mixed each serum with normal mononuclear cells (MNCs). Following challenge with TPO, the MNCs' production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, correlated with the TPOAb content...... that TPO-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from phagocytic cells and T-cell responses to TPO are promoted by TPOAbs....

  12. Alcohol and Inflammatory Responses: Summary of the 2013 Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting

    OpenAIRE

    Niya L Morris; Ippolito, Jill A.; Curtis, Brenda J.; Chen, Michael M.; Friedman, Scott L.; Hines, Ian N.; Haddad, Gorges E.; Chang, Sulie L; Brown, Lou Ann; Waldschmidt, Thomas; Mandrekar, Pranoti; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2014-01-01

    Loyola University Chicago, Health Sciences Campus in Maywood, Illinois hosted the 18th annual Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting on November 22, 2013. This year’s meeting emphasized alcohol’s effect on inflammatory responses in diverse disease states and injury conditions. The meeting consisted of three plenary sessions demonstrating the adverse effects of alcohol, specifically, liver inflammation, adverse systemic effects, and alcohol’s role in infection and immun...

  13. Whey protein enhances normal inflammatory responses during cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ebaid Hossam; Salem Amir; Sayed Abdalla; Metwalli Ali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Prolonged wound healing is a complication of diabetes that contributes to mortality. Impaired wound healing occurs as a consequence of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Whey protein (WP) is able to reduce the oxygen radicals and increase the levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with WP could enhance normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic rats. Animals we...

  14. Inflammatory response in the early prediction of severity in human acute pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Viedma, J A; M. Pérez-Mateo; Agulló, J.; Domínguez, J E; F. Carballo

    1994-01-01

    The role of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis and its relation with the clinical course was examined. This study examined if the serial measurement of polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) elastase/A1PI complex, phospholipase A catalytic activity, C reactive protein, and other acute phase proteins, and the protease inhibitor alpha 2-macroglobulin, provides meaningful information for prognosis. Eighty non-consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis, classified according to their c...

  15. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy not responsive to other treatments.

    OpenAIRE

    Nemni, R; Amadio, S; Fazio, R; GALARDI, G; Previtali, S; G. Comi

    1994-01-01

    Nine patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating poliradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. All patients had been previously treated with prednisone and/or plasma exchange without effect. Objective improvement in clinical condition occurred in six patients. One patient became refractory after two treatment courses, two patients had no response. The results indicate that intravenous immunoglobulin has beneficial effects in a high percentage of patients wit...

  16. The role of multiple negative social relationships in inflammatory cytokine responses to a laboratory stressor

    OpenAIRE

    Sunmi Song; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Corwin, Elizabeth J; Ceballos, Rachel M.; Taylor, Shelley E.; Teresa Seeman; Laura Cousino Klein

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the unique impact of perceived negativity in multiple social relationships on endocrine and inflammatory responses to a laboratory stressor. Via hierarchical cluster analysis, those who reported negative social exchanges across relationships with a romantic partner, family, and their closest friend had higher mean IL-6 across time and a greater increase in TNF-α from 15 min to 75 min post stress. Those who reported negative social exchanges across relationships with...

  17. Depression and sickness behavior are Janus-faced responses to shared inflammatory pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Maes Michael; Berk Michael; Goehler Lisa; Song Cai; Anderson George; Gałecki Piotr; Leonard Brian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It is of considerable translational importance whether depression is a form or a consequence of sickness behavior. Sickness behavior is a behavioral complex induced by infections and immune trauma and mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is an adaptive response that enhances recovery by conserving energy to combat acute inflammation. There are considerable phenomenological similarities between sickness behavior and depression, for example, behavioral inhibition, anorexia and we...

  18. HIF-1 mediates pathogenic inflammatory responses to intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Feinman, Rena; Deitch, Edwin A.; Watkins, Anthony C.; Abungu, Billy; Colorado, Iriana; Kannan, Kolenkode B.; Sheth, Sharvil U.; Caputo, Francis J.; Lu, Qi; Ramanathan, Madhuri; Attan, Shirhan; Badami, Chirag D.; Doucet, Danielle; Barlos, Dimitrios; Bosch-Marce, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the development of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) are major causes of death in trauma patients. Gut inflammation and loss of gut barrier function as a consequence of splanchnic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) have been implicated as the initial triggering events that contribute to the development of the systemic inflammatory response, ALI, and MODS. Since hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is a key regulator of the physiological and pathophysiological resp...

  19. Ethanol Extract of Sarcodon asparatus Mitigates Inflammatory Responses in Lipopolysaccharide-Challenged Mice and Murine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Min-Yu; Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Hye-Jin; Shon, Dong Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Ku

    2015-11-01

    A number of compounds isolated from mushrooms have exhibited disease-modifying effects. We sought to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of an extract from the mushroom species Sarcodon asparatus (SAE). Male BALB/c mice (N=42; 6 weeks old) were randomly assigned to four treatment groups. Intraperitoneal administration of SAE significantly attenuated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated increases in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity. LPS also increased serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, which were dose-dependently and significantly attenuated by SAE. Correlative relationships between serum ALT activity and proinflammatory cytokines suggested that SAE-mediated suppression of liver injury was partly attributable to the attenuation of serum inflammatory responses. SAE significantly decreased hepatic NO(•) production and subsequent 3-nitrotyrosine formation, and the hepatic NO(•) production significantly correlated with serum ALT and cytokine levels, suggesting that SAE mitigates liver injury in association with inflammatory processes, likely by suppressing NO(•) production. Anti-inflammatory activity and further mechanisms of SAE were evaluated using RAW264.7 with LPS challenge. Noncytotoxic levels of SAE significantly attenuated NO(•) production in RAW264.7 cells and also markedly suppressed the expression of iNOS and other proinflammatory mediators, including COX-2 and IL-6, which were upregulated in the presence of LPS. SAE inhibited the phosphorylation of p65, an observation that occurred independently of IKKαβ-mediated IκBα phosphorylation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that SAE suppressed NO(•)-mediated inflammation by inhibiting p65 transcriptional activation without affecting IKKαβ-mediated IκBα phosphorylation. Further studies are warranted to examine the major compounds responsible for these effects and the mechanisms responsible for the p65

  20. Inflammatory responses to induced infectious endometritis in mares resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis

    OpenAIRE

    Christoffersen Mette; Woodward Elizabeth; Bojesen Anders M; Jacobsen Stine; Petersen Morten R; Troedsson Mats HT; Lehn-Jensen Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of the study was to evaluate the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, IL-1 receptor antagonist [ra] and serum amyloid A (SAA) in endometrial tissue and circulating leukocytes in response to uterine inoculation of 105 colony forming units (CFU) Escherichia coli in mares. Before inoculation, mares were classified as resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis based on their ute...

  1. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  2. Regulation of inflammatory responses by gut microbiota and chemoattractant receptor GPR43

    OpenAIRE

    Maslowski, Kendle M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Ng, Aylwin; Kranich, Jan; Sierro, Frederic; Yu, Di; Schilter, Heidi C; Rolph, Michael S.; Mackay, Fabienne; Artis, David; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Teixeira, Mauro M; Mackay, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    The immune system responds to pathogens by a variety of pattern recognition molecules such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which promote recognition of dangerous foreign pathogens. However, recent evidence indicates that normal intestinal microbiota might also positively influence immune responses, and protect against the development of inflammatory diseases1,2. One of these elements may be short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are produced by fermentation of dietary fibre by intestinal m...

  3. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C., E-mail: susan.tilton@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Lee, K. Monica [Battelle Toxicology Northwest, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  4. MicroRNA-155 is induced during the macrophage inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Ryan M.; Taganov, Konstantin D.; Boldin, Mark P.; Cheng, Genhong; Baltimore, David

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian inflammatory response to infection involves the induction of several hundred genes, a process that must be carefully regulated to achieve pathogen clearance and prevent the consequences of unregulated expression, such as cancer. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a class of gene expression regulators that has also been linked to cancer. However, the relationship between inflammation, innate immunity, and miRNA expression is just beginning to be explored. In the present...

  5. Regulation of MicroRNA-155 in Atherosclerotic Inflammatory Responses by Targeting MAP3K10

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Ting; Yang, Lin; Li, Zhoubin; Wong, Mei Mei; Zheng, Xiaoye; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Li; Yan, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Aims Accumulating evidence suggest that numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as various diseases that accompany inflammatory responses. Inflammation is known to be a major contributor to atherogenesis. Previous studies provide promising evidence in support of the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular disease. However, mechanistic data on these small molecules in atherosclerosis (AS) are still missing. The present study aims...

  6. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein during systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis and organ dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Castelli, Gian Paolo; Pognani, Claudio; Meisner, Michael; Stuani, Antonio; Bellomi, Daniela; Sgarbi, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Both C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) are accepted sepsis markers. However, there is still some debate concerning the correlation between their serum concentrations and sepsis severity. We hypothesised that PCT and CRP concentrations are different in patients with infection or with no infection at a similar severity of organ dysfunction or of systemic inflammatory response. Patients and methods One hundred and fifty adult intensive care unit patients were observed...

  7. Novel immune genes associated with excessive inflammatory and antiviral responses to rhinovirus in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baines Katherine J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhinovirus (RV is a major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations, and primarily infects bronchial epithelial cells. Immune responses from BECs to RV infection are critical in limiting viral replication, and remain unclear in COPD. The objective of this study is to investigate innate immune responses to RV infection in COPD primary BECs (pBECs in comparison to healthy controls. Methods Primary bronchial epithelial cells (pBECs from subjects with COPD and healthy controls were infected with RV-1B. Cells and cell supernatant were collected and analysed using gene expression microarray, qPCR, ELISA, flow cytometry and titration assay for viral replication. Results COPD pBECs responded to RV-1B infection with an increased expression of antiviral and pro-inflammatory genes compared to healthy pBECs, including cytokines, chemokines, RNA helicases, and interferons (IFNs. Similar levels of viral replication were observed in both disease groups; however COPD pBECs were highly susceptible to apoptosis. COPD pBECs differed at baseline in the expression of 9 genes, including calgranulins S100A8/A9, and 22 genes after RV-1B infection including the signalling proteins pellino-1 and interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 2. In COPD, IFN-β/λ1 pre-treatment did not change MDA-5/RIG-I and IFN-β expression, but resulted in higher levels IFN-λ1, CXCL-10 and CCL-5. This led to reduced viral replication, but did not increase pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions COPD pBECs elicit an exaggerated pro-inflammatory and antiviral response to RV-1B infection, without changing viral replication. IFN pre-treatment reduced viral replication. This study identified novel genes and pathways involved in potentiating the inflammatory response to RV in COPD.

  8. Aerobic Exercise Attenuates Airway Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Atopic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Pastva, Amy; Estell, Kim; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that aerobic exercise improves the overall physical fitness and health of asthmatic patients. The specific exercise-induced improvements in the pathology of asthma and the mechanisms by which these improvements occur, however, are ill-defined; thus, the therapeutic potential of exercise in the treatment of asthma remains unappreciated. Using an OVA-driven mouse model, we examined the role of aerobic exercise in modulating inflammatory responses associated with atopic a...

  9. Traumatic Reticuloperitonitis in Water Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): Clinical Findings and the Associated Inflammatory Response

    OpenAIRE

    Maged El-Ashker; Mohamed Salama; Mohamed El-Boshy

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to describe the clinical picture of traumatic reticuloperitonitis (TRP) in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and to evaluate the inflammatory and immunologic responses for this clinical condition. Twenty-two buffalo with acute local TRP were monitored in our study. Additionally, 10 clinically healthy buffalo were randomly selected and served as controls. Acute local TRP was initially diagnosed by clinical examination and confirmed by ultrasonographic (USG) exam...

  10. The Plasma Mitochondrial DNA Is an Independent Predictor for Post-Traumatic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoling Gu; Yanwen Yao; Guannan Wu; Tangfeng Lv; Liang Luo; Yong Song

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), a newly identified damage-associated molecular pattern, has been observed in trauma patients, however, little is known concerning the relationship between plasma mtDNA levels and concrete post-traumatic complications, particularly systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The aim of this study is to determine whether plasma mtDNA levels are associated with injury severity and cloud predict post-traumatic SIRS in patients with acute trau...

  11. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and MELD Score in Hospital Outcome of Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Behroozian, Ramin; Bayazidchi, Mehrdad; Rasooli, Javad

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The evidence saying that the rate of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is high in patients with advanced cirrhosis and portal hypertension, this could have negative outcome on patients prognosis. METHODS This prospective study included 109 cirrhotic patients who were admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, affiliated with Orumieh University of Medical Sciences, during 2011-2012. The presence of SIRS and the model for end stage liver disease (MELD) were assessed on admissio...

  12. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Serum Lipopolysaccharide Levels Predict Multiple Organ Failure and Death in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Michelena, Javier; Altamirano, José; Abraldes, Juan G.; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Dominguez, Marlene; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Javier; Arroyo, Vicente; Ginès, Pere; Louvet, Alexandre; Mathurin, Philippe; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Caballería, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) frequently progresses to multiple organ failure (MOF) and death. However, the driving factors are largely unknown. At admission, patients with AH often show criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) even in the absence of an infection. We hypothesize that the presence of SIRS may predispose to MOF and death. To test this hypothesis, we studied a cohort including 162 patients with biopsy-proven AH. The presence of SIRS and infections was assessed in al...

  13. Characteristics of leptospirosis with systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a multicenter study

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Hava; Turhan, Vedat; Yasar, Kadriye Kart; Hatipoglu, Mustafa; Sunbul, Mustafa; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a common zoonotic infection in the world. In patients with leptospirosis, in case of presence of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), clinical and laboratory findings can be mistaken for sepsis due to other causes of infection. The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with leptospirosis in terms of the presence of SIRS and to examine the association of these with mortality. Methods One hundred fifty-seven ...

  14. Epidemiology of the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Horeczko, Timothy; Green, Jeffrey P.; Panacek, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Consensus guidelines recommend sepsis screening for adults with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), but the epidemiology of SIRS among adult emergency department (ED) patients is poorly understood. Recent emphasis on cost-effective, outcomes-based healthcare prompts the evaluation of the performance of large-scale efforts such as sepsis screening. We studied a nationally representative sample to clarify the epidemiology of SIRS in the ED and subsequent category of il...

  15. Air embolism as a cause of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Tarun; Gutierrez, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    We describe a case of systemic inflammatory response syndrome associated with air embolism following the removal of a central line catheter, coupled with a deep inspiratory maneuver. The presence of a patent foramen ovale allowed the passage of a clinically significant amount of air from the venous circulation to the systemic circulation. The interaction of air with the systemic arterial endothelium may have triggered the release of endothelium-derived cytokines, resulting in the physiologic ...

  16. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gergely, J.; Sipka, S; Csípo, J.; Udvardy, M.; Gy. Szegedi; Kulcsár, A.

    1997-01-01

    We have observed the symptoms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in male rats intoxicated by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Severe hypothermia, tachypnoea and increase in the heart beat min were diagnosed. These symptoms developed in the first hour of intoxication. The hepatic dysfunction was characterized by elevated bilirubin levels. In the sera we have measured increases in the activity of secretable (group II) phospholipase A2 sPLA2 (2,8x) and 6-ketoprostaglandin F1α (KPGF) (...

  17. Elevated Cardiac Troponins in Setting of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Sepsis, and Septic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Elevation of cardiac troponins and creatinine kinase is frequently observed in setting of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, or septic shock. Underlying pathophysiologic mechanism for such troponin leak, its clinical significance, and what different could be done in such settings remain elusive. In this paper we have briefly overviewed the proposed pathogenic mechanisms for SIRS, sepsis, or septic shock-related troponin elevation (SRTE) and have provided brief overview on...

  18. Strategies for modulating the inflammatory response after decompression from abdominal compartment syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Shinil K; Jimenez Fernando; Letourneau Phillip A; Walker Peter A; Moore-Olufemi Stacey D; Stewart Randolph H; Laine Glen A; Cox Charles S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Management of the open abdomen is an increasingly common part of surgical practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the scientific background for the use of temporary abdominal closure (TAC) in the open abdomen as a way to modulate the local and systemic inflammatory response, with an emphasis on decompression after abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Methods A review of the relevant English language literature was conducted. Priority was placed on articles publ...

  19. Inflammatory responses to induced infectious endometritis in mares resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to evaluate the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, IL-1 receptor antagonist [ra] and serum amyloid A (SAA) in endometrial tissue and circulating leukocytes in response to uterine inoculation of 105 colony forming units (CFU) Escherichia coli in mares. Before inoculation, mares were classified as resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis based on their uterine inflammatory response to infusion of 109 killed spermatozoa and histological assessment of the endometrial quality. Endometrial biopsies were obtained 3, 12, 24 and 72 hours (h) after bacterial inoculation and blood samples were obtained during the 7 day period post bacterial inoculation. Expression levels of cytokines and SAA were determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Results Compared to levels in a control biopsy (obtained in the subsequent estrous), resistant mares showed an up-regulation of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α at 3 h after E. coli inoculation, while susceptible mares showed increased gene expression of IL-6 and IL-1ra. Susceptible mares had a significant lower gene expression of TNF-α,IL-6 and increased expression of IL-1ra 3 h after E. coli inoculation compared to resistant mares. Susceptible mares showed a sustained and prolonged inflammatory response with increased gene expression levels of IL-1β, IL-8, IL-1ra and IL-1β:IL-1ra ratio throughout the entire study period (72 h), whereas levels in resistant mares returned to estrous control levels by 12 hours. Endometrial mRNA transcripts of IL-1β and IL-1ra were significantly higher in mares with heavy uterine bacterial growth compared to mares with no/mild growth. All blood parameters were unaffected by intrauterine E. coli infusion, except for a lower gene expression of IL-10 at 168 h and an increased expression of IL-1ra at 48 h observed in susceptible mares compared to

  20. Inflammatory responses to induced infectious endometritis in mares resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffersen Mette

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the study was to evaluate the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, IL-1 receptor antagonist [ra] and serum amyloid A (SAA in endometrial tissue and circulating leukocytes in response to uterine inoculation of 105 colony forming units (CFU Escherichia coli in mares. Before inoculation, mares were classified as resistant or susceptible to persistent endometritis based on their uterine inflammatory response to infusion of 109 killed spermatozoa and histological assessment of the endometrial quality. Endometrial biopsies were obtained 3, 12, 24 and 72 hours (h after bacterial inoculation and blood samples were obtained during the 7 day period post bacterial inoculation. Expression levels of cytokines and SAA were determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR. Results Compared to levels in a control biopsy (obtained in the subsequent estrous, resistant mares showed an up-regulation of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α at 3 h after E. coli inoculation, while susceptible mares showed increased gene expression of IL-6 and IL-1ra. Susceptible mares had a significant lower gene expression of TNF-α,IL-6 and increased expression of IL-1ra 3 h after E. coli inoculation compared to resistant mares. Susceptible mares showed a sustained and prolonged inflammatory response with increased gene expression levels of IL-1β, IL-8, IL-1ra and IL-1β:IL-1ra ratio throughout the entire study period (72 h, whereas levels in resistant mares returned to estrous control levels by 12 hours. Endometrial mRNA transcripts of IL-1β and IL-1ra were significantly higher in mares with heavy uterine bacterial growth compared to mares with no/mild growth. All blood parameters were unaffected by intrauterine E. coli infusion, except for a lower gene expression of IL-10 at 168 h and an increased expression of IL-1ra at 48 h observed in susceptible

  1. Common resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shawniqua; Conte, Mary; Goldfine, Andrew; Noirhomme, Quentin; Gosseries, Olivia; Thonnard, Marie; Beattie, Bradley; Hersh, Jennifer; Katz, Douglas; Victor, Jonathan; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest Some individuals who experience severe brain damage are left with disorders of consciousness. While they can appear to be awake, these individuals lack awareness of their surroundings and cannot respond to events going on around them. Few treatments are available, but a minority of patients show striking improvements in speech, alertness and movement in response to the sleeping pill zolpidem. Although the idea of a sleeping pill increasing consciousness is paradoxical, it is poss...

  2. Sex-Steroid Hormone Manipulation Reduces Brain Response to Reward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Henningsson, Susanne; Pinborg, Anja;

    2016-01-01

    Mood disorders are twice as frequent in women than in men. Risk mechanisms for major depression include adverse responses to acute changes in sex-steroid hormone levels, eg, postpartum in women. Such adverse responses may involve an altered processing of rewards. Here, we examine how women...... to map regional brain activity related to the magnitude of risk during choice and to monetary reward. The GnRHa intervention caused a net reduction in ovarian sex steroids (estradiol and testosterone) and increased depression symptoms. Compared with placebo, GnRHa reduced amygdala's reactivity to...

  3. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  4. Sleep loss and the inflammatory response in mice under chronic environmental circadian disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison J Brager

    Full Text Available Shift work and trans-time zone travel lead to insufficient sleep and numerous pathologies. Here, we examined sleep/wake dynamics during chronic exposure to environmental circadian disruption (ECD, and if chronic partial sleep loss associated with ECD influences the induction of shift-related inflammatory disorder. Sleep and wakefulness were telemetrically recorded across three months of ECD, in which the dark-phase of a light-dark cycle was advanced weekly by 6 h. A three month regimen of ECD caused a temporary reorganization of sleep (NREM and REM and wake processes across each week, resulting in an approximately 10% net loss of sleep each week relative to baseline levels. A separate group of mice were subjected to ECD or a regimen of imposed wakefulness (IW aimed to mimic sleep amounts under ECD for one month. Fos-immunoreactivity (IR was quantified in sleep-wake regulatory areas: the nucleus accumbens (NAc, basal forebrain (BF, and medial preoptic area (MnPO. To assess the inflammatory response, trunk blood was treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequent release of IL-6 was measured. Fos-IR was greatest in the NAc, BF, and MnPO of mice subjected to IW. The inflammatory response to LPS was elevated in mice subjected to ECD, but not mice subjected to IW. Thus, the net sleep loss that occurs under ECD is not associated with a pathological immune response.

  5. Leishmania donovani secretory serine protease alters macrophage inflammatory response via COX-2 mediated PGE-2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Partha; De, Tripti; Chakraborti, Tapati

    2014-12-01

    Leishmania parasites determine the outcome of the infection by inducing inflammatory response that suppresses macrophage's activation. Defense against Leishmania is dependent on Th1 inflammatory response by turning off macrophages' microbicidal property by upregulation of COX-2, as well as immunosuppressive PGE-2 production. To understand the role of L. donovani secretory serine protease (pSP) in these phenomena, pSP was inhibited by its antibody and serine protease inhibitor, aprotinin. Western blot and TAME assay demonstrated that pSP antibody and aprotinin significantly inhibited protease activity in the live Leishmania cells and reduced infection index of L. donovani-infected macrophages. Additionally, ELISA and RT-PCR analysis showed that treatment with pSP antibody or aprotinin hold back COX-2-mediated immunosuppressive PGE-2 secretion with enhancement of Th1 cytokine like IL-12 expression. This was also supported in Griess test and NBT assay, where inhibition of pSP with its inhibitors elevated ROS and NO production. Overall, our study implies the pSP is involved in down-regulation of macrophage microbicidal activity by inducing host inflammatory responses in terms of COX-2-mediated PGE-2 release with diminished reactive oxygen species generation and thus suggests its importance as a novel drug target of visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25823228

  6. Depression and sickness behavior are Janus-faced responses to shared inflammatory pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maes Michael

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is of considerable translational importance whether depression is a form or a consequence of sickness behavior. Sickness behavior is a behavioral complex induced by infections and immune trauma and mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is an adaptive response that enhances recovery by conserving energy to combat acute inflammation. There are considerable phenomenological similarities between sickness behavior and depression, for example, behavioral inhibition, anorexia and weight loss, and melancholic (anhedonia, physio-somatic (fatigue, hyperalgesia, malaise, anxiety and neurocognitive symptoms. In clinical depression, however, a transition occurs to sensitization of immuno-inflammatory pathways, progressive damage by oxidative and nitrosative stress to lipids, proteins, and DNA, and autoimmune responses directed against self-epitopes. The latter mechanisms are the substrate of a neuroprogressive process, whereby multiple depressive episodes cause neural tissue damage and consequent functional and cognitive sequelae. Thus, shared immuno-inflammatory pathways underpin the physiology of sickness behavior and the pathophysiology of clinical depression explaining their partially overlapping phenomenology. Inflammation may provoke a Janus-faced response with a good, acute side, generating protective inflammation through sickness behavior and a bad, chronic side, for example, clinical depression, a lifelong disorder with positive feedback loops between (neuroinflammation and (neurodegenerative processes following less well defined triggers.

  7. Evaluation of inflammatory responses against muscle larvae of different Trichinella species by an image analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, F; Marucci, G; Pozio, E; Masetti, M

    2009-02-23

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory response in the muscle tissue against Trichinella larvae of encapsulated (T. spiralis, T. britovi) and non-encapsulated (T. pseudospiralis) species. The inflammatory response was estimated in histological sections of muscle tissues from Trichinella-infected CD1 mice by a newly developed method. Nuclei were stained with one fluorescent probe, which binds nucleic acids with high affinity, and fluorescence was analysed by a software program. Evaluation of the relative fluorescence units was performed in both peri-capsular (close to the nurse cell-parasite complex) and extra-capsular (where the parasite was not visible) areas. The increase in the number of nuclei in the muscle tissues of Trichinella-infected mice was considered an inflammation marker, since uninfected muscles show low nucleus density. In order to evaluate differences in the nitrosylation pattern between encapsulated (T. spiralis, T. britovi) and non-encapsulated (T. pseudospiralis, Trichinella papuae, Trichinella zimbabwensis) species, L(1) larvae were tested by immunoblotting with an anti-nitrotyrosine polyclonal antibody. Inflammation induced by T. spiralis larvae in muscle tissues is statistically higher than that elicited by the other species, both in peri- and extra-capsular areas. Nitrosylation occurs at a higher level in encapsulated than in non-encapsulated species. The method developed in this work allows demonstration of differences in the host inflammatory response against encapsulated and non-encapsulated Trichinella species. PMID:19046814

  8. ALX/FPR2 Modulates Anti-Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Submandibular Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Wee, Yinshen; Yang, Chieh-Hsiang; Melvin, James E; Baker, Olga J

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the G-protein coupled formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2) by the lipid mediators lipoxin A4 and resolvin D1 (RvD1) promotes resolution of inflammation. Our previous in vitro studies indicate that RvD1 activation of ALX/FPR2 resolves cytokine-mediated inflammatory responses in mammalian cells. However, the impact of ALX/FPR2 activation on salivary gland function in vivo is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether submandibular glands (SMG) from ALX/FPR2(-/-) mice display enhanced inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) stimulation. For these studies, C57BL/6 and ALX/FPR2(-/-) mice at age 8-12-week-old were treated with LPS by i.p for 24 h. Salivary gland structure and function were analyzed by histopathological assessment, saliva flow rate, quantitative PCR, Western blot analyses and immunofluorescence. Our results showed the following events in the ALX/FPR2(-/-) mice treated with LPS: a) upregulated inflammatory cytokines and decreased M3R (Muscarinic Acetylcholine receptor M3) and AQP5 (Aquaporin 5) protein expression, b) decreased saliva secretion, c) increased apoptosis, d) alteration of tight junction and neuronal damage. Overall, our data suggest that the loss of ALX/FPR2 results in unresolved acute inflammation and SMG dysfunction (xerostomia) in response to LPS that is similar to human salivary gland dysfunction induced by bacterial infection. PMID:27064029

  9. Francisella Infection in Cultured Tilapia in Thailand and the Inflammatory Cytokine Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantrakajorn, Sasibha; Wongtavatchai, Janenuj

    2016-06-01

    Francisella infections developed in freshwater Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and red tilapia Oreochromis spp. farms in Thailand during 2012-2014. The diseased fish were lethargic and pale in color and showed numerous white nodules in their enlarged spleens. Histopathological examination and electron microscopy suggested that the white nodules were multifocal granulomas consisting of coccobacilli within vacuolated cells. Isolation of Francisella-like bacteria was achieved from 42 of 100 samples, while polymerase chain reaction confirmed Francisella infections in all samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from samples obtained from three different geographical culture areas revealed more than 99% similarity with F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. The influence of Francisella infection on inflammatory cytokines was determined on splenic cells of fish intraperitoneally injected with the bacteria (0.8 × 10(5) colony-forming units per fish). Infected tilapia showed significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrotic factor-α (TNF-α) within 24 h postinjection (hpi) and for up to 96 hpi. However, down-regulation of an anti-inflammatory gene, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was observed as early as 24 hpi. This investigation demonstrates that an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to the infection may account for the substantial number of granulomas in fish hematopoietic tissues that was found in the later stage of the disease. Received September 9, 2015; accepted December 13, 2015. PMID:27196982

  10. Caffeine prevents LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Ryu, Su-Jung; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2016-03-25

    Caffeine is a white crystalline xanthine alkaloid found in the seeds of coffee plants and leaves of the tea bush. In this study, we evaluated whether caffeine exerts anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. RAW264.7 cells were treated with various concentrations of caffeine in the presence or absence of LPS. Caffeine decreased the LPS-induced inflammatory mediator, nitric oxide (NO). Caffeine treatment also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-6 and IL-12, and decreased both IL-6 secretion and phosphorylated p38MAPK expression in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Caffeine inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) via IκBα phosphorylation. In addition, caffeine inhibited LPS-induced NO production in zebrafish. These results suggest that caffeine may suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells by regulating NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation.

  11. Modulation of untruthful responses with noninvasive brain stimulation

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    Shirley eFecteau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Deceptive abilities have long been studied in relation to personality traits. More recently, studies explored the neural substrates associated with deceptive skills suggesting a critical role of the prefrontal cortex. Here we investigated whether noninvasive brain stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC could modulate generation of untruthful responses about subject’s personal life across contexts (i.e., deceiving on guilt-free questions on daily activities; generating previously memorized lies about past experience; and producing spontaneous lies about past experience, as well as across modality responses (verbal and motor responses. Results reveal that real, but not sham, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the DLPFC can reduce response latency for untruthful over truthful answers across contexts and modality responses. Also, contexts of lies seem to incur a different hemispheric laterality. These findings add up to previous studies demonstrating that it is possible to modulate some processes involved in generation of untruthful answers by applying noninvasive brain stimulation over the DLPFC and extend these findings by showing a differential hemispheric contribution of DLPFCs according to contexts.

  12. Signaling the Unfolded Protein Response in primary brain cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Avril, Tony; Quillien, Véronique; Morandi, Xavier; Chevet, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is an adaptive cellular program used by eukaryotic cells to cope with protein misfolding stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). During tumor development, cancer cells are facing intrinsic (oncogene activation) and extrinsic (limiting nutrient or oxygen supply; exposure to chemotherapies) challenges, with which they must cope to survive. Primary brain tumors are relatively rare but deadly and present a significant challenge in the determination of risk factors in the population. These tumors are inherently difficult to cure because of their protected location in the brain. As such surgery, radiation and chemotherapy options carry potentially lasting patient morbidity and incomplete tumor cure. Some of these tumors, such as glioblastoma, were reported to present features of ER stress and to depend on UPR activation to sustain growth, but to date there is no clear general representation of the ER stress status in primary brain tumors. In this review, we describe the key molecular mechanisms controlling the UPR and their implication in cancers. Then we extensively review the literature reporting the status of ER stress in various primary brain tumors and discuss the potential impact of such observation on patient stratification and on the possibility of developing appropriate targeted therapies using the UPR as therapeutic target. PMID:27016056

  13. Systemic inflammatory response to smoking in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: evidence of a gender effect.

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    Rosa Faner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is the main risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD but not all smokers develop the disease. An abnormal pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response to smoking is thought to play a major pathogenic role in COPD, but this has never been tested directly. METHODS: We studied the systemic biomarker and leukocyte transcriptomic response (Affymetrix microarrays to smoking exposure in 10 smokers with COPD and 10 smokers with normal spirometry. We also studied 10 healthy never smokers (not exposed to smoking as controls. Because some aspects of COPD may differ in males and females, and the inflammatory response to other stressors (infection might be different in man and women, we stratified participant recruitment by sex. Differentially expressed genes were validated by q-PCR. Ontology enrichment was evaluated and interaction networks inferred. RESULTS: Principal component analysis identified sex differences in the leukocyte transcriptomic response to acute smoking. In both genders, we identified genes that were differentially expressed in response to smoking exclusively in COPD patients (COPD related signature or smokers with normal spirometry (Smoking related signature, their ontologies and interaction networks. CONCLUSIONS: The use of an experimental intervention (smoking exposure to investigate the transcriptomic response of peripheral leukocytes in COPD is a step beyond the standard case-control transcriptomic profiling carried out so far, and has facilitated the identification of novel COPD and Smoking expression related signatures which differ in males and females.

  14. Multiplexed digital mRNA profiling of the inflammatory response in the West Nile Swiss Webster mouse model.

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    José Peña

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to track changes in gene expression following viral infection is paramount to understanding viral pathogenesis. This study was undertaken to evaluate the nCounter, a high throughput digital gene expression system, as a means to better understand West Nile virus (WNV dissemination and the inflammatory response against WNV in the outbred Swiss Webster (SW mouse model over the course of infection.The nCounter Mouse Inflammation gene expression kit containing 179 inflammation related genes was used to analyze gene expression changes in multiple tissues over a nine day course of infection in SW mice following intraperitoneal injection with WNV. Protein expression levels for a subset of these cytokine/chemokine genes were determined using a multiplex protein detection system (BioPlex and comparisons of protein/RNA expression levels made.Expression analysis of spleen, lung, liver, kidney and brain of SW mice infected with WNV revealed that Cxcl10 and Il12b are differentially expressed in all tissues tested except kidney. Data stratification of positively confirmed infected (WNV (+ versus non-infected (WNV (- tissues allowed differentiation of the systemic inflammatory gene response from tissue-specific responses arising from WNV infection. Significant (p<0.05 decrease in C3ar1 was found in WNV (- spleen. Il23a was significantly upregulated, while Il10rb was down-regulated in WNV (- lung. Il3 and Mbl2 were down-regulated in WNV (- liver. In WNV (+ livers, Stat1, Tlr2, chemokines Cxcl1, Cxcl3, Cxcl9, Cxcl10, cytokines Il6, Il18, cytokine-related gene Il1r and cytokine agonist Ilrn were significantly upregulated. In WNV (- brain tissues, Csf2 and Cxcl10 were significantly upregulated. Similar gene and protein expression kinetics were found for Ccl2, Ccl3, Ccl4 and Ccl5 and correlated with the presence of infectious virus. In summary, the utility of the nCounter platform for rapid identification of gene expression changes in SW mice associated

  15. The hemic response of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) with inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Amy B; Parkinson, Lily A; Grant, Krystan R; Carlson, Eric; Campbell, Terry W

    2016-05-01

    As elasmobranch medicine becomes more commonplace, there continues to be confusion with techniques and evaluation of the shark hemogram and it remains unknown if they are able to mount an inflammatory hemic response. The aims of this study were to compare two total white blood cell (WBC) count techniques, establish a reference interval for captive white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum), and determine if elasmobranchs are capable of mounting an inflammatory hemic response. Correlation statistics were performed on hematologic results for healthy female bamboo sharks to assess the use of Natt-Herrick's and phloxine methods. Total WBC counts and differentials were obtained from males with severe traumatic clasper wounds and compared to the healthy females. We elected clasper amputation as the preferred treatment intervention and post-operative hematology was performed one month later. There was poor correlation of leukocyte counts between the two WBC count methods. Hematologic values were established for the females and males pre- and post-operatively. Males with wounds had a marked leukocytosis and heterophilia. Post-operative blood work showed a resolution of total WBC count and a trend toward resolution of the heterophilia. This study provides hematologic values for white-spotted bamboo sharks and confirms that the Natt-Herrick's method is preferred for lymphocytic species. Hematologic differences present in males with clasper wounds suggests that elasmobranchs do mount an inflammatory hemic response. Treatment via clasper amputation proved to be a safe and efficient means for clinical treatment that led to a trend toward resolution of the inflammatory leukogram. Zoo Biol. 35:251-259, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970476

  16. Allicin enhances host pro-inflammatory immune responses and protects against acute murine malaria infection

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    Feng Yonghui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malaria infection, multiple pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, TNF and nitric oxide (NO play a crucial role in the protection against the parasites. Modulation of host immunity is an important strategy to improve the outcome of malaria infection. Allicin is the major biologically active component of garlic and shows anti-microbial activity. Allicin is also active against protozoan parasites including Plasmodium, which is thought to be mediated by inhibiting cysteine proteases. In this study, the immunomodulatory activities of allicin were assessed during acute malaria infection using a rodent malaria model Plasmodium yoelii 17XL. Methods To determine whether allicin modulates host immune responses against malaria infection, mice were treated with allicin after infection with P. yoelii 17XL. Mortality was checked daily and parasitaemia was determined every other day. Pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-4 were quantified by ELISA, while NO level was determined by the Griess method. The populations of dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, CD4+ T and regulatory T cells (Treg were assessed by FACS. Results Allicin reduced parasitaemia and prolonged survival of the host in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is at least partially due to improved host immune responses. Results showed that allicin treatment enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-12p70 and NO. The absolute numbers of CD4+ T cells, DCs and macrophages were significantly higher in allicin-treated mice. In addition, allicin promoted the maturation of CD11c+ DCs, whereas it did not cause major changes in IL-4 and the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Conclusions Allicin could partially protect host against P. yoelii 17XL through enhancement of the host innate and adaptive immune responses.

  17. Regulation of microRNA-155 in atherosclerotic inflammatory responses by targeting MAP3K10.

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    Jianhua Zhu

    Full Text Available AIMS: Accumulating evidence suggest that numerous microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as various diseases that accompany inflammatory responses. Inflammation is known to be a major contributor to atherogenesis. Previous studies provide promising evidence in support of the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular disease. However, mechanistic data on these small molecules in atherosclerosis (AS are still missing. The present study aims to investigate the potential role of miRNAs in AS. METHODS AND RESULTS: The miRNA transcriptase was verified by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Thoracic aorta samples were obtained from Apolipoprotein E knockout mice, and plasma samples were from coronary artery disease (CAD patients. The results showed that the miR-155 level was the most significantly elevated both in AS mice and CAD patients relative to the normal control. The functional role of miR-155 in the atherosclerotic path physiological process was also observed in vivo and in vitro. The observations suggested that miR-155 is a part of a negative feedback loop, which down-modulates inflammatory cytokine production and decreases AS progression. miR-155 was also found to mediate the inflammatory response and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 10. CONCLUSIONS: miR-155 contributes to the prevention of AS development and progression. It may also be involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of the inflammatory response and MAPK pathway by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 10.

  18. A New Experimental Polytrauma Model in Rats: Molecular Characterization of the Early Inflammatory Response

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Weckbach; Mario Perl; Tim Heiland; Sonja Braumüller; Stahel, Philip F.; Flierl, Michael A; Anita Ignatius; Florian Gebhard; Markus Huber-Lang

    2012-01-01

    Background. The molecular mechanisms of the immune response after polytrauma are highly complex and far from fully understood. In this paper, we characterize a new standardized polytrauma model in rats based on the early molecular inflammatory and apoptotic response. Methods. Male Wistar rats (250 g, 6–10/group) were anesthetized and exposed to chest trauma (ChT), closed head injury (CHI), or Tib/Fib fracture including a soft tissue trauma (Fx + STT) or to the following combination of injurie...

  19. Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Effects Did Not Improve Organ Quality in Brain-Dead Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebolledo, Rolando A.; Liu, Bo; Akhtar, Mohammed Z.; Ottens, Petra J.; Zhang, Jian-ning; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Effect of glucocorticoid administration on improving the outcomes of kidney and liver allografts has not been clearly elucidated. This study investigated the effect of prednisolone administration after onset of brain death (BD) on kidney and liver in a controlled rat model of BD. BD was induced in r

  20. Is 'bipolar disorder' the brain's autopoietic response to schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Sue

    2009-10-01

    Evidence is accumulating that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are related conditions. This paper proposes a particular form of relatedness. If 'schizophrenia' is a mind/brain 'trapped' between waking and dreaming, in a disordered in-between state, then bipolar 'disorder' could actually be an attempt to restore order. The mind/brain is a self-producing, self-organizing system. Autopoiesis applies to such systems. Neuromodulation accomplishes self-organization in the mind/brain. If schizophrenia is a state in-between waking and dreaming, characterized by aminergic/cholinergic interpenetration and dopaminergic imbalance then bipolar 'disorder' could be a modulatory response. This autopoietic reaction may take the form of either aminergic hyperactivity aimed at producing a purer waking state, (precipitating mania in the waking state), or cholinergic hyperactivity aimed at producing a purer dreaming state, (producing depression in the waking state), or both, resulting in rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Thus bipolar activity may be an autopoietic response aimed at restoring differentiation to the in-between state of schizophrenia. PMID:19589644

  1. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

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    S.F. Fonseca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H and 8 normotensive (N subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively. They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity. Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP. Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05, although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1 and lower TBARS (P<0.01 and FRAP (P<0.05 levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors, present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response.

  2. Muscle cells challenged with saturated fatty acids mount an autonomous inflammatory response that activates macrophages

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    Pillon Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Within adipose tissue of mice fed a high fat diet, resident and infiltrating macrophages assume a pro-inflammatory phenotype characterized by the production of cytokines which in turn impact on the surrounding tissue. However, inflammation is not restricted to adipose tissue and high fat-feeding is responsible for a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in muscle. Although skeletal muscle is the major disposer of dietary glucose and a major determinant of glycemia, the origin and consequence of muscle inflammation in the development of insulin resistance are poorly understood. We used a cell culture approach to investigate the vectorial crosstalk between muscle cells and macrophages upon exposure to physiological, low levels of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Inflammatory pathway activation and cytokine expression were analyzed in L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (L6GLUT4myc exposed to 0.2 mM palmitate or palmitoleate. Conditioned media thereof, free of fatty acids, were then tested for their ability to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Palmitate -but not palmitoleate- induced IL-6, TNFα and CCL2 expression in muscle cells, through activation of the NF-κB pathway. Palmitate (0.2 mM alone did not induce insulin resistance in muscle cells, yet conditioned media from palmitate-challenged muscle cells selectively activated macrophages towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype. These results demonstrate that low concentrations of palmitate activate autonomous inflammation in muscle cells to release factors that turn macrophages pro-inflammatory. We hypothesize that saturated fat-induced, low-grade muscle cell inflammation may trigger resident skeletal muscle macrophage polarization, possibly contributing to insulin resistance in vivo.

  3. Clinical aspects of acute inflammatory diseases of the brain; Klinisch-neurologische Aspekte akut-entzuendlicher Hirnerkrankungen

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    Block, F.; Nolden-Koch, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Neurologische Klinik

    2000-11-01

    Despite the progress, which has been made in diagnosis and therapy of encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, these acute inflammatory diseases of the brain still display a certain amount of morbidity and mortality. History, physical examination, analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid and radiological examination are the mainstay for the diagnosis of these diseases. With respect to the acute inflammatory diseases of the brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging fulfil three purposes: 1. They can be used to clarify the diagnosis and to rule out other diseases. 2. They can identify the focus from which a bacterial meningitis can evolve. 3. Complications like edema, cerebral vasculitis, septic sinus thrombosis, hydrocephalus or abscess can be visualized. If the diagnosis is made early, the possible complications are recognized in good time and the appropriate therapy is started immediately, then morbidity and mortality can be kept at a minimum. (orig.) [German] Die bakterielle Meningitis und die Enzephalitis sind akut-entzuendliche Hirnerkrankungen, die trotz aller Fortschritte in der Diagnostik und Therapie mit einer nicht unerheblichen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet behaftet sind. Die Anamnese, die koerperliche Untersuchung, die laborchemische Diagnostik von Blut und Liquor und die Bildgebung sind die wesentlichen Saeulen in der Diagnostik akut-entzuendlicher Hirnerkrankungen. Die Bildgebung, die mittels Computertomographie bzw. Kernspintomographie erfolgt, hat in diesem Zusammenhang 3 Aufgaben: 1. Sie kann dazu beitragen, die Diagnose zu sichern bzw. differentialdiagnostisch in Erwaegung zu ziehende Erkrankungen auszuschliessen oder nachzuweisen. 2. Sie kann bei der bakteriellen Meningitis entzuendliche Foci im Bereich der Nasennebenhoehlen, des Mastoids oder des Mittelohrs erkennen, die sofort operativ saniert werden muessen. 3. Komplikationen akut-entzuendlicher Hirnerkrankungen koennen bei entsprechendem klinischem Verdacht mittels Bildgebung

  4. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J; Gray, Jason D; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K; Seifert, Erin L; McEwen, Bruce S; Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-12-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism's multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal-medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  5. Macrophage pro-inflammatory response to Francisella novicida infection is regulated by SHIP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore V L Parsa

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen infecting principally macrophages and monocytes, is the etiological agent of tularemia. Macrophage responses to F. tularensis infection include the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-12, which is critical for immunity against infection. Molecular mechanisms regulating production of these inflammatory mediators are poorly understood. Herein we report that the SH2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP is phosphorylated upon infection of primary murine macrophages with the genetically related F. novicida, and negatively regulates F. novicida-induced cytokine production. Analyses of the molecular details revealed that in addition to activating the MAP kinases, F. novicida infection also activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway in these cells. Interestingly, SHIP-deficient macrophages displayed enhanced Akt activation upon F. novicida infection, suggesting elevated PI3K-dependent activation pathways in absence of SHIP. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt resulted in suppression of F. novicida-induced cytokine production through the inhibition of NFkappaB. Consistently, macrophages lacking SHIP displayed enhanced NFkappaB-driven gene transcription, whereas overexpression of SHIP led to decreased NFkappaB activation. Thus, we propose that SHIP negatively regulates F. novicida-induced inflammatory cytokine response by antagonizing the PI3K/Akt pathway and suppressing NFkappaB-mediated gene transcription. A detailed analysis of phosphoinositide signaling may provide valuable clues for better understanding the pathogenesis of tularemia.

  6. Heat-killed Propionibacterium acnes is capable of inducing inflammatory responses in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyte, Peter; Sur, Runa; Nigam, Anu; Southall, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    The etiology of acne is a complex process, and acne is one of the most common skin disorders affecting millions of people. The pathogenesis of acne is closely associated with the bacterium, Propionibacterium acnes which was previously known as Corynebacterium parvum. Both viable and non-viable P. acnes/C. parvum have been shown to induce an immunostimulatory effect in vivo, suggesting that even dead bacteria continue to activate an inflammatory response. Acne treatments with lasers or devices, induce a bactericidal effect through heat generation which may not address the immunogenic activity of P. acnes and the resulting acne inflammation. Therefore, we sought to determine whether killed P. acnes is capable of inducing an inflammatory response and therefore could be a contributing factor in acne. Direct heat treatment of P. acnes cultures with temperatures ranging from 50 degrees C to 80 degrees C reduced P. acnes viability. Both viable and heat-killed P. acnes activated the p38 MAP kinase and its downstream substrate Hsp27. Stimulating keratinocytes with normal and heat-inactivated P. acnes resulted in an induction of proinflammatory nitric oxide and IL-8 production. Thus killed P. acnes is capable of inducing inflammation in skin suggesting that therapies that have both bactericidal and anti-inflammatory effects may result in a more effective treatment of patients with acne than treatments that are bactericidal alone. PMID:19624731

  7. Inflammatory Response Using Different Lipid Parenteral Nutrition Formulas in Children After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Gómez, María Auxiliadora; de la Torre-Aguilar, María José; Aguilera-García, Concepción María; Olza, Josune; Pérez-Navero, Juan Luis; Gil-Campos, Mercedes

    2016-07-01

    Nutritional support is an integral part of the supportive care of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN) may modify the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study is to compare plasma cytokine levels in children after HSCT using an n-3 FA-containing lipid emulsion (LE) and a soybean oil-based formulation in PN. A randomized double-blind controlled trial was conducted on 14 children following HSCT. Children were randomized to receive either a fish oil or a soybean oil LE. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, on Day 10 and after completion of PN to analyze plasma interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), 2 (IL-2), 6 (IL-6), 8 (IL-8), 10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). After 10 days of PN, there were no significant changes in interleukins levels when comparing the two groups or time points (baseline vs. Day 10 of PN). In children requiring PN >21 days, IL-10 and TNF-α levels (P ≤ 0.05) were lower in the fish-oil-containing LE group. Fish oil- and soybean oil-supplemented PN administered for at least 10 days does not cause inflammatory changes. Prolonged PN based on fish oil LE may modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:27270245

  8. CETP Lowers TLR4 Expression Which Attenuates the Inflammatory Response Induced by LPS and Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Martins Venancio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection eliciting high mortality rate which is a serious health problem. Despite numerous studies seeking for therapeutic alternatives, the mechanisms involved in this disease remain elusive. In this study we evaluated the influence of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, a glycoprotein that promotes the transfer of lipids between lipoproteins, on the inflammatory response in mice. Human CETP transgenic mice were compared to control mice (wild type, WT after polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, aiming at investigating their survival rate and inflammatory profiles. Macrophages from the peritoneal cavity were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of recombinant CETP for phenotypic and functional studies. In comparison to WT mice, CETP mice showed higher survival rate, lower IL-6 plasma concentration, and decreased liver toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH protein. Moreover, macrophages from WT mice to which recombinant human CETP was added decreased LPS uptake, TLR4 expression, NF-κB activation and IL-6 secretion. This raises the possibility for new therapeutic tools in sepsis while suggesting that lowering CETP by pharmacological inhibitors should be inconvenient in the context of sepsis and infectious diseases.

  9. Lipid Bodies: Inflammatory Organelles Implicated in Host-Trypanosoma cruzi Interplay during Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa D'Avila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The flagellated protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas' disease, a significant public health issue and still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. Acute Chagas' disease elicits a strong inflammatory response. In order to control the parasite multiplication, cells of the monocytic lineage are highly mobilized. Monocyte differentiation leads to the formation of phagocytosing macrophages, which are strongly activated and direct host defense. A distinguishing feature of Chagas' disease-triggered macrophages is the presence of increased numbers of distinct cytoplasmic organelles termed lipid bodies or lipid droplets. These organelles are actively formed in response to the parasite and are sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators. This review covers current knowledge on lipid bodies elicited by the acute Chagas' disease within inflammatory macrophages and discusses the role of these organelles in inflammation. The increased knowledge of lipid bodies in pathogenic mechanisms of infections may not only contribute to the understanding of pathogen-host interactions but may also identify new targets for intervention.

  10. Nuclear Control of the Inflammatory Response in Mammals by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Mandard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-activated transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of a very large number of biological processes including inflammation. Using specific examples, this paper focuses on the interplay between PPARs and innate immunity/inflammation and, when possible, compares it among species. We focus on recent discoveries establishing how inflammation and PPARs interact in the context of obesity-induced inflammation and type 2 diabetes, mostly in mouse and humans. We illustrate that PPARγ ability to alleviate obesity-associated inflammation raises an interesting pharmacologic potential. In the light of recent findings, the protective role of PPARα and PPARβ/δ against the hepatic inflammatory response is also addressed. While PPARs agonists are well-established agents that can treat numerous inflammatory issues in rodents and humans, surprisingly very little has been described in other species. We therefore also review the implication of PPARs in inflammatory bowel disease; acute-phase response; and central, cardiac, and endothelial inflammation and compare it along different species (mainly mouse, rat, human, and pig. In the light of the data available in the literature, there is no doubt that more studies concerning the impact of PPAR ligands in livestock should be undertaken because it may finally raise unconsidered health and sanitary benefits.

  11. Role of histamine in the inhibitory effects of phycocyanin in experimental models of allergic inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Remirez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been reported that phycocyanin, a biliprotein found in the blue-green microalgae Spirulina, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in some animal models of inflammation. Taking into account these findings, we decided to elucidate whether phycocyanin might exert also inhibitory effects in the induced allergic inflammatory response and on histamine release from isolated rat mast cells. In in vivo experiments, phycocyanin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg post-orally (p.o. was administered 1 h before the challenge with 1 μg of ovalbumin (OA in the ear of mice previously sensitized with OA. One hour later, myeloperoxidase activity and ear edema were assessed. Phycocyanin significantly reduced both parameters. In separate experiments, phycocyanin (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. also reduced the blue spot area induced by intradermal injections of histamine, and the histamine releaser compound 48/80 in rat skin. In concordance with the former results, phyco-cyanin also significantly reduced histamine release induced by compound 48/80 from isolated peritoneal rat mast cells. The inhibitory effects of phycocyanin were dose dependent. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of allergic inflammatory response by phycocyanin is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of histamine release from mast cells.

  12. A new role for T cells in dampening innate inflammatory responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Hong; FU YangXin

    2010-01-01

    @@ The inflammatory response is an attempt by a host to protect itself against injurious stimuli and initiate the tissue healing process [1,2].Although the production of both proand anti-inflammatory mediators which occurs mainly within tissues is a systemic process, the pathophysiological events of inflammation are usually compartmentalized, being different from organ to organ, and between organs and the peripheral blood [3,4].Inflammation and consequential tissue injury vary according to the nature of the insults (e.g.burns, hemorrhages, trauma, peritonitis), the cellular composition of each tissue (e.g.the types of phagocytes or endothelial cells), the micro-environment (e.g.the localized presence of GM-CSF in the lungs, low levels of arginine in the liver, presence of endotoxins in the gut), and different modes of leukocyte recruitment.

  13. Biocompatibility, Inflammatory Response, and Recannalization Characteristics of Nonradioactive Resin Microspheres: Histological Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-arterial radiotherapy with yttrium-90 microspheres (radioembolization) is a therapeutic procedure exclusively applied to the liver that allows the direct delivery of high-dose radiation to liver tumors, by means of endovascular catheters, selectively placed within the tumor vasculature. The aim of the study was to describe the distribution of spheres within the precapillaries, inflammatory response, and recannalization characteristics after embolization with nonradioactive resin microspheres in the kidney and liver. We performed a partial embolization of the liver and kidney vessels in nine white pigs. The left renal and left hepatic arteries were catheterized and filled with nonradioactive resin microspheres. Embolization was defined as the initiation of near-stasis of blood flow, rather than total occlusion of the vessels. The hepatic circulation was not isolated so that the effects of reflux of microspheres into stomach could be observed. Animals were sacrificed at 48 h, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks, and tissue samples from the kidney, liver, lung, and stomach evaluated. Microscopic evaluation revealed clusters of 10-30 microspheres (15-30 μm in diameter) in the small vessels of the kidney (the arciform arteries, vasa recti, and glomerular afferent vessels) and liver. Aggregates were associated with focal ischemia and mild vascular wall damage. Occlusion of the small vessels was associated with a mild perivascular inflammatory reaction. After filling of the left hepatic artery with microspheres, there was some evidence of arteriovenous shunting into the lungs, and one case of cholecystitis and one case of marked gastritis and ulceration at the site of arterial occlusion due to the presence of clusters of microspheres. Beyond 48 h, microspheres were progressively integrated into the vascular wall by phagocytosis and the lumen recannalized. Eight-week evaluation found that the perivascular inflammatory reaction was mild. Liver cell damage, bile duct injury, and

  14. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J. [Department of Pharmacology, Reata Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Irving, TX 75063 (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: Dongqi.Tang@uscmed.sc.edu [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  15. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marecková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S; Nawaz Khan, Irum;

    2014-01-01

    fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use......Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain's response to faces and the use of oral...... contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right...

  16. Inhibition of mTOR Signal Reduces Epileptogenesis by Inhibiting Early Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiju Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that brain inflammation is an important mechanism that promotes epileptogenesis and seizure development. This topic was inspired from the tuberous sclerosis (TSC, in the pathogenesis of the deletion of Tsc1/2 gene induced by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR abnormal activation signal, which is associated with intractable epilepsy. mTOR specific inhibitor can reduce TSC subependymal nodules, and seizures eased. While the mTOR inhibitors are also powerful immunosuppressant, we presumed that mTOR signal abnormal activation was involved in the chronic epileptogenesis after seizures, whether mTOR inhibitors could prevent the epileptogenesis by inhibiting the early inflammatory factors via mTOR signal. We induced seizures in rats (P10d by intraperitoneal injection kainic acid (KA, and pretreatment of rapamycin was given intraperitoneally (6 mg/kg/day under isoflurane anesthesia for 3 consecutive days prior to kainate injection, once daily for 7 days. The experiment rats were divided into KA group, KA+RAP group and Control group. We observed the difference of chronic spontaneous seizures (SRS occurred in the groups. This study will research the alteration of the mTOR signal after seizures in immature rats. We also study the effects of mTOR inhibitors on astrocytes, microglia and early inflammatory factors such as IL-1β, COX-2, TGF- 1 after KA induced-SE. mTOR inhibitors can reduce the occurrence of SRS in chronic phase, and inhibit the gene and protein expression of early inflammatory cytokines of IL-1, TGF-1 and COX-2 level, Which may provide new ideas and methods to prevent the formation of chronic epilepsy.

  17. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-2 (SOCS2) Regulates the Microglial Response and Improves Functional Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basrai, Harleen S.; Christie, Kimberly J.; Turbic, Alisa; Bye, Nicole; Turnley, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently characterized by neuronal, axonal and myelin loss, reactive gliosis and neuroinflammation, often associated with functional deficits. Endogenous repair mechanisms include production of new neurons from precursor cells, but usually the new neurons fail to integrate and survive more than a few weeks. This is in part mediated by the toxic and inflammatory environment present in the injured brain which activates precursor cells to proliferate and differentiate but limits survival of the newborn progeny. Therefore, an understanding of mechanisms that regulate production and survival of newborn neurons and the neuroinflammatory response after brain injury may lead to therapeutic options to improve outcomes. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 2 (SOCS2) promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and survival of newborn neurons in the adult brain and regulates anti-inflammatory responses in the periphery, suggesting it may be a useful candidate to improve outcomes of TBI. In this study the functional and cellular responses of SOCS2 over-expressing transgenic (SOCS2Tg) mice were compared to wildtype littermates following mild or moderately severe TBI. Unlike wildtype controls, SOCS2Tg mice showed functional improvement on a ladder test, with a smaller lesion volume at 7d post injury and increased numbers of proliferative CD11b+ microglia/macrophages at 35d post-injury in the mild injury paradigm. At 7d post-moderately severe injury there was an increase in the area covered by cells expressing an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype marker (CD206+) but no difference in cells with a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype marker (CD16/32+). No effect of SOCS2 overexpression was observed in production or survival of newborn neurons, even in the presence of the neuroprotective agent erythropoietin (EPO). Therefore, SOCS2 may improve outcome of TBI in mice by regulating aspects of the neuroinflammatory response, promoting a more anti-inflammatory environment

  18. MAPK and pro-inflammatory mediators in the walls of brain blood vessels following cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Maddahi, Aida

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stroke is a serious neurological disease which may lead to death and severe disability [1, 2]. There are two major types of stroke: ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Both are associated with disruption of blood flow to a part of the brain with rapid depletion of cellular energy and oxygen, resulting in ionic disturbances and eventually neuronal cell death [3]. The pathologic process that develops after stroke is divided into acute (within hours), sub-acute (hours to days), ...

  19. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 contributes to the pro-inflammatory response of keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of 11β-HSD1 in skin inflammation. •Various stimuli increase expression of 11β-HSD1 in keratinocytes. •11β-HSD1 knockdown by siRNA decreases cortisol levels in media. •11β-HSD1 knockdown abrogates the response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. •Low-dose versus high-dose cortisol has opposing effects on keratinocyte inflammation. -- Abstract: The endogenous glucocorticoid, cortisol, is released from the adrenal gland in response to various stress stimuli. Extra-adrenal cortisol production has recently been reported to occur in various tissues. Skin is known to synthesize cortisol through a de novo pathway and through an activating enzyme. The enzyme that catalyzes the intracellular conversion of hormonally-inactive cortisone into active cortisol is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1). We recently reported that 11β-HSD1 is expressed in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and negatively regulates proliferation of NHEKs. In this study, we investigated the role of 11β-HSD1 in skin inflammation. Expression of 11β-HSD1 was induced by UV-B irradiation and in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNFα. Increased cortisol concentrations in culture media also increased in response to these stimuli. To investigate the function of increased 11β-HSD1 in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines, we knocked down 11β-HSD1 by transfecting siRNA. Production of IL-6 and IL-8 in response to IL-1β or TNFα stimulation was attenuated in NHEKs transfected with si11β-HSD1 compared with control cells. In addition, IL-1β-induced IL-6 production was enhanced in cultures containing 1 × 10−13 M cortisol, whereas 1 × 10−5 M cortisol attenuated production of IL-6. Thus, cortisol showed immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive activities depending on its concentration. Our results indicate that 11β-HSD1 expression is increased by various stimuli. Thus, regulation of cytosolic cortisol concentrations

  20. Prehospital resuscitation with hypertonic saline-dextran modulates inflammatory, coagulation and endothelial activation marker profiles in severe traumatic brain injured patients

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison Laurie J; Baker Andrew J; Crnko Naomi T; Rhind Shawn G; Shek Pang N; Scarpelini Sandro; Rizoli Sandro B

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates interrelated inflammatory and coagulation cascades characterized by wide-spread cellular activation, induction of leukocyte and endothelial cell adhesion molecules and release of soluble pro/antiinflammatory cytokines and thrombotic mediators. Resuscitative care is focused on optimizing cerebral perfusion and reducing secondary injury processes. Hypertonic saline is an effective osmotherapeutic agent for the treatment of intracranial ...

  1. The multifaceted responses of primary human astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells to the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Brissette

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vector-borne pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes a multi-system disorder including neurological complications. These neurological disorders, collectively termed neuroborreliosis, can occur in up to 15% of untreated patients. The neurological symptoms are probably a result of a glial-driven, host inflammatory response to the bacterium. However, the specific contributions of individual glial and other support cell types to the pathogenesis of neuroborreliosis are relatively unexplored. The goal of this project was to characterize specific astrocyte and endothelial cell responses to B. burgdorferi. Primary human astrocytes and primary HBMEC (human brain microvascular endothelial cells were incubated with B. burgdorferi over a 72-h period and the transcriptional responses to the bacterium were analyzed by real-time PCR arrays. There was a robust increase in several surveyed chemokine and related genes, including IL (interleukin-8, for both primary astrocytes and HBMEC. Array results were confirmed with individual sets of PCR primers. The production of specific chemokines by both astrocytes and HBMEC in response to B. burgdorferi, including IL-8, CXCL-1, and CXCL-10, were confirmed by ELISA. These results demonstrate that primary astrocytes and HBMEC respond to virulent B. burgdorferi by producing a number of chemokines. These data suggest that infiltrating phagocytic cells, particularly neutrophils, attracted by chemokines expressed at the BBB (blood–brain barrier may be important contributors to the early inflammatory events associated with neuroborreliosis.

  2. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-3-deficient mice exhibit WHIM syndrome features and attenuated inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Tarrant, Teresa K.; Billard, Matthew J.; Timoshchenko, Roman G; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Foreman, Oded; Esserman, Denise A.; Chao, Nelson J.; Lento, William E.; Lee, David M.; Patel, Dhavalkumar; Siderovski, David P.

    2013-01-01

    GRK3−/− mice exhibit impaired CXCL12/CXCR4 responses, myelokathexis and hypogammaglobulinemia, as in WHIM syndrome, and are protected in inflammatory arthritis models by altered granulocyte trafficking.

  3. Instillation of coarse ash particulate matter and lipopolysaccharide produces a systemic inflammatory response in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnerty, K.; Choi, J.E.; Lau, A.; Davis-Gorman, G.; Diven, C.; Seaver, N.; Linak, W.P.; Witten, M.; McDonagh, P.F. [Arizona Health Science Center, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Coronary ischemic events increase significantly following a 'bad air' day. Ambient particulate matter (PM10) is the pollutant most strongly associated with these events. PM10 produces inflammatory injury to the lower airways. It is not clear, however, whether pulmonary inflammation translates to a systemic response. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a proinflammatory molecule often associated with the coarse fraction of PM. It was hypothesized that PM > 2.5 from coal plus LPS induce pulmonary inflammation leading to a systemic inflammatory response. Mice were intratracheally instilled with saline, PM (200 {mu} g), PM+ LPS10 (PM+ 10 {mu} g LPS), or PM+ LPS100 (PM+ 100 {mu} g LPS). Eighteen hours later, histologic analysis was performed on lungs from each group. Pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed by measuring the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6 in the pulmonary supernatant and plasma. In a follow-up study, the effects of LPS alone were assessed. Histologic analysis revealed a dose-dependent elevation in pulmonary inflammation with all treatments. Pulmonary TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 both increased significantly with PM+ LPS100 treatment. Regarding plasma, TNF-{alpha} significantly increased in both PM+ LPS10 and PM+ LPS100 treatments. For plasma IL-6, all groups tended to rise with a significant increase in the PM+ LPS100 group. The results of the follow-up study indicate that the responses to PM+ LPS were not due to LPS alone. These results suggest that coarse coal fly ash PM > 2.5 combined with LPS produced pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses. The resulting low-level systemic inflammation may contribute to the increased severity of ischemic heart disease observed immediately following a bad air day.

  4. Uncoupling between inflammatory and fibrotic responses to silica: evidence from MyD88 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Lo Re

    Full Text Available The exact implication of innate immunity in granuloma formation and irreversible lung fibrosis remains to be determined. In this study, we examined the lung inflammatory and fibrotic responses to silica in MyD88-knockout (KO mice. In comparison to wild-type (WT mice, we found that MyD88-KO animals developed attenuated lung inflammation, neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β release in response to silica. Granuloma formation was also less pronounced in MyD88-KO mice after silica. This limited inflammatory response was not accompanied by a concomitant attenuation of lung collagen accumulation after silica. Histological analyses revealed that while pulmonary fibrosis was localized in granulomas in WT animals, it was diffusely distributed throughout the parenchyma in MyD88-KO mice. Robust collagen accumulation was also observed in mice KO for several other components of innate immunity (IL-1R, IL-1, ASC, NALP3, IL-18R, IL-33R, TRIF, and TLR2-3-4,. We additionally show that pulmonary fibrosis in MyD88-KO mice was associated with the accumulation of pro-fibrotic regulatory T lymphocytes (T regs and pro-fibrotic cytokine expression (TGF-β, IL-10 and PDGF-B, not with T helper (Th 17 cell influx. Our findings indicate that the activation of MyD88-related innate immunity is central in the establishment of particle-induced lung inflammatory and granuloma responses. The development of lung fibrosis appears uncoupled from inflammation and may be orchestrated by a T reg-associated pathway.

  5. Neural mechanisms linking social status and inflammatory responses to social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatell, Keely A; Dedovic, Katarina; Slavich, George M; Jarcho, Michael R; Breen, Elizabeth C; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2016-06-01

    Social stratification has important implications for health and well-being, with individuals lower in standing in a hierarchy experiencing worse outcomes than those higher up the social ladder. Separate lines of past research suggest that alterations in inflammatory processes and neural responses to threat may link lower social status with poorer outcomes. This study was designed to bridge these literatures to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms linking subjective social status and inflammation. Thirty-one participants reported their subjective social status, and underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan while they were socially evaluated. Participants also provided blood samples before and after the stressor, which were analysed for changes in inflammation. Results showed that lower subjective social status was associated with greater increases in inflammation. Neuroimaging data revealed lower subjective social status was associated with greater neural activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) in response to negative feedback. Finally, results indicated that activation in the DMPFC in response to negative feedback mediated the relation between social status and increases in inflammatory activity. This study provides the first evidence of a neurocognitive pathway linking subjective social status and inflammation, thus furthering our understanding of how social hierarchies shape neural and physiological responses to social interactions. PMID:26979965

  6. The role of interpersonal processes in shaping inflammatory responses to social-evaluative threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Henderson, Neha A; Stellar, Jennifer E; Mendoza-Denton, Rodolfo; Francis, Darlene D

    2015-09-01

    In response to social-evaluative threat induced in the laboratory, lower (compared to higher) subjective social class of a participant predicts greater increases in the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). In spite of the interpersonal nature of social-evaluation, little work has explored whether characteristics of the evaluator shape physiological responses in this context. In the current study, in a sample of 190 college students (male=66), we explored whether one's subjective social class interacts with the perceived social class of an evaluator to predict changes in Oral Mucosal Transudate (OMT) IL-6 in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Participants were randomly assigned to be the speaker or the evaluator. Extending past work, we found that while speakers low in subjective social class consistently respond with strong increases in IL-6 regardless of their perception of their evaluator's social class, speakers high in subjective social class responded with greater increases in IL-6 when their evaluator was perceived as high social class compared to when they were perceived as low social class. This finding highlights the importance of perceptions of the evaluator in informing inflammatory responses to a social-evaluative task.

  7. Role of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in regulating host response and its interventional strategy for inflammatory diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Da-wei; ZHOU Rong-bin; YAO Yong-ming

    2009-01-01

    @@ The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) is a neurophysiological mechanism that regulates the immune system. The CAP inhibits inflammation by suppressing cytokine synthesis via release of acetylcholine in organs of the reticuloendothelial system, including the lungs, spleen, liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Impact of graft composition on the systemic inflammatory response after an elective repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Jong Kwan; Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min Joo; Han, Youngjin; Chung, Young Soo; Park, Hojong; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study aimed to evaluate the risk factors and the role of graft material in the development of an acute phase systemic inflammatory response, and the clinical outcome in patients who undergo endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) or open surgical repair (OSR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods We retrospectively evaluated the risk factors and the role of graft material in an increased risk of developing systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and the clinic...

  9. Propolis derivatives inhibit the systemic inflammatory response and protect hepatic and neuronal cells in acute septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Aida Abdelhamid Korish; Maha Mohamed Arafa

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe pathogenic infection triggers excessive release of cytokines as part of the massive inflammatory response associated with septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the protective effect of caffeic acid phenethye ester (CAPE) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced endotoxemia, hepatic and neuronal damage and the associated systemic inflammatory response (SIR). METHODS: Fifty male Wister rats were divided into: control, LPS, and CAPE+LPS groups. Plasma concentrations of vari...

  10. Liver damage and systemic inflammatory responses are exacerbated by the genetic deletion of CD39 in total hepatic ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    SUN, XIAOFENG; IMAI, MASATO; Nowak-Machen, Martina; Guckelberger, Olaf; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Wu, Yan; Khalpey, Zain; Berberat, Pascal; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Robson, Simon Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Liver ischemia reperfusion injury is associated with both local damage to the hepatic vasculature and systemic inflammatory responses. CD39 is the dominant vascular endothelial cell ectonucleotidase and rapidly hydrolyses both adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate to adenosine monophosphate. These biochemical properties, in tandem with 5′-nucleotidases, generate adenosine and potentially illicit inflammatory vascular responses and thrombosis. We have evaluated the role of CD3...

  11. Serum Calcitonin gene-related Petide concentrations in the horse and their relationship to the Systemic Inflammatory Response

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Emma

    2006-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in both human and equine intensive care patients. This systemic inflammatory response may be due to insult from bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic invasion or from trauma or hypoxemia. Local and systemic release of a wide variety of endogenous pro-inflammatory mediators results in activation of the innate immune system in order to resolve the insult. In sepsis this initial appropriate host response becomes amplified and de...

  12. Crucial role of Toll-like receptors in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun, E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Liou, Saou-Hsing; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Chao, How-Ran [Emerging Compounds Research Center, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, National Pingtung University and Science and Technology, Neipu, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Our previous studies indicated that zinc induced inflammatory response in both vascular endothelial cells and promonocytes. Here, we asked if other metals could cause the similar effect on vascular endothelial cells and tried to determine its underlying mechanism. Following screening of fifteen metals, zinc and nickel were identified with a marked proinflammatory effect, as determined by ICAM-1 and IL-8 induction, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Inhibiting protein expression of myeloid differentiation primary response protein-88 (MyD88), a Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor acting as a TLR-signaling transducer, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, suggesting the critical roles of TLRs in the inflammatory response. Blockage of TLR-4 signaling by CLI-095, a TLR-4 inhibitor, completely inhibited the nickel-induced ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression and NFκB activation. The same CLI-095 treatment significantly blocked the zinc-induced IL-8 expression, however with no significant effect on the ICAM-1 expression and a minor inhibitory effect on the NFκB activation. The finding demonstrated the differential role of TLR-4 in regulation of the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, where TLR-4 played a dominant role in NFκB activation by nickel, but not by zinc. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB by adenovirus-mediated IκBα expression and Bay 11-7025, an inhibitor of cytokine-induced IκB-α phosphorylation, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory responses, indicating the critical of NFκB in the process. The study demonstrates the crucial role of TLRs in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells and herein deciphers a potential important difference in NFκB activation via TLRs. The study provides a molecular basis for linkage between zinc/nickel exposure and pathogenesis of the metal-related inflammatory vascular disease. - Highlights: • Both zinc and nickel cause

  13. Pattern of CXCR7 Gene Expression in Mouse Brain Under Normal and Inflammatory Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banisadr, Ghazal; Podojil, Joseph R; Miller, Stephen D; Miller, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXCL12 acting via its G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) CXCR4 has been implicated in neurogenesis, neuromodulation, brain inflammation, HIV-1 encephalopathy and tumor growth. CXCR7 was identified as an alternate receptor for SDF-1/CXCL12. Characterization of CXCR7-deficient mice demonstrated a role for CXCR7 in fetal endothelial biology, cardiac development, and B-cell localization. Despite its ligand binding properties, CXCR7 does not seem to signal like a conventional GPCR. It has been suggested that CXCR7 may not function alone but in combination with CXCR4. Here, we investigated the regional localization of CXCR7 receptors in adult mouse brain using CXCR7-EGFP transgenic mice. We found that the receptors were expressed in various brain regions including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, subventricular zone (SVZ), hypothalamus and cerebellum. Extensive CXCR7 expression was associated with cerebral blood vessels. Using cell type specific markers, CXCR7 expression was found in neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte progenitors. GAD-expressing neurons exhibited CXCR7 expression in the hippocampus. Expression of CXCR7 in the dentate gyrus included cells that expressed nestin, GFAP and cells that appeared to be immature granule cells. In mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), CXCR7 was expressed by migrating oligodendrocyte progenitors in the SVZ. We then compared the distribution of SDF-1/CXCL12 and CXCR7 using bitransgenic mice expressing both CXCR7-EGFP and SDF-1-mRFP. Enhanced expression of SDF-1/CXCL12 and CXCR7 was observed in the corpus callosum, SVZ and cerebellum. Overall, the expression of CXCR7 in normal and pathological nervous system suggests CXCR4-independent functions of SDF-1/CXCL12 mediated through its interaction with CXCR7. PMID:25997895

  14. Thioredoxin-1 Increases Survival in Sepsis by Inflammatory Response Through Suppressing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guobing; Li, Xiang; Huang, Mengbing; Li, Mei; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Li, Ye; Bai, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis is the main cause of death in critically ill patients, pathogenesis of which is still unclear. The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inflammatory signal pathway mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in sepsis. Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) is an important protein of regulating oxidative stress. It plays a crucial role in the anti-oxidation, anti-apoptosis, and anti-inflammation. However, the role and the mechanism of Trx-1 in sepsis have not been extensively studied. In the present study, we showed that the survival was longer in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture in Trx-1 overexpression transgenic (Tg) mice compared with wild-type mice. Wet/dry lung weight ratio was decreased in Trx-1 Tg mice. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in plasma and lung tissue were inhibited in Tg mice. The expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78, inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2, C/EBP homologous protein, NF-κB, and inhibitors of NF-κBα were increased in lung tissue. More importantly, the overexpression of Trx-1 in transgenic mice suppressed NF-κB inflammatory signal pathway by inhibiting the activation of molecules involved in ER stress. Our results suggest that Trx-1 may play protective role in extending survival in sepsis by regulating inflammatory response through suppressing ER stress. PMID:27299588

  15. Mutation of cysteine 46 in IKK-beta increases inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi Hong; Jiang, Shui Ping; Liu, Yan; Wang, Ting Yu; Yao, Xiao Jun; Su, Xiao Hui; Yan, Feng Gen; Liu, Juan; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Yi, Xiao Qin; Wong, Yuen Fan; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Activation of IκB kinase β (IKK-β) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling contributes to cancer pathogenesis and inflammatory disease; therefore, the IKK-β−NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target. Current drug design strategies focus on blocking NF-κB signaling by binding to specific cysteine residues on IKK-β. However, mutations in IKK-β have been found in patients who may eventually develop drug resistance. For these patients, a new generation of IKK-β inhibitors are required to provide novel treatment options. We demonstrate in vitro that cysteine-46 (Cys-46) is an essential residue for IKK-β kinase activity. We then validate the role of Cys-46 in the pathogenesis of inflammation using delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and an IKK-βC46A transgenic mouse model. We show that a novel IKK-β inhibitor, dihydromyricetin (DMY), has anti-inflammatory effects on WT DTH mice but not IKK-βC46A transgenic mice. These findings reveal the role of Cys-46 in the promotion of inflammatory responses, and suggest that Cys-46 is a novel drug-binding site for the inhibition of IKK-β. PMID:26378659

  16. Lung inflammatory responses and hyperinflation induced by an intratracheal exposure to lipopolysaccharide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Anne-Helene; Eriksson, Christina; Wang, Xiangdong

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of the respiratory tract to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces acute local inflammation and tissue injury associated with the various deliveries of LPS. To determine potential association of local inflammatory responses with respiratory tract dysfunction, infiltration of inflammatory cells, production of inflammatory mediators, lung hyperinflation and edema were measured in Wister rats 2, 4, and 24 h after an intratracheal administration of LPS at different doses (5, 50, 500 and 5000 microg/ml/kg). Lung hyperinflation determined by an increased excised lung gas volume was significantly increased 2 and 4 h after LPS instillation and lung edema occurred from 2 h onward. Peak BAL levels of TNFalpha appeared at 2 h, MCP-1 at 4 h, and IL-6 at 2 and 4 h, while BAL levels of IL-1beta were increased during 24 h after the intratracheal instillation of LPS. Neutrophilia in BAL fluid was noted from 2 h post-challenge. Our results demonstrate a clear dose-related change in the lung weight at 4 and 24 h, in the BAL levels of MCP-1 at 4 h, and IL-6 and IL-1beta at 2 and 4 h. It seems important to understand polymorphisms of LPS-induced lung hyperinflation and inflammation. Lung hyperinflation and inflammation may be independent during the development of acute lung injury.

  17. Utility of immune response-derived biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Oever, Jaap; Netea, Mihai G; Kullberg, Bart-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating between inflammatory disorders is difficult, but important for a rational use of antimicrobial agents. Biomarkers reflecting the host immune response may offer an attractive strategy to predict the etiology of an inflammatory process and can thus be of help in decision making. We performed a review of the literature to evaluate the diagnostic value of inflammatory biomarkers in adult patients admitted to the hospital with suspected systemic acute infections. Elevated procalcitonin (PCT) concentrations indicate a bacterial infection in febrile patients with an auto-immune disease, rather than a disease flare. CD64 expression on neutrophils can discriminate between non-infectious systemic inflammation and sepsis, and limited evidence suggests the same for decoy receptor 3. PCT is useful for both diagnosing bacterial infection complicating influenza and guiding antibiotic treatment in lower respiratory tract infections in general. In undifferentiated illnesses, increased CD35 expression on neutrophils distinguishes bacterial from viral infections. Compared to bacterial infections, invasive fungal infections are characterized by low concentrations of PCT. No biomarker predicting a specific infecting agent could be identified. PMID:26429736

  18. Brazilin Limits Inflammatory Responses through Induction of Prosurvival Autophagy in Rheumatoid Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunji Lee

    Full Text Available Brazilin is an active compound of Caesalpinia sappan L. (Leguminosae, which possesses pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammation potentials depending on the specific cell type. However, it is largely unknown whether autophagy is implicated in the mechanism underlying its chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Here, we show that treatment of RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS with brazilin results in enhanced level of autophagic flux, evidenced by accumulation of autophagosome and increased level of lipidated LC3 (LC3-II, which is mainly mediated by enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, long-term exposure of brazilin was able to restore cell survival against the cytotoxity, exclusively in RA FLS, but not in normal fibroblast. Importantly, such a restoration from brazilin-induced cytotoxity in RA FLS was completely abrogated after co-treatment with autophagy inhibitors including NH4Cl or chloroquine. Furthermore, we found that the pretreatment of RA FLS with brazilin reduced LPS- or TNF-induced NF-κB activation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in parallel with the enhanced autophagic flux. Such anti-NF-κB potentials of brazilin were drastically masked in RA FLS when autophagy was suppressed. These results suggest that brazilin is capable of activating autophagy exclusively in RA FLS, and such inducible autophagy promotes cell survival and limits inflammatory response.

  19. Obesity and coronary microvascular disease - implications for adipose tissue-mediated remote inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, Zsolt; Broskova, Zuzana; Feher, Attila

    2014-05-01

    It is believed that obesity has detrimental effects on the coronary circulation. These include immediate changes in coronary arterial vasomotor responsiveness and the development of occlusive large coronary artery disease. Despite its critical role in regulating myocardial perfusion, the altered behavior of coronary resistance arteries, which gives rise to coronary microvascular disease (CMD) is poorly understood in obesity. A chronic, low-grade vascular inflammation has been long considered as one of the main underlying pathology behind CMD. The expanded adipose tissue and the infiltrating macrophages are the major sources of pro-inflammatory mediators that have been implicated in causing inadequate myocardial perfusion and, in a long term, development of heart failure in obese patients. Much less is known the mechanisms regulating the release of these cytokines into the circulation that enable them to exert their remote effects in the coronary microcirculation. This mini review aims to examine recent studies describing alterations in the vasomotor function of coronary resistance arteries and the role of adipose tissue-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in contributing to CMD in obesity. We provide examples of regulatory mechanisms by which adipokines are released from adipose tissue to exert their remote inflammatory effects on coronary microvessels. We identify some of the important challenges and opportunities going forward.

  20. Effects of Thymol and Carvacrol, Constituents of Thymus vulgaris L. Essential Oil, on the Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carolina Fachini-Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., Lamiaceae is an aromatic and medicinal plant that has been used in folk medicine, phytopharmaceutical preparations, food preservatives, and as an aromatic ingredient. The effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO and its isolated constituents thymol and cavacrol (CVL were studied in the following experimental models: ear edema, carrageenan-induced pleurisy, and chemotaxis in vitro. In the pleurisy model, TEO, CVL, and thymol significantly inhibited inflammatory edema. However, only TEO and CVL inhibited leukocyte migration. In the in vitro chemotaxis experiment, CVL inhibited leukocyte migration, whereas thymol exerted a potent chemoattractant effect. In the ear edema model, CVL (10 mg/ear, applied topically, reduced edema formation, exerting a topical anti-inflammatory effect. Thymol did not reduce edema formation but rather presented an irritative response, probably dependent on histamine and prostanoid release. Our data suggest that the antiinflammatory effects of TEO and CVL are attributable to the inhibition of inflammatory edema and leukocyte migration.

  1. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Down-Regulates NOD Signaling and Inflammatory Response in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi Ping; Huang, Shungen; Zhou, Huiting; Xie, Yi; Pan, Jian; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Jiang Huai; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on expression and function of NOD1 and NOD2 in children with congenital heart disease (CHD), in an attempt to clarify whether NOD1 and NOD2 signaling is involved in the modulation of host innate immunity against postoperative infection in pediatric CHD patients. Peripheral blood samples were collected from pediatric CHD patients at five different time points: before CPB, immediately after CPB, and 1, 3, and 7 days after CPB. Real-time PCR, Western blot, and ELISA were performed to measure the expression of NOD1 and NOD2, their downstream signaling pathways, and inflammatory cytokines at various time points. Proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and TNF-α levels in response to stimulation with either the NOD1 agonist Tri-DAP or the NOD2 agonist MDP were significantly reduced after CPB compared with those before CPB, which is consistent with a suppressed inflammatory response postoperatively. The expression of phosphorylated RIP2 and activation of the downstream signaling pathways NF-κB p65 and MAPK p38 upon Tri-DAP or MDP stimulation in PBMCs were substantially inhibited after CPB. The mRNA level of NOD1 and protein levels of NOD1 and NOD2 were also markedly decreased after CPB. Our results demonstrated that NOD-mediated signaling pathways were substantially inhibited after CPB, which correlates with the suppressed inflammatory response and may account, at least in part, for the increased risk of postoperative infection in pediatric CHD patients. PMID:27622570

  3. Oleanolic acid controls allergic and inflammatory responses in experimental allergic conjunctivitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Córdova

    Full Text Available Pollen is the most common aeroallergen to cause seasonal conjunctivitis. The result of allergen exposure is a strong Th2-mediated response along with conjunctival mast cell degranulation and eosinophilic infiltration. Oleanolic acid (OA is natural a triterpene that displays strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties being an active anti-allergic molecule on hypersensitivity reaction models. However, its effect on inflammatory ocular disorders including conjunctivitis, has not yet been addressed. Hence, using a Ragweed pollen (RWP-specific allergic conjunctivitis (EAC mouse model we study here whether OA could modify responses associated to allergic processes. We found that OA treatment restricted mast cell degranulation and infiltration of eosinophils in conjunctival tissue and decreased allergen-specific Igs levels in EAC mice. Th2-type cytokines, secreted phospholipase A2 type-IIA (sPLA2-IIA, and chemokines levels were also significantly diminished in the conjunctiva and serum of OA-treated EAC mice. Moreover, OA treatment also suppressed RWP-specific T-cell proliferation. In vitro studies, on relevant cells of the allergic process, revealed that OA reduced the proliferative and migratory response, as well as the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators on EoL-1 eosinophils and RBL-2H3 mast cells exposed to allergic and/or crucial inflammatory stimuli such as RWP, sPLA2-IIA or eotaxin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the beneficial activity of OA in ocular allergic processes and may provide a new intervention strategy and potential therapy for allergic diseases.

  4. Fractalkine Signaling Regulates the Inflammatory Response in an α-Synuclein Model of Parkinson Disease.

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    Aaron D Thome

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and widespread aggregates of the protein alpha-synuclein (α-syn. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator; however, the role of α-syn in triggering and sustaining inflammation remains unclear. In models of Alzheimer's disease (AD, multiple sclerosis (MS and neurotoxin models of PD, the chemokine CX3CL1 (fractalkine and its receptor (CX3CR1 have important roles in modulating neuroinflammation.To examine the role of fractalkine signaling in α-syn-induced-neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, we used an in vivo mouse model in which human α-syn is overexpressed by an adeno associated viral vector serotype 2 (AAV2 and in vitro phagocytosis and protein internalization assays with primary microglia treated with aggregated α-syn.We observed that loss of CX3CR1 expression led to a reduced inflammatory response, with reduced IgG deposition and expression of MHCII 4 weeks post-transduction. Six months post transduction, AAV2 mediated overexpression of α-syn leads to loss of dopaminergic neurons, and this loss was not exacerbated in animals with deletion of CX3CR1. To determine the mechanism by which CX3CR1affects inflammatory responses in α-syn-induced inflammation, phagocytosis was assessed using a fluorescent microsphere assay as well as by microglial uptake of aggregated α-syn. CX3CR1-/- microglia showed reduced uptake of fluorescent beads and aggregated α-syn.Our results suggest that one mechanism by which CX3CR1-/- attenuates inflammation is at the level of phagocytosis of aggregated α-syn by microglia. These data implicate fractalkine signaling as a potential therapeutic target for regulating inflammatory response in α-syn models PD.

  5. The human metapneumovirus matrix protein stimulates the inflammatory immune response in vitro.

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    Audrey Bagnaud-Baule

    Full Text Available Each year, during winter months, human Metapneumovirus (hMPV is associated with epidemics of bronchiolitis resulting in the hospitalization of many infants. Bronchiolitis is an acute illness of the lower respiratory tract with a consequent inflammation of the bronchioles. The rapid onset of inflammation suggests the innate immune response may have a role to play in the pathogenesis of this hMPV infection. Since, the matrix protein is one of the most abundant proteins in the Paramyxoviridae family virion, we hypothesized that the inflammatory modulation observed in hMPV infected patients may be partly associated with the matrix protein (M-hMPV response. By western blot analysis, we detected a soluble form of M-hMPV released from hMPV infected cell as well as from M-hMPV transfected HEK 293T cells suggesting that M-hMPV may be directly in contact with antigen presenting cells (APCs during the course of infection. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy allowed determining that M-hMPV was taken up by dendritic cells (moDCs and macrophages inducing their activation. Furthermore, these moDCs enter into a maturation process inducing the secretion of a broad range of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to M-hMPV. Additionally, M-hMPV activated DCs were shown to stimulate IL-2 and IFN-γ production by allogeneic T lymphocytes. This M-hMPV-mediated activation and antigen presentation of APCs may in part explain the marked inflammatory immune response observed in pathology induced by hMPV in patients.

  6. Apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine response of mast cells induced by influenza A viruses.

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    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the influenza A virus has been investigated heavily, and both the inflammatory response and apoptosis have been found to have a definitive role in this process. The results of studies performed by the present and other groups have indicated that mast cells may play a role in the severity of the disease. To further investigate cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, apoptosis and inflammatory response were studied in mouse mastocytoma cell line P815. This is the first study to demonstrate that H1N1 (A/WSN/33, H5N1 (A/Chicken/Henan/1/04, and H7N2 (A/Chicken/Hebei/2/02 influenza viruses can induce mast cell apoptosis. They were found to do this mainly through the mitochondria/cytochrome c-mediated intrinsic pathway, and the activation of caspase 8-mediated extrinsic pathway was here found to be weak. Two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3 -only molecules Bim and Puma appeared to be involved in the apoptotic pathways. When virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited in P815 cells using pan-caspase (Z-VAD-fmk and caspase-9 (Z-LEHD-fmk inhibitors, the replication of these three subtypes of viruses was suppressed and the secretions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and MCP-1, decreased. The results of this study may further understanding of the role of mast cells in host defense and pathogenesis of influenza virus. They may also facilitate the development of novel therapeutic aids against influenza virus infection.

  7. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with inflammatory responses during rat liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Yi Shao; Li-Feng Zhao; Cun-Shuan Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between inflammatory response and liver regeneration (LR) at transcriptional level.METHODS: After partial hepatectomy (PH) of rats,the genes associated with inflammatory response were obtained according to the databases, and the gene expression changes during LR were checked by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array.RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty-nine genes were associated with liver regeneration. The initial and total expressing gene numbers found in initiation phase (0.5-4 h after PH), G0/G1 transition (4-6 h after PH),cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH), cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction (66-168 h after PH) of liver regeneration were 107, 34, 126, 6 and 107,92, 233, 145 respectively, showing that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the beginning of liver regeneration, and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 groups: only up-regulated, predominantly up-,only down-, predominantly down-, up- and down-,involving 92, 25, 77, 14 and 31 genes, respectively. The total times of their up- and down-regulated expression were 975 and 494, respectively, demonstrating that the expressions of the majority of genes were increased,and that of a few genes were decreased. Their time relevance was classified into 13 groups, showing that the cellular physiological and biochemical activities were staggered during liver regeneration. According to gene expression patterns, they were classified into 33 types,suggesting that the activities were diverse and complex during liver regeneration.CONCLUSION: Inflammatory response is closely associated with liver regeneration, in which 239 LRassociated genes play an important role.

  8. Withaferin A inhibits inflammatory responses induced by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Eui-Jeong; Kang, Ming-Jung; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Hye-Jin; Oh, Sang-Muk; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Kim, Dong-Jae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Cho, Sung-Dae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Periodontitis is a progressive chronic inflammatory disease and a major cause of tooth loss in humans. As a withanolides, withaferin A (WA) is known to exhibit strong anti‑inflammatory activity. The present study examined whether WA inhibited inflammatory responses in macrophages in response to two representative periodontal pathogens, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Murine bone marrow‑derived macrophages (BMDMs) were used in this study and cytokine production in culture supernatants was measured by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assays. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the activation of nuclear factor‑κB and mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), toll‑like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. The production of nitric oxide (NO) was determined by the Griess reaction. WA treatment was shown to decrease interleukin (IL)‑6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α production in BMDMs in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans in a dose‑dependent manner. The phosphorylation of IκB‑α and MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal‑regulated kinases and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinases) induced by F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans was also inhibited by WA. F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans induced iNOS expression and NO production in BMDMs, which was inhibited by WA in a dose‑dependent manner. WA also reduced endogenous and induced expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in these cells. These results suggest that WA may be a potential therapeutic agent or preventive additive for periodontitis control. PMID:27220676

  9. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms and Response to Anti-TNFs in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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    Rocío Prieto-Pérez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha is a major proinflammatory cytokine involved in the immune response in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Anti-TNF drugs such as infliximab and adalimumab are used to treat IBD; however, approximately 30% of patients do not respond to treatment. Individual genetic differences could contribute to lack of efficacy. Genetic studies have tried to uncover the factors underlying differences in response, however, knowledge remains limited, and the results obtained should be validated, so that pharmacogenetic information can be applied in clinical practice. In this review, we gather current knowledge in the pharmacogenetics of anti-TNF drugs in patients with IBD. We observed a connection between the major genes described as possible predictors of response to anti-TNF drugs in IBD and the cytokines and molecules involved in the T helper (Th 17 pathway.

  10. Localization of macrophage inflammatory protein : Macrophage inflammatory PROTEIN-1 expression in rat brain after peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide and focal cerebral ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gourmala, NG; Limonta, S; Bochelen, D; Sauter, A; Boddeke, HWGM

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein is a member of the C-C subfamily of chemokines, which exhibits, in addition to proinflammatory activities, a potent endogenous pyrogen activity. In this study, we analysed the time-course of expression and cellular source of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha and

  11. Equine herpesvirus type 1 modulates inflammatory host immune response genes in equine endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Stephanie; Barsova, Jekaterina; Campos, Isabel; Frampton, Arthur R

    2016-08-30

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM), a disease caused by equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), is characterized by severe inflammation, thrombosis, and hypoxia in central nervous system (CNS) endothelial cells, which can result in a spectrum of clinical signs including urinary incontinence, ataxia, and paralysis. Strains of EHV-1 that contain a single point mutation within the viral DNA polymerase (nucleotide A2254>G2254: amino acid N752→D752) are isolated from EHM afflicted horses at higher frequencies than EHV-1 strains that do not harbor this mutation. Due to the correlation between the DNA Pol mutation and EHM disease, EHV-1 strains that contain the mutation have been designated as neurologic. In this study, we measured virus replication, cell to cell spread efficacy, and host inflammatory responses in equine endothelial cells infected with 12 different strains of EHV-1. Two strains, T953 (Ohio 2003) (neurologic) and Kentucky A (KyA) (non-neurologic), have well described disease phenotypes while the remaining strains used in this study are classified as neurologic or non-neurologic based solely on the presence or absence of the DNA pol mutation, respectively. Results show that the neurologic strains do not replicate better or spread more efficiently in endothelial cells. Also, the majority of the host inflammatory genes were modulated similarly regardless of EHV-1 genotype. Analyses of host gene expression showed that a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, as well as CCL5, IL-6 and TNF-α were consistently up-regulated in endothelial cells infected with each EHV-1 strain. The identification of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines in endothelial cells that are modulated by EHV-1 provides further insight into the factors that contribute to the immunopathology observed after infection and may also reveal new targets for disease intervention. PMID:27527764

  12. Environmental particulate matter induces murine intestinal inflammatory responses and alters the gut microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Kish

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Particulate matter (PM is a key pollutant in ambient air that has been associated with negative health conditions in urban environments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of orally administered PM on the gut microbiome and immune function under normal and inflammatory conditions. METHODS: Wild-type 129/SvEv mice were gavaged with Ottawa urban PM10 (EHC-93 for 7-14 days and mucosal gene expression analyzed using Ingenuity Pathways software. Intestinal permeability was measured by lactulose/mannitol excretion in urine. At sacrifice, segments of small and large intestine were cultured and cytokine secretion measured. Splenocytes were isolated and incubated with PM10 for measurement of proliferation. Long-term effects of exposure (35 days on intestinal cytokine expression were measured in wild-type and IL-10 deficient (IL-10(-/- mice. Microbial composition of stool samples was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Short chain fatty acids were measured in caecum. RESULTS: Short-term treatment of wild-type mice with PM10 altered immune gene expression, enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the small intestine, increased gut permeability, and induced hyporesponsiveness in splenocytes. Long-term treatment of wild-type and IL-10(-/- mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the colon and altered short chain fatty acid concentrations and microbial composition. IL-10(-/- mice had increased disease as evidenced by enhanced histological damage. CONCLUSIONS: Ingestion of airborne particulate matter alters the gut microbiome and induces acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the intestine.

  13. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  14. Recombinant human erythropoietin reduces plasminogen activator inhibitor and ameliorates pro-inflammatory responses following trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mojtahedzadeh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n  "n Background and the purpose of the study: Besides its hematopoietic effects, erythropoietin (EPO by mobilization of iron and modulation of some inflammatory cytokines has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these effects of erythropoietin and its impact on organ function in traumatized patients. "n Methods: Twenty-six ICU-admitted traumatized patients within 24 hrs after trauma were randomly assigned to the EPO (received EPO, 300 units/Kg/day and Control (not received EPO groups. The inflammatory biomarkers including Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α, Interleukin 1 (IL-1, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 and Nitrotyrosine were recorded at the admission, 3, 6 and 9 days thereafter. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA scores were also recorded. "n Results: Among 12 patients (EPO group TNF-α level at the day of 9 (P=0.046, and within EPO group at the days of 3 (P=0.026 ameliorate, 6 (P=0.016, and 9 (P=0.052 were significantly lowered. Level of IL-1 and PAI-1 decreased significantly at days of 3, 6 and 9 post intervention. Also there were significant differences between two groups in the SOFA score during three measured time intervals (the first, third and seventh days. "n Conclusion: From the results of this study it seems that injection of erythrocyte stimulating agent is well tolerated and inhibits the inflammatory response and oxidative stress following trauma.

  15. Surfactant Protein D modulates allergen particle uptake and inflammatory response in a human epithelial airway model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schleh Carsten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen-containing subpollen particles (SPP are released from whole plant pollen upon contact with water or even high humidity. Because of their size SPP can preferentially reach the lower airways where they come into contact with surfactant protein (SP-D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of SP-D in a complex three-dimensional human epithelial airway model, which simulates the most important barrier functions of the epithelial airway. The uptake of SPP as well as the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was investigated. Methods SPP were isolated from timothy grass and subsequently fluorescently labeled. A human epithelial airway model was built by using human Type II-pneumocyte like cells (A549 cells, human monocyte derived macrophages as well as human monocyte derived dendritic cells. The epithelial cell model was incubated with SPP in the presence and absence of surfactant protein D. Particle uptake was evaluated by confocal microscopy and advanced computer-controlled analysis. Finally, human primary CD4+ T-Cells were added to the epithelial airway model and soluble mediators were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay or bead array. Results SPP were taken up by epithelial cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. This uptake coincided with secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. SP-D modulated the uptake of SPP in a cell type specific way (e.g. increased number of macrophages and epithelial cells, which participated in allergen particle uptake and led to a decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results display a possible mechanism of how SP-D can modulate the inflammatory response to inhaled allergen.

  16. Lactobacillus acidophilus alleviates platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory responses in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alip Borthakur

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been used as alternative prevention and therapy modalities in intestinal inflammatory disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Pathophysiology of IBD and NEC includes the production of diverse lipid mediators, including platelet-activating factor (PAF that mediate inflammatory responses in the disease. PAF is known to activate NF-κB, however, the mechanisms of PAF-induced inflammation are not fully defined. We have recently described a novel PAF-triggered pathway of NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, requiring the pivotal role of the adaptor protein Bcl10 and its interactions with CARMA3 and MALT1. The current studies examined the potential role of the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus in reversing the PAF-induced, Bcl10-dependent NF-κB activation and IL-8 production in IECs. PAF treatment (5 µM×24 h of NCM460 and Caco-2 cells significantly increased nuclear p65 NF-κB levels and IL-8 secretion (2-3-fold, P<0.05, compared to control, which were blocked by pretreatment of the cells for 6 h with L. acidophilus (LA or its culture supernatant (CS, followed by continued treatments with PAF for 24 h. LA-CS also attenuated PAF-induced increase in Bcl10 mRNA and protein levels and Bcl10 promoter activity. LA-CS did not alter PAF-induced interaction of Bcl10 with CARMA3, but attenuated Bcl10 interaction with MALT1 and also PAF-induced ubiquitination of IKKγ. Efficacy of bacteria-free CS of LA in counteracting PAF-induced inflammatory cascade suggests that soluble factor(s in the CS of LA mediate these effects. These results define a novel mechanism by which probiotics counteract PAF-induced inflammation in IECs.

  17. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy; Guillain-Barré - CIDP ... CIDP is one cause of damage to nerves outside the brain or spinal cord ( peripheral neuropathy ). Polyneuropathy ...

  18. Immunoglobulin G–mediated Inflammatory Responses Develop Normally in Complement-deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvestre, Diana; Clynes, Raphael; Ma, Minga; Warren, Henry; Carroll, Michael C.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    1996-01-01

    The role of complement in immunoglobulin G–triggered inflammation was studied in mice genetically deficient in complement components C3 and C4. Using the reverse passive Arthus reaction and experimental models of immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia, we show that these mice have types II and III inflammatory responses that are indistinguishable from those of wild-type animals. Complement-deficient and wild-type animals exhibit comparable levels of erythrophagocytosis and platelet clearance in response to cytotoxic anti–red blood cell and antiplatelet antibodies. Furthermore, in the reverse passive Arthus reaction, soluble immune complexes induce equivalent levels of hemmorhage, edema, and neutrophillic infiltration in complement-deficient and wild-type animals. In contrast, mice that are genetically deficient in the expression of Fc receptors exhibit grossly diminished reactions by both cytotoxic antibodies and soluble immune complexes. These studies provide strong evidence that the activation of cell-based FcγR receptors, but not complement, are required for antibody-triggered murine inflammatory responses. PMID:8976192

  19. Pulmonary inflammatory response: cellular events in experimental pulmonary arterial hypersensitivity disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) was covalently linked to polyacrylamide or agarose beads and was injected into control Syrian hamsters and hamsters previously immunized with either HRP or BSA. Animals sensitized to soluble antigen and subsequently challenged intravenously with the same antigen immobilized on beads developed an acute focal inflammatory response within 2 to 6 hours after injection. The acute response involved local deposition of IgG and complement (β1A/β1C globulin), polymorphonuclear leukocyte exudation, and variable amounts of hemorrhage. A focal vasculitis was occasionally present. Within 72 hours, the reaction had become largely mononuclear or granulomatous in nature, and giant cell formation was seen within 4 days after immobilized antigen injection. Severe reactions developed only upon recognition of specific antigenic determinants; thus hamsters immunized against soluble HRP developed characteristic lesions only upon intravenous challenge with HRP-coated beads but not with beads coated with unrelated antigen (BSA). The beads elicited only a mild foreign body reaction in the control hamsters at 5 to 7 days after injection, a reaction that was temporally and histopathologically distinct from the lesions in immunized hamsters. Thus, the state of existing immunity can influence the character and severity of the local pulmonary inflammatory response. (U.S.)

  20. Contribution of Lung Macrophages to the Inflammatory Responses Induced by Exposure to Air Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Hiraiwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large population cohort studies have indicated an association between exposure to particulate matter and cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The inhalation of toxic environmental particles and gases impacts the innate and adaptive defense systems of the lung. Lung macrophages play a critically important role in the recognition and processing of any inhaled foreign material such as pathogens or particulate matter. Alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells are the predominant cells that process and remove inhaled particulate matter from the lung. Cooperatively, they produce proinflammatory mediators when exposed to atmospheric particles. These mediators produce integrated local (lung, controlled predominantly by epithelial cells and systemic (bone marrow and vascular system, controlled predominantly by macrophages inflammatory responses. The systemic response results in an increase in the release of leukocytes from the bone marrow and an increased production of acute phase proteins from the liver, with both factors impacting blood vessels and leading to destabilization of existing atherosclerotic plaques. This review focuses on lung macrophages and their role in orchestrating the inflammatory responses induced by exposure to air pollutants.

  1. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation.

  2. Farnesoid X receptor antagonizes NF-κB in hepatic inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Meihua; Yu, Donna; Forman, Barry M.; Huang, Wendong

    2008-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor that plays key roles in hepatoprotection by maintaining the homeostasis of liver metabolism. FXR null mice display strong hepatic inflammation and develop spontaneous liver tumors. In this report, we demonstrate that FXR is a negative modulator of NF-κB-mediated hepatic inflammation. Activation of FXR by its agonist ligands inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators in response to the NF-κB activation in both HepG2 cells and primary...

  3. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite bacteraemia is present in the majority of patients with pneumococcal, little is known about the influence of the systemic infection on the meningeal inflammatory response. METHODS: To explore the role of systemic infection on the meningeal inflammation, experimental meningitis...... levels in 153 pneumococcal meningitis patients with and without presence of bacteraemia. RESULTS: As designed, blood bacterial concentrations were significantly different among three experimental groups during the 16 hours study period (Kruskal Wallis test, P ... to the two other groups between 12-16 hours from time of infection (P meningitis, no significant difference in CSF WBC was observed between patients with or without bacteraemia at admission (n = 103, 1740...

  4. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and renal response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Jensen, N G; Hansen, J M;

    1999-01-01

    Nabumetone, a newer non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) which preferentially blocks cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity, may be less nephrotoxic than indomethacin. This study tested whether nabumetone has effects different from those of indomethacin on exercise-induced changes in renal function...... decreased the plasma renin concentration. Thus, during exercise, nabumetone may decrease the excretion of 6-oxo-PGF(1alpha) by inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-1 or by inhibition of specific exercise-induced activation of cyclo-oxygenase-2, or both. None of the drugs changed the renal response to exercise...

  5. Dietary tryptophan and methionine as modulators of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) immune status and inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marina; Azeredo, Rita; Díaz-Rosales, Patricia; Afonso, António; Peres, Helena; Oliva-Teles, Aires; Costas, Benjamín

    2015-02-01

    Amino acids regulate key metabolic pathways important to immune responses and their nutritional supply may increase synthesis of immune-related proteins. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of tryptophan and methionine on European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) cellular and humoral status. The immunomodulatory effects of tryptophan and methionine during an inflammatory insult was also evaluated after intraperitoneal injection with inactivated Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (Phdp). A practical isonitrogenous (45% crude protein) and isolipidic (16% crude fat) diets was formulated to include fish meal and a blend of plant feedstuffs as protein sources and fish oil as the main lipid source (CRL diet). Two other diets were formulated similar to the control but including L-tryptophan or L-methionine at ×2 the requirement level (diets TRP and MET, respectively). European seabass weighing 275 g were fed the experimental diets for a period of 15 days before being sampled (trial 1). Then, fish were subjected to a peritoneal inflammation by intraperitoneally injecting UV killed Phdp (10(6) colony forming units ml(-1)) and sampled following 4 and 24 h post-injection (trial 2). Fish injected with a saline solution served as control. The haematological profile, peripheral cell dynamics and several plasma immune parameters were determined in trials 1 and 2, whereas cell migration to the inflammatory focus was also determined in trial 2. MET positively affected European seabass immune status by improving the peripheral leucocyte response, complement activity and bactericidal capacity, a stronger cellular recruitment to the inflammatory focus, and higher plasma peroxidase and bactericidal activities. TRP also seemed to improve immunostimulation, as there was a trend to augment both cell-mediated immunity and humoral capacity. However, TRP failed to improve an inflammatory response, verified by a decrease in blood phagocyte numbers

  6. Cervical sympathetic block regulates early systemic inflammatory response in severe trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ming-Hua; Tian, Jun; Su, Yong-Ping; WANG, Tao; Xiang, Qiang; Wen, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Background This aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one-side cervical sympathetic block on early inflammatory response in severe trauma patients. Material/Methods Thirty severe trauma patients with injury severity score (ISS) of 16 to 25 were randomly divided into treatment and control groups (n=15 each). Patients in the treatment group underwent a right-side stellate ganglion block (SGB) using 8 mL 0.75% ropivacaine for 4 times, with the first injection within 12 hr of admiss...

  7. Circulating Plasma microRNAs can differentiate Human Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Caserta; Florian Kern; Jonathan Cohen; Stephen Drage; Newbury, Sarah F; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation in humans may be triggered by infection, termed sepsis, or non-infective processes, termed non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). MicroRNAs regulate cellular processes including inflammation and may be detected in blood. We aimed to establish definitive proof-of-principle that circulating microRNAs are differentially affected during sepsis and non-infective SIRS. Critically ill patients with severe (n = 21) or non-severe (n = 8) intra-abdominal sep...

  8. Inflammatory response in chronic degenerative endometritis mares treated with platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reghini, Maria Fernanda S; Ramires Neto, Carlos; Segabinazzi, Lorenzo G; Castro Chaves, Maria Manoela B; Dell'Aqua, Camila de Paula F; Bussiere, Maria Clara C; Dell'Aqua, José Antonio; Papa, Frederico O; Alvarenga, Marco Antonio

    2016-07-15

    Degenerative changes of the endometrium are directly related to age and fertility in mares. Chronic degenerative endometritis (CDE) is correlated with uterine fluid retention and reduced ability to clear uterine inflammation. Recent research in the areas of equine surgery and sports medicine has shown that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment acts as an immunomodulator of the inflammatory response. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if the uterine infusion of PRP could modulate the local inflammatory response and modify the intrauterine NO concentrations after artificial insemination (AI) in both normal mares and those with CDE. Thirteen mares with endometrium classified as grade III on the histology (mares with CDE) and eight mares with endometrial histological classification I or II-a normal mares were selected to investigate the effect of PRP therapy. The mares were inseminated with fresh semen in two consecutive cycles in a crossover study design. Thereby, each mare served as its own control and the treatment was performed with intrauterine PRP infusion four hours after AI. The percentage of neutrophils in uterine cytology (CIT, %), uterine fluid accumulation observed on ultrasonography (FLU, mm) and nitric oxide concentration of uterine fluid (NO, μM) were analyzed before and 24 hours after AI. The results reported that mares with CDE (CIT, 68.3 ± 3.27, FLU, 10.7 ± 1.61) have a higher (P  0.05) between categories of mares. In treated cycles with PRP, the intrauterine inflammatory response decrease (P < 0.05) in CDE mares (CDE: CIT, 31.4 ± 6.48, FLU, 5.5 ± 1.28; normal mares: CIT, 13.5 ± 4.31, FLU, 0) when compared with nontreated cycle (CDE: CIT, 68.3 ± 3.27, FLU, 10.7 ± 1.61; NM: CIT, 24.4 ± 3.56, FLU, 0), but did not modify NO concentrations in uterine fluid. Thus, we can conclude that PRP was effective in modulating the exacerbated uterine inflammatory response to semen in mares with CDE but did not reduce NO

  9. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells transplantation suppresses inflammatory responses in global cerebral ischemia:contribution of TNF-α-induced protein 6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-ming LIN; Shen ZHAO; Li-li ZHOU; Xiang-shao FANG; Yue FU; Zi-tong HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation on rat global cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanisms.Methods:Adult male SD rats underwent asphxial cardiac arrest to induce global cerebral ischemia,then received intravenous injection of 5x106 cultured MSCs of SD rats at 2 h after resuscitation.In another group of cardiac arrest rats,tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 6 (TSG-6,6 μg) was injected into the right lateral ventricle.Functional outcome was assessed at 1,3,and 7 d after resuscitation.Donor MSCs in the brains were detected at 3 d after resuscitation.The level of serum S-1OOB and proinflammatory cytokines in cerebral cortex were assayed using ELISA.The expression of TSG-6 and proinflammatory cytokines in cerebral cortex was assayed using RT-PCR.Western blot was performed to determine the levels of TSG-6 and neutrophil elastase in cerebral cortex.Results:MSCs transplantation significantly reduced serum S-1OOB level,and improved neurological function after global cerebral ischemia compared to the PBS-treated group.The MSCs injected migrated into the ischemic brains,and were observed mainly in the cerebral cortex.Furthermore,MSCs transplantation significantly increased the expression of TSG-6,and reduced the expression of neutrophil elastase and proinflammatory cytokines in the cerebral cortex.Intracerebroventricular injection of TSG-6 reproduced the beneficial effects of MSCs transplantation in rats with global cerebral ischemia.Conclusion:MSCs transplantation improves functional recovery and reduces inflammatory responses in rats with global cerebral ischemia,maybe via upregulation of TSG-6 expression.

  11. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Schröder-Braunstein

    Full Text Available Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Nutritional modulation of the inflammatory response in inflammatory bowel disease-From the molecular to the integrative to the clinical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient deficiencies are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both total parenteral and enteral nutrition provide important supportive therapy for IBD patients, but in adults these are not useful for primary therapy. Dietary intervention with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids contained in fish oil may be useful for the care of IBD patients, and recent studies have stressed the role of PPAR on NFκB activity on the potential beneficial effect of dietary lipids on intestinal function.

  13. Nanoparticles responsive to the inflammatory microenvironment for targeted treatment of arterial restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shibin; Hu, Ying; Peng, Song; Han, Songling; Tao, Hui; Zhang, Qixiong; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Jianxiang; Hu, Houyuan

    2016-10-01

    Coronary arterial disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death globally. Percutaneous coronary interventions are frequently used nonsurgical techniques for treating CAD, which may unfortunately lead to arterial restenosis. Currently, there are no effective drugs that can thoroughly prevent restenosis. We hypothesize inflammation-triggerable nanomedicines may function as effective therapeutics for targeted therapy of restenosis, by preferentially releasing their payload at the diseased site. To demonstrate our hypothesis and develop targeted nanotherapies for restenosis, this study was designed to examine effectiveness of nanomedicines responsive to the inflammatory microenvironment with mild acidity and high reactive oxygen species (ROS). To this end, an acetalated β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) material (Ac-bCD) was synthesized as a pH-responsive carrier material, while a ROS-responsive material (Ox-bCD) was produced by hydrophobic functionalization of β-CD with an oxidation-labile group. Based on these two responsive materials, either pH- or ROS-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by a nanoprecipitation technique and fully characterized. Using rapamycin (RAP) as a candidate drug, responsive nanotherapies were fabricated. In vitro hydrolysis and release studies confirmed these nanovehicles and nanotherapies exhibited desirable responsive behaviors. Both in vitro cell culture and in vivo evaluations revealed their good safety profile. These responsive NPs could be effectively internalized by rat vascular smooth muscle cells, which in turn notably potentiated anti-proliferation and anti-migration activities of RAP. After intravenous (i.v.) injection, NPs may be accumulated at the injured site in the carotid artery of rats subjected to balloon angioplasty injury. Compared with a non-responsive nanotherapy based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide), treatment with either pH- or ROS-responsive nanotherapy by i.v. injection more effectively attenuated neointimal

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of an inflammatory lesion model in the neonatal rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Edgar; Berti, Romain; Londono, Irène; Xie, Ningshi; Bellec, Pierre; Lesage, Frédéric; Lodygensky, G. A.

    2014-09-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a condition that may cause significant neurodevelopmental handicap in premature newborns. It is characterized by white matter injury, associated with inflammation. This work aimed to assess the impact of inflammation on cerebral oxygen saturation (sO2) using depth-sensitive photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The aspects of PVL were reproduced in a rodent model by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the corpus callosum. The results of this exploratory work reveal lower sO2 values in LPS group, as compared to sham controls; showing decreased values in the corpus callosum and in the left cortex, ipsilateral to the injection site. Interhemispherical connectivity was not affected by LPS injection, as shown by functional connectivity analysis. This study supports the use of PAT as a non-invasive tool to assess oxygenation values in vivo in the newborn brain.

  15. The shopping brain: math anxiety modulates brain responses to buying decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William J; Childers, Terry L; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metacognitive theories propose that consumers track fluency feelings when buying, which may have biological underpinnings. We explored this using event-related potential (ERP) measures as twenty high-math anxiety (High MA) and nineteen low-math anxiety (Low MA) consumers made buying decisions for promoted (e.g., 15% discount) and non-promoted products. When evaluating prices, ERP correlates of higher perceptual and conceptual fluency were associated with buys, however only for High MA females under no promotions. In contrast, High MA females and Low MA males demonstrated greater FN400 amplitude, associated with enhanced conceptual processing, to prices of buys relative to non-buys under promotions. Concurrent late positive component (LPC) differences under no promotions suggest discrepant retrieval processes during price evaluations between consumer groups. When making decisions to buy or not, larger (smaller) P3, sensitive to outcome responses in the brain, was associated with buying for High MA females (Low MA females) under promotions, an effect also present for males under no promotions. Thus, P3 indexed decisions to buy differently between anxiety groups, but only for promoted items among females and for no promotions among males. Our findings indicate that perceptual and conceptual processes interact with anxiety and gender to modulate brain responses during consumer choices.

  16. Prenatal stress causes alterations in the morphology of microglia and the inflammatory response of the hippocampus of adult female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diz-Chaves Yolanda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress during fetal life increases the risk of affective and immune disorders later in life. The altered peripheral immune response caused by prenatal stress may impact on brain function by the modification of local inflammation. In this study we have explored whether prenatal stress results in alterations in the immune response in the hippocampus of female mice during adult life. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were subjected three times/day during 45 minutes to restraint stress from gestational Day 12 to delivery. Control non-stressed pregnant mice remained undisturbed. At four months of age, non-stressed and prenatally stressed females were ovariectomized. Fifteen days after surgery, mice received an i.p. injection of vehicle or of 5 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Mice were sacrificed 20 hours later by decapitation and the brains were removed. Levels of interleukin-1β (IL1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interferon γ-inducible protein 10 (IP10, and toll-like receptor 4 mRNA were assessed in the hippocampus by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Iba1 immunoreactivity was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Statistical significance was determined by one-way or two-way analysis of variance. Results Prenatal stress, per se, increased IL1β mRNA levels in the hippocampus, increased the total number of Iba1-immunoreactive microglial cells and increased the proportion of microglial cells with large somas and retracted cellular processes. In addition, prenatally stressed and non-stressed animals showed different responses to peripheral inflammation induced by systemic administration of LPS. LPS induced a significant increase in mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IP10 in the hippocampus of prenatally stressed mice but not of non-stressed animals. In addition, after LPS treatment, prenatally stressed animals showed a higher proportion of Iba1-immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus with

  17. Comparison of Cellular Uptake and Inflammatory Response via Toll-Like Receptor 4 to Lipopolysaccharide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyoshi Taniguchi; Koki Kanehira; Sharmy Saimon Mano

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is the earliest cellular response to infectious agents and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in these interactions. We have already shown that TLRs are involved with the uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) and promote inflammatory responses. In this paper, we compared role of cellular uptake and inflammatory response via TLR 4 to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TiO2 NPs. In the case o...

  18. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markworth, James F; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S; Tull, Dedreia L; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W; Sinclair, Andrew J; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Cameron-Smith, David

    2013-12-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0-3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a biological

  19. Inflammatory and metabolic responses to high-fat meals with and without dairy products in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Alexandra; Petry, Nicolai; Walther, Barbara; Bütikofer, Ueli; Luginbühl, Werner; Gille, Doreen; Chollet, Magali; McTernan, Philip G; Gijs, Martin A M; Vionnet, Nathalie; Pralong, François P; Laederach, Kurt; Vergères, Guy

    2015-06-28

    Postprandial inflammation is an important factor for human health since chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with chronic diseases. Dairy products have a weak but significant anti-inflammatory effect on postprandial inflammation. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of a high-fat dairy meal (HFD meal), a high-fat non-dairy meal supplemented with milk (HFM meal) and a high-fat non-dairy control meal (HFC meal) on postprandial inflammatory and metabolic responses in healthy men. A cross-over study was conducted in nineteen male subjects. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after consumption of the test meals. Plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TAG and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at each time point. IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin concentrations were assessed at baseline and endpoint (6 h). Time-dependent curves of these metabolic parameters were plotted, and the net incremental AUC were found to be significantly higher for TAG and lower for CRP after consumption of the HFM meal compared with the HFD meal; however, the HFM and HFD meals were not different from the HFC meal. Alterations in IL-6, TNF-α and endotoxin concentrations were not significantly different between the test meals. The results suggest that full-fat milk and dairy products (cheese and butter) have no significant impact on the inflammatory response to a high-fat meal. PMID:25990454

  20. Age-dependent alterations in the inflammatory response to pulmonary challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, Helena M; Ochani, Kanta; Lin, Ke; Lee, Ji Young; Miller, Edmund J

    2015-12-01

    The aging lung is increasingly susceptible to infectious disease. Changes in pulmonary physiology and function are common in older populations, and in those older than 60 years, pneumonia is the major cause of infectious death. Understanding age-related changes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and how they affect both pulmonary and systemic responses to pulmonary challenge are critical to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of the elderly patient. In this observational study, we examined age-associated differences in inflammatory responses to pulmonary challenge with cell wall components from Gram-positive bacteria. Thus, male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 6 months or greater than 18 months (approximating humans of 20 and 55-65 years), were challenged, intratracheally, with lipoteichoic acid and peptidoglycan. Cellular and cytokine evaluations were performed on both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and plasma, 24 h post-challenge. The plasma concentration of free thyroxine, a marker of severity in non-thyroidal illness, was also evaluated. The older animals had an increased chemotactic gradient in favor of the airspaces, which was associated with a greater accumulation of neutrophils and protein. Furthermore, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an inflammatory mediator and putative biomarker in acute lung injury, was increased in both the plasma and BAL of the older, but not young animals. Conversely, plasma free thyroxine, a natural inhibitor of MIF, was decreased in the older animals. These findings identify age-associated inflammatory/metabolic changes following pulmonary challenge that it may be possible to manipulate to improve outcome in the older, critically ill patient. PMID:26318747

  1. Monocytes in systematic inflammatory response syndrome: Differences between sepsis and acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vassilios Koussoulas; Michalis Tzivras; Vassiliki Karagianni; Ekaterini Spyridaki; Diamantis Plachouras; Helen Giamarellou; Evangelos J Giamarellos-Bourboulis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To unravel the differences between systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) of acute pancreatitis compared to the same syndrome in sepsis.METHODS: Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 12 with sepsis and 13 acute pancreatitis. After diagnosis 20 mL blood was sampled. Half were assayed for isolation of monocytes and 10 mL was centrifuged for serum test of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6(IL-6). Half of monocytes were incubated in the presence of patients' serum and supernatants were collected. The other half was treated for estimation of optical photometry under caspase-3 inhibition. TNFα and IL-6 were estimated by an enzyme immunoassay.RESULTS: median ± SE of serum IL-6 in septic patients and acute pancreatitis patients was 192.30 ± 35.40 ng/L and 21.00 ± 16.05 ng/L, respectively (P < 0.01). Respective values of caspase-3 were 0.94 ± 0.17 pmol/min 104 cells and 0.34 ± 0.09 pmol/min 104 cells (P < 0.05).IL-6 of monocyte supernatants of patients with sepsis was significantly increased after addition of patients' serum, while that of patients with acute pancreatitis did not show significant difference.CONCLUSION: The data have shown that monocyte activity is different between acute pancreatitis and sepsis. This phenomenon might be explained as a different pathway to the pro-inflammatory cytokines release or could be a novel anti-inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis.

  2. Infant intestinal Enterococcus faecalis down-regulates inflammatory responses in human intestinal cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shugui Wang; Lydia Hui Mei Ng; Wai Ling Chow; Yuan Kun Lee

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the ability of Lactic acid bacteria (LAB)to modulate inflammatory reaction in human intestinal celllines(Caco-2,HT-29 and HCT 116).Different strains of LAB isolatedfrom new born infants and fermented milk,together withthestrains obtained from culture collectionsweretested.METHODS:LABs were treated with human intestinal cell lines.ELISA was used to detect IL-8 and TGF-β protein secretion.Cytokines and Toll like receptors (TLRs) gene expression were assessed using RT-PCR.Conditional medium,sonicated bacteria and UV killed bacteria were used to find the effecter molecules on the bacteria.Carbohydrate oxidation and protein digestion were applied to figure out the molecules'residues.Adhesion assays were further carried out.RESULTS:It was found that Enterococcus faecalis is the main immune modulator among the LABs by downregulation of IL-8 secretion and upregulation of TGF-β.Strikingly,the effect was only observed in four strains of E.faecalis out of the 27 isolated and tested.This implies strain dependent immunomodulation in the host.In addition,E.faecalis may regulate inflammatory responses through TLR3,TLR4,TLR9 and TRAF6.Carbohydrates on the bacterial cell surface are involved in both its adhesion to intestinal cells and regulation of inflammatory responses in the host.CONCLUSION:These data provide a case for the modulation of intestinal mucosal immunity in which specific strains of E.faecalis have uniquely evolved to maintain colonic homeostasis and regulate inflammatoryresponses.

  3. Bovine and soybean milk bioactive compounds: Effects on inflammatory response of human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Rosa; Aresta, Antonella; Trapani, Adriana; Zambonin, Carlo; Cianciulli, Antonia; Salvatore, Rosaria; Clodoveo, Maria Lisa; Corbo, Filomena; Franchini, Carlo; Panaro, Maria Antonietta

    2016-11-01

    In this study the effects of commercial bovine and soybean milks and their bioactive compounds, namely genistein, daidzein and equol, on the inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of human intestinal Caco-2 cells were examined, in terms of nitric oxide (NO) release and inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) expression. Both milks and their bioactive compounds significantly inhibited, dose-dependently, the expression of iNOS mRNA and protein, resulting in a decreased NO production. The NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated intestinal cells was also examined. In all cases we observed that cell pre-treatment before LPS activation inhibited the IkB phosphorylation. Accordingly, quantification of bioactive compounds by solid phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography has shown that they were absorbed, metabolized and released by Caco-2 cells in culture media. In conclusion, we demonstrated that milks and compounds tested are able to reduce LPS-induced inflammatory responses from intestinal cells, interfering with NF-kB dependent molecular mechanisms. PMID:27211648

  4. Traumatic Reticuloperitonitis in Water Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis: Clinical Findings and the Associated Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged El-Ashker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to describe the clinical picture of traumatic reticuloperitonitis (TRP in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis and to evaluate the inflammatory and immunologic responses for this clinical condition. Twenty-two buffalo with acute local TRP were monitored in our study. Additionally, 10 clinically healthy buffalo were randomly selected and served as controls. Acute local TRP was initially diagnosed by clinical examination and confirmed by ultrasonographic (USG examination and/or necropsy findings. Blood samples were collected from all examined buffalo to measure the respective levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and interferon gamma (INF-γ, serum amyloid A (SAA, C-reactive protein (CRP, haptoglobin (Hp, fibrinogen (Fb, and serum sialic acid (SSA. It was found that TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, SAA, CRP, Hp, Fb, and SSA were significantly higher in buffalo with TRP than the controls. Our findings suggest that the examined immunologic variables were helpful in documenting the inflammatory response in buffalo with TRP. However, their diagnostic usefulness only becomes apparent when considered in tandem with the clinical findings for any given animal, its anamnesis, and a subsequent USG assessment. Due to the frequent complications of TRP, more accurate indicators of its occurrence and severity would be useful.

  5. MicroRNA-155 is induced during the macrophage inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Ryan M; Taganov, Konstantin D; Boldin, Mark P; Cheng, Genhong; Baltimore, David

    2007-01-30

    The mammalian inflammatory response to infection involves the induction of several hundred genes, a process that must be carefully regulated to achieve pathogen clearance and prevent the consequences of unregulated expression, such as cancer. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a class of gene expression regulators that has also been linked to cancer. However, the relationship between inflammation, innate immunity, and miRNA expression is just beginning to be explored. In the present study, we use microarray technology to identify miRNAs induced in primary murine macrophages after exposure to polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid or the cytokine IFN-beta. miR-155 was the only miRNA of those tested that was substantially up-regulated by both stimuli. It also was induced by several Toll-like receptor ligands through myeloid differentiation factor 88- or TRIF-dependent pathways, whereas up-regulation by IFNs was shown to involve TNF-alpha autocrine signaling. Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase JNK blocked induction of miR-155 in response to either polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid or TNF-alpha, suggesting that miR-155-inducing signals use the JNK pathway. Together, these findings characterize miR-155 as a common target of a broad range of inflammatory mediators. Importantly, because miR-155 is known to function as an oncogene, these observations identify a potential link between inflammation and cancer. PMID:17242365

  6. Case Study of Hepatic Radiofrequency Ablation Causing a Systemic Inflammatory Response Under Total Intravenous Anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalte, Gereon; Waning, Christian; Rossaint, Rolf; Mahnken, Andreas H. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Aachen, (Germany); Henzler, Dietrich [Dalhousie University, Queen Elisabeth II Health Sciences Center, Halifax (Canada); Tacke, Josef [Interventional Radiology, Klinikum Passau, Passau (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    To investigate the effects of hepatic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with malignant liver disease with respect to inflammation activation and stress response. In an observational trial, we investigated the physiologic parameters of 17 patients (20 interventions) who underwent percutaneous RFA under general anesthesia after applying total intravenous anesthesia. TNF{alpha}, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, adrenaline and noradrenaline, liver enzymes, lactate and creatine kinase were determined pre-interventionally after induction of anesthesia (T1), 90 minutes after initiation of RFA (T2), immediately after the conclusion of the procedure (T3), and 24 hours after the procedure (T4). A significant increase in body temperature (p < 0.001), and mean arterial pressure (p = 0.001) were measured intraoperatively (T2) and the day after the procedure (T4). Increased levels of IL-6 were measured at T3 and T4 (p = 0.001). IL-10 increased immediately after the procedure (T3; p = 0.007). IL-6 levels correlated well with the total energy applied ({gamma} = 0.837). Significant increases in the levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline were present at T3 and T4 (p < 0.001). The RFA-induced destruction of hepatic tissue was associated with increased levels of AST, ALT, GLDH and LDH. Percutaneous RFA of hepatic malignancies causes an inflammatory and endocrine activation, similar to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. These effects have to be taken in account when dealing with patients susceptible to sepsis or multi-organ failure

  7. Chronic fluoride exposure-induced testicular toxicity is associated with inflammatory response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ruifen; Luo, Guangying; Sun, Zilong; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Jundong

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that fluoride (F) can affect testicular toxicity in humans and rodents. However, the mechanism underlying F-induced testicular toxicity is not well understood. This study was conducted to evaluate the sperm quality, testicular histomorphology and inflammatory response in mice followed F exposure. Healthy male mice were randomly divided into four groups with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 0, 25, 50, 100 mg/L in the drinking water for 180 days. At the end of the exposure, significantly increased percentage of spermatozoa abnormality was found in mice exposed to 50 and 100 mg/L NaF. Disorganized spermatogenic cells, vacuoles in seminiferous tubules and loss and shedding of sperm cells were also observed in the NaF treated group. In addition, chronic F exposure increased testicular interleukin-17(IL-17), interleukin-17 receptor C (IL-17RC), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in transcriptional levels, as well as IL-17 and TNF-α levels in translational levels. Interestingly, we observed that F treated group elevated testicular inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA level and nitric oxide (NO) concentration. Taken together, these results indicated that testicular inflammatory response could contribute to chronic F exposure induced testicular toxicity in mice.

  8. Inflammatory response study of gellan gum impregnated duck's feet derived collagen sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jeong Eun; Lee, Seon Eui; Cha, Se Rom; Jang, Na Keum; Tripathy, Nirmalya; Reis, Rui L; Khang, Gilson

    2016-10-01

    Tissue engineered biomaterials have biodegradable and biocompatible properties. In this study, we have fabricated sponges using duck's feet derived collagen (DC) and gellan gum (GG), and further studied its inflammatory responses. The as-prepared duck's feet DC/GG sponges showed the possibility of application as a tissue engineering material through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The physical and chemical properties of sponges were characterized by compression strength, porosity, and scanning electron microscopy, etc. In vitro cell viability were investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. An inflammatory response was studied after seeding RAW264.7 cells on as-fabricated sponges using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In vivo studies were carried out by implanting in subcutaneous nude mouse followed by extraction, histological staining. Collectively, superior results were showed by DC/GG sponges than GG sponge in terms of physical property and cell proliferation and thus can be considered as a potential candidate for future tissue engineering applications.

  9. Shp2 Deficiency Impairs the Inflammatory Response Against Haemophilus influenzae by Regulating Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifang; Xia, Jingyan; Li, Tiantian; Zhou, Hui; Ouyang, Wei; Hong, Zhuping; Ke, Yuehai; Qian, Jing; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-15

    Macrophages can polarize and differentiate to regulate initiation, development, and cessation of inflammation during pulmonary infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms driving macrophage phenotypic differentiation are largely unclear. Our study investigated the role of Shp2, a Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase, in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and bacterial clearance. Shp2 levels were increased upon NTHi stimulation. Selective inhibition of Shp2 in mice led to an attenuated inflammatory response by skewing macrophages toward alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Upon pulmonary NTHi infection, Shp2(-/-) mice, in which the gene encoding Shp2 in monocytes/macrophages was deleted, showed an impaired inflammatory response and decreased antibacterial ability, compared with wild-type controls. In vitro data demonstrated that Shp2 regulated activated macrophage (M1) gene expression via activation of p65-nuclear factor-κB signaling, independent of p38 and extracellular regulated kinase-mitogen-activated proteins kinase signaling pathways. Taken together, our study indicates that Shp2 is required to orchestrate macrophage function and regulate host innate immunity against pulmonary bacterial infection.

  10. The Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS in acutely hospitalised medical patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storgaard Merete

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis is an infection which has evoked a systemic inflammatory response. Clinically, the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS is identified by two or more symptoms including fever or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnoea and change in blood leucocyte count. The relationship between SIRS symptoms and morbidity and mortality in medical emergency ward patients is unknown. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of the frequency of SIRS and its relationship to sepsis and death among acutely hospitalised medical patients. In 437 consecutive patients, SIRS status, blood pressure, infection and comorbidity on admission was registered together with 28-day mortality. Results A hundred and fifty-four patients (35% had SIRS on admission, 211 patients (48% had no SIRS, and 72 patients (16% had insufficient data to evaluate their SIRS status. SIRS patients were 2.2 times more frequently infected, with 66/154 SIRS patients versus 41/211 non-SIRS patients: p Conclusion We found SIRS status on admission to be moderately associated with infection and strongly related to 28-day mortality.

  11. The Ovine Fetal and Placental Inflammatory Response to Umbilical Cord Occlusions With Worsening Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Alex; Matushewski, Brad; Cao, Mingju; Hammond, Robert; Frasch, Martin G; Richardson, Bryan S

    2015-11-01

    We hypothesized that repetitive umbilical cord occlusions (UCOs) leading to severe acidemia will stimulate a placental and thereby fetal inflammatory response which will be exacerbated by chronic hypoxemia and low-grade bacterial infection. Chronically instrumented fetal sheep served as controls or underwent repetitive UCOs for up to 4 hours or until fetal arterial pH was 55% and placental cotyledons processed for measurement of macrophage, neutrophil, and mast cell counts. Repetitive UCOs resulted in severe fetal acidemia with pH approaching 7.00 for all 3 UCO groups. Neutrophils, while unchanged within the cotyledon fetal and intermediate zones, were ∼2-fold higher within the zona intima for all 3 UCO groups. However, no differences were observed in macrophage counts among the treatment groups and no cotyledon mast cells were seen. Fetal plasma and amniotic fluid cytokines remained little changed post-UCOs and/or at 1 and 48 hours of recovery in the normoxic-UCO and hypoxic-UCO groups but increased several fold in the LPS-UCO group with IL-6 plasma values at 1 hour recovery highly correlated with the nadir pH attained (r = -.97). As such, repetitive UCOs with severe acidemia can induce a placental inflammatory response and more so with simulated low-grade infection and likely contributing to cytokine release in the umbilical circulation. PMID:25878209

  12. Regional brain responses in nulliparous women to emotional infant stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Montoya

    Full Text Available Infant cries and facial expressions influence social interactions and elicit caretaking behaviors from adults. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that neural responses to infant stimuli involve brain regions that process rewards. However, these studies have yet to investigate individual differences in tendencies to engage or withdraw from motivationally relevant stimuli. To investigate this, we used event-related fMRI to scan 17 nulliparous women. Participants were presented with novel infant cries of two distress levels (low and high and unknown infant faces of varying affect (happy, sad, and neutral in a randomized, counter-balanced order. Brain activation was subsequently correlated with scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System scale. Infant cries activated bilateral superior and middle temporal gyri (STG and MTG and precentral and postcentral gyri. Activation was greater in bilateral temporal cortices for low- relative to high-distress cries. Happy relative to neutral faces activated the ventral striatum, caudate, ventromedial prefrontal, and orbitofrontal cortices. Sad versus neutral faces activated the precuneus, cuneus, and posterior cingulate cortex, and behavioral activation drive correlated with occipital cortical activations in this contrast. Behavioral inhibition correlated with activation in the right STG for high- and low-distress cries relative to pink noise. Behavioral drive correlated inversely with putamen, caudate, and thalamic activations for the comparison of high-distress cries to pink noise. Reward-responsiveness correlated with activation in the left precentral gyrus during the perception of low-distress cries relative to pink noise. Our findings indicate that infant cry stimuli elicit activations in areas implicated in auditory processing and social cognition. Happy infant faces may be encoded as rewarding, whereas sad faces activate regions associated with empathic processing. Differences

  13. Regional brain responses in nulliparous women to emotional infant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Jessica L; Landi, Nicole; Kober, Hedy; Worhunsky, Patrick D; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mencl, W Einar; Mayes, Linda C; Potenza, Marc N

    2012-01-01

    Infant cries and facial expressions influence social interactions and elicit caretaking behaviors from adults. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that neural responses to infant stimuli involve brain regions that process rewards. However, these studies have yet to investigate individual differences in tendencies to engage or withdraw from motivationally relevant stimuli. To investigate this, we used event-related fMRI to scan 17 nulliparous women. Participants were presented with novel infant cries of two distress levels (low and high) and unknown infant faces of varying affect (happy, sad, and neutral) in a randomized, counter-balanced order. Brain activation was subsequently correlated with scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System scale. Infant cries activated bilateral superior and middle temporal gyri (STG and MTG) and precentral and postcentral gyri. Activation was greater in bilateral temporal cortices for low- relative to high-distress cries. Happy relative to neutral faces activated the ventral striatum, caudate, ventromedial prefrontal, and orbitofrontal cortices. Sad versus neutral faces activated the precuneus, cuneus, and posterior cingulate cortex, and behavioral activation drive correlated with occipital cortical activations in this contrast. Behavioral inhibition correlated with activation in the right STG for high- and low-distress cries relative to pink noise. Behavioral drive correlated inversely with putamen, caudate, and thalamic activations for the comparison of high-distress cries to pink noise. Reward-responsiveness correlated with activation in the left precentral gyrus during the perception of low-distress cries relative to pink noise. Our findings indicate that infant cry stimuli elicit activations in areas implicated in auditory processing and social cognition. Happy infant faces may be encoded as rewarding, whereas sad faces activate regions associated with empathic processing. Differences in motivational

  14. Regulatory T Cells Protect Fine Particulate Matter-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-cai Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the role of CD4+CD25+ T cells (Tregs in protecting fine particulate matter (PM- induced inflammatory responses, and its potential mechanisms. Methods. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were treated with graded concentrations (2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 µg/cm2 of suspension of fine particles for 24h. For coculture experiment, HUVECs were incubated alone, with CD4+CD25− T cells (Teff, or with Tregs in the presence of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies for 48 hours, and then were stimulated with or without suspension of fine particles for 24 hours. The expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokines was examined. Results. Adhesion molecules, including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL- 6 and IL-8, were increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the adhesion of human acute monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1 to endothelial cells was increased and NF-κB activity was upregulated in HUVECs after treatment with fine particles. However, after Tregs treatment, fine particles-induced inflammatory responses and NF-κB activation were significantly alleviated. Transwell experiments showed that Treg-mediated suppression of HUVECs inflammatory responses impaired by fine particles required cell contact and soluble factors. Conclusions. Tregs could attenuate fine particles-induced inflammatory responses and NF-κB activation in HUVECs.

  15. Effect of lornoxicam in lung inflammatory response syndrome after operations for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Vretzkakis, Giorgos; Mikroulis, Dimitris; Mpakas, Andreas; Kesisis, Georgios; Arikas, Stamatis; Kolettas, Alexandros; Moschos, Giorgios; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Siminelakis, Stavros; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Background The establishment of Extracorporeal Circulation (EC) significantly contributed to improvement of cardiac surgery, but this is accompanied by harmful side-effects. The most important of them is systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Many efforts have been undertaken to minimize this problem but unfortunately without satisfied solution to date. Materials and methods Lornoxicam is a non steroid anti-inflammatory drug which temporally inhibits the cycloxygenase. In this clinical trial we study the effect of lornoxicam in lung inflammatory response after operations for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. In our study we conclude 14 volunteers patients with ischemic coronary disease undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with EC. In seven of them 16 mg lornoxicam was administered iv before the anesthesia induction and before the connection in heart-lung machine. In control group (7 patients) we administered the same amount of normal saline. Results Both groups are equal regarding pro-operative and intra-operative parameters. The inflammatory markers were calculated by Elisa method. We measured the levels of cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, e-Selectin, p-Selectin) and matrix metaloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) just after anesthesia induction, before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, just after the patients administration in ICU and after 8 and 24 hrs. In all patients we estimated the lung’s inflammatory reaction with lung biopsy taken at the begging and at the end of the operation. We calculated hemodynamics parameters: Cardiac Index (CI), Systemic Vascular Resistance Index (SVRI), Pulmonary Vascular Resistance Index (PVRI), Left Ventricular Stroke Work Index (LVSWI), Right Ventricular Stroke Work Index (RVSWI), and the Pulmonary arterial pressure, and respiratory parameters too: alveolo-arterial oxygen difference D (A-a), intrapulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) and pulmonary Compliance. IL-6 levels of lornoxicam group were statistical

  16. Morinda citrifolia leaf enhanced performance by improving angiogenesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory & stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shalan, Nor Aijratul Asikin; Mustapha, Noordin M; Mohamed, Suhaila

    2016-12-01

    Morinda citrifolia fruit, (noni), enhanced performances in athletes and post-menopausal women in clinical studies. This report shows the edible noni leaves water extract enhances performance in a weight-loaded swimming animal model better than the fruit or standardized green tea extract. The 4weeks study showed the extract (containing scopoletin and epicatechin) progressively prolonged the time to exhaustion by threefold longer than the control, fruit or tea extract. The extract improved (i) the mammalian antioxidant responses (MDA, GSH and SOD2 levels), (ii) tissue nutrient (glucose) and metabolite (lactate) management, (iii) stress hormone (cortisol) regulation; (iv) neurotransmitter (dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin) expressions, transporter or receptor levels, (v) anti-inflammatory (IL4 & IL10) responses; (v) skeletal muscle angiogenesis (VEGFA) and (v) energy and mitochondrial biogenesis (via PGC, UCP3, NRF2, AMPK, MAPK1, and CAMK4). The ergogenic extract helped delay fatigue by enhancing energy production, regulation and efficiency, which suggests benefits for physical activities and disease recovery.

  17. Inflammatory and regenerative responses in salmonids following mechanical tissue damage and natural infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Lunder, Tor; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2010-01-01

    Locale responses in muscle tissue against either a sterile tissue damage or infection were compared in salmonid fish in order to examine the inflammatory responses and regeneration of tissue. From higher vertebrates both damage and infection are known to cause inflammation since DAMPs released from....... Samples were obtained from site of lesions and from locations without clinical signs of disease and lesions. The tissue damage was performed in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by applying sterile needles to skin and muscle tissue to one side of the fish. Samples were taken 7, 14, 21, 28 and 42 days...... injured cells as well as PAMPs from the surface of pathogens are immunogenic. To examine this in salmonid fishes, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were infected with Moritella viscosus, the causative agent of winter ulcer. Muscle tissue was sampled from infected fish at 4, 7 and 14 days post infection...

  18. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer enhances the postoperative systemic inflammatory response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has been established to improve the long-term survival in patients with esophageal carcinoma. However, little is known about whether preoperative CRT may affect the postoperative systemic response. We investigated the postoperative clinical course in terms of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in patients with preoperative CRT (CRT group) and surgery alone (SA group). Both the postoperative heart and respiratory rate in the CRT group were significantly higher than in the SA group. The duration and incidence of SIRS, as well as the number of positive criteria for SIRS, were significantly greater than those in the SA group. There was no difference in the postoperative morbidity and mortality between the two groups. Preoperative CRT was found to significantly enhance the postoperative SIRS, thus suggesting its potentially higher risk of complications. (author)

  19. Restoration of dietary-fat induced blood–brain barrier dysfunction by anti-inflammatory lipid-modulating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallebage-Gamarallage Menuka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified use of non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory drugs and statins for prevention of dementia, but their efficacy in slowing progression is not well understood. Cerebrovascular disturbances are common pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported chronic ingestion of saturated fatty acids (SFA compromises blood–brain barrier (BBB integrity resulting in cerebral extravasation of plasma proteins and inflammation. However, the SFA-induced parenchymal accumulation of plasma proteins could be prevented by co-administration of some cholesterol lowering agents. Restoration of BBB dysfunction is clinically relevant, so the purpose of this study was to explore lipid-lowering agents could reverse BBB disturbances induced by chronic ingestion of SFA’s. Methods Wild-type mice were fed an SFA diet for 12 weeks to induce BBB dysfunction, and then randomised to receive atorvastatin, pravastatin or ibuprofen in combination with the SFA-rich diet for 2 or 8 weeks. Abundance of plasma-derived immunoglobulin-G (IgG and amyloid-β enriched apolipoprotein (apo-B lipoproteins within brain parenchyme were quantified utilising immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Atorvastatin treatment for 2 and 8 weeks restored BBB integrity, indicated by a substantial reduction of IgG and apo B, particularly within the hippocampus. Pravastatin, a water-soluble statin was less effective than atorvastatin (lipid-soluble. Statin effects were independent of changes in plasma lipid homeostasis. Ibuprofen, a lipid-soluble cyclooxygenase inhibitor attenuated cerebral accumulation of IgG and apo B as effectively as atorvastatin. Our findings are consistent with the drug effects being independent of plasma lipid homeostasis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBB dysfunction induced by chronic ingestion of SFA is reversible with timely introduction and sustained treatment with agents that suppress inflammation.

  20. Diet-Induced Obesity Reprograms the Inflammatory Response of the Murine Lung to Inhaled Endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, Monika K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.