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Sample records for brain infarction

  1. Basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging

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    Kim, E.E.; Schacht, R.A.; Domstad, P.A.; DeLand, F.H.

    1982-11-01

    Four cases of basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging are presented. Bilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two patients were probably related to methanol intoxication and meningoencephalitis, and unilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two other patients were presumably due to cerebral atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Various causes and mechanisms of basal ganglia infarction as well as positive findings of radionuclide brain imaging are briefly reviewed.

  2. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

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    Lee, Jong Jin; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yun Hui; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Jin Su; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institite of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advent of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not good enough as human image. Due to larger brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mouse or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCI. A burr hole was made at 1 cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 {mu}l was injected using 30 G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN) scans were performed 1, 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition, {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans were performed using human PET scanner (Gemini, Philips medical systems, CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infarction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the human PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using {sup 18}F-FDG microPET scanner.

  3. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

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    Lee, J. J.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, J. H.; Hwang, D. W.; Jung, J. G.; Lee, M. C [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, S. M [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advance of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not so much satisfactory as human image. As cats have relatively large sized brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mice or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCl. A burr hole was made at 1cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 ul was injected using 30G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. F-18 FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville. TN) scans were performed 1. 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition. 18F-FDG PET scans were performed using Gemini PET scanner (Philips medical systems. CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infraction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the Gemini PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using F-18 FDG microPET scanner.

  4. Clinical values of CT and dynamic CT in brain infarction

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    Lim, Soo Il; Jang, Do; Seo, Eun Joo; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-04-15

    With the advent of faster scan time and new computer program, a scanning technique called 'dynamic computed tomography' has become possible. Dynamic computed tomography consisted of performing multiple rapid sequence scans after injection of contrast material. The authors have evaluated the clinical usefulness of computed tomography and dynamic computed tomography of 93 patients with brain infarction and/or ischemia during the period of 17 months from April 1983 to August 1984 in Department of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Hospital. The results were as follows; 1. The age distribution ranged from 18 years to 78 years. Among them the most common age group was between 50 years and 59 years (40.9%). 2. The sites of brain infarction were cerebral lobes (63 cases,68), basal ganglia (15 cases, 16.1%) and multiple sites (6 cases, 6.4%). The common affected site was middle cerebral artery territories. 3. The contrast enhancement of acute infarction was noted in 14 cases (17.5%) which occurred commonly between 3 days and 2 weeks from ictus. 4. The patterns of time-density curve in brain infarction and/or ischemia were as follow: a. Depression of slow wash-in phase was 20 cases (59%). b. Lower peak concentration was 17 cases (50%). c. Lower and delayed peak concentration was 7 cases (21%). d. No definite peak concentration was 6 cases (18%). First three patterns of time-density curve were thought as relatively characteristic curve of brain infarction and/or ischemia. 5. Two cases that showed negative findings on precontrast CT scan appeared to be positive findings as hypodensity on postcontrast CT scan and were confirmed as brain infarction by dynamic CT. 6. The diagnostic entity of dynamic CT scan were as follows; a. large artery thrombotic infarction were 23 cases (58%). b. lacnar infarction were 6 cases (15%). c. ischemia were 5 cases (13%). d. normal were 5 cases (13%). In six cases of lacunar infarction which was double hypodensity on pre

  5. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: serial MRI

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    Siskas, N.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Ioannidis, I.; Charitandi, A.; Dimitriadis, A.S. [Radiology Department, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotele University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2003-05-01

    High-signal cortical lesions are observed on T1-weighted images in cases of brain infarct. Histological examination has demonstrated these to be ''cortical laminar necrosis'', without haemorrhage or calcification. We report serial MRI in this condition in 12 patients with brain infarcts. We looked at high-signal lesions on T1-weighted images, chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-signal cortical lesions began to appear about 2 weeks after the ictus, were prominent at 1 - 2 months, then became less evident, but occasionally remained for up to 1.5 years. They gave high signal or were isointense on T2-weighted images and did not give low signal at any stage. Contrast enhancement of these lesions was prominent at 1 - 2 months, and less apparent from 3 months, but was seen up to 5 months. (orig.)

  6. The 'silence' of silent brain infarctions may be related to chronic ischemic preconditioning and nonstrategic locations rather than to a small infarction size

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    Chao Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Silent brain infarctions are the silent cerebrovascular events that are distinguished from symptomatic lacunar infarctions by their 'silence'; the origin of these infarctions is still unclear. This study analyzed the characteristics of silent and symptomatic lacunar infarctions and sought to explore the mechanism of this 'silence'. METHODS: In total, 156 patients with only silent brain infarctions, 90 with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions, 160 with both silent and symptomatic lacunar infarctions, and 115 without any infarctions were recruited. Vascular risk factors, leukoaraiosis, and vascular assessment results were compared. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were compared between patients with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions and patients with two types of infarctions. The locations of all of the infarctions were evaluated. The evolution of the two types of infarctions was retrospectively studied by comparing the infarcts on the magnetic resonance images of 63 patients obtained at different times. RESULTS: The main risk factors for silent brain infarctions were hypertension, age, and advanced leukoaraiosis; the main factors for symptomatic lacunar infarctions were hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and atherosclerosis of relevant arteries. The neurological deficits of patients with only symptomatic lacunar infarctions were more severe than those of patients with both types of infarctions. More silent brain infarctions were located in the corona radiata and basal ganglia; these locations were different from those of the symptomatic lacunar infarctions. The initial sizes of the symptomatic lacunar infarctions were larger than the silent brain infarctions, whereas the final sizes were almost equal between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic ischemic preconditioning and nonstrategic locations may be the main reasons for the 'silence' of silent brain infarctions.

  7. Cerebral Infarction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Incidence and Risk Factors

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    Bae, Dong-Hyeon; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2014-01-01

    Objective Post-traumatic cerebral infarction (PTCI) is one of the most severe secondary insults after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and is known to be associated with poor outcome and high mortality rate. We assessed the practical incidence and risk factors for the development of PTCI. Methods We conducted retrospective study on 986 consecutive patients with TBI from the period May 2005 to November 2012 at our institution. The definition of PTCI was made on non-enhanced CT scan based on a wel...

  8. Frequency and pathogenesis of silent subcortical brain infarction in acute first-ever ischemic stroke

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    Adachi, Tomohide; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    We have often observed silent subcortical brain lesions on CT or MRI in first-ever ischemic stroke, but there is little published information on the relationship of these lesions to stroke subtypes. Here, we describe the incidence of MRI-detected silent subcortical brain lesions, including infarctions and white matter lesions, in a series of patients with first-ever ischemic stroke classified according to stroke subtypes. We also discuss the pathogenesis of these silent subcortical lesions. We evaluated 171 patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. The subjects were divided into three groups: lacunar, atherothrombotic and cardioembolic infarction groups. We evaluated silent subcortical brain infarction (SSBI), enlargement of perivascular space (EPS), and other white-matter lesions using MRI. Hypertension was observed in 67.6% of lacunar infarction, 57.1% of atherosclerotic infarction, and 54.1% of cardioembolic infarction. SSBI was more frequently observed in lacunar infarction than the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 81.5% vs. 44.4% vs. 42.1%, p=0.006). High-grade EPS (grade 2 or higher) was also observed more frequently in lacunar infarction than in the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 63.3% vs. 24.2% vs. 0%, p<0.001). Scheltens' score of silent subcortical lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in the others. The frequency of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in atherosclerotic or cardioembolic infarction. We suggest that the pathogenesis of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions is common to that of lacunar infarction, that is, small-vessel vasculopathy. (author)

  9. Migraine with aura and silent brain infarcts lack of mediation of patent foramen ovale.

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    Calviere, L; Tall, P; Massabuau, P; Bonneville, F; Larrue, V

    2013-12-01

    Population-based studies have shown a heightened prevalence of clinically silent brain infarcts in subjects who have migraine with aura (MA). We sought to determine whether this association could be confirmed in young patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke, and explored the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) as a potential underlying mechanism. Patients were selected from a registry of young patients consecutively treated for ischemic stroke in a tertiary university hospital among those without definite cause of stroke. Patients with PFO were matched for age and gender with patients with normal atrial septum. Migraine and MA were evaluated after patient selection and matching. Silent brain infarcts were independently evaluated on MRI. We included 100 patients [60 men; mean age (SD), 44.8 years (8.3)], 50 patients with PFO. We found silent brain infarcts in 36 patients and MA in 13 patients. MA was more frequent in patients with silent brain infarcts than in patients without silent brain infarcts (25.0% vs. 6.3%; OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.4-17.6; P = 0.01). Traditional cardiovascular risk factors were not associated with silent brain infarcts. PFO was neither associated with MA (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.5-5.3) nor silent brain infarcts (OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.3-1.5). The association of MA with silent brain infarcts was not altered after adjustment for PFO. Findings suggest that silent brain infarcts in young patients with cryptogenic stroke is associated with MA. We found no evidence for a mediating effect of PFO on this association. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  10. Cerebral Infarction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Incidence and Risk Factors.

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    Bae, Dong-Hyeon; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2014-10-01

    Post-traumatic cerebral infarction (PTCI) is one of the most severe secondary insults after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and is known to be associated with poor outcome and high mortality rate. We assessed the practical incidence and risk factors for the development of PTCI. We conducted retrospective study on 986 consecutive patients with TBI from the period May 2005 to November 2012 at our institution. The definition of PTCI was made on non-enhanced CT scan based on a well-demarcated or fairly discernible region of low attenuation following specific vascular territory with normal initial CT. Clinical and radiological findings that related to patients' outcome were reviewed and statistically compared. PTCI was observed in 21 (2.1%) patients. Of various parameters, age (p=0.037), initial Glasgow coma scale score (paccident and PTCI, patterns of TBI and vascular territory of PTCI were not specific. The mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with PTCI than without PTCI. The development of PTCI is rare after TBI, but it usually results in serious outcome and high mortality. Early recognition for risks and aggressive managements is mandatory to prevent PTCI.

  11. Clinical factors adversely affecting early outcome after brain infarction

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    Charles André

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE AND METHODS: One-hundred-and-nine consecutive patients admitted during the acute phase of a CT-confirmed brain infarction (BI were studied. Putative adverse influence of demographic and stroke risk factors, previous medical history, clinical presentation, initial and follow-up neurological examination, initial general evaluation, laboratory findings, chest X-ray and electrocardiographic findings, treatment, and topography and etiology of the ischemic insult was analysed. The end-point for assessment was early death (within 30 days. Statistical analysis was performed with univariate analysis and multiple regression. RESULTS: The main adverse factors related to an increased death risk during the first 30 days were, in decreasing order of importance: coma 48-72 hours after admission; stroke occuring in already hospitalized patients; Babinski sign on admission; minor degrees of impairment of consciousness 48-72 hours after admission; stroke related to large artery atherothrombosis and to embolism; a history of early impairment of consciousness; cardiac failure on admission. In 53 lucid patients on admission, only a history of congestive heart failure (CHF was associated with a reduced survival rate. In 56 patients with impaired consciousness, the presence of a Babinski sign increased death risk, but the main factor predicting a high case-fatality rate was the persistence of consciousness disturbances after48-72 hours. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of impairment of consciousness, especially coma, 2-3 days after disease onset, and a history of CHF greatly increase the early case fatality rate in patients with acute BI presenting with or without consciousness disturbances at admission, respectively. The use of a prognostic algorythm considering these few variables seems to predict the approximate 30-day fatality rates.

  12. Diffusion weighted MR imaging in non-infarct lesions of the brain

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    Karaarslan, E. [Department of Radiology, American Hospital, Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: ercankaraarslan@yahoo.com; Arslan, A. [Department of Radiology, Kocaeli University Medical School, Kocaeli (Turkey)], E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net

    2008-03-15

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a relatively new method in which the images are formed by the contrast produced by the random microscopic motion of water molecules in different tissues. Although DWI has been tried for different organ systems, it has been found its primary use in the central nervous system. The most widely used clinical application is in the detection of hyperacute infarcts and the differentiation of acute or subacute infarction from chronic infarction. Recently DWI has been applied to various other cerebral diseases. In this pictorial paper the authors demonstrated different DWI patterns of non-infarct lesions of the brain which are hyperintense in the diffusion trace image, such as infectious, neoplastic and demyelinating diseases, encephalopathies - including hypoxic-ischemic, hypertensive, eclamptic, toxic, metabolic and mitochondrial encephalopathies - leukodystrophies, vasculitis and vasculopathies, hemorrhage and trauma.

  13. Automatic segmentation of brain infarction in diffusion-weighted MR images

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    Li, Wu; Tian, Jie

    2003-05-01

    It is important to detect the site and size of infarction volume in stroke patients. An automatic method for segmenting brain infarction lesion from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients has been developed. The method uses an integrated approach which employs image processing techniques based on anisotropic filters and atlas-based registration techniques. It is a multi-stage process, involving first images preprocessing, then global and local registration between the anatomical brain atlas and the patient, and finally segmentation of infarction volume based on region splitting and merging and multi-scale adaptive statistical classification. The proposed multi-scale adaptive statistical classification model takes into account spatial, intensity gradient, and contextual information of the anatomical brain atlas and the patient. Application of the method to diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) scans of twenty patients with clinically determined infarction was carried out. It shows that the method got a satisfied segmentation even in the presence of radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneities. The results were compared with lesion delineations by human experts, showing the identification of infarction lesion with accuracy and reproducibility.

  14. Distribution of brain infarction in children with tuberculous meningitis and correlation with outcome score at 6 months

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    Andronikou, Savvas [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. Box 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa); Wilmshurst, Jo; Hatherill, Mark [University of Cape Town, Pediatric Neurology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); VanToorn, Ronald [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2006-12-15

    Prognostic indicators for tuberculous meningitis (TBM) offer realistic expectations for parents of affected children. Infarctions affecting the basal ganglia are associated with a poor outcome. To correlate the distribution of infarction in children with TBM on CT with an outcome score (OS). CT brain scans in children with TBM were retrospectively reviewed and the distribution of infarctions recorded. The degree of correlation with OS at 6 months was determined. There was a statistically significant association between all sites of infarction (P = 0.0001-0.001), other than hemispheric (P = 0.35), and outcome score. There was also a statistically significant association between all types of infarction (P = 0.0001-0.02), other than hemispheric (P = 0.05), and overall poor outcome. The odds ratio for poor outcome with bilateral basal ganglia and internal capsule infarction was 12. The odds ratio for poor outcome with 'any infarction' was 4.91 (CI 2.24-10.74), with 'bilateral infarctions' 8.50 (CI 2.49-28.59), with basal ganglia infarction 5.73 (CI 2.60-12.64), and for hemispheric infarction 2.30 (CI 1.00-5.28). Infarction is associated with a poor outcome unless purely hemispheric. MRI diffusion-weighted imaging was not part of this study, but is likely to play a central role in detecting infarctions not demonstrated by CT. (orig.)

  15. Migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities: an MRI study.

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    Gaist, David; Garde, Ellen; Blaabjerg, Morten; Nielsen, Helle H; Krøigård, Thomas; Østergaard, Kamilla; Møller, Harald S; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Madsen, Camilla G; Iversen, Pernille; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Siebner, Hartwig R; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-07-01

    A small number of population-based studies reported an association between migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities in females. We investigated these relations in a population-based sample of female twins. We contacted female twins ages 30-60 years identified through the population-based Danish Twin Registry. Based on questionnaire responses, twins were invited to participate in a telephone-based interview conducted by physicians. Headache diagnoses were established according to the International Headache Society criteria. Cases with migraine with aura, their co-twins, and unrelated migraine-free twins (controls) were invited to a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan performed at a single centre. Brain scans were assessed for the presence of infarcts, and white matter hyperintensities (visual rating scales and volumetric analyses) blinded to headache diagnoses. Comparisons were based on 172 cases, 34 co-twins, and 139 control subjects. Compared with control subjects, cases did not differ with regard to frequency of silent brain infarcts (four cases versus one control), periventricular white matter hyperintensity scores [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): -0.1 (-0.5 to 0.2)] or deep white matter hyperintensity scores [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.1 (-0.8 to 1.1)] assessed by Scheltens' scale. Cases had a slightly higher total white matter hyperintensity volume compared with controls [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.17 (-0.08 to 0.41) cm(3)] and a similar difference was present in analyses restricted to twin pairs discordant for migraine with aura [adjusted mean difference 0.21 (-0.20 to 0.63)], but these differences did not reach statistical significance. We found no evidence of an association between silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and migraine with aura. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  16. Neurocardiology: Cardiovascular Changes and Specific Brain Region Infarcts

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    Rongjun Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are complex and dynamic reflex control networks between the heart and the brain, including cardiac and intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brainstem, and central nucleus. Recent literature based on animal model and clinical trials indicates a close link between cardiac function and nervous systems. It is noteworthy that the autonomic nervous-based therapeutics has shown great potential in the management of atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmia, and myocardial remodeling. However, the potential mechanisms of postoperative brain injury and cardiovascular changes, particularly heart rate variability and the presence of arrhythmias, are not understood. In this chapter, we will describe mechanisms of brain damage undergoing cardiac surgery and focus on the interaction between cardiovascular changes and damage to specific brain regions.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of whole-brain CT perfusion in the detection of acute infratentorial infarctions

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    Bollwein, Christine; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Plate, Annika; Straube, Andreas; Baumgarten, Louisa von [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Hendrik [South Nuremberg Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Although the diagnostic performance of whole-brain computed tomographic perfusion (WB-CTP) in the detection of supratentorial infarctions is well established, its value in the detection of infratentorial strokes remains less well defined. We examined its diagnostic accuracy in the detection of infratentorial infarctions and compared it to nonenhanced computed tomography (NECT), aiming to identify factors influencing its detection rate. Out of a cohort of 1380 patients who underwent WB-CTP due to suspected stroke, we retrospectively included all patients with MRI-confirmed infratentorial strokes and compared it to control patients without infratentorial strokes. Two blinded readers evaluated NECT and four different CTP maps independently for the presence and location of infratentorial ischemic perfusion deficits. The study was designed as a retrospective case-control study and included 280 patients (cases/controls = 1/3). WB-CTP revealed a greater diagnostic sensitivity than NECT (41.4 vs. 17.1 %, P = 0.003). The specificity, however, was comparable (93.3 vs. 95.0 %). Mean transit time (MTT) and time to drain (TTD) were the most sensitive (41.4 and 40.0 %) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) the most specific (99.5 %) perfusion maps. Infarctions detected using WB-CTP were significantly larger than those not detected (15.0 vs. 2.2 ml; P = 0.0007); infarct location, however, did not influence the detection rate. The detection of infratentorial infarctions can be improved by assessing WB-CTP as part of the multimodal stroke workup. However, it remains a diagnostic challenge, especially small volume infarctions in the brainstem are likely to be missed. (orig.)

  18. Pharmacoepidemiological analysis of the drugs used for secondary prevention of brain infarction on dispensary stage

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    Miheyeva N.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The secondary prevention of cerebral infarction on dispensary stage to current clinical guidelines was analyzed. Adherence of patients to prescribe medications was evaluated. Material and methods. 106 patients of hospital neurologic department with brain infarction were included in prospective pharmacoepidemiological study of the drugs used for secondary prevention of brain infarction on dispensary stage since 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009. Duration of outpatient observation was 3 years. Results. All of the patients were of 64,9 ± 10,3 years old. Hypertension was diagnosed in 102 of them (96.2%, atrial fibrillation — in 33 (31.1% patients. 39 (36.8% patients died during 3 years after discharge from the hospital. ACE inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor antagonist were prescribed for 83 (78.3% patients, antiplatelet- 76 (71,7%, statins — 16 (15,1% patients in discharge from hospital. Warfarin was prescribed only for 1 (3.05% patient with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke.consumption of drugs with evidence efficiency were diminished already after one year of observation in outpatient clinics. Conclusion.Therapy for secondary stroke prevention is not fully comply with current clinical guidelines

  19. Incidence of Brain Infarcts, Cognitive Change, and Risk of Dementia in the General Population: The AGES-Reykjavik Study (Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study).

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    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Aspelund, Thor; Kjartansson, Olafur; Gudmundsson, Elias F; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jonsson, Palmi V; van Buchem, Mark A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2017-09-01

    The differentiation of brain infarcts by region is important because their cause and clinical implications may differ. Information on the incidence of these lesions and association with cognition and dementia from longitudinal population studies is scarce. We investigated the incidence of infarcts in cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, and overall brain regions and how prevalent and incident infarcts associate with cognitive change and incident dementia. Participants (n=2612, 41% men, mean age 74.6±4.8) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of infarcts and cognitive testing at baseline and on average 5.2 years later. Incident dementia was assessed according to the international guidelines. Twenty-one percent of the study participants developed new infarcts. The risk of incident infarcts in men was higher than the risk in women (1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.3). Persons with both incident and prevalent infarcts showed steeper cognitive decline and had almost double relative risk of incident dementia (1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.2) compared with those without infarcts. Persons with new subcortical infarcts had the highest risk of incident dementia compared with those without infarcts (2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-3.4). Men are at greater risk of developing incident brain infarcts than women. Persons with incident brain infarcts decline faster in cognition and have an increased risk of dementia compared with those free of infarcts. Incident subcortical infarcts contribute more than cortical and cerebellar infarcts to incident dementia which may indicate that infarcts of small vessel disease origin contribute more to the development of dementia than infarcts of embolic origin in larger vessels. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. The effects of early exercise on brain damage and recovery after focal cerebral infarction in rats.

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    Matsuda, F; Sakakima, H; Yoshida, Y

    2011-02-01

    Exercise can be used to enhance neuroplasticity and facilitate motor recovery after a stroke in rats. We investigated whether treadmill running could reduce brain damage and enhance the expression of midkine (MK) and nerve growth factor (NGF), increase angiogenesis and decrease the expression of caspase-3. Seventy-seven Wistar rats were split into three experimental groups (ischaemia-control: 36, ischaemia-exercise: 36, sham-exercise: 5). Stroke was induced by 90-min left middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament. Beginning on the following day, the rats were made to run on a treadmill for 20 min once a day for a maximum of 28 consecutive days. Functional recovery after ischaemia was assessed using the beamwalking test and a neurological evaluation scale in all rats. Infarct volume, and the expression of MK, NGF, anti-platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1), and caspase-3 were evaluated at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 28 days after the induction of ischaemia. Over time motor coordination and neurological deficits improved more in the exercised group than in the non-exercised group. The infarct volume in the exercised group (12.4 ± 0.8%) subjected to treadmill running for 28 days was significantly decreased compared with that in the control group (19.8 ± 4.2%, P exercised rats. Our findings show that treadmill exercise improves motor behaviour and reduces neurological deficits and infarct volume, suggesting that it may aid recovery from central nervous system injury.

  1. Enhanced involvement of brain vasopressin V1 receptors in cardiovascular responses to stress in rats with myocardial infarction.

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    Dobruch, Jakub; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Szczepanska-Sadowska, Ewa

    2005-12-01

    Stress is one of the factors provoking cardiovascular complications. The purpose of the study was to explore the role of vasopressin (VP) in central control of arterial blood pressure and heart rate under resting conditions and during stimulation by an alarming stress (air jet stress) in myocardial infarct-induced cardiac failure. Six groups of male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were subjected either to sham surgery (sham rats) or to ligation of a left coronary artery (infarcted rats). After 5 weeks both infarcted and sham rats were subjected either to intracerebroventricular infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) (sham aCSF and infarcted aCSF), [Arg8]-VP (sham VP and infarcted VP) or VP V1a receptor antagonist (d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2Ala-]VP, sham V1ANT and infarcted V1ANT). Air jet stress elicited significantly greater increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate in the infarcted aCSF than in the sham aCSF rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of V1ANT significantly reduced resting MABP and MABP and heart rate increases in response to stress in the infarcted but not in the sham rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of VP elicited a significant increase in resting MABP in the infarcted VP but not in the sham VP rats. The results provide evidence for enhanced engagement of the brain V1 VP receptors in regulation of resting MABP and in generation of exaggerated cardiovascular responses to air jet stress during the post-infarct state.

  2. Extensive white matter hyperintensities may increase brain volume in cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

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    Yao, Ming; Jouvent, Eric; During, Marco; Godin, Ophélia; Hervé, Dominique; Guichard, Jean Pierre; Zhu, Yi-Cheng; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Opherk, Christian; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues

    2012-12-01

    The extent of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is associated with cerebral atrophy in elderly people. WMH is a radiological hallmark of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), but their relationship with brain volume remains poorly understood. The association between WMH and brain volume was analyzed in a large population of patients with CADASIL. Demographic and MRI data of 278 patients recruited from a prospective cohort study were analyzed. Volumes of WMH and lacunar infarcts, number of cerebral microbleeds, and brain parenchymal fraction were measured. Multivariate analysis was used to study the impact of WMH on brain volume at baseline. In univariate analyses, brain parenchymal fraction was negatively associated with age, male sex, and all MRI markers. Multiple regression modeling showed that brain parenchymal fraction was inversely related to age, number of cerebral microbleeds, and normalized volume of lacunar infarcts but positively related to normalized volume of WMH (Pbrain parenchymal fraction ≥86.37% (median values, both P≤0.001). The results of the present study suggest that extensive WMH may be associated with increase of brain volume in CADASIL. In this disorder, WMH may be related not only to loss of white matter components, but also to a global increase of water content in the cerebral tissue.

  3. Serial MR observation of cortical laminar necrosis caused by brain infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    To examine the chronological changes characteristic of cortical laminar necrosis caused by brain infarction, 16 patients were repeatedly examined using T1-, T2-weighted spin-echo, T2{sup *}-weighted gradient echo, fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images at 1.0 or 1.5 T. High intensity cortical lesions were visible on the T1-weighted images from 2 weeks after ictus and became prominent at 1 to 3 months, then became less apparent, but occasionally remained at high intensity for 2 years. High intensity cortical lesions on FLAIR images became prominent from 1 month, and then became less prominent from 1 year, but occasionally remained at high intensity for 2 years. Subcortical lesions did not display high intensity on T1-weighted images at any stage. On FLAIR images, subcortical lesions initially showed slightly high intensity and then low intensity from 6 months due to encephalomalacia. Cortical lesions showed prominent contrast enhancement from 2 weeks to 3 months, but subcortical lesions were prominent from 2 weeks only up to 1 month. T2*-weighted images disclosed haemosiderin in 3 of 7 patients, but there was no correlation with cortical short T1 lesions. Cortical laminar necrosis showed characteristic chronological signal changes on T1-weighted images and FLAIR images. Cortical short T1 lesions were found not to be caused by haemorrhagic infarction. (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 9 refs.

  4. Prominent hypointense veins on susceptibility weighted image in the cat brain with acute infarction: DWI, SWI, and PWI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Seon Hee; Kim, Dong Chan

    2014-10-01

    The multiple prominent hypointense veins on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) have been found in the ischemic territory of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Venous side is the unknown area in the hemodynamics of brain infarction. To evaluate the venous aspect in acute brain infarction through an animal study. The acute infarction in cat brains was induced with a bolus infusion of 0.25 mL of triolein through one side of the common carotid artery. The magnetic resonance (MR) images, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, SW, and perfusion-weighted (PWI) images, were obtained serially at 2 h (n = 17), 1 day (n = 11), and 4 days (n = 4) after triolein infusion. The obtained MR images were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. For qualitative assessment, the signal intensity of the serial MR images was evaluated. The presence or absence and the location with serial changes of infarction were identified on DWI and ADC map images. The presence or absence of prominent hypointense veins and the serial changes of cortical veins were also evaluated on SWI. Quantitative assessment was performed by comparing the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean transit times (MTT) of the lesions with those of the contralateral normal side calculated on PWI. The serial changes of rCBV, rCBF, and MTT ratio were also evaluated. Acute infarction in the first and second medial gyrus of lesion hemisphere was found by qualitative evaluation of DWI and ADC map images. On the serial evaluation of SWI, the cortical veins of cat brain with infarction were obscured at 2 h and then re-appeared at 1 day. The hemorrhage transformation and prominent hypointense veins were seen at 4 days on SWI. The quantitative evaluation revealed increased MTT ratios and decreased rCBV and rCBF ratios on PWIs in the acute infarction of cat brain. The prominent hypointense veins on SWI were seen in the half of the acute

  5. Migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Garde, Ellen; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2016-01-01

    A small number of population-based studies reported an association between migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities in females. We investigated these relations in a population-based sample of female twins. We contacted female twins ages 30-60 years...... identified through the population-based Danish Twin Registry. Based on questionnaire responses, twins were invited to participate in a telephone-based interview conducted by physicians. Headache diagnoses were established according to the International Headache Society criteria. Cases with migraine with aura......% confidence interval): 0.17 (-0.08 to 0.41) cm(3)] and a similar difference was present in analyses restricted to twin pairs discordant for migraine with aura [adjusted mean difference 0.21 (-0.20 to 0.63)], but these differences did not reach statistical significance. We found no evidence of an association...

  6. [Retinal and brain infarctions secondary to acute carotid thrombosis in ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, L; Martínez-Corral, M; Martí, E; Martí-Fábregas, J

    2008-06-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening iatrogenic condition that may appear following ovulation induction in the course of some fertility treatments. This may lead to further complications, some of which may be severe, such as thromboembolic events. Though rarely, it can therefore be a potential cause of stroke. We report the case of a 34-year old woman under ovulation induction treatment who developed retinal and brain infarctions secondary to internal carotid occlusion. Oral anticoagulation was administered and recovery was good in spite of the persistence of carotid occlusion in follow-up magnetic ressonance imaging- angiographies. This is the first case of carotid occlusion following an OHSS reported in Spain and the eighth one published in the literature. Current literature on cerebrovascular complications in OHSS is also briefly reviewed.

  7. Effects of exercise training on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in skeletal muscle and heart of rats post myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heow Won; Ahmad, Monir; Wang, Hong-Wei; Leenen, Frans H H

    2017-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Exercise training increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus, which depends on a myokine, fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5). Whether exercise training after myocardial infarction induces parallel increases in FNDC5 and BDNF expression in skeletal muscle and the heart has not yet been studied. What is the main finding and its importance? Exercise training after myocardial infarction increases BDNF protein in skeletal muscle and the non-infarct area of the LV without changes in FNDC5 protein, suggesting that BDNF is not regulated by FNDC5 in skeletal muscle and heart. An increase in cardiac BDNF may contribute to the improvement of cardiac function by exercise training. Exercise training after myocardial infarction (MI) attenuates progressive left ventricular (LV) remodelling and dysfunction, but the peripheral stimuli induced by exercise that trigger these beneficial effects are still unclear. We investigated as possible mediators fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the skeletal muscle and heart. Male Wistar rats underwent either sham surgery or ligation of the left descending coronary artery, and surviving MI rats were allocated to either a sedentary (Sed-MI) or an exercise group (ExT-MI). Exercise training was done for 4 weeks on a motor-driven treadmill. At the end, LV function was evaluated, and FNDC5 and BDNF mRNA and protein were assessed in soleus muscle, quadriceps and non-, peri- and infarct areas of the LV. At 5 weeks post MI, FNDC5 mRNA was decreased in soleus muscle and all areas of the LV, but FNDC5 protein was increased in the soleus muscle and the infarct area. Mature BDNF (mBDNF) protein was decreased in the infarct area without a change in mRNA. Exercise training attenuated the decrease in ejection fraction and the increase in LV end-diastolic pressure post MI. Exercise training had no

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of ischemic brain infarction according to time passage in a canine stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Noh, Daji; Kim, Youngwhan; Jeong, Inseong; Choi, Hojung; Lee, Youngwon; Lee, Kija

    2017-07-10

    This study describes magnetic resonance imaging findings and changes in lateral ventricular size according to time passage of canine ischemic stroke model. T1- and T2-weighted (T1W, T2W) imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence were performed at 3 h and 3, 8, and 35 days after brain infarct induction. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping were obtained at 8 and 35 days. A total of 29 brain lesions were induced successfully in 12 of 14 beagle dogs. At 3 h, T2W and FLAIR detected hyperintense lesions (3/3) in three randomly selected dogs. On T1W, lesions appeared hypo- to isointense at 3 h, iso- (18/29) or hypointense (11/29) at 3 days, hypo- to isointense with peripheral hyperintensity (24/26) at 8 days, and hypointense (18/26) at 35 days. Infarcts on DWI/ADC were hypo- to isointense centrally, with the periphery hyperintense/hyperintense (11/26) at 8 days and hypointense/hyperintense (19/26) at 35 days. A markedly increased lateral ventricular size was observed in dogs with cerebral infarcts. In conclusion, T2W and FLAIR were useful for detecting early stage (3 h to 3 days) brain infarction. T1W and DWI were useful for detecting neuronal necrosis and providing supplemental information for phase evaluation.

  9. Analysis of Small Ischemic Lesions in the Examinees of a Brain Dock and Neurological Examination of Animals Subjected to Cortical or Basal Ganglia Photothrombotic Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Tabata, Hitoshi; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya; Schallert, Timothy; Keep, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cases of small brain ischemic lesions found in examinees of a brain dock (neurological health screening center). Small cerebral infarction was found in 17 % of the examinees (733 cases). White matter lesions were found in 24 %. Infarctions were located in the cortex or subcortical white matter in 31 % and in the basal ganglia in 44 % of cases. Infratentorial infarction was found in 1.6 %. We have developed an animal model of small infarction in the cortex or basal ganglia induced by photothrombosis in rodents. Sprague-Dawley rats or Mongolian gerbils were anesthetized and photothrombotic infarction was induced in the left caudate nucleus or parietal cortex by light exposure via an optic fiber and intravenous Rose Bengal dye injection. Histological examination revealed development of a small spherical infarction surrounding the tip of the optic fiber. The lesion turned to a cyst by 6 weeks after lesioning. Neurological deficits were found in animals both with cortical and caudate infarction. Behavioral changes in an open field test differed with the lesion site. Neurological deficits were sustained longer in animals with larger infarctions. Thus, photothrombotic infarction is useful for analyzing location-dependent and size-dependent neurological and neuropathological changes after cerebral infarction.

  10. The influence of meteorological and geomagnetic factors on acute myocardial infarction and brain stroke in Moscow, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikov, Dmitry; Revich, Boris; Gurfinkel, Yuri; Naumova, Elena

    2014-07-01

    Evidence of the impact of air temperature and pressure on cardiovascular morbidity is still quite limited and controversial, and even less is known about the potential influence of geomagnetic activity. The objective of this study was to assess impacts of air temperature, barometric pressure and geomagnetic activity on hospitalizations with myocardial infarctions and brain strokes. We studied 2,833 myocardial infarctions and 1,096 brain strokes registered in two Moscow hospitals between 1992 and 2005. Daily event rates were linked with meteorological and geomagnetic conditions, using generalized linear model with controls for day of the week, seasonal and long-term trends. The number of myocardial infarctions decreased with temperature, displayed a U-shaped relationship with pressure and variations in pressure, and increased with geomagnetic activity. The number of strokes increased with temperature, daily temperature range and geomagnetic activity. Detrimental effects on strokes of low pressure and falling pressure were observed. Relative risks of infarctions and strokes during geomagnetic storms were 1.29 (95 % CI 1.19-1.40) and 1.25 (1.10-1.42), respectively. The number of strokes doubled during cold spells. The influence of barometric pressure on hospitalizations was relatively greater than the influence of geomagnetic activity, and the influence of temperature was greater than the influence of pressure. Brain strokes were more sensitive to inclement weather than myocardial infarctions. This paper provides quantitative estimates of the expected increases in hospital admissions on the worst days and can help to develop preventive health plans for cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Purinergic receptor stimulation reduces cytotoxic edema and brain infarcts in mouse induced by photothrombosis by energizing glial mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatments to improve the neurological outcome of edema and cerebral ischemic stroke are severely limited. Here, we present the first in vivo single cell images of cortical mouse astrocytes documenting the impact of single vessel photothrombosis on cytotoxic edema and cerebral infarcts. The volume of astrocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP increased by over 600% within 3 hours of ischemia. The subsequent growth of cerebral infarcts was easily followed as the loss of GFP fluorescence as astrocytes lysed. Cytotoxic edema and the magnitude of ischemic lesions were significantly reduced by treatment with the purinergic ligand 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2-MeSADP, an agonist with high specificity for the purinergic receptor type 1 isoform (P2Y(1R. At 24 hours, cytotoxic edema in astrocytes was still apparent at the penumbra and preceded the cell lysis that defined the infarct. Delayed 2MeSADP treatment, 24 hours after the initial thrombosis, also significantly reduced cytotoxic edema and the continued growth of the brain infarction. Pharmacological and genetic evidence are presented indicating that 2MeSADP protection is mediated by enhanced astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism via increased inositol trisphosphate (IP(3-dependent Ca(2+ release. We suggest that mitochondria play a critical role in astrocyte energy metabolism in the penumbra of ischemic lesions, where low ATP levels are widely accepted to be responsible for cytotoxic edema. Enhancement of this energy source could have similar protective benefits for a wide range of brain injuries.

  12. Surgery-related thrombosis critically affects the brain infarct volume in mice following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Lin

    Full Text Available Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO model is widely used to mimic human focal ischemic stroke in order to study ischemia/reperfusion brain injury in rodents. In tMCAO model, intraluminal suture technique is widely used to achieve ischemia and reperfusion. However, variation of infarct volume in this model often requires large sample size, which hinders the progress of preclinical research. Our previous study demonstrated that infarct volume was related to the success of reperfusion although the reason remained unclear. The aim of present study is to explore the relationship between focal thrombus formation and model reproducibility with respect to infarct volume. We hypothesize that suture-induced thrombosis causes infarct volume variability due to insufficient reperfusion after suture withdrawal. Seventy-two adult male CD-1 mice underwent 90 minutes of tMCAO with or without intraperitoneal administration of heparin. Dynamic synchrotron radiation microangiography (SRA and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI were performed before and after tMCAO to observe the cerebral vascular morphology and to measure the cerebral blood flow in vivo. Infarct volume and neurological score were examined to evaluate severity of ischemic brain injury. We found that the rate of successful reperfusion was much higher in heparin-treated mice compared to that in heparin-free mice according to the result of SRA and LSCI at 1 and 3 hours after suture withdrawal (p<0.05. Pathological features and SRA revealed that thrombus formed in the internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery or anterior cerebral artery, which blocked reperfusion following tMCAO. LSCI showed that cortical collateral circulation could be disturbed by thrombi. Our results demonstrated that suture-induced thrombosis was a critical element, which affects the success of reperfusion. Appropriate heparin management provides a useful approach for improving reproducibility of reperfusion

  13. Involvement of brain-gut axis in treatment of cerebral infarction by β-asaron and paeonol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaogang; Cai, Qiufang; Li, Jianxiang; Guo, Weifeng

    2018-02-14

    Cerebral infarction (CI) causes severe brain damage with high incidence. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of brain-gut axis in the treatment of CI by combined administration of β-asaron and paeonol. Rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model was established, the interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the rat peripheral blood were determined by ELISA assay, and brain tissue damage was evaluated by TUNNEL assay. The correlation of cholecystokinin (CCK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling components between intestinal mucosa and prefrontal cortex of MCAO rats treated with β-asaron and paeonol were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting. In vitro transwell co-culture was performed to confirm the correlated expression. The expression of CCK and NF-κB signaling components were closely correlated between the intestinal mucosa and prefrontal cortex of MCAO rats treated with β-asaron and paeonol. The combined administration also regulates the IL-1β and TNF-α in the MCAO rat peripheral blood and ameliorate the brain damage in MCAO rats. Elevated expression of related genes was observed in the cortical neurons co-cultured with intestinal mucosal epithelial cells treated by β-asaron and paeonol. The brain-gut axis mediates the therapeutic effect of β-asaron and paeonol for cerebral infarction through CCK and NF-κB signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of lacunar infarction in brain CT-scans: No evidence of bias from accompanying patient information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonke, B.; Knippenberg, F.C.E. van; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Koudstaal, P.J.; Dijkstra, G.; Hilligersberg, R. van; Kappelle, L.J.

    1989-05-01

    Interobserver agreement in assessing brain CT-scans is, in general, high. The extent, however, to which such agreement is caused by bias through knowledge of other clinical details remains uncertain. The hypothesis that observers are somehow prejudiced before assessing ambiguous, CT-scans in this particular situation was tested. Sixteen neurologists and 16 radiologists volunteered to interpret two ambiguous brain CT-scans, with regard to the presence or absence of a lacunar infarct in the region of the internal capsule. The scans were accompanied by 'patient' information that was or was not suggestive of a stroke. These scans were camouflaged by a variety of other scans, to be assessed in the same way, to mask the purpose of the study. I was assumed that the observers, in their assessments of the scans, would somehow let their ratings of the likelihood of a lacunar infarction in or near the internal capsule be subject to the accompanying information. Results showed lower ratings produced by neurologists (i.e., less likelihood of an infarction) than by radiologists in the majority of all assessments, but no bias by the accompanying information.

  15. MRI of Cerebellar Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Cocker, Laurens J L; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing brain infarction. Because of few or atypical clinical symptoms and a relatively low sensitivity of CT scans, many cerebellar infarctions may be detected only with MRI. With adequate recognition of cerebellar infarction on MRI and

  16. Brain stem infarction: Imaging diagnosis and endovascular therapy; Hirnstamminsult: Bildgebende Diagnostik und endovaskulaere Therapiekonzepte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Mayer, T.E. [Klinikum Muenchen-Grosshadern (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2004-09-01

    This review article describes the vascular anatomy and pathophysiology of the vertebrobasilar ischaemia as well as the most important clinical syndromes of brainstem infarctions. An overview of the literature presents the role of invasive and non-invasive techniques (ultrasound, MRI, MRA, CT, CTA, intraarterial angiography) to diagnose an acute brainstem infarction. Current concepts are described for treating acute vertebrobasilar thrombosis, including local intraarterial fibrinolysis, mechanical recanalization and medical treatment, and for preventing brainstem infarction, including angioplasty and stent-assisted angioplasty of the brainstem supplying arteries. (orig.)

  17. The effects of blood pressure and urokinase on brain injuries after experimental cerebral infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xunming; Li, Ke; Li, Wenbin; Li, Shuting; Yan, Feng; Gong, Wei; Luo, Yumin

    2009-03-01

    With the proposal of penumbra theory and development of intra-arterial thrombolysis (such as urokinase), the outcome of ischemic cerebrovascular disease is greatly improved. However, the incidence of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increased concomitantly, and some studies showed a close relationship between blood pressure and HT. The mechanisms of blood pressure and urokinase effect on the incidence of HT are not clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of the different levels of blood pressure and urokinase on the ischemic lesions, the incidence of HT and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in the rat ischemia-reperfusion models. Temporary focal ischemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats using the intraluminal vascular occlusion method. The animals were assigned into four groups (n=11 in each group): low blood pressure group (LP), normal blood pressure group (NP), high blood pressure group (HP) and urokinase/high blood pressure group (UKHP). Adnephrin was applied to enhance the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) at the beginning of reperfusion. MABP was maintained 20 mmHg higher than the baseline for 1 hour. Sodium nitroprusside was used to decrease MABP by 20 mmHg lower than the baseline for 1 hour. Both urokinase and adnephrin were used concomitantly in the UKHP group. Neurological deficit scores were evaluated at 2 hours (R2h) and 24 hours (R24h) after reperfusion. All rats were decapitated, their brains were sliced into 15-mum-thick slices, and the infarct volume and the visible HT were analysed. Three rats in each group were taken for immunohistochemistry and pathological analysis. There was no significant difference in MABP among the groups at the baseline time points (p>0.05), but blood pressure are definitely increased and decreased in the HP, UKHP, and LP groups. Neurological deficit scores showed no significant difference at R2h among the groups (p=0.443). However, neurological deficit scores showed significant

  18. Assessment of cerebral hemodynamics to acetazolamide using brain perfusion SPECT in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soon-Ah; Yang, Chung-Yong; Choi, See-Sung; Kim, Woo Hyoung

    2011-02-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary microangiopathy caused by mutations in the Notch3 gene located on chromosome 19, leading to 4 cardinal features with aura, cerebrovascular ischemic events, mood disturbances, and dementia. Acetazolamide (ACZ) has been promoted as a drug to determine cerebral hemodynamics, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in patients with cerebrovascular disease. In CADASIL patients with small-vessel disease, ACZ may be possible to increase CBF. We present that reduced CBF was dramatically improved after administration of ACZ on Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT in a CADASIL patient.

  19. Tooth loss is associated with brain white matter change and silent infarction among adults without dementia and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, Yang-Ki; Suk, Seung-Han; Park, Hyunyoung; Cheong, Jin-Sung; Yang, Hyunduk; Lee, Sungik; Do, Seung-Yeon; Kang, Ji-Sook

    2013-06-01

    Periodontal disease is a predictor of stroke and cognitive impairment. The association between the number of lost teeth (an indicator of periodontal disease) and silent infarcts and cerebral white matter changes on brain CT was investigated in community-dwelling adults without dementia or stroke. Dental examination and CT were performed in 438 stroke- and dementia-free subjects older than 50 yr (mean age, 63 ± 7.9 yr), who were recruited for an early health check-up program as part of the Prevention of Stroke and Dementia (PRESENT) project between 2009 and 2010. In unadjusted analyses, the odds ratio (OR) for silent cerebral infarcts and cerebral white matter changes for subjects with 6-10 and > 10 lost teeth was 2.3 (95% CI, 1.38-4.39; P = 0.006) and 4.2 (95% CI, 1.57-5.64; P < 0.001), respectively, as compared to subjects with 0-5 lost teeth. After adjustment for age, education, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and smoking, the ORs were 1.7 (95% CI, 1.08-3.69; P = 0.12) and 3.9 (95% CI, 1.27-5.02; P < 0.001), respectively. These findings suggest that severe tooth loss may be a predictor of silent cerebral infarcts and cerebral white matter changes in community-dwelling, stroke- and dementia-free adults.

  20. Quantitative clinical proteomic study of autopsied human infarcted brain specimens to elucidate the deregulated pathways in ischemic stroke pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arnab; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Heese, Klaus; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2013-10-08

    Ischemic stroke, still lacking an effective neuroprotective therapy is the third leading cause of global mortality and morbidity. Here, we have applied an 8-plex iTRAQ-based 2D-LC-MS/MS strategy to study the commonly regulated infarct proteome from three different brain regions (putamen, thalamus and the parietal lobe) of female Japanese patients. Infarcts were compared with age-, post-mortem interval- and location-matched control specimens. The iTRAQ experiment confidently identified 1520 proteins with 0.1% false discovery rate. Bioinformatics data mining and immunochemical validation of pivotal perturbed proteins revealed a global failure of the cellular energy metabolism in the infarcted tissues as seen by the parallel down-regulation of proteins related to glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. The concomitant down-regulation of all participating proteins (SLC25A11, SLC25A12, GOT2 and MDH2) of malate-aspartate shuttle might be responsible for the metabolic in-coordination between the cytosol and mitochondria resulting in the failure of energy metabolism. The levels of proteins related to reactive gliosis (VIM, GFAP) and anti-inflammatory response (ANXA1, ANXA2) showed an increasing trend. The elevation of ferritin (FTL, FTH1) may indicate an iron-mediated oxidative imbalance aggravating the mitochondrial failure and neurotoxicity. The deregulated proteins could be useful as potential therapeutic targets or biomarkers for ischemic stroke. Clinical proteomics of stroke has been lagging behind other areas of clinical proteomics like Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia. Our study is the first quantitative clinical proteomics study where iTRAQ-2D-LC-MS/MS has been utilized in the area of ischemic stroke to obtain a comparative profile of human ischemic infarcts and age-, sex-, location- and post-mortem interval-matched control brain specimens. Different pathological attributes of ischemic stroke well-known through basic

  1. Incomplete brain infarction of reperfused cortex may be quantitated with iomazenil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawara, J; Sperling, B; Lassen, N A

    1997-01-01

    with ischemic stroke to detect viable neurons in cortex that appeared structurally intact on conventional neuroimaging studies. METHODS: Fourteen patients were selected by (1) angiography within 24 hours of onset showing embolic occlusion of an intracranial artery, (2) cerebral blood flow showing ischemia...... of moderate severity in 12 cases and spontaneous reflow in 2 cases, and (3) thrombolysis with reperfusion within 24 hours in most cases. Thirty reperfused cortical areas that remained structurally intact, 7 infarcted cortical areas, and 6 contralateral cerebellar areas with reduced blood flow were selected...... was calculated. RESULTS: The mean asymmetry ratio was 0.89 +/- 0.11 (range, 0.64 to 1.05), 0.50 +/- 0.15 (range, 0.23 to 0.67), and 0.97 +/- 0.05 (range, 0.90 to 1.04) in reperfused cortex, infarcted cortex, and contralateral cerebellum, respectively. Compared with unity, both reperfused cortex and infarcted...

  2. Brain infarction and blasts with bilobed nuclei in a patient with monocytic acute myeloid leukemia mimicking acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghazaly, Assem A; Ibrahim, Mamoun H; AlGwaiz, Layla A

    2016-09-01

    We are presenting a case of an adult male patient with monocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who had on presentation brain infarction and bilobed nuclei had been demonstrated in many of the leukemic blasts. There was no laboratory evidence of acute disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, on presentation or later on. Initially the diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was considered, so all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) was added to induction chemo therapy. As the diagnosis of APL was ruled out, based on the flow cytometry, fluorescent in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction findings, the ATRA was discontinued and the patient continued on the standard AML chemo therapy induction regimen. Later on chromosomal analysis was also normal. Sever dehydration on presentation, would have contributed to brain infarction. AML particularly monocytic, can mimic APL, especially its microgranular variant. The possible ATRA therapy side effects, can be avoided by early confirmation of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased Silent Brain Infarction Accompanied With High Prevalence of Diabetes and Dyslipidemia in Psychiatric Inpatients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Tetsuto; Uju, Yoriyasu; Sekine, Keisuke; Ishii, Yukihiro; Yoshimi, Taro; Yasui, Reiko; Yasukawa, Asuka; Sato, Mamoru; Okamoto, Seiko; Hisaoka, Tetsuya; Miura, Masafumi; Kusanishi, Shun; Murakami, Kanako; Nakano, Chieko; Mizuta, Yasuhiko; Mimori, Seisuke; Mishima, Shunichi; Igarashi, Kazuei; Takizawa, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Tatsuro; Tsukada, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have increased risk of atherosclerotic diseases. It is already known that lifestyle-related disorders and the use of antipsychotics are closely related with the progression of atherosclerosis in psychiatric patients. Stroke as well as coronary heart disease play an important role in the cause of death in Asia and Japan. Thus, we studied the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in psychiatric inpatients in Japan using brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This cross-sectional study was performed from January 2012 to December 2013. Study participants were 152 hospitalized patients (61 men and 91 women) in the Department of Psychiatry at Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa City, Japan. Mean ages were 50.0 and 57.1 years old for men and women, respectively. The diagnoses (DSM-IV-TR criteria) of participants were schizophrenia (69.1%), mood disorder (18.4%), and other mental disorders (12.5%). We checked physical status, metabolic status of glucose and lipid levels, and brain MRI within 1 week of admission. The study group showed a significantly high prevalence of diabetes and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterolemia in both sexes (n = 61 in men, n = 91 in women, P < .05). In the study group, serum fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels were significantly high (n = 152, P < .05), but serum HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol were significantly low in both sexes (n = 61 in men, n = 90 in women, P < .05), and triglycerides were low in men (n = 61, P < .05). Silent brain infarction was recognized at a higher rate (n = 98, P < .05) compared with healthy controls. Participants in this study had an increased ratio of silent brain infarction compared with Japanese healthy controls, accompanied with higher ratios of diabetes and low HDL cholesterol.

  4. Antiphospholipid antibodies, brain infarcts, and cognitive and motor decline in aging (ABICMA): design of a community-based, longitudinal, clinical-pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitakis, Zoe; Brey, Robin L; Rand, Jacob H; Schneider, Julie A; Leurgans, Sue E; Yu, Lei; Buchman, Aron S; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Fleischman, Debra A; Boyle, Patricia A; Bennett, David A; Levine, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the Antiphospholipid Antibodies, Brain Infarcts, and Cognitive and Motor Decline in Aging study is to test the hypothesis that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are associated with an increased risk of pathologically proven brain infarcts and are related to cognitive and motor decline in aging. Putative biologic mechanisms underlying the association of aPL with infarcts and the relation of aPL with clinical outcomes of cognitive and motor impairment, including vascular and other processes, will be examined. The design of this longitudinal, clinical-pathologic study involves quantifying four aPL assays, and relating these to brain infarcts, and to cognitive and motor decline. Vascular mechanisms assessed using antemortem magnetic resonance neuroimaging and postmortem neuropathology, as well as nonvascular mechanisms of inflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability alterations will be examined as plausible mediators of the relation of aPL to cognitive and motor impairment. We will take advantage of antemortem biological specimens (longitudinally collected sera and plasma from which aPL, annexins, C-reactive protein, and matrix metalloproteinases will be quantified), and clinical, neuroimaging, and postmortem neuropathologic data from about 800 elderly, community-dwelling women and men who have agreed to brain autopsy at the time of death, participating in one of two ongoing studies of aging: the Religious Orders Study and the Memory and Aging Project. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Infiltration of invariant natural killer T cells occur and accelerate brain infarction in permanent ischemic stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Kui; Xue, Li; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-10-28

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of T cells that have been implicated in inflammation, atopy, autoimmunity, infections, and cancer. Although iNKT cells have been extensively studied over the past decade, its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic brain injury is still largely unknown. In our study, we determined whether iNKT cells infiltration occur in a mouse model of permanent cerebral ischemia. C57BL6/J male mice were treated with either alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) or vehicle control before undergoing permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). α-GalCer, a glycolipid antigen, specifically activates iNKT cells by a CD1d-restricted mechanism. Using flow cytometry, 10,000 leukocytes (CD45 high cells) from the ischemic hemisphere and peripheral blood respectively were analyzed to determine the number of NK1.1+CD3+ cells at 3, 12, 24 and 48h post-pMCAO. Cerebral infarct size, brain edema and morphological characteristics were measured at the stipulated time points by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, weighing, and H&E staining. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in brain tissue and serum were assessed by immunohistochemistry and ELISA respectively. We found that the number of iNKT cells started increasing from 12h (PB sample) and 24h (ischemic hemisphere sample) respectively in the vehicle treated group. iNKT cells infiltration occurred at an earlier time-point compared in the α-GalCer treated group (T=3H vs T=12H in PB sample; T=12H vs T=24H in ischemic hemisphere sample). Brain water content at 12h and 24h was significantly higher in pMCAO+α-GalCer mice compared to pMCAO+vehicle mice which was in turn higher than mice that underwent sham surgery. Aggravated morphological abnormalities in HE-stained neurons and significantly increased neurons with pyknotic nuclei and cavitation in the ischemic region were observed at 24h in the pMCAO+α-GalCer and pMCAO+vehicle groups. Cerebral infarct volume, neurological

  6. The findings of Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT in the patients with left anterior thalamic infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y. A.; Kim, S. H.; Sohn, H. S.; Jeong, S. G. [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The thalamus has multiple connections with areas of the cerebral cortex involved in arousal and cognition. Thalamic damage has been reported to be associated with variable neuropsychological dysfunctions and dementia. This study evaluates the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) by using SPM analysis of brain perfusion SPECT and examining the neuropsychological abnormalities of 4 patients with anterior thalamic infarctions. Four patients with left anterior thalamic infarctions and eleven normal controls were evaluated. K-MMSE and the Seoul Neuropsychological Screening Battery were performed within 2 days after stroke. The normalized SPECT data of 4 patients were compared to those of 11 controls for the detection of areas with decreased rCBF by SPM analysis. All 4 patients showed anterograde amnesia in their verbal memory, which was not improved by recognition. Dysexecutive features were occasionally present, such as decreased word fluency and impaired Stroop test results. SPM analysis revealed decreased rCBF in the left supra marginal gyrus, the superior temporal gyrus, the middle and inferior frontal gyrus, the medial dorsal and anterior nucleus of the left thalamus. The changes of rCBF in patients with left anterior thalamic infarctions may be due to the remote suppression on metabolism by the interruption of the cortico-subcortical circuit, which connects the anterior thalamic nucleus and various cortical areas. The executive dysfunction and dysnomia may be caused by the left dorsolateral frontal dysfunction of the thalamo-cortical circuit. Anterograde amnesia with storage deficit may be caused by the disruption of mamillothalamic tract.

  7. Chronological changes in nonhaemorrhagic brain infarcts with short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Our purpose was to investigate nonhaemorrhagic infarcts with a short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia. We carried out repeat MRI on 12 patients with infarcts in the cerebellum or basal ganglia with a short T1. Cerebellar cortical lesions showed high signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images beginning at 2 weeks, which became prominent from 3 weeks to 2 months, and persisted for as long as 14 months after the ictus. The basal ganglia lesions demonstrated slightly high signal from a week after the ictus, which became more intense thereafter. Signal intensity began to fade gradually after 2 months. High signal could be seen at the periphery until 5 months, and then disappeared, while low or isointense signal, seen in the central portion from day 20, persisted thereafter. (orig.)

  8. Cerebral Taurine Levels are Associated with Brain Edema and Delayed Cerebral Infarction in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Mario; Schiefecker, Alois; Ferger, Boris; Beer, Ronny; Sohm, Florian; Broessner, Gregor; Hackl, Werner; Rhomberg, Paul; Lackner, Peter; Pfausler, Bettina; Thomé, Claudius; Schmutzhard, Erich; Helbok, Raimund

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral edema and delayed cerebral infarction (DCI) are common complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and associated with poor functional outcome. Experimental data suggest that the amino acid taurine is released into the brain extracellular space secondary to cytotoxic edema and brain tissue hypoxia, and therefore may serve as a biomarker for secondary brain injury after aSAH. On the other hand, neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine treatment have been described in the experimental setting. We analyzed cerebral taurine levels using high-performance liquid chromatography in the brain extracellular fluid of 25 consecutive aSAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring including cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Patient characteristics and clinical course were prospectively recorded. Associations with CMD-taurine levels were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with an autoregressive process to handle repeated observations within subjects. CMD-taurine levels were highest in the first days after aSAH (11.2 ± 3.2 µM/l) and significantly decreased over time (p < 0.001). Patients with brain edema on admission or during hospitalization (N = 20; 80 %) and patients developing DCI (N = 5; 20 %) had higher brain extracellular taurine levels compared to those without (Wald = 7.3, df = 1, p < 0.01; Wald = 10.1, df = 1, p = 0.001, respectively) even after adjusting for disease severity and CMD-probe location. There was no correlation between parenteral taurine supplementation and brain extracellular taurine (p = 0.6). Moreover, a significant correlation with brain extracellular glutamate (r = 0.82, p < 0.001), lactate (r = 0.56, p < 0.02), pyruvate (r = 0.39, p < 0.01), potassium (r = 0.37, p = 0.01), and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio (r = 0.24, p = 0.02) was found. Significantly higher CMD-taurine levels were found in patients with brain edema or DCI after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Its value as a

  9. Osteoporosis as an independent risk factor for silent brain infarction and white matter changes in men and women: the PRESENT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, Y K; Suk, S H; Do, S Y

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have not demonstrated a relationship between osteoporosis and cerebral infarction in the community, especially in men. We found that osteoporosis may be an independent risk factor for brain white matter change/silent infarction in men, as well as in women. We aimed to study the relationship between low bone mineral density (BMD) and brain white matter changes and/or silent infarcts (WMC/SI). This was a community-based, cross-sectional study supported by the regional government. Bone mineral density measurements and brain computed tomography were performed in 646 stroke- and dementia-free subjects (aged 50-75 years). After adjustment for age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and current smoking status, the odds ratio (OR) of risk for WMC and/or SI was 1.8 in the osteopenia group (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.15-2.77; P = 0.01) and 2.2 in the osteoporosis group (95 % CI 1.42-3.55; P women, the OR was 1.9 (95 % CI 1.15-2.78; P = 0.010) and 2.2 (95 % CI 1.42-3.55; P = 0.001), respectively. Severe bone mass loss may be an independent risk factor for brain WMC/SI in men and women. Low BMD may cause brain WMC/SI in the step that leads to stroke. Although there are well-designed studies on the prevention of cerebral infarction in patients with brain WMC/SI, a specific prevention method, such as aspirin, should be used for patients with low BMD who have WMC/SI. Screening for low BMD as an independent vascular risk factor in healthy subjects may be required to prevent stroke.

  10. Combination of cyclosporine and erythropoietin improves brain infarct size and neurological function in rats after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Pei-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tested the superiority of combined cyclosporine A (CsA-erythropoietin (EPO therapy compared with either one in limiting brain infarction area (BIA and preserving neurological function in rat after ischemic stroke (IS. Methods Fifty adult-male SD rats were equally divided into sham control (group 1, IS plus intra-peritoneal physiological saline (at 0.5/24/48 h after IS (group 2, IS plus CsA (20.0 mg/kg at 0.5/24h, intra-peritoneal (group 3, IS plus EPO (5,000IU/kg at 0.5/24/48h, subcutaneous (group 4, combined CsA and EPO (same route and dosage as groups 3 and 4 treatment (group 5 after occlusion of distal left internal carotid artery. Results BIA on day 21 after acute IS was higher in group 2 than in other groups and lowest in group 5 (all p Conclusion combined treatment with CsA and EPO was superior to either one alone in protecting rat brain from ischemic damage after IS.

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT). Comparing with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and aged control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kitani, M.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1987-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by /sup 133/Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID.

  12. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Colliez

    Full Text Available The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement magnetic resonance (MR technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1' would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1 and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001 than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027. Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min, hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  13. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001) than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027). Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  14. Brain natriuretic peptide in acute myocardial infarction: a marker of cardio-renal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltrasio, Marco; Cosentino, Nicola; De Metrio, Monica; Rubino, Mara; Cabiati, Angelo; Milazzo, Valentina; Discacciati, Andrea; Marana, Ivana; Bonomi, Alice; Veglia, Fabrizio; Lauri, Gianfranco; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac and renal functions are major independent predictors of outcomes in both ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). As B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) seems to be a major mediator in the cross-talk between heart and kidneys, we aimed at evaluating its capacity to reflect cardiac and renal function in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. We measured BNP plasma levels at hospital admission in 619 patients with STEMI (n = 346) and NSTEMI (n = 273), grouped according to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF; > or ≤40%) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; > or ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m). Median BNP values were 82 (38-186), 121 (40-342), 219 (80-685), and 474 (124-1263) pg/ml in patients with normal LVEF and eGFR (n = 347), with LVEF 40% or less and eGFR higher than 60 ml/min/1.73 m (n = 120), with LVEF higher than 40% and eGFR 60 ml/min/1.73 m or less (n = 86), and with combined LVEF and eGFR reductions (n = 66), respectively (P < 0.0001). At general linear model, both LVEF higher than 40% (P < 0.0001) and eGFR 60 ml/min/1.73 m or less (P < 0.0001) independently predicted BNP values. At multivariable analysis, BNP, LVEF 40% or less, and eGFR 60 ml/min/1.73 m or less were found to be independent predictors of the combined end point of in-hospital death, cardiogenic shock, need for renal replacement therapy, or mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003; P < 0.0001; P = 0.01, respectively). BNP plasma levels are closely related to LVEF and eGFR at hospital admission, in both STEMI and NSTEMI patients. Future studies should investigate whether BNP levels can summarize in a single parameter the prognostic information provided separately by cardiac and renal dysfunction.

  15. On the influence of space storms on the frequency of infarct-myocardial, brain strokes, and hard car accidents; possible using of CR for their forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, L. I.; Iucci, N.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.

    We consider the influence of space storms as strong interplanetary shock waves causing great cosmic ray Forbush-decreases and big geomagnetic storms on the people health at the ground level We used data of more than 7 millions ambulance cases in Moscow and St Petersburg included information on daily numbers of the hard traffic accidents infarctions and brain strokes We found that during space storms the average daily numbers of hard traffic accidents with using ambulances as well as infarctions and brain strokes confirmed by medical personal increase by 17 4 pm 3 1 10 5 pm 1 2 and 7 0 pm 1 7 respectively We show that the forecasting of these dangerous apace phenomena can be done partly by using cosmic ray data on pre-increase and pre-decrease effects as well as on the change of 3-D cosmic ray anisotropy

  16. Effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment on prognosis of acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Zhou Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment on prognosis of acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock. Methods: A total of 112 cases of inpatients treated in Cardiology Department of our hospital from March 2013 to March 2015 were selected, all of whom had acute myocardial infarction within 12 hours of onset and received direct PCI treatment. They were divided into observation group and control group according to random number table, each group with 56 cases, control group received conventional interventional treatment and observation group received recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment. Then differences of regional myocardial deformability, myocardial enzyme spectrum indicators, brain natriuretic peptide and inflammatory factors, blood sugar and stress hormones as well as myocardial infarction prognosis-associated indexes, etc, between two groups after treatment were compared. Results: After treatment, LVEF, SRs, SRe and Sra levels of observation group were higher than those of control group, WMSI level was lower than that of control group; serum myocardial enzyme spectrum indicators CK, CK-MB, AST and LDH values were lower than those of control group; serum BNP, CRP, TNF-α and IL-6 levels were lower than those of control group; serum cortisol, growth hormone and glucagon levels were lower than those of control group, insulin level was higher than that of control group; FT3 and IGF-1 levels were higher than those of control group, sPLA2 and Hcy levels were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment for acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock can reduce myocardial function injury, protect normal myocardial function and optimize patients’ long-term prognosis; it has active clinical significance.

  17. Depressed glucose consumption at reperfusion following brain ischemia does not correlate with mitochondrial dysfunction and development of infarction: an in vivo positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Abraham; Rojas, Santiago; Pareto, Deborah; Santalucia, Tomàs; Millán, Olga; Abasolo, Ibane; Gómez, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi; Gispert, Joan D; Falcon, Carles; Bargalló, Núria; Planas, Anna M

    2009-05-01

    Glucose consumption is severely depressed in the ischemic core, whereas it is maintained or even increased in penumbral regions during ischemia. Conversely, glucose utilization is severely reduced early after reperfusion in spite that glucose and oxygen are available. Experimental studies suggest that glucose hypometabolism might be an early predictor of brain infarction. However, the relationship between early glucose hypometabolism with later development of infarction remains to be further studied in the same subjects. Here, glucose consumption was assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion. Perfusion was evaluated by PET with (13)NH(3) during and after 2-hour (h) middle cerebral artery occlusion, and (18)F-FDG was given after 2h of reperfusion. Brain infarction was evaluated at 24h. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was examined ex vivo using a biochemical method. Cortical (18)F-FDG uptake was reduced by 45% and 25% in the ischemic core and periphery, respectively. However, substantial alteration of mitochondrial respiration was not apparent until 24h, suggesting that mitochondria retained the ability to consume oxygen early after reperfusion. These results show reduced glucose use at early reperfusion in regions that will later develop infarction and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent regions. Depressed glucose metabolism in the ischemic core might be attributable to reduced metabolic requirement due to irreversible cellular injury. However, reduced glucose metabolism in peripheral regions suggests either an impairment of glycolysis or reduced glucose demand. Thus, our study supports that glycolytic depression early after reperfusion is not always related to subsequent development of infarction.

  18. Optimal delivery route of bone marrow stromal cells for rat infarct brain – A study using non-invasive optical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND - Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC have the potential to improve neurological function when transplanted into animal model of central nervous system (CNS disorders. However, there still exist several questions to solved prior to clinical application. In this study, therefore, we aimed to clarify the optimal delivery route of BMSC transplantation over a reasonable time window.MATERIALS AND METHODS - The rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. The BMSC were labeled with quantum dot (QD 800. The labeled BMSC were transplanted into the infarct brain directly or intravenously at 7 days after the insult. Motor function was serially assessed. The BMSC were also tracked using near infrared (NIR fluorescence imaging technique every week. The fate of the transplanted BMSC was examined at 5 weeks after transplantation, using Immunohistochemistry. RESULTS - Direct, but not intravenous, transplantation of BMSC significantly enhanced functional recovery. NIR fluorescence imaging could visualize their migration towards cerebral infarct in directly, but not intravenously, injected animals. The findings were supported on histological analysis. Thus, the BMSC were widely engrafted in the infarct brain in the directly injected animals, but few BMSC were observed in the intravenously injected ones. CONCLUSION - This study strongly suggests that direct transplantation of BMSC may be more beneficial in treating patients with ischemic stroke than their intravenous transplantation. Therapeutic time window must be called into account when considering the route of BMSC transplantation.

  19. Epileptiform activity and spreading depolarization in the blood-brain barrier-disrupted peri-infarct hippocampus are associated with impaired GABAergic inhibition and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Kristina; Kamintsky, Lyn; Kim, Soo Young; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Prager, Ofer; Nichtweiss, Julia Friederike; Salar, Seda; Kaufer, Daniela; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon

    2017-05-01

    Peri-infarct opening of the blood-brain barrier may be associated with spreading depolarizations, seizures, and epileptogenesis as well as cognitive dysfunction. We aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying neural network pathophysiology in the blood-brain barrier-dysfunctional hippocampus. Photothrombotic stroke within the rat neocortex was associated with increased intracranial pressure, vasogenic edema, and peri-ischemic blood-brain barrier dysfunction that included the ipsilateral hippocampus. Intrahippocampal recordings revealed electrographic seizures within the first week in two-thirds of animals, accompanied by a reduction in gamma and increase in theta frequency bands. Synaptic interactions were studied in parasagittal hippocampal slices at 24 h and seven days post-stroke. Field potential recordings in CA1 and CA3 uncovered multiple population spikes, epileptiform episodes, and spreading depolarizations at 24 h. Input-output analysis revealed that fEPSP-spike coupling was significantly enhanced at seven days. In addition, CA1 feedback and feedforward inhibition were diminished. Slices generating epileptiform activity at seven days revealed impaired bidirectional long-term plasticity following high and low-frequency stimulation protocols. Microarray and PCR data confirmed changes in expression of astrocyte-related genes and suggested downregulation in expression of GABAA-receptor subunits. We conclude that blood-brain barrier dysfunction in the peri-infarct hippocampus is associated with early disinhibition, hyperexcitability, and abnormal synaptic plasticity.

  20. Embolic Brain Infarcts: A Rare Fatal Complication of Preoperative Embolization of a Massive Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura

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    Patel, Shreyas R., E-mail: Shrey000@gmail.com; Vachhani, Prasann; Moeslein, Fred [University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura (SFTP) is a rare intrathoracic neoplasm, often giant in size and highly vascular, which can make surgical resection very challenging. Preoperative percutaneous embolization before surgical removal can significantly reduce the risk of uncontrollable intraoperative hemorrhage. However, a rare potential life threatening complication could result from embolization of SFTP and must be taken into consideration. This report describes a 69-year-old female with a large right thoracic SFTP, who underwent preoperative angiography and embolization and developed diffuse embolic brain infarcts immediately after the administration of polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  1. Effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on renal function in patients with acute heart failure following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbo; Gu, Xinshun; Fan, Weize; Fan, Yanming; Li, Wei; Fu, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) on renal function in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Consecutive patients with AHF following AMI were enrolled in this clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive rhBNP (rhBNP group) or nitroglycerin (NIT group). Patients in the rhBNP group received rhBNP 0.15 μg /kg bolus injection after randomization followed by an adjusted-dose (0.0075-0.020 μg/kg/min) for 72 hours, while patients in NIT received infusion of nitroglycerin with an adjusted-dose (10-100 μg/kg/min) for 72 hours in NIT group. Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected. The levels of serum creatinine (SCr), urea, β-2 microglobulin and cystatin C were measured at baseline and repeated at the end of the 24, 48 and 72 hours after infusion. The primary end point was the incidence of acute renal dysfunction, which was defined as an increase in SCr > 0.5 mg/dl (> 44.2 μmol/L) or 25% above baseline SCr value. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) was followed up for 1 month. Of the 50 patients enrolled, 26 were randomly assigned to rhBNP and 24 to nitroglycerin (NIT). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The baseline concentrations of SCr, urea, β-2 microglobulin and cystatin C at admission were similar in the two groups. However, the concentrations of SCr and urea were significantly higher in rhBNP group than those in NIT group at hour 24 and 48 after treatments (all P acute renal dysfuntion in rhBNP group was higher (9/26 vs. 2/24, P = 0.040). The results of multiple logistic regression found that the use of rhBNP was an independent predictor of acute renal dysfunction in patients with AHF following AMI (OR, 0.162; 95% CI, 0.029 to 0.909; P = 0.039). the incidence of acute renal dysfuntion in rhBNP group was higher, and the use of rhBNP was an

  2. Splenic infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splenic infarction is the death of tissue (necrosis) in the spleen due to a blockage in blood flow. ... Common causes of splenic infarction include: Blood clots Blood diseases such as sickle cell anemia Infections such as endocarditis

  3. Effect of Donepezil on Wernicke Aphasia After Bilateral Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction: Subtraction Analysis of Brain F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Kim, Je-Kyung; An, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the most common neurologic deficits occurring after stroke. Although the speech-language therapy is a mainstream option for poststroke aphasia, pharmacotherapy is recently being tried to modulate different neurotransmitter systems. However, the efficacy of those treatments is still controversial. We present a case of a 53-year-old female patient with Wernicke aphasia, after the old infarction in the territory of left middle cerebral artery for 8 years and the recent infarction in the right middle cerebral artery for 4 months. On the initial evaluation, the Aphasia Quotient in Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery was 25.6 of 100. Baseline brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images demonstrated a decreased cerebral metabolism in the left temporoparietal area and right temporal lobe. Donepezil hydrochloride, a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, was orally administered 5 mg/d for 6 weeks after the initial evaluation and was increased to 10 mg/d for the following 6 weeks. After the donepezil treatment, the patient showed improvement in language function, scoring 51.0 of 100 on Aphasia Quotient. A subtraction analysis of the brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images after donepezil medication demonstrated increased uptake in both middle temporal gyri, extended to the occipital area and the left cerebellum. Thus, we suggest that donepezil can be an effective therapeutic choice for the treatment of Wernicke aphasia.

  4. Twenty-four hours hypothermia has temporary efficacy in reducing brain infarction and inflammation in aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandu, Raluca Elena; Buga, Ana Maria; Balseanu, Adrian Tudor

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of disability for which no neuroprotective measures are available. Age is the principal nonmodifiable risk factor for this disease. Previously, we reported that exposure to hydrogen sulfide for 48 hours after stroke lowers whole body temperature and confers neuroprotection...... inflammation and infarct size. However, after 1 week, the infarct size became even larger than in controls and after 2 weeks there was no beneficial effect on regenerative processes such as neurogenesis. Behaviorally, hypothermia also had a limited beneficial effect. Finally, after hydrogen sulfide...

  5. Bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction resulting from vertebral artery injury following cervical trauma without radiographic damage of the spinal column: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimata, Yoshikuni; Sato, Kotaro; Suzuki, Yoshiaki [Iwate Prefectural Chubu Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitakami (Japan); Murakami, Hideki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Vertebral artery injury can be a complication of cervical spine injury. Although most cases are asymptomatic, the rare case progresses to severe neurological impairment and fatal outcomes. We experienced a case of bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction with fatal outcome resulting from vertebral artery injury associated with cervical spine trauma. A 69-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of tetraplegia after falling down the stairs and hitting his head on the floor. Marked bony damage of the cervical spine was not apparent on radiographs and CT scans, so the injury was initially considered to be a cervical cord injury without bony damage. However, an intensity change in the intervertebral disc at C5/C6, and a ventral epidural hematoma were observed on MRI. A CT angiogram of the neck showed the right vertebral artery was completely occluded at the C4 level of the spine. Forty-eight hours after injury, the patient lapsed into drowsy consciousness. The cranial CT scan showed a massive low-density area in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and brain stem. Anticoagulation was initiated after a diagnosis of the right vertebral artery injury, but the patient developed bilateral cerebellar and brain stem infarction. The patient's brain herniation progressed and the patient died 52 h after injury. We considered that not only anticoagulation but also treatment for thrombosis would have been needed to prevent cranial embolism. We fully realize that early and appropriate treatment are essential to improve the treatment results, and constructing a medical system with a team of orthopedists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons is also very important. (orig.)

  6. The broad-spectrum cation channel blocker pinokalant (LOE 908 MS) reduces brain infarct volume in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Wienrich, Marion; Ensinger, Helmut A

    2005-01-01

    Activation of cation channels conducting Ca2+, Na+ and K+ is involved in the pathogenesis of infarction in experimental focal cerebral ischaemia. Pinokalant (LOE 908 MS) is a novel broad-spectrum inhibitor of several subtypes of such channels and has previously been shown to improve the metabolic...

  7. Caudal brain infarctions in a kitten – case reportInfartos em região encefálica caudal em gata filhote – relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Alécio Gomes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is uncommon in animals compared with humans because of the lower incidence of atherosclerosis and primary hypertension. However with advanced imaging, vascular disease is being recognized with increasing frequency in veterinary medicine. Cerebrovascular disease can be subdivided into infarction and hemorrhage, although the two categories overlap in the case of hemorrhagic infarcts. The aim of thisarticle is to report the neurological manifestations associated with stroke (infarctions in at two-month old, domestic shorthair cat. Neurological evaluation revealed head tilt, tetraparesis, proprioceptive deficits in all four limbs, and decreased pupillary light reflex. Further, manifestations of neurological dysfunctions were acute and progressive. At the necropsy, grossly there were hemorrhage and necrosis at mid-brain and cerebellum. Histopathology confirmed liquefactive necrosis at the mid-brain and cerebellum. The neurological manifestations associated with the pathological findings are suggestive of an anoxic infarction probably due to vascular occlusion. Em animais é baixa a incidência de arterosclerose e hipertensão primária. Devido a tal característica, infarto cerebral é incomum nos mesmos. Entretanto, com o avanço das modalidades de imagem, doença vascular está sendo reconhecida com maio frequência na medicina veterinária. Doença cerebrovascular pode ser subdividida em infarto e hemorragia, embora as duas categorias se interponham no caso de infartos hemorrágicos. Assim sendo, o objetivo deste artigo é descrever as manifestações neurológicas associadas a acidente vascular (infartos em uma gata de dois meses de idade, sem raça definida e domiciliada. Na avaliação neurológica observou-se inclinação de cabeça, tetraparesia, déficits proprioceptivos nos quatro membros e diminuição do reflexo pupilar a luz. Além disso, os problemas neurológicos foram agudos e progressivos. Na necropsia macroscopicamente

  8. Fatal outcome after brain stem infarction related to bilateral vertebral artery occlusion - case report of a detrimental complication of cervical spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beauchamp Kathryn M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebral artery injury (VAI after blunt cervical trauma occurs more frequently than historically believed. The symptoms due to vertebral artery (VA occlusion usually manifest within the first 24 hours after trauma. Misdiagnosed VAI or delay in diagnosis has been reported to cause acute deterioration of previously conscious and neurologically intact patients. Case presentation A 67 year-old male was involved in a motor vehicle crash (MVC sustaining multiple injuries. Initial evaluation by the emergency medical response team revealed that he was alert, oriented, and neurologically intact. He was transferred to the local hospital where cervical spine computed tomography (CT revealed several abnormalities. Distraction and subluxation was present at C5-C6 and a comminuted fracture of the left lateral mass of C6 with violation of the transverse foramen was noted. Unavailability of a spine specialist prompted the patient's transfer to an area medical center equipped with spine care capabilities. After arrival, the patient became unresponsive and neurological deficits were noted. His continued deterioration prompted yet another transfer to our Level 1 regional trauma center. A repeat cervical spine CT at our institution revealed significantly worsened subluxation at C5-C6. CT angiogram also revealed complete occlusion of bilateral VA. The following day, a repeat CT of the head revealed brain stem infarction due to bilateral VA occlusion. Shortly following, the patient was diagnosed with brain death and care was withdrawn. Conclusion Brain stem infarction secondary to bilateral VA occlusion following cervical spine trauma resulted in fatal outcome. Prompt imaging evaluation is necessary to assess for VAI in cervical trauma cases with facet joint subluxation/dislocation or transverse foramen fracture so that treatment is not delayed. Additionally, multiple transportation events are risk factors for worsening when unstable cervical

  9. Treatment of acute ischemic brain infarction with the assistance of local intraarterial thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncyljusz, W; Falkowski, A; Kojder, I; Cebula, E; Sagan, L; Czechowski, J; Walecka, A

    2007-09-01

    Cerebral infarction is usually due to arterial occlusion. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow and improve recovery from an infarct. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of local intraarterial thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA) in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarctions within 6 hours of the onset of symptoms. Sixteen patients (10 females and six males) aged from 42 to 61 years, with acute MCA territory infarcts were selected for treatment with local i.a. rtPA up to 6 hours after the onset of symptoms. Patient selection was based on clinical examination, computed tomography (CT), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A clinical evaluation was performed before treatment, at the time of discharge, and 90 days post-procedure on the basis of modified Rankin and NIHSS scores. Controls (n = 16, nine females and seven males) aged from 51 to 70 years were treated only with intravenous anticoagulation using i.v. heparin infusion. The control group was evaluated with multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography performed on entry to the study and at 2-4 hours afterwards. Eight patients (50%) achieved a modified Rankin score of 2 or less as the primary outcome after 90 days follow-up. The secondary clinical outcome at 90-day follow-up was as follows: NIHSS score or =50% decrease, nine (56%) of the patients. A recanalization rate of 75% was achieved in 12 of the 16 treated patients, but only 12.5% in two of the 16 patients in the control group. Intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in two (12.5%) of the patients in the treatment group, but in only one patient (6%) in the control group. There were no deaths in the treated group after thrombolysis up to the time of discharge; however, during the 90-day follow-up, two patients died compared to three patients in the control group (19% vs. 12.5% mortality rate). Patients with cerebral infarction who were treated within 6 hours of onset using

  10. [Cerebral infarctions in vertebrobasilar artery atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufriev, P L; Evdokimenko, A N; Gulevskaya, T S

    2018-01-01

    to obtain more specific information on the morphology and pathogenesis of cerebral infarctions occurring in vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) atherosclerosis. Macro- and microscopic investigations of the brain, its arterial system, and heart were conducted in 69 autopsy cases with infarctions located in the vertebrobasilar system (VBS) in atherosclerosis. 69 cases were found to have 206 VBA infarctions of various extent and locations. The detected infarctions were single and multiple in 27 and 42 cases, respectively. The detected infarctions included extensive (n=7), large (n=9), medium (n=63), small deep (lacunar) (n=97), and small superficial (n=30). The brain stem showed lacunar infarctions most frequently (76% of the infarctions at this site). Medium and small infarctions were identified at the same frequency in the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. The occurrence of 94% of the extensive and large infarctions was ascertained to be pathogenetically associated with atherothrombotic occlusion of the intracranial arteries in the VBS. 76% of the small infarctions occurred through the mechanism of cerebral vascular insufficiency in tandem atherostenosis of VBAs in conjunction with an additional decrease in cerebral blood flow under the influence of an extracerebral factor (coronary heart disease). Medium infarctions were approximately equifrequently due to the two aforementioned causes and, in some cases, to cardiogenic thromboembolism of VBAs. Infarctions were multiple in most cases; while recent large atherothrombotic infarctions were frequently concurrent with small organized infarctions resulting from tandem atherostenosis of VBAs. This investigation could establish the relationship between the site, extent, and pathogenetic factors of infarctions in the VBA bed in atherosclerosis, as well as the prognostic value of small infarctions as predictors for severe ischemic stroke.

  11. SONOlysis in prevention of Brain InfaRctions During Internal carotid Endarterectomy (SONOBIRDIE) trial - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbáč, Tomáš; Netuka, David; Beneš, Vladimír; Nosáľ, Vladimír; Kešnerová, Petra; Tomek, Aleš; Fadrná, Táňa; Beneš, Vladimír; Fiedler, Jiří; Přibáň, Vladimír; Brozman, Miroslav; Langová, Kateřina; Herzig, Roman; Školoudík, David

    2017-01-17

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a beneficial procedure for selected patients with an internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis. Surgical risk of CEA varies from between 2 and 15%. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of sonolysis (continual transcranial Doppler monitoring, TCD) using a 2-MHz diagnostic probe with maximal diagnostic energy on the reduction of the incidence of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) and brain infarction detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by the activation of the endogenous fibrinolytic system during CEA. Design: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial. international, multicenter trial for patients with at least 70% symptomatic or asymptomatic ICA stenosis undergoing CEA. patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic ICA stenosis of at least 70% are candidates for CEA; a sufficient temporal bone window for TCD; aged 40-85 years, functionally independent; provision of signed informed consent. Randomization: consecutive patients will be assigned to the sonolysis or control (sham procedure) group by computer-generated 1:1 randomization. Prestudy calculations showed that a minimum of 704 patients in each group is needed to reach a significant difference with an alpha value of 0.05 (two-tailed) and a beta value of 0.8 assuming that 10% would be lost to follow-up or refuse to participate in the study (estimated 39 endpoints). the primary endpoint is the incidence of stroke or TIA during 30 days after CEA and the incidence of new ischemic lesions on brain MRI performed 24 h after CEA in the sonolysis and control groups. Secondary endpoints are occurrence of death, any stroke, or myocardial infarction within 30 days, changes in cognitive functions 1 year post procedure related to pretreatment scores, and number of new lesions and occurrence of new lesions ≥0.5 mL on post-procedural brain MRI. descriptive statistics and linear/logistic multiple regression models will be

  12. Migrainous infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, K; Artto, V; Bendtsen, L

    2011-01-01

    Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included......Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included...

  13. PREDICTION OF SPECIFIC DAMAGE OR INFARCTION FROM THE MEASUREMENT OF TISSUE IMPEDANCE FOLLOWING REPETITIVE BRAIN ISCHEMIA IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLEIN, HC; KROPVANGASTEL, W; GO, KG; KORF, J

    The development of irreversible brain damage during repetitive periods of hypoxia and normoxia was studied in anaesthetized rats with unilateral occlusion of the carotid artery (modified Levine model). Rats were exposed to 10 min hypoxia and normoxia until severe damage developed. As indices of

  14. Patent foramen ovale closure with GORE HELEX or CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder vs. antiplatelet therapy for reduction of recurrent stroke or new brain infarct in patients with prior cryptogenic stroke: Design of the randomized Gore REDUCE Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasner, Scott E; Thomassen, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars; Rhodes, John F; Larsen, Coby C; Jacobson, Joth

    2017-12-01

    Rationale The utility of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure for secondary prevention in patients with prior cryptogenic stroke is uncertain despite multiple randomized trials completed to date. Aims The Gore REDUCE Clinical Study (REDUCE) aims to establish superiority of patent foramen ovale closure in conjunction with antiplatelet therapy over antiplatelet therapy alone in reducing the risk of recurrent clinical ischemic stroke or new silent brain infarct in patients who have had a cryptogenic stroke. Methods and design This controlled, open-label trial randomized 664 subjects with cryptogenic stroke at 63 multinational sites in a 2:1 ratio to either antiplatelet therapy plus patent foramen ovale closure (with GORE® HELEX® Septal Occluder or GORE® CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder) or antiplatelet therapy alone. Subjects will be prospectively followed for up to five years. Neuroimaging is required for all subjects at baseline and at two years or study exit. Study outcomes The two co-primary endpoints for the study are freedom from recurrent clinical ischemic stroke through at least 24 months post-randomization and incidence of new brain infarct (defined as clinical ischemic stroke or silent brain infarct) through 24 months. The primary analyses are an unadjusted log-rank test and a binomial test of subject-based proportions, respectively, both on the intent-to-treat population, with adjustment for testing multiplicity. Discussion The REDUCE trial aims to target a patient population with truly cryptogenic strokes. Medical therapy is limited to antiplatelet agents in both arms thereby reducing confounding. The trial should determine whether patent foramen ovale closure with the Gore septal occluders is safe and more effective than medical therapy alone for the prevention of recurrent clinical ischemic stroke or new silent brain infarct; the neuroimaging data will provide an opportunity to further support the proof of concept. The main results are anticipated in 2017

  15. Comparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, Halvor; Romi, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome of spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction. Methods: Risk factors, concomitant diseases, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome were registered among 28 patients with spinal cord infarction and 1075 patients with cerebral infarction admitted to the Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Multivariate analyses were performed with location of stroke (cord or brain), neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome (both Barthel Index [BI] 1 week after symptom onset and discharge home or to other institution) as dependent variables. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that patients with spinal cord infarction were younger, more often female, and less afflicted by hypertension and cardiac disease than patients with cerebral infarction. Functional score (BI) was lower among patients with spinal cord infarctions 1 week after onset of symptoms (P infarction compared to cerebral infarction after adjusting for BI scored 1 week after onset (P = 0.019). Conclusion: Patients with spinal cord infarction have a risk factor profile that differs significantly from that of patients with cerebral infarction, although there are some parallels to cerebral infarction caused by atherosclerosis. Patients with spinal cord infarction were more likely to be discharged home when adjusting for early functional level on multivariate analysis. PMID:21915166

  16. Electroacupuncture enhances motor recovery performance with brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in rats with cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Wook; Chung, You Chul; Jung, Hee Chan; Park, Moon-Seo; Han, Young-Min; Chung, Yong-An; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Sang-In; Lim, Jiyeon; Im, Woo-Seok; Chung, Jin Young; Kim, Minky; Mook, Inhee; Kim, Manho

    2012-09-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) is a traditional medicine in patients with post-stroke rehabilitation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent growth factor involved in recovery following cerebral injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether EA increases BDNF levels and facilitates functional recovery. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was performed in rats (N=12) followed by reperfusion. EA was applied at the GV20 (Baihui) acupoint. Motor and sensory functions were monitored on the Garcia scale for 2 weeks. Expressions of BDNF and receptor tyrosine kinase B (trkB) were determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Improvement of Garcia scores, particularly in motor performance, were noted in the group with EA stimulation (precovery and stimulates BDNF/trkB expression in rats with cerebral ischaemia.

  17. Hypereosinophilia with Multiple Thromboembolic Cerebral Infarcts and Focal Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ju; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Hyun Young [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    We report a case of hypereosinophilia causing multiple areas of cerebral infarcts. A 52-year-old Korean man presented with dysarthria and weakness in both arms. A brain MRI revealed multiple acute infarcts in the distal border zone with focal intracerebral hemorrhage, whereas a cerebral angiogram was not remarkable. The eosinophil count was 5,500/{mu}L and was accompanied by elevated cardiac enzyme levels. The pattern of cerebral infarcts and laboratory results suggest a thromboembolic infarction associated with hypereosinophilia.

  18. Clinical phase II study with Gd-DTPA (dimeglumine gadopentetate, SHL 451 A) in brain tumor and cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kohki; Aoki, Shigeki; Machida, Tohru and others

    1988-06-01

    A clinical phase II study with Gd-DTPA, the first contrast medium for MRI, was performed in 109 cases, a total of 114 studies mainly with brain tumor. In this study, one of the three concentrations of Gd-DTPA, 0.05 mmol/kg, 0.10 mmol/kg or 0.15 mmol/kg was used in each patient. It was elucidated that especially 0.10 and 0.15 Gd-DTPA were useful in detecting disruption or abscence of BBB and distinguishing tumor from edema. The side-effect observed was only a slight urticaria which was seen with 0.15 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Accordingly, it was estimated that the standard concentration of Gd-DTPA would be 0.10 mmol/kg. As this contrast medium was safe, and clinically useful in detecting diseases of the central nervous system, it was concluded that the shift to the clinical phase III trial is possible.

  19. Recirculation usually precedes malignant edema in middle cerebral artery infarcts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Ståhl, N; Schalén, W

    2012-01-01

    In patients with large middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarcts, maximum brain swelling leading to cerebral herniation and death usually occurs 2-5 days after onset of stroke. The study aimed at exploring the pattern of compounds related to cerebral energy metabolism in infarcted brain tissue....

  20. Subcortical cerebral infarctions in sickle cell trait.

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, M G

    1989-01-01

    At necropsy, two patients with sickle cell trait and progressive motor and visual deficits, lethargy and coma showed infarctions of the deep cerebral white matter and brain stem. The findings in these patients and another reported in the literature suggest that subcortical infarctions may be more common in sickle cell trait than has been recognised and should be suspected in any patient with sickle cell trait who presents with an unusual neurological illness.

  1. In vivo relaxation of N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine plus phosphocreatine, and choline containing compounds during the course of brain infarction: a proton MRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Henriksen, O

    1992-01-01

    the course of infarction can be explained by changes in T1 and T2 relaxation times, eight patients with acute stroke were studied. STEAM sequences with varying echo delay times and repetition times were used to measure T1 and T2 of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr) and choline...

  2. Focal cerebral ischemia induces increased myelin basic protein and growth-associated protein-43 gene transcription in peri-infarct areas in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, R; Christensen, Thomas; Lehrmann, E

    2001-01-01

    Although oligodendrocytes are vulnerable to focal cerebral ischemia, remyelination of denuded or regenerating axons in the peri-infarct area has been observed in the central nervous system. We studied the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a major component of central nervous system myelin...... messenger RNA (mRNA) had disappeared by 24 h, whereas myelin protein, identified by MBP and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunohistochemistry, appeared structurally intact until day 3. Peri-infarct oligodendrocytes increased their expression of MBP mRNA from 24 h to maximal levels at day 7...... showed that increased expression of GAP-43 mRNA in neurons was concomitant to MBP mRNA upregulation in oligodendrocytes. While the mechanisms regulating oligodendrocyte survival and myelination signals are not clear at this point, axonal sprouting could putatively serve as a stimulus for the upregulation...

  3. Cerebral hemorrhagic infarction after radiation for pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogaki, Satoko; Suzuki, Masatsune; Shimano, Hitoshi; Toyoshima, Hideo; Sone, Hirohito; Okuda, Yukichi; Yamada, Nobuhiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Suzuki, Seiji; Suzuki, Hiroaki [National Hospital Tokyo Disaster Medical Center, Tachikawa (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We report a case of cerebral hemorrhagic infarction after radiation for pituitary adenoma. A 55-year-old woman was hospitalized to check for aldosteronism, post-operative pituitary function, and recurrence of thyroid cancer. She had short-term memory disturbance beginning two months prior to admission. Brain MRI showed a T1 and T2 high intensity lesion of her left anterolateral thalamus. Brain MRA revealed a narrowing in her left middle cerebral artery. The abnormal brain lesion was diagnosed as cerebral hemorrhagic infarction. She had received radiation therapy for pituitary adenoma 20 years earlier. It was considered that her cerebral hemorrhagic infarction was caused by radiation therapy. (author)

  4. Transcortical sensory aphasia following left frontal infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, M; Soma, Y; Koyama, A; Yoshimura, N; Furukawa, H; Tsuji, S

    1998-02-01

    Two right-handed patients who exhibited language disability after left frontal infarction are described. The patients spoke fluently and exhibited excellent repetition ability from the onset of infarction without exhibiting any oral apraxia, but had deficits in auditory comprehension, naming, reading and writing. In both patients, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed infarction in the left inferior frontal gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus and the anterior part of the lower precentral gyrus. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) revealed decreased blood flow in the same regions as those shown to be infarcted by MRI. The MRI and SPECT findings and the symptoms of these patients suggest that left frontal lesions that encompass Broca's area produce fluent aphasia if the posterior part of the left precentral gyrus or motor cortex remains intact and that lesions anterior to Broca's area and the middle frontal gyrus produce a deficit in auditory comprehension of single words as well as sentences.

  5. Intestinal ischemia and infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/001151.htm Small intestinal ischemia and infarction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intestinal ischemia and infarction occurs when there is a narrowing or blockage ...

  6. Cognitive Function and Emotional Status of Middle-aged Chinese Hypertensive Patients Without Detectable White Matter Brain Lesions or Lacunar Infarctions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Heather L

    2006-01-01

    .... Executive functions, speed of processing, memory and attention are especially impacted. Hypertension may affect cognitive function because of pathological physiological changes in the brain (e.g...

  7. Classification of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lotte; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Hosbond, Susanne Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The classification of myocardial infarction into 5 types was introduced in 2007 as an important component of the universal definition. In contrast to the plaque rupture-related type 1 myocardial infarction, type 2 myocardial infarction is considered to be caused by an imbalance between demand...... and supply of oxygen in the myocardium. However, no specific criteria for type 2 myocardial infarction have been established....

  8. Bilateral cerebral hemispheric infarction associated with sildenafil citrate (Viagra) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K-K; Kim, D G; Ku, Y H; Lee, Y J; Kim, W-C; Kim, O J; Kim, H S

    2008-03-01

    Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) is one of the frequently prescribed drugs for men with erectile dysfunction. We describe a 52-year-old man with bilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarction after sildenafil use. He ingested 100 mg of sildenafil and about 1 h later, he complained of chest discomfort, palpitation and dizziness followed by mental obtundation, global aphasia and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging documented acute bilateral hemispheric infarction, and cerebral angiography showed occluded bilateral MCA. Despite significant bilateral MCA stenosis and cerebral infarction, systemic hypotension persisted for a day. We presume that cerebral infarction was caused by cardioembolism with sildenafil use.

  9. SPECT analysis of recent cerebral infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raynaud, C; Rancurel, G; Tzourio, N

    1989-01-01

    We measured regional cerebral blood flow and [123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) uptake in 16 patients with unilateral brain infarcts during the subacute period (Day 3 to Day 50) and again after 3 months. Our results show that the central and peripheral areas described earlier in the chronic period were ...

  10. Improved brain MRI indices in the acute brain stem infarct sites treated with hydroxyl radical scavengers, Edaravone and hydrogen, as compared to Edaravone alone. A non-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hirohisa; Nishijima, Yoji; Adachi, Naoto; Tachibana, Shigekuni; Chitoku, Shiroh; Mukaihara, Shigeo; Sakamoto, Masaki; Kudo, Yohei; Nakazawa, Jun; Kaneko, Kumi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2011-06-07

    In acute stage of cerebral infarction, MRI indices (rDWI & rADC) deteriorate during the first 3-7 days after the ictus and then gradually normalize in approximately 10 days (pseudonormalization time), although the tissue is already infarcted. Since effective treatments improve these indices significantly and in less than the natural pseudonormalization time, a combined analysis of these changes provides an opportunity for objective evaluation on the effectiveness of various treatments for cerebral infarction. Hydroxyl radicals are highly destructive to the tissue and aggravate cerebral infarction. We treated brainstem infarction patients in acute stage with hydroxyl radical scavengers (Edaravone and hydrogen) by intravenous administration and evaluated the effects of the treatment by a serial observation and analysis of these MRI indices. The effects of the treatment were evaluated and compared in two groups, an Edaravone alone group and a combined group with Edaravone and hydrogen, in order to assess beneficial effects of addition of hydrogen. The patients were divided in Edaravone only group (E group. 26 patients) and combined treatment group with Edaravone and hydrogen enriched saline (EH group. 8 patients). The extent of the initial hump of rDWI, the initial dip of rADC and pseudo-normalization time were determined in each patient serially and averages of these data were compared in these two groups and also with the natural course in the literatures. The initial hump of rDWI reached 2.0 in the E group which was better than 2.5 of the natural course but was not as good as 1.5 of the EH group. The initial dip of rADC was 0.6 in the E group which was close to the natural course but worse than 0.8 of the EH group. Pseudonormalization time of rDWI and rADC was 9 days only in EH group but longer in other groups. Addition of hydrogen caused no side effects. Administration of hydroxyl radical scavengers in acute stage of brainstem infarction improved MRI indices

  11. Improved brain MRI indices in the acute brain stem infarct sites treated with hydroxyl radical scavengers, Edaravone and hydrogen, as compared to Edaravone alone. A non-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono Hirohisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In acute stage of cerebral infarction, MRI indices (rDWI & rADC deteriorate during the first 3-7 days after the ictus and then gradually normalize in approximately 10 days (pseudonormalization time, although the tissue is already infarcted. Since effective treatments improve these indices significantly and in less than the natural pseudonormalization time, a combined analysis of these changes provides an opportunity for objective evaluation on the effectiveness of various treatments for cerebral infarction. Hydroxyl radicals are highly destructive to the tissue and aggravate cerebral infarction. We treated brainstem infarction patients in acute stage with hydroxyl radical scavengers (Edaravone and hydrogen by intravenous administration and evaluated the effects of the treatment by a serial observation and analysis of these MRI indices. The effects of the treatment were evaluated and compared in two groups, an Edaravone alone group and a combined group with Edaravone and hydrogen, in order to assess beneficial effects of addition of hydrogen. Methods The patients were divided in Edaravone only group (E group. 26 patients and combined treatment group with Edaravone and hydrogen enriched saline (EH group. 8 patients. The extent of the initial hump of rDWI, the initial dip of rADC and pseudo-normalization time were determined in each patient serially and averages of these data were compared in these two groups and also with the natural course in the literatures. Results The initial hump of rDWI reached 2.0 in the E group which was better than 2.5 of the natural course but was not as good as 1.5 of the EH group. The initial dip of rADC was 0.6 in the E group which was close to the natural course but worse than 0.8 of the EH group. Pseudonormalization time of rDWI and rADC was 9 days only in EH group but longer in other groups. Addition of hydrogen caused no side effects. Conclusions Administration of hydroxyl radical scavengers in

  12. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals.

  13. Cervical spinal cord infarction after cervical spine decompressive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Samuel; Fakhran, Saeed; Dean, Bruce; Ross, Jeffrey; Porter, Randall W; Kakarla, Udaya K; Ruggieri, Paul; Theodore, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    To report five patients who underwent cervical decompressive surgeries and developed persistent postoperative neurologic deficits compatible with spinal cord infarctions and evaluate causes for these rare complications. The clinical courses and imaging studies of five patients were retrospectively analyzed. Imaging findings, types of surgeries, vascular compromise or risk factors, hypotensive episodes, intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials, concomitant brain infarctions, and clinical degree and radiographic extent of spinal cord infarction were studied. The presence of spinal cord infarction was determined by clinical course and imaging evaluation. All five patients had antecedent cervical cord region vascular compromise or generalized vascular risk factors. Four patients developed hypotensive episodes, two intraoperatively and two postoperatively. None of the four patients with hypotensive episodes had imaging or clinical evidence of concomitant brain infarctions. Neuroimaging evaluation of spinal cord infarction after decompressive surgery is done to exclude spinal cord compression, to ensure adequate surgical decompression, and to confirm infarction by imaging. Antecedent, unrecognized preoperative vascular compromise may be a significant contributor to spinal cord infarction by itself or in combination with hypotension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  15. Acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Grant W; Rossi, Jeffrey E; Cannon, Christopher P

    2017-01-14

    Acute myocardial infarction has traditionally been divided into ST elevation or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction; however, therapies are similar between the two, and the overall management of acute myocardial infarction can be reviewed for simplicity. Acute myocardial infarction remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite substantial improvements in prognosis over the past decade. The progress is a result of several major trends, including improvements in risk stratification, more widespread use of an invasive strategy, implementation of care delivery systems prioritising immediate revascularisation through percutaneous coronary intervention (or fibrinolysis), advances in antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and greater use of secondary prevention strategies such as statins. This seminar discusses the important topics of the pathophysiology, epidemiological trends, and modern management of acute myocardial infarction, focusing on the recent advances in reperfusion strategies and pharmacological treatment approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral infarctions due to CNS infection with Enterobacter sakazakii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, P.G. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Pediatrics Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (USA)); Ball, W.S. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Radiology Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Recent reports have implicated Enterobacter sakazakii, a gram-negative enteric bacillus, in neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Cases of severe central nervous system involvement, including ventriculitis, brain abscess, infarction, and cyst formation, have been described. We present serial head CT findings in a case of neonatal E. sakazakii meningitis complicated by a ring enhancing cerebral infarction which mimicked abscess formation. In meningitis secondary to this agent, a recognized pattern of cerebral hypodensity with or without cystic degeneration late in the course of the infection is likely to represent cerebral infarction rather than an abscess especially if there is a lack of culture evidence of a bacterial infection. (orig.).

  17. Infarct fogging on immediate postinterventional CT - a not infrequent occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekeyzer, Sven [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw (OLV) Ziekenhuis Aalst, Department of Medical Imaging, Aalst (Belgium); RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Reich, Arno [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Othman, Ahmed E. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiesmann, Martin; Nikoubashman, Omid [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    A pseudo-normalization of infarcted brain parenchyma, similar to the ''fogging effect'' which usually occurs after 2-3 weeks, can be observed on CT performed immediately after endovascular stroke treatment (EST). Goal of this study was to analyze the incidence of this phenomenon and its evolution on follow-up imaging. One hundred fifty-two patients in our database of 949 patients, who were treated for acute stroke between January 2010 and January 2015, fulfilled the inclusion criteria of (a) EST for an acute stroke in the anterior circulation, (b) an ASPECT-score < 10 on pre-interventional CT, and (c) postinterventional CT imaging within 4.5 h after the procedure. Two independent reviewers analyzed imaging data of these patients. Transformation of brain areas from hypoattenuated on pre-interventional CT to isodense on postinterventional CT was seen in 37 patients in a total of 49 ASPECTS areas (Cohen's kappa 0.819; p < 0.001). In 17 patients, the previously hypoattenuated brain areas became isodense, but appeared swollen. In 20 patients (13%), the previously hypodense brain area could not be distinguished from normal brain parenchyma. On follow-up imaging, all isodense brain areas showed signs of infarction. Pseudo-normalization of infarct hypoattenuation on postinterventional CT is not infrequent. It is most likely caused by contrast leakage in infarcted parenchyma and does not represent salvage of ischemic brain parenchyma. (orig.)

  18. Omental Infarction Mimicking Cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Smolilo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omental infarction can be difficult to diagnose preoperatively as imaging may be inconclusive and patients often present in a way that suggests a more common surgical pathology such as appendicitis. Here, a 40-year-old Caucasian man presented to casualty with shortness of breath and progressive right upper abdominal pain, accompanied with right shoulder and neck pain. Exploratory laparoscopy was eventually utilised to diagnose an atypical form of omental infarction that mimics cholecystitis. The vascular supply along the long axis of the segment was occluded initiating necrosis. In this case, the necrotic segment was adherent with the abdominal wall, a pathology not commonly reported in cases of omental infarction.

  19. Myocardial infarct expansion, infarct extension, and reinfarction: pathophysiologic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, H F; Healy, B

    1987-01-01

    Infarct expansion and infarct extension are events early in the course of myocardial infarction with serious short- and long-term consequences. Infarct expansion, disproportionate thinning, and dilatation of the infarct segment probably begin within hours of acute infarction and usually reach peak extent within seven to 14 days. Clinical data suggest that infarct expansion occurs in approximately 35% to 45% of anterior transmural myocardial infarctions and to a lesser extent in infarctions at other sites. Although expansion usually develops in large infarcts, the extent of transmural necrosis rather than absolute infarct size predicts its occurrence. Expansion has an adverse effect on infarct structure and function for several reasons. Functional infarct size is increased because of infarct segment lengthening, and expansion results in over-all ventricular dilatation. Thus, patients with expansion of an infarct have poorer exercise tolerance, more congestive heart failure symptoms, and greater early and late mortality than those without expansion. Infarct rupture and late aneurysm formation are two additional structural consequences of infarct expansion. Experimental and clinical data suggest that the incidence and severity of expansion can be modified by interventions. Increased ventricular loading conditions and steroidal and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents make expansion more severe. Reperfusion of the infarct segment and pharmacologic interventions that decrease ventricular afterload lessen the severity of expansion. Previous myocardial infarction and preexisting ventricular hypertrophy may also limit the development of infarct expansion. Infarct extension is defined clinically as early in-hospital reinfarction after a myocardial infarction. The pathologic finding of infarct extension is necrotic and healing myocardium of several different recent ages within the same vascular territory. Although this pathologic criterion usually cannot be verified, studies

  20. Hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD in subacute cortical infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Kweon, Sun Uck; Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    It has been known that hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD (HF) is not shown in subacute cerebral infarction because the brain distribution of Tc-99m ECD reflects not only perfusion but also the metabolic status of brain tissue. However, we observed several cases with HF in the subacute pure cortical infarction. To find out the cause of HF in subacute cortical infarction. We assessed the difference in associated cerebral hemodynamics and clinical findings between the subacute cortical infarctions with and without HF. We reviewed 16 patients (63.8{+-}8.6 yr, M/F: 15/1) with pure cortical infarction not involving adjacent subcortical white matter on MRI. All patients underwent acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD and MRI at subacute period (7.3{+-}4.4 days from ictus). Uptake of Tc-99m ECD in infarcted cortex was assessed visually comparing the contralateral side. To assess the difference in associate clinical findings between the infarctions with and without HF, rCVR of the cerebral territory including infarcted cortex, extent of Gd-enhancement on MRI. Intervals between SPECT and ictus, and the presence of associated ICA stenosis were evaluated. Infarctions were focal (n=8) or multifocal (n=8) and located in frontoparietal cortices on MRI. Twelve patients were accompanied with ipsilateral ICA stenosis. Resting SPECT showed increased cortical uptake (=HF) in 7 patients and decreased in 9. rCVR of the MCA territory was preserved in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with 4 of the 9 patients without HF (p=0.03). Gd-enhancement was minimal in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with of the 0 patients without HF (p=0.03). Presence of ipsilateral ICA stenosis and intervals from ictus were not different (p>0.1) Subacute cerebral cortical infarction with HF was more frequently associated with preserved rCVR and minimal destruction of the blood-brain barrier than that without HF. Our findings suggest that HF may result from luxury perfusion of

  1. Digital subtraction angiography in cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sin Young; Kim, Ji Hun; Suh, Hong Kil; Kim, Hyo Heon; Kwack, Eun Young; Lee, Il Seong [College of Medicine Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    The usefulness and radiographic findings of the angiography in cerebral infarction are well known. We attempted to evaluate the angiographic causes, findings, and the usefulness of DSA in cerebral infarction. The authors reviewed retrospectively DSA images of 51 patients who were diagnosed as having cerebral infarction by brain CT and/or MRI and clinical settings. DSA was performed in all 51 patients, and in 3 patients, conventional angiogram was also done. Both carotid DSA images were obtained in AP, lateral, oblique projections, and one or both vertebral DSA images in AP and lateral. The authors reviewed the patient's charts for symptoms, operative findings and final diagnosis, and analysed DSA findings of cerebral atherosclerosis with focus on 6 major cerebral arteries. Among the 51 patients of cerebral infarction 43 patients (84.3%) had cerebral atherosclerosis, 1 dissecting aneurysm, 1 moyamoya disease and 6 negative in angiogram. DSA findings of cerebral atherosclerosis were multiple narrowing in 42 patients (97.7%), tortuosity in 22 (51.2%), dilatation in 14, occlusion in 12, avascular region in 8, collaterals in 7, ulcer in 6, and delayed washout of contrast media in 3. In cerebral atherosclerosis, internal carotid artery was involved in 37 patients (86.0%), middle cerebral artery in 29 (67.4%) posterior cerebral artery in 28, anterior cerebral artery in 26, vertebral artery in 22, and basilar artery in 15. Intracranial involvement of cerebral atherosclerosis (64.9%) was more common than extracranial involvement (16.2%). In cerebral infarction MRA may be the screening test, but for more precise evaluation of vascular abnormality and its extent, DSA should be considered.

  2. Scintigraphic findings in myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemichen, C.; Krause, T.

    1988-09-01

    Radioisotope studies are currently used mainly to assess the individual risk before and after myocardial infarction (MI). Scintigraphy will be used increasingly to diagnose and localize acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to measure the infarct size and to detect reperfusion, whether spontaneous or after lysis, in the infarct area. High sensitivity and specificity are obtained by using tomographic imaging modalities and by the combined and simultaneous use of markers for perfusion and necrosis. This technique allows recognition even of nontransmural infarctions, involvement of the right ventricle, subendocardial necroses, and ischemic injuries in unstable angina pectoris.

  3. Imaging of cerebral infarction caused by atrial myxoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, G.T. (Neuroradology Section, Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)); Bazan, C. III (Neuroradology Section, Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)); Jinkins, J.R. (Neuroradology Section, Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1994-05-01

    We describe the radiologic investigation of two patients with primary left atrial myxoma who presented with embolic manifestations in the brain. MRI and CT showed multiple infarcts, while the cardiac atrial mass was demonstrated in one of the patients by MRI and in both by echocardiography. (orig.)

  4. Dotlike hemosiderin spots are associated with past hemorrhagic strokes in patients with lacunar infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Toshio; Honma, Toshimi; Horita, Yoshifumi; Iihoshi, Satoshi; Nomura, Tatsufumi; Yoshifuji, Kazuhisa; Niwa, Jun

    2005-04-01

    Dotlike hemosiderin spots ongradient-echo T2(*)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain have been histologically diagnosed as old microbleeds associated with small vessel disease (SVD). The authors hypothesize that the presence of many dotHSs may be correlated with the fragility of small vessels and the recurrence of SVD, including lacunar infarction and deep intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). To investigate how dotHSs are related to past history of SVD, the number of subcortical or deep dotHSs was investigated in 146 patients with lacunar infarctions (95 men, 51 women, age 38 to 90 [66.6+/-9.4] years). They were divided into 2 subgroups according to history of deep ICHs or lacunar infarctions. The odds ratio (OR) for past history was estimated from logistic regression analyses with the number of subcortical or deep dotHSs as well as other factors. Of 146 patients with lacunar infarctions, 11 had past symptomatic ICHs and 19 had past symptomatic lacunar infarctions. An elevated rate of history of ICH was found for lacunar infarction patients with many deep dotHSs (>or=3; OR, 9.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-51, P=.015). However, history of lacunar infarction was not significantly associated with the number of subcortical or deep dotHSs. Our findings suggest that many deep dotHSs on T2(*)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may be correlated with deep ICH-lacunar infarction type of SVD recurrence but not lacunar infarction-lacunar infarction type.

  5. Predisposing factors in posterior circulation infarcts: a vascular morphological assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coban, Goekcen; Cifci, Egemen; Yildirim, Erkan; Agildere, Ahmet Muhtesem [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya (Turkey)

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the effect of shape, diameter, elongation and deviation criteria of basilar artery (BA), convergence angle and diameter variations of vertebral arteries, and concurrent chronic diseases on posterior circulation infarcts. Between January 2010 and May 2013, 186 patients who underwent brain and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with suspected cerebrovascular accident and were diagnosed with posterior circulation infarct and 120 infarct negative control subjects were included in this case-control retrospective study. Vertebral artery (VA) and BA diameter, right (R) and left (L) VA angles at the level of bifurcation, and BA elongation-deviation, and shape of BA were assessed in a total of 306 subjects. Ischemic lesions in the posterior circulation were classified according to their anatomical location and vascular perfusion areas. No significant difference was noted between the control and patient groups with respect to BA diameter (p = 0.676). The most effective risk factors for posterior circulation infarcts were as follows: BA elongation of 2 or 3, BA transverse location of 2 or 3, increase in left VA angle, and history of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus. Our results suggest that prominent elongation and deviation, C and J shape of BA, and increased L VA angle may be the predictors of at-risk patients in posterior circulation infarcts. Reporting marked morphological BA and VA variations detected at routine brain MRI will aid in selection of patients. Timely detection and treatment of at-risk patients may be life-saving. (orig.)

  6. [Migrainous infarct in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuá, J L; Calles, C

    We present the case of a migrainous patient who had a cerebral infarct during a migrainous crisis. She was 26 weeks pregnant. The infarct, detected on MRI was in the right thalamic region. It presented as left hemiparesia and left hemi-hypo-estesia. Laboratory tests were normal. There was full recovery from the episode. Migraine is considered to be a risk factor per se for stroke, especially in young women. The association of migrainous ictus, which is a diagnosis by exclusion of other aetiologies, and pregnancy is rare, as is apparent on review of the subject. In the Western world, pregnancy is not considered to be a risk factor for ictus. The functional prognosis of migrainous stroke is good, with minimal risk of relapse.

  7. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-03

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors.

  8. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in Posterior Circulation Infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of blood brain barrier injury in posterior circulation infarction as demonstrated by the hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM on fluid attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR.From a MRI report database we identified patients with posterior circulation infarction who underwent MRI, including perfusion-weighted images (PWI, within 12 hours after onset and follow-up MRI within 24 hours and analyzed diffusion-weighted images (DWI, PWI, FLAIR, and MR angiography (MRA. On FLAIR images, the presence of HARM was noted by using pre-specified criteria (focal enhancement in the subarachnoid space and/or the ventricles.Overall 16 patients (median age of patients 68.5 (IQR 55.5-82.75 years with posterior circulation infarction were included. Of these, 13 (81.3% demonstrated PCA occlusion, and 3 (18.7% patients BA occlusion on MRA. Initial DWI demonstrated ischemic lesions in the thalamus (68.8%, splenium (18.8%, hippocampus (75%, occipital lobe (81.3%, mesencephalon (18.8%, pons (18.8%, and cerebellum (50%. On follow-up MRA recanalization was noted in 10 (62.5% patients. On follow-up FLAIR images, HARM was observed in 8 (50% patients. In all of these, HARM was detected remote from the acute ischemic lesion. HARM was more frequently observed in patients with vessel recanalization (p = 0.04, minor infarction growth (p = 0.01, and smaller ischemic lesions on follow-up DWI (p = 0.05.HARM is a frequent finding in posterior circulation infarction and associated with vessel recanalization, minor infarction growth as well as smaller infarction volumes in the course. Neuroradiologists should be cognizant of the fact that HARM may be present on short interval follow-up FLAIR images in patients with acute ischemic infarction who initially underwent MRI and received intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents.

  9. [Bonsai induced acute myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Hüseyin; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Süygün, Hakan; Durmaz, Tahir

    2014-09-01

    Incidences of drug abuse and cannabis have increased in young adults, recently. Cannabis induced myocardial infarction has rarely been reported in these people. There is no any literature about a synthetic cannabinoid, being recently most popular Bonsai, to cause myocardial infarction. In this case report we presented a 33-year-old male patient who developed acute myocardial infarction after taking high doses of Bonsai.

  10. Myocardial infarction and cerebral infarction in a Danish suburban community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngborg, K; Marquardsen, J; Trautner, F

    1985-01-01

    A comparison was made of 485 cases of cerebral infarction (CI), registered prospectively in Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, with 495 cases of myocardial infarction (AMI), recorded retrospectively in the same population. The overall annual incidence of AMI was 6.5 per 1,000 population for males, 3...

  11. Renal infarct following varicella infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Arora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal infarction usually occurs against a background of heart disease or a thromboembolic tendency and rarely is associated with infections. Here we present a case of a young boy who reported with painless gross hematuria following primary Varicella infection and was found to have an isolated renal infarct.

  12. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, T.J.P., E-mail: timothyjpbray@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); Mortensen, K.H., E-mail: mortensen@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); University Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Box 318, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D., E-mail: deepa.gopalan@btopenworld.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis.

  13. Cerebral infarction in autopsies of chagasic patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Aras

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of encephalic infarction and its contribution to lethality in patients with Chagas' disease and heart failure. METHODS: Medical records and autopsy reports of patients with Chagas' disease complicated by heart failure, who died at the Professor Edgar Santos Hospital of the Federal University of Bahia in the past 45 years were retrospectively analyzed. Data comprised information regarding the clinical history on hospital admission, complementary and anatomicopathological examinations, including the presence of encephalic infarction, the impaired region, and the cause of death. RESULTS: Of the 5,447 autopsies performed, 524 were in patients with heart failure due to Chagas' disease. The mean age was 45.7 years, and 51 (63% patients were of the male sex. The frequency of encephalic infarction was 17.5%, corresponding to 92 events in 92 individuals, 82 (15.8% of which involved the brain, 8 (1.5% involved the cerebellum, and 2 (0.4% involved the hypophysis. CONCLUSION: Cerebral infarction has been a frequent finding in autopsies of chagasic patients with heart failure, and it has been an important cause of death in our region. The presence of cerebral infarction and its complications have been associated with death in 52% of the cases studied.

  14. Isolated Hypoglossal Paralysis Caused by Ischemic Infarction in the Centrum Semiovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Nakazato, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Naotoshi; Araki, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Toshimasa

    2017-08-01

    In the present report, we discuss the case of a 66-year-old woman with isolated unilateral hypoglossal paralysis due to cerebral infarction in the centrum semiovale. To date, it has hardly been discussed where the corticolingual tract passes through in the centrum semiovale. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a small ischemic infarction in the contralateral centrum semiovale. We could demonstrate a route of the corticolingual tract. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Auditory extinction and dichotic listening cv task in cerebral infarction preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Muszkat

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Six stroke patients were studied using a dichotic listening¹ CV task, 4 with left hemisphere infarction, 2 with right hemisphere infarction. It was observed a «lesion--effect», a shift of hemisphere prevalence to the side opposite a brain lesion. The authors suggest that the lesion-effect can be explained by the auditory extinction phenomenon at the linguistic level.

  16. Depression following myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe life event that is accompanied by an increased risk of depression. Mounting evidence suggests that post-MI depression is associated with adverse outcomes, but the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear, and no previous studies have examined...... whether the mental burden of MI is so heavy that it increases the risk of suicide. Although post-MI depression is common and burdensome, the condition remains under-recognised and under-treated. The development of new strategies to improve the quality of care for people with post-MI depression requires...... thorough understanding of the mechanisms that influence the prognosis as well as knowledge of the present care provided. The purpose of this PhD thesis is accordingly subdivided into four specific aims: 1. To estimate the prevalence of depression in people with MI after three months, and to estimate...

  17. Research article: clinical characteristics of isolated anterior cerebral artery territory infarction due to arterial dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Yuito; Fukuoka, Takuya; Hayashi, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Deguchi, Ichiro; Maruyama, Hajime; Horiuchi, Yohsuke; Sano, Hiroyasu; Mizuno, Satoko; Tanahashi, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Isolated brain infarction in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory is rare, and its etiology has not yet been fully elucidated. Thus, we aimed to determine the etiologic and clinical characteristics of patients with isolated ACA territory infarction due to arterial dissection. Of 2315 patients with acute cerebral infarction admitted to our hospital between April 2007 and September 2013, 34 patients (1.5%; 28 men, 6 women; mean age, 65 ± 15 years) suffered isolated ACA territory infarction. We performed cranial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR angiography for all the patients. Whenever possible, we also performed 3-dimensional computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography, and MR cisternography to diagnose the stroke subtype. The stroke subtypes of the 34 patients with isolated ACA territory infarction were atherothrombotic infarction, cardioembolic infarction, arterial dissection, and unclassified in 11 patients (32%), 11 patients (32%), 11 patients (32%), and 1 patient (3%), respectively. The mean ages at onset were 48 ± 9 and 72 ± 11 years in the dissection and nondissection groups, respectively (P territory infarction demonstrated a relatively high frequency of dissection (32%). Patients with dissection were younger, had a higher frequency of headaches, and demonstrated more favorable prognoses than patients without dissection. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of infarction development after endovascular stroke therapy with dual-energy computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurdjevic, Tanja; Gizewski, Elke Ruth; Grams, Astrid Ellen [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Rehwald, Rafael; Glodny, Bernhard [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Knoflach, Michael; Matosevic, Benjamin; Kiechl, Stefan [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    After intraarterial recanalisation (IAR), the haemorrhage and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption can be distinguished using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether future infarction development can be predicted from DECT. DECT scans of 20 patients showing 45 BBB disrupted areas after IAR were assessed and compared with follow-up examinations. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses using densities from the iodine map (IM) and virtual non-contrast (VNC) were performed. Future infarction areas are denser than future non-infarction areas on IM series (23.44 ± 24.86 vs. 5.77 ± 2.77; p < 0.0001) and more hypodense on VNC series (29.71 ± 3.33 vs. 35.33 ± 3.50; p < 0.0001). ROC analyses for the IM series showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.99 (cut-off: <9.97 HU; p < 0.05; sensitivity 91.18 %; specificity 100.00 %; accuracy 0.93) for the prediction of future infarctions. The AUC for the prediction of haemorrhagic infarctions was 0.78 (cut-off >17.13 HU; p < 0.05; sensitivity 90.00 %; specificity 62.86 %; accuracy 0.69). The VNC series allowed prediction of infarction volume. Future infarction development after IAR can be reliably predicted with the IM series. The prediction of haemorrhages and of infarction size is less reliable. (orig.)

  19. Biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chan, Daniel; Ng, Leong L

    2010-01-01

    .... Biomarkers have been used to assist with timely diagnosis, while an increasing number of novel markers have been identified to predict outcome following an acute myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome...

  20. Rapid and long-term induction of effector immediate early genes (BDNF, Neuritin and Arc) in peri-infarct cortex and dentate gyrus after ischemic injury in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Teilum, Maria; Wieloch, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    The genomic response following brain ischemia is very complex and involves activation of both protective and detrimental signaling pathways. Immediate early genes (IEGs) represent the first wave of gene expression following ischemia and are induced in extensive regions of the ischemic brain...... including cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Neuritin and Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) belong to a subgroup of immediate early genes implicated in synaptic plasticity known as effector immediate early genes. Here, we investigated...... at 0-6 h of reperfusion for Neuritin and 0-12 h of reperfusion for Arc while BDNF was induced 0-9 h of reperfusion. Our study demonstrates a rapid and long-term activation of effector immediate early genes in distinct brain areas following ischemic injury in rat. Effector gene activation may be part...

  1. Comparison of the prognostic potential of biomechanic stress markers - circulating stromelysin-1, matrix metalloprteinase-9 and N-terminal fragment of brain natriuretic peptide in patients with acute Q-wave myocardial infarction. Results of cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Samura

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 85 patients after documented Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI were observed. Echocardiography was performed and circulating levels of such biomarkers as MMP-3, MMP-9 and NT-pro-BNP were detected on the day of hospitalization and diagnosis of acute IM, on 21 and 60 days after onset of acute MI. The analysis of revealed data has shown that increase of MMP-3 and MMP-9 above optimal cut-point (9.7 ng/ml and 18.1 ng/ml respectively was closely associated with up of 1-year cardiovascular mortality risk in patients after Q-MI. Used in prognostic model analysis of content of circulating MMP-3 and MMP-9 is corelated with increase of positive prognostic value of both of them rising up to 70% (prognostic sensitivity and specify are 84% and 82% respectively.

  2. Pseudoperipheral palsy: a case of subcortical infarction imitating peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusufovic, Mirza; Lygren, Astrid; Aamodt, Anne Hege; Nedregaard, Bård; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-08-25

    Vascular damage in the central hand knob area can mimic peripheral motor nerve deficits. We describe the case of a woman presenting with apparent peripheral neuropathy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography angiography revealed an infarct in the precentral hand knob area, with significant stenosis in the right proximal middle cerebral artery trunk. Subsequent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the brain suggested cerebral angiitis. The patient experienced improved hand function following combined glucocorticoid and cyclophosphamide treatment. Vascular damage in the hand knob area should be considered when evaluating peripheral motor nerve deficits in the presence of normal nerve conduction velocities. The diagnosis of cerebral angiitis remains a major challenge for clinicians.

  3. Superficial vein thrombosis with hemorrhagic cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-wei CONG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Cerebral superficial vein thrombosis was rare and often misdiagnosed or missed for its various etiological factors, and complicated and nonspecific clinical manifestations. This paper reported one case of superficial vein thrombosis in right fronto-parietal lobe with hemorrhagic infarction. The anatomy of superficial vein, pathophysiological points, diagnosis and treatment of superficial vein thrombosis were reviewed to help to reduce missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. Methods and Results A 18-year-old male patient had suffered from progressive headache for 4 years and weakness of left limbs for 2 d. Head MRI showed circular space-occupying lesion in right fronto-parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance venography (MRV examination showed the front two-thirds of the superior sagittal sinus was not clear. The lesions were removed and decompressive craniectomy was conducted, showing the brain tissue was pale, partly yellow or dark red, and superficial venous engorgement. Histological observation showed pial superficial vein thrombosis and subpial encephalomalacia, and multifocal hemorrhage of cerebral cortex and local parenchymal hemorrhage. A large number of "grid cells" and vascular "cuff" phenomenan were visible in surrounding tissue, and the parenchymal blood vessel proliferation was obvious. Left hand activity of the patient was obviously limited after the operation. Conclusions Clinical diagnosis of superficial vein thrombosis with hemorrhagic infarction is difficult, and brain imaging and serological examination can provide certain help. Much attention should be paid to the multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment to reduce misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis, and gather clinical experience. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.01.007

  4. Correlating interleukin-10 promoter gene polymorphisms with human cerebral infarction onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-hong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that interleukin-10 (IL-10 deficiency exacerbates inflammation and worsens the outcome of brain ischemia. In view of the critical role of the single nucleotide polymorphic sites -1082 (A/G and -819 (C/T in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene, we hypothesized that they are associated with cerebral infarction morbidity in the Chinese Han population. We genotyped these allelic gene polymorphisms by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction methods in 181 patients with cerebral infarction (cerebral infarction group and 115 healthy subjects (control group. We identified significant differences in genotype distribution and allele frequency of the IL-10-1082 A/G allele between cerebral infarction and control groups (χ2 = 6.643, P = 0.010. The IL-10-1082 A allele frequency was significantly higher in the cerebral infarction group (92.3% than in the control group (86.1% (P = 0.015. Moreover, cerebral infarction risk of the AA genotype was 2-fold higher than with the AG genotype (OR = 2.031, 95%CI: 1.134-3.637. In addition, AA genotype together with hypertension was the independent risk factor of cerebral infarction (OR = 2.073, 95%CI: 1.278-3.364. No statistical difference in genotype distribution or allele frequency of IL-10-819 C/T was found between cerebral infarction and control groups (P > 0.05. These findings suggest that the IL-10-1082 A/G gene polymorphism is involved in cerebral infarction, and increased A allele frequency is closely associated with occurrence of cerebral infarction.

  5. Acute Amnesia due to Isolated Mammillary Body Infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuluru, Krishna; Filippi, Christopher G; Lignelli, Angela

    2015-10-01

    There are limited reports describing acute amnesia after mammillothalamic tract infarction. Furthermore, acute infarction isolated to the mammillary body has never been reported. We present the first case of anterograde amnesia after isolated acute infarction of the mammillary body in a patient without concurrent or prior thalamic or mammillothalamic tract injury. A retrospective review of the patient's electronic medical record including inpatient notes and all radiological examinations was performed. A 50-year-old woman presented with acute onset of confusion and constant repetition of the same questions. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain showed isolated acute infarct of the left mammillary body without concurrent abnormality of the thalamus or mammillothalamic tract. MR angiography showed severe stenosis of the proximal posterior cerebral artery at the origin of the perforating mammillary artery. Isolated injury to the mammillary body is rare. In addition to recognized memory-related structures such as the thalamus and mammillothalamic tract, mammillary body injury may also play a role in memory dysfunction. Knowledge of the vascular supply of memory-related structures is important in diagnosing and understanding memory dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Volumetric Integral Phase-shift Spectroscopy for Noninvasive Detection of Hemispheric Bioimpedance Asymmetry in Acute Brain Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    Stroke; Stroke, Acute; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhage; Clot (Blood); Brain; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Hemorrhage; Cerebral Stroke; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Intracerebral Injury

  7. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  8. [Incomplete Gerstmann syndrome with a cerebral infarct in the left middle frontal gyrus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoshihito; Sawada, Mikio; Morita, Mitsuya; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Nakano, Imaharu

    2009-09-01

    A 65-year-old right-handed man noted a sudden onset of numbness and weakness of the right hand. On the initial visit to our hospital, he showed severe acalculia, and transient agraphia (so called incomplete Gerstmann syndrome) and transcortical sensory aphasia. Brain MRI revealed a fresh infarct in the left middle frontal gyrus. The paragraphia and aphasia improved within 14 days after onset, but the acalculia persisted even at seven months after onset In an 123I-IMP SPECT study, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) was found to be decreased in the infarction lesion and its adjacent wide area, the ipsilateral angular and supramarginal gyri, and contralateral cerebellar hemisphere. We speculate that inactivation in the infarction lesion caused the CBF decrease in the non-infarcted areas due to diaschisis. This case indicates that Gerstmann syndrome can be caused by not only dysfunction of the angular gyrus but also of the left middle frontal gyrus in the dominant hemisphere.

  9. Myocardial infarction in children: Two interesting cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryawanshi Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction in children is extremely rare and can have various etiologies. The following two case reports highlight rare but important causes of myocardial infarction in children.

  10. Is enhanced MRI helpful in brainstem infarction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y. M.; Shin, G. H.; Choi, W. S. [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To determine the role of MR contrast enhancement in evaluating time course of brainstem infarction. MR imaging with IV administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine was retrospectively reviewed in 43 patients with clinically and radiologically documented brainstem infarctions. The pattern of infarction was classified into spotty and patchy. Presence of parenchymal enhancement in infarction was evaluated. By location, there were 34 pontine, 3 midbrain, 6 medullary infarctions. The age of the infarctions ranged from 1 day to 9 months, with 5 patients scanned within 3 days and 10 scanned within 2 weeks of clinical ictus. Abnormalities on T2-weighted images were encountered in every case, with spotty pattern in 14 cases and patchy pattern in 29 cases. Parenchymal contrast enhancement was seen in 9 cases(20%), primarily occurring between days 8 and 20. MR contrast enhancement in brainstem infarction was infrequent that it may not be useful in the estimation of the age of infarction.

  11. Renal infarction complicating fibromuscular dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavalas, M; Meisner, R; Labropoulos, N; Gasparis, A; Tassiopoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease that most commonly affects the renal and extracranial carotid arteries. We present 3 cases of renal infarction complicating renal artery FMD in 42-, 43-, and 46-year-old females and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic. In our patients, oral anticoagulation therapy was used to treat all cases of infarction, and percutaneous angioplasty was used nonemergently in one case to treat refractory hypertension. All patients remained stable at 1-year follow-up. This is consistent with outcomes in previously published reports where conservative medical management was comparable to surgical and interventional therapies. Demographic differences may also exist in patients with renal infarction and FMD. A higher prevalence of males and a younger age at presentation have been found in these patients when compared to the general population with FMD. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Clinical, MRI and perfusion SPECT findings in strategic infarct dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Woo [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Strategic infarct dementia (SID) is characterized by focal ischemic lesions involving specific sites that are critical for higher cortical functions. The mechanism of SID are not well understood. We evaluate lesion sites, neuropsychiatric symptoms, brain perfusion SPECT and neuropsychological findings in patients with SID. Eleven patients with SID according to NINDS-AIREN criteria for vascular dementia were included. All patients performed brain MR and MRA, Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT. Various sites were responsible for SID; thalamus(n=3), medial temporal lobe(n=3), medial frontal lobe(n=1), genu of internal capsule(n=1), caudate nucleus(n=1), angular gyrus(n=1) and temporooccipital lobe(n=1). The most common neuropsychiatric symptoms were apathy and indifference by K-NPI. Brain perfusion SPECT revealed ipsilateral cortical hypoperfusion, mainly in frontal and temporal lobe area, in patients with subcortical strategic infarct. On neuropsychological assessment, cognitive deficits on attention and frontal executive function were prominent. The thalamus and medial temporal lobe were the most common sites responsible for SID. It was suggested that strategic disruption of frontal-subcortical circuit be an important role to produce SID in patients with subcortical strategic lesions.

  13. A large left atrial myxoma causing multiple cerebral infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Saba; Edmunds, Eiry; Raybould, Adrian

    2013-11-27

    A 52-year-old man presented with a history of sudden onset diplopia. On neurological examination, the only abnormality was a right-sided oculomotor (third nerve) palsy. A brain CT was performed and reported as showing no abnormality. He was discharged to be investigated as an outpatient. He presented 1 month later with a new expressive dysphasia and confusional state. MRI was performed which revealed multiple cerebral infarcts. He was discharged on secondary stroke prevention medication. Six months elapsed, before a transthoracic echocardiogram was performed. This showed a large left atrial myxoma. The patient underwent an emergency resection and made a good postoperative recovery. This case report showed the importance of considering a cardiogenic source of emboli in patients who present with cerebral infarcts. Performing echocardiography early will help to detect treatable conditions such as atrial myxoma, and prevent further complications.

  14. The Artery of Percheron Infarction after Coronary Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham Mazek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary angiography is the golden choice for coronary artery disease evaluation and management. However, as with any invasive procedures, there is a risk of complications. We are reporting a case of 69-year-old male with past medical history of cardiac bypass surgery, CHF, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia who was admitted to the hospital to evaluate his chest pain. He had treadmill stress test that showed ischemic induced exercise. Patient underwent coronary angiography that showed proximal complete occlusion of the RCA with a patent graft. At the end of the procedure, the patient did not wake up and remained minimally responsive. An urgent brain MRI was ordered and showed infarctions consistent with an artery of Percheron infarction. Later, patient has improved slowly and was discharged home. We briefly here discuss this rare complication including the risk factor, clinical presentation, and the management.

  15. Perceived stress in myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Suzanne V.; Smolderen, K.G.E.; Buchanan, Donna M.; Li, Yan; Spertus, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine the association of chronic stress with long-term adverse outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (AMI).BackgroundChronic stress has been shown to be associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and, in the case of particular types of stress

  16. Neonatal Myocardial Infarction or Myocarditis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vetten, Leanne; Bergman, Klasien A.; Elzenga, Nynke J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Timmer, Albertus; Bartelds, Beatrijs

    We report a 29 week-gestation preterm infant who presented during his second week of life with cardiogenic shock. Clinical presentation and first diagnostics suggested myocardial infarction, but echocardiographic features during follow-up pointed to a diagnosis of enteroviral myocarditis. The child

  17. Cecal infarction in neonatal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaska, John M; Moeller, Robert B; Blanchard, Patricia C; Aly, Sharif S

    2017-03-01

    Cecal infarction is an uncommon lesion in calves that results in localized peritonitis and, on occasion, perforation with secondary diffuse peritonitis and death. This lesion in calves has not been described previously. We reviewed the postmortem cases of cecal infarction in dairy calves ≤30 d of age that had been submitted over the course of 5 y to the Tulare branch of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System. The area of cecal infarction and the associated lesion margins were examined histologically. Ischemic necrosis of the mucosal side of the cecal wall with various degrees of neutrophilic inflammation of subjacent tissues was found consistently, and thrombosis and vascular occlusion within the areas of necrosis and inflammation was found in 21 of 34 cases. Cecal infarction cases were then compared to controls using a retrospective matched case-control study design. Cases ( n = 34) and controls ( n = 86) were compared with respect to bacteremia (as defined by pure culture of a single bacterial agent from lung and/or liver), species of bacteria isolated, and for the presence of K99 Escherichia coli (calves ≤5 d), attaching and effacing E. coli, Cryptosporidium (calves ≥5 d of age), Salmonella isolation from the intestine, rotavirus, Bovine coronavirus, and Bovine viral diarrhea virus. In addition, the presence of rumenitis or abomasitis, and omphalitis were compared between cases and controls. There were no significant differences in ruminal, abomasal, or umbilical cord tissue inflammation, or pathogen test-positive status between cases and controls.

  18. Pregnancy-related myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, H.; Lont, M. C.; Buter, H.; van Boven, A. J.; Boonstra, P. W.; Pieper, P. G.

    Introduction The risk of acute myocardial infarction in young women is low, but increases during pregnancy due to the physiological changes in pregnancy, including hypercoagulability. Ischaemic heart disease during pregnancy is not only associated with increased maternal morbidity and mortality, but

  19. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  20. Renal infarction secondary to ketamine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Li; Chen, Jin-Li; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Tang, Shou-Hung; Tsao, Chih-Wei; Meng, En

    2013-07-01

    Renal infarction is an uncommon condition that resulted from inadequate perfusion of the kidney and is easily missed diagnosed due to its nonspecific clinical presentations. Major risk factors for renal infarction are atrial fibrillation, previous embolism, and ischemic and valvular heart disease. Progressive decrease in renal function or even death can occur if renal infarction is not diagnosed accurately and promptly. Ketamine abuse may cause variable urinary tract injury. However, renal infarction caused by ketamine abuse has never been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of renal infarction following nasal insufflation of ketamine.

  1. Biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Leong L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myocardial infarction causes significant mortality and morbidity. Timely diagnosis allows clinicians to risk stratify their patients and select appropriate treatment. Biomarkers have been used to assist with timely diagnosis, while an increasing number of novel markers have been identified to predict outcome following an acute myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome. This may facilitate tailoring of appropriate therapy to high-risk patients. This review focuses on a variety of promising biomarkers which provide diagnostic and prognostic information. Heart-type Fatty Acid Binding Protein and copeptin in combination with cardiac troponin help diagnose myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome in the early hours following symptoms. An elevated N-Terminal Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide has been well validated to predict death and heart failure following a myocardial infarction. Similarly other biomarkers such as Mid-regional pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, ST2, C-Terminal pro-endothelin 1, Mid-regional pro-Adrenomedullin and copeptin all provide incremental information in predicting death and heart failure. Growth differentiation factor-15 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict death following an acute coronary syndrome. Pregnancy associated plasma protein A levels following chest pain predicts risk of myocardial infarction and revascularisation. Some biomarkers such as myeloperoxidase and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in an apparently healthy population predicts risk of coronary disease and allows clinicians to initiate early preventative treatment. In addition to biomarkers, various well-validated scoring systems based on clinical characteristics are available to help clinicians predict mortality risk, such as the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score. A multimarker approach incorporating biomarkers and clinical scores will increase the prognostic

  2. Dementia mimicking a sudden cognitive and behavioral change induced by left globus pallidus infarction: review of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun; Park, Kee Hyung; Sung, Young Hee; Lee, Yeoung Bae; Park, Hyun Mi; Shin, Dong Jin

    2008-09-15

    Recently there has been increasing interest in the non-motor functions of the globus pallidus, and especially its role in cognitive processing. We experienced two patients with acute cognitive and behavior changes after globus pallidus infarctions. Examination of both revealed inattention, decreased verbal fluency, emotional blunting, and amnesia. There were no other sensory or motor symptoms. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed focal acute cerebral infarction in the left globus pallidus. Neuropsychological assessment revealed decreased frontal executive function, with verbal memory disturbance. These cases suggest that strategic infarction dementia can result from a single globus pallidus lesion.

  3. Mortality rate in type 2 myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Lotte; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2014-01-01

    2 myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality in patients with type 2 myocardial infarction is high, reaching approximately 50% after 2 years. Further descriptive and survival studies are needed to improve the scientific evidence on which treatment of type 2 myocardial infarction is based.......BACKGROUND: The classification of myocardial infarction into 5 types was introduced in 2007. The prognostic impact of this universal definition, with particular focus on type 2 myocardial infarction, has not been studied prospectively in unselected hospital patients. METHODS: During a 1-year period......, all hospitalized patients having cardiac troponin I measured were considered. The diagnosis of a myocardial infarction was according to the universal definition, and specified criteria were used in the classification of type 2 myocardial infarction. Follow-up was at least 1 year, with mortality...

  4. Intermittent pacing therapy favorably modulates infarct remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitterdijk, André; Springeling, Tirza; Hermans, Kevin C M; Merkus, Daphne; de Beer, Vincent J; Gorsse-Bakker, Charlotte; Mokelke, Eric; Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Cleutjens, Jack P M; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Prinzen, Frits W; van der Giessen, Willem J; van Geuns, Robert-Jan M; Duncker, Dirk J

    2017-05-01

    Despite early revascularization, remodeling and dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remain important therapeutic targets. Intermittent pacing therapy (IPT) of the LV can limit infarct size, when applied during early reperfusion. However, the effects of IPT on post-AMI LV remodeling and infarct healing are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of IPT on global LV remodeling and infarct geometry in swine with a 3-day old AMI. For this purpose, fifteen pigs underwent 2 h ligation of the left circumflex coronary artery followed by reperfusion. An epicardial pacing lead was implanted in the peri-infarct zone. After three days, global LV remodeling and infarct geometry were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Animals were stratified into MI control and IPT groups. Thirty-five days post-AMI, follow-up MRI was obtained and myofibroblast content, markers of extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover and Wnt/frizzled signaling in infarct and non-infarct control tissue were studied. Results showed that IPT had no significant effect on global LV remodeling, function or infarct mass, but modulated infarct healing. In MI control pigs, infarct mass reduction was principally due to a 26.2 ± 4.4% reduction in infarct thickness (P ≤ 0.05), whereas in IPT pigs it was mainly due to a 35.7 ± 4.5% decrease in the number of infarct segments (P ≤ 0.05), with no significant change in infarct thickness. Myofibroblast content of the infarct zone was higher in IPT (10.9 ± 2.1%) compared to MI control (5.4 ± 1.6%; P ≤ 0.05). Higher myofibroblast presence did not coincide with alterations in expression of genes involved in ECM turnover or Wnt/frizzled signaling at 5 weeks follow-up. Taken together, IPT limited infarct expansion and altered infarct composition, showing that IPT influences remodeling of the infarct zone, likely by increasing regional myofibroblast content.

  5. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid; Donnan, Geoffrey A. [The University of Melbourne, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies. (orig.)

  6. Myocardial infarction and stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ananda Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Permanent loss of cardiomyocytes and scar tissue formation after myocardial infarction (MI results in an irreversible damage to the cardiac function. Cardiac repair (replacement, restoration, and regeneration is, therefore, essential to restore function of the heart following MI. Existing therapies lower early mortality rates, prevent additional damage to the heart muscle, and reduce the risk of further heart attacks. However, there is need for treatment to improve the infarcted area by replacing the damaged cells after MI. Thus, the cardiac tissue regeneration with the application of stem cells may be an effective therapeutic option. Recently, interest is more inclined toward myocardial regeneration with the application of stem cells. However, the potential benefits and the ability to improve cardiac function with the stem cell-based therapy need to be further addressed. In this review, we focus on the clinical applications of stem cells in the cardiac repair.

  7. Myocardial infarction and subsequent pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedoldi Citânia Lúcia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 40-year-old woman with 2 previous myocardial infarctions, revascularization surgery, and an ongoing pregnancy complicated with preeclampsia and fetal hypoxia. Her follow-up performed by a multidisciplinary team made possible the birth through cesarean section of a premature infant of the female sex with a very low birth weight, but without severe respiratory distress of the hyaline membrane disease type. Three months after the delivery, mother and daughter were healthy.

  8. Survival following spinal cord infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, P W; McFarlane, C L

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective open cohort. To calculate the survival of patients with spinal cord infarction and to compare the cause of death in patients with different mechanisms of ischaemic injury. Spinal Rehabilitation Unit, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Consecutive admissions between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2008 with recent onset of spinal cord infarction. Linkage to the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Victoria) was used to determine survival following discharge from in-patient rehabilitation and cause of death. A total of 44 patients were admitted (males=26, 59%), with a median age of 72 years (interquartile range (IQR) 62-79). One patient died during their in-patient rehabilitation programme. In all, 14 patients (n=14/44; 33%) died during the follow-up period. The median survival after diagnosis was 56 months (IQR 28-85) and after discharge from in-patient rehabilitation was 46 months (IQR 25-74). The 1- and 5-year mortality rates were 7.0% (n=3/43; 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.4-18.6%) and 20.9% (n=9/43; 95% CI=11.4-35.2%). There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients with the different aetiologies of spinal cord infarction (other vs idiopathic: χ(2)=0.6, P=0.7; other vs vascular: χ(2)=1.9, P=0.3). There was no relationship between survival and gender (χ(2)=0.2, P=0.6), age (χ(2)=3.0, P=0.08), level of injury (χ(2)=0.0, P=1) or American Spinal Cord Society Impairment Scale grade of spinal cord injury (χ(2)=0.02, P=0.9). Patients with spinal cord infarction appear to have a fair survival after discharge from in-patient rehabilitation, not withstanding the occurrence of risk factors of vascular disease in many patients.

  9. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P.J. van Hout (G. P J); M.P.J. Teuben (Michel P.J.); M. Heeres (Marjolein); S. de Maat (Steven); R. Jong (Rosa); C. Maas (Coen); L.H.J.A. Kouwenberg (Lisanne H.J.A.); L. Koenderman (Leo); W.W. van Solinge (Wouter W.); S.C.A. de Jager (Saskia); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); I.E. Hoefer (Imo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstract& Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine. Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting

  10. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Gerardus P J; Teuben, Michel P J; Heeres, Marjolein; de Maat, Steven; de Jong, Renate; Maas, Coen; Kouwenberg, Lisanne H J A; Koenderman, Leo; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Jager, Saskia C A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Höfer, IE

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting translational failure. Experimentally, MI is induced artificially and the effect of

  11. [Cerebral infarct and the immune response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartko, D; Lesický, O; Buc, M

    1997-06-01

    There are only few data available regarding the immunological mechanisms for cerebral infarction. The aim of this study was to find out the humoral and cell-mediated immunity under the conditions of focal brain ischemia (CI). As a method for humoral immunity, the complement consumption test against a panel of 8 antigens, quantitative analysis of immunoglobins and fractionized sedimentation of erythrocytes were used in the group of pts with CI, and the group of atherosclerotics (AS) and hypertonics (VH), potential victims of focal brain ischemia. It was found that the occurrence of antibodies against the whole panel of antigens in the group of CI is significantly higher as compared with the healthy controls, but it is lower than that in the group of AS and VH. The occurrence of antibodies exclusively against only brain antigens and that in CSF is similar. No correlation to the location of ischemic lesion and the degree of neurological deficit score was found. These findings didn't change in 2 and 4 weeks as well as in 1 year after the onset of CI. The quantitative analysis of immunoglobins revealed statistically higher levels of IgA and lower levels of IgM in comparison with the controls. IgG were higher, but without statistical significance. Statistically significant higher levels of all immunoglobins in CSF were found. As similar trend of changes found also in the group of AS and VH. These results of humoral immunity confirmed by the results of fractionized sedimentation of erythrocytes with EP. The results can be interpreted as a possible change or disorder of central regulation of immunizing processes due to the latent (in AS and VH) of manifest (in CI) lesions of the brain. But the quality and quantity of this response might have been affected by the entire case history of the patients who survived cerebral infarction. The changes in immunity response of the organism in CI was shown also in cell-mediated immunity. The results a statistically significant

  12. Reduction of cerebral infarction in rats by biliverdin associated with amelioration of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Kentaro; Hayashi, Takeshi; Nagotani, Shoko; Sehara, Yoshihide; Zhang, Hanzhe; Tsuchiya, Atsushi; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Tomiyama, Koji; Morimoto, Nobutoshi; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Huh, Nam-Ho; Nakao, Atsunori; Kamiya, Tatsushi; Abe, Koji

    2008-01-10

    Biliverdin (BV), one of the byproducts of heme catalysis through heme oxygenase (HO) system, is a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that BV treatment could protect rat brain cells from oxidative injuries via its anti-oxidant efficacies. Cerebral infarction was induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for 90 min, followed by reperfusion. BV or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally immediately after reperfusion. The size of the cerebral infarction 2 days after tMCAO was evaluated by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) stain. Superoxide generation 4 h after tMCAO was determined by detection of oxidized hydroethidine. In addition, the oxidative impairment of neurons were immunohistochemically assessed by stain for lipid peroxidation with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and damaged DNA with 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). BV treatment significantly reduced infarct volume of the cerebral cortices associated with less superoxide production and decreased oxidative injuries of brain cells. The present study demonstrated that treatment with BV ameliorated the oxidative injuries on neurons and decreased brain infarct size in rat tMCAO model.

  13. Biatrial myxoma and multiple organ infarctions combined with Leriche syndrome in a female patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seung Yeon; Lim, Young-Hyo; Lee, Hyung Tak; Shin, Jinho; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hyuck

    2014-12-05

    Multiple organ infarctions combined with Leriche syndrome due to embolic particles of myxoma are very rare. There is no definite guideline for immediate medical treatment. A 36-year-old married female was referred to the emergency department (ED) with severe pain of both lower extremities and gradual decreased mental status. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed acute multiple organ infarctions including the brain, spleen, and bilateral kidneys combined with Leriche syndrome. To evaluate the embolic source, echocardiography was performed and it revealed biatrial myxoma. Because of the risk of progression in systemic embolic events, surgical excision and embolectomy were performed urgently. After the operation, renal function was recovered, and the pain of both limbs was relieved. However, the visual field defect due to the brain infarction remained. She was discharged uneventfully on the fourteenth postoperative day. This was an extremely rare case of multiple organ infarctions combined with Leriche syndrome as the initial presentation of biatrial myxoma. The treatment of choice for myxoma is surgical excision, but the optimal timing of operations is still controversial in patients who have had recent neurological insults. Echocardiography was useful to clarify the diagnosis and decide on the proper treatment modality: surgical treatment or thrombolysis.

  14. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Massive Splenic Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Granulomatous inflammation involving the spleen is common and associated with splenomegaly. However, massive splenomegaly is a rare occurrence. Infrequently massive splenomegaly can result in splenic infarction. Massive splenic infarction in sarcoidosis has, to our knowledge, not been previously reported. We present a case of a woman presenting with massive splenic infarction and sarcoidosis confirmed by granulomatous inflammation of the liver.

  15. Sarcoidosis presenting as massive splenic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ishita; Ismajli, Mediola; Steuer, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Granulomatous inflammation involving the spleen is common and associated with splenomegaly. However, massive splenomegaly is a rare occurrence. Infrequently massive splenomegaly can result in splenic infarction. Massive splenic infarction in sarcoidosis has, to our knowledge, not been previously reported. We present a case of a woman presenting with massive splenic infarction and sarcoidosis confirmed by granulomatous inflammation of the liver.

  16. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Massive Splenic Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Ishita Patel; Mediola Ismajli; Alan Steuer

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. Granulomatous inflammation involving the spleen is common and associated with splenomegaly. However, massive splenomegaly is a rare occurrence. Infrequently massive splenomegaly can result in splenic infarction. Massive splenic infarction in sarcoidosis has, to our knowledge, not been previously reported. We present a case of a woman presenting with massive splenic infarction and sarcoidosis confirmed by granulomatous in...

  17. Leukocytosis: a risk factor for myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Kotla, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Suman K KotlaDepartment of Internal Medicine, Memorial Medical Center, Johnstown, PA, USAAbstract: Myocardial infarction commonly results from atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries. Approximately 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction do not have atherosclerotic disease. In this case report, we present an unusual leukostatic complication in a patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia and extreme hyperleukocytosis who presented with an acute myocardial infarction that resolv...

  18. Comparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Naess H; Romi,

    2011-01-01

    Halvor Naess, Fredrik RomiDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, NorwayBackground: To compare the clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome of spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction.Methods: Risk factors, concomitant diseases, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome were registered among 28 patients with spinal cord infarction and 1075 patients with cerebral infarction admitted to the Department of Neurology, Haukeland Universi...

  19. [Changes after dynamic observation of ultrastructural cerebral infarction in renovascular hypertensive rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y; Huang, R; Su, Z; Lin, J; Li, J

    2000-06-01

    To study the ultrastructural damages of brain tissues dynamically after middle cerebral artery obstruction (MCAO). A middle cerebral artery obstruction (MCAO) model was reproduced in renal vascular hypertensive rats (RHR). Brain tissues in different locations were collected for eight times in row, from two hours to seven days after establishment of the animal model. The changes occurred in the whole brain after focal cerebral ischemia. The severity of impairment and time of emergence differed with the location sampled. The earliest in the infarcted region with necrosis was considered the major change and completely irreversible damage. The next was seen in marginal regions, mainly with microvascular collapse, formation of microthrombi, and partial necrosis of brain cells and was considered partially reversible damage. The last was in distant and contralateral hemisphere, mainly with reversible swelling of endothelial cells and astrocytes. Changes in the MCAO models reproduced by RHR models were much similar to the clinical pathological changes in cerebral infarction based on the hypertensive cerebrovascular impairment, and it was regarded as a relatively ideal model for studying focal ischemic cerebral impairment. Dynamic changes of cerebral ultrastructure in which microvascular impairment plays an important role suggest that clinical therapy cannot only be focused on infarction foci, but also on the whole brain with comprehensively effective measurements.

  20. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, P; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size.

  1. Cerebellar infarct patterns: The SMART-Medea study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurens J.L. De Cocker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Small cerebellar infarcts proved to be much more common than larger infarcts, and preferentially involved the cortex. Small cortical infarcts predominantly involved the posterior lobes, showed sparing of subcortical white matter and occurred in characteristic topographic patterns.

  2. Abnormal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential in anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarction: frequency, pattern, and a determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Oh, Sun-Young; Lee, Hyung

    2011-08-15

    There has been no systematic study that carefully investigates the characteristic features of abnormal cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) response associated with the AICA territory infarction. To investigate the frequency, the characteristic patterns of abnormal cVEMP associated with AICA territory infarction, and the crucial site for producing abnormal cVEMP response in the AICA territory infarction. We studied 16 consecutive cases of unilateral AICA territory infarction diagnosed by brain MRI. VEMP was induced by a short click sound and was recorded in contracting sternocleidomastoid muscle. Each patient underwent a quantitative audiovestibular evaluation, including bithermal caloric test and pure tone audiogram. Eight patients (50%) exhibited abnormal cVEMP response on the side of the AICA territory infarction. All patients with abnormal cVEMP showed an absent or decreased response in amplitude but no difference in latency. Patients with abnormal VEMP were significantly more likely to have canal paresis (CP), sensorineural hearing loss, or both compared with patients who had normal cVEMP. Conversely, abnormal cVEMP was more frequently observed among patients with CP than among those without CP. There was no difference in lesion sites according to brain MRI among patients with or without abnormal cVEMP response. Our findings suggest that the peripheral vestibular structure with the inner ear probably plays a crucial role in producing abnormal cVEMP response associated with AICA territory infarction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regenerative healing following foetal myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, Benjamin J; Danzer, Enrico; Davey, Marcus G; Allukian, Myron; Englefield, Virginia; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2010-12-01

    The adult response to myocardial infarction results in inflammation, scar formation, left ventricular dilatation, and loss of regional and global function. Regenerative scarless healing has been demonstrated in foetal dermis and tendon and is associated with diminished inflammation. We hypothesised that following foetal myocardial infarction, there would be minimal inflammation, regenerative healing, and preservation of function. Anteroapical myocardial infarction encompassing 20% of the left ventricle was created in adult or early gestation foetal sheep. Myocardial function was serially assessed using quantitative echocardiography. Infarct architecture was examined histologically for evidence of scar formation. Cellular inflammation, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed using immunohistochemistry. In the adult sheep 4 weeks following myocardial infarction, there was a significant decline in ejection fraction (EF) (41±7.4% to 26±7.4%, p<0.05), and the akinetic myocardial segment increased in size (6.9±0.8 cm to 7.9±1.1 cm, p<0.05). By contrast, there was no decline in the foetal EF (53±8.1% to 55±8.8%) and no akinetic foetal myocardial segment 4 weeks post-infarction. The foetal infarcts lacked an inflammatory cell infiltrate and healed with minimal fibrosis, compared with the adults. Foetal infarcts also demonstrated 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)+ proliferating cells, including cardiomyocytes, within the infarct. These data demonstrate that the foetal response to myocardial infarction is dramatically different from the adult and is characterised by minimal inflammation, lack of fibrosis, myocardial proliferation and restoration of cardiac function. Diminished inflammation is associated with foetal regenerative cardiac healing following injury. Understanding the mechanisms involved in foetal myocardial regeneration may lead to applications to alter the adult response following myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2010 European Association for

  4. Regenerative healing following fetal myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, Benjamin J.; Danzer, Enrico; Davey, Marcus G.; Allukian, Myron; Englefield, Virginia; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Liechty, Kenneth W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The adult response to myocardial infarction results in inflammation, scar formation, left ventricular dilatation, and loss of regional and global function. Regenerative scarless healing has been demonstrated in fetal dermis and tendon and is associated with diminished inflammation. We hypothesized that following fetal myocardial infarction there would be minimal inflammation, regenerative healing, and preservation of function. Methods Anteroapical myocardial infarction encompassing 20% of the left ventricle were created in adult or early gestation fetal sheep. Myocardial function was serially assessed using quantitative echocardiography. Infarct architecture was examined histologically for evidence of scar formation. Cellular inflammation, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In the adult sheep 4 weeks following myocardial infarction, there was a significant decline in ejection fraction (41±7.4% to 26±7.4%, p<0.05), and the akinetic myocardial segment increased in size (6.9±0.8 cm to 7.9±1.1 cm, p<0.05). In contrast, there was no decline in the fetal ejection fraction (53±8.1% to 55±8.8%) and no akinetic fetal myocardial segment 4 weeks post-infarction. The fetal infarcts lacked an inflammatory cell infiltrate and healed with minimal fibrosis, compared to the adults. Fetal infarcts also demonstrated BrdU+ proliferating cells, including cardiomyocytes, within the infarct. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the fetal response to myocardial infarction is dramatically different than the adult and is characterized by minimal inflammation, lack of fibrosis, myocardial proliferation, and restoration of cardiac function. Diminished inflammation is associated with fetal regenerative cardiac healing following injury. Understanding the mechanisms involved in fetal myocardial regeneration may lead to applications to alter the adult response following myocardial infarction. PMID:20452780

  5. [Progressive dysarthria and bilateral sensory disturbance in a case of bilateral ventrolateral pontine infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Soichiro; Okazaki, Shuhei; Tonomura, Shuichi; Miyashita, Kotaro; Ihara, Masafumi

    2017-12-27

    A rare case of bilateral ventrolateral pontine infarction in a 70-year-old man who developed progressive dysarthria and bilateral sensory disturbance is reported with literature review. He had been diagnosed with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance 10 years earlier. Ten days before admission, he was aware of the difficulty in walking and speaking, which gradually worsened. On admission he showed bilateral thermal hypoalgesia of face and lower extremities, dysarthria, dysphagia, and ataxic gait. High resolution three-dimensional MRI revealed bilateral ventrolateral pontine infarction with a large atherosclerotic plaque in the ventral side of the basilar artery, which led to a diagnosis of atherothrombotic brain infarction. The atherosclerotic plaque in the basilar artery was thought to be responsible for simultaneous occlusion of the bilateral short circumflex arteries of the pons.

  6. An unusual case of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, Riccardo; Vizzardi, Enrico; D'Aloia, Antonio; Bonadei, Ivano; Sciatti, Edoardo; Metra, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Myocardial infarction may be the result of embolism of calcified material from the aortic valve or thrombotic formations adhering to the same. We report a case of late myocardial infarction secondary to embolization from a thrombus adherent to the aortic valve jutting out in the ostium of the left main coronary artery.

  7. Do episodes of anger trigger myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, J; Hallqvist, J; Diderichsen, Finn

    1999-01-01

    Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility.......Our objectives were to study anger as a trigger of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to explore potential effect modification by usual behavioral patterns related to hostility....

  8. Experimental Approaches to Acute Myocardial Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.B. Uitterdijk (André)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract This thesis is dedicated to i) novel methods and optimization studies to improve the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction as well as fundamental studies that precede novel therapies for myocardial infarction. In part ii) 2 novel, adjunctive therapies

  9. Cerebellar Infarction Presenting with Acute Vestibular Syndrome in Two U.S. Air Force Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbrock, Roger R

    2017-09-01

    Cerebellar infarction is an uncommon but serious cause of isolated acute vestibular symptoms, particularly in young, healthy individuals, and can easily be overlooked. We present two cases of cerebellar infarction in U.S. Air Force pilots, one of which occurred during flight. A 41-yr-old man developed acute vertigo, disequilibrium, nausea, and headache, with progressive slow symptomatic improvement, and presented to medical attention 4 d after symptom onset. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed right inferomedial cerebellar infarction. Echocardiography discovered patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm. A 40-yr-old man developed severe vertigo, nausea, and vomiting during initial aircraft descent. Head computed tomography scan was performed acutely and was normal. Initial assessment was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Brain magnetic resonance imaging 1 mo after symptom onset showed a small right inferior cerebellar infarction. Patent foramen ovale and bilateral atrial enlargement were seen on echocardiography. Both pilots made full neurological recoveries and were eventually returned to flight status. Central causes of isolated acute vestibular symptoms are uncommon and are often not considered in otherwise healthy individuals. Cerebellar infarction is one of these uncommon but increasingly recognized causes of acute vestibular symptoms. As evaluation and management of central causes are much different from peripheral conditions, prompt localization confirmation is paramount. Accurate evidence-based bedside screening methods are available for rapid localization. Awareness of the possibility of central etiologies and careful clinical evaluation with application of bedside screening methods in patients with acute vestibular symptoms will reduce the number of inaccurate diagnoses.Hesselbrock RR. Cerebellar infarction presenting with acute vestibular syndrome in two U.S. Air Force pilots. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):880-883.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  11. Topographic distribution of cerebral infarct probability in patients with acute ischemic stroke: mapping of intra-arterial treatment effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, A M M; Berkhemer, O A; Slump, C H; van Zwam, W H; Roos, Y B W E M; van der Lugt, A; van Oostenbrugge, R J; Yoo, A J; Dippel, D W J; Marquering, H A; Majoie, C B L M

    2017-05-01

    Since proof emerged that IA treatment (IAT) is beneficial for patients with acute ischemic stroke, it has become the standard method of care. Despite these positive results, recovery to functional independence is established in only about one-third of treated patients. The effect of IAT is commonly assessed by functional outcome, whereas its effect on brain tissue salvage is considered a secondary outcome measure (at most). Because patient and treatment selection needs to be improved, understanding the treatment effect on brain tissue salvage is of utmost importance. To introduce infarct probability maps to estimate the location and extent of tissue damage based on patient baseline characteristics and treatment type. Cerebral infarct probability maps were created by combining automatically segmented infarct distributions using follow-up CT images of 281 patients from the MR CLEAN trial. Comparison of infarct probability maps allows visualization and quantification of probable treatment effects. Treatment impact was calculated for 10 Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) and 27 anatomical regions. The insular cortex had the highest infarct probability in both control and IAT populations (47.2% and 42.6%, respectively). Comparison showed significant lower infarct probability in 4 ASPECTS and 17 anatomical regions in favor of IAT. Most salvaged tissue was found within the ASPECTS M2 region, which was 8.5% less likely to infarct. Probability maps intuitively visualize the topographic distribution of infarct probability due to treatment, which makes it a promising tool for estimating the effect of treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Novel adjunctive treatments of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Pryds, Kasper; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is a major cause of death and disability worldwide and myocardial infarct size is a major determinant of prognosis. Early and successful restoration of myocardial reperfusion following an ischemic event is the most effective strategy to reduce final infarct size and improve...... by endovascular infusion of cold saline all reduce infarct size and may confer clinical benefit for patients admitted with acute myocardial infarcts. Equally promising, three follow-up studies of the effect of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) show clinical prognostic benefit in patients undergoing coronary...... clinical outcome, but reperfusion may induce further myocardial damage itself. Development of adjunctive therapies to limit myocardial reperfusion injury beyond opening of the coronary artery gains increasing attention. A vast number of experimental studies have shown cardioprotective effects of ischemic...

  13. Contrast MR imaging of acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogame, Saeko; Syakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi (Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-04-01

    Thirty patients with acute and subacute cerebral infarction (13 and 17 deep cerebral infarction) were studied with 0.5 T MR unit before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA. Thirteen patients were studied within 7 days after neurological ictus, 17 patients were studied between 7 and 14 days. Two types of abnormal enhancement, cortical arterial and parenchymal enhancement, were noted. The former was seen in 3 of 4 cases of very acute cortical infarction within 4 days after clinical ictus. The latter was detected in all 7 cases of cortical infarction after the 6th day of the ictus, and one patient with deep cerebral infarction at the 12th day of the ictus. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging seems to detect gyral enhancement earlier compared with contrast CT, and depict intra-arterial sluggish flow which was not expected to see on contrast CT scans. (author).

  14. Acute myocardial infarction with changing axis deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2011-07-01

    Changing axis deviation has been rarely reported also during atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Changing axis deviation has been rarely reported also during acute myocardial infarction associated with atrial fibrillation. Isolated left posterior hemiblock is a very rare finding but the evidence of transient right axis deviation with a left posterior hemiblock pattern has been reported during acute anterior myocardial infarction as related with significant right coronary artery obstruction and collateral circulation between the left coronary system and the posterior descending artery. Left anterior hemiblock development during acute inferior myocardial infarction can be an indicator of left anterior descending coronary artery lesions, multivessel coronary artery disease, and impaired left ventricular systolic function. We present a case of changing axis deviation in a 62-year-old Italian man with acute myocardial infarction. Also this case focuses attention on changing axis deviation during acute myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Visceral obesity is associated with white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K W; Seo, H; Kwak, M-S; Kim, D

    2017-05-01

    The presence of white matter hyperintensity (WMH) and lacunar infarct are recognized as risk factors of dementia, stroke and mortality. It is undetermined whether visceral adipose tissue (VAT) area is associated with an increased risk of cerebral small vessel disease. We explored whether VAT area was responsible for cerebral small vessel disease through the identification of WMH and lacunar infarct. A total of 2046 subjects free of cerebrovascular disease who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and abdominal fat computed tomography during a general health check-up were enrolled. The prevalence of cerebral WMH was 37.7%. Subjects with WMH had greater VAT area and higher BMI and waist circumference than those without WMH, although significant differences in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) area were not shown. Subjects with lacunar infarct also had significantly greater VAT area and higher waist circumference and BMI than those without lacunar infarct. Multivariate analyses adjusted for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and alcohol, showed VAT area was an independent risk factor of cerebral WMH (odds ratio (OR): 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.24, P=0.016), whereas waist circumference and SAT area were not significantly associated with the risk of WMH. Likewise, VAT area was also independently associated with lacunar infarct (OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06-1.81, P=0.018), whereas the other anthropometric measures were not related with lacunar infarct. VAT has a significant association with cerebral small vessel disease, which was defined as WMH or lacunar infarct. Visceral obesity can be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of cerebral small vessel disease.

  16. Autophagy, dysglycemia and myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Xiao-Fang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy has been thought as a novel cell death mechanism involving in the pathophysiological process of myocardial infarction (MI, and modulation of autophagy may be considered as a promising treatment modality for MI. Dysglycemia was associated with higher mortality in patients with MI. We hypothesize that autophagy may be a potential pathway through which dysglycemia has an impact on the outcomes of MI. In this review, we summarize the function of autophagy in the conditions of MI and the regulatory effects of dysglycemia on autophagy. Four main impacts of autophagy on MI under dysglycemia have been revealed. The first one is that autophagy limits the infarct size via inhibited mTOR. The second one is that autophagy promotes the survival of cardiomyocytes through depleted ATP. The third one is that autophagy protects cardiac myocytes from imparing by way of degradation. The last one is that autophagy maintenance of LV function through FoxO1. Therefore, the ability to modulate autophagy may represent as a potential and promising therapeutic strategy in limiting MI caused by dysglycemia. However, elucidation of precise ways of autophagy in mediating MI caused by dysglycemia, as well as when and how autophagy is manipulated remains us to research.

  17. Multiple small hemorrhagic infarcts in cerebral air embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Masaya; Hoshi, Taku; Matsuoka, Ryosuke; Imai, Yukihiro; Kohara, Nobuo

    2017-11-16

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare cause of cerebral infarction. In cerebral air embolism, T2 star-weighted imaging shows numerous spotty hypointense signals. Previous reports have suggested that these signals represent air in the brain and are gradually diminished and absorbed. We experienced two cases of cerebral air embolism, and in one of them, we conducted an autopsy. Case 1 was a 76-year-old Japanese man with lung cancer and emphysema. A spasmodic cough induced massive cerebral and cardiac air embolisms and the patient died because of cerebral herniation. T2 star-weighted imaging of brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple spotty low signals. Brain autopsy showed numerous spotty hemorrhagic infarcts in the area of T2 star-weighted imaging signals. Case 2 was an 85-year-old Japanese man with emphysema who suffered from acute stroke. Similar spotty T2 star-weighted imaging signals were observed and remained unchanged 2 months after the onset. These findings indicate that T2 star-weighted imaging in cerebral air embolism partially represents micro-hemorrhagic infarction caused by air bubbles that have migrated into the brain.

  18. Serial CT and MRI of ischaemic cerebral infarcts: frequency and clinical impact of haemorrhagic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Dept. of Radiology/Neuroradiology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany); Droste, D.W. [Dept. of Neurology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany)

    2000-04-01

    The frequency, predisposing factors and clinical consequences of haemorrhagic infarcts and damaged blood-brain barrier as shown by contrast enhancement (CE) in ischaemic cerebral infarcts are controversial. We prospectively compared the sensitivity of CT and MRI to haemorrhagic transformation (HT) and CE. We also wished to investigate the clinical significance of HT and factors possibly associated with it. We studied 36 patients with acute ischaemic infarcts in the middle cerebral artery territory during the first 2 weeks after the ictus. After CT and rating of the neurological deficit on admission, serial examinations with clinical neuromonitoring, contrast-enhanced CT and MRI were done on the same day. The occurrence and severity of HT were correlated with CE, stroke mechanism, infarct size, development of neurological deficits and antithrombotic treatment. The frequency of HT detected by MRI was 80 %. CE usually preceded HT or was seen simultaneously. MRI had a higher sensitivity than CT to HT and CE. Severity of HT was positively correlated with infarct size (P < 0.01). HT had no influence on patient's neurological status. Neither the type of antithrombotic treatment nor the stroke mechanism was associated with the severity of HT. No parenchymal haemorrhage occurred. (orig.)

  19. Could infarct location predict the long-term functional outcome in childhood arterial ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio López-Espejo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To explore the influence of infarct location on long-term functional outcome following a first-ever arterial ischemic stroke (AIS in non-neonate children. Method: The MRIs of 39 children with AIS (median age 5.38 years; 36% girls; mean follow-up time 5.87 years were prospectively evaluated. Infarct location was classified as the absence or presence of subcortical involvement. Functional outcome was measured using the modified Rankin scale (mRS for children after the follow-up assessment. We utilized multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratios (ORs for the outcome while adjusting for age, sex, infarct size and middle cerebral artery territory involvement (significance < 0.05. Results: Both infarcts ≥ 4% of total brain volume (OR 9.92; CI 1.76 – 55.9; p 0.009 and the presence of subcortical involvement (OR 8.36; CI 1.76 – 53.6; p 0.025 independently increased the risk of marked functional impairment (mRS 3 to 5. Conclusion: Infarct extension and location can help predict the extent of disability after childhood AIS.

  20. “Heart Appearance” Infarction of the Pons: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Ishizawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Heart appearance” on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a unique presentation of bilateral medial medullary infarction. In contrast, “heart appearance” infarction of the pons has rarely been featured in the medical literature. In this paper, we present a case of “heart appearance” infarction of the pons with its MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA findings. The patient was an 87-year-old male who manifested with weakness in the four extremities. Later, bulbar palsy and tetraplegia became apparent, and he eventually was trapped in locked-in syndrome. Brain MRI disclosed a “heart appearance” lesion in the pons, which was high on diffusion-weighted image MRI and low on apparent diffusion coefficient map MRI. Brain MRA demonstrated that the basilar artery remained intact. A diagnosis of fresh, bilateral pontine infarction with a “heart appearance” was made. After the treatment he was transferred to another hospital for long-term care. This case suggests that bilateral ischemic involvement of the pons is possible even in the context of an intact basilar artery.

  1. OCCLUSION OF ARTERY OF PERCHERON: A RARE AETIOLOGY OF BILATERAL THALAMIC INFARCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mane Makarand, Mane Priyanka, Mohite Rajsinh , Bhattad Prashant, Bangar Kushal, Mahajani Anup

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Artery of Percheron, a rare anatomical variant of brain vascularisation, arises from the posterior cerebral artery. Occlusion of this artery leads to bilateral paramedian thalamic infarct leads to dysfunction of central nervous system. Incidence of bilateral thalamic infarct secondary to occlusion of artery of Percheron is unknown because of its rarity. Here we report a case of 35 year old female presented with altered state of consciousness and the underlying cause was occlusion of Artery of Percheron which leads to bilateral thalamic infarct detected on MRI scanning. It showed hyperintensities on T2W1 and FLAIR, and hypointensity on T1W1, restricted to bilateral ventromedial thalami showing corresponding area of high signal intensity on diffusion weighted images and hypointensity on apparent diffusion coefficient images indicating diffusion restriction, suggestive of infarct. On further investigation magnetic resonance arteriogram (MRA of the brain demonstrated a single common artery arising from the left P1 segment which divided into two branches distally supplying bilateral thalami. Patient became alright after 2 weeks of medical line of treatment.

  2. Clinical discriminators between acute brain hemorrhage and infarction: a practical score for early patient identification Características clínicas diferenciais entre hemorragia e infarto cerebral: uma escala prática para identificação precoce do paciente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrton R. Massaro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available New treatments for acute stroke require a rapid triage system, which minimizes treatment delays and maximizes selection of eligible patients. Our aim was to create a score for assessing the probability of brain hemorrhage among patients with acute stroke based upon clinical information. Of 1805 patients in the Stroke Data Bank, 1273 had infarction (INF and 237 had parenchymatous hemorrhage (HEM verified by CT. INF and HEM discriminators were determined by logistic regression and used to create a score. ROC curve was used to choose the cut-point for predicting HEM (score Novas perspectivas no tratamento do acidente vascular cerebral (AVC requerem um método de triagem rápido para seleção dos pacientes. Nosso objetivo foi criar uma escala com informações clínicas simples para diferenciar hematoma intra-parenquimatoso (HEM entre os pacientes com AVC. Estudamos 1.273 pacientes com AVC isquêmico (INF e 237 com HEM do Stroke Data Bank. Variáveis independentes para o diagnóstico de INF e HEM foram determinadas pela análise de regressão logística e utilizadas para criar uma escala. Através da curva ROC foi escolhido o nível de corte para discriminar HEM (<= 2 , com sensibilidade de 76%, especificidade de 83%. Foi realizada validação externa utilizando os pacientes do estudo NOMASS. Embora o uso de uma escala de fácil aplicação pelas equipes de emergência não possa substituir os métodos de imagem na diferenciação entre INF e HEM para a indicação de trombolítico, a escala proposta pode ser útil para selecionar pacientes para estudos clínicos e tratamento pré-hospitalar, alertar técnicos de tomografia e as equipes médicas sobre a chegada de pacientes, contribuindo para reduzir atrasos cruciais no tratamento.

  3. Vascular brain lesions, brain atrophy, and cognitive decline. The Second Manifestations of ARTerial diseased-Magnetic Resonance (SMART-MR) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, M.; Geerlings, M.I.; van der Graaf, Y.; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Vincken, K.L.; Kappelle, L.J.; Muller, M.; Biessels, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the association between brain atrophy and vascular brain lesions (i.e., white matter lesions [WMLs] or brain infarcts), alone or in combination, with decline in memory and executive functioning over 4 years of follow-up in 448 patients (57 ± 9.5 years) with symptomatic atherosclerotic

  4. The aetiology and possible prevention of myocardial infarction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aetiology and possible prevention of myocardial infarction. ... The subjects of this study were 250 cases of myocardial infarction treated personally. ... Until the aetiology of myocardial infarction has been clarified, it would appear reasonable to treat these factors so as to perhaps afford potential myocardial infarction ...

  5. Delayed reflow of an ischemic infarct after spontaneous thrombolysis studied by CBF tomography using SPECT and Tc-99m HMPAO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Companioni, J M; Lassen, N A; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    1991-01-01

    A patient with a large ischemic infarct in the left middle cerebral artery territory was studied six times in the acute/subacute phase by cerebral blood flow (CBF) tomography using Tc-99m-HMPAO. The SPECT instrument used was a brain dedicated highly sensitive four-camera system (TOMOMATIC 232) th...

  6. Acute renal infarction: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgault, Marie; Grimbert, Philippe; Verret, Catherine; Pourrat, Jacques; Herody, Michel; Halimi, Jean Michel; Karras, Alexandre; Amoura, Zahir; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Izzedine, Hassan; François, Hélène; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Hummel, Aurélie; Bernadet-Monrozies, Pauline; Fouque, Denis; Canouï-Poitrine, Florence; Lang, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Audard, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Renal infarction is an arterial vascular event that may cause irreversible damage to kidney tissues. This study describes the clinical characteristics of patients with renal infarction according to underlying mechanism of vascular injury. This study retrospectively identified 94 patients with renal infarction diagnosed between 1989 and 2011 with the aim of highlighting potential correlations between demographic, clinical, and biologic characteristics and the etiology of renal infarction. Four groups were identified: renal infarction of cardiac origin (cardiac group, n=23), renal infarction associated with renal artery injury (renal injury group, n=29), renal infarction associated with hypercoagulability disorders (hypercoagulable group, n=15), and apparently idiopathic renal infarction (idiopathic group, n=27). Clinical symptoms included abdominal and/or flank pain in 96.8% of cases; 46 patients had uncontrolled hypertension at diagnosis. Laboratory findings included increase of lactate dehydrogenase level (90.5%), increase in C-reactive protein level (77.6%), and renal impairment (40.4%). Compared with renal injury group patients, this study found that cardiac group patients were older (relative risk for 1 year increase=1.21, P=0.001) and displayed a lower diastolic BP (relative risk per 1 mmHg=0.94, P=0.05). Patients in the hypercoagulable group had a significantly lower diastolic BP (relative risk=0.86, P=0.005). Patients in the idiopathic group were older (relative risk=1.13, P=0.01) and less frequently men (relative risk=0.11, P=0.02). Seven patients required hemodialysis at the first evaluation, and zero patients died during the first 30 days. This study suggests that the clinical and biologic characteristics of patients can provide valuable information about the causal mechanism involved in renal infarction occurrence.

  7. Myocardial infarction in the young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengel A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients under 40 years of age are being hospitalized with the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. This is partly due to the increased prevalance of risk factors for atherosclerosis in the younger age group; especially increased incidence of impaired fasting glucose, high triglyceride, low high-density lipoprotein levels and increased waist to hip ratio. However, non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease or hypercoagulability should also be investigated or at least suspected in the younger patients. The pathophysiology of different clinical conditions and disease states which cause acute coronary syndromes in the young patients are reviewed, and the diagnostic modalities and therapatic options for these conditions are briefly discussed by searching for "premature atherosclerosis", "hypercoagulable states", "risk factors for atherosclerosis in youth", "novel risk factors for atherosclerosis", "non-atherosclerotic coronary artery diseases" in PubMed.

  8. [Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Ghannem, L

    2015-12-01

    Although the proofs of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation accumulate, many patients are not sent to rehabilitation units, especially younger and very elderly patients. As the length of stay in acute care units decreases, rehabilitation offers more time to fully assess the patients' conditions and needs. Meta-analyses of randomised trials suggest that mortality can be improved by as much as 20-30%. In addition, rehabilitation helps managing risk factors, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and sedentary behaviours. Physical training also helps improving exercise capacity. Because of all of these effects, cardiac rehabilitation for post-myocardial infarction patients has been given a class IA recommendation in current guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Myocardial infarction and nocturnal hypoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penčić Biljana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with nocturnal intermittent hypoxaemia. Objecive. The aim of this study was to evalute the influence of nocturnal hypoxaemia on ventricular arrhythmias and myocardial ischaemia in patients with myocardial infarction (MI. Method. We studied 77 patients (55.8±7.9 years with MI free of complications, chronic pulmonary diseases, abnormal awake blood gases tension. All patients underwent overnight pulse oximetry and 24-hour electrocardiography. Patients were divided into two groups according to nocturnal hypoxaemia. Total number of ventricular premature complex (VPC; maximal VPC/h; incidence of VPC Lown class>2 and occurrence of ST-segment depression were analyzed for nocturnal (10 PM to 6 AM, daytime (6 AM to 22 PM periods and for the entire 24 hours. Results. Both groups were similar in age, gender, standard risk factors, myocardial infarction size and did not differ in VPC during the analyzed periods. The number of nocturnal maximal VPC/h was insignificantly greater in group 1 (with hypoxaemia compared to group 2 (without hypoxaemia, (p=0.084. Maximal VPC/h did not differ significantly either for daytime or for 24 hours among the groups. Nocturnal VPC Lown>2 were significantly more frequent in group 1 (25% vs 0%, p=0.002. The incidence of VPC Lown>2 was similar during the daytime, and during 24 hrs in both groups. Occurrence of ST-segment depression did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Conclusion. Nocturnal hypoxaemia was associated with complex nocturnal ventricular arrhythmias in patients with MI. .

  10. Changing axis deviation during acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2010-07-09

    Changing axis deviation has been reported during acute myocardial infarction also associated with atrial fibrillation. Isolated left posterior hemiblock is a very rare finding but the evidence of transient right axis deviation with a left posterior hemiblock pattern has been reported during acute anterior myocardial infarction as related with significant right coronary artery obstruction and collateral circulation between the left coronary system and the posterior descending artery. We present a case of changing axis deviation in a 70-year-old Italian man with acute myocardial infarction. Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasonographic features of spontaneous breast tumor infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Lee, A Won; Song, Byung Joo; Kim, Hyen Sook; Cha, Eun Suk

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the ultrasonographic features of spontaneous breast tumor infarction. The pathologic information system database of the Department of Radiology was retrospectively searched. Between 2009 and 2011, nine cases in eight patients were pathologically confirmed as spontaneous breast tumor infarctions. Mammographic images and the ultrasonographic images were acquired. Two other radiologists analyzed the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings. Most common features were oval, indistinct, heterogeneously hypoechoic mass with posterior enhancement. All lesions were classified as C4 (suspicious finding) except one case. Spontaneous breast tumor infarction should be included in the differential diagnoses of hetereogeneously hypoechoic suspicious solid lesions mimicking malignancy.

  12. Effects of age and cortical infarction on EEG dynamic changes associated with spike wave discharges in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kevin M; Shiau, Deng-Shan; Jukkola, Peter I; Miller, Eric R; Mercadante, Amanda L; Quigley, Matthew M; Nair, Sandeep P; Sackellares, J Chris

    2011-11-01

    Rodent models of absence seizures are used to investigate the network properties and regulatory mechanisms of the seizure's generalized spike and wave discharge (SWD). As rats age, SWDs occur more frequently, suggesting aging-related changes in the regulation of the corticothalamic mechanisms generating the SWD. We hypothesized that brain resetting mechanisms - how the brain "resets" itself to a more normal functional state following a transient period of abnormal function, e.g., a SWD - are impaired in aged animals and that brain infarction would further affect these resetting mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of aging, infarction, and their potential interaction on the resetting of EEG dynamics assessed by quantitative EEG (qEEG) measures of linear (signal energy measured by amplitude variation; signal frequency measured by mean zero-crossings) and nonlinear (signal complexity measured by the pattern match regularity statistic and the short-term maximum Lyapunov exponent) brain EEG dynamics in 4- and 20-month-old F344 rats with and without brain infarction. The main findings of the study were: 1) dynamic resetting of both linear and nonlinear EEG characteristics occurred following SWDs; 2) animal age significantly affected the degree of dynamic resetting in all four qEEG measures: SWDs in older rats exhibited a lower degree of dynamic resetting; 3) infarction significantly affected the degree of dynamic resetting only in terms of EEG signal complexity: SWDs in infarcted rats exhibited a lower degree of dynamic resetting; and 4) in all four qEEG measures, there was no significant interaction effect between age and infarction on dynamic resetting. We conclude that recovery of the brain to its interictal state following SWDs was better in young adult animals compared with aged animals, and to a lesser degree, in age-matched controls compared with infarction-injured animal groups, suggesting possible effects of brain resetting

  13. Imaging of Integrin αvβ3 Expression Using 68Ga-RGD Positron Emission Tomography in Pediatric Cerebral Infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyoon Choi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced expression of integrin αvβ3 is commonly used as a biomarker for angiogenesis, which is one of the key pathophysiologic processes in cerebral infarct. Integrin αvβ3 can be imaged with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD peptide agents. In this study, characteristics of positron emission tomography (PET using a 68Ga-labeled RGD were investigated in pediatric cerebral infarct. Pediatric patients with moyamoya disease underwent 68Ga-RGD PET in a research protocol for neovascularization evaluation. In these patients, 17 cerebral infarct lesions of 10 patients were included in the analysis. On 68Ga-RGD PET, the infarct lesion to contralateral brain ratio (LCR of the infarct lesion was measured and analyzed with regard to postinfarct time interval (PTI and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT findings. An increase in 68Ga-RGD uptake was observed in cerebral infarct, particularly in recent lesions. The LCR was significantly higher in the recent than in the chronic lesions, and a significant correlation existed between the LCR and PTI. Additionally, the LCR was significantly higher in the lesions with hyperperfusion on SPECT. This study, as the first human study using an RGD agent for in vivo cerebral infarct imaging, demonstrated that 68Ga-RGD PET has a potential for molecular imaging of integrin αvβ3 expression in cerebral infarct as a biomarker of angiogenesis.

  14. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: chronological changes on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Yasui, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    We studied the MRI characteristics of cortical laminar necrosis in ischaemic stroke. We reviewed 13 patients with cortical laminar high signal on T1-weighted images to analyse the chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-density cortical lesions began to appear on T1-weighted images about 2 weeks after the ictus. At 1-2 months they were prominent. They began to fade from 3 months but could be seen up to 11 months. These cortical lesions showed isointensity or high intensity on T2-weighted images and did not show low intensity at any stage. Contrast enhancement of the laminar lesions was prominent at 1-2 months and became less apparent from 3 months, but could be seen up to 8 months. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, α-Lipoic acid, Cerebral infarct area, Edema, Antioxidants,. Inflammatory markers. Tropical Journal of ... live births, of which ~55 % of the affected premature children die by the age of 2 years ..... severe complications, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, motor impairment, and delayed.

  16. ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, α-Lipoic acid, Cerebral infarct area, Edema, Antioxidants,. Inflammatory markers. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus,. International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index Copernicus, ...

  17. Migraine and structural changes in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Lipton, Richard B; Ashina, Sait

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the association between migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) and 3 types of structural brain abnormalities detected by MRI: white matter abnormalities (WMAs), infarct-like lesions (ILLs), and volumetric changes in gray and white matter (GM, WM) regions....

  18. Acetylsalicylic acid resistance risk factors in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarek, Wioleta; Kasprzak, Michał; Obońska, Karolina; Ostrowska, Małgorzata; Wiciński, Michał; Kubica, Aldona; Kubica, Jacek; Grześk, Grzegorz

    2015-10-01

    Despite its commonly recognized benefits in the cardiovascular disease setting, an issue of resistance to this drug has lately emerged. The aim of this research was assessment of the phenomenon of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) resistance and its risk factors in patients treated for myocardial infarction. This study is a post-hoc analysis of a previous prospective study with approximately 200 patients treated for myocardial infarction with a coated formulation of ASA. The population was divided into two subgroups according to the response to ASA. ASA responsiveness was assessed using the arachidonic acid-dependent platelet aggregation (ASPI-test). The measurements were performed using the technique of impedance aggregometry. The prevalence of aspirin resistance among the study population was 6.2%. All analyzed aggregometric parameters (including ASPI-test, adenosine diphosphate dependent platelet aggregation - ADP-test, bleeding time measurement) showed significant differences between both subgroups. ASA resistant patients had higher concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), leukocytes (WBC) and platelets (PLT) but lower concentrations of hemoglobin (HGB). The temporal point analysis for both subgroups showed aspirin resistance incidence peak in patients at 9 months after myocardial infarction. The prevalence of aspirin resistance in our study population is comparable with rates reported in literature among patients with cardiovascular diseases. There is a possible relation between aspirin resistance and clopidogrel resistance. Presence did not affect the incidence of the clinical end-points. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain' most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of 'orofacial pain' are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of 'orofacial pain' remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of 'atypical odontalgia'. 'Atypical odontalgia' is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. 'Atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia' can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain.

  20. Somatosensory and acoustic brain stem reflex myoclonus.

    OpenAIRE

    Shibasaki, H; Kakigi, R; Oda, K; Masukawa, S

    1988-01-01

    A patient with brain stem reflex myoclonus due to a massive midbrain infarct was studied electrophysiologically. Myoclonic jerks were elicited at variable latencies by tapping anywhere on the body or by acoustic stimuli, and mainly involved flexor muscles of upper extremities. The existence of convergence of somatosensory and acoustic inputs in the brain stem was suggested. This myoclonus seemed to be mediated by a mechanism similar to the spino-bulbo-spinal reflex.

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  5. Cardiac biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aldous, Sally J

    2013-01-01

    ... (established and novel) assays. Cardiac troponin, our current "gold standard" biomarker criterion for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction has high sensitivity and specificity for this diagnosis and therapies instituted...

  6. Acute myocardial infarction following a hornet sting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković-Matić Danica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction following a hornet sting has been very rarely reported in the previous literature. Pathogenetic mechanisms include direct action of the venom components on the coronary endothelium and allergic reaction with mediators released from mast cells. The anaphylactic reaction and venom components can produce acute coronary artery thrombosis. Case report. We reported a 45-year-old man with acute myocardial infarction after a hornet sting in the presence of anaphylaxis. We also discussed clinical implications and pathophysiological mechanisms of acute myocardial infarction caused by hymenoptera sting. Conclusion. A case report of this unusual acute myocardial infarction highlights the potential acute myocardial ischemia associated with hymenoptera sting which requests early diagnosis, thorough cardiovascular evaluation and appropriate treatment.

  7. Locations of cerebral infarctions in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, F.Y.; Chia, L.G. (Section of Neurology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan)); Shen, W.C. (Section of Neuroradiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan))

    1992-06-01

    The locations of cerebral infarctions were studied in 14 patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 173 patients with noninflammatory ischemic stroke (IS). In patients with TBM, 75% of infarctions occurred in the 'TB zone' supplied by medial striate and thalamoperforating arteries; only 11% occurred in the 'IS zone' supplied by lateral striate, anterior choroidal and thalamogeniculate arteries. In patients with IS, 29% of infarctions occurred in the IS zone, 29% in the subcortical white matter, and 24% in (or involving) the cerebral cortex. Only 11% occurred in the TB zone. Bilaterally symmetrical infarctions of the TB zone were common with TBM (71%) but rare with IS (5%). (orig.).

  8. Effects of antidepressant treatment following myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Melle, Joost P.; De Jonge, Peter; Honig, Adriaan; Schene, Aart H.; Kuyper, Astrid M. G.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Schins, Annique; Tulner, Dorien; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Ormel, Johan

    Background Depression following myocardial infarction is associated with poor cardiac prognosis. It is unclear whether antidepressant treatment improves long-term depression status and cardiac prognosis. Aims To evaluate the effects of antidepressant treatment compared with usual care in an

  9. Effects of antidepressant treatment following myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, Joost P.; de Jonge, Peter; Honig, Adriaan; Schene, Aart H.; Kuyper, Astrid M. G.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Schins, Annique; Tulner, Dorien; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Ormel, Johan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression following myocardial infarction is associated with poor cardiac prognosis. It is unclear whether antidepressant treatment improves long-term depression status and cardiac prognosis. AIMS: To evaluate the effects of antidepressant treatment compared with usual care in an

  10. Systemic inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu FANG Xiao-Lei Moorea Anthony M Dart Le-Min WANG

    2015-01-01

    Acute cardiomyocyte necrosis in the infarcted heart generates damage-associated molecular patterns, activating complement and toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 signaling, and triggering an intense inflammatory response...

  11. Biventricular thrombi complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghvi, Sanjeev; Baroopal, Anil; Sarda, Pawan

    2016-09-01

    A rare case of biventricular thrombi complicating acute myocardial infarction detected during echocardiography is described. Copyright © 2016 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Myocardial infarction following cannabis induced coronary vasospasm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gunawardena, Mudalige Don Vajira Malin; Rajapakse, Senaka; Herath, Jagath; Amarasena, Naomali

    2014-01-01

    Smoking cannabis is a rare cause of myocardial infarction. We report a 29-year-old man who presented with acute coronary syndrome following consumption of a type of cannabis with the street name 'Kerala Ganja...

  13. Medical image of the week: artery of Percheron infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta TT

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 55-year-old African-American man presented to the Emergency Department for acute altered mental status which started 4 hours ago. His medical history was significant for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, diabetes mellitus, marijuana and opioid use. On admission, the patient appeared to be in a deep sleep, unarousable, with grimacing to noxious stimuli. He occasionally moved all extremities. He was intubated for airway protection. Initial CT head non-contrast demonstrated a previous right MCA infarct, with no new acute hemorrhage. MRI/MRA brain revealed complete infarction of the artery of Percheron (AOP, likely due to a left ventricular thrombus (Figure 1. The patient remained somnolent throughout hospitalization with minimal neurologic improvement, and was ultimately transferred to a long-term care facility after a tracheostomy and PEG placement. The artery of Percheron is a rare, normal intracranial vascular variant in which a single arterial trunk originates from the posterior cerebral artery, giving rise …

  14. Stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Moelker, Amber

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCoronary heart disease and heart failure continue to be significant burdens to healthcare systems in the Western world and are predicted to become so in emerging economies. Despite mixed results in both experimental and clinical studies, stem cell therapy is a promising option for patients suffering from myocardial infarction or patients with chronic heart failure after myocardial infarction. However, many issues in the field of cellular cardiomyoplasty still need to be resolved. ...

  15. Echocardiography diagnosis of myocardial infarction complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Oryshchyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and management of myocardial infarction complications are discussed in this article. These complications are associated with high level of mortality and surgery is a main treatment method. High level of suspicion and early diagnosis are essential for appropriate treatment and improvement of prognosis. Echocardiography is a main diagnostic method. Analysis of literature about contemporary management of mechanical complications of myocardial infarction has been performed, case reports are presented.

  16. The contemporary value of peak creatine kinase-MB after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction above other clinical and angiographic characteristics in predicting infarct size, left ventricular ejection fraction, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Minke H T; Eppinga, Ruben N; Vlaar, Pieter J J; Lexis, Chris P H; Lipsic, Erik; Haeck, Joost D E; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Horst, Iwan C C; van der Harst, Pim

    2017-05-01

    Complex multimarker approaches to predict outcome after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have only considered a single baseline sample, while neglecting easily obtainable peak creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) values during hospitalization. We studied 476 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for STEMI and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) at 4-6 months after STEMI. We determined the association with cardiac biomarkers (peak CK-MB, peak troponin T, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide), clinical and angiographic characteristics with infarct size, and LVEF, followed by association with mortality in 1120 STEMI patients. Peak CK-MB was the strongest predictor for infarct size (P<0.001, R (2) =0.60) and LVEF (P<0.001, R (2) =0.40). The additional value of clinical and angiographic characteristics was limited. The optimal peak CK-MB cutpoints, for differentiation among small (<10% of the left ventricle), moderate (≥10%-<30%), and large infarct size (≥30%), were 210 U/L and 380 U/L, respectively. These cutpoints were associated with 90-day mortality; the hazard ratio for moderate infarct was 2.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.51-5.93, P=0.002) and for large infarct 6.53 (95% CI: 3.63-11.76, P<0.001). Classical peak CK-MB measured during hospitalization for STEMI was superior to other clinical and angiographic characteristics in predicting CMRI-defined infarct size and LVEF, and should be included and validated in future multimarker studies. Peak CK-MB cutpoints differentiated among infarct size categories and were associated with increased 90-day mortality risk. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Aromatase and neuroinflammation in rat focal brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu H; Dhawan, Jasbeer; Kovoor, Joel A; Sullivan, John; Zhang, Wei X; Choi, Dennis; Biegon, Anat

    2017-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that expression of aromatase, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of androgens to estrogens, is transiently upregulated in rat stroke models. It was further suggested that increased aromatase expression is linked to neuroinflammation and that it is neuroprotective in females. Our goal was to investigate aromatase upregulation in male rats subjected to experimental stroke in relationship to neuroinflammation, infarct and response to treatment with different putative neuroprotective agents. Intact male rats were subjected to transient (90min) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and administered selfotel (N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor competitive antagonist), TPEN (a zinc chelator), a combination of the two drugs or vehicle, injected immediately after reperfusion. Animals were killed 14days after MCAO and consecutive brain sections used to measure aromatase expression, cerebral infarct volume and neuroinflammation. Quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated increased brain aromatase expression in the peri-infarct area relative to contralesional area, which was partially abrogated by neuroprotective agents. There was no correlation between aromatase expression in the peri-infarct zone and infarct volume, which was reduced by neuroprotective agents. Microglial activation, measured by quantitative autoradiography, was positively correlated with infarct and inversely correlated with aromatase expression in the peri-infarct zone. Our findings indicate that focal ischemia upregulates brain aromatase in the male rat brain at 14days post surgery, which is within the time frame documented in females. However, the lack of negative correlation between aromatase expression and infarct volume and lack of positive correlation between microgliosis and aromatase do not support a major role for aromatase as a mediator of neuroprotection or a causal relationship between microglial activation and increased aromatase

  18. Report of Intracerebral Hemorrhage Following Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akvan Paymard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Stroke is a rare complication of myocardial infarction (AMI. Aspirin, plavix, and enoxaparin are among drug treatments for myocardial infarction, which lead to stroke. The present study is a case report of stroke after myocardial infarction, which discusses patient’s records and clinical history along with paraclinical findings. Case Report: The patient was a 60-year-old man with a history of heart disease and diabetes, presented with severe chest pain and dyspnea to the Emergency Department of Yasuj Sajad Hospital on January 29, 2015, and after taking ECG, it was found that there was no signs of myocardial infarction, but troponin test was positive two times. The diagnosis was myocardial infarction without ST segment elevation. The patient took aspirin and plavix, and after subcutaneous injection of enoxaparin at the dose of 80 mg, his level of consciousness decreased, which caused GCS:5, right-side mydriasis, and motor paralysis in the left half of the body, therefore, CT was performed, and the patient that had about 90 ml hemorrhage in temporoparietal lobe. The patient was transformed to the operating room and 60 ml blood was removed using partial lobectomy and a microscope. After hospitalization in ICU for several days, the patient was extubated under the SIMV mode. Considering the high prevalence of heart disease, especially increasing rate of myocardial infarction in the country, anticoagulants should be more carefully used and after administration of this group of drugs, patients be regularly monitored for side effects.

  19. Improving lipid control following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankam, Jyoti; Feldman, David I; Blaha, Michael J; Martin, Seth S

    2014-09-01

    Following a myocardial infarction, lipid-lowering therapy is an established intervention to reduce the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events. Prior studies show a need to improve clinical practice in this area. Here, we review the latest research and perspectives on improving postmyocardial infarction lipid control. Dyslipidemia and myocardial infarction remain leading causes of global disability and premature mortality throughout the world. The processes of care in lipid control involve multiple patient-level, provider-level, and healthcare system-level factors. They can be challenging to coordinate. Recent studies show suboptimal use of early high-intensity statin therapy and overall lipid control following myocardial infarction. Encouragingly, lipid control has improved over the last decade. Implementation science has identified checklists as an effective tool. At the top of the checklist for reducing atherogenic lipids and recurrent event risk postmyocardial infarction is early high-intensity statin therapy. Smoking cessation and participation in cardiac rehabilitation are also priorities, as are lifestyle counseling, promotion of medication adherence, ongoing lipid surveillance, and medication management. Optimizing lipid control could further enhance clinical outcomes after myocardial infarction.

  20. CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    The CT findings of the acute cerebral infarction are well known. However the CT findings of early stroke within 24 hours of the onset have not been sufficiently reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate early acute cerebral infarction on CT within 24 hours after ictus. The early and accurate CT diagnosis could lead to the appropriate therapy and improved outcome of the patients. Authors retrospectively analyzed 16 patients with early acute cerebral infarction. Acute cerebral infarction was confirmed by follow-up CT in 11 patients, SPECT in 4 patients, and MRI in 1 patient. The CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction include effacement of cortical sulci or cistern (n = 16, 100%), hyperattenuation of MCA (n = 3), obscuration of lentiform nucleus (n = 6), loss of insular ribbon (n = 6) and subtle low density in hemisphere (n = 5). The most frequent finding was effacement of cortical sulci in our study, and it was thought to be the most important sign of early acute cerebral infarction.

  1. THE SPECTRUM OF AMALRIC TRIANGULAR CHOROIDAL INFARCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroff, Julia; Phasukkijwatana, Nopasak; Vaclavik, Veronika; Nagiel, Aaron; Holz, Eric R; Sarraf, David

    2017-01-01

    To describe the multimodal imaging findings, including optical coherence tomography angiography analysis, and spectrum of etiologies associated with Amalric triangular choroidal infarction. This study is a multicenter, retrospective, observational case series review of the clinical and multimodal imaging findings for six patients with Amalric triangular choroidal infarction. Six patients (10 eyes) with Amalric triangular choroidal infarction were enrolled. Patients' ages ranged from 7 years to 90 years (mean 54 years, median 60 years). Wedge-shaped or triangular areas of choroidal ischemia were evident with fluorescein angiography in all patients and with indocyanine green angiography in one patient. Optical coherence tomography angiography demonstrated choriocapillaris flow reduction that colocalized with outer retinal structural abnormalities with en face optical coherence tomography and corresponded with the triangular zones of choroidal infarction identified with fluorescein angiography in one patient. Etiologies included giant cell arteritis in three cases: traumatic carotid dissection, traumatic retrobulbar hemorrhage, and malignant hypertension secondary to lupus-associated nephropathy. The Amalric triangular syndrome of choroidal infarction can occur as a result of a spectrum of etiologies, especially giant cell arteritis. Infarction is evident on traditional angiography in all cases. Optical coherence tomography angiography may provide a simple noninvasive tool to evaluate choroidal ischemia.

  2. Automatic prediction of infarct growth in acute ischemic stroke from MR apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Nidiyare Hevia; Rosso, Charlotte; Chupin, Narie; Deltour, Sanorine; Bardinet, Eric; Dormont, Didier; Samson, Yves; Baillet, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to the prediction of final infarct growth in human acute ischemic stroke based on image analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps obtained from magnetic resonance imaging. Evidence from multiple previous studies indicate that ADC maps are likely to reveal brain regions belonging to the ischemic penumbra, that is, areas that may be at risk of infarction in the few hours following stroke onset. In a context where "time is brain," and contrarily to the alternative-and still-debated-perfusion-diffusion weighted image (PWI/DWI) mismatch approach, the DWI magnetic resonance sequences are standardized, fast to acquire, and do not necessitate injection of a contrast agent. The image analysis approach presented here consists of the segmentation of the ischemic penumbra using a fast three-dimensional region-growing technique that mimics the growth of the infarct lesion during acute stroke. The method was evaluated with both numerical simulations and on two groups of 20 ischemic stroke patients (40 patients total). The first group of patient data was used to adjust the parameters of the model ruling the region-growing procedure. The second group of patient data was dedicated to evaluation purposes only, with no subsequent adjustment of the free parameters of the image-analysis procedure. Results indicate that the predicted final infarct volumes are significantly correlated with the true final lesion volumes as revealed by follow-up measurements from DWI sequences. The DWI-ADC mismatch method is an encouraging fast alternative to the PWI-DWI mismatch approach to evaluate the likeliness of infarct growth during the acute stage of ischemic stroke.

  3. CT perfusion during delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage: distinction between reversible ischemia and ischemia progressing to infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremers, Charlotte H.P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, PO Box 85500, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vos, Pieter C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, PO Box 85500, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) can be reversible or progress to cerebral infarction. In patients with a deterioration clinically diagnosed as DCI, we investigated whether CT perfusion (CTP) can distinguish between reversible ischemia and ischemia progressing to cerebral infarction. From a prospectively collected series of aSAH patients, we included those with DCI, CTP on the day of clinical deterioration, and follow-up imaging. In qualitative CTP analyses (visual assessment), we calculated positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) with 95 % confidence intervals (95%CI) of a perfusion deficit for infarction on follow-up imaging. In quantitative analyses, we compared perfusion values of the least perfused brain tissue between patients with and without infarction by using receiver-operator characteristic curves and calculated a threshold value with PPV and NPV for the perfusion parameter with the highest area under the curve. In qualitative analyses of 33 included patients, 15 of 17 patients (88 %) with and 6 of 16 patients (38 %) without infarction on follow-up imaging had a perfusion deficit during clinical deterioration (p = 0.002). Presence of a perfusion deficit had a PPV of 71 % (95%CI: 48-89 %) and NPV of 83 % (95%CI: 52-98 %) for infarction on follow-up. Quantitative analyses showed that an absolute minimal cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold of 17.7 mL/100 g/min had a PPV of 63 % (95%CI: 41-81 %) and a NPV of 78 % (95%CI: 40-97 %) for infarction. CTP may differ between patients with DCI who develop infarction and those who do not. For this purpose, qualitative evaluation may perform marginally better than quantitative evaluation. (orig.)

  4. [A patient with prosopagnosia which developed after an infarction in the left occipital lobe in addition to an old infarction in the right occipital lobe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Keisuke; Satoh, Akira; Satoh, Hideyo; Seto, Makiko; Ochi, Makoto; Tsujihata, Mitsuhiro

    2011-05-01

    A 66-year-old, right-handed male, was admitted to our hospital with difficulty in recognizing faces and colors. He had suffered a stroke in the right occipital region three years earlier that had induced left homonymous hemianopsia, but not prosopagnosia. A neurological examination revealed prosopagnosia, color agnosia, constructional apraxia, and topographical disorientation, but not either hemineglect or dressing apraxia. The patient was unable to distinguish faces of familiar persons such as his family and friends, as well as those of unfamiliar persons such as doctors and nurses. Brain MRI demonstrated an old infarction in the right medial occipital lobe and a new hemorrhagic infarction in the left medial occipital lobe, including the fusiform and lingual gyrus. It is unclear whether a purely right medial occipital lesion can be responsible for prosopagnosia, or whether bilateral medial occipital lesions are necessary for this occurrence. The current case indicated that bilateral medial occipital lesions play an important role in inducing porsopagnosia.

  5. Posttraumatic cerebral infarction: incidence, outcome, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Isaac; Stein, Deborah M; Mirvis, Stuart E; Scalea, Thomas M

    2008-04-01

    Outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often affected by secondary insults including posttraumatic cerebral infarction (PTCI). The incidence of PTCI after TBI was previously reported to be 2% with no mortality impact. We suspected that recent advances in imaging modalities and treatment might affect incidence and outcome. We sought to define the incidence and mortality impact of PTCI. We also identified risk factors associated with PTCI. We retrospectively reviewed all patients admitted between 2004 and 2006 with severe TBI (brain Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score >2, Glasgow Coma Scale score [GCS] men. Mortality was 21%, and 48% had a brain AIS score of 5. Mean age was 36 years (11-90 years), admission GCS score was 5 (3-8), and Injury Severity Score was 32 (9-75). Thirty-one (8%) had a confirmed PTCI. The PTCI group had a significantly increased mortality (45% vs. 19%, p insult and the associated risk factors may help identify the group at risk and tailor management of patients with severe TBI.

  6. Myocardial infarction in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Amelia; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Advances in pharmacological treatment and effective early myocardial revascularization have -in recent years- led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it has been suggested that compared to younger subjects, elderly AMI patients are less likely to receive evidence-based treatment, including myocardial revascularization therapy. Several reasons have been postulated to explain this trend, including uncertainty regarding the true benefits of the interventions commonly used in this setting as well as increased risk mainly associated with comorbidities. The diagnosis, management, and post-hospitalization care of elderly patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome pose many difficulties at present. A complex interplay of variables such as comorbidities, functional and socioeconomic status, side effects associated with multiple drug administration, and individual biologic variability, all contribute to creating a complex clinical scenario. In this complex setting, clinicians are often required to extrapolate evidence-based results obtained in cardiovascular trials from which older patients are often, implicitly or explicitly, excluded. This article reviews current recommendations regarding management of AMI in the elderly.

  7. Interstitial collagen is increased in the non-infarcted human myocardium after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volders, P. G.; Willems, I. E.; Cleutjens, J. P.; Arends, J. W.; Havenith, M. G.; Daemen, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this study we report the changes of interstitial collagen in the human non-infarcted interventricular septum after a myocardial infarction as well as in hypertrophic human hearts with or without hypertension. The collagen amount was determined with the Sirius Red morphometry technique, which

  8. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  9. D-dimer levels and cerebral infarction in critically ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeong-Am; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Geun-Ho

    2017-08-30

    D-dimer levels have been used in the diagnosis of a variety of thrombosis-related diseases. In this study, we evaluated whether measuring D-dimer levels can help to diagnose cerebral infarction (CI) in critically ill cancer patients. We retrospectively evaluated all cancer patients who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between March 2010 and February 2014 at the medical oncology intensive care unit (ICU) of Samsung Medical Center. Brain MRI scanning was performed when CI was suspected due to acute neurological deficits. We compared D-dimer levels between patients ultimately diagnosed as having or not having CI and analyzed diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion patterns. A total of 88 patients underwent brain MRI scanning due to clinical suspicion of CI; altered mental status and unilateral hemiparesis were the most common neurological deficits. CI was ultimately diagnosed in 43 (49%) patients. According to the DWI patterns, multiple arterial infarctions (40%) were more common than single arterial infarctions (9%). Cryptogenic stroke etiologies were more common (63%) than determined etiologies. There was no significant difference in D-dimer levels between patients with and without CI (P = 0.319). Although D-dimer levels were not helpful in diagnosing CI, D-dimer levels were associated with cryptogenic etiologies in critically ill cancer patients; D-dimer levels were higher in the cryptogenic etiology group than in the determined etiology group or the non-infarction group (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, elevated D-dimer levels (> 8.89 μg/mL) were only associated with cryptogenic stroke (adjusted OR 5.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.876-15.857). Abnormal D-dimer levels may support the diagnosis of cryptogenic stroke in critically ill cancer patients.

  10. Thrombolytic therapy of acute myocardial infarction alters collagen metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, N B; Hansen, S S; Jensen, L T

    1994-01-01

    infarction and receiving thrombolytic therapy. Regardless of whether acute myocardial infarction was confirmed or not, S-PIIINP increased (94-120%) 4 h after streptokinase therapy (p ....02). With confirmed acute myocardial infarction, S-PIIINP increased from 24 h towards a plateau reached at day 2-3 (p acute myocardial infarction had S-PICP above baseline at 1, 2, and 6 months (p ....05). A less pronounced S-PIIINP increase was noted with tissue-plasminogen activator than with streptokinase. Thrombolytic therapy induces collagen breakdown regardless of whether acute myocardial infarction is confirmed or not. With confirmed acute myocardial infarction collagen metabolism is altered...

  11. Association between carotid stenosis or lacunar infarction and incident dementia in patients with vascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, K; Miwa, K; Yagita, Y; Okazaki, S; Sakaguchi, M; Mochizuki, H

    2015-01-01

    The association between vascular risk factors and dementia is of interest. Several studies have shown that cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is associated with dementia. However, the association between cerebral large vessel disease (LVD) and dementia has not been thoroughly examined. The Osaka Follow-up Study for Carotid Atherosclerosis, Part 2, was a prospective cohort study of cardiovascular events and dementia in which patients (n = 1106) with vascular risk factors underwent carotid ultrasound. Of these patients, 600 who had normal cognitive function were included and underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of lacunar infarction and carotid stenosis served as markers for SVD and LVD, respectively. Amongst 600 patients (mean 68 years, 57% men), 261 (44%) showed lacunar infarction and 94 (16%) showed carotid stenosis. During the follow-up period (median 8.0 years), 57 patients had incident dementia. Patients with carotid stenosis and lacunar infarction were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with dementia (log-rank test, P = 0.037 and P dementia remained significant after adjusting for risk factors including stroke history, apolipoprotein E genotype and years of education (hazard ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 1.22-6.09). However, the presence of carotid stenosis was not associated with incident dementia after adjusting for age and sex (P = 0.477). This study demonstrated that carotid stenosis had little association with dementia, but lacunar infarction had a significant association. The impact of SVD on dementia could be much greater than that of LVD. © 2014 EAN.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of human cerebral infarction: Enhancement with Gd-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imakita, S.; Nishimura, T.; Naito, H.; Yamada, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Takamiya, M.; Yamada, Y.; Sakashita, Y.; Minamikawa, J.; Kikuchi, H.

    1987-09-01

    Five patients (1 female and 4 males) with cerebral infarction of 4 h to 27 months duration were studied 9 times with magnetic resonance (MR) using Gd-DTPA. Spinecho (SE) MR images (MRI) were obtained before and after the administration of Gd-DTPA, and correlative CT scans were performed on the same day. In 2 cases, 4 h and 27 months after the ictus, there was no enhancement with Gd-DTPA. There was faint enhancement in 2 cases with cerebral infarction of about 24 h duration and obvious enhancement in all cases in the subacute stage. Compared with enhanced CT, MR using Gd-DTPA demonstrated more obvious enhancement of infarcted areas. MR enhancement using Gd-DTPA showed a gradual increase and the accumulated Gd-DTPA in infarcted areas slowly diffused to the periphery. MR enhancement with Gd-DTPA is similar to that of enhanced CT, but may be more sensitive in the detection of blood brain barrier breakdown.

  13. Ischemic stroke and incomplete infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Javier; Lassen, N A; Weiller, C

    1996-01-01

    The concept of selective vulnerability or selective loss o f individual neurons, with survival of glial and vascular elements as one of the consequences of a systemic ischemic-hypoxic insult (eg, transient cardiac arrest or severe hypotension), has been recognized for decades. In contrast, select......, selective neuronal death as one of the lesions that may develop in the brain after occluding an intracranial artery is an idea not readily acknowledged in the current medical literature dealing with human stroke....

  14. Brain metabolic pattern analysis using a magnetic resonance spectra classification software in experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Xarrié, Elena; Davila, Myriam; Candiota, Ana Paula; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Ortega-Martorell, Sandra; Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Arús, Carles; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2017-01-13

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides non-invasive information about the metabolic pattern of the brain parenchyma in vivo. The SpectraClassifier software performs MRS pattern-recognition by determining the spectral features (metabolites) which can be used objectively to classify spectra. Our aim was to develop an Infarct Evolution Classifier and a Brain Regions Classifier in a rat model of focal ischemic stroke using SpectraClassifier. A total of 164 single-voxel proton spectra obtained with a 7 Tesla magnet at an echo time of 12 ms from non-infarcted parenchyma, subventricular zones and infarcted parenchyma were analyzed with SpectraClassifier ( http://gabrmn.uab.es/?q=sc ). The spectra corresponded to Sprague-Dawley rats (healthy rats, n = 7) and stroke rats at day 1 post-stroke (acute phase, n = 6 rats) and at days 7 ± 1 post-stroke (subacute phase, n = 14). In the Infarct Evolution Classifier, spectral features contributed by lactate + mobile lipids (1.33 ppm), total creatine (3.05 ppm) and mobile lipids (0.85 ppm) distinguished among non-infarcted parenchyma (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity), acute phase of infarct (100% sensitivity and 95% specificity) and subacute phase of infarct (78% sensitivity and 100% specificity). In the Brain Regions Classifier, spectral features contributed by myoinositol (3.62 ppm) and total creatine (3.04/3.05 ppm) distinguished among infarcted parenchyma (100% sensitivity and 98% specificity), non-infarcted parenchyma (84% sensitivity and 84% specificity) and subventricular zones (76% sensitivity and 93% specificity). SpectraClassifier identified candidate biomarkers for infarct evolution (mobile lipids accumulation) and different brain regions (myoinositol content).

  15. Modification of infarct material properties limits adverse ventricular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masato; Eckert, Chad E; Matsuzaki, Kanji; Noma, Mio; Ryan, Liam P; Burdick, Jason A; Jackson, Benjamin M; Gorman, Joseph H; Sacks, Michael S; Gorman, Robert C

    2011-08-01

    Infarct expansion after myocardial infarction (MI) is an important phenomenon that initiates and sustains adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that infarct modification by material-induced infarct stiffening and thickening limits infarct expansion and LV remodeling. Anteroapical infarction was induced in 21 sheep. Sheep were randomized to injection of saline (2.6 mL) or tissue filler material (2.6 mL) into the infarct within 3 hours of MI. Animals were monitored for 8 weeks with echocardiography to assess infarct expansion and global LV remodeling. Morphometric measurements were performed of excised hearts to quantify infarct thickness. Regional blood flow was assessed with colored microspheres. Infarct material properties were measured using biaxial tensile testing. Compared with controls at 8 weeks, treatment animals had less infarct expansion, reduced LV dilatation (LV systolic volumes: 60.8±4.3 vs 80.3±6.9 mL; p<0.05), greater ejection fraction (0.310±0.026 vs 0.276±0.013; p<0.05), thicker infarcts (5.5±0.2 vs 2.2±0.3 mm; p<0.05), and greater infarct blood flow (0.22±0.04 vs 0.11±0.03 mL/min/g; p<0.05). The longitudinal peak strain in the treatment group was less (0.05014±0.0141) than the control group (0.1024±0.0101), indicating increased stiffness of the treated infarcts. Durable infarct thickening and stiffening can be achieved by infarct biomaterial injection, resulting in the amelioration of infarct expansion and global LV remodeling. Further material optimization will allow for clinical translation of this novel treatment paradigm. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative omental infarction following colonic resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, S.F., E-mail: skerr44@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Hyland, R.; Rowbotham, E.; Chalmers, A.G. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Aim: To illustrate the computed tomography (CT) appearances and natural history of postoperative omental infarction following colonic resection and to highlight the important clinical implications of this radiological diagnosis. Materials and methods: Over a 3 year period, 15 patients with a history of colonic resection were identified as having a CT diagnosis of postoperative omental infarction. Relevant clinical and pathological data were retrospectively collected from the institution's electronic patient records system and all relevant imaging was reviewed, including serial CT images in 10 patients. Results: A diagnosis of postoperative omental infarction was made in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who had undergone open or laparoscopic colonic resection for benign or malignant disease. CT appearances ranged from diffuse omental stranding to discrete masses, which typically appeared within weeks of surgery and could persist for years. In four (36%) of the patients with colorectal cancer, the CT appearances raised concern for recurrent malignancy, but percutaneous biopsy and/or serial CT allowed a confident diagnosis of omental infarction to be made. Although most cases were self-limiting, three (20%) cases were complicated by secondary infection and required radiological or surgical intervention. Conclusion: Postoperative omental infarction is an under-recognized complication of colonic resection. It has the potential to mimic recurrent malignancy and may require radiological or surgical intervention for secondary infection.

  17. Neuropsychological changes related to unilateral lenticulostriate infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, O; Rousseaux, M; Pruvo, J P; Cabaret, M; Leys, D

    1994-01-01

    According to previous studies, focal capsulostriatal lesions may produce aphasia, hemineglect, gestural apraxia, frontal lobe dysfunction, and memory impairment. A few reports of capsulostriate infarcts secondary to involvement of lenticulostriate arteries have confirmed that aphasia and hemineglect may occur whereas gestural apraxia, anosognosia and frontal-lobe symptoms are rare. Most studies used CT scan assessment and did not exclude possible associated lesions. Neuropsychological changes in 11 patients with lenticulostriate infarcts diagnosed by CT scan were prospectively investigated. MRI in five of the 11 patients showed an associated cortical lesion not seen on CT scan. Patients with pure lenticulostriate infarcts on MRI may exhibit aphasia of mild severity whereas Broca's aphasia, hemineglect, gestural apraxia, and anosognosia were only seen in the subgroup with associated cortical lesions. Aphasia in patients with pure lenticulostriate infarcts was characterised by prominent expressive and lexicosemantic task impairments. The results strongly suggest that cortical involvement is critical to the extent and severity of neuropsychological changes in patients with lenticulostriate infarcts. Images PMID:8164000

  18. Bone infarction - A rare complication of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, T.M.; Jesspo, J.F.; Wong, J.C.H. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1997-09-01

    Full text: In this study a combination of a {sup 99m}Tc MDP Bone scan and {sup 67}Ga scan was used to help in the diagnosis of bone infarction, in a patient with known pancreatitis. A 40-year-old male patient presented to hospital with a history of abdominal epigastric pain and generalised joint pains especially in his left knee and foot. He was recovering after a diagnosis four months earlier of hypertension and pancreatitis. On examination, he was febrile, and had scattered erythematous nodules on both legs. There were joint effusions involving his elbows, knees and ankles. (A series of tests, seemed to suggest either an inflammatory process or osteomyelitis.) At this stage, a two phase bone scan was performed which showed several areas of marked hyperaemia on the blood pools and intense abnormal uptake in the delayed images. Differential diagnosis was bone infarcts or multifocal osteomyelitis. A gallium scan was performed. The combined bone and gallium studies were more in keeping with bone infarcts. Conservative treatment was instituted and a repeat bone scan one year later showed marked improvement. Since pancreatitis is rarely complicated by bone infarction, the diagnosis is often delayed. In this case, nuclear medicine imaging played a very decisive role in excluding osteomyelitis and diagnosing the presence of widespread bone infarction-a rare sequela of pancreatitis.

  19. Echocardiographic Diagnostics of Myocardial Infarction in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Revunenkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Early and correct diagnostics of myocardial infarction in newborns is impossible without modern instrumental methods, among which echocardiography is the leading one. Hypokinesia, akinesia or dyskinesia of local segments of the heart ventricular wall is determined with echocardiography. We examined a 3-days-old baby with circulatory failure requiring cardiotonic support. On auscultation there was a heart murmur. It was an intracardiac conduction disoder and infarction-like changes on ECG, however, a convincing evidence to interpret the patient’s condition as myocardial infarction has not been received. Therefore, it was decided to conduct echocardiography. According to the results of echocardiography the presence of hyperechogenic diskinetic locus in the apical segment of the right ventricle (post-infarction scar, a local pericardial effusion in the same projection, hyperechogenic movable mass (thrombus in the apical segment of the right ventricle were determined that together with the results of the ECG allowed us to set diagnosis myocardial infarction. Transthoracic echocardiography is one of highly informative methods; the data obtained allowed to correctly interpret the clinical picture of heart failure and to reveal the cause of the patien’st dependance on cardiotonic support.

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies ... medication. This information may someday make it possible to predict who ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ...

  3. Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Brain lesions By Mayo Clinic Staff A brain lesion is an abnormality seen on a brain-imaging test, such as ... tomography (CT). On CT or MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don' ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  5. Restraining infarct expansion preserves left ventricular geometry and function after acute anteroapical infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, S T; Malekan, R; Gorman, J H; Jackson, B M; Gorman, R C; Suzuki, Y; Plappert, T; Bogen, D K; Sutton, M G; Edmunds, L H

    Expansion of an acute myocardial infarction predicts progressive left ventricular (LV) dilatation, functional deterioration, and early death. This study tests the hypothesis that restraining expansion of an acute infarction preserves LV geometry and resting function. In 23 sheep, snares were placed around the distal left anterior descending and second diagonal coronary arteries. In 12 sheep, infarct deformation was prevented by Marlex mesh placed over the anticipated myocardial infarct. Snared arteries were occluded 10 to 14 days later. Serial hemodynamic measurements and transdiaphragmatic quantitative echocardiograms were obtained up to 8 weeks after anteroapical infarction of 0.23 of LV mass. In sheep with mesh, circulatory hemodynamics, stroke work, and end-systolic elastance return to preinfarction values 1 week after infarction and do not change subsequently. Ventricular volumes and ejection fraction do not change after the first week postinfarction. Control animals develop large anteroapical ventricular aneurysms, increasing LV dilatation, and progressive deterioration in circulatory hemodynamics and ventricular function. At week 8, differences in LV end-diastolic pressure, cardiac output, end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction, stroke work, and end-systolic elastance are significant (P<0.01) between groups. Preventing expansion of acute myocardial infarctions preserves LV geometry and function.

  6. Acquired hemophilia A associated with internal border-zone infarction triggered by major hemorrhage of thigh and leg: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Nagami, Shuuhei; Shimizu, Hisao; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2015-02-01

    It is unusual to be complicated with cerebral infarction for bleeding disorders. We describe a first case of internal border-zone infarction (I-BZI) complicated with acquired hemophilia A. A 79-year-old man was introduced from other hospital by cerebral infarction and severe anemia. His left thigh and leg were swollen with subcutaneous bleeding. Activated partial thromboplastin time was 99.4 seconds. Factor VIII activity was less than 1% and Factor VIII inhibitor concentration was 85 BU, respectively. The platelet count and prothrombin time were normal. These results were consistent with the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed multiple small infarction in bilateral internal border zone. To our knowledge, this is the first case of I-BZI complicated with acquired hemophilia A. This case suggested that major hemorrhage is one of the sole causes of I-BZI. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  8. Aircraft noise, air pollution, and mortality from myocardial infarction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/331385880; Spoerri, A.; Egger, M.; Roosli, M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Myocardial infarction has been associated with both transportation noise and air pollution. We examined residential exposure to aircraft noise and mortality from myocardial infarction, taking air pollution into account. METHODS: We analyzed the Swiss National Cohort, which includes

  9. Cerebral And Myocardial Infarction In A Patient With Uncorrected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    embolism. Ischaemia from thrombotic occlusion of vessels supplying major organs may occur. The case is presented of a 17 year old boy with Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) who developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and cerebral infarction ...

  10. Association of blood transfusion with increased mortality in myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Saurav; Wetterslev, Jørn; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists.......The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists....

  11. Pediatric myocardial infarction after racemic epinephrine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, M J; Nguyen, B X; Hutchison, T J; Wiggins, J W; Ziegler, J W

    1999-07-01

    Myocardial infarction is a previously unreported complication of treatment with racemic epinephrine that is used commonly in the emergency department for severe respiratory distress in bronchiolitis or croup syndrome. We describe a pediatric patient who presented with the croup syndrome and severe respiratory distress that required multiple doses of nebulized racemic epinephrine in the emergency department. The patient developed ventricular tachycardia and mild chest discomfort during one treatment, which resolved spontaneously on discontinuation of the nebulization. Persistently abnormal electrocardiograms and elevated creatine phosphokinase MB isoenzyme (CPK-MB) levels suggested a myocardial infarction had occurred. Subsequent echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and angiography revealed an anatomically normal heart with normal coronary circulation; however, a stress nuclear study showed a small myocardial infarct. The significance of this previously unreported complication of racemic epinephrine is discussed, along with recommendations for proper use in the emergency department.

  12. Optical projection tomography permits efficient assessment of infarct volume in the murine heart postmyocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Wu, J; Gray, C D; McGregor, K; Rossi, A G; Morrison, H; Jansen, M A; Gray, G A

    2015-08-15

    The extent of infarct injury is a key determinant of structural and functional remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). Infarct volume in experimental models of MI can be determined accurately by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but this is costly and not widely available. Experimental studies therefore commonly assess injury by histological analysis of sections sampled from the infarcted heart, an approach that is labor intensive, can be subjective, and does not fully assess the extent of injury. The present study aimed to assess the suitability of optical projection tomography (OPT) for identification of injured myocardium and for accurate and efficient assessment of infarct volume. Intact, perfusion-fixed, optically cleared hearts, collected from mice 7 days after induction of MI by coronary artery occlusion, were scanned by a tomograph for autofluorescence emission after UV excitation, generating >400 transaxial sections for reconstruction. Differential autofluorescence permitted discrimination between viable and injured myocardium and highlighted the heterogeneity within the infarct zone. Two-dimensional infarct areas derived from OPT imaging and Masson's trichrome staining of slices from the same heart were highly correlated (r(2) = 0.99, P < 0.0001). Infarct volume derived from reconstructed OPT sections correlated with volume derived from in vivo late gadolinium enhancement MRI (r(2) = 0.7608, P < 0.005). Tissue processing for OPT did not compromise subsequent immunohistochemical detection of endothelial cell and inflammatory cell markers. OPT is thus a nondestructive, efficient, and accurate approach for routine in vitro assessment of murine myocardial infarct volume. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Porcine (Sus scrofa) Chronic Myocardial Infarction Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-03

    be used to investigate new methodologies for treatment of chronic myocardial infarction in individuals afflicted with chronic ischemic... Myocardial Infarction Model Development.” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (PI) / TRAINING COORDINATOR (TC): Lt Col. Daren Danielson DEPARTMENT: 60MSGS/SGCH...invasively, a myocardial infarction that was isolated to the mid-anterior, left ventricular wall. In doing so, we were able to create an infarct that

  14. Regional Mechanics Determine Collagen Fiber Structure in Healing Myocardial Infarcts

    OpenAIRE

    Fomovsky, Gregory M.; Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shap...

  15. Lacunar infarct during pallidotomy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christoforidis, G.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Dept. of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Spickler, E.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Papaioannou, G. [2. Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Athens Medical School (Greece); Junn, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2001-04-01

    A symptomatic lacunar infarct is an unusual complication which may develop during stereotactically guided pallidotomy using radiofrequency thermoablation. We describe a 54-year-old man with Parkinson's disease involving predominantly the right side, progressively deteriorating under medical management. He underwent stereotactically guided radiofrequency thermoablation of the posteroventral globus pallidus interna. Despite intraoperative microelectrode recording and stimulation, the patient developed right facial weakness and pronator drift during the procedure. MRI showed a small lacunar infarct in the left internal capsule, in addition to the appropriately placed ablative lesion. We discuss the potential mechanisms for this type of injury. (orig.)

  16. [Segmental testicular infarction in sickle cell anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, F E

    2014-05-01

    Vascular occlusions are the clinical indicators of sickle cell disease and in urology they can lead to papillary necrosis, renal infarction or priapism. Segmental testicular infarction in patients with sickle cell disease is a rare event and only a few cases have been reported. We present a 25-year-old man with right testicular pain increasing over 3 days and sickle cell disease. Ultrasound of the right scrotum presented an inhomogeneous, mainly hypoechegenic mass with a hyperechogenic margin and no sign of blood flow. A partial orchiectomy was performed with total enucleation of the lesion, which was histologically diagnosed as benign hemorrhagic necrotic testicular tissue.

  17. Infarction in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatka, L A; Depper, M H; Marini, A M

    1998-08-01

    Infarction in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory is an uncommon cause of stroke. The clinical findings of ACA infarctions are not fully characterized but include contralateral hemiparesis, urinary incontinence, transcortical aphasia, agraphia, apraxia, and executive dysfunction. We report a patient with a large right ACA infarction, who in addition to previously reported findings also had a complete hemiplegia, profound sensory neglect, and micrographia.

  18. Platelet hyperreactivity and prognosis in survivors of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, M. D.; Cats, V. M.; van Capelle, F. J.; Vreeken, J.

    1990-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increase in spontaneous aggregability of platelets in vitro predicts mortality and coronary events in patients who have survived a recent myocardial infarction. A cohort of 149 survivors of infarction entered our study three months after the index infarction and was

  19. Association of splenic and renal infarctions in acute abdominal emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano; Gatta, Gianluca; Lombardo, Patrizia; Stavolo, Ciro; Romano, Luigia; Grassi, Roberto

    2004-04-01

    Introduction: Splenic and renal infarctions are usually related to vascular disease or haematologic abnormalities. Their association is infrequent and rarely observed in trauma. In this study, we analyze our data to look at the occurrence of renal and splenic infarctions based on CT findings in a period of 4 years. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of 84 patients admitted to our Department of Diagnostic Imaging from June 1998 to December 2002, who underwent emergency abdominal spiral CT examination and in whom there was evidence of splenic and/or renal infarction. Results: We found 40 cases of splenic infarction and 54 cases of renal infarction, associated in 10 patients. In 26 patients, there was also evidence of intestinal infarction. A traumatic origin was found in 19 cases; non-traumatic causes were found in 65 patients. Association between renal and splenic infarction in the same patient was related to trauma in two cases. Conclusions: Although renal and splenic infarctions are a common manifestation of cardiac thromboembolism, other systemic pathologies, infections or trauma may lead to this occurrence. Renal infarction may be clinically and/or surgically managed with success in most cases. There are potential complications in splenic infarction, such as development of pseudocysts, abscesses, hemorrhage, subcapsular haematoma or splenic rupture; splenectomy in these cases may be necessary. Some patients with splenic and/or renal infarction may be clinically asymptomatic. The high accuracy of CT examination is needed to allow a correct evaluation of infarcted organs.

  20. Acute myocardial infarction as a result of stress

    OpenAIRE

    Bakusová, Tereza

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to describe acute myocardial infarction as a psychosomatic disease. Represents acute myocardial infarction as a result of stress and type A behavior. Research part reveals number of respondents, affected by stresss at the time of myocardial infarction and respondents with type A behavior.

  1. Hemicraniectomy after middle cerebral artery infarction with life-threatening Edema trial (HAMLET). Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of decompressive surgery in space-occupying hemispheric infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Amelink, G Johan; Algra, Ale; van Gijn, Jan; Macleod, Malcolm R; Kappelle, L Jaap; van der Worp, H Bart

    2006-09-11

    Patients with a hemispheric infarct and massive space-occupying brain oedema have a poor prognosis. Despite maximal conservative treatment, the case fatality rate may be as high as 80%, and most survivors are left severely disabled. Non-randomised studies suggest that decompressive surgery reduces mortality substantially and improves functional outcome of survivors. This study is designed to compare the efficacy of decompressive surgery to improve functional outcome with that of conservative treatment in patients with space-occupying supratentorial infarction The study design is that of a multi-centre, randomised clinical trial, which will include 112 patients aged between 18 and 60 years with a large hemispheric infarct with space-occupying oedema that leads to a decrease in consciousness. Patients will be randomised to receive either decompressive surgery in combination with medical treatment or best medical treatment alone. Randomisation will be stratified for the intended mode of conservative treatment (intensive care or stroke unit care). The primary outcome measure will be functional outcome, as determined by the score on the modified Rankin Scale, at one year.

  2. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Multiple Embolic Infarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy W. Yoon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Only a few cases of Turner syndrome (TS with ischemic stroke have been reported. Various arteriopathies of the cerebral arteries, including fibromuscular dysplasia, congenital hypoplasia, moyamoya syndrome, and premature atherosclerosis have been assumed to be the cause of ischemic stroke in TS. There has been no case report of a TS patient presenting with an embolic stroke pattern without any cerebral arteriopathy. A 28-year-old woman with TS was referred to our hospital because of abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings. She underwent brain MRI at the referring hospital because she experienced sudden-onset diffuse headache. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed multiple acute embolic infarcts in different vascular territories. Intracranial and extracranial arterial disease was not detected on cerebral magnetic resonance angiography and carotid sonography. Embolic source workups, including transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, Holter monitoring, and transcranial Doppler shunt study, were all negative. Hypercoagulability and vasculitis panels were also negative. Our patient was diagnosed with cryptogenic embolic stroke. This is the first report of a TS patient with an embolic stroke pattern. Our case shows that ischemic stroke in TS could be due to embolism as well as the various cerebral arteriopathies documented in previous reports.

  3. Malignant Hemispheric Cerebral Infarction Associated with Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Miyata

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS is a rare condition that is characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability due to a shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. This results in diffuse general swelling, fetal hypovolemic shock, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. Although ISCLS rarely induces cerebral infarction, we experienced a patient who deteriorated and was comatose as a result of massive cerebral infarction associated with ISCLS. In this case, severe hypotensive shock, general edema, hemiparesis, and aphasia appeared after serious antecedent gastrointestinal symptoms. Progressive life-threatening ischemic cerebral edema required decompressive hemicraniectomy. The patient experienced another episode of severe hypotension and limb edema that resulted in multiple extremity compartment syndrome. Treatment entailed forearm and calf fasciotomies. Cerebral edema in the ischemic brain progresses rapidly in patients suffering from ISCLS. Strict control of fluid volume resuscitation and aggressive diuretic therapy may be needed during the post-leak phase of fluid remobilization.

  4. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann's syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yen; Yen, Che-Hung; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Chang, Serena; Huang, San-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Gerstmann's syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann's syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann's syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.

  5. Robust unsupervised segmentation of infarct lesion from diffusion tensor MR images using multiscale statistical classification and partial volume voxel reclassification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Tian, Jie; Li, Enzhong; Dai, Jianping

    2004-12-01

    Manual region tracing method for segmentation of infarction lesions in images from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is usually used in clinical works, but it is time consuming. A new unsupervised method has been developed, which is a multistage procedure, involving image preprocessing, calculation of tensor field and measurement of diffusion anisotropy, segmentation of infarction volume based on adaptive multiscale statistical classification (MSSC), and partial volume voxel reclassification (PVVR). The method accounts for random noise, intensity overlapping, partial volume effect (PVE), and intensity shading artifacts, which always appear in DT-MR images. The proposed method was applied to 20 patients with clinically diagnosed brain infarction by DT-MRI scans. The accuracy and reproducibility in terms of identifying the infarction lesion have been confirmed by clinical experts. This automatic segmentation method is promising not only in detecting the location and the size of infarction lesion in stroke patient but also in quantitatively analyzing diffusion anisotropy of lesion to guide clinical diagnoses and therapy.

  6. Malignant infarction of the middle cerebral artery in a porcine model. A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Arikan

    Full Text Available Interspecies variability and poor clinical translation from rodent studies indicate that large gyrencephalic animal stroke models are urgently needed. We present a proof-of-principle study describing an alternative animal model of malignant infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA in the common pig and illustrate some of its potential applications. We report on metabolic patterns, ionic profile, brain partial pressure of oxygen (PtiO2, expression of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1, and the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4.A 5-hour ischemic infarct of the MCA territory was performed in 5 2.5-to-3-month-old female hybrid pigs (Large White x Landrace using a frontotemporal approach. The core and penumbra areas were intraoperatively monitored to determine the metabolic and ionic profiles. To determine the infarct volume, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and immunohistochemistry analysis was performed to determine SUR1 and TRPM4 expression.PtiO2 monitoring showed an abrupt reduction in values close to 0 mmHg after MCA occlusion in the core area. Hourly cerebral microdialysis showed that the infarcted tissue was characterized by reduced concentrations of glucose (0.03 mM and pyruvate (0.003 mM and increases in lactate levels (8.87mM, lactate-pyruvate ratio (4202, glycerol levels (588 μM, and potassium concentration (27.9 mmol/L. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased expression of SUR1-TRPM4 channels.The aim of the present proof-of-principle study was to document the feasibility of a large animal model of malignant MCA infarction by performing transcranial occlusion of the MCA in the common pig, as an alternative to lisencephalic animals. This model may be useful for detailed studies of cerebral ischemia mechanisms and the development of neuroprotective strategies.

  7. Malignant infarction of the middle cerebral artery in a porcine model. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Fuat; Martínez-Valverde, Tamara; Sánchez-Guerrero, Ángela; Campos, Mireia; Esteves, Marielle; Gandara, Dario; Torné, Ramon; Castro, Lidia; Dalmau, Antoni; Tibau, Joan; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Interspecies variability and poor clinical translation from rodent studies indicate that large gyrencephalic animal stroke models are urgently needed. We present a proof-of-principle study describing an alternative animal model of malignant infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the common pig and illustrate some of its potential applications. We report on metabolic patterns, ionic profile, brain partial pressure of oxygen (PtiO2), expression of sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1), and the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4). A 5-hour ischemic infarct of the MCA territory was performed in 5 2.5-to-3-month-old female hybrid pigs (Large White x Landrace) using a frontotemporal approach. The core and penumbra areas were intraoperatively monitored to determine the metabolic and ionic profiles. To determine the infarct volume, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and immunohistochemistry analysis was performed to determine SUR1 and TRPM4 expression. PtiO2 monitoring showed an abrupt reduction in values close to 0 mmHg after MCA occlusion in the core area. Hourly cerebral microdialysis showed that the infarcted tissue was characterized by reduced concentrations of glucose (0.03 mM) and pyruvate (0.003 mM) and increases in lactate levels (8.87mM), lactate-pyruvate ratio (4202), glycerol levels (588 μM), and potassium concentration (27.9 mmol/L). Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased expression of SUR1-TRPM4 channels. The aim of the present proof-of-principle study was to document the feasibility of a large animal model of malignant MCA infarction by performing transcranial occlusion of the MCA in the common pig, as an alternative to lisencephalic animals. This model may be useful for detailed studies of cerebral ischemia mechanisms and the development of neuroprotective strategies.

  8. The Changing Epidemiology of Myocardial Infarction in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1995–2012: Trends in Myocardial Infarction Incidence and Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Yariv; Weston, Susan A.; Jiang, Ruoxiang; Roger, Véronique L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Contemporary data on the epidemiology of myocardial infarction in the population are limited and derived primarily from cohorts of hospitalized myocardial infarction patients. We assessed temporal trends in incident and recurrent myocardial infarction, with further partitioning of the rates into prehospital deaths and hospitalized events, in a geographically defined community. METHODS All myocardial infarction events recorded among Olmsted County, Minnesota residents aged 25 years and older from 1995–2012, including prehospital deaths, were classified into incident and recurrent. Standardized rates were calculated and temporal trends compared. RESULTS Altogether, 5258 myocardial infarctions occurred, including 1448 (27.5%) recurrences; 430 (8.2%) prehospital deaths were recorded. Among hospitalized events, recurrent myocardial infarction was associated with greater mortality risk than incident myocardial infarction (age-, sex-, and year-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.37–1.61). Although the overall rate of myocardial infarction declined over time (average annual percent change, −3.3), the magnitude of the decline varied widely. Incident hospitalized myocardial infarction rate fell 2.7%/y, compared with decreases of 1.5%/y in recurrent hospitalized myocardial infarction, 14.1%/y in prehospital fatal incident myocardial infarction, and 12.3% in prehospital fatal recurrent myocardial infarction (all P for diverging trends infarctions (25.3% in 1995–2000, 26.8% in 2001–2006, and 29.0% in 2007–2012, Ptrend = .02). CONCLUSIONS Over the past 18 years, a heterogeneous decline in myocardial infarction rates occurred in Olmsted County, resulting in transitions from incident to recurrent events and from prehospital deaths to hospitalized myocardial infarctions. Recurrent myocardial infarction confers a worse prognosis, thereby stressing the need to optimize prevention strategies in the population. PMID:25261010

  9. Restraining infarct expansion preserves left ventricular geometry and function after acute anteroapical infarction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelley, S T; Malekan, R; Gorman, 3rd, J H; Jackson, B M; Gorman, R C; Suzuki, Y; Plappert, T; Bogen, D K; Sutton, M G; Edmunds, Jr, L H

    1999-01-01

    .... Snared arteries were occluded 10 to 14 days later. Serial hemodynamic measurements and transdiaphragmatic quantitative echocardiograms were obtained up to 8 weeks after anteroapical infarction of 0.23 of LV mass...

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Treatment With Colchicine in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Alexopoulos, Nikolaos; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Sianos, George; Goudevenos, John; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Pyrgakis, Vlasios; Cleman, Michael W; Manolis, Antonis S; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Lekakis, John

    2015-10-13

    Inflammatory processes have been identified as key mediators of the deleterious effects of ischemia/reperfusion in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Colchicine is a substance with potent anti-inflammatory properties, suitable for safe use in patients with cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a short course of colchicine treatment could lead to reduced infarct size. Patients presenting with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction ≤12 hours from pain onset (treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention) were randomly assigned to colchicine or placebo for 5 days. The primary outcome parameter was the area under the curve of creatine kinase-myocardial brain fraction concentration. A subset of patients underwent cardiac MRI with late gadolinium enhancement 6 to 9 days after the index ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. One hundred fifty-one patients were included (60 in the MRI substudy). The area under the creatine kinase-myocardial brain fraction curve was 3144 (interquartile range [IQR], 1754-6940) ng·h(-1)·mL(-1) in the colchicine group in comparison with 6184 (IQR, 4456-6980) ng·h(-1)·mL(-1) in controls (Pinfarct size was 18.3 (IQR, 7.6-29.9) mL/1.73 m(2) in the colchicine group versus 23.2 (18.5-33.4) mL/1.73 m(2) in controls (P=0.019). The relative infarct size (as a proportion to left ventricular myocardial volume) was 13.0 (IQR, 8.0-25.3) % and 19.8 (IQR, 13.7-29.8) %, respectively (P=0.034). These results suggest a potential benefit of colchicine in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, but further clinical trials are necessary to draw secure conclusions, especially considering the fact that the present study was not powered to assess clinical end points. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01936285. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Patterns of damage in the mature neonatal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triulzi, Fabio; Parazzini, Cecilia; Righini, Andrea [Children' s Hospital ' ' Vittore Buzzi' ' , Departments of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    Patterns of damage in the mature neonatal brain can be subdivided into focal, multifocal and diffuse. The main cause of diffuse brain damage in the term newborn is hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). HIE is still the major recognized perinatal cause of neurological morbidity in full-term newborns. MRI offers today the highest sensitivity in detecting acute anoxic injury of the neonatal brain. Conventional acquisition techniques together with modern diffusion techniques can identify typical patterns of HIE injury, even in the early course of the disease. However, even though highly suggestive, these patterns cannot be considered as pathognomonic. Perinatal metabolic disease such as kernicterus and severe hypoglycaemia should be differentiated from classic HIE. Other conditions, such as infections, non-accidental injury and rarer metabolic diseases can be misinterpreted as HIE in their early course when diffuse brain swelling is still the predominant MRI feature. Diffusion techniques can help to differentiate different types of diffuse brain oedema. Typical examples of focal injuries are arterial or venous infarctions. In arterial infarction, diffusion techniques can define more precisely than conventional imaging the extent of focal infarction, even in the hyperacute phase. Moreover, diffusion techniques provide quantitative data of acute corticospinal tract injury, especially at the level of the cerebral peduncles. Venous infarction should be suspected in every case of unexplained cerebral haematoma in the full-term newborn. In the presence of spontaneous bleeding, venous structures should always be evaluated by MR angiography. (orig.)

  12. In vivo 1H spectroscopy of the human brain at 1.5 tesla. Preliminary experience at a clinical installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Larsson, H; Jensen, K M

    1990-01-01

    technique. Our preliminary results indicate that it is possible to detect a number of metabolites in the brain within a total measurement time of one hour. The dominant peaks in the spectra from healthy volunteers are N-acetyl aspartate, choline and creatine/phosphocreatine. The spectra obtained from......In vivo localized water suppressed proton spectroscopy of human brain was carried out on 15 healthy volunteers and 2 patients suffering from a brain tumour and an infarction, respectively. The measurements were performed on a whole body MR system, operating at 1.5 tesla using the stimulated echo...... the brain tumour and the infarct, respectively, differed very much from those obtained in healthy brain tissue. Our preliminary results indicate that localized proton spectroscopy may contribute to non-invasive brain tumour classification and possibly also to the differentiation between tumours and infarcts...

  13. Does plasma copeptin level at admission predict final infarct size in ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, Vijai; Beig, Jahangir Rashid; Tramboo, Nisar A; Rasool, Roohi; Choh, Nasir A; Bashir, Shazia; Rather, Hilal A; Lone, Ajaz A

    2016-09-15

    Copeptin is a novel biomarker of potential diagnostic and prognostic value in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between plasma copeptin levels at admission and final infarct size in STEMI patients. This observational study was conducted in Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical sciences, Srinagar, for a period of 1year. 60 patients with STEMI admitted within 24h of symptom onset were included in the study. Plasma copeptin concentrations were determined by ELISA from blood samples drawn at the time of admission. Infarct size was estimated on cardiac MRI after 5-14days of admission, in successfully reperfused patients. Correlations between plasma copeptin levels, infarct size and various clinico-hemodynamic variables were studied. Plasma copeptin concentrations showed a significant positive correlation with MRI determined infarct size (r=0.957; p≤0.0001). Copeptin levels were significantly higher in patients with anterior wall infarction (p≤0.0001), longer symptom duration (p=0.018), advanced Killip class (p≤0.0001), higher body mass index (p=0.019) and extensive coronary artery disease (p≤0.0001). On multivariate analysis, copeptin levels at admission independently predicted final infarct size, irrespective of the clinico-hemodynamic profile of patients or mode of reperfusion (p≤0.0001). The only independent predictor of copeptin level was symptom duration (p=0.018). Copeptin level at admission predicts final infarct size in STEMI patients. Further evidence is however needed before implementation of this biomarker into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cilostazol, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, attenuates photothrombotic focal ischemic brain injury in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hideki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Yao, Hiroshi; Miyakoda, Goro

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of anti-platelet agents with different modes of action (cilostazol, aspirin, and clopidogrel) on brain infarction produced by photothrombotic middle-cerebral-artery (MCA) occlusion in male, spontaneously hypertensive rats. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry in the penumbral cortex. Infarct size was evaluated 24 h after MCA occlusion. The effects of these drugs on infarct size were examined by pretreatment of rats undergoing MCA occlusion. Pretreatment with cilostazol (100 mg/kg) significantly reduced infarct size. In contrast, aspirin (10 mg/kg) and clopidogrel (3 mg/kg) failed to mitigate infarct size, regardless of their apparent inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation. Post-treatment with cilostazol also significantly attenuated the infarct size, associated with improved CBF in the penumbral region. In support of this effect, cilostazol increased nitric oxide (NO) production and prostaglandin-I(2) (PGI(2)) release in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Cilostazol-induced NO production and PGI(2) release were completely abolished by an NO synthase inhibitor and aspirin, respectively. These findings show that cilostazol reduced brain infarct size due to an improvement in penumbral CBF possibly in association with increased endothelial NO and PGI(2) production.

  15. Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S.; Hawes, Armani M.; Smith, Jacqui

    2015-01-01

    Background The main strategy for alleviating heart disease has been to target individuals and encourage them to change their health behaviors. Though important, emphasis on individuals has diverted focus and responsibility away from neighborhood characteristics, which also strongly influence people’s behaviors. Although a growing body of research has repeatedly demonstrated strong associations between neighborhood characteristics and cardiovascular health, it has typically focused on negative neighborhood characteristics. Only a few studies have examined the potential health enhancing effects of positive neighborhood characteristics, such as perceived neighborhood social cohesion. Methods Using multiple logistic regression models, we tested whether higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with lower incidence of myocardial infarction. Prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study—a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50—were used to analyze 5,276 participants with no history of heart disease. Respondents were tracked for four years and analyses adjusted for relevant sociodemographic, behavioral, biological, and psychosocial factors. Results In a model that adjusted for age, gender, race, marital status, education, and total wealth, each standard deviation increase in perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a 22% reduced odds of myocardial infarction (OR = 0.78, 95% CI, 0.63–0.94. The association between perceived neighborhood social cohesion and myocardial infarction remained even after adjusting for behavioral, biological, and psychosocial covariates. Conclusions Higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion may have a protective effect against myocardial infarction. PMID:25135074

  16. Calcium and M'yocardial Infarction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-16

    Mar 16, 1974 ... Urinary excretion of calcium tended to be even lower in these .... 16 March 1974. S.A. MEDICAL JOURNAL. 525. 150. 50. Fig. 5. Urine calcium in myocardial infarction (means and standard error relative to age). AGE OF PATIENT .... Plasma proteins and blood urea were also measured in. 10 consecutive ...

  17. Acute Thrombo-embolic Renal Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old woman was admitted for acute onset of right lower abdominal pain. She was taking anticoagulant medication regularly for rheumatic valvular disease and atrial fibrillation. Physical examination revealed no obvious abdominal or flank tenderness. Right thrombo-embolic renal infarction was diagnosed after performing computed tomography angiography (CTA.

  18. Bilateral Simultaneous Macular Infarction with Spontaneous Visual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... To report the rare and dramatic event of bilateral macular infarction in a sickle cell hemoglobinopathy (SS genotype) patient, resulting in bilateral severe reduction in visual acuity. Without any intervention, the patient's vision gradually improved over the follow‑up period. Central visual field defects however ...

  19. Bilateral Simultaneous Macular Infarction with Spontaneous Visual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To report the rare and dramatic event of bilateral macular infarction in a sickle cell hemoglobinopathy (SS genotype) patient, resulting in bilateral severe reduction in visual acuity. Without any intervention, the patient's vision gradually improved over the follow‑up period. Central visual field defects however persisted.

  20. Metabolic interventions in acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, Johannes Cornelis Clemens van der

    2005-01-01

    This thesis is a new branch on the large tree of studies on optimal therapeutic strategy for and understanding of ST segment elevation MI. In 1989, the Zwolle Myocardial Infarction Study Group performed its first study of comparing PCI with streptokinase. Thereafter studies on the effect of primary

  1. Ambulatory ST segment monitoring after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of transient myocardial ischaemia after myocardial infarction seems to be lower than in other subgroups with coronary artery disease. In postinfarction patients, however, a greater proportion of ischaemic episodes are silent. At present there is substantial evidence that transient ...

  2. Transient myocardial ischemia after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H

    1995-01-01

    Ambulatory ST-segment monitoring is a relatively new device in the evaluation of myocardial ischemia. The method is unique in allowing us to continuously examine the patient over an extended period of time in a changing environmental milieu. In survivors of acute myocardial infarction the prevale...

  3. Glucose control peri-myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatvedt, G D

    2008-05-01

    This review summarises the available clinical trials data investigating the effects of glucose lowering on mortality in patients admitted to hospital with acute myocardial infarction. The results of these studies are inconclusive with no clear evidence that this intervention has additional benefit over and above routine care.

  4. Statins and perioperative myocardial infarction. | Levin | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growing prevalence of atherosclerosis means that perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI) is of significant concern to anesthesiologists. Perioperative revascularization (if indicated medically), beta blockade (in high risk patients) and statin therapy are therapeutic modalities that are currently employed to reduce PMI.

  5. Antioxidants and myocardial infarction : the EURAMIC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis reports the background, design and results of a multi-centre study on the relationship between diet-derived antioxidants and the risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI) in men. Levels of α-tocopherol and β-carotene in adipose tissue and of selenium in toenails were compared between

  6. Antioxidants and myocardial infarction : the EURAMIC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis reports the background, design and results of a multi-centre study on the relationship between diet-derived antioxidants and the risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI) in men. Levels of α-tocopherol and β-carotene in adipose tissue and of selenium in toenails were compared

  7. The treatment of perioperative myocardial infarctions following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI) is a common complication following noncardiac surgery, with a 30-day mortality of 10-20%. Effective therapeutic interventions ... Significantly more haemodynamically unstable patients received acute coronary interventions (75.8% vs. 23.1%, p-value = 0.0006). Acute ...

  8. Aeromedical transport after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Bruun, Niels Eske; Nielsen, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No guidelines exist for the planning of aeromedical repatriation after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In 2004, we employed a risk evaluation-based decision-making system for repatriation of patients after AMI. The objective was to evaluate the safety of transports during 2005...

  9. Early assessment and treatment of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoog, V.C. de

    2015-01-01

    Although the detection and treatment of acute myocardial infarction (MI) has dramatically improved the last decades, ischemic heart disease is still a leading cause of death worldwide. Whereas mortality has declined in industrialized countries, it continues to rise in other parts of the world.

  10. Myocardial infarction : early diagnosis and cardioprotective strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, M.I.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we have investigated novel diagnostic and cardioprotective strategies to limit myocardial cell death and improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. We demonstrated a new way to speed up the diagnosis of acute MI by using very small pieces of RNA (microRNAs). Using these

  11. Unrecognised myocardial infarction in patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Juel, Jacob; Al Zuhairi, Karam Sadoon Majeed

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with a reduction of the lifespan by 20 years, with type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease contributing the most to the increased mortality. Unrecognised or silent myocardial infarction (MI) occurs in ~30% of the population, but the rates of unrecognised...

  12. High dose aspirin and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction: aspirin and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Anna; Hu, Kai; Bayer, Barbara; Wagner, Helga; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Frantz, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    Proinflammatory proteins like inflammatory cytokines are implicated in myocardial depression and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. High-dose aspirin inhibits cytokine activation. Therefore, we tested the influence of high-dose aspirin treatment on left ventricular remodeling in mice after myocardial infarction. Mice were treated for 4 weeks with placebo or aspirin (120 mg/kg per day) by Alzet mini-osmotic pumps after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Serial transthoracic echocardiography was performed at days 1, 7, and 28. Over the 4 weeks, mortality was not different between the groups (placebo 30.8%, aspirin 30.8%). On echocardiography, animals after myocardial infarction exhibited left ventricular dilatation (week 4, end-systolic area, placebo sham 8.9 +/- 1.7 vs. placebo MI 15.9 +/- 2.5 mm(2)), which was not changed by aspirin treatment (week 4, end-systolic area, aspirin MI 14.5 +/- 1.3 mm(2), p= ns vs. placebo MI). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-1beta were markedly upregulated in mice with myocardial infarction on placebo. Cytokine expression was significantly reduced by aspirin treatment while collagen deposition was not influenced. Continuous aspirin treatment (120 mg/kg/d) reduces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines after myocardial infarction, but does not affect post-infarct cardiac remodeling and cardiac function.

  13. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: ... of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  16. The usefulness of a computerized tomographic scan taken parallel to the clivus in the management of brain-stem lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Akio; Mishima, Kazuhiko; Miyagawa, Naohisa; Aritake, Kouichi; Segawa, Hiromu; Sano, Keiji (Fuji Brain Instutue and Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1989-04-01

    It is important to detect the definite sites and extent of lesions in the management of brainstem infarction. While axial computerized tomographic scan (axial CT) has usually been used to map brain-stem lesions, it often fails to show small lesions or their longitudinal extent. In this report, the usefulness of CT scan using scan slices taken parallel to the clivus (clival CT) is evaluated in cases of brain-stem infarction. Clival CT was performed with the patient in a supine position, with as much neck flexion as possible. CT slices were taken parallel to the clivus (orbito-meatal line, 35-50 deg.). Both axial and clival CT scans were performed in 25 patients with brain-stem infarctions. Axial CT was most useful in detecting small lesions located in the ventral pons and in showing the anatomical structure which was involved. On the other hand, clival CT was superior in demonstrating the longitudinal extent of infarctions, especially in the midbrain or thalamus. In cases with major brain-stem infarctions or in cases with associated cerebellar lesions, the combination of axial and clival CT shows the configuration and continuity of the lesions clearly. Therefore, clival CT, when used with axial CT, clearly shows the three-dimensional extent of brain-stem infarctions; this technique is also recommended when managing other types of brain-stem disease. In addition, it is important to select appropriate CT slice angles in order to demonstrate the anatomical structure of interest. (author).

  17. Model-based design of mechanical therapies for myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomovsky, Gregory M; Macadangdang, Jesse R; Ailawadi, Gorav; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2011-02-01

    The mechanical properties of healing myocardial infarcts are a critical determinant of pump function and the transition to heart failure. Recent reports suggest that modifying infarct mechanical properties can improve function and limit ventricular remodeling. However, little attempt has been made to identify the specific infarct material properties that would optimize left ventricular (LV) function. We utilized a finite-element model of a large anteroapical infarct in a dog heart to explore a wide range of infarct mechanical properties. Isotropic stiffening of the infarct reduced end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes, improved LV contractility, but had little effect on stroke volume. A highly anisotropic infarct, with high longitudinal stiffness but low circumferential stiffness coefficients, produced the best stroke volume by increasing diastolic filling, without affecting contractility or ESV. Simulated infarcts in two different locations displayed different transmural strain patterns. Our results suggest that there is a general trade-off between acutely reducing LV size and acutely improving LV pump function, that isotropically stiffening the infarct is not the only option of potential therapeutic interest, and that customizing therapies for different infarct locations may be important. Our model results should provide guidance for design and development of therapies to improve LV function by modifying infarct mechanical properties.

  18. Detection of myocardial infarct extension by CK-B radioimmunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothkopf, M; Boerner, J; Stone, M J; Smitherman, T C; Buja, L M; Parkey, R W; Willerson, J T

    1979-02-01

    Myocardial infarct extension after the acute event was defined as a second reise in the myocardial isoenzyme of serum creatine kinase (CK-B) after the initial return of CK-B to normal values. In 43 patients with acute myocardial infarcts, CK-B was measured by radioimmunoassay every 12 hours for 14 days. Nineteen patients had anterior transmural myocardial infarcts AMI, 14 had inferior transmural myocardial infarcts (IMI) and 10 had subendocardial myocardial infarcts (SEMI). Infarct extension as detectd by a second rise in serum CK-B occurred in six patients (32%) with AMI, two (14%) with IMI and two (20%) with SEMI; these differences are not statistically significant. Infarct extension for all patients combined was 23%. Four patients with AMI also had infarct extension as determined by recurrent chest pain. ECG alterations and other enzyme changes. In the other six, the infarct extension was undetected clinically. Four patients with AMI and infarct extension died within 3 weeks after hospitalization. We did not note any additional morbidity or mortality in patients with infarct extension who had IMI or SEMI. There was no significant difference in the frequency of previous myocardial infarction, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus or smoking history in patients with and without infarct extension shown by serum CK-B isoenzyme elevations. The measurement of serum CK-B values with a quantitative and sensitive assay suggests that myocardial infarct extension occurs more commonly than clinically recognized, but the frequency of extension may be less than that reported in patients in whom precordial mapping and total serum CK values were measured to identify this phenomenon.

  19. Concurrent diseases and conditions in cats with renal infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M C; Jandrey, K; Farrell, K S; Carlson-Bremer, D

    2014-01-01

    Renal infarcts identified without definitive association with any specific disease process. Determine diseases associated with diagnosis of renal infarcts in cats diagnosed by sonography or necropsy. 600 cats underwent abdominal ultrasonography, necropsy, or both at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Information obtained from electronic medical records. Cats classified as having renal infarct present based on results of sonographic evaluation or necropsy. Time-matched case-controls selected from cats that underwent the next scheduled diagnostic procedure. 309 of 600 cats having diagnosis of renal infarct and 291 time-matched controls. Cats 7-14 years old were 1.6 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 1.03-2.05, P = .03) more likely to have renal infarct than younger cats but no more likely to have renal infarct than older cats (1.4, 0.89-2.25, P = .14). All P = .14 are statistically significant. Cats with renal infarcts were 4.5 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.63-7.68, P cats without renal infarcts. Cats with renal infarcts were 0.7 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 0.51-0.99, P = .046) less likely to have diagnosis of neoplasia compared to cats without renal infarcts. Cats with diagnosis of hyperthyroidism did not have significant association with having renal infarct. Cats with renal infarcts were 8 times (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.55-25.40, P ≤ .001) more likely to have diagnosis of distal aortic thromboembolism than cats without renal infarcts. Cats with renal infarcts identified on antemortem examination should be screened for occult cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Terminology and diagnostic criteria for Non-Q-wave myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Kovačević Branislava; Štajnic Miroslav; Čemerlić-Ađić Nadica; Dejanović Jadranka

    2002-01-01

    Non-Q myocardial infarction represents a specific entity of infarction. Many studies have shown that non-Q myocardial infarction differs from Q myocardial infarction not only electrocardiographically, but also from pathophysiological, histological, clinical and prognostic points of view. Non-Q myocardial infarction - terminology Until 1980's, anatomical terminology depending on ECG changes was used in the literature. Subendocardial infarction referred to non-Q myocardial infarction, while tra...

  1. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  2. Brain Malformations

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    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  3. Brain surgery

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    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain ... imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ... chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with ...

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  17. Strategic infarct location for post-stroke cognitive impairment: A multivariate lesion-symptom mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Biesbroek, J Matthijs; Shi, Lin; Liu, Wenyan; Kuijf, Hugo J; Chu, Winnie Wc; Abrigo, Jill M; Lee, Ryan Kl; Leung, Thomas Wh; Lau, Alexander Yl; Biessels, Geert J; Mok, Vincent; Wong, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Lesion location is an important determinant for post-stroke cognitive impairment. Although several 'strategic' brain regions have previously been identified, a comprehensive map of strategic brain regions for post-stroke cognitive impairment is lacking due to limitations in sample size and methodology. We aimed to determine strategic brain regions for post-stroke cognitive impairment by applying multivariate lesion-symptom mapping in a large cohort of 410 acute ischemic stroke patients. Montreal Cognitive Assessment at three to six months after stroke was used to assess global cognitive functioning and cognitive domains (memory, language, attention, executive and visuospatial function). The relation between infarct location and cognition was assessed in multivariate analyses at the voxel-level and the level of regions of interest using support vector regression. These two assumption-free analyses consistently identified the left angular gyrus, left basal ganglia structures and the white matter around the left basal ganglia as strategic structures for global cognitive impairment after stroke. A strategic network involving several overlapping and domain-specific cortical and subcortical structures was identified for each of the cognitive domains. Future studies should aim to develop even more comprehensive infarct location-based models for post-stroke cognitive impairment through multicenter studies including thousands of patients.

  18. Microvascular Resistance Predicts Myocardial Salvage and Infarct Characteristics in ST‐Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Alexander R.; Berry, Colin; Doolin, Orla; McEntegart, Margaret; Petrie, Mark C.; Lindsay, M. Mitchell; Hood, Stuart; Carrick, David; Tzemos, Niko; Weale, Peter; McComb, Christie; Foster, John; Ford, Ian; Oldroyd, Keith G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of myocardial injury and repair in patients with ST‐elevation myocardial infarction is incompletely understood. We investigated the relationships among culprit artery microvascular resistance, myocardial salvage, and ventricular function. Methods and Results The index of microvascular resistance (IMR) was measured by means of a pressure‐ and temperature‐sensitive coronary guidewire in 108 patients with ST‐elevation myocardial infarction (83% male) at the end of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Paired cardiac MRI (cardiac magnetic resonance) scans were performed early (2 days; n=108) and late (3 months; n=96) after myocardial infarction. T2‐weighted‐ and late gadolinium–enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance delineated the ischemic area at risk and infarct size, respectively. Myocardial salvage was calculated by subtracting infarct size from area at risk. Univariable and multivariable models were constructed to determine the impact of IMR on cardiac magnetic resonance–derived surrogate outcomes. The median (interquartile range) IMR was 28 (17–42) mm Hg/s. The median (interquartile range) area at risk was 32% (24%–41%) of left ventricular mass, and the myocardial salvage index was 21% (11%–43%). IMR was a significant multivariable predictor of early myocardial salvage, with a multiplicative effect of 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.82 to 0.92) per 20% increase in IMR; Pmicrovascular obstruction and myocardial hemorrhage. Conclusion Microvascular resistance measured during primary percutaneous coronary intervention significantly predicts myocardial salvage, infarct characteristics, and left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with ST‐elevation myocardial infarction. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e002246 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112.002246) PMID:23130166

  19. The role of infarct transmural extent in infarct extension: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Chin-Neng; Lim, Einly; Andriyana, Andri; Al Abed, Amr; Lovell, Nigel Hamilton; Hayward, Christopher; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Dokos, Socrates

    2017-02-01

    Infarct extension, a process involving progressive extension of the infarct zone (IZ) into the normally perfused border zone (BZ), leads to continuous degradation of the myocardial function and adverse remodelling. Despite carrying a high risk of mortality, detailed understanding of the mechanisms leading to BZ hypoxia and infarct extension remains unexplored. In the present study, we developed a 3D truncated ellipsoidal left ventricular model incorporating realistic electromechanical properties and fibre orientation to examine the mechanical interaction among the remote, infarct and BZs in the presence of varying infarct transmural extent (TME). Localized highly abnormal systolic fibre stress was observed at the BZ, owing to the simultaneous presence of moderately increased stiffness and fibre strain at this region, caused by the mechanical tethering effect imposed by the overstretched IZ. Our simulations also demonstrated the greatest tethering effect and stress in BZ regions with fibre direction tangential to the BZ-remote zone boundary. This can be explained by the lower stiffness in the cross-fibre direction, which gave rise to a greater stretching of the IZ in this direction. The average fibre strain of the IZ, as well as the maximum stress in the sub-endocardial layer, increased steeply from 10% to 50% infarct TME, and slower thereafter. Based on our stress-strain loop analysis, we found impairment in the myocardial energy efficiency and elevated energy expenditure with increasing infarct TME, which we believe to place the BZ at further risk of hypoxia. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Acute Incidental Infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Monica; Suministrado, Ma Serrie P; Hilal, Saima; Dong, Yan Hong; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Ikram, Mohammad K; Chen, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The study of silent stroke has been limited to imaging of chronic infarcts; acute incidental infarcts (AII) detected on brain magnetic resonance imaging have been less investigated. This study aims to describe prevalence and risk factors of AII in a community and a clinic-based population. Subjects were drawn from 2 ongoing studies: Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore study, which is a subsample from a population-based study, and a clinic-based case-control study. Subjects from both studies underwent similar clinical and neuropsychological assessments and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Prevalence of AII from these studies was determined. Subsequently, risk factors of AII were examined using multivariable logistic regression models. AII were seen in 7 of 623 (1.2%) subjects in Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore (mean age, 70.9±6.8 years; 45% men) and in 12 of 389 (3.2%) subjects (mean age, 72.1±8.3 years; 46% men) in the clinic-based study. AII were present in 0.8% of subjects with no cognitive impairment, 1.9% of those with cognitive impairment not dementia, and 4.2% of subjects with dementia. Significant association of AII was found with cerebral microbleeds (≥5) in the Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore (odds ratio, 6.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-35.65; P=0.02) and in the clinic-based cohort (odds ratio, 4.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.39-15.53; P=0.01). There was no association of AII with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or hyperlipidemia. AII are more likely to be present in those with cognitive impairment. Although a cause-effect relationship between the presence of AII and cognitive impairment is plausible, the association may be because of under-reporting of symptoms by individuals with cognitive impairment. The association between AII and cerebral microbleeds may indicate cerebral vasculopathy, independent of traditional vascular risk factors. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. MRI/MRA evaluation of sickle cell disease of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Robert A. [Childrens Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Sickle cell disease is a major cause of pediatric stroke. Understanding the disease that affects the brain as infarctions, both clinically apparent and silent, requires an understanding of how the blood vessels are affected, the way in which both the brain and the blood vessels are imaged by MRI and MRA and the mechanism of injury. (orig.)

  2. Brain computed tomography of the hypertensive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, W. K.; Park, C. K.; Cho, O. K.; Hahm, C. K. [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Now a day, hypertension is more increasing in frequency and ranked the top of the causes of death in Korea and other nations. Most of cerebrovascular accidents in hypertensive patients are composed of vascular occlusive changes and hemorrhages. In cerebral angiogram, we can only detect occlusion of large artery and large mass effect from hematoma or cerebral infarction without identification of its entity. The computed tomogram, however, is the best way for evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. This study includes evaluation of computed tomograms of 106 patients with hypertension during the period of 17 months from Feb. 1979 to June 1980 in the department of radiology, college of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 106 patients was broad ranging from 25 years to 76 years. 67.9% of patients were over the age of 50. The male and female sex ratio was 3:2. 2. 28 out of 106 patients were normal and 78 patients revealed abnormal on C. T. findings; those were intracranial hemorrhage (35 patients), cerebral infarction (32 patients) and brain atrophy (11 patients). 3. All of the intracranial hemorrhage except one were intracerebral hemorrhage; those were located in the cerebral hemisphere (19 patients), basal ganglia (15 patients) and brain stem (1 patient). The except one case of intracranial hemorrhage was subdural hematoma. 7 patients of intraventricular hemorrhage and 1 patient of subarachnoid hemorrhage were combined with intracerebral hemorrhage. 2/3 of patients who had hemorrhage in cerebral hemisphere revealed lesions in the parietal and temporal lobes. 4. In cases of cerebral infarction, the cerebral hemisphere was most common site of lesion (20 cases), and the next was basal ganglia (11 cases). Most of the infarcts in cerebral hemisphere were located in the parietal and temporal lobes. The left basal ganglia was more commonly involved

  3. Spontaneous thrombosis of developmental venous anomaly (DVA) with venous infarct and acute cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-08-01

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA), formally known as venous angioma, is a congenital anatomic variant of the venous drainage of the brain. Although they typically have a benign clinical course and a low symptomatic rate, thrombosis of a drainage vein may occur, leading to potentially debilitating complications. We report a unique case of spontaneous thrombosis of a posterior fossa developmental venous anomaly with cerebellar infarct in a 61-year-old man who presented with acute onset cerebellar ataxia. DVA thrombosis was well-depicted on CT and MR studies. Patient was put on anticoagulant therapy and complete recanalization was seen on follow-up imaging.

  4. Rapid recovery from aphasia after infarction of Wernicke’s area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie Yen

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of connected speech samples and language testing following infarction of Wernicke’s area revealed rapid improvements in almost all speech/language measures, spanning phonological, syntactic and semantic domains. The greatest changes occurred early, with recovery slowing over time, and the data were well fit by logarithmic recovery curves. Despite the importance of Wernicke’s area, the rapidity and extent of recovery observed suggest that other brain regions can be rapidly recruited to support many of the functions of Wernicke’s area (Weiller et al., 1995.

  5. Splenectomy reduces infarct volume and neuroinflammation in male but not female mice in experimental stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Abby L.; Wang, Jianming; Saugstad, Julie; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Offner, Halina

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral immune response contributes to neurodegeneration after stroke yet little is known about how this process differs between males and females. The current study demonstrates that splenectomy prior to experimental stroke eliminates sex differences in infarct volume and activated brain monocytes/microglia. In the periphery of both sexes, activated T cells correlate directly with stroke outcome while monocytes are reduced by splenectomy only in males. This study provides new information about the sex specific mechanisms of the peripheral immune response in neurodegeneration after stroke and demonstrates the need for representation of both sexes in basic and clinical stroke research. PMID:25434281

  6. Myocardial strain in sub-acute peri-infarct myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzsics, Balázs; Surányi, Pál; Kiss, Pál; Brott, Brigitta C; Litovsky, Silvio; Denney, Thomas S; Aban, Inmaculada; Lloyd, Steven G; Simor, Tamas; Elgavish, Gabriel A; Gupta, Himanshu

    2009-02-01

    In the absence of additional ischemic insults, the peri-infarct region surrounding the infarct myocardium can recover function. T2 weighted MRI signal is sensitive to edema and used to detect peri-infarct, salvageable myocardium. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the alterations in myocardial strain in the peri-infarct myocardium as compared to normal and infarct myocardium. Comprehensive MRI of the myocardium was performed in five pigs 6-7 days following coronary artery occlusion-reperfusion myocardial injury. MRI included tagged cine images for myocardial strain, T2weighted (T2w)-images and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for assessing myocardial viability. Automated signal intensity thresholds were used to define tissue edema and myocardial infarct. Maximum-shortening strains were analyzed in the infarct, peri-infarct and normal myocardial sectors. The results were correlated with triphenyltetrazolium-chloride (TTC) and hemotoxylin-eosin stained tissue images. We found an excellent correlation of LGE with TTC (r = 0.94, P myocardial sectors had higher myocardial strain than infarct myocardial sectors (P myocardial strain measurements provide complementary information and both may be useful for characterization of the peri-infarct myocardium.

  7. Regional Mechanics Determine Collagen Fiber Structure in Healing Myocardial Infarcts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomovsky, Gregory M.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shape, and/or location produce different patterns of mechanical stretch that guide evolving collagen fiber structure. We tested the effects of infarct shape and location using a combined experimental and computational approach. We studied mechanics and collagen fiber structure in cryoinfarcts in 53 Sprague-Dawley rats and found that regardless of shape or orientation, cryoinfarcts near the equator of the left ventricle stretched primarily in the circumferential direction and developed circumferentially aligned collagen, while infarcts at the apex stretched similarly in the circumferential and longitudinal direction and developed randomly oriented collagen. In a computational model of infarct healing, an effect of mechanical stretch on fibroblast and collagen alignment was required to reproduce the experimental results. We conclude that mechanical environment determines collagen fiber structure in healing myocardial infarcts. Our results suggest that emerging post-infarction therapies that alter regional mechanics will also alter infarct collagen structure, offering both potential risks and novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:22418281

  8. Repetitive Myocardial Infarctions Secondary to Delirium Tremens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schwartzberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium tremens develops in a minority of patients undergoing acute alcohol withdrawal; however, that minority is vulnerable to significant morbidity and mortality. Historically, benzodiazepines are given intravenously to control withdrawal symptoms, although occasionally a more substantial medication is needed to prevent the devastating effects of delirium tremens, that is, propofol. We report a trauma patient who required propofol sedation for delirium tremens that was refractory to benzodiazepine treatment. Extubed prematurely, he suffered a non-ST segment myocardial infarction followed by an ST segment myocardial infarction requiring multiple interventions by cardiology. We hypothesize that his myocardial ischemia was secondary to an increased myocardial oxygen demand that occurred during his stress-induced catecholamine surge during the time he was undertreated for delirium tremens. This advocates for the use of propofol for refractory benzodiazepine treatment of delirium tremens and adds to the literature on the instability patients experience during withdrawal.

  9. Risk stratification after myocardial infarction. Clinical overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, R.A. (Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Many patients with an acute myocardial infarction can be stratified into subgroups that are at high risk for morbidity and mortality on the basis of clinical characteristics that indicate recurrent myocardial ischemia, persistent left ventricular dysfunction, and/or recurrent cardiac arrhythmias. In patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction the assessment of symptoms, physical findings, and ECG changes during predischarge exercise testing often identifies patients at increased risk for further cardiac events. Because of the suboptimum sensitivity and specificity of the exercise ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia, myocardial perfusion imaging with 201Tl and/or assessment of global and segmental ventricular function by two-dimensional echocardiography or radionuclide cineangiography during or immediately after exercise are often added to the predischarge risk stratification.

  10. [Did Emperior Tiberius die from myocardial infarction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, M

    1996-01-01

    In Svetonius' Life of the Twelve Cesars, in Tacitus' Annals, and in Dio, Cassius' Roman History, arguments can be found for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction in the case of the Roman emperor Tiberius. After violent and repeated efforts he felt an intense thoracic pain, and from that moment he became very ill and had to be carried in a litter. The course of the disease was marked by several syncopes with apparent death, some of long duration, but with spontaneous total recovery, except for the last one (which occured when getting out of bed). Moreover, we know he had abnormalities of the pulse indicating a lethal prognosis. The most logical explanation is: myocardial infarction complicated with access of ventricular tachycardia, the last one ending in ventricular fibrillation.

  11. Aspirin ameliorates cerebral infarction through regulation of TLR4/NF‑κB‑mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Bin; Sun, Dezhou; Cui, Xiangyu

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is a cerebrovascular disease caused by local brain ischemic necrosis or softening, which is associated with diabetes, obesity, hypertension and rheumatic heart arrhythmia. Previous studies have indicated that aspirin is a potential oral anticoagulant in the treatment of cerebral ischemic stroke. However, the potential mechanism mediated by aspirin in cerebral infarction therapy is not well understood. The present study analyzed the therapeutic effects of aspirin on cerebral infarction and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of aspirin‑ameliorated benefits for thrombolysis. The results demonstrated that aspirin inhibited inflammation and apoptosis of cerebrovascular endothelial cells in a mouse model of cerebral infarction. Aspirin treatment suppressed toll‑like receptor (TLR)4 and nuclear factor (NF)‑κB expression in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was suppressed by aspirin treatment through the downregulation of protein kinase R‑like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 subunit 1 and C/EBP homologous protein expression levels in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. It was identified that knockdown of TLR4 inhibited aspirin‑mediated downregulation of NF‑κB signaling pathway and ER stress in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. Expression levels of adenosine diphosphate plasminogen activator inhibitors, von Willebrand factor and thromboxane were downregulated in cerebrovascular endothelial cells and in serum in experimental mice. The results demonstrated that aspirin was beneficial forthrombolysis by decreasing thrombin‑activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and plasminogen activator inhibitor‑1 expression in a mouse model of cerebral infarction. These results suggested that aspirin may improve cerebral infarction by downregulating TLR4/NF‑κB‑mediated ER stress in a mouse model.

  12. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarct are associated with abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Lu

    somatic, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms of depression commonly observed after myocardial infarction. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine is an important substance in the gut-brain axis, and its abnormal metabolism is a critical finding after myocardial infarct.

  13. Pretreatment with intravenous FGF-13 reduces infarct volume and ameliorates neurological deficits following focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, D L; Masonic, K; Petullo, D; Li, L Y; Lincoln, C; Wibberley, L; Alderson, R F; Antonaccio, M

    1999-02-06

    Fibroblast growth factor-13 (FGF-13), novel member of FGF family has recently been molecularly cloned as a result of high throughput sequencing of a ovarian cancer cell, hippocampal, and kidney cDNA libraries. The human gene encodes for a protein with a molecular weight of 22 kDa that is most homologous to FGF-8 (70% similarity). In the current study, we tested the effects of intravenously administered FGF-13 in a model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia in Sprague-Dawley rats. FGF-13 or the vehicle was administered systematically via the tail vein 30 min prior, and 30 min and 24 h after the occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAo). Animals were weighed and evaluated behaviorally prior to and at 24 and 48 h after MCAo. The volume of cerebral infarct and swelling were determined using an image analysis system (BioQuant) and cresyl violet stained sequential sections from the forebrain region. Histopathology was evaluated to compare the therapeutic effects. We found a 63% reduction in infarct volume in FGF-13- vs. vehicle-treated animals (infarct volume was 21.9+/-3.8% in vehicle- and 8.1+/-1.6% in FGF-13-treated rats, p=0.0016) and a moderate inhibition of brain swelling by FGF-13. The reduction in infarct volume and brain swelling were associated with improvement of clinical deficits in FGF-13 treated animals (p<0.001). Histopathological examination determined that nervous tissue was better preserved in FGF-13 treated rats than those of controls. These data show that pretreatment with intravenous FGF-13 reduces infarct size and ameliorates neurological deficits following permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Cerebellar infarction presenting as inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gempp, E; Louge, P; Soulier, B; Alla, P

    2014-11-01

    Inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving is not uncommon and the characteristic features of this disorder are acute peripheral vestibular syndrome, sometimes associated with cochlear signs, requiring urgent hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Cerebellar infarction can also mimic isolated peripheral vestibulopathy. The authors report the case of a 47-year-old man in good general health admitted with acute left vestibular dysfunction suggestive of inner ear decompression sickness 6 hours after scuba diving. Normal videonystagmography and delayed onset of occipital headache finally led to brain MRI that confirmed the presence of recent ischaemic infarction in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Complementary investigations revealed the presence of a patent foramen ovale with atrial septal aneurysm. No underlying atherosclerotic disease or clotting abnormalities were observed. Cerebellar infarction can present clinically with features of inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving. An underlying air embolism mechanism cannot be excluded, particularly in patients with a large right-to-left circulatory shunt and no other cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Circulating Biomarkers in Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescini, Francesca; Donnini, Ida; Cesari, Francesca; Nannucci, Serena; Valenti, Raffaella; Rinnoci, Valentina; Poggesi, Anna; Gori, Anna Maria; Giusti, Betti; Rogolino, Angela; Carluccio, Alessandra; Bianchi, Silvia; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio; Balestrino, Maurizio; Adriano, Enrico; Abbate, Rosanna; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an inherited cerebral microangiopathy presenting with variable features, including migraine, psychiatric disorders, stroke, and cognitive decline and variable disability. On neuroimaging, CADASIL is characterized by leukoencephalopathy, multiple lacunar infarcts, and microbleeds. Previous studies suggest a possible role of endothelial impairment in the pathogenesis of the disease. We assessed plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombomodulin (TM) and the blood levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) in 49 CADASIL patients and 49 age-matched controls and their association with clinical/functional and neuroimaging features. In multivariate analysis, CADASIL patients had significantly higher vWF and lower EPC levels. TM levels were similar in the 2 groups. CADASIL patients with a more severe clinical phenotype (history of stroke or dementia) presented lower CPC levels in comparison with patients with a milder phenotype. On correlation analysis, lower CPC levels were associated with worse performances on neuropsychological, motor and functional tests, and with higher lesion load on brain magnetic resonance imaging (degree of leukoencephalopathy and number of lacunar infarcts). This is the first CADASIL series in which multiple circulating biomarkers have been studied. Our findings support previous studies on the presence and the possible modulating effect of endothelial impairment in the disease. Furthermore, our research data suggest that blood CPCs may be markers of disease severity. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann’s syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen TY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Yu Chen,1 Chun-Yen Chen,1,3 Che-Hung Yen,2,3 Shin-Chang Kuo,1,3 Yi-Wei Yeh,1,3 Serena Chang,1 San-Yuan Huang1,31Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, 3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Gerstmann’s syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann’s syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann’s syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.Keywords: Gerstmann’s syndrome, dementia, parietal lobe infarction

  17. Perceived neighbourhood social cohesion and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Hawes, Armani M; Smith, Jacqui

    2014-11-01

    The main strategy for alleviating heart disease has been to target individuals and encourage them to change their health behaviours. Although important, emphasis on individuals has diverted focus and responsibility away from neighbourhood characteristics, which also strongly influence people's behaviours. Although a growing body of research has repeatedly demonstrated strong associations between neighbourhood characteristics and cardiovascular health, it has typically focused on negative neighbourhood characteristics. Only a few studies have examined the potential health enhancing effects of positive neighbourhood characteristics, such as perceived neighbourhood social cohesion. Using multiple logistic regression models, we tested whether higher perceived neighbourhood social cohesion was associated with lower incidence of myocardial infarction. Prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study--a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50--were used to analyse 5276 participants with no history of heart disease. Respondents were tracked for 4 years and analyses adjusted for relevant sociodemographic, behavioural, biological and psychosocial factors. In a model that adjusted for age, gender, race, marital status, education and total wealth, each SD increase in perceived neighbourhood social cohesion was associated with a 22% reduced odds of myocardial infarction (OR=0.78, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.94. The association between perceived neighbourhood social cohesion and myocardial infarction remained even after adjusting for behavioural, biological and psychosocial covariates. Higher perceived neighbourhood social cohesion may have a protective effect against myocardial infarction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Acute renal infarction: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesiano, Paola; Rollino, Cristiana; Beltrame, Giulietta; Ferro, Michela; Quattrocchio, Giacomo; Fenoglio, Roberta; Pozzato, Marco; Cecere, Pasqualina; Forneris, Giacomo; Bazzan, Mario; Macchia, Gianluca; Roccatello, Dario

    2017-02-01

    Acute renal infarction is a rare condition whose diagnosis is often delayed. Major risk factors include atrial fibrillation, valvular or ischemic heart disease, renal artery thrombosis/dissection and coagulopathy. We reviewed the medical records of 18 patients admitted to our Nephrology Department between 1999 and 2015 for acute renal infarction diagnosed by computed tomography. Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy was performed in some patients during follow-up to assess parenchymal lesions and estimate differential kidney function. Mean age was 59.8 years. Major associated risk factors included hypertension (44 %), obesity (33 %), atrial fibrillation (28 %), peripheral vascular disease (17 %), smoking (17 %), prior thromboembolic event (11 %), diabetes (11 %), estroprogestinic therapy (11 %). Seventy-two percent of patients presented with flank pain. Mean serum creatinine was 1.2 ± 0.6 mg/dl. Acute kidney injury occurred as the initial manifestation in two patients. Patients were managed conservatively, with low molecular weight heparin (83 %) or aspirin (11 %). At the end of follow-up serum creatinine was 1.1 ± 0.3 mg/dl; one patient remained on chronic hemodialysis. 58 % of patients who underwent renal scintigraphy after a median of 8 months had a reduced contribution of the previously affected kidney to total renal function. Risk factors associated with the development of chronic kidney disease following renal infarction are unknown. In our subjects, renal function remained stable in all but one patient who developed end stage renal disease. Further studies should focus on etiology and evolution of kidney function in patients with acute renal infarction.

  19. [Emergency treatment of myocardial infarction in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allonneau, Alexandre; Gonzva, Jonathan; Lovi, Steven; Klein, Isabelle; Lefort, Hugues

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) affects mainly men. In women, chest pain is less typical, delaying the diagnosis and increasing the time before treatment is delivered. Morbidity-mortality is greater notably due to a modification of the myocardial reperfusion strategy. The acute care of MI is almost identical for men and women. Knowing more about the epidemiology of women with MI enables prevention strategies to be targeted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Midterm renal functions following acute renal infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakir Ongun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore clinical features of renal infarction (RI that may have a role in diagnosis and treatment in our patient cohort and provide data on midterm renal functions. Medical records of patients with diagnosis of acute RI, established by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT and at least 1 year follow-up data, who were hospitalized in our clinic between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed; including descriptive data, clinical signs and symptoms, etiologic factors, laboratory findings, and prescribed treatments. Patients with solitary infarct were treated with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA only, whereas patients with atrial fibrillation (AF or multiple or global infarct were treated with anticoagulants. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR referring to renal functions was determined by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula. Twenty-seven renal units of 23 patients with acute RI were identified. The mean age was 59.7 ± 15.7 years. Fourteen patients (60.8% with RI had atrial fibrillation (AF as an etiologic factor of which four had concomitant mesenteric ischemia at diagnosis. At presentation, 20 patients (86.9% had elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, 18 patients (78.2% had leukocytosis, and 16 patients (69.5% had microscopic hematuria. Two patients with concomitant mesenteric ischemia and AF passed away during follow up. Mean eGFR was 70.8 ± 23.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 at admission and increased to 82.3 ± 23.4 mL/min/1.73 m2 at 1 year follow up. RI should be considered in patients with persistent flank or abdominal pain, particularly if they are at high risk of thromboembolism. Antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant drugs are both effective treatment options according to the amplitude of the infarct for preserving kidney functions.

  1. Acute myocardial infarction: 'telomerasing' for cardioprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchís-Gomar, Fabián; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Reactivating the telomerase gene through gene therapy after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been recently reported to improve survival in mice. Given that regular physical exercise also activates this gene, therapeutic and lifestyle interventions targeting telomerase need to be explored as possible additions to the current armamentarium for myocardial regeneration. 9.292 JCR (2015) Q1, 17/289 Biochemistry & mollecular biology, 17/187 Cell biology, 8/124 Medicine, research & experimen...

  2. Two Case Report With Bilateral Thalamic Infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utku Cenikli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral thalamic infarction is a rare clinical condition. Thalamo-perforan arteries are arise from the same vascular territory in nearly one third of the cases and oclussion of it causes bilateral infacts. Clinical presentation can be altered mental status, decrease alertness, memory problems, mood disorders, cognitive problems and vertical gaze palsy. In this report we present two cases with different clinical status.

  3. Creation of Chronic Myocardial Infarction in a Pig (Sus Scrofa) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Objectives: The goal of this protocol was to create myocardial infarctions in mini pigs using polystyrenemicrospheres to infarct a portion of the...underwent myocardial infarctions without misadventure. Infusion of polystyrene beads into a diagonal branch of the LAD resulted In a repeatable and...controlled myocardial Infarction.Conclusion: The method reported here provided consistent and repeatable myocardial infarcts with minimal morbidity.

  4. Splenic Infarction in Acute Infectious Mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviglio, Samuele; Abate, Maria Valentina; Chinello, Matteo; Ventura, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of a febrile patient with acute abdominal pain represents a frequent yet possibly challenging situation in the emergency department (ED). Splenic infarction is an uncommon complication of infectious mononucleosis, and may have a wide range of clinical presentations, from dramatic to more subtle. Its pathogenesis is still incompletely understood, yet it may be associated with the occurrence of transient prothrombotic factors. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented with fever, sore throat, left upper quadrant abdominal pain, and splenomegaly, with no history of recent trauma. Laboratory tests revealed a markedly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and positive lupus anticoagulant. Abdominal ultrasonography showed several hypoechoic areas in the spleen consistent with multiple infarctions. Magnetic resonance imaging eventually confirmed the diagnosis. He was admitted for observation and supportive treatment, and was discharged in good condition after 7 days. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Spontaneous splenic infarction should be considered in the differential list of patients presenting with left upper quadrant abdominal pain and features of infectious mononucleosis; the diagnosis, however, may not be straightforward, as clinical presentation may also be subtle, and abdominal ultrasonography, which is often used as a first-line imaging modality in pediatric EDs, has low sensitivity in this scenario and may easily miss it. Furthermore, although treatment is mainly supportive, close observation for possible complications is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PHARMACOINTERVENTIONAL TACTICS OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION TREATMENT

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    A. P. Golikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective was to conduct a prospective observational study to assess the effect of pharmacointerventional tactics on the outcome of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI in terms of mortality.MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study included 405 patients with acute STEMI. The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI Risk Score was used to assess the coronary circulation recovery in a major epicardial coronary artery (CA. Percutaneoous coronary interventions (PCIs were undertaken either as initial interventions, or in a framework of pharmacointervantional treatment tactics.RESULTS. Among 405 patients with STEMI, 154 (38% underwent a thrombolytic therapy (TLT. Coronarography performed within 24 h from the onset of disease clinical symptoms demonstrated a completely occluded CA that had supplied blood to the area of present infarction in 73% of patients without previous TLT and in 74% of patients after TLT. TLT proved to be effective only in 36 % of patients. A successful revascularization, compared to that of inefficient, reduced the relative all-cause mortality risk and MI-caused mortality risk in the initially high-risk patients by 74% and 78 %, respectively.concLusIons A timely myocardium revascularization using PCI is effective after successfully performed TLT. This proves the benefit of pharmacointerventional treatment tactics for the patients with STEMI in the cases when initial PCI appeared impossible for some reasons. 

  6. Sensitive Troponin Assay and the Classification of Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anoop S.V.; McAllister, David A.; Mills, Rosamund; Lee, Kuan Ken; Churchhouse, Antonia M.D.; Fleming, Kathryn M.; Layden, Elizabeth; Anand, Atul; Fersia, Omar; Joshi, Nikhil V.; Walker, Simon; Jaffe, Allan S.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Newby, David E.; Mills, Nicholas L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lowering the diagnostic threshold for troponin is controversial because it may disproportionately increase the diagnosis of myocardial infarction in patients without acute coronary syndrome. We assessed the impact of lowering the diagnostic threshold of troponin on the incidence, management, and outcome of patients with type 2 myocardial infarction or myocardial injury. Methods Consecutive patients with elevated plasma troponin I concentrations (≥50 ng/L; n = 2929) were classified with type 1 (50%) myocardial infarction, type 2 myocardial infarction or myocardial injury (48%), and type 3 to 5 myocardial infarction (2%) before and after lowering the diagnostic threshold from 200 to 50 ng/L with a sensitive assay. Event-free survival from death and recurrent myocardial infarction was recorded at 1 year. Results Lowering the threshold increased the diagnosis of type 2 myocardial infarction or myocardial injury more than type 1 myocardial infarction (672 vs 257 additional patients, P infarction were at higher risk of death compared with those with type 1 myocardial infarction (37% vs 16%; relative risk [RR], 2.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.98-2.69) but had fewer recurrent myocardial infarctions (4% vs 12%; RR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.26-0.49). In patients with troponin concentrations 50 to 199 ng/L, lowering the diagnostic threshold was associated with increased healthcare resource use (P infarction and death for patients with type 1 myocardial infarction (31% vs 20%; RR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.41-0.99), but not type 2 myocardial infarction or myocardial injury (36% vs 33%; RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.75-1.15). Conclusions After implementation of a sensitive troponin assay, the incidence of type 2 myocardial infarction or myocardial injury disproportionately increased and is now as frequent as type 1 myocardial infarction. Outcomes of patients with type 2 myocardial infarction or myocardial injury are poor and do not seem to be modifiable after reclassification despite

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. ... specialized brain systems. We have many specialized brain systems that work ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which ...

  11. Acute myocardial infarction and infarct size: do circadian variations play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aída Suárez-Barrientos,1 Borja Ibáñez1,21Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, 2Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The circadian rhythm influences cardiovascular system physiology, inducing diurnal variations in blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, endothelial functions, platelet aggregation, and coronary arterial flow, among other physiological parameters. Indeed, an internal circadian network modulates cardiovascular physiology by regulating heart rate, metabolism, and even myocyte growth and repair ability. Consequently, cardiovascular pathology is also controlled by circadian oscillations, with increased morning incidence of cardiovascular events. The potential circadian influence on the human tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion has not been systematically scrutinized until recently. It has since been proven, in both animals and humans, that infarct size varies during the day depending on the symptom onset time, while circadian fluctuations in spontaneous cardioprotection in humans with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI have also been demonstrated. Furthermore, several studies have proposed that the time of day at which revascularization occurs in patients with STEMI may also influence infarct size and reperfusion outcomes. The potential association of the circadian clock with infarct size advocates the acknowledgment of time of day as a new prognostic factor in patients suffering acute myocardial infarction, which would open up a new field for chronotherapeutic targets and lead to the inclusion of time of day as a variable in clinical trials that test novel cardioprotective strategies.Keywords: cardioprotection, circadian rhythm, reperfusion injury, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

  12. Infarction of the corpus callosum: a retrospective clinical investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Li

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate patients with ischemic infarctions in the territory of the corpus callosum to advance our understanding of this rare stroke subtype by providing comprehensive descriptive and epidemiological data.From January 1, 2010 to June 30, 2014, all cases of acute ischemic stroke diagnosed by clinical manifestation and diffusion weighted imaging in Dalian Municipal Central Hospital were investigated. The patients presenting with corpus callosum infarctions were selected and further allocated into genu and/or body and splenium infarction groups. Proportion, lesion patterns, clinical features, risk factors and etiology of corpus callosum infarction were analyzed.Out of 1,629 cases, 59 patients (3.6% with corpus callosum infarctions were identified by diffusion weighted imaging, including 7 patients who had ischemic lesions restricted to the corpus callosum territory. Thirty six patients had lesions in the splenium (61.0%. Corpus callosum infarction patients suffered from a broad spectrum of symptoms including weakness and/or numbness of the limbs, clumsy speech, and vertigo, which could not be explained by lesions in corpus callosum. A classical callosal disconnection syndrome was found in 2 out of all patients with corpus callosum infarctions. Statistical differences in the risk factor and infarct pattern between the genu and/or body group and splenium group were revealed.Corpus callosum infarction and the callosal disconnection syndrome were generally rare. The most susceptible location of ischemic corpus callosum lesion was the splenium. Splenium infarctions were often associated with bilateral cerebral hemisphere involvement (46.2%. The genu and/or body infarctions were associated with atherosclerosis. The most common cause of corpus callosum infarction probably was embolism.

  13. Howell-Jolly bodies. A clue to splenic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrimer, J H; Mendelson, D S; Metz, E N

    1975-06-01

    A 74-year-old woman with secondary erythrocytosis was found to have Howell-Jolly bodies in peripheral blood erythrocytes following acute splenic infarction. The Howell-Jolly bodies were a transitory finding and disappeared six days after the infarction, although the spleen remained abnormal by isotope scanning for several weeks. Careful inspection of the peripheral blood film may be an aid in the diagnosis of acute splenic infarction.

  14. Concurrent Diseases and Conditions in Cats with Renal Infarcts

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, M. C.; Jandrey, K.; Farrell, K.S.; Carlson?Bremer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal infarcts identified without definitive association with any specific disease process. Objective Determine diseases associated with diagnosis of renal infarcts in cats diagnosed by sonography or necropsy. Animals 600 cats underwent abdominal ultrasonography, necropsy, or both at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Methods Information obtained from electronic medical records. Cats classified as having renal infarct present based on results of sonographic evaluation or necro...

  15. The value of exercise tests after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F E; Nielsen, S L; Knudsen, F

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to relate the clinical course in patients after a first acute myocardial infarction with the response to exercise-tests performed one month after discharge. 90 consecutive patients who suffered an acute myocardial infarction for the first time were followed-up after...... (W) were predictive with respect to mortality, heart failure, and angina pectoris requiring drug treatment. Exercise tests following acute myocardial infarction could not predict the chances of returning to work....

  16. Nursing Care in Patient with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Němec, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with the issue of acute myocardial infarction in context of prehospital, and hospital care. Specific clinical symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and treatment of acute myocardial infarction are described in the theoretical part. The part is also devoted to nursing care. Emphasis is put especially on prevention of cardiovascular diseases development. The goal is to evaluate nursing care of patients with acute myocardial infarction in prehospital, and later on, hospital care. Th...

  17. Hepatic infarction in HELLP syndrome; a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Jeong; Kim, Hong [Keimyung Univ. School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    Hepatic infarction is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of pregnancy-associated preeclampsia or HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver function tests, low platelets) syndrome. We present a case of hepatic infarction subsequent to HELLP syndrome and occurring during the immediate postpartum, and the associated radiologic findings. Sonography revealed poorly defined hypoechoic zones of infarction. Computed tomography(CT) demonstrated the characteristic features of nonenhancing, low attenuation, relatively well-defined, wedge shaped or geographic hepatic lesions, without mass effect.

  18. Frequency and clinical significance of acute bilateral cerebellar infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Man; Bang, Oh Young; Chung, Chin-Sang; Joo, In Soo; Huh, Kyoon

    2008-01-01

    Unlike acute unilateral cerebellar infarct (UCI), acute bilateral cerebellar infarcts (BCI) have attracted little attention. To evaluate the clinical significance of BCI, we compared UCI and BCI and analyzed potentially prognostic factors. Patients who were consecutively admitted at a university hospital over a 4-year period with acute cerebellar infarcts, proven by diffusion-weighted imaging, were studied. Cerebellar infarcts were topographically classified, and divided into 2 groups: UCI and BCI. The demographics, involved territories, concomitant lesions outside the cerebellum (CLOC), bilateral involvement, infarct volume, hospital courses, and mechanisms were analyzed. We performed multiple regression analysis to predict the poor outcome at discharge [> or =3 on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS)]. Among 162 patients with acute cerebellar infarcts, 31% (n = 50) were BCI. Territorial infarcts were 74% (n = 120) and non-territorial infarcts 26% (n = 42) of the total. Posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarcts were the most common, and combined-territorial infarcts were the rarest. Baseline demographics were not significantly different between UCI and BCI, except for initial stroke severity (modified NIH Stroke Scale and infarct volume) and diabetes. Large-artery atherosclerosis was significantly higher in BCI, whereas undetermined causes were higher in UCI (p = 0.028). By multiple regression analysis, BCI was the only independent radiological factor for poor prognosis (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% CI, 1.80-26.92), and represented a significantly more unstable hospital course, longer hospital stay, worse mRS at discharge, and higher mortality. In acute cerebellar infarcts, bilateral involvement is common and appears to be a superior determinant for early prognosis rather than territories involved or CLOC. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Neonatal cerebral infarction; Symptoms, CT findings and prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Shinji; Togari, Hajime; Sobajima, Hisanori; Suzuki, Shigesumi; Wada, Yoshiro (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Yokochi, Kenji; Nishimura, Yutaka; Inukai, Kazuhisa; Futamura, Masahide

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective multi-center study, we investigated eighteen infants with unilateral cerebral infarctions confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scans. The initial symptoms were observed in all the patients between 0 and 3 days of age. Convulsions or apneic attacks were the initial symptoms in all but one. Only 4 patients had complicated obstetric histories and none showed polycythemia or electrolyte abnormalities. All of the initial CT scans revealed unilaterally localized hypodense areas. In 10, the initial CT scans were performed within 24 hours after the clinical onset. In 16, the lesions were within the territory of the middle cerebral artery, 9 of which also involved the cortico-spinal tract (CST). In the remaining 2 patients, the lesions were located whithin the territory of the posterior cerebral artery. None of the 9 patients without CST involvement developed hemiplegia, whereas 5 (56%) of the 9 with CST involvement had hemiplegia, which is a fairly low incidence compared with that in adult cases. This difference was thought to be related to neonatal brain plasticity. (author).

  20. Musical, visual and cognitive deficits after middle cerebral artery infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Rosemann

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The perception of music can be impaired after a stroke. This dysfunction is called amusia and amusia patients often also show deficits in visual abilities, language, memory, learning, and attention. The current study investigated whether deficits in music perception are selective for musical input or generalize to other perceptual abilities. Additionally, we tested the hypothesis that deficits in working memory or attention account for impairments in music perception. Twenty stroke patients with small infarctions in the supply area of the middle cerebral artery were investigated with tests for music and visual perception, categorization, neglect, working memory and attention. Two amusia patients with selective deficits in music perception and pronounced lesions were identified. Working memory and attention deficits were highly correlated across the patient group but no correlation with musical abilities was obtained. Lesion analysis revealed that lesions in small areas of the putamen and globus pallidus were connected to a rhythm perception deficit. We conclude that neither a general perceptual deficit nor a minor domain general deficit can account for impairments in the music perception task. But we find support for the modular organization of the music perception network with brain areas specialized for musical functions as musical deficits were not correlated to any other impairment.

  1. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Wright

    Full Text Available CT Perfusion (CTP derived cerebral blood flow (CBF thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11 through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155-180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion.

  2. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; d'Esterre, Christopher D; Morrison, Laura B; Cockburn, Neil; Kovacs, Michael; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-01-01

    CT Perfusion (CTP) derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11) through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155-180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion.

  3. [A case of infectious mononucleosis with splenic infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Daisuke; Nakatani, Toshiya; Fujinaga, Yukihisa; Seki, Kenichiro; Saikawa, Soichiro; Sawada, Yasuhiko; Sato, Yoshiki; Nagamatsu, Shinsaku; Matsuo, Hideki; Kikuchi, Eiryo

    2013-08-01

    A 22-year-old man complaining of persisting high fever and right hypochondralgia was admitted to our hospital for infectious mononucleosis with splenic infarction detected by computed tomography. The splenic infarction deteriorated with a marked elevation of inflammatory parameters. This necessitated the commencement of methylprednisolone pulse therapy, resulting in prompt amelioration of inflammation and a reduction in cytokine levels. Including our case, only 9 cases of mononucleosis with splenic infarction have been reported to date; however, splenic infarction should be considered because it is a significant complication of infectious mononucleosis.

  4. Sex differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Carolyn S P; McEntegart, Margaret; Claggett, Brian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined the association of sex with clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients following myocardial infarction (MI) in the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial (VALIANT). METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 4570 women and 10 133 men with heart failure (HF), left...... ventricular systolic dysfunction or both were enrolled 0.5-10 days after myocardial infarction (MI) and followed for a median of 24.7 months. Compared with men, women were older, had more comorbidities, and were more likely to present in Killip Class III/IV and experience post-infarction angina or HF. After...

  5. The prognostic importance of creatinine clearance after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, C R; Brendorp, B; Rask-Madsen, C

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this study was to assess renal dysfunction as an independent predictor of mortality after acute myocardial infarction. METHODS: The study population was 6252 patients with a myocardial infarction admitted alive from 1990 to 1992. The mortality status was obtained after at least.......9-1.3) respectively. CONCLUSION: Renal dysfunction is an important risk factor after acute myocardial infarction. When the risk is adjusted for available competing risk factors only severely reduced renal function is associated with an important and independent risk of mortality after acute myocardial infarction...

  6. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  7. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Treatment with the gap junction modifier rotigaptide (ZP123) reduces infarct size in rats with chronic myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugan, Ketil; Marcussen, Niels; Kjølbye, Anne Louise

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with non-selective drugs (eg, long-chain alcohols, halothane) that reduce gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is associated with reduced infarct size after myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, it has been suggested that gap junction intercellular communication stimulating...... compounds may increase infarct size. The antiarrhythmic peptide analogue rotigaptide (ZP123) increases cardiac gap junction intercellular communication and the purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of rotigaptide treatment on infarct size. Myocardial infarction was induced in male rats...... by ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Rats (n = 156) were treated with rotigaptide at three dose levels or vehicle from the onset of ischemia and for 3 weeks following LAD occlusion. Infarct size was determined using histomorphometry after 3 weeks treatment. Rotigaptide treatment producing...

  9. Current trend of acute myocardial infarction in Korea (from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry from 2006 to 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Hyun Yi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Oh, Sangeun; Yoo, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Ju Han; Chai, Leem Soon; Kim, Young Jo; Kim, Chong Jin; Chan Cho, Myeong

    2014-12-15

    Although the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Korea has been rapidly changed because of westernization of diet, lifestyle, and aging of the population, the recent trend of the myocardial infarction have not been reported by classification. We investigated recent trends in the incidence and mortality associated with the 2 major types of AMI. We reviewed 39,978 patients registered in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry for either ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from 2006 to 2013. When the rate for AMI were investigated according to each year, the incidence rates of STEMI decreased markedly from 60.5% in 2006 to 48.1% in 2013 (p myocardial infarction has been changed rapidly in the aspect of risk factors, ratio of STEMI versus NSTEMI, and therapeutic strategies during the recent 8 years in Korea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy correlated by xenon contrast CT scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Meyer, J.S.; Tanahashi, N.; Rogers, R.L.; Tachibana, H.; Kandula, P.; Dowell, R.E.; Mortel, K.F.

    1985-11-01

    Correlations between cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured during stable xenon contrast CT scanning and standard CT indices of brain atrophy were investigated in the patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type, multi-infarct dementia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Compared to age-matched normal volunteers, significant correlations were found in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease between cortical and subcortical gray matter blood flow and brain atrophy estimated by the ventricular body ratio, and mild to moderate brain atrophy were correlated with stepwise CBF reductions. However, in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia, brain atrophy was not associated with stepwise CBF reductions. Overall correlations between brain atrophy and reduced CBF were weak. Mild degrees of brain atrophy are not always associated with reduced CBF.

  11. Diagnosis of small posterior fossa stroke on brain CT: effect of iterative reconstruction designed for brain CT on detection performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Taihei; Yoshida, Morikatsu; Yokoyama, Koichi [Amakusa Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amakusa, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakaura, Takeshi; Hirata, Kenichiro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Harada, Kazunori [Amakusa Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether iterative model reconstruction designed for brain CT (IMR-neuro) would improve the accuracy of posterior fossa stroke diagnosis on brain CT. We enrolled 37 patients with ischaemic stroke in the posterior fossa and 37 patients without stroke (controls). Using axial images reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP) and IMR-neuro, we compared the CT numbers in infarcted areas, image noise in the pons, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of infarcted and non-infarcted areas on scans subjected to IMR-neuro and FBP. To analyse the performance of hypo-attenuation detection, we used receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve techniques. The image noise was significantly lower (2.2 ± 0.5 vs. 5.1 ± 0.9 Hounsfield units, p < 0.01) and the difference in CNR between the infarcted and non-infarcted areas was significantly higher with IMR-neuro than with FBP (2.2 ± 1.7 vs. 4.0 ± 3.6, p < 0.01). Furthermore, the average area under the ROC curve was significantly higher with IMR-neuro (0.90 vs. 0.86 for FBP, p = 0.04). IMR-neuro yielded better image quality and improved hypo-attenuation detection in patients with ischaemic stroke. (orig.)

  12. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Xue Dong

    Full Text Available Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke.Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger's test were obtained to detect publication bias.We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate.This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA.

  13. Analysis of the extension of Q-waves after infarction with body surface map: relationship with infarct size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, Vicente; Sanchis, Juan; Guillem, María S; Núñez, Julio; López-Lereu, María P; Gómez, Cristina; Moratal, David; Chorro, Francisco J; Millet, José; Llàcer, Angel

    2006-08-28

    We aimed to characterize the extension of Q-waves after a first ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction using body surface map (BSM) and its relationship with infarct size quantified with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Thirty-five patients were studied 6 months after a first ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (23 anterior, 12 inferior). All cases had single-vessel disease and an open artery. The extension of Q-waves was analyzed by means of a 64-lead BSM. Infarct size was quantified with CMR. Absence of Q-waves in BSM was observed in 5 patients (14%), 2 of whom (40%) had >1 segment with transmural necrosis. Absence of Q-waves in 12-lead ECG was observed in 8 patients (23%), 7 of whom (87%) had >1 segment with transmural necrosis. Patients with inferior infarctions (n=12, 34%) showed a larger number of Q-waves in BSM (18+/-7.1 leads) than patients with anterior infarctions (n=23, 66%; 3.7+/-3.6 leads; pmedian (2 leads) was related to a higher number of necrotic segments (5.1+/-2.4 vs. 2+/-2.2 segments; p=0.004). The same was observed in inferior infarctions (median 20 leads: 3.5+/-1.9 vs. 1.2+/-1.2 segments; p=0.03). In a stable phase after a first ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, absence of Q-waves does not mean non-transmural necrosis. Using BSM, extension of Q-waves is much higher in inferior infarctions; a separate analysis depending on infarct location is necessary. A major BSM-derived extension of Q-waves is related to larger infarct size both in anterior and in inferior infarctions.

  14. The relationship between cerebral infarction on MR and angiographic findings in moyamoya disease: significance of the posterior circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Song, Soon Young [College of Medicine, Kwangdong Univ., Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Won Jong; Jung, So Lyung; Chung, Bong Gak; Kag, Si Won [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Deuk [College of Medicine, Pochon CHA Univ., Pochon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between changes in the posterior and anterior circulation, as seen at angiography, and the frequency and extent of cerebral infarction revealed by MR imaging in moyamoya disease. This study involved 34 patients (22 females and 12 males, aged 2-52 years) in whom cerebral angiography revealed the presence of moyamoya disease (bilateral; unilateral= 24:10; total hemispheres=58) and who also underwent brain MR imaging. To evaluate the angiographic findings, we applied each angiographic staging system to the anterior and posterior circulation. Leptomeningeal collateral circulation from the cortical branches of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) was also assigned one of four grades. At MR imaging, areas of cerebral cortical or subcortical infarction in the hemisphere were divided into six zones. White matter and basal ganglionic infarction, ventricular dilatation, cortical atrophy, and hemorrhagic lesions were also evaluated. To demonstrate the statistical significance of the relationship between the angiographic and the MR findings, both the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test for trend and the chi-square test were used. The degree of steno-occlusive PCA change correlated significantly with the internal carotid artery (ICA) stage (p<0.0001). As PCA stages advanced, the degree of leptomeningeal collaterals from the PCA decreased significantly (P<0.0001), but ICA stages were not significant (p>0.05). The prevalence of infarction showed significant correlation with the degree of steno-occlusive change in both the ICA and PCA. The degree of cerebral ischemia in moyamoya patients increased proportionally with the severity of PCA stenosis rather than with that of steno-occlusive lesins of the anterior circulation. Infarctions tended to be distributed in the anterior part of the hemisphere at PCA state I or II, while in more advanced PCA lesions, they were also found posteriorly, especially in the territories of the posterior middle cerebral artery

  15. Necrotizing mycotic vasculitis with cerebral infarction caused by Aspergillus niger in a horse with acute typholocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunev, S S; Ehrhart, E J; Jensen, H E; Foreman, J H; Richter, R A; Messick, J B

    1999-07-01

    An 18-year-old Morgan mare was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Illinois, with a 10-day history of watery diarrhea, depression, and dysphagia. On admission, the animal was severely dehydrated, depressed, and unable to swallow and had no clinical signs of diarrhea. The respiratory and heart rate and body temperature were within normal limits. Following fluid therapy, the mare developed severe watery diarrhea and continued to be depressed, incoordinated, and dysphagic. The animal died on the fourth day after admission and was sent to the Laboratories of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine for necropsy. Gross postmortem findings were consistent with an acute cerebral infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, an acute necrotizing typhlocolitis, multifocal petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, enlarged and congested pars intermedia of the pituitary gland, and marked bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia with multifocal areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Histologic evaluation of the affected brain demonstrated an area of coagulative necrosis of the gray matter, with hemorrhage, vasculitis, and thrombosis. There were many fungal hyphae 3.5-6.0 microm, pale basophilic, septate, and occasionally branching at 45 degrees present in the arterial walls and throughout the necrotic tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed Aspergillus niger as the etiologic agent responsible for the mycotic vasculitis and infarction in the brain. Bacteria culture and immunohistochemical staining of the colon and cecum failed to demonstrate specific pathogens.

  16. Acute Anterior Myocardial Infarction Accompanied by Acute Inferior Myocardial Infarction: A Very Rare Coronary Artery Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Alsancak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery anomalies are rare and mostly silent in clinical practice. First manifestation of this congenital abnormality can be devastating as syncope, acute coronary syndrome, and sudden cardiac death. Herein we report a case with coronary artery anomaly complicated with ST segment myocardial infarction in both inferior and anterior walls simultaneously diagnosed during primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

  17. Emergency coronary bypass grafting for evolving myocardial infarction. Effects on infarct size and left ventricular function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flameng, W.; Sergeant, P.; Vanhaecke, J.; Suy, R.

    1987-07-01

    Emergency aorta-coronary bypass grafting was performed early in the course of evolving myocardial infarction in 48 patients. The time interval between the onset of symptoms and reperfusion was 169 +/- 80 minutes. Quantitative assessment of postoperative thallium 201 myocardial scans in 19 patients revealed a significant salvage of myocardium after surgical reperfusion: The size of the residual infarction was less than 50% of that in a matched, medically treated, prospective control group (n = 39) (p less than 0.05). Postoperative equilibrium-gated radionuclide blood pool studies (technetium 99m) showed an enhanced recovery of regional and global ejection fraction after operation as compared to after medical treatment (p less than 0.05). Ultrastructural evaluation of biopsy specimens obtained during the operation delineated subendocardial necrosis in the majority of cases (72%), but subepicardial necrosis was found in only 6% of instances. Q-wave abnormalities were observed on the postoperative electrocardiogram in 50% of cases. Operative mortality was 0% in low-risk patients (i.e., hemodynamically stable condition, n = 26) and 18% in high-risk patients (i.e., cardiogenic shock including total electromechanical dysfunction, n = 22). Survival rate at 18 months was 92% +/- 4%, and 95% +/- 4% of the survivors were event free. It is concluded that early surgical reperfusion of evolving myocardial infarction limits infarct size significantly, enhances functional recovery, and may be a lifesaving operation in patients having cardiogenic shock associated with unsuccessful resuscitation.

  18. A detailed family history of myocardial infarction and risk of myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Petersen, Jonathan Aavang; Bundgård, Henning

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Family history of myocardial infarction (MI) is an independent risk factor for MI. Several genetic variants are associated with increased risk of MI and family history of MI in a first-degree relative doubles MI risk. However, although family history of MI is not a simple dichotomous...

  19. CURRENT REPERFUSION THERAPY POSSIBILITIES IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION AND ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Konstantinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke remain to be of the greatest medical and social importance because of their high prevalence, disability, and mortality rates. Intractable thrombotic occlusion of the respective artery leads to the formation of an ischemic lesion focus in the tissue of the heart or brain. Emergency reperfusion serves to decrease a necrotic focus, makes its formation reversible, and reduces patient death rates. The paper considers main reperfusion therapy lines: medical (with thrombolytic drugs and mechanical (with primary interventions one and their combination in treating patients with acute myocardial and cerebral ischemia. Each reperfusion procedure is discussed in view of its advantages, disadvantages, available guidelines, and possibilities of real clinical practice. Tenecteplase is assessed in terms of its efficacy, safety, and capacities for bolus administration, which allows its use at any hospital and at the pre-hospital stage. Prehospital thrombolysis permits reperfusion therapy to bring much closer to the patient and therefore aids in reducing time to reperfusion and in salvaging as much the myocardial volume as possible. The rapidest recovery of myocardial and cerebral perfusion results in a decreased necrotic area and both improved immediate and late prognosis. The results of randomized clinical trials studying the possibilities of the medical and mechanical methods to restore blood flow are analyzed in the context of evidence-based medicine. The reason why despite the available contraindications, limited efficiency, and the risk of hemorrhagic complications, thrombolytic therapy remains the method of choice for prehospital reperfusion, an alternative to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI if it cannot be carried out in patients with myocardial infarction at the stated time, and the only treatment ischemic stroke treatment that has proven its efficiency and safety in clinical trials is under

  20. Osthole, a natural coumarin, improves neurobehavioral functions and reduces infarct volume and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity after transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuexuan; Yin, Wei; Liu, Mengfei; Ye, Minzhong; Liu, Peiqing; Liu, Jianxin; Lian, Qishen; Xu, Suowen; Pi, Rongbiao

    2011-04-18

    Previously we demonstrated that Osthole, a natural coumarin, protects against focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury in rats. In the present study, the effects of Osthole on neurobehavioral functions, infarct volume and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in a rat 2h focal cerebral ischemia model were investigated. Osthole (100mg/kg per dose) was administrated intraperitoneally 30min before ischemic insult and immediately after reperfusion. Osthole treatment significantly reduced neurological deficit score and infarct volume by 38.5% and 33.8%, respectively, as compared with the untreated animals. Osthole reversed ischemia-reperfusion-induced increase in MMP-9 protein level/activity as evidenced by Western blotting and gelatin zymography. Taken together, these results for the first time demonstrate that Osthole reduces infarct volume, restores neurobehavioral functions and downregulates MMP-9 protein level/activity in ischemia/reperfused brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Wallerian degeneration of brain: MRI and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hsopital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Wallerian degeneration is well known as the anterograde degeneration of axon and their accompanying myelin sheath from injury to the proximal portion of the axon or its cell body. The most common cause of wallerian degeneration is cerebral infarction. Authors experienced three patients with old hemispheric infarct with typical wallerian degeneration in the brain stem, which was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in two cases and CT in one case. This report demonstrates the wallerian degeneration in the corticospinal tract in on the MRI and CT with the brief review of literatures.

  2. Heart Failure Complicating Acute Mtyocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-07-01

    Factors predisposing the older person with acute myocardial infarction (MI) to develop heart failure (HF) include an increased prevalence of MI, multivessel coronary artery disease, decreased left ventricular (LV) contractile reserve, impairment of LV diastolic relaxation, increased hypertension, LV hypertrophy, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, and renal insufficiency. HF associated with acute MI should be treated with a loop diuretic. The use of nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, beta-blockers, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs; treatment of arrhythmias and mechanical complications; and indications for use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Myocardial infarction with acute valvular regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sandhya; Greenberg, Mark; Wharton, Ronald

    2012-08-01

    Left-sided valvular lesions are commonly associated with acute and chronic coronary syndromes. Ischemic mitral regurgitation is well described in the literature. We report a case of acute ischemic right-sided valvular disease in which the presenting symptom of an infarction was severe tricuspid regurgitation. This rare entity is usually caused by distortion of the valve apparatus due to underlying wall motion abnormalities. In conclusion, tricuspid regurgitation is an important yet uncommon presentation of acute ischemia that requires a high degree of suspicion for diagnosis.

  4. Cardioembolic Stroke and Postmyocardial Infarction Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Marius; Franke, Jennifer; Gafoor, Sameer; Sievert, Horst

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a rare but serious complication due to left ventricular thrombus formation and atrial fibrillation. Early revascularization of the culprit coronary lesion is essential. Treatment trends may affect the risk. Conversely, the greater use of antiplatelet agents to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke could increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of stroke after AMI has decreased significantly with more use of percutaneous coronary intervention and antithrombotic therapies in the acute setting, and statins, antihypertensive medications, and dual antiplatelet therapy as secondary prevention strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cerebral infarction and ventricular septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuiab, A

    1989-07-01

    With the availability of contrast echocardiography, patent foramen ovale is frequently detected in patients with stroke, especially in those with no clear etiology and/or the young patient with stroke. Before this report, an association of stroke with ventricular septal defect had not been reported. In this communication, we describe a 38-year-old patient who developed an occipital lobe infarction and who, on investigation, was found to have a ventricular septal defect. Other investigations, which included four-vessel cerebral angiography, collagen disease workup, and coagulation profile, were all normal. We believe this case further extends the spectrum of cerebral ischemic events that may occur with intracardiac shunts.

  6. Midterm renal functions following acute renal infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongun, Sakir; Bozkurt, Ozan; Demir, Omer; Cimen, Sertac; Aslan, Guven

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore clinical features of renal infarction (RI) that may have a role in diagnosis and treatment in our patient cohort and provide data on midterm renal functions. Medical records of patients with diagnosis of acute RI, established by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and at least 1 year follow-up data, who were hospitalized in our clinic between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed; including descriptive data, clinical signs and symptoms, etiologic factors, laboratory findings, and prescribed treatments. Patients with solitary infarct were treated with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) only, whereas patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or multiple or global infarct were treated with anticoagulants. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) referring to renal functions was determined by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. Twenty-seven renal units of 23 patients with acute RI were identified. The mean age was 59.7 ± 15.7 years. Fourteen patients (60.8%) with RI had atrial fibrillation (AF) as an etiologic factor of which four had concomitant mesenteric ischemia at diagnosis. At presentation, 20 patients (86.9%) had elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 18 patients (78.2%) had leukocytosis, and 16 patients (69.5%) had microscopic hematuria. Two patients with concomitant mesenteric ischemia and AF passed away during follow up. Mean eGFR was 70.8 ± 23.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at admission and increased to 82.3 ± 23.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at 1 year follow up. RI should be considered in patients with persistent flank or abdominal pain, particularly if they are at high risk of thromboembolism. Antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant drugs are both effective treatment options according to the amplitude of the infarct for preserving kidney functions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  7. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    CBF) SPECT-scanning using 99mTc-HMPAO as flow tracer was performed in the patients. Mean water content (SD) in the infarct area was 37.7 (5.1); 41.8 (4.8); 35.2 (5.4); and 39.3 (5.1) mol x [kg wet weight](-1) at 0-3; 4-7; 8-21; and >180 days after stroke, respectively. Water content increased between Day 0......Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r...

  8. Therapeutic drugs during healing after myocardial infarction modify infarct collagens and ventricular distensibility at elevated pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugdutt, Bodh I; Idikio, Halliday; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2007-10-01

    We investigated whether therapeutic drugs given during healing following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) modify infarct collagens and left ventricular (LV) distensibility. We treated dogs with drugs from major classes (i.e., indomethacin, ibuprofen, captopril, enalapril, verapamil, amlodipine, propranolol, isosorbide dinitrate [ISDN] and digoxin) between day 2 and 6 weeks and measured hemodynamics, LV remodeling and function during healing over 6 weeks after transmural anterior AMI, and regional collagens, LV distensibility under increasing pressure, rupture threshold (RT), and topography at 6 weeks. Relative to sham, AMI controls showed infarct zone (IZ) expansion and thinning, 9.3-fold increase in IZ collagen, LV dilation and dysfunction, and no change in distensibility and RT. Relative to controls, indomethacin as well as enalapril, captopril and amlodipine decreased IZ collagen. Infarct expansion was attenuated by ibuprofen, captopril, amlodipine and ISDN but augmented by indomethacin. Infarct thinning was prevented by captopril, amlodipine and ISDN but enhanced by indomethacin. Importantly, indomethacin and enalapril enhanced LV distensibility and lowered RT. Distensibility correlated positively with IZ type III collagen and negatively with type I/III collagen ratio and pyridinoline cross-links whereas RT correlated positively with IZ type I collagen. Systolic volume and ejection fraction deteriorated with indomethacin but were improved or preserved with other therapies. The results demonstrate that different therapeutic drugs may produce different effects on IZ collagens during healing post-AMI: drugs that attenuate or adversely alter IZ collagens also enhance LV distensibility, augment adverse remodeling and lower RT, suggesting that testing for these effects post-AMI is warranted.

  9. Electrocardiographic infarct size assessment after thrombolysis: insights from the Acute Myocardial Infarction STudy ADenosine (AMISTAD) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagelata, Alejandro; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Califf, Robert M; Garg, Jyotsna; Birnbaum, Yochai; Grinfeld, Liliana; Gibbons, Raymond J; Granger, Christopher B; Goodman, Shaun G; Wagner, Galen S; Mahaffey, Kenneth W

    2005-10-01

    Noninvasive methods are needed to evaluate reperfusion success in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). The AMISTAD trial was analyzed to compare MI size and myocardial salvage determined by electrocardiogram (ECG) with technetium Tc 99m sestamibi single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of 236 patients enrolled in AMISTAD, 166 (70 %) with no ECG confounding factors and no prior MI were included in this analysis. Of these, group 1 (126 patients, 53%) had final infarct size (FIS) available by both ECG and SPECT. Group 2 (56 patients, 24%) had myocardium at risk, FIS, and salvage index (SI) assessed by both SPECT and ECG techniques. Aldrich/Clemmensen scores for myocardium at risk and the Selvester QRS score for final MI size were used. Salvage index was calculated as follows: SI = (myocardium at risk-FIS)/(myocardium at risk). In group 1, FIS was 15% (6, 24) as measured by ECG and 11% (2, 27) as measured by SPECT. In the adenosine group, FIS was 12% (6, 21) and 11% (2, 22). In the placebo group, FIS was 16.5% (7.5, 24) and 11.5% (3.0, 38.5) by ECG and SPECT, respectively. The overall correlation between SPECT and ECG for FIS was 0.58 (P = .0001): 0.60 in the placebo group (P = .0001) and 0.54 (P = .0001) in the adenosine group. In group 2, myocardium at risk was 23% (17, 30) and 26% (10, 50) with ECG and SPECT, respectively (P = .0066). Final infarct size was 17% (6, 21) and 12% (1, 24) (P < .0001). The SI was 29% (-7, 57) and 46% (15, 79) with ECG and SPECT, respectively (P = .0510). The ECG measurement of infarct size has a moderate relationship with SPECT infarct size measurements in the population with available assessments. This ECG algorithm must further be validated on clinical outcomes.

  10. Impact of Atrial Fibrillation During ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction on Infarct Characteristics and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstadler, Sebastian J; Stiermaier, Thomas; Eitel, Charlotte; Fuernau, Georg; Saad, Mohammed; Pöss, Janine; de Waha, Suzanne; Mende, Meinhard; Desch, Steffen; Metzler, Bernhard; Thiele, Holger; Eitel, Ingo

    2018-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is frequently observed in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and associated with worse clinical outcome. However, the mechanisms for this increased risk are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of the presence of AF to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) derived myocardial salvage and damage as well as clinical outcomes. This multicenter CMR study enrolled 786 patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. CMR parameters (infarct size, myocardial salvage index, microvascular obstruction, and myocardial function) were assessed 3 (interquartile range [IQR], 2-4) days post-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and compared between patients with or without AF during hospitalization. Major adverse cardiac events were assessed as a composite of all-cause death, reinfarction, and new congestive heart failure at 12 months. AF was documented in 48 (6.1%) patients. There was no significant difference in infarct size (18 [IQR, 9-29]% versus 17 [IQR, 9-25]% of left ventricular mass; P=0.340), myocardial salvage index (51 [IQR, 34-69] versus 51 [IQR, 33-69]; P=0.830), or microvascular obstruction (0.6 [IQR, 0-2.0]% versus 0.0 [IQR, 0-1.8]% of left ventricular mass; P=0.340) between groups. Patients with AF had significantly lower left ventricular (47 [IQR, 34-54]% versus 51 [IQR, 44-58]%; P=0.003) and left atrial (42 [IQR, 17-57]% versus 53 [IQR, 45-59]%; PURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00712101. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News New BRAIN Grants BRAIN Cell Census Launched ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to change the way she thinks about and reacts to things that may trigger her depression. Several ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Careers at NIMH Staff Directories Getting to NIMH Transforming the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses. Search ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

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  7. Nonfasting glucose, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; McCarthy, Mark I

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI).......The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI)....

  8. [Comparison of hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, P; Castillo, J; Pardellas, H; Vadillo, J; Lema, M; Noya, M

    1998-05-01

    Arterial hypertension and hypohyalinosis of the arterias perforantes are said to be the commonest cause of lacunar infarcts, although other etiological factors and anatomo-pathological lesions are described more and more frequently. We designed a study to compare the clinical topographic and prognostic characteristics of patients with hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. We selected 51 patients with lacunar infarcts: in 23 (45%) arterial hypertension was the only etiological factor recognized. In 28 (55%) other risk factors (16 diabetes mellitus, 17 cardiopathy, 8 hyperlipemia, 13 cigarette smoking and 11 alcoholism) were seen. We evaluated the form of presentation, the type of infarct and whether this was associated with headache. The degree of defect was determined on admission using the Canadian scale. The size of the infarct was measured on CT or RM, using whichever measurement was greater. The evolution of the condition was determined on the Canadian scale and the index of Barthel after three months. Age and sex distribution was similar to both groups. Motor hemiparesia was the commonest lacunar syndrome and the distribution was similar. There was no difference in form of onset, association with headache or neurological defect between the hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. The topographical distribution, the presentation of single or multiple lesions, the size of the infarcts and the prognosis were similar in both groups. Lacunar infarcts, whether hypertensive or not, show no differences regarding clinical, neuro-radiological or evolutionary characteristics.

  9. Prognostic relevance of PCI-related myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, Pier; Grundeken, Maik J.; van de Hoef, Tim P.; Wallentin, Lars; Fox, Keith A.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Damman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Procedure-related myocardial infarction (pMI) is directly associated with a coronary revascularization procedure, such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or CABG surgery. In contrast to spontaneous myocardial infarction (MI), the prognostic relevance of pMI is the subject of ongoing debate.

  10. To avoid operating on pseudo tumoral pulmonary infarctions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary infarction usually appears as a hump-shaped triangular opacity with its base applied to a pleural surface. In some cases, pulmonary infarctions may appear as a pseudo tumoral opacity mimicking lung cancer. Thoracotomy could be prevented by repeating CT scan in properly selected patients. Pan African ...

  11. Bilateral orbital infarction and retinal detachment in a previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone infarction involving the orbit in sickle cell disease is not common. Bilateral orbital infarction in a previously undiagnosed sickle cell hemoglobinopathy has not been previously reported. In this report, we present a case of an 11‑year‑old previously undiagnosed sickle cell disease Nigerian girl with severe acute bilateral ...

  12. Giant biventricular thrombi presenting with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Adnan; Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Keskin, Muhammed; Öz, Ahmet; Aydın, Berat Arıkan

    2016-09-01

    Biventricular thrombi secondary to anterior myocardial infarction is very rare. We present a patient with giant biventricular thrombi subsequent to an old anterior wall myocardial infarction, and devastating consequences, including acute pulmonary artery and femoral artery embolism. We introduce a unique case report with demonstrative and illustrative images. Copyright © 2016 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Anisotropic reinforcement of acute anteroapical infarcts improves pump function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomovsky, Gregory M; Clark, Samantha A; Parker, Katherine M; Ailawadi, Gorav; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2012-07-01

    We hypothesize that a therapy that improves left ventricular (LV) pump function early after infarction should decrease the need for compensation through sympathetic activation and dilation, thereby reducing the risk of developing heart failure. The mechanical properties of healing myocardial infarcts are an important determinant of LV function, yet improving function by altering infarct properties has proven unexpectedly difficult. Using a computational model, we recently predicted that stiffening a large anterior infarct anisotropically (in only one direction) would improve LV function, whereas isotropic stiffening, the focus of previous studies and therapies, would not. The goal of this study was to test the novel strategy of anisotropic infarct reinforcement. We tested the effects of anisotropic infarct reinforcement in 10 open-chest dogs with large anteroapical infarcts that depressed LV pump function. We measured regional mechanics, LV volumes, and cardiac output at a range of preloads at baseline, 45 minutes after coronary ligation (ischemia), and 30 minutes later, after surgical reinforcement in the longitudinal direction (anisotropic). Ischemia shifted the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship and cardiac output curves rightward, decreasing cardiac output at matched end-diastolic pressure by 44%. Anisotropic reinforcement significantly improved systolic function without impairing diastolic function, recovering half the deficit in overall LV function. We conclude that anisotropic reinforcement is a promising new approach to improving LV function after a large myocardial infarction.

  14. Benefits and risks of thrombolysis for acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThrombolytic therapy is a major step forward in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and may result in up to 50% mortality reduction, provided that it is administered early (chapter 1). In 80 to 85% of patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction, a coronary artery is

  15. Interobserver variation in interpretation of electrocardiographic signs of atrial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J H; Nielsen, F E; Falstie-Jensen, N

    1993-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is the only means of diagnosing atrial infarction antemortem. Certain ECG changes (PR-segment displacements) have been taken earlier as signs of atrial infarction. The purpose of this study was to assess the interobserver variation on suggested ECG signs of atrial infa...

  16. Survival and cause of death after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Torben; Davidsen, M

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish WHO MONICA study, a register of patients with myocardial infarction was established in 1982, covering 11 municipalities in the western part of Copenhagen County, Denmark. During the period 1982-91, all cases of myocardial infarction among citizens aged 25-74 years were regis...

  17. Influence of smoking on the location of acute myocardial infarctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Rahel; Fuller, Eileen E; Harper, John F; Feldman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether there is an association between smoking and the location of acute myocardial infarctions. Methods. Using a cohort from our hospital and published cohorts from Ireland, Uruguay, and Israel, we calculated odds of having an inferior wall as opposed to an anterior wall acute myocardial infarction among smokers and nonsmokers. Results. In our cohort, there was a higher proportion of smokers than nonsmokers in patients with inferior acute myocardial infarctions than in patients with anterior infarctions. This difference was also present in each of the other cohorts. Odds ratios for an inferior versus an anterior acute myocardial infarction among smokers ranged from 1.15 to 2.00 (median odds ratio, 1.32). When the cohorts were combined (n = 3, 160), the pooled odds ratio for an inferior as opposed to an anterior acute myocardial infarction among smokers was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.20 to 1.58) (P < .002). Conclusions. Cigarette smoking increases the risk of inferior wall acute myocardial infarction more than the risk of anterior wall infarction. Smoking thus appears to adversely affect the right coronary arterial circulation to a greater extent than the left coronary arterial circulation by a mechanism not yet understood.

  18. Thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction with hormonal contraception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism with newer hormonal contraception, few have examined thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, and results have been conflicting.......Although several studies have assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism with newer hormonal contraception, few have examined thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction, and results have been conflicting....

  19. Spontaneous resolution of splenic infarcts after distal splenorenal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In cases of portal hypertension with splenic infarcts, splenectomy with proximal splenorenal shunt has been recommended. We are sharing our experience with distal splenorenal shunt in these cases contrary to the popular belief. Materials and Methods: Splenic infarcts were graded as mild, moderate and ...

  20. Sequential thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy after acute infarction in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.W.; Mueller, H.S.; Rao, P.S.

    1980-07-01

    Three sequential Tl-201 myocardial perfusion studies were performed in 21 patients (18 men, 3 women) with first acute transmural myocardia infarction. The Tl-201 image defect size was determined with a semiquantitative visual scoring method and temporal changes in image defect size were compared to CK-MB infarct size and enzymatic evidence of progressive myocardial necrosis and infarct extension. Progressive decreases in Tl-201 image defect size were observed and the visual score in all 21 patients decreased significantly from 6.5 +- 3.7 (mean +- SD) on day 1 to 4.9 +- 3.5 on day 12. Eleven patients without evidence of infarct extension had significantly lower infarct size, a significant decrease in visual score by the 12th day and had significantly smaller Tl-201 defects at all three study times compared to 10 patients with infarct extension. Seven of 10 (70%) with extension had an initial visual score greater than or equal to 7 compared to only 2/11 (18%) without extension. The temporal behavior of Tl-201 image defects is related to the size of the infarction and presence or absence of extension. Sequential studies comparing early initial and subsequent defect size may assist in evaluating the behavior of ischemic and infarcted myocardium in the postinfarction period.

  1. Review Paper: Myocardial Rupture After Acute Myocardial Infarction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myocardial rupture complications after acute myocardial infarction are infrequent but lethal. They mainly involve rupture of the ventricular free wall, ventricular septum, papillary muscle, or combined. We compare features of different kinds of myocardial ruptures after acute myocardial infarction by reviewing the clinical ...

  2. Acute myocardial infarction in young adults with Antiphospholipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rarely associated with antiphospholipid syndrome. The treatment of these patients is a clinical challenge. We report the observations of 2 young adults (1 woman and 1 man), admitted in our acute care unit for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A coagulopathy work-up concludes ...

  3. Prognostic importance of complete atrioventricular block complicating acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Engstrøm, Thomas; Vejlstrup, Niels G

    2003-01-01

    Third-degree atrioventricular block after acute myocardial infarction is considered to have prognostic importance. However, its importance in conjunction with thrombolytic therapy and its relation to left ventricular function remains uncertain. This report also outlines an important distinction...... between atrioventricular block in the setting of anterior and inferior wall acute myocardial infarction, with profound clinical and prognostic implications....

  4. Galectin-3 and post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Wouter C.; van der Velde, A. Rogier; Pascual-Figal, Domingo A.; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the current literature regarding the involvement and the putative role(s) of galectin-3 in post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling. Post-myocardial infarction remodeling is characterized by acute loss of myocardium, which leads to structural and biomechanical changes in

  5. Predictors of Appraisal and Coping Dimensions in Myocardial Infarction Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyong Sil; Martin, Peter

    This study attempted to identify predictors of perception and coping after the occurrence of a myocardial infarction. Sixty males and 17 females who had suffered from a myocardial infarction within 3 months prior to the research were recruited from a hospital rehabilitation program. Subjects completed the Peri-Life Events Scale, the 16-PF…

  6. Mechanisms and therapeutic modulation of myocardial infarct healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818534

    2008-01-01

    This thesis aimed to increase the basic mechanistic understanding of myocardial infarct healing and to develop novel approaches to prevent heart failure following myocardial infarction (MI). Different approaches have been tested to reduce myocardial injury in the acute phase of MI, leading to

  7. Occurrence of vasospasm and infarction in relation to a focal monitoring sensor in patients after SAH: placing a bet when placing a probe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Ulrich

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vasospastic brain infarction is a devastating complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Using a probe for invasive monitoring of brain tissue oxygenation or blood flow is highly focal and may miss the site of cerebral vasospasm (CVS. Probe placement is based on the assumption that the spasm will occur either at the dependent vessel territory of the parent artery of the ruptured aneurysm or at the artery exposed to the focal thick blood clot. We investigated the likelihood of a focal monitoring sensor being placed in vasospasm or infarction territory on a hypothetical basis. METHODS: From our database we retrospectively selected consecutive SAH patients with angiographically proven (day 7-14 severe CVS (narrowing of vessel lumen >50%. Depending on the aneurysm location we applied a standard protocol of probe placement to detect the most probable site of severe CVS or infarction. We analyzed whether the placement was congruent with existing CVS/infarction. RESULTS: We analyzed 100 patients after SAH caused by aneurysms located in the following locations: MCA (n = 14, ICA (n = 30, A1CA (n = 4, AcoA or A2CA (n = 33, and VBA (n = 19. Sensor location corresponded with CVS territory in 93% of MCA, 87% of ICA, 76% of AcoA or A2CA, but only 50% of A1CA and 42% of VBA aneurysms. The focal probe was located inside the infarction territory in 95% of ICA, 89% of MCA, 78% of ACoA or A2CA, 50% of A1CA and 23% of VBA aneurysms. CONCLUSION: The probability that a single focal probe will be situated in the territory of severe CVS and infarction varies. It seems to be reasonably accurate for MCA and ICA aneurysms, but not for ACA or VBA aneurysms.

  8. In vivo 1H spectroscopy of the human brain at 1.5 tesla. Preliminary experience at a clinical installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Larsson, H; Jensen, K M

    1990-01-01

    In vivo localized water suppressed proton spectroscopy of human brain was carried out on 15 healthy volunteers and 2 patients suffering from a brain tumour and an infarction, respectively. The measurements were performed on a whole body MR system, operating at 1.5 tesla using the stimulated echo...

  9. Outcomes of acute myocardial infarction in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tanush; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Wilbert S; Mujib, Marjan; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Sule, Sachin; Jain, Diwakar; Ahmed, Ali; Lanier, Gregg M; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Fonarow, Gregg C; Panza, Julio A

    2015-08-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a recognized complication in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, limited data are available on outcomes of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and acute myocardial infarction. We analyzed the 2003-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged ≥18 years with a principal diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Patients with a concomitant diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were then identified and analyzed as a separate cohort. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction with and without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Of 5,901,827 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 5688 (0.1%) had a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were older, more likely to be female, and less likely to have traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Compared with patients without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were less likely to present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and more likely to present with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with ST-elevation myocardial infarction or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction were less likely to receive revascularization. In the overall population with acute myocardial infarction, there was no difference in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality between patients with and without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.11; P = .59). In the population with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had lower risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality than those without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.63-0.91; P = .003), whereas in the population with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, there was no difference in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality between patients with

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a major mood circuit called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain ... in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays ...

  11. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic- ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent from one neuron to ... of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ...

  17. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the brain (ventricles) or surrounding your brain and spinal cord to drain the excess fluid into an external bag. Sometimes it may then be necessary to introduce a shunt system — which consists of a ... brain and ending in your abdominal cavity. Rehabilitative therapy. ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  20. CT Perfusion in Acute Stroke: "Black Holes" on Time-to-Peak Image Maps Indicate Unsalvageable Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Ruairi; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-11-01

    CT perfusion is becoming important in acute stroke imaging to determine optimal patient-management strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive value of time-to-peak image maps and, specifically, a phenomenon coined a "black hole" for assessing infarcted brain tissue at the time of scan. Acute stroke patients were screened for the presence of black holes and their follow-up imaging (noncontrast CT or MR) was reviewed to assess for infarcted brain tissue. Of the 23 patients with signs of acute ischemia on CT perfusion, all had black holes. The black holes corresponded with areas of infarcted brain on follow-up imaging (specificity 100%). Black holes demonstrated significantly lower cerebral blood volumes (P Black holes on time-to-peak image maps represent areas of unsalvageable brain. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  1. Prognostic impact of physical activity prior to myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlersen, Hanne; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina

    2017-01-01

    Background: Animal studies indicate that exercise reduces myocardial damage during myocardial infarction by ischaemic preconditioning. Aim: To determine from a prospective cohort study whether the level of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) in humans prior to myocardial infarction could modify......-up. There was no association between LTPA levels prior to myocardial infarction and the risk of heart failure or all-cause mortality after non-fatal myocardial infarction: adjusted HRs for moderate/high versus sedentary LTPA were 1.06 (0.78-1.45) and 0.90 (0.74-1.08), respectively. Conclusion Individuals who were physically...... active had lower case fatality of myocardial infarction, but survivors were not protected against subsequent heart failure or mortality....

  2. [Case of infective endocarditis diagnosed with renal infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Minato; Saito, Kazutaka; Takenaka, Shunsuke; Kubo, Yuichi; Iimura, Yasumasa; Numao, Noboru; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Koga, Fumitaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori

    2009-03-01

    A 46-year-old woman with sudden on set strong right flank pain was transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of right renal infarction. Cardiac ultrasonography revealed a vegetation on the posterior cusp of the mitral valve, and the renal infarction was thought to be caused by renal artery embolism from infective endocarditis. Since the vegetation remained after antimicrobial therapy as conservative management, the patient was surgically treated by mitral annuloplasty. It has been known that infective endocarditis can cause renal infarction. Infective endocarditis requires immediate and adequate treatment because of high mortality. Therefore, the appropriate diagnosis of infective endocarditis is needed for patients with renal infarction without any other disorder causing renal infarction.

  3. Omental infarction in an obese 10-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Kambouri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary omental infarction (POI has a low incidence worldwide, with most cases occurring in adults. This condition is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in childhood. Herein, we present a case of omental infarction in an obese 10-year-old boy who presented with acute abdominal pain in the right lower abdomen. The ultrasound (US examination did not reveal the appendix but showed secondary signs suggesting acute appendicitis. The child was thus operated on under the preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis but the intraoperative finding was omental infarct. Since the omental infarct as etiology of acute abdominal pain is uncommon, we highlight some of the possible etiologies and emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of omental infarction.

  4. [Integrated assessment of serum homeostasis shifts in experimental myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, M A; Medvedeva, U S; Mirzoyan, R S; Maslennikov, D V; Zolotov, N N; Karganov, M Yu

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic changes in serum homeostasis of rats with experimental myocardial infarction evolution using the method of laser correlation spectroscopy were studied. The presence of necrotic myocardial damage was confirmed by electrocardiographic, histological and biochemical methods. Increased contribution of small particles in the acute period of myocardial infarction was detected, which indicates products of catabolism accumulation in serum and changing the level of some proteins. Comparison of subfractional content of sera from rats with varying degrees of extension of myocardial necrosis through the ventricular wall revealed the predominance of particles of low molecular size (up to 10 nm) in animals with transmural infarction and middle-size fraction (50-120 nm) in animals with non-transmural infarction. These results are consistent with the clinical data obtained by this method in patients with Q-wave and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction.

  5. Correlation between aortic/carotid atherosclerotic plaques and cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baojun; Sun, Shaoli; Liu, Guorong; Li, Yuechun; Pang, Jiangxia; Zhang, Jingfen; Yang, Lijuan; Li, Ruiming; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Changchun; Li, Xiue

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between aortic/carotid atherosclerotic plaques and cerebral infarction. We examined 116 cases of cerebral infarction using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in order to exclude cerebrovascular stenosis. Transesophageal echocardiography and color Doppler ultrasound were used to detect aortic atherosclerotic plaques (AAPs) and carotid atherosclerotic plaques (CAPs). AAPs were detected in a total of 70 of the 116 cases (60.3%), including 56 with moderate/severe atherosclerotic changes (48.3%). The difference in the incidence of various types of infarction between APP severity levels was significant (PCAPs (55.2%), including 46 with unstable plaque (39.7%). The difference in the incidence of various types of infarction between CAP stability levels was significant (PCAP are significant causes of embolic infarction without stenosis in the internal carotid arteries.

  6. Splenic infarction associated with sickle cell trait at low altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegars, Mary Beth; Brett, Allan S

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell trait is widely known to be associated with splenic infarction at high altitudes. Although textbooks and reviews imply that this complication does not occur at low altitudes, we encountered such a case and identified several previous cases in the literature. An 18-year-old woman with sickle cell trait who resided near sea level presented with left upper quadrant abdominal pain and was found to have multiple splenic infarcts. She was otherwise well, with no comorbidities that would predispose to hypoxemia or vascular injury. A review of the literature revealed 12 previously published cases of low-altitude splenic infarction in patients with sickle trait; 7 of those patients had comorbidities that likely predisposed to splenic infarction. None. Spontaneous splenic infarction can occur in patients with sickle trait who live at low altitudes. It is unclear whether this complication is rare, or whether it is relatively common but under-recognized.

  7. Nonhemorrhagic Adrenal Infarction With Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenette, Jeffrey P; Tatli, Servet

    2015-10-01

    Adrenal infarction is an infrequent cause of severe abdominal pain during pregnancy. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of adrenal infarction have not previously been thoroughly described. A 20-year-old woman, gravida 1 para 0, presented at 27 4/7 weeks of gestation with sudden-onset right upper quadrant and flank pain. A 29-year-old woman, gravida 2 para 1, presented at 17 5/7 weeks of gestation with sudden-onset right abdominal and flank pain and again at 35 5/7 weeks of gestation with sudden-onset severe left flank and upper quadrant pain. In both patients, unilateral adrenal infarction was diagnosed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography after initial nondiagnostic ultrasonography and MRI. Clinical presentation and MRI features of nonhemorrhagic adrenal infarction are described. Nonhemorrhagic adrenal infarction may be an underdiagnosed cause of acute abdominal pain during pregnancy and can be diagnosed with MRI.

  8. Renal Infarction Caused by Isolated Spontaneous Renal Artery Intramural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sihyung; Lee, Ga Hee; Jin, Kyubok; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Yang Wook; Park, Bong Soo

    2015-11-24

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon condition resulting from an obstruction or a decrease in renal arterial blood flow. Isolated spontaneous renal artery intramural hematoma is a rare cause of renal infarction. A 46-year-old healthy man presented to our emergency room because of sudden onset of severe right flank pain. An enhanced abdominal computed tomography scan showed a low-attenuated lesion in the lateral portion of the right kidney but no visible thromboembolisms in the main vessels. Computed tomography angiography revealed acute infarction resulting from intramural hematoma of the anterior segmental artery of the right kidney, with distal occlusion. The rarity and non-specific clinical presentation of renal infarction often lead to a delayed diagnosis that may result in impaired renal function. Clinical suspicion is important in the early diagnosis, and intramural hematoma of the renal artery should be considered the cause of renal infarction even in healthy patients without predisposing factors.

  9. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  10. Diabetic Muscle Infarction Masquerading as Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Janga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old male patient with past medical history of diabetes mellitus (DM, end stage renal disease (ESRD on hemodialysis (HD, congestive heart failure (CHF, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, and chronic anemia presented with complaints of left thigh pain. A computerized tomogram (CT of the thigh revealed evidence of edema with no evidence of a focal collection or gas formation noted. The patient’s clinical symptoms persisted and he underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of his thigh which was reported to show small areas of muscle necrosis with fluid collection. These findings in the acute setting concerned necrotizing fasciitis. After careful discussion following a multidisciplinary approach, a decision was made to perform a fasciotomy with tissue debridement. The patient was treated with IV antibiotics and discharged with a vacuum assisted wound drain. The surgical pathology revealed evidence of muscle edema with necrosis. Seven weeks later the patient presented with similar complaints on the other thigh (right thigh. MRI of the thighs revealed worsening edema with features suggestive of myositis and possible muscle infarction. A CT guided biopsy of the right quadriceps muscle revealed fibrotic interstitial connective tissue and no evidence of necrosis. This favored a diagnosis of diabetic muscle infarction. The disease was managed with pain control, strict diabetes management, and aggressive dialysis.

  11. Medical image of the week: splenic infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey DJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 52-year-old Hispanic woman with a past medical history significant for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, hypertension, and rheumatoid arthritis presented with left upper quadrant pain for one day. Her review of systems was positive for bloating, severe epigastric and left upper quadrant tenderness that radiated to the back and left shoulder, nausea with non-bilious emesis, and diarrhea for one day prior to admission. Physical exam only revealed epigastric and left upper quadrant tenderness to light palpation without rebound or guarding. Abdominal computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated a new acute or subacute splenic infarct with no clear evidence of an embolic source in the abdomen or pelvis (Figure 1. Echocardiogram with bubble study and contrast did not demonstrate valve abnormalities, cardiac mass, vegetation, valve or wall motion abnormalities and no evidence of patent foramen ovale. Splenic infarction should be suspected when patients present with sharp, acute left upper quadrant pain ...

  12. Vitamin D and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Valentina; De Metrio, Monica; Cosentino, Nicola; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Tremoli, Elena

    2017-01-26

    Vitamin D deficiency is a prevalent condition, cutting across all ethnicities and among all age groups, and occurring in about 30%-50% of the population. Besides vitamin D established role in calcium homeostasis, its deficiency is emerging as a new risk factor for coronary artery disease. Notably, clinical investigations have suggested that there is an association between hypovitaminosis D and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Not only has it been linked to incident AMI, but also to increased morbidity and mortality in this clinical setting. Moreover, vitamin D deficiency seems to predispose to recurrent adverse cardiovascular events, as it is associated with post-infarction complications and cardiac remodeling in patients with AMI. Several mechanisms underlying the association between vitamin D and AMI risk can be involved. Despite these observational and mechanistic data, interventional trials with supplementation of vitamin D are controversial. In this review, we will discuss the evidence on the association between vitamin D deficiency and AMI, in terms of prevalence and prognostic impact, and the possible mechanisms mediating it. Further research in this direction is warranted and it is likely to open up new avenues for reducing the risk of AMI.

  13. Mesenteric infarction due to iatrogenic polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Katrina; Carmelle-Elie, Marie; Ferguson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Polycythemia vera is defined as a chronic myeloproliferative disorder characterized by increased red blood cell count. There have been no reports on mesenteric thrombosis resulting from iatrogenic polycythemia. We present a patient with a history of non-small cell lung cancer undergoing maintenance oral chemotherapy on tarceva and adjunctive use of procrit. The patient presented to our emergency department with an acute abdomen and was found to have ischemic bowel from unmonitored procrit, which lead to hyperviscosity of blood and mesenteric infarction. The patient remained intubated with ventilator support. He refused a tracheostomy. He continued on feeding through the J port of the nasojejunal tube. His white cell count, and hematocrit and creatinine levels remained normal. Procrit use and chemotherapy were not restarted. He was transferred to a subacute nursing facility for further treatment. Procrit and other erythropoiesis stimulating drugs can cause significant morbidity and mortality with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, gastrointestinal bleeding, thromboembolism and stroke. This case report suggests that without closely monitoring hematocrit levels, epoetin may also be associated with an increased risk of mesenteric infarction.

  14. Occipital lobe infarction and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagawa, Koichi; Nagata, Ken; Shishido, Fumio (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1990-08-01

    Even though the PET study revealed a total infarct in the territory of the left PCA in our 3 cases of pure alesia, it is still obscure which part of the left occipital lobe is most closely associated with the occurrence of the pure alexia. In order to elucidate the intralobar localization of the pure alexia, it is needed to have an ideal case who shows an pure alexia due to the localized lesion within the left occipital lobe. Furthermore, high-resolution PET scanner will circumvent the problem in detecting the metabolism and blood flow in the corpus callosum which plays an important role in the pathogenesis. We have shown that the occlusion of the right PCA also produced a left unilateral agnosia which is one of the common neurological signs in the right MCA infarction. To tell whether the responsible lesion for the unilateral spatial agnosia differs between the PCA occlusion and the MCA occlusion, the correlation study should be carried out in a greater number of the subjects. Two distinctive neuropsychological manifestations, cerebral color blidness and prosopagnosia, have been considered to be produced by the bilateral occipital lesion. The PET studies disclosed reduction of blood flow and oxygen metabolism in both occipital lobes in our particular patient who exibited cerebral color blindness and posopagnosia. (author).

  15. Dermal filler injection: a novel approach for limiting infarct expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Liam P; Matsuzaki, Kanji; Noma, Mio; Jackson, Benjamin M; Eperjesi, Thomas J; Plappert, Theodore J; St John-Sutton, Martin G; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    Early infarct expansion after coronary occlusion compromises contractile function in perfused myocardial regions and promotes adverse long-term left ventricular (LV) remodeling. We hypothesized that injection of a tissue-expanding dermal filler material into a myocardial infarction (MI) would attenuate infarct expansion and limit LV remodeling. Fifteen sheep were subjected to an anteroapical MI involving approximately 20% of the LV followed by the injection of 1.3 mL of a calcium hydroxyapatite-based dermal filler into the infarct. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography was performed at baseline, 30 minutes after MI, and 15 minutes after injection to assess infarct expansion. Sixteen additional sheep were subjected to the same infarction and followed echocardiographically and hemodynamically for 4 weeks after MI to assess chronic remodeling. Eight animals had injection with dermal filler as described above immediately after MI, and 8 animals were injected with an equal amount of saline solution. All animals exhibited infarct expansion soon after coronary occlusion. The regional ejection fraction of the apex became negative after infarction, consistent with systolic dyskinesia. Injection of the dermal filler converted the apical wall motion from dyskinetic to akinetic and resulted immediately in significant decreases in global, regional, and segmental LV volumes. Chronically, relative to saline control, dermal filler injection significantly reduced LV end-systolic volume (62.2 +/- 3.6 mL versus 44.5 +/- 3.9 mL; p < 0.05) and improved global ejection fraction (0.295 +/- 0.016 versus 0.373 +/- 0.017; p < 0.05) at 4 weeks after infarction. Injection of an acellular dermal filler into an MI immediately after coronary occlusion reduces early infarct expansion and limits chronic LV remodeling.

  16. Cerebral infarction following intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric Moyamoya disease - A case report and brief review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Patra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a clinical entity characterized by progressive cerebrovascular occlusion with spontaneous development of a collateral vascular network called Moyamoya vessels. This disease mainly manifests as cerebral ischemia. Intracranial bleeding is another major presentation of patients with Moyamoya disease. We report here a 12-year-old male child who presented with severe headache, vomiting and meningismus. Initial neuroimaging study with noncontrast computed tomography scan revealed fresh intraventricular hemorrhage in right-sided lateral ventricle. Magnetic resonance imaging with angiography of brain was done 5 days later when the child developed right-sided hemiparesis, and the diagnosis of Moyamoya disease was confirmed along with lacunar infarction of right posterior peri and paraventricular area and in the left paraventricular area and centrum semiovale. Simultaneous presence of cerebral infarction along with intraventricular hemorrhage in adult with bleeding-type Moyamoya disease is reported in literature, but it is a rare entity in a child.

  17. Effect of Metformin on Metabolites and Relation With Myocardial Infarct Size and Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction After Myocardial Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, Ruben N.; Kofink, Daniel; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Dalmeijer, Geertje W.; Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim

    2017-01-01

    Background-Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct size (ISZ) are key predictors of long-term survival after myocardial infarction (MI). However, little is known about the biochemical pathways driving LV dysfunction after MI. To identify novel biomarkers predicting post-MI LVEF and

  18. Myocardial sympathetic innervation, function, and oxidative metabolism in non-infarcted myocardium in patients with prior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hirofumi; Matsunari, Ichiro; Nomura, Yusuke; Fujita, Wataru; Komatsu, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Yoshiharu; Nekolla, Stephan G; Kajinami, Kouji

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between sympathetic innervation, contractile function, and the oxidative metabolism of the non-infarcted myocardium in patients with prior myocardial infarction. In 19 patients (14 men, 5 women, 65 ± 9 years) after prior myocardial infarction, sympathetic innervation was assessed by (11)C-hydroxyephedrine (HED) positron emission tomography (PET). Oxidative metabolism was quantified using (11)C-acetate PET. Left ventricular systolic function was measured by echocardiography with speckle tracking technique. The (11)C-HED retention was positively correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (r = 0.566, P infarcted myocardium (r = -0.561, P infarcted myocardium. When the patients were divided into two groups based on the median value of left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) (41 mL), there were no significant differences in age, sex, and rate pressure product between the groups. However, the large LVESVI group (>41 mL) was associated with reduced (11)C-HED retention and peak longitudinal strain in systole, whereas Kmono was similar between the groups. This study indicates that remodeled LV after myocardial infarction is associated with impaired sympathetic innervation and function even in the non-infarcted myocardial tissue. Furthermore, oxidative metabolism in the non-infarcted myocardium seems to be operated by normal regulatory mechanisms rather than pre-synaptic sympathetic neuronal function.

  19. Understanding the Neurophysiology and Quantification of Brain Perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Elizabeth; Sugrue, Leo; Wintermark, Max

    2017-04-01

    Newer neuroimaging technology has moved beyond pure anatomical imaging and ventured into functional and physiological imaging. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (PWI), which depicts hemodynamic conditions of the brain at the microvascular level, has an increasingly important role in clinical central nervous system applications. This review provides an overview of the established role of PWI in brain tumor and cerebrovascular imaging, as well as some emerging applications in neuroimaging. PWI allows better characterization of brain tumors, grading, and monitoring. In acute stroke imaging, PWI is utilized to distinguish penumbra from infarcted tissue. PWI is a promising tool in the assessment of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, although its clinical role is not yet defined.

  20. Brain MRI findings of neuropsychiatric lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang-Wook; Kwon, Bae Ju; Lee, Seung-Ro; Hahm, Chang-Kok; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong; Bae, Sang-Chul [Hanyang Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the brain MRI findings in patients with neuropsychiatric lupus. In 26 patients (M:F = 2:24 ; aged 9-48 years) in whom the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus was clinically or pathologically proven and in whom neuropsychiatric lupus was also clinically diagnosed, the findings of brain MRI were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were analyzed with regard to the distribution, location, size and number of lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction, the presence of cerebral atrophy, and the extent and degree of brain parenchymal and intravascular enhancement. The most common MRI findings were lesions due to cerebral ischemia or infarction occurring in 18 patients (69%), and located within deep periventricular white matter (n=10), subcortical white matter (n=8), the cerebral cortex (n=7), basal ganglia (n=7), or brain stem or cerebellum (n=2). The lesions were single (n=3) or multiple (n=15), and in 17 patients were less than 1cm in diameter in regions other than the cerebral cortex. In six of these patients, lesions of 1-4cm in diameter in this region were combined, and one occurred in the cerebral cortex only. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 16 patients (62%), in ten of whom there was no past history of treatment with steroids for more than six months. In 15 patients (58%), contrast-enhanced MR image revealed diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia or intravascular enhancement. In no case were MRI findings normal. The primary mainfestations of neuropsychiatric lupus are multifocal ischemia or infarctions in the cerebral cortex, and subcortical and deep white matter, and the cerebral atrophy. Contrast-enhanced MR images also demonstrated diffuse enhancement of the basal ganglia and intravascular enhancement, both thought to be related to the congestion due to the stagnation of cerebral blood flow.