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Sample records for brain improves targeting

  1. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Yard, Benito A.; Seelen, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function afte

  2. Non-target adjacent stimuli classification improves performance of classical ERP-based brain computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, G. A.; Hernández, L. F.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The classical ERP-based speller, or P300 Speller, is one of the most commonly used paradigms in the field of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI). Several alterations to the visual stimuli presentation system have been developed to avoid unfavorable effects elicited by adjacent stimuli. However, there has been little, if any, regard to useful information contained in responses to adjacent stimuli about spatial location of target symbols. This paper aims to demonstrate that combining the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli with standard classification (target versus non-target) significantly improves classical ERP-based speller efficiency. Approach. Four SWLDA classifiers were trained and combined with the standard classifier: the lower row, upper row, right column and left column classifiers. This new feature extraction procedure and the classification method were carried out on three open databases: the UAM P300 database (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico), BCI competition II (dataset IIb) and BCI competition III (dataset II). Main results. The inclusion of the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli improves target classification in the classical row/column paradigm. A gain in mean single trial classification of 9.6% and an overall improvement of 25% in simulated spelling speed was achieved. Significance. We have provided further evidence that the ERPs produced by adjacent stimuli present discriminable features, which could provide additional information about the spatial location of intended symbols. This work promotes the searching of information on the peripheral stimulation responses to improve the performance of emerging visual ERP-based spellers.

  3. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G; Ploeg, Rutger J; Yard, Benito A; Seelen, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function after transplantation. Brain death (BD) was induced in Fisher rats by inflation of an epidurally placed balloon catheter and ventilated for 6h. BD animals were treated with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) 1h before or 1h after BD. Kidney transplantation was performed and 7 days after transplantation animals were sacrificed. Plasma creatinine and urea were measured at days 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 after transplantation. Renal function was significantly better at day 1 after transplantation in recipients receiving a sCR1 pre-treated donor kidney compared to recipients of a non-treated donor graft. Also treatment with sCR1, 1h after the diagnosis of BD, resulted in a better renal function after transplantation. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1beta and TGF-beta were significantly lower in renal allografts recovered from treated donors. This study shows that targeting complement activation, during BD in the donor, leads to an improved renal function after transplantation in the recipient.

  4. Improved Targeting Through Collaborative Decision-Making and Brain Computer Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Barrero, David F.; McDonald-Maier, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a first step toward a brain-computer interface (BCI) for collaborative targeting. Specifically, we explore, from a broad perspective, how the collaboration of a group of people can increase the performance on a simple target identification task. To this end, we requested a group of people to identify the location and color of a sequence of targets appearing on the screen and measured the time and accuracy of the response. The individual results are compared to a collective identification result determined by simple majority voting, with random choice in case of drawn. The results are promising, as the identification becomes significantly more reliable even with this simple voting and a small number of people (either odd or even number) involved in the decision. In addition, the paper briefly analyzes the role of brain-computer interfaces in collaborative targeting, extending the targeting task by using a BCI instead of a mechanical response.

  5. Improving brain drug targeting through exploitation of the nose-to-brain route: a physiological and pharmacokinetic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhan, R K S; Kaur, M; Lungare, S; Obuobi, S

    2014-01-01

    With an ageing population and increasing prevalence of central-nervous system (CNS) disorders new approaches are required to sustain the development and successful delivery of therapeutics into the brain and CNS. CNS drug delivery is challenging due to the impermeable nature of the brain microvascular endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and which prevent the entry of a wide range of therapeutics into the brain. This review examines the role intranasal delivery may play in achieving direct brain delivery, for small molecular weight drugs, macromolecular therapeutics and cell-based therapeutics, by exploitation of the olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathways. This approach is thought to deliver drugs into the brain and CNS through bypassing the BBB. Details of the mechanism of transfer of administrated therapeutics, the pathways that lead to brain deposition, with a specific focus on therapeutic pharmacokinetics, and examples of successful CNS delivery will be explored.

  6. Drug targeting to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-09-01

    The goal of brain drug targeting technology is the delivery of therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), including the human BBB. This is accomplished by re-engineering pharmaceuticals to cross the BBB via specific endogenous transporters localized within the brain capillary endothelium. Certain endogenous peptides, such as insulin or transferrin, undergo receptor-mediated transport (RMT) across the BBB in vivo. In addition, peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies (MAb) may also cross the BBB via RMT on the endogenous transporters. The MAb may be used as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry across the BBB large molecule pharmaceuticals, including recombinant proteins, antibodies, RNA interference drugs, or non-viral gene medicines. Fusion proteins of the molecular Trojan horse and either neurotrophins or single chain Fv antibodies have been genetically engineered. The fusion proteins retain bi-functional properties, and both bind the BBB receptor, to trigger transport into brain, and bind the cognate receptor inside brain to induce the pharmacologic effect. Trojan horse liposome technology enables the brain targeting of non-viral plasmid DNA. Molecular Trojan horses may be formulated with fusion protein technology, avidin-biotin technology, or Trojan horse liposomes to target to brain virtually any large molecule pharmaceutical. PMID:17554607

  7. Upregulation of Haploinsufficient Gene Expression in the Brain by Targeting a Long Non-coding RNA Improves Seizure Phenotype in a Model of Dravet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hsiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome is a devastating genetic brain disorder caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN1A. There are currently no treatments, but the upregulation of SCN1A healthy allele represents an appealing therapeutic strategy. In this study we identified a novel, evolutionary conserved mechanism controlling the expression of SCN1A that is mediated by an antisense non-coding RNA (SCN1ANAT. Using oligonucleotide-based compounds (AntagoNATs targeting SCN1ANAT we were able to induce specific upregulation of SCN1A both in vitro and in vivo, in the brain of Dravet knock-in mouse model and a non-human primate. AntagoNAT-mediated upregulation of Scn1a in postnatal Dravet mice led to significant improvements in seizure phenotype and excitability of hippocampal interneurons. These results further elucidate the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome and outline a possible new approach for the treatment of this and other genetic disorders with similar etiology.

  8. Brain-targeted nasal clonazepam microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaji J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin-chitosan mucoadhesive microspheres of clonazepam were prepared using the emulsion cross linking method. Mirospheres were evaluated using the in vitro and ex vivo drug release patterns. In vivo CNS drug distribution studies were carried out in rats by administering the clonazepam microspheres intra-nasally and clonazepam solution intravenously. From the drug levels in plasma and CSF, drug targeting index and drug targeting efficiency were calculated. Results obtained indicated that intranasally administered clonazepam microspheres resulted in higher brain levels with a drug targeting index of 2.12. Gelatin-chitosan cross linked mucoadhesive microspheres have the potential to be developed as a brain-targeted drug delivery system for clonazepam.

  9. Targeted Toxins in Brain Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter A. Hall

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeted toxins, also known as immunotoxins or cytotoxins, are recombinant molecules that specifically bind to cell surface receptors that are overexpressed in cancer and the toxin component kills the cell. These recombinant proteins consist of a specific antibody or ligand coupled to a protein toxin. The targeted toxins bind to a surface antigen or receptor overexpressed in tumors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor or interleukin-13 receptor. The toxin part of the molecule in all clinically used toxins is modified from bacterial or plant toxins, fused to an antibody or carrier ligand. Targeted toxins are very effective against cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. They are far more potent than any known chemotherapy drug. Targeted toxins have shown an acceptable profile of toxicity and safety in early clinical studies and have demonstrated evidence of a tumor response. Currently, clinical trials with some targeted toxins are complete and the final results are pending. This review summarizes the characteristics of targeted toxins and the key findings of the important clinical studies with targeted toxins in malignant brain tumor patients. Obstacles to successful treatment of malignant brain tumors include poor penetration into tumor masses, the immune response to the toxin component and cancer heterogeneity. Strategies to overcome these limitations are being pursued in the current generation of targeted toxins.

  10. Development and evaluation of vinpocetine inclusion complex for brain targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaojiao Ding

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to prepare vinpocetine (VIN inclusion complex and evaluate its brain targeting effect after intranasal administration. In the present study, VIN inclusion complex was prepared in order to increase its solubility. Stability constant (Kc was used for host selection. Factors influencing properties of the inclusion complex was investigated. Formation of the inclusion complex was identified by solubility study and DSC analysis. The brain targeting effect of the complex after intranasal administration was studied in rats. It was demonstrated that properties of the inclusion complex was mainly influenced by cyclodextrin type, organic acids type, system pH and host/guest molar ratio. Multiple component complexes can be formed by the addition of citric acid, with solubility improved for more than 23 times. Furthermore, In vivo study revealed that after intranasal administration, the absolute bioavailability of vinpocetine inclusion complex was 88%. Compared with intravenous injection, significant brain targeting effect was achieved after intranasal delivery, with brain targeting index 1.67. In conclusion, by intranasal administration of VIN inclusion complex, a fast onset of action and good brain targeting effect can be achieved. Intranasal route is a promising approach for the treatment of CNS diseases.

  11. Phenylalanine-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles for brain tumor targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharya, Parul; Jain, Ashish; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Jain, Ankit; Hurkat, Pooja [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India); Majumdar, Subrata [Bose Institute, Division of Molecular Medicine (India); Jain, Sanjay K., E-mail: drskjainin@yahoo.com [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the targeting potential of amino acid (phenylalanine)-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with ionically complexed doxorubicin HCl (Dox). Ionic complexation was used to enhance the loading efficiency and release characteristics of water soluble form of Dox. l-Type amino acid transporters (LAT1) are highly expressed on blood brain barrier as well as on many brain cancer cells, thus targeting LAT1 using phenylalanine improved anticancer activity of prepared nanocarrier. The phenylalanine-coupled SLN were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. The particle size of the resulting SLN was found to be in the range of 163.3 ± 5.2 to 113.0 ± 2.6 nm, with a slightly negative surface charge. In ex vivo study on C6 glioma cell lines, the cellular cytotoxicity of the SLN was highly increased when coupled with phenylalanine. In addition, stealthing sheath of PEG present on the surface of the SLN enhanced the cellular uptake of the SLN on C6 glioma cell line. Results of biodistribution and fluorescence studies clearly revealed that phenylalanine-coupled SLN could deliver high amount of drug into the brain tumor cells and showed the brain-targeting potential.

  12. Targeted drug delivery to the brain using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Moos, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells denote the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and conjugation of nanoparticles with antibodies that target molecules expressed by these endothelial cells may facilitate their uptake and transport into the brain. Magnetic nanoparticles can be encapsulated in liposomes and carry large molecules with therapeutic potential, for example, siRNA, cDNA and polypeptides. An additional approach to enhance the transport of magnetic nanoparticles across the BBB is the application of extracranially applied magnetic force. Stepwise targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to brain capillary endothelial cells followed by transport through the BBB using magnetic force may prove a novel mechanism for targeted therapy of macromolecules to the brain.

  13. Brain tumor stem cells as research and treatment targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant forms of human cancer. Despite intensive treatment, the mean survival of GBM patients remains about 1 year. Recent cancer studies revealed that cancer tissues are pathologically heterogeneous and only a small population of cells has the specific ability to reinitiate cancer. This small cell population is called cancer stem cells (CSCs); in brain tumors these are known as brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). The identification of BTSCs yielded new insights into chemo- and radioresistance, by which BTSCs can survive selectively and initiate recurrence. Research focused on BTSCs as treatment targets may contribute to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. Clinical and basic research studies gradually led to improved outcomes in patients with brain tumors. Stupp et al. reported a mean survival of 14.6 months in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients treated with radiotherapy plus temozolomide and 12.1 months in those subjected to radiotherapy alone. Earlier cancer therapies primarily targeted rapidly dividing cells but not minor populations of slowly dividing cells that contain BTSCs. Accumulating evidence suggests that BTSCs may represent an excellent tool for discovering new strategies to treat GBM patients. In this review, we present evidence supporting the CSC model of tumor progression, and discuss difficulties encountered in CSC research and experimental and therapeutic implications. (author)

  14. Future of brain stimulation: new targets, new indications, new technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariz, Marwan; Blomstedt, Patric; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2013-11-01

    In the last quarter of a century, DBS has become an established neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and tremors. Improved understanding of brain circuitries and their involvement in various neurological and psychiatric illnesses, coupled with the safety of DBS and its exquisite role as a tool for ethical study of the human brain, have unlocked new opportunities for this technology, both for future therapies and in research. Serendipitous discoveries and advances in structural and functional imaging are providing abundant "new" brain targets for an ever-increasing number of pathologies, leading to investigations of DBS in diverse neurological, psychiatric, behavioral, and cognitive conditions. Trials and "proof of concept" studies of DBS are underway in pain, epilepsy, tinnitus, OCD, depression, and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, as well as in eating disorders, addiction, cognitive decline, consciousness, and autonomic states. In parallel, ongoing technological development will provide pulse generators with longer battery longevity, segmental electrode designs allowing a current steering, and the possibility to deliver "on-demand" stimulation based on closed-loop concepts. The future of brain stimulation is certainly promising, especially for movement disorders-that will remain the main indication for DBS for the foreseeable future-and probably for some psychiatric disorders. However, brain stimulation as a technique may be at risk of gliding down a slippery slope: Some reports indicate a disturbing trend with suggestions that future DBS may be proposed for enhancement of memory in healthy people, or as a tool for "treatment" of "antisocial behavior" and for improving "morality." PMID:24123327

  15. Targeted drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier using ultrasound technique

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Cheri X.

    2010-01-01

    Effective delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain can greatly improve the treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Application of focused ultrasound facilitated by microbubbles has shown the potential to deliver drugs across the blood–brain barrier into targeted sites within the brain noninvasively. This review provides a summary of the technological background and principle, highlights of recent significant developments and research progress, as well as a critical com...

  16. USE OF LIPOSOMES AND NANOPARTICLES FOR BRAIN DRUG TARGETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Pal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Blood Brain Barrier (BBB poses a obstacle for a drugs, including antineoplastic agent, antibiotics, neuropeptides, CNS active agents, to be delivered to the brain for therapeutic reasons. The use of formulation dependent strategy such as the use of heterogenous pharmaceutical systems for its effective targeting to the brain is being explored recently. Liposomes and Nanoparticles are good possibilities to achieve the goal. Chemically modified liposomes and nanoparticles are tried in recent times to act as brain targeting aids, and this article tries to explain the possibilities and problems behind such an endeavor.KEY WORDS:

  17. Nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery in brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinda, Subas C; Pattnaik, Gurudutta

    2013-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) found to act as rate limiting factor in drug delivery to brain in combating the central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Such limiting physiological factors include the reticuloendothelial system and protein opsonization, which present across BBB, play major role in reducing the passage of drug. Several approaches employed to improve the drug delivery across the BBB. Nanoparticles (NP) are the solid colloidal particle ranges from 1 to 1000 nm in size utilized as career for drug delivery. At present NPs are found to play a significant advantage over the other methods of available drug delivery systems to deliver the drug across the BBB. Nanoparticles may be because of its size and functionalization characteristics able to penetrate and facilitate the drug delivery through the barrier. There are number of mechanisms and strategies found to be involved in this process, which are based on the type of nanomaterials used and its combination with therapeutic agents, such materials include liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and non-viral vectors of nano-sizes for CNS gene therapy, etc. Nanotechnology is expected to reduce the need for invasive procedures for delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Some devices such as implanted catheters and reservoirs however will still be needed to overcome the problems in effective drug delivery to the CNS. Nanomaterials are found to improve the safety and efficacy level of drug delivery devices in brain targeting. Nanoegineered devices are found to be delivering the drugs at cellular levels through nono-fluidic channels. Different drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nonogels and nonobiocapsules have been used to improve the bioavailability of the drug in the brain, but microchips and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticulate careers are found to be more effective therapeutically in treating brain tumor. The physiological approaches also utilized to improve the transcytosis capacity

  18. Brain-Targeted Nasal Clonazepam Microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Shaji J; Poddar A; Iyer S

    2009-01-01

    Gelatin-chitosan mucoadhesive microspheres of clonazepam were prepared using the emulsion cross linking method. Mirospheres were evaluated using the in vitro and ex vivo drug release patterns. In vivo CNS drug distribution studies were carried out in rats by administering the clonazepam microspheres intra-nasally and clonazepam solution intravenously. From the drug levels in plasma and CSF, drug targeting index and drug targeting efficiency were calculated. Results obtained indicated that int...

  19. Single-domain antibodies for brain targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Lalatsa, Katerina; Moreira Leite, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Smaller recombinant antibody fragments as single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are emerging as credible alternatives because of their target specificity, high affinity, and cost-effective recombinant production. sdAbs have been forged into multivalent and multispecif ic therapeutics, or targeting moieties, that are able to shuttle their linked therapeutic cargo (i.e., drugs, nanoparticles, toxins, enzymes, and radionuclides) to the receptor of interest. Their ability to permeate across the blood ...

  20. Development of risperidone liposomes for brain targeting through intranasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Reema; Singh, Mohan; Ranjan, OmPrakash; Nayak, Yogendra; Garg, Sanjay; Shavi, Gopal V; Nayak, Usha Y

    2016-10-15

    The present paper is aimed at development of functionalized risperidone liposomes for brain targeting through nasal route for effective therapeutic management of schizophrenia. The risperidone liposomes were prepared by thin film hydration method. Various parameters such as lipid ratio and lipid to drug ratio were optimized by using Design-Expert(®) Software to obtain high entrapment with minimum vesicle size. The surface of the optimized liposomes was modified by coating stearylamine and MPEG-DSPE for enhanced penetration to the brain. The formulations were evaluated for vesicle size, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency. The morphology was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In vivo efficacy was assessed by performing pharmacokinetic study in Wistar albino rats following intranasal administration of the formulations in comparison to intravenous bolus administration of pure drug. The mean vesicle size of optimized liposomes ranged from 90 to 100nm with low polydispersity index (smooth bilayered surface. All formulations showed prolonged diffusion controlled drug release. The in vivo results showed that liposomal formulations provided enhanced brain exposure. Among the formulations studied, PEGylated liposomes (LP-16) had shown greater uptake of risperidone into the brain than plasma. High brain targeting efficiency index for LP-16 indicating preferential transport of the drug to brain. The study demonstrated successful formulation of surface modified risperidone liposomes for nasal delivery with brain targeting potential. PMID:27593571

  1. Focusing and targeting of magnetic brain stimulation using multiple coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohonen, J; Ilmoniemi, R J

    1998-05-01

    Neurones can be excited by an externally applied time-varying electromagnetic field. Focused magnetic brain stimulation is attained using multiple small coils instead of one large coil, the resultant induced electric field being a superposition of the fields from each coil. In multichannel magnetic brain stimulation, partial cancellation of fields from individual coils provides a significant improvement in the focusing of the stimulating field, and independent coil channels allow targeting of the stimuli on a given spot without moving the coils. The problem of shaping the stimulating field in multichannel stimulation is analysed, and a method is derived that yields the driving currents required to induce a field with a user-defined shape. The formulation makes use of lead fields and minimum-norm estimation from magneto-encephalography. Using these methods, some properties of multichannel coil arrays are examined. Computer-assisted multichannel stimulation of the cortex will enable several new studies, including quick determination of the cortical regions, the stimulation of which disrupts cortical processing required by a task. PMID:9747568

  2. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways. PMID:27649142

  3. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyshak Alva Venur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6 pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  4. Brain Targeting in MPS-IIIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Nicolina Cristina; Fraldi, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS-IIIA) is a childhood metabolic neuropathology caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase and is characterized by the accumulation of undegraded glycosaminoglycans in the lysosomes of cells and tissues of affected patients. MPS-IIIA represents one of the most common forms of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) and to date there is no cure. Since neurodegeneration is the most relevant pathological feature in MPS-IIIA patients, the treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) lesions represents the goal of any effective therapy for this devastating disorder. During the last years many advances have been made in developing and testing new therapies for brain involvement in MPS-IIIA. These studies have been possible because of the availability of mouse and dog models that recapitulate the MPS-IIIA neuropathological features. Some of these approaches are based on direct CNS administration routes through which the therapeutic molecules access the CNS via the parenchyma (intracerebral injections) or via the cerebrospinal fluid (intraventricular/intrathecal injections). These approaches are highly invasive and poorly suited for clinical use. Minimally invasive approaches are based on systemic injections into the blood stream of therapeutics capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This review will present the background of the clinic and pathology aspects of MPS-IIIA and will describe the current MPS-IIIA preclinical and clinical studies focusing on how a systemic therapeutic strategy based on crossing the BBB has been successfully used to treat CNS pathology and behavioral abnormalities in a mouse model of MPS-IIIA. Future clinical applications of this approach to MPS-IIIA patients will be also discussed together with the possibility of using similar strategies in other LSDs with neurological involvement. PMID:27491210

  5. Potential of solid lipid nanoparticles in brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Bhandari, Rohit; Bhandari, Swati; Kakkar, Vandita

    2008-04-21

    Brain is a delicate organ, isolated from general circulation and characterized by the presence of relatively impermeable endothelial cells with tight junctions, enzymatic activity and the presence of active efflux transporter mechanisms (like P-gp efflux). These formidable obstacles often impede drug delivery to the brain. As a result several promising molecules (showing a good potential in in vitro evaluation) are lost from the market for a mere consequence of lack of in vivo response probably because the molecule cannot reach the brain in a sufficient concentration. The options to tailor make molecules for brain, though open to the medical chemist, are a costly proposition in terms of money, manpower and time (almost 50 years). The premedial existing approaches for brain delivery like superficial and ventricular application of chemical or the application of chemicals to brain parenchyma are invasive and hence are less patient friendly, more laborious and require skill and could also damage the brain permanently. In view of these considerations novel drug delivery systems such as the nanoparticles are presently being explored for their suitability for targeted brain delivery. Nanoparticles are solid colloidal particles ranging in size from 1 to 1000 nm (<1 microm) and composed of macromolecular material. Nanoparticles could be polymeric or lipidic (SLNs). SLNs are taken up readily by the brain because of their lipidic nature. The bioacceptable and biodegradable nature of SLNs makes them less toxic as compared to polymeric nanoparticles. Supplemented with small size which prolongs the circulation time in blood, feasible scale up for large scale production and absence of burst effect makes them interesting candidates for study. In the present review we will discuss about the barriers to CNS drug delivery, strategies to bypass the blood-brain barrier and characterization methods of SLNs and their usefulness. The proposed mechanism of uptake, methods of prolonging the

  6. Design, synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of brain targeting L-ascorbic acid prodrugs of ibuprofen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying Wu; Xiao-Cen Li; Jie Mi; Jing You; Li Hai

    2013-01-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (AA,vitamin C) exhibits a high concentration in the brain.The transportation of AA in brain is mainly mediated by the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the Na+-dependent vitamin C transporter SVCT2.While L-ascorbic acid C6-O conjugation has been investigated as a tool to enhance brain drug delivery,C5-O conjugation and C5-O & C6-O conjugation as brain targeting tools have not been reported.In this letter,ibuprofen was linked directly to C5-O,C6-O and C5-O & C6-O positions of L-ascorbic acid with eater bonds,providing prodrug 1,2 and 3,respectively,to improve their targeting abilities in the brain.Prodrug 1,2 and 3 were synthesized in facile ways with good yields.And the preliminary evaluation in vivo illustrated that prodrug 2 had a better targeting ability than prodrug 1.Moreover,prodrug 3,whose C5-O & C6-O positions were both modified,had good targeting ability for brain which will provide an important evidence for our further study on C5-O-& C6-O-di-derivatives of L-ascorbic acid.

  7. Brain Targeting of a Water Insoluble Antipsychotic Drug Haloperidol via the Intranasal Route Using PAMAM Dendrimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katare, Yogesh K; Daya, Ritesh P; Sookram Gray, Christal; Luckham, Roger E; Bhandari, Jayant; Chauhan, Abhay S; Mishra, Ram K

    2015-09-01

    Delivery of therapeutics to the brain is challenging because many organic molecules have inadequate aqueous solubility and limited bioavailability. We investigated the efficiency of a dendrimer-based formulation of a poorly aqueous soluble drug, haloperidol, in targeting the brain via intranasal and intraperitoneal administration. Aqueous solubility of haloperidol was increased by more than 100-fold in the developed formulation. Formulation was assessed via different routes of administration for behavioral (cataleptic and locomotor) responses, and for haloperidol distribution in plasma and brain tissues. Dendrimer-based formulation showed significantly higher distribution of haloperidol in the brain and plasma compared to a control formulation of haloperidol administered via intraperitoneal injection. Additionally, 6.7 times lower doses of the dendrimer-haloperidol formulation administered via the intranasal route produced behavioral responses that were comparable to those induced by haloperidol formulations administered via intraperitoneal injection. This study demonstrates the potential of dendrimer in improving the delivery of water insoluble drugs to brain.

  8. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Tsakraklides

    Full Text Available Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications.

  9. Targeting oncogenes to improve breast cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Laura A; Finch, Rick A; Booker, Adam J; Vasquez, Karen M

    2006-04-15

    Despite recent advances in treatment, breast cancer remains a serious health threat for women. Traditional chemotherapies are limited by a lack of specificity for tumor cells and the cell cycle dependence of many chemotherapeutic agents. Here we report a novel strategy to help overcome these limitations. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to direct DNA damage site-specifically to oncogenes overexpressed in human breast cancer cells, we show that the effectiveness of the anticancer nucleoside analogue gemcitabine can be improved significantly. TFOs targeted to the promoter region of c-myc directly inhibited gene expression by approximately 40%. When used in combination, specific TFOs increased the incorporation of gemcitabine at the targeted site approximately 4-fold, presumably due to induction of replication-independent DNA synthesis. Cells treated with TFOs and gemcitabine in combination showed a reduction in both cell survival and capacity for anchorage-independent growth (approximately 19% of untreated cells). This combination affected the tumorigenic potential of these cancer cells to a significantly greater extent than either treatment alone. This novel strategy may be used to increase the range of effectiveness of antitumor nucleosides in any tumor which overexpresses a targetable oncogene. Multifaceted chemotherapeutic approaches such as this, coupled with triplex-directed gene targeting, may lead to more than incremental improvements in nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. PMID:16618728

  10. Targeting Neuronal Networks with Combined Drug and Stimulation Paradigms Guided by Neuroimaging to Treat Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faingold, Carl L; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-10-01

    Improved therapy of brain disorders can be achieved by focusing on neuronal networks, utilizing combined pharmacological and stimulation paradigms guided by neuroimaging. Neuronal networks that mediate normal brain functions, such as hearing, interact with other networks, which is important but commonly neglected. Network interaction changes often underlie brain disorders, including epilepsy. "Conditional multireceptive" (CMR) brain areas (e.g., brainstem reticular formation and amygdala) are critical in mediating neuroplastic changes that facilitate network interactions. CMR neurons receive multiple inputs but exhibit extensive response variability due to milieu and behavioral state changes and are exquisitely sensitive to agents that increase or inhibit GABA-mediated inhibition. Enhanced CMR neuronal responsiveness leads to expression of emergent properties--nonlinear events--resulting from network self-organization. Determining brain disorder mechanisms requires animals that model behaviors and neuroanatomical substrates of human disorders identified by neuroimaging. However, not all sites activated during network operation are requisite for that operation. Other active sites are ancillary, because their blockade does not alter network function. Requisite network sites exhibit emergent properties that are critical targets for pharmacological and stimulation therapies. Improved treatment of brain disorders should involve combined pharmacological and stimulation therapies, guided by neuroimaging, to correct network malfunctions by targeting specific network neurons.

  11. Polylactic Acid Nanoparticles Targeted to Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huafang; HU Yu; SUN Wangqiang; XIE Changsheng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, blank polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles with unstained surface were prepared by the nano-deposition method. On the basis of the preparation, the effect of surface modification on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) targeting was examined by in vivo experiments and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that PLA nanoparticles are less toxic than PACA nanoparticles but their BMECs targeting is similar to PACA nanoparticles. The experiments suggest that drugs can be loaded onto the particles and become more stable through adsorption on the surface of PLA nanoparticles with high surface activity. The surface of PLA nanoparticles was obviously modified and the hydrophilicity was increased as well in the presence of non-ionic surfactants on PLA nanoparticles. As a targeting moiety, polysobate 80 (T-80) can facilitate BMECs targeting of PLA nanoparticles.

  12. Combinatorial approaches for the identification of brain drug delivery targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Charles C; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB.

  13. Transcranial route of brain targeted delivery of methadone in oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathirana W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique anatomical arrangement of blood vessels and sinuses in the human skull and the brain, the prevalence of a high density of skin appendages in the scalp, extracranial vessels of the scalp communicating with the brain via emissary veins and most importantly, the way that the scalp is used in Ayurvedic medical system in treating diseases associated with the brain show that a drug could be transcranially delivered and targeted to the brain through the scalp. The present study was to investigate by measuring the antinociceptive effect on rats whether the opioid analgesic methadone could be delivered and targeted to the brain by transcranial delivery route. A non aqueous solution of methadone base in sesame oil was used for the application on the scalp. Animal studies were carried out using six groups of male rats consisting of group 1, the oral control treated with distilled water 1 ml; group 2, the oral positive control treated with methadone hydrochloride solution 316.5 μg/ml; group 3, the negative control treated transcranially with the blank sesame oil 0.2 ml and three test groups 4, 5 and 6 treated with three different dose levels of the transcranial oil formulation of methadone base, 41.6 μg/0.2 ml, 104 μg/0.2 ml and 208 μg/0.2 ml, respectively. The antinociceptive effects were examined by subjecting the rats to the hot plate and tail flick tests. The two higher concentrations of the three transcranial methadone formulations yielded response vs time curves showing nearly equal maximum antinociceptive effects similar to that of the oral positive control. Maximum analgesic effect after transcranial administration was observed between 1st and 2nd h and declined up to 6th hour. The results indicate that the transcranial brain targeted delivery of methadone base in the form of an oil based non aqueous solution results in statistically significant antinociceptive effects under experimental conditions. Therefore, it is possible to

  14. Intranasal administration of carbamazepine to mice: a direct delivery pathway for brain targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available antiepileptic drugs are typically administered via oral or intravenous (IV) routes which commonly exhibit high systemic distribution into non-targeted tissues, leading to peripheral adverse effects and limited brain uptake. In order to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the antiepileptic drug therapy, alternative administration strategies have been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine administered via ...

  15. Vocal Tremor: Novel Therapeutic Target for Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Ravikumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tremulous voice is characteristically associated with essential tremor, and is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT. Current estimates suggest that up to 40% of individuals diagnosed with essential tremor also present with EVT, which is associated with an impaired quality of life. Traditional EVT treatments have demonstrated limited success in long-term management of symptoms. However, voice tremor has been noted to decrease in patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS with the targeting of thalamic nuclei. In this study, we describe our multidisciplinary procedure for awake, frameless DBS with optimal stimulation targets as well as acoustic analysis and laryngoscopic assessment to quantify tremor reduction. Finally, we investigate the most recent clinical evidence regarding the procedure.

  16. Anatomical distribution of estrogen target neurons in turtle brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoradiographic studies with [3H]estradiol-17β in red-eared turtle (Pseudemys scripta elegans) show concentration and retention of radioactivity in nuclei of neurons in certain regions. Accumulations of estrogen target neurons exist in the periventricular brain with relationships to ventral extensions of the forebrain ventricles, including parolfactory, amygdaloid, septal, preoptic, hypothalamic and thalamic areas, as well as the dorsal ventricular ridge, the piriform cortex, and midbrain-pontine periaqueductal structures. The general anatomical pattern of distribution of estrogen target neurons corresponds to those observed not only in another reptile (Anolis carolinensis), but also in birds and mammals, as well as in teleosts and cyclostomes. In Pseudemys, which appears to display an intermediate degree of phylogenetic differentiation, the amygdaloid-septal-preoptic groups of estrogen target neurons constitute a continuum. In phylogenetic ascendency, e.g. in mammals, these cell populations are increasingly separated and distinct, while in phylogenetic descendency, e.g. in teleosts and cyclostomes, an amygdaloid group appears to be absent or contained within the septal-preoptic target cell population. (Auth.)

  17. Astrocyte-targeted expression of IL-6 protects the CNS against a focal brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, Mercedes; Lago, Natalia;

    2003-01-01

    The effect of CNS-targeted IL-6 gene expression has been thoroughly investigated in the otherwise nonperturbed brain but not following brain injury. Here we examined the impact of astrocyte-targeted IL-6 production in a traumatic brain injury (cryolesion) model using GFAP-IL6 transgenic mice. Thi...

  18. Demyelination as a rational therapeutic target for ischemic or traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hong; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; An, Chengrui; Suenaga, Jun; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-10-01

    Previous research on stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) heavily emphasized pathological alterations in neuronal cells within gray matter. However, recent studies have highlighted the equal importance of white matter integrity in long-term recovery from these conditions. Demyelination is a major component of white matter injury and is characterized by loss of the myelin sheath and oligodendrocyte cell death. Demyelination contributes significantly to long-term sensorimotor and cognitive deficits because the adult brain only has limited capacity for oligodendrocyte regeneration and axonal remyelination. In the current review, we will provide an overview of the major causes of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death following acute brain injuries, and discuss the crosstalk between myelin, axons, microglia, and astrocytes during the process of demyelination. Recent discoveries of molecules that regulate the processes of remyelination may provide novel therapeutic targets to restore white matter integrity and improve long-term neurological recovery in stroke or TBI patients. PMID:25819104

  19. Application of Preoperative CT/MRI Image Fusion in Target Positioning for Deep Brain Stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Zi-yuan Liu; Wan-chen Dou; Wen-bin Ma; Ren-zhi Wang; Yi Guo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of target positioning by preoperative CT/MRI image fusion technique in deep brain stimulation. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data and images of 79 cases (68 with Parkinson’s disease, 11 with dystonia) who received preoperative CT/MRI image fusion in target positioning of subthalamic nucleus in deep brain stimulation. Deviation of implanted electrodes from the target nucleus of each patient were measured. Neurological evaluations of each patient before and after the treatment were performed and compared. Complications of the positioning and treatment were recorded. Results The mean deviations of the electrodes implanted on X, Y, and Z axis were 0.5 mm, 0.6 mm, and 0.6 mm, respectively. Postoperative neurologic evaluations scores of unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (UPDRS) for Parkinson’s disease and Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) for dystonia patients improved significantly compared to the preoperative scores (P<0.001); Complications occurred in 10.1% (8/79) patients, and main side effects were dysarthria and diplopia. Conclusion Target positioning by preoperative CT/MRI image fusion technique in deep brain stimulation has high accuracy and good clinical outcomes.

  20. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and remote kidney preconditioning ameliorate brain damage through kidney-to-brain cross-talk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis N Silachev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many ischemia-induced neurological pathologies including stroke are associated with high oxidative stress. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants could rescue the ischemic organ by providing specific delivery of antioxidant molecules to the mitochondrion, which potentially suffers from oxidative stress more than non-mitochondrial cellular compartments. Besides direct antioxidative activity, these compounds are believed to activate numerous protective pathways. Endogenous anti-ischemic defense may involve the very powerful neuroprotective agent erythropoietin, which is mainly produced by the kidney in a redox-dependent manner, indicating an important role of the kidney in regulation of brain ischemic damage. The goal of this study is to track the relations between the kidney and the brain in terms of the amplification of defense mechanisms during SkQR1 treatment and remote renal preconditioning and provide evidence that the kidney can generate signals inducing a tolerance to oxidative stress-associated brain pathologies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the cationic plastoquinone derivative, SkQR1, as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant to alleviate the deleterious consequences of stroke. A single injection of SkQR1 before cerebral ischemia in a dose-dependent manner reduces infarction and improves functional recovery. Concomitantly, an increase in the levels of erythropoietin in urine and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β in the brain was detected 24 h after SkQR1 injection. However, protective effects of SkQR1 were not observed in rats with bilateral nephrectomy and in those treated with the nephrotoxic antibiotic gentamicin, indicating the protective role of humoral factor(s which are released from functional kidneys. Renal preconditioning also induced brain protection in rats accompanied by an increased erythropoietin level in urine and kidney tissue and P-GSK-3β in brain. Co-cultivation of SkQR1-treated

  1. Can Brain 'Pacemaker' Improve Lives of Head Trauma Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 161109.html Can Brain 'Pacemaker' Improve Lives of Head Trauma Patients? Deep brain stimulation appears to boost function and quality of life, small study finds To use the sharing ... that's implanted from the head, under the skin, through the neck and shoulders ...

  2. Ultrasound effects on brain-targeting mannosylated liposomes: in vitro and blood–brain barrier transport investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidan AS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Zidan,1,2 Hibah Aldawsari1 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt Abstract: Delivering drugs to intracerebral regions can be accomplished by improving the capacity of transport through blood–brain barrier. Using sertraline as model drug for brain targeting, the current study aimed at modifying its liposomal vesicles with mannopyranoside. Box-Behnken design was employed to statistically optimize the ultrasound parameters, namely ultrasound amplitude, time, and temperature, for maximum mannosylation capacity, sertraline entrapment, and surface charge while minimizing vesicular size. Moreover, in vitro blood–brain barrier transport model was established to assess the transendothelial capacity of the optimized mannosylated vesicles. Results showed a dependence of vesicular size, mannosylation capacity, and sertraline entrapment on cavitation and bubble implosion events that were related to ultrasound power amplitude, temperature. However, short ultrasound duration was required to achieve >90% mannosylation with nanosized vesicles (<200 nm of narrow size distribution. Optimized ultrasound parameters of 65°C, 27%, and 59 seconds for ultrasound temperature, amplitude, and time were elucidated to produce 81.1%, 46.6 nm, and 77.6% sertraline entrapment, vesicular size, and mannosylation capacity, respectively. Moreover, the transendothelial ability was significantly increased by 2.5-fold by mannosylation through binding with glucose transporters. Hence, mannosylated liposomes processed by ultrasound could be a promising approach for manufacturing and scale-up of brain-targeting liposomes. Keywords: CNS delivery, sizing, lipid based formulations, quality by design, sertraline hydrochloride

  3. Antagonism of purinergic signalling improves recovery from traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Choo, Anthony M.; William J. Miller; Chen, Yung-Chia; Nibley, Philip; Patel, Tapan P.; Goletiani, Cezar; Morrison, Barclay; Kutzing, Melinda K.; Firestein, Bonnie L.; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Haydon, Philip G.; Meaney, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The recent public awareness of the incidence and possible long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury only heightens the need to develop effective approaches for treating this neurological disease. In this report, we identify a new therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury by studying the role of astrocytes, rather than neurons, after neurotrauma. We use in vivo multiphoton imaging and show that mechanical forces during trauma trigger intercellular calcium waves throughout the astroc...

  4. High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation of the Putamen Improves Bradykinesia in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Erwin B.; Huang, He; Walker, Harrison C.; Guthrie, Barton L.; Watts, Ray L.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is effective for a wide range of neurological disorders; however, its mechanisms of action remain unclear. With respect to Parkinson’s disease, the existence of multiple effective targets suggests that putamen stimulation also may be effective and raises questions as to the mechanisms of action. Are there as many mechanisms of action as there are effective targets or some single or small set of mechanisms common to all effective targets? During the course of routine surgery of the globus pallidus interna in patients with Parkinson’s disease, the deep brain stimulation lead was placed in the putamen en route to the globus pallidus interna. Recordings of hand opening and closing during high-frequency and no stimulation were made. Speed of the movements, based on the amplitude and frequency of the repetitive hand movements as well as the decay in amplitude, were studied. Hand speed in 6 subjects was statistically significantly faster during active deep brain stimulation than the no-stimulation condition. There were no statistically significant differences in decay in the amplitude of hand movements. High-frequency deep brain stimulation of the putamen improves bradykinesia in a hand-opening and -closing task in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Consequently, high-frequency deep brain stimulation of virtually every structure in the basal ganglia-thalamic-cortical system improves bradykinesia. These observations, together with microelectrode recordings reported in the literature, argue that deep brain stimulation effects may be system specific and not structure specific. PMID:21714010

  5. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle encapsulated tarenflurbil: A potential brain targeting strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntimadugu, Eameema; Dhommati, Raju; Jain, Anjali; Challa, Venu Gopala Swami; Shaheen, M; Khan, Wahid

    2016-09-20

    Poor brain penetration of tarenflurbil (TFB) was one of the major reasons for its failure in phase III clinical trials conducted on Alzheimer's patients. Thus there is a tremendous need of developing efficient delivery systems for TFB. This study was designed with the aim of improving drug delivery to brain through intranasally delivered nanocarriers. TFB was loaded into two different nanocarriers i.e., poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (TFB-NPs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (TFB-SLNs). Particle size of both the nanocarriers (TFB-SLNs (i.n.)>TFB solution (i.n.)>TFB suspension (oral). Brain targeting efficiency was determined in terms of %drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and drug transport percentage (DTP). The higher %DTE (287.24) and DTP (65.18) were observed for TFB-NPs followed by TFB-SLNs (%DTE: 183.15 and DTP: 45.41) among all other tested groups. These encouraging results proved that therapeutic concentrations of TFB could be transported directly to brain via olfactory pathway after intranasal administration of polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. PMID:27185298

  6. Ghana : Improving the Targeting of Social Programs

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    This study, a draft of which was shared with the Government of Ghana in November 2009, provides a basic diagnostic of the benefit incidence and targeting performance of a large number of social programs in Ghana. Both broad-based programs (such as spending for education and health, and subsidies for food, oil-related products, and electricity) as well as targeted programs (such as Liveliho...

  7. Improved multilevel filters to enhance infrared small target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Wang; Tianxu Zhang; Luxin Yan; Man Wang; Jiawei Wu

    2011-01-01

    We propose improved multilevel filters (IMLFs) involving the absolute value operation into the algorithmic framework of traditional multilevel filters (MLFs) to improve the robustness of infrared small target enhancement techniques under a complex infrared cluttered background. Compared with the widely used small target enhancement methods which only deal with bright targets, the proposed technique can enhance the infrared small target, whether it is bright or dark. Experimental results verify that the proposed technique is efficient and practical.%@@ We propose improved multilevel filters (IMLFs) involving the absolute value operation into the algorithmic framework of traditional multilevel filters (MLFs) to improve the robustness of infrared small target enhancement techniques under a complex infrared cluttered background.Compared with the widely used small target enhancement methods which only deal with bright targets, the proposed technique can enhance the infrared small target, whether it is bright or dark.Experimental results verify that the proposed technique is efficient and practical.

  8. Target Improves Efficiency in New Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    Target Corporation partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to reduce annual energy consumption in new stores by at least 50% versus requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  9. Improved tumor identification using dual tracer molecular imaging in fluorescence guided brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Torres, Veronica; Straus, David; Brey, Eric M.; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumors represent a leading cause of cancer death for people under the age of 40 and the probability complete surgical resection of brain tumors remains low owing to the invasive nature of these tumors and the consequences of damaging healthy brain tissue. Molecular imaging is an emerging approach that has the potential to improve the ability for surgeons to correctly discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue; however, conventional molecular imaging approaches in brain suffer from significant background signal in healthy tissue or an inability target more invasive sections of the tumor. This work presents initial studies investigating the ability of novel dual-tracer molecular imaging strategies to be used to overcome the major limitations of conventional "single-tracer" molecular imaging. The approach is evaluated in simulations and in an in vivo mice study with animals inoculated orthotopically using fluorescent human glioma cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted Affibody-fluorescent marker was employed as a targeted imaging agent, and the suitability of various FDA approved untargeted fluorescent tracers (e.g. fluorescein & indocyanine green) were evaluated in terms of their ability to account for nonspecific uptake and retention of the targeted imaging agent. Signal-to-background ratio was used to measure and compare the amount of reporter in the tissue between targeted and untargeted tracer. The initial findings suggest that FDA-approved fluorescent imaging agents are ill-suited to act as untargeted imaging agents for dual-tracer fluorescent guided brain surgery as they suffer from poor delivery to the healthy brain tissue and therefore cannot be used to identify nonspecific vs. specific uptake of the targeted imaging agent where current surgery is most limited.

  10. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, L.W.; Prickaerts, J.; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Y. Temel

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and v...

  11. Phage display:development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babak Bakhshinejad; Marzieh Karimi; Mohammad Khalaj-Kondori

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systemati-cally administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for ifnding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface func-tionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efifcient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future.

  12. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  13. Targeting pannexin1 improves seizure outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo F Santiago

    Full Text Available Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1 is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K(+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures.

  14. Astrocytes as therapeutic targets of estrogenic compounds following brain injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Barreto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades, astrocytes have been considered to be non-excitable support cells that are relatively resistant to brain injury. This view has changed radically during the past twenty years. Multiple essential functions are performed by astrocytes in normal brain. Astrocytes are dynamically involved in synaptic transmission, metabolic and ionic homeostasis, and inflammatory maintenance of the blood brain barrier. Advances in our understanding of astrocytes include new observations about their structure, organization, and function. Astrocytes play an active and important role in the pathophysiology of brain damage. Brain injury impairs mitochondrial function and this is accompanied by increased oxidative stress, leading to prominent astrogliosis, which involves changes in gene expression and morphology, and therefore glial scar formation. Recent works have demonstrated a protective role of reactive astrocytes after brain injury. Nevertheless, others have pointed to an inhibitory role of astrocytes in axonal regeneration after injury. Reactive astrogliosis is a complex phenomenon that includes a mixture of positive and negative responses for neuronal survival and regeneration. Reactive astroglia maintains the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and the survival of the perilesional tissue, but may prevent axonal and damaged tissue regeneration. Neuroprotective strategies aiming at reducing gliosis and enhance brain plasticity are of potential interest for translational neuroscience research in brain injuries. In this context, neurosteroids have shown to be a promising strategy to protect brain against injury, as their effects may rely on reducing gliosis, brain inflammation and potentially modulating recovery from brain injury by engaging mechanisms of neural plasticity. In conclusion, in this work we will consider particularly the two-edged sword role of reactive astrocytes, which is an experimental paradigm helpful in discriminating destructive

  15. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  16. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui [Department of Pharmacy, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China); Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Animal Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Al-Suwayeh, S A; Fang, Jia-You [Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Chang, Hui-Wen, E-mail: fajy@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-08

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  17. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Wen, Chih-Jen; Al-Suwayeh, S. A.; Chang, Hui-Wen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Fang, Jia-You

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  18. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  19. Near-infrared fluorescence heptamethine carbocyanine dyes mediate imaging and targeted drug delivery for human brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shi, Changhong; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Xu, Qijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Qinlong; Yu, John S; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumors and brain metastases are among the deadliest malignancies of all human cancers, largely due to the cellular blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers that limit the delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents from the systemic circulation to tumors. Thus, improved strategies for brain tumor visualization and targeted treatment are critically needed. Here we identified and synthesized a group of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes and derivative NIRF dye-drug conjugates for effective imaging and therapeutic targeting of brain tumors of either primary or metastatic origin in mice, which is mechanistically mediated by tumor hypoxia and organic anion-transporting polypeptide genes. We also demonstrate that these dyes, when conjugated to chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine, significantly restricted the growth of both intracranial glioma xenografts and prostate tumor brain metastases and prolonged survival in mice. These results show promise in the application of NIRF dyes as novel theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of brain tumors.

  20. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare the ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the machine learning methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30% of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and fi...

  1. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  2. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves cognitive functioning after brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liu; Guangyu Shen; Shukun Deng; Xiubin Wang; Qinfeng Wu; Aisong Guo

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been widely applied and recognized in the treatment of brain injury;however, the correlation between the protective effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and changes of metabolites in the brain remains unclear. To investigate the effect and potential mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cognitive functioning in rats, we established traumatic brain injury models using Feeney’s free fal ing method. We treated rat models with hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 0.2 MPa for 60 minutes per day. The Morris water maze test for spatial navigation showed that the average escape latency was significantly prolonged and cognitive function decreased in rats with brain injury. After treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy for 1 and 2 weeks, the rats’ spatial learning and memory abilities were improved. Hydrogen proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis showed that the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio in the hippocampal CA3 region was sig-nificantly increased at 1 week, and the N-acetylaspartate/choline ratio was significantly increased at 2 weeks after hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Nissl staining and immunohistochemical staining showed that the number of nerve cells and Nissl bodies in the hippocampal CA3 region was significantly increased, and glial fibril ary acidic protein positive cells were decreased after a 2-week hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment. Our findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy significantly im-proves cognitive functioning in rats with traumatic brain injury, and the potential mechanism is me-diated by metabolic changes and nerve cellrestoration in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  4. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow-up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare seven different ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the ML methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30 per cent of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow-up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.

  5. Intraoperative Targeted Temperature Management in Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Jacqueline; Karpenko, Anna; Rincon, Fred

    2016-02-01

    Acute brain and spinal cord injuries affect hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. Though advances in pre-hospital and emergency and neurocritical care have improved the survival of some to these devastating diseases, very few clinical trials of potential neuro-protective strategies have produced promising results. Medical therapies such as targeted temperature management (TTM) have been trialed in traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI), acute ischemic stroke (AIS), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), but in no study has a meaningful effect on outcome been demonstrated. To this end, patient selection for potential neuro-protective therapies such as TTM may be the most important factor to effectively demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials. The use of TTM as a strategy to treat and prevent secondary neuronal damage in the intraoperative setting is an area of ongoing investigation. In this review we will discuss recent and ongoing studies that address the role of TTM in combination with surgical approaches for different types of brain injury. PMID:26759319

  6. Genetic improvement of tomato by targeted control of fruit softening

    KAUST Repository

    Uluisik, Selman

    2016-07-25

    Controlling the rate of softening to extend shelf life was a key target for researchers engineering genetically modified (GM) tomatoes in the 1990s, but only modest improvements were achieved. Hybrids grown nowadays contain \\'non-ripening mutations\\' that slow ripening and improve shelf life, but adversely affect flavor and color. We report substantial, targeted control of tomato softening, without affecting other aspects of ripening, by silencing a gene encoding a pectate lyase. © 2016 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeted delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for the treatment of blindness and deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalin I

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Igor Khalin,1 Renad Alyautdin,2 Ganna Kocherga,3 Muhamad Abu Bakar1 1Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Scientific Centre for Expertise of Medical Application Products, Moscow, Russia; 3Ophthalmic Microsurgery Department, International Medical Center Oftalmika, Kharkiv, UkraineAbstract: Neurodegenerative causes of blindness and deafness possess a major challenge in their clinical management as proper treatment guidelines have not yet been found. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been established as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders including hearing and visual loss. Unfortunately, the blood–retinal barrier and blood–cochlear barrier, which have a comparable structure to the blood–brain barrier prevent molecules of larger sizes (such as BDNF from exiting the circulation and reaching the targeted cells. Anatomical features of the eye and ear allow use of local administration, bypassing histo-hematic barriers. This paper focuses on highlighting a variety of strategies proposed for the local administration of the BDNF, like direct delivery, viral gene therapy, and cell-based therapy, which have been shown to successfully improve development, survival, and function of spiral and retinal ganglion cells. The similarities and controversies for BDNF treatment of posterior eye diseases and inner ear diseases have been analyzed and compared. In this review, we also focus on the possibility of translation of this knowledge into clinical practice. And finally, we suggest that using nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems may substantially contribute to the development of clinically viable techniques for BDNF delivery into the cochlea or posterior eye segment, which, ultimately, can lead to a long-term or permanent rescue of auditory and optic neurons from degeneration. Keywords: brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurodegeneration, posterior eye segment

  8. Formulation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol nanocrystals to improve oral bioavailability and brain delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Lisha; Cao, Fangrui; Miao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Tongkai; Chang, Qi; Zheng, Ying

    2016-01-30

    The aim of this study was to fabricate 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) nanocrystals to improve PPD's oral bioavailability and brain delivery. PPD nanocrystals were fabricated using an anti-solvent precipitation approach where d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was optimized as the stabilizer. The fabricated nanocrystals were nearly spherical with a particle size and drug loading of 90.44 ± 1.45 nm and 76.92%, respectively. They are in the crystalline state and stable at 4°C for at least 1 month. More than 90% of the PPD could be rapidly released from the nanocrystals, which was much faster than the physical mixture and PPD powder. PPD nanocrystals demonstrated comparable permeability to solution at 2.52 ± 0.44×10(-5)cm/s on MDCK monolayers. After oral administration of PPD nanocrystals to rats, PPD was absorbed quickly into the plasma and brain with significantly higher Cmax and AUC0-t compared to those of the physical mixture. However, no brain targeting was observed, as the ratios of the plasma AUC0-t to brain AUC0-t for the two groups were similar. In summary, PPD nanocrystals are a potential oral delivery system to improve PPD's poor bioavailability and its delivery into the brain for neurodegenerative disease and intracranial tumor therapies in the future.

  9. Non-virally engineered human adipose mesenchymal stem cells produce BMP4, target brain tumors, and extend survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Gullotti, David; Kozielski, Kristen L; Kim, Jennifer E; Seng, Michael; Abbadi, Sara; Schiapparelli, Paula; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Vescovi, Angelo; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty; Green, Jordan J; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for enabling non-viral nanobiotechnology to allow safe and effective gene therapy and cell therapy, which can be utilized to treat devastating diseases such as brain cancer. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) display high anti-glioma tropism and represent a promising delivery vehicle for targeted brain tumor therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that non-viral, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) can be used to engineer hAMSCs with higher efficacy (75% of cells) than leading commercially available reagents and high cell viability. To accomplish this, we engineered a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) polymer structure to transfect hAMSCs with significantly higher efficacy than Lipofectamine™ 2000. We then assessed the ability of NP-engineered hAMSCs to deliver bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which has been shown to have a novel therapeutic effect by targeting human brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), a source of cancer recurrence, in a human primary malignant glioma model. We demonstrated that hAMSCs genetically engineered with polymeric nanoparticles containing BMP4 plasmid DNA (BMP4/NP-hAMSCs) secrete BMP4 growth factor while maintaining their multipotency and preserving their migration and invasion capacities. We also showed that this approach can overcome a central challenge for brain therapeutics, overcoming the blood brain barrier, by demonstrating that NP-engineered hAMSCs can migrate to the brain and penetrate the brain tumor after both intranasal and systemic intravenous administration. Critically, athymic rats bearing human primary BTIC-derived tumors and treated intranasally with BMP4/NP-hAMSCs showed significantly improved survival compared to those treated with control GFP/NP-hAMCSs. This study demonstrates that synthetic polymeric nanoparticles are a safe and effective approach for stem cell-based cancer-targeting therapies. PMID:27240162

  10. Streamline and Improve the Targeting of Education Tax Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for College Access & Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This one-page document presents The Institute for College Access & Success' (TICAS') recommendations for ways to improve the targeting of higher education tax benefits. The TICAS white paper, "Aligning the Means and the Ends: How to Improve Federal Student Aid and Increase College Access and Success," recommends almost entirely…

  11. Epigenetic Modifications, Alcoholic Brain and Potential Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangra, Ashok; Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Pandey, Suryanarayan; Choubey, Priyansha; Rajput, Prabha; Saroha, Babita; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic alcohol exposure evidently influences epigenetic changes, both transiently and permanently, and these changes in turn influence a variety of cells and organ systems throughout the body. Many of the alcohol-induced epigenetic modifications can contribute to cellular adaptations that ultimately lead to behavioral tolerance and alcohol dependence. The persistence of behavioral changes demonstrates that long-lasting changes in gene expression, within particular regions of the brain, may contribute importantly to the addiction phenotype. The research activities over the past years have demonstrated a crucial role of epigenetic mechanisms in causing long lasting and transient changes in the expression of several genes in diverse tissues, including brain. This has stimulated recent research work that is aimed at characterizing the influence of epigenetic regulatory events in mediating the long lasting and transient effects of alcohol abuse on the brain in humans and animal models of alcohol addiction. In this study, we update our current understanding of the impact of alcohol exposure on epigenetic mechanisms in the brain and refurbish the knowledge of epigenetics in the direction of new drugs development. PMID:27780992

  12. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge; Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics in

  13. The design and performance of an improved target for MICE

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C N; Langlands, J; Overton, E; Robinson, M; Smith, P J; Barber, G; Long, K R; Shepherd, B; Capocci, E; MacWaters, C; Tarrant, J

    2016-01-01

    The linear motor driving the target for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment has been redesigned to improve its reliability and performance. A new coil-winding technique is described which produces better magnetic alignment and improves heat transport out of the windings. Improved field-mapping has allowed the more precise construction to be demonstrated, and an enhanced controller exploits the full features of the hardware, enabling increased acceleration and precision. The new user interface is described and analysis of performance data to monitor friction is shown to allow quality control of bearings and a measure of the ageing of targets during use.

  14. The design and performance of an improved target for MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, C. N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P. J.; Barber, G.; Long, K. R.; Shepherd, B.; Capocci, E.; MacWaters, C.; Tarrant, J.

    2016-05-01

    The linear motor driving the target for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment has been redesigned to improve its reliability and performance. A new coil-winding technique is described which produces better magnetic alignment and improves heat transport out of the windings. Improved field-mapping has allowed the more precise construction to be demonstrated, and an enhanced controller exploits the full features of the hardware, enabling increased acceleration and precision. The new user interface is described and analysis of performance data to monitor friction is shown to allow quality control of bearings and a measure of the ageing of targets during use.

  15. Cerebral Edema in Traumatic Brain Injury: Pathophysiology and Prospective Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Minter, Daniel; Yue, John K; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a heterogeneous disorder resulting from an external force applied to the head. The development of cerebral edema plays a central role in the evolution of injury following brain trauma and is closely associated with neurologic outcomes. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular and cellular pathways contributing to the posttraumatic development of cerebral edema have led to the identification of multiple prospective therapeutic targets. The authors summarize the pathogenic mechanisms underlying cerebral edema and highlight the molecular pathways that may be therapeutically targeted to mitigate cerebral edema and associated sequelae following traumatic brain injury. PMID:27637397

  16. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood–Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Georgieva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood–brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood–brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier–drug system (“Trojan horse complex” is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain.

  17. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and test...

  18. Concomitant treatment of brain metastasis with Whole Brain Radiotherapy [WBRT] and Temozolomide [TMZ] is active and improves Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montella Liliana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain metastases (BM represent one of the most frequent complications related to cancer, and their treatment continues to evolve. We have evaluated the activity, toxicity and the impact on Quality of Life (QoL of a concomitant treatment with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT and Temozolomide (TMZ in patients with brain metastases from solid tumors in a prospective Simon two stage study. Methods Fifty-nine patients were enrolled and received 30 Gy WBRT with concomitant TMZ (75 mg/m2/day for ten days, and subsequently TMZ (150 mg/m2/day for up to six cycles. The primary end points were clinical symptoms and radiologic response. Results Five patients had a complete response, 21 patients had a partial response, while 18 patients had stable disease. The overall response rate (45% exceeded the target activity per study design. The median time to progression was 9 months. Median overall survival was 13 months. The most frequent toxicities included grade 3 neutropenia (15% and anemia (13%, and only one patient developed a grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Age, Karnofsky performance status, presence of extracranial metastases and the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA were found to be predictive factors for response in patients. Overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were dependent on age and on the RPA class. Conclusion We conclude that this treatment is well tolerated, with an encouraging objective response rate, and a significant improvement in quality of life (p

  19. Operational Performance Improvements to BRIght Target Explorer Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Yun

    The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE)-Constellation is composed of six nano-satellites funded by Austria, Canada, and Poland, and each of them is equipped with an optical telescope that observes stars with visual magnitude +3.5 or brighter. BRITE-Constellation has provided numerous images of bright stars from Low Earth Orbit, which will eventually lead to investigation of origin of the Universe. This thesis presents the contribution of the author to BRITE mission, especially in BRITE Operations. The author performed antenna steering experiments on UniBRITE and BRITE-Toronto, to improve data downlink. To improve scientific data collection from BRITE satellites, the author computed available observation time for multiple targets every orbit, which resulted in collection of twice the amount of scientific data. Also, the author increased the available observation time for each target from 32 minutes to 48 minutes by improving the performance of the star tracker on-board BRITE-Toronto.

  20. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  1. Effect of target probability on pre-stimulus brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, G; Berchicci, M; Perri, R L; Spinelli, D; Di Russo, F

    2016-05-13

    Studies on perceptual decision-making showed that manipulating the proportion of target and non-target stimuli affects the behavioral performance. Tasks with high frequency of targets are associated to faster response times (RTs) conjunctively to higher number of errors (reflecting a response bias characterized by speed/accuracy trade-off) when compared to conditions with low frequency of targets. Electroencephalographic studies well described modulations of post-stimulus event-related potentials as effect of the stimulus probability; in contrast, in the present study we focused on the pre-stimulus preparatory activities subtending the response bias. Two versions of a Go/No-go task characterized by different proportion of Go stimuli (88% vs. 12%) were adopted. In the task with frequent go trials, we observed a strong enhancement in the motor preparation as indexed by the Bereitschaftspotential (BP, previously associated with activity within the supplementary motor area), faster RTs, and larger commission error rate than in the task with rare go trials. Contemporarily with the BP, a right lateralized prefrontal negativity (lateral pN, previously associated with activity within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) was larger in the task with rare go trial. In the post-stimulus processing stage, we confirmed that the N2 and the P3 components were larger for rare trials, irrespective of the Go/No-go stimulus category. The increase of activities recorded in the preparatory phase related to frequency of targets is consistent with the view proposed in accumulation models of perceptual decision for which target frequency affects the subjective baseline, reducing the distance between the starting-point and the response boundary, which determines the response speed. PMID:26912279

  2. Interfacing brain with computer to improve communication and rehabilitation after brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, A; Pichiorri, F; Schettini, F; Toppi, J; Risetti, M; Formisano, R; Molinari, M; Astolfi, L; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D

    2016-01-01

    Communication and control of the external environment can be provided via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) to replace a lost function in persons with severe diseases and little or no chance of recovery of motor abilities (ie, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brainstem stroke). BCIs allow to intentionally modulate brain activity, to train specific brain functions, and to control prosthetic devices, and thus, this technology can also improve the outcome of rehabilitation programs in persons who have suffered from a central nervous system injury (ie, stroke leading to motor or cognitive impairment). Overall, the BCI researcher is challenged to interact with people with severe disabilities and professionals in the field of neurorehabilitation. This implies a deep understanding of the disabled condition on the one hand, and it requires extensive knowledge on the physiology and function of the human brain on the other. For these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach and the continuous involvement of BCI users in the design, development, and testing of new systems are desirable. In this chapter, we will focus on noninvasive EEG-based systems and their clinical applications, highlighting crucial issues to foster BCI translation outside laboratories to eventually become a technology usable in real-life realm. PMID:27590975

  3. Identifying targets for quality improvement in hospital antibiotic prescribing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreuwel, P.C. van; Blok, H.; Langelaar, M.F.; Kullberg, B.J.; Mouton, J.W.; Natsch, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To audit antibiotic use in a university hospital and to identify targets for quality improvement in a setting with low antibiotic use and resistance rates. METHODOLOGY: A point-prevalence survey (PPS), using a patient-based audit tool for antibiotic use, was executed in the Radboud Unive

  4. Non-invasive intranasal delivery of quetiapine fumarate loaded microemulsion for brain targeting: Formulation, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Brijesh; Khunt, Dignesh; Misra, Manju; Padh, Harish

    2016-08-25

    Systemic drug delivery in schizophrenia is a major challenge due to presence of obstacles like, blood-brain barrier and P-glycoprotein, which prohibit entry of drugs into the brain. Quetiapine fumarate (QF), a substrate to P-glycoprotein under goes extensive first pass metabolism leading to limited absorption thus necessitating frequent oral administration. The aim of this study was to develop QF based microemulsion (ME) with and without chitosan (CH) to investigate its potential use in improving the bioavailability and brain targeting efficiency following non-invasive intranasal administration. QF loaded ME and mucoadhesive ME (MME) showed globule size, pH and viscosity in the range of 29-47nm, 5.5-6.5 and 17-40cP respectively. CH-ME with spherical globules having mean size of 35.31±1.71nm, pH value of 5.61±0.16 showed highest ex-vivo nasal diffusion (78.26±3.29%) in 8h with no sign of structural damage upon histopathological examination. Circular plume with an ovality ratio closer to 1.3 for CH-ME depicted ideal spray pattern. Significantly higher brain/blood ratio of CH-ME in comparison to QF-ME and drug solution following intranasal administration revealed prolonged retention of QF at site of action suggesting superiority of CH as permeability enhancer. Following intranasal administration, 2.7 and 3.8 folds higher nasal bioavailability in brain with CH-ME compared to QF-ME and drug solution respectively is indicative of preferential nose to brain transport (80.51±6.46%) bypassing blood-brain barrier. Overall, the above finding shows promising results in the area of developing non-invasive intranasal route as an alternative to oral route for brain delivery. PMID:27174656

  5. Fluoxetine targets early progenitor cells in the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Encinas, Juan M.; Vaahtokari, Anne; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2006-01-01

    Chronic treatment with antidepressants increases neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. This increase in the production of new neurons may be required for the behavioral effects of antidepressants. However, it is not known which class of cells within the neuronal differentiation cascade is targeted by the drugs. We have generated a reporter mouse line, which allows identification and classification of early neuronal progenitors. It also allows accurate quantitation of changes induced by neuro...

  6. Targeted Drug Delivery to the Brain by MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Lisa Hsu; McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yongzhi; Tam, Karen; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    The effect of focused ultrasound on the absorption of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin in the brain was investigated. By applying focused ultrasound in the presence of microbubble ultrasound contrast agent, we achieved targeted drug delivery to the brain in vivo. Tissue drug concentrations in sonicated brain corresponded with cytotoxic levels measured in various human tumors and were significantly different from those measured in unexposed contralateral control samples (p ⩽ 0.02). In addition, increased MR signal enhancement at the focal location on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fast spin echo images correlated with increased penetration of doxorubicin into brain tissue (r = 0.85), indicating the potential of MRI to be used as an indicator of blood-brain barrier permeability during treatment. Further investigation is required to evaluate the efficacy of this technique and to optimize its parameters for clinical application.

  7. Destruction of vasculogenic mimicry channels by targeting epirubicin plus celecoxib liposomes in treatment of brain glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju RJ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rui-Jun Ju,1,2,* Fan Zeng,1,* Lei Liu,1 Li-Min Mu,1 Hong-Jun Xie,1 Yao Zhao,1 Yan Yan,1 Jia-Shuan Wu,1 Ying-Jie Hu,1 Wan-Liang Lu1 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and New Drug System, State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The efficacy of chemotherapy for brain glioma is restricted by the blood–brain barrier (BBB, and surgery or radiotherapy cannot eliminate the glioma cells because of their unique location. Residual brain glioma cells can form vasculogenic mimicry (VM channels that can cause a recurrence of brain glioma. In the present study, targeting liposomes incorporating epirubicin and celecoxib were prepared and used for the treatment of brain glioma, along with the destruction of their VM channels. Evaluations were performed on the human brain glioma U87MG cells in vitro and on intracranial brain glioma-bearing nude mice. Targeting epirubicin plus celecoxib liposomes in the circulatory blood system were able to be transported across the BBB, and accumulated in the brain glioma region. Then, the liposomes were internalized by brain glioma cells and killed glioma cells by direct cytotoxic injury and the induction of apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis was related to the activation of caspase-8- and -3-signaling pathways, the activation of the proapoptotic protein Bax, and the suppression of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. The destruction of brain glioma VM channels was related to the downregulation of VM channel-forming indictors, which consisted of MMP-2, MMP-9, FAK, VE-Cad, and VEGF. The results demonstrated that the targeting epirubicin plus celecoxib liposomes were able to effectively destroy the glioma VM channels and exhibited significant efficacy in the

  8. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  9. Development of high drug-loading nanomicelles targeting steroids to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sijia; Xie, Yanqi; Li, Yuan; Li, Ling; Tian, Ning; Zhu, Wenbo; Yan, Guangmei; Wu, Chuanbin; Hu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate high drug-loading ligand-modified nanomicelles to deliver a steroidal compound to the brain. YC1 (5α-cholestane-24-methylene-3β, 5α, 6β, 19-tetraol), with poor solubility and limited access to the brain, for the first time, has been proved to be an effective neuroprotective steroid by our previous studies. Based on the principle of 'like dissolves like', cholesterol, which shares the same steroidal parent nucleus with YC1, was selected to react with sodium alginate, producing amphiphilic sodium alginate- cholesterol derivatives (SACDs). To increase the grafting ratio and drug loading, cholesterol was converted to cholesteryl chloroformate, for the first time, before reacting with sodium alginate. Further, lactoferrin was conjugated on SACDs to provide lactoferrin-SACDs (Lf-SACD), which was established by immune electron microscopy (IEM) and self-assembled into brain-targeting nanomicelles. These nanomicelles were negatively charged and spherical in nature, with an average size of cyclodextrin solution at 37°C, indicated a prolonged release profile. The YC1 concentration in mouse brain delivered by lactoferrin-modified nanomicelles was higher than in those delivered by non-modified nanomicelles and YC1 solution. The unique brain-targeting nanomicelle system may provide a promising carrier to deliver hydrophobic drugs across the blood-brain barrier for the treatment of brain diseases. PMID:24379663

  10. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  11. [Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qi; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Fang

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients' quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approach. The combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy can greatly benefit patients in clinical work. PMID:27561803

  12. Evaluation of accuracy in target positions of multmodality imaging using brain phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of target positions in radiation therapy or radiosurgery is critical to the successful treatment. It is often difficult to recognize the target position only from single image modality since each image modality has unique image pattern and image distortion problem. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of target positions with multimodality brain phantom. We obtained CT, MR, and SPECT scan images with the specially designed brain phantom. Brain phantom consists of brain for images and frame for localization. The phantom was a water fillable cylinder containing 58 axial layers of 2.0 mm thickness. Each layer allows water to permeate various regions to match gray matter to white matter of 1:1 ratio. Localization frame with 5mm inner diameter and 150/160 mm length were attached to the outside of the brain slice and inside of the phantom cylinder. The phantom was filled with 0.16 M CuSO4 solution for MRI scan, and distilled water for CT and 15mCi (555 MBq) Tc-99m for SPECT. Axial slice images and volume images including the targets and localizer were obtained for each modality. To evaluate the errors in target positions, the position of localization and target balls measured in SPECT were compared with MR and CT. Transformation parameters for translation, rotation and scaling were determined by surface matching each SPECT with MR and CT images. Multimodality phantom was very useful to evaluate the accuracy of target positions among the different types of image modality such as CT, MR and SPECT

  13. Reduced phosphorylation of brain insulin receptor substrate and Akt proteins in apolipoprotein-E4 targeted replacement mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Qi-Rui; Chan, Elizabeth S; Lim, Mei-Li; Cole, Gregory M; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2014-01-17

    Human ApoE4 accelerates memory decline in ageing and in Alzheimer's disease. Although intranasal insulin can improve cognition, this has little effect in ApoE4 subjects. To understand this ApoE genotype-dependent effect, we examined brain insulin signaling in huApoE3 and huApoE4 targeted replacement (TR) mice. At 32 weeks, lower insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) at S636/639 and Akt phosphorylation at T308 were detected in fasting huApoE4 TR mice as compared to fasting huApoE3 TR mice. These changes in fasting huApoE4 TR mice were linked to lower brain glucose content and have no effect on plasma glucose level. However, at 72 weeks of age, these early changes were accompanied by reduction in IRS2 expression, IRS1 phosphorylation at Y608, Akt phosphorylation at S473, and MAPK (p38 and p44/42) activation in the fasting huApoE4 TR mice. The lower brain glucose was significantly associated with higher brain insulin in the aged huApoE4 TR mice. These results show that ApoE4 reduces brain insulin signaling and glucose level leading to higher insulin content.

  14. Microemulsion-based drug delivery system for transnasal delivery of Carbamazepine: preliminary brain-targeting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rashmin Bharatbhai; Patel, Mrunali Rashmin; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of Carbamazepine (CMP)-loaded microemulsions (CMPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of epilepsy. The CMPME was prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. All formulations were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (technetium) and biodistribution of CMP in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rats was also performed to determine the uptake of the CMP into the brain. CMPME were found crystal clear and stable with average globule size of 34.11 ± 1.41 nm. (99m)Tc-labeled CMP solution (CMPS)/CMPME/CMP mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of CMPMME compared to intravenous CMPME was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the CMP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for CMPMME post-intranasal administration compared to intravenous CMP. Rat brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the CMP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of CMP into the brain through intranasal CMPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of epilepsy.

  15. Marrow stromal cells administrated intracisternally to rats after traumatic brain injury migrate into the brain and improve neurological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡德志; 周良辅; 朱剑虹

    2004-01-01

    @@ Marrow stromal cells(MSCs) have been reported to transplant into injured brain via intravenous or intraarterial or direct intracerebral administration.1-3 In the present study, we observed that MSCs migrated into the brain, survived and diffeneriated into neural cells after they were injected into the cisterna magna of rats, and that the behavior of the rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was improved.

  16. Improved Snake algorithm for complex target's boundary detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bao-jun; LI Dong

    2006-01-01

    The traditional Snake algorithm cannot effectively detect the object edge of an image with non-convex shapes or low SNR.This paper studies the characteristics of this type of image with complex shape target or noise and presents an improved Snake algorithm.The traditional Snake function model and operation strategy are improved by increasing new control energy functions,and the influencing weight of these energy factors is discussed.At the same time,a dynamic arrangement for the Snake points is used to adapt different target shapes.The simulation results indicate that the new Snake model greatly decreases the dependence on the Snake point's initial position and effectively overcomes noise influence.This method enhances the Snake algorithm's ability of detecting object edge.

  17. Intranasal microemulsion for targeted nose to brain delivery in neurocysticercosis: Role of docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Rajshree L; Bharkad, Gopal P; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-10-01

    Intranasal Microemulsions (MEs) for nose to brain delivery of a novel combination of Albendazole sulfoxide (ABZ-SO) and Curcumin (CUR) for Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a brain infection are reported. MEs prepared by simple solution exhibited a globule size 95% was seen for both drugs. High drug targeting efficiency (DTE) to the brain compared to Capmul ME and drug solution (P<0.05) suggested the role of DHA in aiding nose to brain delivery. Histopathology study confirmed no significant changes. High efficacy of ABZ-SO: CUR (100:10ng/mL) DHA ME in vitro on Taenia solium cysts was confirmed by complete ALP inhibition and disintegration of cysts at 96h. Considering that the brain concentration at 24h was 1400±160.1ng/g (ABZ-SO) and 120±35.2ng/g (CUR), the in vitro efficacy seen at a 10 fold lower concentration of the drugs strongly supports the assumption of clinical efficacy. The intranasal DHA ME is a promising delivery system for targeted nose to brain delivery.

  18. Neurological disorders and therapeutics targeted to surmount the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwar JR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jagat R Kanwar, Bhasker Sriramoju, Rupinder K KanwarNanomedicine Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, Centre for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Biosciences, Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: We are now in an aging population, so neurological disorders, particularly the neurodegenerative diseases, are becoming more prevalent in society. As per the epidemiological studies, Europe alone suffers 35% of the burden, indicating an alarming rate of disease progression. Further, treatment for these disorders is a challenging area due to the presence of the tightly regulated blood–brain barrier and its unique ability to protect the brain from xenobiotics. Conventional therapeutics, although effective, remain critically below levels of optimum therapeutic efficacy. Hence, methods to overcome the blood–brain barrier are currently a focus of research. Nanotechnological applications are gaining paramount importance in addressing this question, and yielding some promising results. This review addresses the pathophysiology of the more common neurological disorders and novel drug candidates, along with targeted nanoparticle applications for brain delivery.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, neurological diseases, brain delivery, targeted nanoparticles

  19. Targeting bone metastases in prostate cancer: improving clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body, Jean-Jacques; Casimiro, Sandra; Costa, Luís

    2015-06-01

    Bone metastases develop in most patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). They affect the structural integrity of bone, manifesting as pain and skeletal-related events (SREs), and are the primary cause of patient disability, reduced quality of life (QOL) and death. Understanding the pathophysiology of bone metastases resulted in the development of agents that improve clinical outcome, suggesting that managing both the systemic disease and associated bone events is important. Historically, the treatment of CRPC bone metastases with early radiopharmaceuticals and external beam radiation therapy was largely supportive; however, now, zoledronic acid and denosumab are integral to the therapeutic strategy for mCRPC. These agents substantially reduce skeletal morbidity and improve patient QOL. Radium-223 dichloride is the first bone-targeting agent to show improved survival and reduced pain and symptomatic skeletal events in patients with mCRPC without visceral disease. Five other systemic agents are currently approved for use in mCRPC based on their ability to improve survival. These include the cytotoxic drugs docetaxel and cabazitaxel, the hormone-based therapies, abiraterone and enzalutamide, and the immunotherapeutic vaccine sipuleucel-T. Abiraterone and enzalutamide are able to reduce SREs and improve survival in this setting. Novel agents targeting tumour and bone cells are under clinical development. PMID:26119830

  20. Rubisco activity and regulation as targets for crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Martin A J; Andralojc, P John; Scales, Joanna C; Salvucci, Michael E; Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Alonso, Hernan; Whitney, Spencer M

    2013-01-01

    Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase) enables net carbon fixation through the carboxylation of RuBP. However, some characteristics of Rubisco make it surprisingly inefficient and compromise photosynthetic productivity. For example, Rubisco catalyses a wasteful reaction with oxygen that leads to the release of previously fixed CO(2) and NH(3) and the consumption of energy during photorespiration. Furthermore, Rubisco is slow and large amounts are needed to support adequate photosynthetic rates. Consequently, Rubisco has been studied intensively as a prime target for manipulations to 'supercharge' photosynthesis and improve both productivity and resource use efficiency. The catalytic properties of Rubiscos from diverse sources vary considerably, suggesting that changes in turnover rate, affinity, or specificity for CO(2) can be introduced to improve Rubisco performance in specific crops and environments. While attempts to manipulate plant Rubisco by nuclear transformation have had limited success, modifying its catalysis by targeted changes to its catalytic large subunit via chloroplast transformation have been much more successful. However, this technique is still in need of development for most major food crops including maize, wheat, and rice. Other bioengineering approaches for improving Rubisco performance include improving the activity of its ancillary protein, Rubisco activase, in addition to modulating the synthesis and degradation of Rubisco's inhibitory sugar phosphate ligands. As the rate-limiting step in carbon assimilation, even modest improvements in the overall performance of Rubisco pose a viable pathway for obtaining significant gains in plant yield, particularly under stressful environmental conditions.

  1. Improved target detection by IR dual-band image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomeit, U.; Ebert, R.

    2009-09-01

    Dual-band thermal imagers acquire information simultaneously in both the 8-12 μm (long-wave infrared, LWIR) and the 3-5 μm (mid-wave infrared, MWIR) spectral range. Compared to single-band thermal imagers they are expected to have several advantages in military applications. These advantages include the opportunity to use the best band for given atmospheric conditions (e. g. cold climate: LWIR, hot and humid climate: MWIR), the potential to better detect camouflaged targets and an improved discrimination between targets and decoys. Most of these advantages have not yet been verified and/or quantified. It is expected that image fusion allows better exploitation of the information content available with dual-band imagers especially with respect to detection of targets. We have developed a method for dual-band image fusion based on the apparent temperature differences in the two bands. This method showed promising results in laboratory tests. In order to evaluate its performance under operational conditions we conducted a field trial in an area with high thermal clutter. In such areas, targets are hardly to detect in single-band images because they vanish in the clutter structure. The image data collected in this field trial was used for a perception experiment. This perception experiment showed an enhanced target detection range and reduced false alarm rate for the fused images compared to the single-band images.

  2. Improved definition of the mouse transcriptome via targeted RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussotti, Giovanni; Leonardi, Tommaso; Clark, Michael B; Mercer, Tim R; Crawford, Joanna; Malquori, Lorenzo; Notredame, Cedric; Dinger, Marcel E; Mattick, John S; Enright, Anton J

    2016-05-01

    Targeted RNA sequencing (CaptureSeq) uses oligonucleotide probes to capture RNAs for sequencing, providing enriched read coverage, accurate measurement of gene expression, and quantitative expression data. We applied CaptureSeq to refine transcript annotations in the current murine GRCm38 assembly. More than 23,000 regions corresponding to putative or annotated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and 154,281 known splicing junction sites were selected for targeted sequencing across five mouse tissues and three brain subregions. The results illustrate that the mouse transcriptome is considerably more complex than previously thought. We assemble more complete transcript isoforms than GENCODE, expand transcript boundaries, and connect interspersed islands of mapped reads. We describe a novel filtering pipeline that identifies previously unannotated but high-quality transcript isoforms. In this set, 911 GENCODE neighboring genes are condensed into 400 expanded gene models. Additionally, 594 GENCODE lncRNAs acquire an open reading frame (ORF) when their structure is extended with CaptureSeq. Finally, we validate our observations using current FANTOM and Mouse ENCODE resources.

  3. Cellular response of the blood-brain barrier to injury: Potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for brain regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro, M M; Ferreira, R; Bernardino, L; Brito, M A

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells are the main component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a vital structure for maintaining brain homeostasis that is seriously disrupted in various neurological pathologies. Therefore, vascular-targeted therapies may bring advantages for the prevention and treatment of brain disorders. In this sense, novel methods to identify and evaluate endothelial damage have been developed and include the detection of circulating endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, endothelial microparticles and exosomes. These cells and cellular structures have been documented in numerous diseases, and increasingly in neurodegenerative disorders, which have led many to assume that they can either be possible biomarkers or tools of repair. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss available data on BBB endothelial damage occurring in two pathologies of the central nervous system, Alzheimer's disease and stroke, which exemplify conditions where chronic and acute vascular damage occur, respectively. The ultimate goal is to identify useful biomarkers and/or therapeutic tools in the healthy and diseased brain that can be used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases where BBB permeability and integrity are impaired. PMID:26996728

  4. Caveolins: Targeting Pro-survival Signaling in the Heart and Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creed M. Stary

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review discusses intracellular signaling moieties specific to membrane lipid rafts (MLRs and the scaffolding proteins caveolin and introduces current data promoting their potential role in the treatment of pathologies of the heart and brain. MLRs are discreet microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in gylcosphingolipids and cholesterol that concentrate and localize signaling molecules. Caveolin proteins are necessary for the formation of MLRs, and are responsible for coordinating signaling events by scaffolding and enriching numerous signaling moieties in close proximity. Specifically in the heart and brain, caveolins are necessary for the cytoprotective phenomenon termed ischemic and anesthetic preconditioning. Targeted overexpression of caveolin in the heart and brain leads to induction of multiple pro-survival and pro-growth signaling pathways; thus, caveolins represent a potential novel therapeutic target for cardaic and neurological pathologies.

  5. In Vivo Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Endogenous Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Rodent Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain have a significant level of neurogenesis plasticity. In vivo monitoring of adult endogenous NSCs would be of great benefit to the understanding of the neurogenesis plasticity under normal and pathological conditions. Here we show the feasibility of in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous NSCs in adult mouse brain by intraventricular delivery of monoclonal anti-CD15 antibody conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. After intraventricular administration of these nanoparticles, the subpopulation of NSCs in the anterior subventricular zone and the beginning of the rostral migratory stream could be in situ labeled and were in vivo visualized with 7.0-T MR imaging during a period from 1 day to 7 days after the injection. Histology confirmed that the injected targeted nanoparticles were specifically bound to CD15 positive cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix. Our results suggest that in vivo targeted MR imaging of endogenous neural stem cells in adult rodent brain could be achieved by using anti-CD15-SPIONs as the molecular probe; and this targeting imaging strategy has the advantage of a rapid in vivo monitoring of the subpopulation of endogenous NSCs in adult brains.

  6. Kinome Profiling in Pediatric Brain Tumors as a New Approach for Target Discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, Arend H.; Diks, Sander H.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; ter Elst, Arja; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Boender, Piet J.; de Wijn, Rik; Kamps, Willem A.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Progression in pediatric brain tumor growth is thought to be the net result of signaling through various protein kinase-mediated networks driving cell proliferation. Defining new targets for treatment of human malignancies, without a priori knowledge on aberrant cell signaling activity, remains exce

  7. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  8. Challenges in the design of clinically useful brain-targeted drug nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, L; Boraschi, D; Eaton, M

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the delivery of drugs by means of intravenously administered nanosized drug carriers - polymerdrug conjugates, liposomes and micelles, is technically possible. These delivery systems are mainly designed for tumour therapy, and accumulate passively into tumours by means of the well known EPR effect. Targeted nanocarriers, that additionally contain ligands for receptors expressed on cell surfaces, are also widely studied but products of this kind are not marketed, and only a few are in clinical trial. Polymeric nanoparticles (Np) able to deliver drugs to the CNS were pioneered in 1995; a number of papers have been published dealing with brain-targeted drug delivery using polymeric Np able to cross the BBB, mainly for the treatment of brain tumours. At present, however, the translation potential of these Np seems to have been exceeded by targeted liposomes, a platform based on a proven technology. This drug delivery system entered clinical trials soon after its discovery, while the challenges in formulation, characterization and manufacturing of brain-targeted polymeric Np and the cost/benefit ratio could be the factors that have prevented their development. A key issue is that it is virtually impossible to define the in vivo fate of polymers, especially in the brain, which is a regulatory requirement; perhaps this is why no progress has been made. The most advanced Np for brain tumours treatment will be compared here with the published data available for those in clinical trial for tumours outside the CNS, to highlight the knowledge gaps that still penalise these delivery systems. At present, new approaches for brain tumours are emerging, such as lipid Np or the use of monoclonal antibody (mAb)-drug conjugates, which avoid polymers. The success or failure in the approval of the polymeric Np currently in clinical trials will certainly affect the field. At present, the chances of their approval appear to be very low.

  9. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel [Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada); Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guillot@usherbrooke.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4, Canada and Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  10. Targeting Potassium Channels for Increasing Delivery of Imaging Agents and Therapeutics to Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Sanyasihally Ningaraj

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Every year in the US, 20,000 new primary and nearly 200,000 metastatic brain tumor cases are reported. The cerebral microvessels/ capillaries that form the blood–brain barrier (BBB not only protect the brain from toxic agents in the blood but also pose a significant hindrance to the delivery of small and large therapeutic molecules. Different strategies have been employed to circumvent the physiological barrier posed by blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB. Studies in our laboratory have identified significant differences in the expression levels of certain genes and proteins between normal and brain tumor capillary endothelial cells. In this study, we validated the non-invasive and clinically relevant Dynamic Contrast Enhancing-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI method with invasive, clinically irrelevant but highly accurate Quantitative Autoradiography (QAR method using rat glioma model. We also showed that DCE-MRI metric of tissue vessel perfusion-permeability is sensitive to changes in blood vessel permeability following administration of calcium-activated potassium (BKCa channel activator NS-1619. Our results show that human gliomas and brain tumor endothelial cells that overexpress BKCa channels can be targeted for increased BTB permeability for MRI enhancing agents to brain tumors. We conclude that monitoring the outcome of increased MRI enhancing agents’ delivery to microsatellites and leading tumor edges in glioma patients would lead to beneficial clinical outcome.

  11. Process safety improvement-Quality and target zero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The 'plan, do, check, act' improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given

  12. Process safety improvement--quality and target zero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scyoc, Karl

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The "plan, do, check, act" improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given. PMID:18374483

  13. Process safety improvement--quality and target zero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scyoc, Karl

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The "plan, do, check, act" improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given.

  14. Process safety improvement-Quality and target zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Scyoc, Karl [Det Norske Veritas (U.S.A.) Inc., DNV Energy Solutions, 16340 Park Ten Place, Suite 100, Houston, TX 77084 (United States)], E-mail: karl.van.scyoc@dnv.com

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The 'plan, do, check, act' improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given.

  15. An improved cortex-like neuromorphic system for target recognitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Yuen, Peter; Hong, Kan; Chen, Tong; Ibrahim, Izzati; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports on the enhancement of biologically-inspired machine vision through a rotation invariance mechanism. Research over the years has suggested that rotation invariance is one of the fundamental generic elements of object constancy, a known generic visual ability of the human brain. Cortex-like vision unlike conventional pixel based machine vision is achieved by mimicking neuromorphic mechanisms of the primates' brain. In this preliminary study, rotation invariance is implemented through histograms from Gabor features of an object. The performance of rotation invariance in the neuromorphic algorithm is assessed by the classification accuracies of a test data set which consists of image objects in five different orientations. It is found that a much more consistent classification result over these five different oriented data sets has been achieved by the integrated rotation invariance neuromorphic algorithm compared to the one without. In addition, the issue of varying aspect ratios of input images to these models is also addressed, in an attempt to create a robust algorithm against a wider variability of input data. The extension of the present achievement is to improve the recognition accuracies while incorporating it to a series of different real-world scenarios which would challenge the approach accordingly.

  16. Inosine improves functional recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachir, Shlomit; Shabashov, Dalia; Trembovler, Victoria; Alexandrovich, Alexander G; Benowitz, Larry I; Shohami, Esther

    2014-03-25

    Despite years of research, no effective therapy is yet available for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The most prevalent and debilitating features in survivors of TBI are cognitive deficits and motor dysfunction. A potential therapeutic method for improving the function of patients following TBI would be to restore, at least in part, plasticity to the CNS in a controlled way that would allow for the formation of compensatory circuits. Inosine, a naturally occurring purine nucleoside, has been shown to promote axon collateral growth in the corticospinal tract (CST) following stroke and focal TBI. In the present study, we investigated the effects of inosine on motor and cognitive deficits, CST sprouting, and expression of synaptic proteins in an experimental model of closed head injury (CHI). Treatment with inosine (100 mg/kg i.p. at 1, 24 and 48 h following CHI) improved outcome after TBI, significantly decreasing the neurological severity score (NSS, pcognitive performance (object recognition, peffect on sensorimotor coordination (rotarod) and spatial cognitive functions (Y-maze). Inosine did not affect CST sprouting in the lumbar spinal cord but did restore levels of the growth-associated protein GAP-43 in the hippocampus, though not in the cerebral cortex. Our results suggest that inosine may improve functional outcome after TBI. PMID:24502983

  17. Targeting the Diabetic Chaperome to Improve Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2016-08-01

    The chaperome constitutes a broad family of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones that facilitate the folding, refolding, and degradation of the proteome. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) promotes the folding of numerous oncoproteins to aid survival of malignant phenotypes, and small molecule inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone complex offer a viable approach to treat certain cancers. One therapeutic attribute of this approach is the selectivity of these molecules to target high affinity oncogenic Hsp90 complexes present in tumor cells, which are absent in nontransformed cells. This selectivity has given rise to the idea that disease may contribute to forming a stress chaperome that is functionally distinct in its ability to interact with small molecule Hsp90 modulators. Consistent with this premise, modulating Hsp90 improves clinically relevant endpoints of diabetic peripheral neuropathy but has little impact in nondiabetic nerve. The concept of targeting the "diabetic chaperome" to treat diabetes and its complications is discussed. PMID:27318486

  18. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim: Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung per...... treatment with ultrafine formulations of ICS will change the natural history of asthma and prevent airway remodelling in both the large and small airways.......Background and Aim: Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... periphery in adult asthma by means of ultrafine aerosols. Results: Ultrafine formulations of inhaled corticosteroids have improved lung deposition up to at least 50 %, primarily in the peripheral airways. Ultrafine formulations of ICS provide equivalent asthma control to non-ultrafine ICS at approximately...

  19. Amphiphilic cationic nanogels as brain-targeted carriers for activated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, G; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Senanayake, T; Rivera, K; Gorantla, S; Poluektova, LY; Vinogradov, SV

    2015-01-01

    Progress in AIDS treatment shifted emphasis towards limiting adverse effects of antiviral drugs while improving the treatment of hard-to-reach viral reservoirs. Many therapeutic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have a limited access to the central nervous system (CNS). Increased NRTI levels induced various complications during the therapy, including neurotoxicity, due to the NRTI toxicity to mitochondria. Here, we describe an innovative design of biodegradable cationic cholesterol-ε-polylysine nanogel carriers for delivery of triphosphorylated NRTIs that demonstrated high anti-HIV activity along with low neurotoxicity, warranting minimal side effects following systemic administration. Efficient CNS targeting was achieved by nanogel modification with brain-specific peptide vectors. Novel dual and triple-drug nanoformulations, analogous to therapeutic NRTI cocktails, displayed equal or higher antiviral activity in HIV-infected macrophages compared to free drugs. Our results suggest potential alternative approach to HIV-1 treatment focused on the effective nanodrug delivery to viral reservoirs in the CNS and reduced neurotoxicity. PMID:25559020

  20. Targeted therapies to improve CFTR function in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodlie, Malcolm; Haq, Iram J; Roberts, Katie; Elborn, J Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common genetically determined, life-limiting disorder in populations of European ancestry. The genetic basis of cystic fibrosis is well established to be mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that codes for an apical membrane chloride channel principally expressed by epithelial cells. Conventional approaches to cystic fibrosis care involve a heavy daily burden of supportive treatments to combat lung infection, help clear airway secretions and maintain nutritional status. In 2012, a new era of precision medicine in cystic fibrosis therapeutics began with the licensing of a small molecule, ivacaftor, which successfully targets the underlying defect and improves CFTR function in a subgroup of patients in a genotype-specific manner. Here, we review the three main targeted approaches that have been adopted to improve CFTR function: potentiators, which recover the function of CFTR at the apical surface of epithelial cells that is disrupted in class III and IV genetic mutations; correctors, which improve intracellular processing of CFTR, increasing surface expression, in class II mutations; and production correctors or read-through agents, which promote transcription of CFTR in class I mutations. The further development of such approaches offers great promise for future therapeutic strategies in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26403534

  1. Neurosurgical targets for compulsivity: what can we learn from acquired brain lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figee, Martijn; Wielaard, Ilse; Mazaheri, Ali; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-03-01

    Treatment efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and other neurosurgical techniques in refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is greatly dependent on the targeting of relevant brain regions. Over the years, several case reports have been published on either the emergence or resolution of obsessive-compulsive symptoms due to neurological lesions. These reports can potentially serve as an important source of insight into the neuroanatomy of compulsivity and have implications for targets of DBS. For this purpose, we have reviewed all published case reports of patients with acquired or resolved obsessive-compulsive symptoms after brain lesions. We found a total of 37 case reports describing 71 patients with acquired and 6 with resolved obsessive-compulsive symptoms as a result of hemorrhaging, infarctions or removal of tumors. Behavioral symptoms following brain lesions consisted of typical obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but also symptoms within the compulsivity spectrum. These data suggests that lesions in the cortico-striato-thalamic circuit, parietal and temporal cortex, cerebellum and brainstem may induce compulsivity. Moreover, the resolution of obsessive-compulsive symptoms has been reported following lesions in the putamen, internal capsule and fronto-parietal lobe. These case reports provide strong evidence supporting the rationale for DBS in the ventral striatum and internal capsule for treatment of compulsivity and reveal the putamen and fronto-parietal cortex as promising new targets. PMID:23313647

  2. Theranostic liposomes loaded with quantum dots and apomorphine for brain targeting and bioimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen CJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Jen Wen1,*, Li-Wen Zhang2,*, Saleh A Al-Suwayeh3, Tzu-Chen Yen1, Jia-You Fang2,4 1Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Gueishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 2Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Chang Gung University, Gueishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Cosmetic Science, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Gueishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Quantum dots (QDs and apomorphine were incorporated into liposomes to eliminate uptake by the liver and enhance brain targeting. We describe the preparation, physicochemical characterization, in vivo bioimaging, and brain endothelial cell uptake of the theranostic liposomes. QDs and the drug were mainly located in the bilayer membrane and inner core of the liposomes, respectively. Spherical vesicles with a mean diameter of ~140 nm were formed. QDs were completely encapsulated by the vesicles. Nearly 80% encapsulation percentage was achieved for apomorphine. A greater fluorescence intensity was observed in mouse brains treated with liposomes compared to free QDs. This result was further confirmed by ex vivo imaging of the organs. QD uptake by the heart and liver was reduced by liposomal incorporation. Apomorphine accumulation in the brain increased by 2.4-fold after this incorporation. According to a hyperspectral imaging analysis, multifunctional liposomes but not the aqueous solution carried QDs into the brain. Liposomes were observed to have been efficiently endocytosed into bEND3 cells. The mechanisms involved in the cellular uptake were clathrin- and caveola-mediated endocytosis, which were energy-dependent. To the best of our knowledge, our group is the first to develop liposomes with a QD-drug hybrid for the aim of imaging and treating brain disorders.Keywords: liposomes, quantum dots, apomorphine

  3. Development of high drug-loading nanomicelles targeting steroids to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sijia; Xie, Yanqi; Li, Yuan; Li, Ling; Tian, Ning; Zhu, Wenbo; Yan, Guangmei; Wu, Chuanbin; Hu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate high drug-loading ligand-modified nanomicelles to deliver a steroidal compound to the brain. YC1 (5α-cholestane-24-methylene-3β, 5α, 6β, 19-tetraol), with poor solubility and limited access to the brain, for the first time, has been proved to be an effective neuroprotective steroid by our previous studies. Based on the principle of 'like dissolves like', cholesterol, which shares the same steroidal parent nucleus with YC1, was selected to react with sodium alginate, producing amphiphilic sodium alginate- cholesterol derivatives (SACDs). To increase the grafting ratio and drug loading, cholesterol was converted to cholesteryl chloroformate, for the first time, before reacting with sodium alginate. Further, lactoferrin was conjugated on SACDs to provide lactoferrin-SACDs (Lf-SACD), which was established by immune electron microscopy (IEM) and self-assembled into brain-targeting nanomicelles. These nanomicelles were negatively charged and spherical in nature, with an average size of drug loading was increased due to the cholesteryl inner cores of the nanomicelles, and the higher the grafting ratio was, the lower the critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of SACD, and the higher drug loading. The in vitro drug release, studied by bulk-equilibrium dialysis in 20 mL of 6% hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin solution at 37°C, indicated a prolonged release profile. The YC1 concentration in mouse brain delivered by lactoferrin-modified nanomicelles was higher than in those delivered by non-modified nanomicelles and YC1 solution. The unique brain-targeting nanomicelle system may provide a promising carrier to deliver hydrophobic drugs across the blood-brain barrier for the treatment of brain diseases.

  4. Localization and distribution of magnetic chemotherapeutic drugs with magnetic targeting in rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI An-min; ZHANG Chuan-xiu; FU Xiang-ping; ZHANG Zhi-wen; XUE Qing-hui; YAN Run-min; YI Lin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background Magnetic targeting therapy may be a new method for the treatment of malignent tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the localization and distribution of ferrofluid microsphere of human serum albumin methotrexate (FM-HSA-MTX) carriers in the brain and to explore the magnetic targeting chemotherapy for malignant brain tumor. Methods Ninety SD rats were divided into three groups: targeting group, non-magnetic targeting group, and control group. Synthesized FM-HSA-MTX carriers (MTX 25 mg/kg) were injected into the systemic circulation via the caudal vein (magnetic targeting group, n=30). A 0.6 T magnetic field was placed around the right hemisphere. The non-magnetic targeting group (n=30) was administered with FM-HSA-MTX without external magnetic field, meanwhile the control group (n=30) was treated with MTX and a magnetic field. Random serial sacrifices (n=10) were conducted at 15, 30 and 45 minutes after drug administration. Bilateral hemispheres were collected respectively, and analyzed for total MTX content. Results MTX content in the right hemisphere of the magnetic targeting group was significantly higher than that in the other two groups at 15, 30 and 45 minutes after drug administration (P<0.05) No difference was seen between the non-targeting group and control group. In the magnetic targeting group, MTX returned to the peak level [(0.564±0.018) mg/g, q15-45=32.252, P<0.05] 45 minutes after the injection but it deceased in the other two groups [non-magnetic targeting group: (0.060±0.015) mg/g, q15-45=9.245, P<0.05, control group: (0.074±0.045) mg/g, q15-45=6.299, P<0.05]. In the magnetic targeting group, the concentration of MTX in the right hemisphere was significantly higher than that in the left hemisphere (t45min=21.135, P=0.000) but no difference was observed between bilateral hemispheres in the other two groups (non-magnetic targeting group: t45min=0.434, P=0.670; control group: t45min=0.533, P=0.600). Conclusion In

  5. Application of Improved Grey Target Technology in Weapon Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Zhi-jian; BO Yu-cheng; WANG Zhi-lin

    2005-01-01

    A new method of effectiveness evaluation of weapon systems is set up by improving the formula of approaching degree. According to the grey target theory of grey system theory, the patterns of the weapon systems to be evaluated are formed with the main tactical and technical performance indices of these weapon systems, thereby the standard pattern of these patterns is determined. By solving the approaching degree of patterns to their standard one and making a comparison among them, the evaluation results can be obtained.

  6. Antisense-mediated RNA targeting: versatile and expedient genetic manipulation in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eZalachoras

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A limiting factor in brain research still is the difficulty to evaluate in vivo the role of the increasing number of proteins implicated in neuronal processes. We discuss here the potential of antisense-mediated RNA targeting approaches. We mainly focus on those that manipulate splicing (exon skipping and exon inclusion, but will also briefly discuss mRNA targeting. Classic knockdown of expression by mRNA targeting is only one possible application of antisense oligonucleotides (AON in the control of gene function. Exon skipping and inclusion are based on the interference of AONs with splicing of pre-mRNAs. These are powerful, specific and particularly versatile techniques, which can be used to circumvent pathogenic mutations, shift splice variant expression, knock down proteins, or to create molecular models using in-frame deletions. Pre-mRNA targeting is currently used both as a research tool, e.g. in models for motor neuron disease, and in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.AONs are particularly promising in relation to brain research, as the modified AONs are taken up extremely fast in neurons and glial cells with a long residence, and without the need for viral vectors or other delivery tools, once inside the blood brain barrier. In this review we cover 1. The principles of antisense-mediated techniques, chemistry and efficacy.2. The pros and cons of AON approaches in the brain compared to other techniques of interfering with gene function, such as transgenesis and short hairpin RNAs, in terms of specificity of the manipulation, spatial and temporal control over gene expression, toxicity and delivery issues.3. The potential applications for Neuroscience. We conclude that there is good evidence from animal studies that the CNS can be successfully targeted, but the potential of the diverse AON-based approaches appears to be under-recognized.

  7. Improving brain injury cognitive rehabilitation by personalized telerehabilitation services: Guttmann neuropersonal trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Javier; Cáceres, César; García-Molina, Alberto; Opisso, Eloy; Roig, Teresa; Tormos, José M; Gómez, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation aims to remediate or alleviate the cognitive deficits appearing after an episode of acquired brain injury (ABI). The purpose of this work is to describe the telerehabilitation platform called Guttmann Neuropersonal Trainer (GNPT) which provides new strategies for cognitive rehabilitation, improving efficiency and access to treatments, and to increase knowledge generation from the process. A cognitive rehabilitation process has been modeled to design and develop the system, which allows neuropsychologists to configure and schedule rehabilitation sessions, consisting of set of personalized computerized cognitive exercises grounded on neuroscience and plasticity principles. It provides remote continuous monitoring of patient's performance, by an asynchronous communication strategy. An automatic knowledge extraction method has been used to implement a decision support system, improving treatment customization. GNPT has been implemented in 27 rehabilitation centers and in 83 patients' homes, facilitating the access to the treatment. In total, 1660 patients have been treated. Usability and cost analysis methodologies have been applied to measure the efficiency in real clinical environments. The usability evaluation reveals a system usability score higher than 70 for all target users. The cost efficiency study results show a relation of 1-20 compared to face-to-face rehabilitation. GNPT enables brain-damaged patients to continue and further extend rehabilitation beyond the hospital, improving the efficiency of the rehabilitation process. It allows customized therapeutic plans, providing information to further development of clinical practice guidelines.

  8. Evaluation of brain targeting efficiency of intranasal microemulsion containing olanzapine: pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rashmin B; Patel, Mrunali R; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate olanzapine (OZP) -loaded microemulsions (OZPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of schizophrenia. The OZPME was formulated by the spontaneous microemulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. Pharmacodynamic assessments (apomorphine - induced compulsive behavior and spontaneous locomotor activity) were performed using mice. All formulations were radiolabeled with technetium-99 ((99m)Tc), and biodistribution of drug in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rabbits was performed to determine the uptake of the OZP into the brain. OZPME were found clear and stable with average globule size of 23.87 ± 1.07 nm. In pharmacodynamic assessments, significant (p < 0.05) difference in parameters estimated were found between the treated and control groups. (99m)Tc-labeled OZP solution (OZPS)/OZPME/OZP mucoadhesive microemulsion (OZPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of OZPMME compared to intravenous OZPME was found to be five to six times higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the OZP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for intranasal OZPMME, compared to intravenous OZPME. Furthermore, rabbit brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the OZP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of OZP into the brain through intranasal OZPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:24845478

  9. Targeting dendritic cells for improved HIV-1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique capacity to activate antigen-naive T cells they likely play a critical role in eliciting immune responses to vaccines. DCs are therefore being explored as attractive targets for vaccines, but understanding the interaction of DCs and clinically relevant vaccine antigens and adjuvants is a prerequisite. The HIV-1/AIDS epidemic continues to be a significant health problem, and despite intense research efforts over the past 30 years a protective vaccine has not yet been developed. A common challenge in vaccine design is to find a vaccine formulation that best shapes the immune response to protect against and/or control the given pathogen. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the diversity, anatomical location and function of different human DC subsets in order to identify the optimal target cells for an HIV-1 vaccine. We review human DC interactions with some of the HIV-1 vaccine antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants currently utilized in preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, the effects of distinctly different vaccine adjuvants in terms of activation of DCs and improving DC function and vaccine efficacy are discussed. The susceptibility and responses of DCs to recombinant adenovirus vectors are reviewed, as well as the strategy of directly targeting DCs by using DC marker-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to an antigen. PMID:22975879

  10. Incorporating modern neuroscience findings to improve brain-computer interfaces: tracking auditory attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronkiewicz, Mark; Larson, Eric; Lee, Adrian KC

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology allows users to generate actions based solely on their brain signals. However, current non-invasive BCIs generally classify brain activity recorded from surface electroencephalography (EEG) electrodes, which can hinder the application of findings from modern neuroscience research. Approach. In this study, we use source imaging—a neuroimaging technique that projects EEG signals onto the surface of the brain—in a BCI classification framework. This allowed us to incorporate prior research from functional neuroimaging to target activity from a cortical region involved in auditory attention. Main results. Classifiers trained to detect attention switches performed better with source imaging projections than with EEG sensor signals. Within source imaging, including subject-specific anatomical MRI information (instead of using a generic head model) further improved classification performance. This source-based strategy also reduced accuracy variability across three dimensionality reduction techniques—a major design choice in most BCIs. Significance. Our work shows that source imaging provides clear quantitative and qualitative advantages to BCIs and highlights the value of incorporating modern neuroscience knowledge and methods into BCI systems.

  11. Intraspinal Rewiring of the Corticospinal Tract Requires Target-Derived Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Compensates Lost Function after Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Hayano, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-01-01

    Brain injury that results in an initial behavioural deficit is frequently followed by spontaneous recovery. The intrinsic mechanism of this functional recovery has never been fully understood. Here, we show that reorganization of the corticospinal tract induced by target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for spontaneous recovery…

  12. Targeting of deep-brain structures in nonhuman primates using MR and CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antong; Hines, Catherine; Dogdas, Belma; Bone, Ashleigh; Lodge, Kenneth; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Bagchi, Ansuman; Lubbers, Laura S.; Uslaner, Jason M.; Johnson, Colena; Renger, John; Zariwala, Hatim A.

    2015-03-01

    In vivo gene delivery in central nervous systems of nonhuman primates (NHP) is an important approach for gene therapy and animal model development of human disease. To achieve a more accurate delivery of genetic probes, precise stereotactic targeting of brain structures is required. However, even with assistance from multi-modality 3D imaging techniques (e.g. MR and CT), the precision of targeting is often challenging due to difficulties in identification of deep brain structures, e.g. the striatum which consists of multiple substructures, and the nucleus basalis of meynert (NBM), which often lack clear boundaries to supporting anatomical landmarks. Here we demonstrate a 3D-image-based intracranial stereotactic approach applied toward reproducible intracranial targeting of bilateral NBM and striatum of rhesus. For the targeting we discuss the feasibility of an atlas-based automatic approach. Delineated originally on a high resolution 3D histology-MR atlas set, the NBM and the striatum could be located on the MR image of a rhesus subject through affine and nonrigid registrations. The atlas-based targeting of NBM was compared with the targeting conducted manually by an experienced neuroscientist. Based on the targeting, the trajectories and entry points for delivering the genetic probes to the targets could be established on the CT images of the subject after rigid registration. The accuracy of the targeting was assessed quantitatively by comparison between NBM locations obtained automatically and manually, and finally demonstrated qualitatively via post mortem analysis of slices that had been labelled via Evan Blue infusion and immunohistochemistry.

  13. Feasibility of noninvasive ultrasound delivery for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; McDannold, Nathan; Clement, Greg; White, Jason; Treat, Lisa; Yin, Xiangtao; Jolesz, Ferenc; Sheikov, Nickolai; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2005-04-01

    The objective of our research during the past few years has been to develop multichannel ultrasound phased arrays for noninvasive brain interventions. We have been successful in developing methods for correcting the skull induced beam distortions and thus, are able to produce sharp focusing through human skulls. This method is now being tested for thermal ablation of tumors, with results from animal studies demonstrating feasibility. In addition, the ability of ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) locally has been explored in animal models. The results suggest that the transcranial ultrasound exposures can induce BBB opening such that therapeutic agents can be localized in the brain. This tool is especially powerful since the beam can be guided by MR images, thus providing anatomical or functional targeting. This talk will review our current status in this research, which ultimately aims for the clinical use of this methodology.

  14. Development of high drug-loading nanomicelles targeting steroids to the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sijia Zheng,1,* Yanqi Xie,1,* Yuan Li,1 Ling Li,1 Ning Tian,1 Wenbo Zhu,2 Guangmei Yan,2 Chuanbin Wu,1 Haiyan Hu1 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmacology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate high drug-loading ligand-modified nanomicelles to deliver a steroidal compound to the brain. YC1 (5α-cholestane-24-methylene-3β, 5α, 6β, 19-tetraol, with poor solubility and limited access to the brain, for the first time, has been proved to be an effective neuroprotective steroid by our previous studies. Based on the principle of ‘like dissolves like’, cholesterol, which shares the same steroidal parent nucleus with YC1, was selected to react with sodium alginate, producing amphiphilic sodium alginate–cholesterol derivatives (SACDs. To increase the grafting ratio and drug loading, cholesterol was converted to cholesteryl chloroformate, for the first time, before reacting with sodium alginate. Further, lactoferrin was conjugated on SACDs to provide lactoferrin-SACDs (Lf-SACD, which was established by immune electron microscopy (IEM and self-assembled into brain-targeting nanomicelles. These nanomicelles were negatively charged and spherical in nature, with an average size of <200 nm. The YC1 drug loading was increased due to the cholesteryl inner cores of the nanomicelles, and the higher the grafting ratio was, the lower the critical micelle concentration (CMC value of SACD, and the higher drug loading. The in vitro drug release, studied by bulk-equilibrium dialysis in 20 mL of 6% hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin solution at 37°C, indicated a prolonged release profile. The YC1 concentration in mouse brain delivered by lactoferrin-modified nanomicelles was higher than in those delivered by non-modified nanomicelles and YC1 solution. The unique brain-targeting

  15. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in traumatic brain injury: an emerging therapeutic target?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hui-jie; JIANG Rong-cai; LIU Li; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause ofmortality and morbidity in the world. Recent clinical investigations and basic researches suggest that strategies to improve angiogenesis following TBI may provide promising opportunities to improve clinical outcomes and brain functional recovery. More and more evidences show that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which have been identified in the peripheral blood, may play an important role in the pathologic and physiological angiogenesis in adults. Moreover, impressive data demonstrate that EPCs are mobilized from bone marrow to blood circulation in response to traumatic or inflammatory stimulations.In this review, we discussed the role of EPCs in the repair of brain injury and the possible therapeutic implication for functional recovery of TBl in the future.

  16. NFL-lipid nanocapsules for brain neural stem cell targeting in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carradori, Dario; Saulnier, Patrick; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne; Eyer, Joel

    2016-09-28

    The replacement of injured neurons by the selective stimulation of neural stem cells in situ represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 showed specific interactions towards neural stem cells of the subventricular zone. The aim of our work was to produce a NFL-based drug delivery system able to target neural stem cells through the selective affinity between the peptide and these cells. NFL-TBS.40-63 (NFL) was adsorbed on lipid nanocapsules (LNC) whom targeting efficiency was evaluated on neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (brain) and from the central canal (spinal cord). NFL-LNC were incubated with primary neural stem cells in vitro or injected in vivo in adult rat brain (right lateral ventricle) or spinal cord (T10). NFL-LNC interactions with neural stem cells were different depending on the origin of the cells. NFL-LNC showed a preferential uptake by neural stem cells from the brain, while they did not interact with neural stem cells from the spinal cord. The results obtained in vivo correlate with the results observed in vitro, demonstrating that NFL-LNC represent a promising therapeutic strategy to selectively deliver bioactive molecules to brain neural stem cells. PMID:27503706

  17. Ligand anchored poly(propyleneimine) dendrimers for brain targeting: Comparative in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hemant K; Gajbhiye, Virendra; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-11-15

    The present investigation was aimed at developing various ligands-anchored dendrimers and comparing their brain targeting potential at one platform. Sialic acid (S), glucosamine (G) and concanavalin A (C) anchored poly(propyleneimine) (PPI) dendritic nanoconjugates were developed and evaluated for delivery of anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX) to the brain. MTT assay on U373MG human astrocytoma cells indicated IC50 values of 0.40, 0.65, 0.95, 2.00 and 3.50μM for PTX loaded SPPI, GPPI, CPPI, PPI formulations, and free PTX, respectively. The invivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in rats showed significantly higher accumulation of PTX in brain as compared to free PTX. The order of targeting potential of various ligands under investigation was found as sialic acid>glucosamine>concanavalin A. Thus, it can be concluded that sialic acid, glucosamine and Con A can be used as potential ligands to append PPI dendrimers for enhanced delivery of anticancer drugs to the brain for higher therapeutic outcome. PMID:27501037

  18. The anteromedial GPi as a new target for deep brain stimulation in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Girish; Evans, Andrew; Bear, Renee E; Velakoulis, Dennis; Bittar, Richard G

    2014-05-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is now well established in the treatment of intractable movement disorders. Over the past decade the clinical applications have expanded into the realm of psychosurgery, including depression and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The optimal targets for electrode placement in psychosurgery remain unclear, with numerous anatomical targets reported for the treatment of OCD. We present four patients with Tourette's syndrome and prominent features of OCD who underwent DBS of the anteromedial globus pallidus internus (GPi) to treat their movement disorder. Their pre-operative and post-operative OCD symptoms were compared, and responded dramatically to surgery. On the basis of these results, we propose the anteromedial (limbic) GPi as a potential surgical target for the treatment of OCD, and furnish data supporting its further investigation as a DBS target for the treatment of psychiatric conditions. PMID:24524950

  19. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  20. Combined strategies of apomorphine diester prodrugs and nanostructured lipid carriers for efficient brain targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Sung, K. C.; Ku, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Fang, Jia-You

    2012-03-01

    Our aim is to develop nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for loading the apomorphine diester prodrugs, diacetyl apomorphine (DAA) and diisobutyryl apomorphine (DIA), into the brain. NLCs were prepared using sesame oil/cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrices. Experiments were performed with the objective of evaluating the physicochemical characteristics, drug release, safety and brain-targeting efficacy of the NLCs. The size of regular NLCs (N-NLCs) was 214 nm. The addition of Forestall (FE) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the NLCs (P-NLCs) increased the particle diameter to 250 nm. The zeta potentials of N-NLCs and P-NLCs were respectively shown to be - 21 and 48 mV. Diester prodrugs were more lipophilic and more chemically stable than the parent apomorphine. The hydrolysis study indicated that the prodrugs underwent bioconversion in plasma and brain extract, with DAA exhibiting faster degradation than DIA. Sustained release was achieved through the synergistic effect of integrating strategies of prodrugs and NLCs, with the longer carbon chain showing the slower release (DIA brain. The distribution duration of the fluorescent dye in the brain region was also prolonged by the nanocarriers.

  1. DISC1 pathway in brain development: exploring therapeutic targets for major psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKamiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic risk factors for major psychiatric disorders play key roles in neurodevelopment. Thus, exploring the molecular pathways of risk genes is important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development, but also to decipher how genetic disturbances affect brain maturation and functioning relevant to major mental illnesses. During the last decade, there has been significant progress in determining the mechanisms whereby risk genes impact brain development. Nonetheless, given that the majority of psychiatric disorders have etiological complexities encompassing multiple risk genes and environmental factors, the biological mechanisms of these diseases remain poorly understood. How can we move forward in our research for discovery of the biological markers and novel therapeutic targets for major mental disorders? Here we review recent progress in the neurobiology of Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1, a major risk gene for major mental disorders, with a particular focus on its roles in cerebral cortex development. Convergent findings implicate DISC1 as part of a large, multi-step pathway implicated in various cellular processes and signal transduction. We discuss links between the DISC1 pathway and environmental factors, such as immune/inflammatory responses, which may suggest novel therapeutic targets. Existing treatments for major mental disorders are hampered by a limited number of pharmacological targets. Consequently, elucidation of the DISC1 pathway, and its association with neuropsychiatric disorders, may offer hope for novel treatment interventions.

  2. Increased brain uptake of targeted nanoparticles by adding an acid-cleavable linkage between transferrin and the nanoparticle core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew J; Davis, Mark E

    2015-10-01

    Most therapeutic agents are excluded from entering the central nervous system by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Receptor mediated transcytosis (RMT) is a common mechanism used by proteins, including transferrin (Tf), to traverse the BBB. Here, we prepared Tf-containing, 80-nm gold nanoparticles with an acid-cleavable linkage between the Tf and the nanoparticle core to facilitate nanoparticle RMT across the BBB. These nanoparticles are designed to bind to Tf receptors (TfRs) with high avidity on the blood side of the BBB, but separate from their multidentate Tf-TfR interactions upon acidification during the transcytosis process to allow release of the nanoparticle into the brain. These targeted nanoparticles show increased ability to cross an in vitro model of the BBB and, most important, enter the brain parenchyma of mice in greater amounts in vivo after systemic administration compared with similar high-avidity nanoparticles containing noncleavable Tf. In addition, we investigated this design with nanoparticles containing high-affinity antibodies (Abs) to TfR. With the Abs, the addition of the acid-cleavable linkage provided no improvement to in vivo brain uptake for Ab-containing nanoparticles, and overall brain uptake was decreased for all Ab-containing nanoparticles compared with Tf-containing ones. These results are consistent with recent reports of high-affinity anti-TfR Abs trafficking to the lysosome within BBB endothelium. In contrast, high-avidity, Tf-containing nanoparticles with the acid-cleavable linkage avoid major endothelium retention by shedding surface Tf during their transcytosis. PMID:26392563

  3. Development and evaluation of brain targeted intranasal alginate nanoparticles for treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Shadabul; Md, Shadab; Sahni, Jasjeet Kaur; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential of Venlafaxine loaded alginate nanoparticles (VLF AG-NPs) for treatment of depression via intranasal (i.n.) nose to brain delivery route. The VLF AG-NPs were prepared and optimized on the basis of various physio-chemical characteristics. Pharmacodynamic studies of the VLF AG-NPs for antidepressant activity were carried in-vivo by forced swimming test and locomotor activity test on albino Wistar rats. VLF AG-NPsi.n. treatment significantly improved the behavioural analysis parameters i.e. swimming, climbing, and immobility in comparison to the VLF solutioni.n. and VLF tabletoral. The intranasal VLF AG-NPs also improved locomotor activity when compared with VLF solutioni.n. and VLF tabletoral. Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy studies were performed on isolated organs of rats after intravenous and intranasal administrations of Rodamine-123 loaded alginate nanoparticles to determine its efficacy for nose to brain delivery and also for its qualitative distribution to other organs. Brain uptake and pharmacokinetic studies were performed by determination of VLF concentration in blood and brain respectively for VLF AG-NPsi.n., VLF solutioni.n. and VLF solutioni.v. The greater brain/blood ratios for VLF AG-NPsi.n. in comparison to VLF solutioni.n. and VLF solutioni.v. respectively at 30 min are indicative of superiority of alginate nanoparticles for direct nose to brain transport of VLF. Thus, VLF AG-NPsi.n. delivered greater VLF to the brain in comparison to VLF solution which indicates that VLF AG-NPs could be a promising approach for the treatment of depression.

  4. An Improved Moving Multi-Human Target Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Feng-Mei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the detection of moving multi-human targets, the major problems existing lie in the detection speed and precision. Fortunately, the HOG feature presents a very considerable effect on the detection accuracy. However, the problem of low detecting speed caused by its large amount of calculation prevents the HOG feature from being well applied in scenes where the real-time requirements are needed. Given this problem, this paper presents a method which combines the Gaussian mixture background model and HOG feature. This method solved firstly by the Gaussian mixture background model to detect the moving foreground in the video. And then use HOG+SVM to handle the moving foreground that has been detected. As a result, the amount of computation is reduced considerably and the real-time performance of the HOG algorithm is improved greatly. Verified by the experiment, the detection accuracy of this algorithm can reach 94%.

  5. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung pe...... treatment with ultrafine formulations of ICS will change the natural history of asthma and prevent airway remodelling in both the large and small airways.......Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... periphery in adult asthma by means of ultrafine aerosols. Results:  Ultrafine formulations of inhaled corticosteroids have improved lung deposition up to at least 50 %, primarily in the peripheral airways. Ultrafine formulations of ICS provide equivalent asthma control to non-ultrafine ICS at approximately...

  6. Brain-targeting study of stearic acid–grafted chitosan micelle drug-delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie YT

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Ting Xie, Yong-Zhong Du, Hong Yuan, Fu-Qiang HuCollege of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaPurpose: Therapy for central nervous system disease is mainly restricted by the blood–brain barrier. A drug-delivery system is an effective approach to overcome this barrier. In this research, the potential of polymeric micelles for brain-targeting drug delivery was studied.Methods: Stearic acid–grafted chitosan (CS-SA was synthesized by hydrophobic modification of chitosan with stearic acid. The physicochemical characteristics of CS-SA micelles were investigated. bEnd.3 cells were chosen as model cells to evaluate the internalization ability and cytotoxicity of CS-SA micelles in vitro. Doxorubicin (DOX, as a model drug, was physically encapsulated in CS-SA micelles. The in vivo brain-targeting ability of CS-SA micelles was qualitatively and quantitatively studied by in vivo imaging and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, respectively. The therapeutic effect of DOX-loaded micelles in vitro was performed on glioma C6 cells.Results: The critical micelle concentration of CS-SA micelles with 26.9% ± 1.08% amino substitute degree was 65 µg/mL. The diameter and surface potential of synthesized CS-SA micelles in aqueous solution was 22 ± 0.98 nm and 36.4 ± 0.71 mV, respectively. CS-SA micelles presented excellent cellular uptake ability on bEnd.3 cells, the IC50 of which was 237.6 ± 6.61 µg/mL. DOX-loaded micelles exhibited slow drug-release behavior, with a cumulative release up to 72% within 48 hours in vitro. The cytotoxicity of DOX-loaded CS-SA micelles against C6 was 2.664 ± 0.036 µg/mL, compared with 0.181 ± 0.066 µg/mL of DOX • HCl. In vivo imaging results indicated that CS-SA was able to transport rapidly across the blood–brain barrier and into the brain. A maximum DOX distribution in brain of 1.01%/g was observed 15 minutes after administration and maintained above 0.45%/g within 1 hour

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Identification of Silicon Incorporated Oxazolidinone Antibiotics with Improved Brain Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharamsingh, B; Ramesh, Remya; Dange, Santoshkumar S; Khairnar, Pankaj V; Singhal, Smita; Upadhyay, Dilip; Veeraraghavan, Sridhar; Viswanadha, Srikant; Vakkalanka, Swaroop; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2015-11-12

    Therapeutic options for brain infections caused by pathogens with a reduced sensitivity to drugs are limited. Recent reports on the potential use of linezolid in treating brain infections prompted us to design novel compounds around this scaffold. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of various oxazolidinone antibiotics with the incorporation of silicon. Our findings in preclinical species suggest that silicon incorporation is highly useful in improving brain exposures. Interestingly, three compounds from this series demonstrated up to a 30-fold higher brain/plasma ratio when compared to linezolid thereby indicating their therapeutic potential in brain associated disorders. PMID:26617962

  8. Improved understanding of brain morphology through 3D printing: A brief guide

    OpenAIRE

    Madan, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Brain morphology can provide insights into inter-individual differences. In the present guide, we outline the steps for generating a print-ready 3D model of brain structures from a standard T1-weighted structural MRI volume. By improving our understanding of brain morphology, we hope to enhance teaching and scientific communication, as well as aid in the development of novel measures of brain morphology. The present guide details the steps for generating a print-ready 3D model of brain ...

  9. Hybrid nanoparticles improve targeting to inflammatory macrophages through phagocytic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagalkot, Vaishali; Badgeley, Marcus A; Kampfrath, Thomas; Deiuliis, Jeffrey A; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Maiseyeu, Andrei

    2015-11-10

    Macrophages are innate immune cells with great phenotypic plasticity, which allows them to regulate an array of physiological processes such as host defense, tissue repair, and lipid/lipoprotein metabolism. In this proof-of-principle study, we report that macrophages of the M1 inflammatory phenotype can be selectively targeted by model hybrid lipid-latex (LiLa) nanoparticles bearing phagocytic signals. We demonstrate a simple and robust route to fabricate nanoparticles and then show their efficacy through imaging and drug delivery in inflammatory disease models of atherosclerosis and obesity. Self-assembled LiLa nanoparticles can be modified with a variety of hydrophobic entities such as drug cargos, signaling lipids, and imaging reporters resulting in sub-100nm nanoparticles with low polydispersities. The optimized theranostic LiLa formulation with gadolinium, fluorescein and "eat-me" phagocytic signals (Gd-FITC-LiLa) a) demonstrates high relaxivity that improves magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensitivity, b) encapsulates hydrophobic drugs at up to 60% by weight, and c) selectively targets inflammatory M1 macrophages concomitant with controlled release of the payload of anti-inflammatory drug. The mechanism and kinetics of the payload discharge appeared to be phospholipase A2 activity-dependent, as determined by means of intracellular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In vivo, LiLa targets M1 macrophages in a mouse model of atherosclerosis, allowing noninvasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaque by MRI. In the context of obesity, LiLa particles were selectively deposited to M1 macrophages within inflamed adipose tissue, as demonstrated by single-photon intravital imaging in mice. Collectively, our results suggest that phagocytic signals can preferentially target inflammatory macrophages in experimental models of atherosclerosis and obesity, thus opening the possibility of future clinical applications that diagnose/treat these conditions. Tunable Li

  10. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  11. Targeting myeloid cells to the brain using non-myeloablative conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chotima Böttcher

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs are able to colonize the central nervous system (CNS at sites of damage. This ability makes BMDCs an ideal cellular vehicle for transferring therapeutic genes/molecules to the CNS. However, conditioning is required for bone marrow-derived myeloid cells to engraft in the brain, which so far has been achieved by total body irradiation (TBI and by chemotherapy (e.g. busulfan treatment. Unfortunately, both regimens massively disturb the host's hematopoietic compartment. Here, we established a conditioning protocol to target myeloid cells to sites of brain damage in mice using non-myeloablative focal head irradiation (HI. This treatment was associated with comparatively low inflammatory responses in the CNS despite cranial radiation doses which are identical to TBI, as revealed by gene expression analysis of cytokines/chemokines such as CCL2, CXCL10, TNF-α and CCL5. HI prior to bone marrow transplantation resulted in much lower levels of blood chimerism defined as the percentage of donor-derived cells in peripheral blood ( 95% or busulfan treatment (> 50%. Nevertheless, HI effectively recruited myeloid cells to the area of motoneuron degeneration in the brainstem within 7 days after facial nerve axotomy. In contrast, no donor-derived cells were detected in the lesioned facial nucleus of busulfan-treated animals up to 2 weeks after transplantation. Our findings suggest that myeloid cells can be targeted to sites of brain damage even in the presence of very low levels of peripheral blood chimerism. We established a novel non-myeloablative conditioning protocol with minimal disturbance of the host's hematopoietic system for targeting BMDCs specifically to areas of pathology in the brain.

  12. Nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of saquinavir mesylate for brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Hitendra S; Mahajan, Milind S; Nerkar, Pankaj P; Agrawal, Anshuman

    2014-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunological privileged sanctuary site-providing reservoir for HIV-1 virus. Current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. The low permeability of anti-HIV drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) leads to insufficient delivery. Therefore, developing a novel approaches enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required for the treatment of neuro-AIDS. The aim of this study was to develop intranasal nanoemulsion (NE) for enhanced bioavailability and CNS targeting of saquinavir mesylate (SQVM). SQVM is a protease inhibitor which is a poorly soluble drug widely used as antiretroviral drug, with oral bioavailability is about 4%. The spontaneous emulsification method was used to prepare drug-loaded o/w nanoemulsion, which was characterized by droplet size, zeta potential, pH, drug content. Moreover, ex-vivo permeation studies were performed using sheep nasal mucosa. The optimized NE showed a significant increase in drug permeation rate compared to the plain drug suspension (PDS). Cilia toxicity study on sheep nasal mucosa showed no significant adverse effect of SQVM-loaded NE. Results of in vivo biodistribution studies show higher drug concentration in brain after intranasal administration of NE than intravenous delivered PDS. The higher percentage of drug targeting efficiency (% DTE) and nose-to-brain drug direct transport percentage (% DTP) for optimized NE indicated effective CNS targeting of SQVM via intranasal route. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated transport of drug in the CNS at larger extent after intranasal administration as NE.

  13. Brain targeted transcranial administration of diazepam and shortening of sleep latency in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Pathirana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of medicated oils on scalp had been practiced for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine in diseases associated with the central nervous system. It is possible that the effectiveness of the therapy may be a result of targeted delivery of active compounds to the brain transcranially. Evidence also comes from two previous studies with positive results on brain targeted transcranial delivery of methadone base and diazepam on rat models. Possibility of transcranial drug delivery was investigated in healthy human volunteers using electroencephalography techniques by assessing the ability of transcranially administered diazepam in bringing about β activity in the electroencephalographic wave patterns and shortening of the sleep latency period. Non polar drug molecules dissolved in a non-aqueous sesame oil based vehicle is a significant feature in the transcranial dosage design. The study was under taken in two phases. In the Phase-I study scalp application of a single dose of 2 mg/3 ml of the oil was employed and in the Phase-II study repeat application of three doses 24 h apart were employed. Sleep latency changes were monitored with Multiple Sleep Latency Tests with 5 naps employing the standard electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography electrodes. Sleep onset was identified with the first epoch of any sleep stage non rapid eye movement 1, 2, 3, 4 or rapid eye movement using electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography criteria. In both phases of the study there was significant reduction in the sleep latencies. It was much more pronounced in the Phase-II study. None of the subjects however displayed beta activity in the electroencephalography. Sleep latency reduction following scalp application in both the phases are suggestive of transcranial migration of diazepam molecules to the receptor sites of the nerve tissue of the brain eliciting its pharmacological effect of sedation

  14. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN. PMID:25826110

  15. Targeting neural endophenotypes of eating disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine A Dunlop

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The term eating disorders (ED encompasses a wide variety of disordered eating and compensatory behaviors, and so the term is associated with considerable clinical and phenotypic heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes optimizing treatment techniques difficult. One class of treatments is non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS. NIBS, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS are accessible forms of neuromodulation that alter the cortical excitability of a target brain region. It is crucial for NIBS to be successful that the target is well selected for the patient population in question. Targets may best be selected by stepping back from conventional DSM-5 diagnostic criteria to identify neural substrates of more basic phenotypes, including behavior related rewards and punishment cognitive control, and social processes. These phenotypic dimensions have been recently laid out by the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC initiative. Consequently, this review is intended to identify potential dimensions as outlined by the RDoC and their underlying behavioral and neurobiological targets associated with ED as potential candidates for NIBS and review the available literature on rTMS and tDCS in ED. This review systematically reviews abnormal neural circuitry in ED within the RDoC framework, and also systematically reviews the available literature investigating NIBS as a treatment for ED.

  16. Brain targeted PLGA nanocarriers alleviating amyloid-Β expression and preserving basal survivin in degenerating mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramoju, Bhasker; Neerati, Prasad; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-11-01

    The chronic systemic administration of d-Galactose in C57BL/6J mice showed a relatively high oxidative stress, amyloid-β expression and neuronal cell death. Enhanced expression of pyknotic nuclei, caspase-3 and reduced expression of neuronal integrity markers further confirmed the aforesaid insults. However, concomitant treatment with the recombinant protein (SurR9-C84A) and the anti-transferrin receptor antibody conjugated SurR9-C84A (SurR9+TFN) nanocarriers showed a significant improvement in the disease status and neuronal health. The beauty of this study is that the biodegradable Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanocarriers enhanced the biological half-life and the efficacy of the treatments. The nanocarriers were effective in lowering the amyloid-β expression, enhancing the neuronal integrity markers and maintaining the basal levels of endogenous survivin that is essential for evading the caspase activation and apoptosis. The current study herein reports for the first time that the brain targeted SurR9-C84A nanocarriers alleviated the d-Galactose induced neuronal insults and has potential for future brain targeted nanomedicine application.

  17. RES and brain targeting stavudine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for AIDS therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchaxari M Dandagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the reticuloendothelial system (RES, e.g., macrophages play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS. The objective of the present study was to investigate the possibility of specifically targeting antiviral drugs Stavudine to RES (like Liver, Spleen etc. and brain using solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs as colloidal drug carriers. Various lipids like stearic acid, cetyl palmitate, glyceryl behenate and phospholipid in combination have been used and effect of lipid on properties of SLNs has been investigated. The SLNs of Stavudine were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The diameter of SLNs was determined and found in range of 175 ± 6.027 to 393 ± 2.309 nm depending on the type of lipid used. Percentage drug entrapment was found to be influenced by the concentration and type of lipid used, which was found in the range of 18.1 to 65.2%. The drug release behavior was studied by dialysis bag method and the release pattern of drug was found to follow Higuchi model. Results of stability evaluation showed a relatively long-term stability after storage at 4°C for 1 month. Stavudine-loaded SLNs were successfully prepared, optimized and effectively targeted to RES and brain. SLNs of Stavudine have been shown to be taken up by brain 11 fold greater as compared to pure Stavudine. This finding is more important since Human Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV infect the central nervous system.

  18. Prospective comparative evaluation of planning target volume margin for brain intensity modulated radiotherapy utilizing hybrid online imaging modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Sayan Paul; Shilpi Roy; Shaleen Agrawal; Anusheel Munshi; Kanan Jassal; Tharmar Ganesh; Saneg Krishnankutty; Jeen Soundra Pandian Sathiya; Bidhu Kalyan Mohanti

    2015-01-01

    Background: A new advancement in daily monitoring of patient positioning is the use of hybrid technologies where two separate online imaging modalities are integrated to achieve precise treatment delivery. Our center has a set-up that integrates Elekta Linear accelerator device (EPID) with BrainLAB ExacTrac imaging for the first time in the world. We calculated planning target volume (PTV) margin for brain radiotherapy with thermoplastic mask immobilization with conventional EPID and BrainLAB...

  19. Targeting different pathophysiological events after traumatic brain injury in mice: Role of melatonin and memantine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelestemur, Taha; Yulug, Burak; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Kilic, Ulkan; Caglayan, Berrak; Yalcin, Esra; Gundogdu, Reyhan Zeynep; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2016-01-26

    The tissue damage that emerges during traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a consequence of a variety of pathophysiological events, including free radical generation and over-activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDAR). Considering the complex pathophysiology of TBI, we hypothesized that combination of neuroprotective compounds, targeting different events which appear during injury, may be a more promising approach for patients. In this context, both NMDAR antagonist memantine and free radical scavenger melatonin are safe in humans and promising agents for the treatment of TBI. Herein, we examined the effects of melatonin administered alone or in combination with memantine on the activation of signaling pathways, injury development and DNA fragmentation. Both compounds reduced brain injury moderately and the density of DNA fragmentation significantly. Notably, melatonin/memantine combination decreased brain injury and DNA fragmentation significantly, which was associated with reduced p38 and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation. As compared with melatonin and memantine groups, SAPK/JNK-1/2 phosphorylation was also reduced in melatonin/memantine combined animals. In addition, melatonin, memantine and their combination decreased iNOS activity significantly. Here, we provide evidence that melatonin/memantine combination protects brain from traumatic injury, which was associated with decreased DNA fragmentation, p38 phosphorylation and iNOS activity.

  20. Mucoadhesive microemulsion of ibuprofen: design and evaluation for brain targeting efficiency through intranasal route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjyanarayan Mandal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at designing mucoadhesive microemulsion gel to enhance the brain uptake of Ibuprofen through intranasal route. Ibuprofen loaded mucoadhesive microemulsion (MMEI was developed by incorporating polycarbophil as mucoadhesive polymer into Capmul MCM based optimal microemulsion (MEI and was subjected to characterization, stability, mucoadhesion and naso-ciliotoxicity study. Brain uptake of ibuprofen via nasal route was studied by performing biodistribution study in Swiss albino rats. MEI was found to be transparent, stable and non ciliotoxic with 66.29 ± 4.15 nm, -20.9 ± 3.98 mV and 98.66 ± 1.01% as average globule size, zeta potential and drug content respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM study revealed the narrow globule size distribution of MEI. Following single intranasal administration of MMEI and MEI at a dose of 2.86 mg/kg, uptake of ibuprofen in the olfactory bulb was around 3.0 and 1.7 folds compared with intravenous injection of ibuprofen solution (IDS. The ratios of AUC in brain tissues to that in plasma obtained after nasal administration of MMEI were significantly higher than those after intravenous administration of IDS. Findings of the present investigation revealed that the developed mucoadhesive microemulsion gel could be a promising approach for brain targeting of ibuprofen through intranasal route.

  1. A Tentative Mechanism of Solubilization of Neuropathy Target Esterase from Chicken Embryo Brain by Phospholipase A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Seifert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuropathy target esterase is a membrane-bound enzyme linked to organophosphate-induced distal neuropathy. Here we report a tentative mechanism of its solubilization from chicken embryo brains by using phospholipase A2. The enzyme was released from brain membranes after degradation of their structural phospholipids initiated by phospholipase A2. L-α-lysophosphatidylcholine, tested as a representative product of phospholipid hydrolysis, was identified as a new efficient detergent for solubilization of the neuropathy target esterase.

  2. Neuronal process structure and growth proteins are targets of heavy PTM regulation during brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Schwämmle, Veit; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Brain development is a process requiring precise control of many different cell types. One method to achieve this is through specific and temporally regulated modification of proteins in order to alter structure and function. Post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is known...... to have wide-ranging and substantial effects on cellular function, both as part of signalling network modulation and more directly by modifying the function of key proteins. In this study, we show that PTM regulation is differentially targeted at different areas of the proteome, and that cytoskeletal...... provides one of the most comprehensive sets of individual PTM site regulation data for mammalian brain tissue. This will provide a valuable resource for those wishing to perform comparisons or meta-analyses of large scale PTMomic data, as are becoming increasingly common. Furthermore, being focussed...

  3. Antibodies targeted to the brain with image-guided focused ultrasound reduces amyloid-beta plaque load in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F Jordão

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD relies on antibodies directed against toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta, which circulate in the bloodstream and remove Abeta from the brain. In mouse models of AD, the administration of anti-Abeta antibodies directly into the brain, in comparison to the bloodstream, was shown to be more efficient at reducing Abeta plaque pathology. Therefore, delivering anti-Abeta antibodies to the brain of AD patients may also improve treatment efficiency. Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is known to transiently-enhance the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing intravenously administered therapeutics to enter the brain. Our goal was to establish that anti-Abeta antibodies delivered to the brain using magnetic resonance imaging-guided FUS (MRIgFUS can reduce plaque pathology. To test this, TgCRND8 mice received intravenous injections of MRI and FUS contrast agents, as well as anti-Abeta antibody, BAM-10. MRIgFUS was then applied transcranially. Within minutes, the MRI contrast agent entered the brain, and BAM-10 was later found bound to Abeta plaques in targeted cortical areas. Four days post-treatment, Abeta pathology was significantly reduced in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion, this is the first report to demonstrate that MRIgFUS delivery of anti-Abeta antibodies provides the combined advantages of using a low dose of antibody and rapidly reducing plaque pathology.

  4. Reduced brain somatostatin in mood disorders: a common pathophysiological substrate and drug target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun eLin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of affect dysregulation has progressively increased, but the pharmacological treatments remain inadequate. Here, we summarize the current literature on deficits in somatostatin, an inhibitory modulatory neuropeptide, in major depression and other neurological disorders that also include mood disturbances. We focus on direct evidence in the human postmortem brain, and review rodent genetic and pharmacological studies probing the role of the somatostatin system in relation to mood. We also briefly go over pharmacological developments targeting the somatostatin system in peripheral organs and discuss the challenges of targeting the brain somatostatin system. Finally, the fact that somatostatin deficits are frequently observed across neurological disorders suggests a selective cellular vulnerability of somatostatin-expressing neurons. Potential cell intrinsic factors mediating those changes are discussed, including nitric oxide induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, high inflammatory response, high demand for neurotrophic environment, and overall aging processes. Together, based on the co-localization of somatostatin with GABA, its presence in dendritic-targeting GABA neuron subtypes, and its temporal-specific function, we discuss the possibility that deficits in somatostatin play a central role in cortical local inhibitory circuit deficits leading to abnormal corticolimbic network activity and clinical mood symptoms across neurological disorders.

  5. Improved signal processing approaches in an offline simulation of a hybrid brain-computer interface

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner & C.; Allison B.Z.; Krusienski D.J.; Kaiser V.; Muller-Putz G.R.; Pfurtscheller G.; Neuper C.

    2010-01-01

    In a conventional brain–computer interface (BCI) system, users perform mental tasks that yield specific patterns of brain activity. A pattern recognition system determines which brain activity pattern a user is producing and thereby infers the user’s mental task, allowing users to send messages or commands through brain activity alone. Unfortunately, despite extensive research to improve classification accuracy, BCIs almost always exhibit errors, which are sometimes so severe that effective c...

  6. Improving brain-machine interface performance by decoding intended future movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Francis R.; Suminski, Aaron J.; Fagg, Andrew H.; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. A brain-machine interface (BMI) records neural signals in real time from a subject's brain, interprets them as motor commands, and reroutes them to a device such as a robotic arm, so as to restore lost motor function. Our objective here is to improve BMI performance by minimizing the deleterious effects of delay in the BMI control loop. We mitigate the effects of delay by decoding the subject's intended movements a short time lead in the future. Approach. We use the decoded, intended future movements of the subject as the control signal that drives the movement of our BMI. This should allow the user's intended trajectory to be implemented more quickly by the BMI, reducing the amount of delay in the system. In our experiment, a monkey (Macaca mulatta) uses a future prediction BMI to control a simulated arm to hit targets on a screen. Main Results. Results from experiments with BMIs possessing different system delays (100, 200 and 300 ms) show that the monkey can make significantly straighter, faster and smoother movements when the decoder predicts the user's future intent. We also characterize how BMI performance changes as a function of delay, and explore offline how the accuracy of future prediction decoders varies at different time leads. Significance. This study is the first to characterize the effects of control delays in a BMI and to show that decoding the user's future intent can compensate for the negative effect of control delay on BMI performance.

  7. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  8. Surface modified PLGA nanoparticles for brain targeting of Bacoside-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, S; Sowmya, S; Cinu, T A; Aleykutty, N A; Thomas, S; Souto, E B

    2014-10-15

    The present paper focuses on the development and in vitro/in vivo characterization of nanoparticles composed of poly-(D,L)-Lactide-co-Glycolide (PLGA) loading Bacoside-A, as a new approach for the brain delivery of the neuroprotective drug for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer Disease). Bacoside-A-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared via o/w emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Surface of the nanoparticles were modified by coating with polysorbate 80 to facilitate the crossing of the blood brain barrier (BBB), and the processing parameters (i.e. sonication time, the concentration of polymer (PLGA) and surfactant (polysorbate 80), and drug-polymer ratio) were optimized with the aim to achieve a high production yield. Brain targeting potential of the nanoparticles was evaluated by in vivo studies using Wistar albino rats. The nanoparticles produced by optimal formulation were within the nanosized range (70-200 nm) with relatively low polydispersity index (0.391 ± 1.2). The encapsulation efficiency of Bacoside-A in PLGA nanoparticles was 57.11 ± 7.11%, with a drug loading capacity of 20.5 ± 1.98%. SEM images showed the spherical shape of the PLGA nanoparticles, whereas their low crystallinity was demonstrated by X-ray studies, which also confirmed no chemical interactions between the drug and polymer molecules. The in vitro release of Bacoside-A from the PLGA nanoparticles followed a sustained release pattern with a maximum release of up to 83.04 ± 2.55% in 48 h. When compared to pure drug solution (2.56 ± 1.23 μg/g tissue), in vivo study demonstrated higher brain concentration of Bacoside-A (23.94 ± 1.74 μg/g tissue) suggesting a significant role of surface coated nanoparticles on brain targeting. The results indicate the potential of surface modified PLGA nanoparticles for the delivery of Bacoside-A to the brain.

  9. Characterising the Analgesic Effect of Different Targets for Deep Brain Stimulation in Trigeminal Anaesthesia Dolorosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Williams, Hugh P.; Javed, Shazia; Pickering, Anthony E.; Patel, Nikunj K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several deep brain stimulation (DBS) targets have been explored for the alleviation of trigeminal anaesthesia dolorosa. We aimed to characterise the analgesia produced from the periaqueductal grey (PAG) and centromedian-parafascicular (CmPf) nucleus using a within-subject design. Method We report a case series of 3 subjects implanted with PAG and CmPf DBS systems for the treatment of anaesthesia dolorosa. At follow-up, testing of onset and offset times, magnitude, and thermal and mechanical sensitivity was performed. Results The mean pain score of the cohort was acutely reduced by 56% (p effective at different stimulation frequencies and were not antagonistic in effect. Conclusion The mechanisms by which stimulation at these two targets produces analgesia are likely to be different. Certain pain qualities may respond more favourably to specific targets. Knowledge of onset and offset times for the targets can guide optimisation of stimulation settings. The use of more than one stimulation target may be beneficial and should be considered in anaesthesia dolorosa patients. PMID:27322524

  10. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  11. Improved laser applicators for interstitial thermotherapy of brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Goldbach, Thomas; Ulrich, Frank; Schober, Ralf; Kahn, Thomas; Kaufmann, Raimund; Wolbarsht, Myron L.

    1994-05-01

    Interstitial thermotherapy is a new treatment for deep seated brain tumors. To destroy large tissue volumes without adverse effects (vaporization, carbonization) a new laser catheter was developed. The device combines the radiative heating of distant tissue volumes with the conductive cooling of areas close to the optical fiber tip.

  12. Improved Detection of Time Windows of Brain Responses in Fmri Using Modified Temporal Clustering Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) has been proposed recently as a method to detect time windows of brain responses in functional MRI (fMRI) studies when the timing and location of the activation are completely unknown. Modifications to the TCA technique are introduced in this report to further improve the sensitivity in detecting brain activation.

  13. Accuracy and precision of targeting using frameless stereotactic system in deep brain stimulator implantation surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the accuracy of targeting using NexFrame frameless targeting system during deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifty DBS leads were implanted in 33 patients using the NexFrame (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN targeting system. Postoperative thin cut CT scans were used for lead localization. X, Y, Z coordinates of the tip of the lead were calculated and compared with the intended target coordinates to assess the targeting error. Comparative frame-based data set was obtained from randomly selected 33 patients during the same period that underwent 65 lead placements using Leksell stereotactic frame. Euclidean vector was calculated for directional error. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare the accuracy between two systems. Results: The mean error of targeting using frameless system in medio-lateral plane was 1.4 mm (SD ± 1.3, in antero-posterior plane was 0.9 mm (SD ± 1.0 and in supero-inferior plane Z was 1.0 mm (SD ± 0.9. The mean error of targeting using frame-based system in medio-lateral plane was 1.0 mm (SD ± 0.7, in antero-posterior plane was 0.9 mm (SD ± 0.5 and in supero-inferior plane Z was 0.7 mm (SD ± 0.6. The error in targeting was significantly more (P = 0.03 in the medio-lateral plane using the frameless system as compared to the frame-based system. Mean targeting error in the Euclidean directional vector using frameless system was 2.2 (SD ± 1.6 and using frame-based system was 1.7 (SD ± 0.6 (P = 0.07. There was significantly more error in the first 25 leads placed using the frameless system than the second 25 leads (P = 0.0015. Conclusion: The targeting accuracy of the frameless system was lower as compared to frame-based system in the medio-lateral direction. Standard deviations (SDs were higher using frameless system as compared to the frame-based system indicating lower accuracy of this system. Error in targeting should be considered while using frameless

  14. Brain-targeted delivery of trans-activating transcriptor-conjugated magnetic PLGA/lipid nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangru Wen

    Full Text Available Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG-NH2, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES, naringin (NAR, and glutathione (GSH were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10% and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%. The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain.

  15. GLP-1 improves neuropathology after murine cold lesion brain trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Hempel, Casper; Johansen, Flemming Fryd;

    2014-01-01

    cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway in the brain in vivo, and whether activation leads to observable increases in protective, anti-neurodegenerative proteins. Finally, we report the first use of a highly sensitive in vivo imaging agent to assess reactive species generation after...... brain trauma. METHODS: Severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion in mice and thereafter treated with vehicle, liraglutide, or liraglutide + GLP-1 receptor antagonist. A therapeutic window was established and lesion size post-trauma was determined. Reactive oxygen species were visualized...... the GLP-1 receptor. Reactive species generation was reduced by ∼40-60%. Necrotic and apoptotic tone maintained similar to sham in diseased animals with Lira treatment. Phosphorylation of CREB was markedly increased by Lira in a GLP-1 receptor-dependent manner. CREB-regulated cytoprotective and anti-neurodegenerative...

  16. Deep brain stimulation and ablation for obsessive compulsive disorder: evolution of contemporary indications, targets and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Travis S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Stanford, Arielle D; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Surgical therapy for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) remains an effective option for well-selected patients managed within a multidisciplinary setting. Historically, lesions within the limbic system have been used to control both obsessive thoughts and repetitive compulsions associated with this disease. We discuss classical targets as well as contemporary neuromodulatory approaches that have been shown to provide symptomatic relief. Recently, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior limb of the internal capsule/ventral striatum received Conformité Européene (CE) mark and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals for treatment of intractable OCD. Remarkably, this is the first such approval for neurosurgical intervention in a strictly psychiatric indication in modern times. This target is discussed in detail along with alternative targets currently being proposed. We close with a discussion of gamma knife capsulotomy, a modality with deep historical roots. Further directions in the surgical treatment of OCD will require better preoperative predictors of postoperative responses, optimal selection of individualized targets, and rigorous reporting of adverse events and standardized outcomes. To meet these challenges, centers must be equipped with a multidisciplinary team and patient-centered approach to ensure adequate screening and follow up of patients with this difficult-to-treat condition. PMID:24099662

  17. Visual encoding and fixation target selection in free viewing: presaccadic brain potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Andrey R.; Jurica, Peter; Nakatani, Chie; Plomp, Gijs; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2013-01-01

    In scrutinizing a scene, the eyes alternate between fixations and saccades. During a fixation, two component processes can be distinguished: visual encoding and selection of the next fixation target. We aimed to distinguish the neural correlates of these processes in the electrical brain activity prior to a saccade onset. Participants viewed color photographs of natural scenes, in preparation for a change detection task. Then, for each participant and each scene we computed an image heat map, with temperature representing the duration and density of fixations. The temperature difference between the start and end points of saccades was taken as a measure of the expected task-relevance of the information concentrated in specific regions of a scene. Visual encoding was evaluated according to whether subsequent change was correctly detected. Saccades with larger temperature difference were more likely to be followed by correct detection than ones with smaller temperature differences. The amplitude of presaccadic activity over anterior brain areas was larger for correct detection than for detection failure. This difference was observed for short “scrutinizing” but not for long “explorative” saccades, suggesting that presaccadic activity reflects top-down saccade guidance. Thus, successful encoding requires local scanning of scene regions which are expected to be task-relevant. Next, we evaluated fixation target selection. Saccades “moving up” in temperature were preceded by presaccadic activity of higher amplitude than those “moving down”. This finding suggests that presaccadic activity reflects attention deployed to the following fixation location. Our findings illustrate how presaccadic activity can elucidate concurrent brain processes related to the immediate goal of planning the next saccade and the larger-scale goal of constructing a robust representation of the visual scene. PMID:23818877

  18. Organophosphates induce distal axonal damage, but not brain oedema, by inactivating neuropathy target esterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single doses of organophosphorus compounds (OP) which covalently inhibit neuropathy target esterase (NTE) can induce lower-limb paralysis and distal damage in long nerve axons. Clinical signs of neuropathy are evident 3 weeks post-OP dose in humans, cats and chickens. By contrast, clinical neuropathy in mice following acute dosing with OPs or any other toxic compound has never been reported. Moreover, dosing mice with ethyloctylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF) - an extremely potent NTE inhibitor - causes a different (subacute) neurotoxicity with brain oedema. These observations have raised the possibility that mice are intrinsically resistant to neuropathies induced by acute toxic insult, but may incur brain oedema, rather than distal axonal damage, when NTE is inactivated. Here we provide the first report that hind-limb dysfunction and extensive axonal damage can occur in mice 3 weeks after acute dosing with a toxic compound, bromophenylacetylurea. Three weeks after acutely dosing mice with neuropathic OPs no clinical signs were observed, but distal lesions were present in the longest spinal sensory axons. Similar lesions were evident in undosed nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice in which NTE had been genetically-deleted from neural tissue. The extent of OP-induced axonal damage in mice was related to the duration of NTE inactivation and, as reported in chickens, was promoted by post-dosing with phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. However, phenyldipentylphosphinate, another promoting compound in chickens, itself induced in mice lesions different from the neuropathic OP type. Finally, EOPF induced subacute neurotoxicity with brain oedema in both wild-type and nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice indicating that the molecular target for this effect is not neural NTE.

  19. Visual encoding and fixation target selection in free viewing: presaccadic brain potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey R Nikolaev

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In scrutinizing a scene, the eyes alternate between fixations and saccades. During a fixation, two component processes can be distinguished: visual encoding and selection of the next fixation target. We aimed to distinguish the neural correlates of these processes in the electrical brain activity prior to a saccade onset. Participants viewed color photographs of natural scenes, in preparation for a change detection task. Then, for each participant and each scene we computed an image heat map, with temperature representing the duration and density of fixations. The temperature difference between the start and end points of saccades was taken as a measure of the expected task-relevance of the information concentrated in specific regions of a scene. Visual encoding was evaluated according to whether subsequent change was correctly detected. Saccades with larger temperature difference were more likely to be followed by correct detection than ones with smaller temperature differences. The amplitude of presaccadic activity over anterior brain areas was larger for correct detection than for detection failure. This difference was observed for short scrutinizing but not for long explorative saccades, suggesting that presaccadic activity reflects top-down saccade guidance. Thus, successful encoding requires local scanning of scene regions which are expected to be task-relevant. Next, we evaluated fixation target selection. Saccades moving up in temperature were preceded by presaccadic activity of higher amplitude than those moving down. This finding suggests that presaccadic activity reflects attention deployed to the following fixation location. Our findings illustrate how presaccadic activity can elucidate concurrent brain processes related to the immediate goal of planning the next saccade and the larger-scale goal of constructing a robust representation of the visual scene.

  20. Brain targeted nanoparticulate drug delivery system of rasagiline via intranasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Deepti; Md, Shadab; Hasan, Quamrul; Fazil, Mohammad; Ali, Asgar; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and evaluate a rasagiline-loaded chitosan glutamate nanoparticles (RAS-CG-NPs) by ionic gelation of CG with tripolyphosphate anions (TPP). RAS-loaded CG-NPs were characterized for particle size, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. The mean particles size, polydispersity index (PDI) and encapsulation efficiency was found to be 151.1 ± 10.31, 0.380 ± 0.01 and 96.43 ± 4.23, respectively. Biodistribution of RAS formulations in the brain and blood of mice following intranasal (i.n.) and intravenous (i.v.) administration was performed using HPLC analytical method. The drug concentrations in brain following the i.n. of CG-NPs were found to be significantly higher at all the time points compared to both drug (i.n.) and drug CG-NPs (i.v.). The Cmax (999.25 ng/ml) and AUC (2086.60 ng h/ml) of formulation CG-NPs (i.n) were found to be significantly higher than CG-NPs (i.v.) and RAS solution (i.n.). The direct transport percentage (DTP%) values of RAS-loaded CG-NPs (i.n.) as compared to drug solution (i.n.) increased from 66.27 ± 1.8 to 69.27 ± 2.1%. The results showed significant enhancement of bioavailability in brain, after administration of the RAS-loaded CG-NPs which could be a substantial achievement of direct nose to brain targeting in Parkinson's disease therapy.

  1. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  2. High-resolution anatomy of the human brain stem using 7-T MRI: improved detection of inner structures and nerves?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R. [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Maderwald, Stefan [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Linn, Jennifer; Bochmann, Katja [LMU Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Dassinger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Neuroradiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Giessen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ladd, Mark E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Departments of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the value of 7 Tesla (7 T) MRI for the depiction of brain stem and cranial nerve (CN) anatomy. Six volunteers were examined at 7 T using high-resolution SWI, MPRAGE, MP2RAGE, 3D SPACE T2, T2, and PD images to establish scanning parameters targeted at optimizing spatial resolution. Direct comparisons between 3 and 7 T were performed in two additional subjects using the finalized sequences (3 T: T2, PD, MPRAGE, SWAN; 7 T: 3D T2, MPRAGE, SWI, MP2RAGE). Artifacts and the depiction of structures were evaluated by two neuroradiologists using a standardized score sheet. Sequences could be established for high-resolution 7 T imaging even in caudal cranial areas. High in-plane resolution T2, PD, and SWI images provided depiction of inner brain stem structures such as pons fibers, raphe, reticular formation, nerve roots, and periaqueductal gray. MPRAGE and MP2RAGE provided clear depiction of the CNs. 3D T2 images improved depiction of inner brain structure in comparison to T2 images at 3 T. Although the 7-T SWI sequence provided improved contrast to some inner structures, extended areas were influenced by artifacts due to image disturbances from susceptibility differences. Seven-tesla imaging of basal brain areas is feasible and might have significant impact on detection and diagnosis in patients with specific diseases, e.g., trigeminal pain related to affection of the nerve root. Some inner brain stem structures can be depicted at 3 T, but certain sequences at 7 T, in particular 3D SPACE T2, are superior in producing anatomical in vivo images of deep brain stem structures. (orig.)

  3. An Improved Image Mining Technique For Brain Tumour Classification Using Efficient Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Rajendran, P

    2010-01-01

    An improved image mining technique for brain tumor classification using pruned association rule with MARI algorithm is presented in this paper. The method proposed makes use of association rule mining technique to classify the CT scan brain images into three categories namely normal, benign and malign. It combines the low level features extracted from images and high level knowledge from specialists. The developed algorithm can assist the physicians for efficient classification with multiple keywords per image to improve the accuracy. The experimental result on prediagnosed database of brain images showed 96 percent and 93 percent sensitivity and accuracy respectively.

  4. Does Inflation Targeting Improve Fiscal Discipline? An Empirical Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Tapsoba, René

    2011-01-01

    Based on panel data of 58 countries, of which 22 Inflation Targeters and 36 non Inflation Targeters, over the period 1980-2003, this paper highlights the effect of Inflation Targeting – IT- on Fiscal Discipline –FD-. We make four contributions to the literature. Firstly, by applying the 2SLS on the data, we estimate the effect of IT on central government FD as measured by Structural Primary Fiscal Balances. Secondly, we found that the effect of IT on FD takes place only on the Developing Coun...

  5. Brain targeted delivery of carmustine using solid lipid nanoparticles modified with tamoxifen and lactoferrin for antitumor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Cheng, Shih-Jue

    2016-02-29

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) conjugated with tamoxifen (TX) and lactoferrin (Lf) were applied to carry anticancer carmustine (BCNU) across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for enhanced antiproliferation against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). BCNU-loaded SLNs with modified TX and Lf (TX-Lf-BCNU-SLNs) were used to penetrate a monolayer of human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and human astrocytes and to target malignant U87MG cells. The surface TX and Lf on TX-Lf-BCNU-SLNs improved the characteristics of sustained release for BCNU. When compared with BCNU-loaded SLNs, TX-Lf-BCNU-SLNs increased the BBB permeability coefficient for BCNU about ten times. In addition, TX-BCNU-SLNs considerably promoted the fluorescent intensity of intracellular acetomethoxy derivative of calcein (calcein-AM) in HBMECs via endocytosis. However, the conjugated Lf could only slightly increase the fluorescence of calcein-AM. Moreover, the order of formulation in the inhibition to U87MG cells was TX-Lf-BCNU-SLNs>TX-BCNU-SLNs>Lf-BCNU-SLNs>BCNU-SLNs. TX-Lf-BCNU-SLNs can be effective in infiltrating the BBB and delivering BCNU to GBM for future chemotherapy application. PMID:26721730

  6. A Simple and Efficient Methodology To Improve Geometric Accuracy in Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery: Implementation in Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaiskos, Pantelis, E-mail: pkaraisk@med.uoa.gr [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Gamma Knife Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Roussakis, Arkadios [CT and MRI Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Torrens, Michael [Gamma Knife Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Seimenis, Ioannis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. Methods and Materials: The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, “average” image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (<2 cm) metastases treated with GK radiation surgery. Results: Phantom study results showed that use of average MR images eliminates the effect of sequence-dependent distortions, leading to a total spatial uncertainty of less than 0.3 mm, attributed mainly to gradient nonlinearities. In brain metastases patients, non-eliminated sequence-dependent distortions lead to target localization uncertainties of up to 1.3 mm (mean: 0.51 ± 0.37 mm) with respect to the corresponding target locations in the “average” MRI series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets.

  7. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical pr

  8. An Improved GLRT Method for Target Detection in SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yingyun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic ground vehicle detection based on SAR imagery is one of the important military applications of SAR. A region-based generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT method is proposed in this paper, and this method combines the GLRT detection theory and image segmentation technology. First, the SAR imagery is roughly segmented as land clutter region and potential target region through the split and merge procedure often used for processing the original images. Then, based on the segmentation results, the reasonable statistical models for the data in the two regions are built respectively. Finally, with the knowledge of statistical characteristics of clutter and target, GLRT detection method is applied to the each pixel in the potential target region to obtain more accurate detection results. Experimental results based on real SAR data show that the proposed method can effectively detect the ground vehicle targets from the land clutter with excellent accuracy and speed.

  9. Saponins as tool for improved targeted tumor therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H; Bachran, D; Panjideh, H; Schellmann, N; Weng, A; Melzig, M F; Sutherland, M; Bachran, C

    2009-02-01

    Saponins are plant glycosides that consist of a steroid, steroid alkaloid or triterpenoid aglycone and one or more sugar chains that are covalently linked by glycosidic binding to the aglycone. Glucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, xylose and rhamnose are commonly bound monosaccharides. Saponins are found in all organs of a variety of higher plants. Due to the great variability of their structures, diverse functions have been described for distinct saponins; including foaming and pore forming properties as well as selective removal of protozoa from the rumen. The most interesting properties are, however, favorable anti-tumorigenic effects. Several saponins inhibit tumor cell growth by cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with half maximal inhibitory concentrations of down to 0.2 microM. A drawback of saponins in tumor therapy is the non-targeted spreading throughout the whole body. Surprisingly, certain saponins were identified that drastically enhance the efficacy of targeted chimeric toxins bearing the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin as cell-killing moiety. It was demonstrated that this effect is substantially more pronounced on target cells than on non-target cells, thus not only preserving the target specificity of the chimeric toxin but also broadening the therapeutic window with simultaneous dose lowering. This review describes the role of saponins as drug in general, their use as single drug treatment in tumor therapy, their combination with conventional tumor treatment strategies and the synergistic effects with particular targeted tumor therapies that are based on recombinant proteins. PMID:19199910

  10. Targeted liposomes for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooy, I.

    2011-01-01

    Our brain is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This barrier is formed by specialized endothelial cells of the brain vasculature and prevents toxic substances from entering the brain. The downside of this barrier is that many drugs that have been developed to cure brain diseases cannot cros

  11. [Targeting the brain through the nose. Effects of intranasally administered insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brünner, Y F; Benedict, C; Freiherr, J

    2013-08-01

    The assumption that the human brain is an insulin-independent organ was disproved with the discovery of insulin receptors in the central nervous system in the year 1978. Evidence has been provided for a high density of insulin receptors in brain regions responsible for cognitive memory processes (hippocampus) and for the regulation of appetite (hypothalamus). Accordingly, in animal studies an increased insulin level in the central nervous system leads to an improvement of hippocampal memory function and a decrease of food intake. Similar results were obtained in humans using the method of intranasal administration of insulin. Intranasal insulin reaches the brain and the cerebrospinal fluid via the olfactory epithelium and olfactory nerve fiber bundles leading through the lamina cribrosa to the olfactory bulb. Thus, this method renders the investigation of specific insulin effects in humans possible. The therapeutic potential of an intranasal insulin administration for the treatment of diseases for which an imbalance of the central nervous insulin metabolism is discussed (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, diabetes mellitus and obesity) can only be estimated with the help of further clinical studies. PMID:23760596

  12. Improving your target-template alignment with MODalign.

    KAUST Repository

    Barbato, Alessandro

    2012-02-04

    SUMMARY: MODalign is an interactive web-based tool aimed at helping protein structure modelers to inspect and manually modify the alignment between the sequences of a target protein and of its template(s). It interactively computes, displays and, upon modification of the target-template alignment, updates the multiple sequence alignments of the two protein families, their conservation score, secondary structure and solvent accessibility values, and local quality scores of the implied three-dimensional model(s). Although it has been designed to simplify the target-template alignment step in modeling, it is suitable for all cases where a sequence alignment needs to be inspected in the context of other biological information. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: Freely available on the web at http://modorama.biocomputing.it/modalign. Website implemented in HTML and JavaScript with all major browsers supported. CONTACT: jan.kosinski@uniroma1.it.

  13. Early initiation of prophylactic heparin in severe traumatic brain injury is associated with accelerated improvement on brain imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Venous thromboembolic prophylaxis (VTEp is often delayed following traumatic brain injury (TBI, yet animal data suggest that it may reduce cerebral inflammation and improve cognitive recovery. We hypothesized that earlier VTEp initiation in severe TBI patients would result in more rapid neurologic recovery and reduced progression of brain injury on radiologic imaging. Study Design: Medical charts of severe TBI patients admitted to a level 1 trauma center in 2009-2010 were queried for admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, head Abbreviated Injury Scale, Injury Severity Score (ISS, osmotherapy use, emergency neurosurgery, and delay to VTEp initiation. Progression (+1 = better, 0 = no change, −1 = worse of brain injury on head CTs and neurologic exam (by bedside MD, nurse was collected from patient charts. Head CT scan Marshall scores were calculated from the initial head CT results. Results: A total of 22, 34, and 19 patients received VTEp at early (5 days time intervals, respectively. Clinical and radiologic brain injury characteristics on admission were similar among the three groups (P > 0.05, but ISS was greatest in the early group (P < 0.05. Initial head CT Marshall scores were similar in early and late groups. The slowest progression of brain injury on repeated head CT scans was in the early VTEp group up to 10 days after admission. Conclusion: Early initiation of prophylactic heparin in severe TBI is not associated with deterioration neurologic exam and may result in less progression of injury on brain imaging. Possible neuroprotective effects of heparin in humans need further investigation.

  14. Improving Global Multi-target Tracking with Local Updates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Anton; Gade, Rikke; Dick, Anthony;

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme to explicitly detect and resolve ambiguous situations in multiple target tracking. During periods of uncertainty, our method applies multiple local single target trackers to hypothesise short term tracks. These tracks are combined with the tracks obtained by a global multi-tar......, which in turn leads to superior per- formance on several challenging benchmark sequences. Additionally, we show tracking results in sports videos where poor video quality and fre- quent and severe occlusions between multiple players pose difficulties for state-of-the-art trackers....

  15. Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery of High Molecular Weight Molecules in Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Salvalaio

    Full Text Available Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSDs are a group of metabolic syndromes, each one due to the deficit of one lysosomal enzyme. Many LSDs affect most of the organ systems and overall about 75% of the patients present neurological impairment. Enzyme Replacement Therapy, although determining some systemic clinical improvements, is ineffective on the CNS disease, due to enzymes' inability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB. With the aim to deliver the therapeutic enzymes across the BBB, we here assayed biodegradable and biocompatible PLGA-nanoparticles (NPs in two murine models for LSDs, Mucopolysaccharidosis type I and II (MPS I and MPS II. PLGA-NPs were modified with a 7-aminoacid glycopeptide (g7, yet demonstrated to be able to deliver low molecular weight (MW molecules across the BBB in rodents. We specifically investigated, for the first time, the g7-NPs ability to transfer a model drug (FITC-albumin with a high MW, comparable to the enzymes to be delivered for LSDs brain therapy. In vivo experiments, conducted on wild-type mice and knockout mouse models for MPS I and II, also included a whole series of control injections to obtain a broad preliminary view of the procedure efficiency. Results clearly showed efficient BBB crossing of albumin in all injected mice, underlying the ability of NPs to deliver high MW molecules to the brain. These results encourage successful experiments with enzyme-loaded g7-NPs to deliver sufficient amounts of the drug to the brain district on LSDs, where exerting a corrective effect on the pathological phenotype.

  16. Improved Classification Methods for Brain Computer Interface System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Fang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI aims at providing a new communication way without brain’s normal output through nerve and muscle. The electroencephalography (EEG has been widely used for BCI system because it is a non-invasive approach. For the EEG signals of left and right hand motor imagery, the event-related desynchronization (ERD and event-related synchronization(ERS are used as classification features in this paper. The raw data are transformed by nonlinear methods and classified by Fisher classifier. Compared with the linear methods, the classification accuracy can get an obvious increase to 86.25%. Two different nonlinear transform were arised and one of them is under the consideration of the relativity of two channels of EEG signals. With these nonlinear transform, the performance are also stable with the balance of two misclassifications.

  17. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete t...

  18. Plausible antioxidant biomechanics and anticonvulsant pharmacological activity of brain-targeted β-carotene nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Yusuf,1 Riaz A Khan,3 Maria Khan,2 Bahar Ahmed11Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 2Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India; 3Department of Chemistry, Manav Rachna International University, National Capital Region, Aravali Hills, Faridabad, IndiaAbstract: β-Carotene has been established as a known free radical scavenger with chain-breaking antioxidant properties. It has been documented for the treatment of epileptic convulsions at a 200 mg/kg body weight dose. The reported pathogenesis for epileptic convulsions is oxidative stress. Hence, experimental epileptic convulsions via oxidative stress was induced in albino mice epileptic models (maximal electroshock seizure and pentylenetetrazole [PTZ]. A dose concentration equivalent to 2 mg/kg was efficaciously administered in the form of brain-targeted polysorbate-80-coated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and further characterized for their physical parameters, in-vitro release kinetics, and in-vivo brain release via various standard methods. Normal β-carotene nanoparticles (BCNP and polysorbate-80-coated β-carotene nanoparticles (P-80-BCNP of 169.8 ± 4.8 nm and 176.3 ± 3.2 nm in size, respectively, were formulated and characterized. Their zeta potential and polydispersity index were subsequently evaluated after 5 months of storage to confirm stability. In vivo activity results showed that a 2 mg unformulated β-carotene dose was ineffective as an anticonvulsant. However, salutary response was reported from BCNP at the same dose, as the hind limb duration decreased significantly in maximal electroshock seizure to 9.30 ± 0.86 seconds, which further decreased with polysorbate-80 coating to 2.10 ± 1.16 seconds as compared to normal control (15.8 ± 1.49 seconds and placebo control (16.50 ± 1.43 seconds. In the PTZ model, the duration of

  19. Robust improvement of target resolution in azimuth and range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruggiano, M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses the development of a robust processing technique aimed at resolving and unmasking targets, in range and azimuth, embedded in the received signal of a single and monostatic rotating surveillance radar. The reason for the need of such technique is twofold. Firstly, there are seve

  20. Clinical improvement in psoriasis with specific targeting of interleukin-23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tamara; Riedl, Elisabeth; Bangert, Christine;

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that affects approximately 2-3% of the population worldwide and has severe effects on patients' physical and psychological well-being. The discovery that psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease has led to more targeted, effective therapies; recent...

  1. Review of transcranial photobiomodulation for major depressive disorder: targeting brain metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Paolo; Petrie, Samuel R; Hamblin, Michael R; Henderson, Theodore A; Iosifescu, Dan V

    2016-07-01

    We examined the use of near-infrared and red radiation (photobiomodulation, PBM) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). While still experimental, preliminary data on the use of PBM for brain disorders are promising. PBM is low-cost with potential for wide dissemination; further research on PBM is sorely needed. We found clinical and preclinical studies via PubMed search (2015), using the following keywords: "near-infrared radiation," "NIR," "low-level light therapy," "low-level laser therapy," or "LLLT" plus "depression." We chose clinically focused studies and excluded studies involving near-infrared spectroscopy. In addition, we used PubMed to find articles that examine the link between PBM and relevant biological processes including metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis. Studies suggest the processes aforementioned are potentially effective targets for PBM to treat depression. There is also clinical preliminary evidence suggesting the efficacy of PBM in treating MDD, and comorbid anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation, and traumatic brain injury. Based on the data collected to date, PBM appears to be a promising treatment for depression that is safe and well-tolerated. However, large randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish the safety and effectiveness of this new treatment for MDD. PMID:26989758

  2. Review of transcranial photobiomodulation for major depressive disorder: targeting brain metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Paolo; Petrie, Samuel R; Hamblin, Michael R; Henderson, Theodore A; Iosifescu, Dan V

    2016-07-01

    We examined the use of near-infrared and red radiation (photobiomodulation, PBM) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). While still experimental, preliminary data on the use of PBM for brain disorders are promising. PBM is low-cost with potential for wide dissemination; further research on PBM is sorely needed. We found clinical and preclinical studies via PubMed search (2015), using the following keywords: "near-infrared radiation," "NIR," "low-level light therapy," "low-level laser therapy," or "LLLT" plus "depression." We chose clinically focused studies and excluded studies involving near-infrared spectroscopy. In addition, we used PubMed to find articles that examine the link between PBM and relevant biological processes including metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis. Studies suggest the processes aforementioned are potentially effective targets for PBM to treat depression. There is also clinical preliminary evidence suggesting the efficacy of PBM in treating MDD, and comorbid anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation, and traumatic brain injury. Based on the data collected to date, PBM appears to be a promising treatment for depression that is safe and well-tolerated. However, large randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish the safety and effectiveness of this new treatment for MDD.

  3. Current strategies for targeted delivery of bio-active drug molecules in the treatment of brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tarun; Bhandari, Saurav; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    Brain tumor is one of the most challenging diseases to treat. The major obstacle in the specific drug delivery to brain is blood-brain barrier (BBB). Mostly available anti-cancer drugs are large hydrophobic molecules which have limited permeability via BBB. Therefore, it is clear that the protective barriers confining the passage of the foreign particles into the brain are the main impediment for the brain drug delivery. Hence, the major challenge in drug development and delivery for the neurological diseases is to design non-invasive nanocarrier systems that can assist controlled and targeted drug delivery to the specific regions of the brain. In this review article, our major focus to treat brain tumor by study numerous strategies includes intracerebral implants, BBB disruption, intraventricular infusion, convection-enhanced delivery, intra-arterial drug delivery, intrathecal drug delivery, injection, catheters, pumps, microdialysis, RNA interference, antisense therapy, gene therapy, monoclonal/cationic antibodies conjugate, endogenous transporters, lipophilic analogues, prodrugs, efflux transporters, direct conjugation of antitumor drugs, direct targeting of liposomes, nanoparticles, solid-lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers and albumin-based drug carriers.

  4. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A MacDiarmid

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers.EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973. No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs.Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of

  5. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDiarmid, Jennifer A.; Langova, Veronika; Bailey, Dale; Pattison, Scott T.; Pattison, Stacey L.; Christensen, Neil; Armstrong, Luke R.; Brahmbhatt, Vatsala N.; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Harrison, Matthew T.; Costa, Marylia; Mugridge, Nancy B.; Sedliarou, Ilya; Grimes, Nicholas A.; Kiss, Debra L.; Stillman, Bruce; Hann, Christine L.; Gallia, Gary L.; Graham, Robert M.; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox) to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers. Methodology/Principle Findings EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry) and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume) were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973). No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs). Conclusions/Significance Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On

  6. Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration with funnel-shaped-hole target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Da Peng; Li, Yu Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration using a funnel-shaped-hole target is demonstrated through particle simulations. When an intense short pulse laser illuminates a thin foil target with a hole at the rear surface, the proton beam divergence is suppressed compared with that obtained in a traditional flat target. In this paper, a funnel-shaped-hole target is proposed to improve the proton beam quality. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, three different shapes of target (funnel-shaped-hole target, cylinder-shaped-hole target and flat target) are simulated and compared. The funnel-shaped hole in the rear surface of the target helps to focus the electron cloud significantly and improve the maximum proton energy and suppress the proton beam divergence. Different thicknesses of the new target are also simulated, and the effects of thickness on the divergence angle and proton spectra are investigated. The optimal size of the new target is obtained and the quality of the proton beam is improved significantly. The funnel-shaped-hole target serves as a new method to improve the proton beam quality in laser-plasma interactions.

  7. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with epidermal growth factor (SPION–EGF for targeting brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevtsov MA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxim A Shevtsov,1,2 Boris P Nikolaev,3 Ludmila Y Yakovleva,3 Yaroslav Y Marchenko,3 Anatolii V Dobrodumov,4 Anastasiya L Mikhrina,5 Marina G Martynova,1 Olga A Bystrova,1 Igor V Yakovenko,2 Alexander M Ischenko31Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, 2AL Polenov Russian Scientific Research Institute of Neurosurgery, 3Research Institute of Highly Pure Biopreparations, 4Institute of Macromolecular Compounds of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, 5IM Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, St Petersburg, RussiaAbstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs conjugated with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (SPION–EGF were studied as a potential agent for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement of malignant brain tumors. Synthesized conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry. The interaction of SPION–EGF conjugates with cells was analyzed in a C6 glioma cell culture. The distribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in an orthotopic model of C6 gliomas. SPION–EGF nanosuspensions had the properties of a negative contrast agent with high coefficients of relaxation efficiency. In vitro studies of SPION–EGF nanoparticles showed high intracellular incorporation and the absence of a toxic influence on C6 cell viability and proliferation. Intravenous administration of SPION–EGF conjugates in animals provided receptor-mediated targeted delivery across the blood–brain barrier and tumor retention of the nanoparticles; this was more efficient than with unconjugated SPIONs. The accumulation of conjugates in the glioma was revealed as hypotensive zones on T2-weighted images with a twofold reduction in T2 relaxation time in comparison to unconjugated SPIONs (P<0.001. SPION

  8. Plausible antioxidant biomechanics and anticonvulsant pharmacological activity of brain-targeted β-carotene nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohammad; Khan, Riaz A; Khan, Maria; Ahmed, Bahar

    2012-01-01

    β-Carotene has been established as a known free radical scavenger with chain-breaking antioxidant properties. It has been documented for the treatment of epileptic convulsions at a 200 mg/kg body weight dose. The reported pathogenesis for epileptic convulsions is oxidative stress. Hence, experimental epileptic convulsions via oxidative stress was induced in albino mice epileptic models (maximal electroshock seizure and pentylenetetrazole [PTZ]). A dose concentration equivalent to 2 mg/kg was efficaciously administered in the form of brain-targeted polysorbate-80-coated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and further characterized for their physical parameters, in-vitro release kinetics, and in-vivo brain release via various standard methods. Normal β-carotene nanoparticles (BCNP) and polysorbate-80-coated β-carotene nanoparticles (P-80-BCNP) of 169.8 ± 4.8 nm and 176.3 ± 3.2 nm in size, respectively, were formulated and characterized. Their zeta potential and polydispersity index were subsequently evaluated after 5 months of storage to confirm stability. In vivo activity results showed that a 2 mg unformulated β-carotene dose was ineffective as an anticonvulsant. However, salutary response was reported from BCNP at the same dose, as the hind limb duration decreased significantly in maximal electroshock seizure to 9.30 ± 0.86 seconds, which further decreased with polysorbate-80 coating to 2.10 ± 1.16 seconds as compared to normal control (15.8 ± 1.49 seconds) and placebo control (16.50 ± 1.43 seconds). In the PTZ model, the duration of general tonic-clonic seizures reduced significantly to 2.90 ± 0.98 seconds by the use of BCNP and was further reduced on P-80-BCNP to 1.20 ± 0.20 seconds as compared to PTZ control and PTZ-placebo control (8.09 ± 0.26 seconds). General tonic-clonic seizures latency was increased significantly to 191.0 ± 9.80 seconds in BCNP and was further

  9. Rapid-releasing of HI-6 via brain-targeted mesoporous silica nanoparticles for nerve agent detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Fan, Lixue; Wang, Feijian; Luo, Yuan; Sui, Xin; Li, Wanhua; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yongan

    2016-05-01

    The toxic nerve agent (NA) soman is the most toxic artificially synthesized compound that can rapidly penetrate into the brain and irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, leading to immediate death. However, there are currently few brain-targeted nanodrugs that can treat acute chemical brain poisoning owing to the limited drug-releasing speed. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a nanodrug against NA toxicity that has high blood-brain barrier penetration and is capable of rapid drug release. Transferrin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TF-MSNs) were conjugated with the known AChE reactivator HI-6. This nanodrug rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier in zebrafish and mice and restored cerebral AChE activity via the released HI-6, preventing the brain damage caused by soman poisoning and increasing the survival rate in mice. Furthermore, there was no toxicity associated with the MSNs in mice or rats. These results demonstrate that TF-MSNs loaded with HI-6 represent the most effective antidote against NA poisoning by soman reported to date, and suggest that MSNs are a safe alternative to conventional drugs and an optimal nanocarrier for treating brain poisoning, which requires acute pulse cerebral administration.The toxic nerve agent (NA) soman is the most toxic artificially synthesized compound that can rapidly penetrate into the brain and irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, leading to immediate death. However, there are currently few brain-targeted nanodrugs that can treat acute chemical brain poisoning owing to the limited drug-releasing speed. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a nanodrug against NA toxicity that has high blood-brain barrier penetration and is capable of rapid drug release. Transferrin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (TF-MSNs) were conjugated with the known AChE reactivator HI-6. This nanodrug rapidly penetrated the blood-brain barrier in zebrafish and

  10. Marketing Educational Improvements via International Partnerships under Brain Drain Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Weslynne; Wagman, Liad

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamics in an educational partnership between a university and a developing region. We examine how the university achieves its goals to improve and advertise its offerings while recruiting a cohort of students from the developing region and maintaining a sustainable relationship with the region and its students. We show that mutually…

  11. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Basolateral Amygdala: Targeting Technique and Electrodiagnostic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Chen, James W Y; Koek, Ralph J; Sultzer, David L; Mandelkern, Mark A; Schwartz, Holly N; Krahl, Scott E

    2016-01-01

    The amygdala plays a critical role in emotion regulation. It could prove to be an effective neuromodulation target in the treatment of psychiatric conditions characterized by failure of extinction. We aim to describe our targeting technique, and intra-operative and post-operative electrodiagnostic findings associated with the placement of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes in the amygdala. We used a transfrontal approach to implant DBS electrodes in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLn) of a patient suffering from severe post-traumatic stress disorder. We used microelectrode recording (MER) and awake intra-operative neurostimulation to assist with the placement. Post-operatively, the patient underwent monthly surveillance electroencephalograms (EEG). MER predicted the trajectory of the electrode through the amygdala. The right BLn showed a higher spike frequency than the left BLn. Intra-operative neurostimulation of the BLn elicited pleasant memories. The monthly EEG showed the presence of more sleep patterns over time with DBS. BLn DBS electrodes can be placed using a transfrontal approach. MER can predict the trajectory of the electrode in the amygdala and it may reflect the BLn neuronal activity underlying post-traumatic stress disorder PTSD. The EEG findings may underscore the reduction in anxiety. PMID:27517963

  12. Brain training game improves executive functions and processing speed in the elderly: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Nouchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The beneficial effects of brain training games are expected to transfer to other cognitive functions, but these beneficial effects are poorly understood. Here we investigate the impact of the brain training game (Brain Age on cognitive functions in the elderly. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-two elderly volunteers were recruited through an advertisement in the local newspaper and randomly assigned to either of two game groups (Brain Age, Tetris. This study was completed by 14 of the 16 members in the Brain Age group and 14 of the 16 members in the Tetris group. To maximize the benefit of the interventions, all participants were non-gamers who reported playing less than one hour of video games per week over the past 2 years. Participants in both the Brain Age and the Tetris groups played their game for about 15 minutes per day, at least 5 days per week, for 4 weeks. Each group played for a total of about 20 days. Measures of the cognitive functions were conducted before and after training. Measures of the cognitive functions fell into four categories (global cognitive status, executive functions, attention, and processing speed. Results showed that the effects of the brain training game were transferred to executive functions and to processing speed. However, the brain training game showed no transfer effect on any global cognitive status nor attention. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that playing Brain Age for 4 weeks could lead to improve cognitive functions (executive functions and processing speed in the elderly. This result indicated that there is a possibility which the elderly could improve executive functions and processing speed in short term training. The results need replication in large samples. Long-term effects and relevance for every-day functioning remain uncertain as yet. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN Clinical Trial Registry 000002825.

  13. Infrared target recognition based on improved joint local ternary pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junding; Wu, Xiaosheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a simple, efficient, yet robust approach, named joint orthogonal combination of local ternary pattern, for automatic forward-looking infrared target recognition. It gives more advantages to describe the macroscopic textures and microscopic textures by fusing variety of scales than the traditional LBP-based methods. In addition, it can effectively reduce the feature dimensionality. Further, the rotation invariant and uniform scheme, the robust LTP, and soft concave-convex partition are introduced to enhance its discriminative power. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve competitive results compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  14. Improving cancer immunotherapy by targeting the STATe of MDSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Nienke; de Koning, Coco; Spilgies, Lisanne; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Hato, Stanleyson V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic avenue; however, in practice its efficacy is hampered by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that consists of suppressive cell types like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Eradication or reprogramming of MDSCs could therefore enhance clinical responses to immunotherapy. Here, we review clinically available drugs that target MDSCs, often through inhibition of STAT signaling, which is essential for MDSC accumulation and suppressive functions. Interestingly, several drugs used for non-cancerous indications and natural compounds similarly inhibit MDSCs by STAT inhibition, but have fewer side effects than anticancer drugs. Therefore, they show great potential for combination strategies with immunotherapy.

  15. Targeted reduction of advanced glycation improves renal function in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harcourt, Brooke E; Sourris, Karly C; Coughlan, Melinda T;

    2011-01-01

    if treatments that lower tissue AGE burden in patients and mice would improve obesity-related renal dysfunction. Overweight and obese individuals (body mass index (BMI) 26-39¿kg/m(2)) were recruited to a randomized, crossover clinical trial involving 2 weeks each on a low- and a high-AGE-containing diet. Renal......-lowering pharmaceutical, alagebrium, and mice in which the receptor for AGE (RAGE) was deleted. Obesity, resulting from a diet high in both fat and AGE, caused renal impairment; however, treatment of the RAGE knockout mice with alagebrium improved urinary albumin excretion, creatinine clearance, the inflammatory profile...

  16. Targeted biolistics for improved transformation of Impatiens balsamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetten, Andy C; Thomas, Jean-Luc; Wagiran, Alina; Chiurugwi, Tinashe

    2012-01-01

    A transgenesis programme has been developed for Impatiens balsamina that will allow elucidation of the roles played by individual genes in the flower reversion phenomenon shown by this model species. The lack of explants exhibiting adventitious shooting in I. balsamina hinders Agrobacterium-based transformation, but the multiple shoots that arise from cotyledonary nodes present a suitable target for biolistics. These tissues can be disrupted by the helium blast effect associated with conventional biolistic devices, so we have utilised modifications to the PDS 1000/He equipment originally developed for transformation of fragile insect tissues. By loading microcarriers on to a rigid, rather than flexible, macrocarrier, the blast effect is largely eliminated, and the use of a focussing nozzle allows the bombardment to be concentrated on the target tissues. This approach reduces waste of plasmid DNA and gold microcarriers and achieves transfection at lower, less disruptive helium pressures than would otherwise be necessary to efficiently penetrate below the shoot epidermis and generate heritable transgenic lines. PMID:22351015

  17. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  18. Night vision image fusion for target detection with improved 2D maximum entropy segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lian-fa; Liu, Ying-bin; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi

    2013-08-01

    Infrared and LLL image are used for night vision target detection. In allusion to the characteristics of night vision imaging and lack of traditional detection algorithm for segmentation and extraction of targets, we propose a method of infrared and LLL image fusion for target detection with improved 2D maximum entropy segmentation. Firstly, two-dimensional histogram was improved by gray level and maximum gray level in weighted area, weights were selected to calculate the maximum entropy for infrared and LLL image segmentation by using the histogram. Compared with the traditional maximum entropy segmentation, the algorithm had significant effect in target detection, and the functions of background suppression and target extraction. And then, the validity of multi-dimensional characteristics AND operation on the infrared and LLL image feature level fusion for target detection is verified. Experimental results show that detection algorithm has a relatively good effect and application in target detection and multiple targets detection in complex background.

  19. Improving the Targeting of Treatment: Evidence from College Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Clayton, Judith; Crosta, Peter M.; Belfield, Clive R.

    2014-01-01

    Remediation is one of the largest single interventions intended to improve outcomes for underprepared college students, yet little is known about the remedial screening process. Using administrative data and a rich predictive model, we find that severe mis-assignments are common using current test-score-cutoff-based policies, with…

  20. Nanoparticle mediated P-glycoprotein silencing for improved drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier: a siRNA-chitosan approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jostein Malmo

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, composed of tightly organized endothelial cells, limits the availability of drugs to therapeutic targets in the central nervous system. The barrier is maintained by membrane bound efflux pumps efficiently transporting specific xenobiotics back into the blood. The efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed at high levels in brain endothelial cells, has several drug substrates. Consequently, siRNA mediated silencing of the P-gp gene is one possible strategy how to improve the delivery of drugs to the brain. Herein, we investigated the potential of siRNA-chitosan nanoparticles in silencing P-gp in a BBB model. We show that the transfection of rat brain endothelial cells mediated effective knockdown of P-gp with subsequent decrease in P-gp substrate efflux. This resulted in increased cellular delivery and efficacy of the model drug doxorubicin.

  1. Design and evaluation of lipoprotein resembling curcumin-encapsulated protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier for brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanfei; Asghar, Sajid; Xu, Yurui; Wang, Jianping; Jin, Xin; Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Jing; Ping, Qineng; Zhou, Jianping; Xiao, Yanyu

    2016-06-15

    Many nanoparticle matrixes have been demonstrated to be efficient in brain targeting, but there are still certain limitations for them. To overcome the shortcomings of the existing nanoparticulate systems for brain-targeted delivery, a lipoprotein resembling protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier (PS80-NLC) loaded with curcumin was constructed and assessed for in vitro and in vivo performance. Firstly, single factor at a time approach was employed to investigate the effects of various formulation factors. Mean particle sizes of ≤100nm, high entrapment efficiency (EE, about 95%) and drug loading (DL, >3%) were obtained for the optimized formulations. In vitro release studies in the presence of plasma indicated stability of the formulation under physiological condition. Compared with NLC, PS80-NLC showed noticeably higher affinity for bEnd.3 cells (1.56 folds greater than NLC) but with lower uptake in macrophages. The brain coronal sections showed strong and widely distributed fluorescence intensity of PS80-NLC than that of NLC in the cortex. Ex vivo imaging studies further confirmed that PS80-NLC could effectively permeate BBB and preferentially accumulate in the brain (2.38 times greater than NLC). The considerable in vitro and in vivo performance of the safe and biocompatible PS80-NLC makes it a suitable option for further investigations in brain targeted drug delivery.

  2. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Larson, D; Ma, L [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  3. Antenatal taurine supplementation for improving brain ultrastructure in fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Liu, L; Chen, H

    2011-05-01

    Changes in brain ultrastructure of fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were explored and the effects of antenatal taurine supplementation on their brain ultrastructure were determined. Fifteen pregnant rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group, IUGR model group and IUGR group given antenatal taurine supplements. Taurine was added to the diet of the taurine group at a dose of 300 mg/kg/d from 12 days after conception until natural delivery. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes in the brains of the newborn rats. At the same time, brain cellular apoptosis was detected using TUNEL, and the changes in protein expression of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that: 1) The average body weight and cerebral weight were significantly lower in the IUGR group than in the control group (ptaurine was supplemented (ptaurine supplementation. 3) The results of TUNEL showed that the counts of apoptotic brain cells in IUGR groups were significantly increased from those in control groups and that taurine could significantly decrease brain cell apoptosis (ptaurine-supplementation could significantly increase the counts of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive cells in fetal rats with IUGR (ptaurine can significantly improve the IUGR fetal brain development.

  4. Zingiber officinale Mitigates Brain Damage and Improves Memory Impairment in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioral deficits including memory. Recently, accumulating lines of evidence showed that dietary enrichment with nutritional antioxidants could reduce brain damage and improve cognitive function. In this study, possible protective effect of Zingiber officinale, a medicinal plant reputed for neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-related brain damage, on brain damage and memory deficit induced by focal cerebral ischemia was elucidated. Male adult Wistar rats were administrated an alcoholic extract of ginger rhizome orally 14 days before and 21 days after the permanent occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCAO. Cognitive function assessment was performed at 7, 14, and 21 days after MCAO using the Morris water maze test. The brain infarct volume and density of neurons in hippocampus were also determined. Furthermore, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus was also quantified at the end of experiment. The results showed that cognitive function and neurons density in hippocampus of rats receiving ginger rhizome extract were improved while the brain infarct volume was decreased. The cognitive enhancing effect and neuroprotective effect occurred partly via the antioxidant activity of the extract. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the beneficial effect of ginger rhizome to protect against focal cerebral ischemia.

  5. Apelin-13 as a novel target for intervention in secondary injury after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hai-Jun; Qiu, Hai-Yang; Kuai, Jin-Xia; Song, Cheng-Jie; Wang, Shao-Xian; Wang, Chao-Qun; Peng, Hua-Bin; Han, Wen-Can; Wu, Yong-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The adipocytokine, apelin-13, is an abundantly expressed peptide in the nervous system. Apelin-13 protects the brain against ischemia/reperfusion injury and attenuates traumatic brain injury by suppressing autophagy. However, secondary apelin-13 effects on traumatic brain injury-induced neural cell death and blood-brain barrier integrity are still not clear. Here, we found that apelin-13 significantly decreases cerebral water content, mitigates blood-brain barrier destruction, reduces aquaporin-4 expression, diminishes caspase-3 and Bax expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and reduces apoptosis. These results show that apelin-13 attenuates secondary injury after traumatic brain injury and exerts a neuroprotective effect. PMID:27630697

  6. Development of a novel microbubble-liposome complex conjugated with peptide ligands targeting IL4R on brain tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, See-Hyoung; Yoon, Young Ii; Moon, Hyoungwon; Lee, Ga-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Lee, Hak Jong

    2016-07-01

    Gas (SF6)-filled microbubbles (MBs) were prepared by emulsion and solvent-evaporation method. The prepared MBs were further conjugated with doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded nano-sized liposome and peptide ligands to interleukin-4 receptor (IL4R) for targeting brain tumor cells. The final MB-liposome (Dox)-IL4R targeting peptide ligand [MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP] had a spherical structure with the mean size of 1,500 nm. The MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP exhibited cellular uptake in U87MG brain tumor cells (a brain tumor cell line expressing strongly IL4R) with frequency ultrasound energy suggesting that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP provided effective targeting ability for brain tumor cells. In addition, WST-1 assay results showed that MB-Lipo (Dox)‑IL4RTP inhibited the proliferation of U87MG cells IL4R‑dependently. This was confirmed by western blotting of γH2AX, phospho (Ser15)-p53, p53 and p21 which are signal transduction proteins involved in DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these results indicate that MB-Lipo (Dox)-IL4RTP represents a promising ultrasonic contrast agent for tumor-targeting ultrasonic imaging.

  7. Segmentation and Classification of Brain MRI Images Using Improved Logismos-B Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dilip kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Automated reconstruction and diagnosis of brain MRI images is one of the most challenging problems in medical imaging. Accurate segmentation of MRI images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy analysis. Computed tomography (CT and Magnetic resonance (MR imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis and treatment planning. Segmentation techniques used for the brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is one of the methods used by the radiographer to detect any abnormality specifically in brain. The method also identifies important regions in brain such as white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (CSF. These regions are significant for physician or radiographer to analyze and diagnose the disease. We propose a novel clustering algorithm, improved LOGISMOS-B to classify tissue regions based on probabilistic tissue classification, generalized gradient vector flows with cost and distance function. The LOGISMOS graph segmentation framework. Expand the framework to allow regionally-aware graph construction and segmentation

  8. Cloning of a serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine brain: expression in the brain and characterization of its target proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, N; Nishibori, M; Kawabata, M; Saeki, K

    1996-12-01

    A cDNA encoding of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin), B-43, was cloned from the cDNA library of the bovine brain. It encoded 378 amino acids, and the MW of the protein was estimated to be 42.6 kDa, which is consistent with that of the native B-43 purified from the bovine brain. The homology search revealed that B-43 belongs to the ovalbumin branch of the serpin superfamily. Among them, B-43 was most homologous to human placental thrombin inhibitor (PI-6) and its murine counterpart, with the amino acid identity of 76% and 71%, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that the size of the transcript was 1.4 kb, and that the expression of B-43 in the bovine brain varied depending on the brain regions, i.e. a lower level of expression was observed in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus compared to the level of expression that was observed in the medulla oblongata. [35S]-labeled B-43 protein was synthesized in vitro by using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, which formed complexes with proteinases such as thrombin, trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and 7S nerve growth factor (NGF), but not with urokinase or plasmin. These results, together with the immunohistochemical localization of B-43 in astrocytes and in some neurons which was observed in the previous study suggest that B-43 may be involved in the regulation of serine proteinases present in the brain or extravasated from the blood.

  9. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 Receptor Deletion Attenuates Intracerebral Hemorrhage-Induced Brain Injury and Improves Functional Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L. Leclerc

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a devastating type of stroke characterized by bleeding into the brain parenchyma and secondary brain injury resulting from strong neuroinflammatory responses to blood components. Production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is significantly upregulated following ICH and contributes to this inflammatory response in part through its E prostanoid receptor subtype 2 (EP2. Signaling through the EP2 receptor has been shown to affect outcomes of many acute and chronic neurological disorders; although, not yet explored in the context of ICH. Wildtype (WT and EP2 receptor knockout (EP2−/− mice were subjected to ICH, and various anatomical and functional outcomes were assessed by histology and neurobehavioral testing, respectively. When compared with age-matched WT controls, EP2−/− mice had 41.9 ± 4.7% smaller ICH-induced brain lesions and displayed significantly less ipsilateral hemispheric enlargement and incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage. Anatomical outcomes correlated with improved functional recovery as identified by neurological deficit scoring. Histological staining was performed to begin investigating the mechanisms involved in EP2-mediated neurotoxicity after ICH. EP2−/− mice exhibited 45.5 ± 5.8% and 41.4 ± 8.1% less blood and ferric iron accumulation, respectively. Furthermore, significantly less striatal and cortical microgliosis, striatal and cortical astrogliosis, blood–brain barrier breakdown, and peripheral neutrophil infiltration were seen in EP2−/− mice. This study is the first to suggest a deleterious role for the PGE2-EP2 signaling axis in modulating brain injury, inflammation, and functional recovery following ICH. Targeting the EP2 G protein-coupled receptor may represent a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of hemorrhagic stroke.

  10. Ultrasound/Magnetic Targeting with SPIO-DOX-Microbubble Complex for Image-Guided Drug Delivery in Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Cheng, Yu-Hang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Ho, Yi-Ju; Hsu, Po-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the deployment of chemotherapeutic drugs against brain tumors is ensuring that sufficient drug concentrations reach the tumor, while minimizing drug accumulation at undesired sites. Recently, injection of therapeutic agents following blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening by focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles (MBs) has been shown to enhance drug delivery in targeted brain regions. Nevertheless, the distribution and quantitative deposition of agents delivered to the brain are still hard to estimate. Based on our previous work on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-loaded MBs, we present a novel theranostic complex of SPIO-Doxorubicin (DOX)-conjugated MB (SD-MB) for drug delivery to the brain. Magnetic labeling of the drug enables direct visualization via magnetic resonance imaging, and also facilitates magnetic targeting (MT) to actively enhance targeted deposition of the drug. In a rat glioma model, we demonstrated that FUS sonication can be used with SD-MBs to simultaneously facilitate BBB opening and allow dual ultrasound/magnetic targeting of chemotherapeutic agent (DOX) delivery. The accumulation of SD complex within brain tumors can be significantly enhanced by MT (25.7 fold of DOX, 7.6 fold of SPIO). The change in relaxation rate R2 (1/T2) within tumors was highly correlated with SD deposition as quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (R2 = 0.93) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (R2 = 0.94), demonstrating real-time monitoring of DOX distribution. Our results suggest that SD-MBs can serve as multifunction agents to achieve advanced molecular theranostics. PMID:27446489

  11. Principles of brain plasticity in improving sensorimotor function of the knee and leg in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Bjorkman, Anders; Rosen, Birgitta;

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Principles of brain plasticity are used in the treatment of patients with functional limitations to improve sensorimotor function. Training is included in the treatment of knee injury to improve both patient-reported function and sensorimotor function. However, impairment...... in sensorimotor function often persists despite training. Therefore, it was suggested that training programs need to be more effective to improve sensorimotor function after knee injury. The aim of the current study was to investigate if principles of brain plasticity that have been successfully used on the hand...... and foot to improve sensorimotor function can be applied on the knee. We hypothesized that temporary anesthesia of the skin area above and below the knee would improve sensorimotor function of the ipsilateral knee and leg. METHODS: In this first double-blind exploratory study, 28 uninjured subjects (mean...

  12. Targeted mutation breeding as a tool for tobacco crop improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicotiana tabacum is a model widely used in functional genomics with transgenesis; however, genetically modified organisms are not accepted by consumers in Europe. Targeted mutagenesis as a non transgenic approach was assessed on a demonstration gene, involved in alkaloid metabolism. The NtabCYP82E4v1 gene is responsible for nicotine demethylation into nornicotine. The secondary alkaloids derivatives (Tobacco Specific Nitrosamines or TSNAs) are supposed to be implicated in the increased risks for various pathologies. As a consequence, their reduction in tobacco has become a major goal for tobacco companies. A population of 4.000 EMS-mutagenized M2 families was created. High throughput Capillary Electrophoresis-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (CE-SSCP) was used to target mutations. Ten mutants were identified by screening 1311 M2 families. Of 10 alleles isolated by screening 0,532 kb of NtabCYP82E4 DNA, 1 was silent, 5 were missense and 4 were truncation mutations. Mutations identified in DNA pools were validated by sequencing. Individual plants carrying missense or truncation mutations were studied for their phenotype. Seeds of M2 families carrying a mutation into the NtabCYP82E4 gene were sown in greenhouse and plants were individually analyzed by CE-SSCP. Heterozygous and mutant plants could be easily distinguished from wild type plants. Nornicotine synthesis in leaf was induced by a bicarbonate treatment. Nornicotine presence was assessed by a rapid colorimetric test, which highlight nornicotine presence with blue spot. In a family carrying a nonsense mutation, we could observe that no nornicotine was detected in homozygous plants for the mutation. These observations could be confirmed in the field by HPLC analyses of secondary alkaloids. These plants have been used as genitors to introduce this mutation into elite lines. Backcrosses are being performed to recover the elite line background in combination with CE-SSCP analysis to follow the mutation. The

  13. The Brain, Seizures and Epilepsy Throughout Life: Understanding a Moving Target

    OpenAIRE

    Baram, Tallie Z.

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is a tremendously complex and still enigmatic three-dimensional structure, composed of countless interconnected neurons and glia. The temporal evolution of the brain throughout life provides a fourth dimension, one that influences every element of the brain's function in health and disease. This temporal evolution contributes to the probability of seizure generation and to the type and the nature of these seizures. The age-specific properties of the brain also influence the co...

  14. Post-mortem Findings in Huntington’s Deep Brain Stimulation: A Moving Target Due to Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Hilliard, Justin D.; Carbunaru, Samuel; Yachnis, Anthony T.; Bloom, Joshua; Keeling, Peyton; Awe, Lisa; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be effective for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and primary dystonia. However, mixed results have been reported in Huntington’s disease (HD). Case Report A single case of HD DBS was identified from the University of Florida DBS Brain Tissue Network. The clinical presentation, evolution, surgical planning, DBS parameters, clinical outcomes, and brain pathological changes are summarized. Discussion This case of HD DBS revealed that chorea may improve and be sustained. Minimal histopathological changes were noted around the DBS leads. Severe atrophy due to HD likely changed the DBS lead position relative to the internal capsule. PMID:27127722

  15. Identification of the Transcriptional Targets of FOXP2, a Gene Linked to Speech and Language, in Developing Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Spiteri, E.; Konopka, G.; Coppola, G; Bomar, J.; Oldham, M; Ou, J.; Vernes, S.; Fisher, S; Ren, B; Geschwind, D

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in FOXP2, a member of the forkhead family of transcription factor genes, are the only known cause of developmental speech and language disorders in humans. To date, there are no known targets of human FOXP2 in the nervous system. The identification of FOXP2 targets in the developing human brain, therefore, provides a unique tool with which to explore the development of human language and speech. Here, we define FOXP2 targets in human basal ganglia (BG) and inferior frontal cortex (I...

  16. Prediction of brain target site concentrations on the basis of CSF PK : impact of mechanisms of blood-to-brain transport and within brain distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, Joost

    2014-01-01

    In the development of drugs for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the prediction of human CNS drug action is a big challenge. Direct measurement of brain extracellular fluid (brainECF) concentrations is highly restricted in human. Therefore, unbound drug concentrations in huma

  17. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ortiz-Avila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats. Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm, besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  18. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  19. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  20. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  1. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  2. Can targeted food taxes and subsidies improve the diet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Leif Jonas; Thunström, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses distributional effects of revenue-neutral tax reforms aimed at improving dietary quality and encouraging healthier grain consumption. Using data on household grain purchases, we analyse both the impact on dietary quality and the tax incidence among income groups of VAT reforms...... and excise duty reforms. The VAT reforms include subsidies of healthy products (products labelled with the Swedish National Food Administration’s healthy symbol) funded by increased VAT on ‘less healthy’ products. The excise duty reforms contain a subsidy of fibre content, funded by excise duties on either...... and the excise duty reforms appear to be progressive. The lowest income group pays less food taxes and generally faces a lower overall post-reform price level. The income group that increases its tax payments most is the one with the highest income. This is also the income group that faces the largest increase...

  3. Deep brain stimulation for treatment of the epilepsies: the centromedian thalamic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, F; Velasco, A L; Velasco, M; Jiménez, F; Carrillo-Ruiz, J D; Castro, G

    2007-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) of the thalamic centromedian nucleus (CMN) has been proposed as a minimally invasive alternative for the treatment of difficult-to-control seizures of multifocal origin and seizures that are generalized from the onset. ES intends to interfere with seizure propagation in a non-specific manner through the thalamic system. By adopting a frontal parasagittal approach and based on anterior-posterior (AC-PC) commissure intersection, deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes are stereotactically inserted. Electrophysiologic confirmation of electrodes position is accomplished by eliciting cortical recruiting responses and direct current (DC) shifts by low- and high-frequency stimulation through the electrodes. Cycling mode of bipolar stimulation has been used at 60-130 Hz, 0.45 msec, 2.5-3.5 V, 1 min ON in one side 4 min OFF, 1 min ON in the other side and 4 min OFF forward and back for 24h. ES of CMN significantly decreases generalized seizures of cortical origin and focal motor seizures. Best results are obtained in non-focal generalized tonic clonic seizures and atypical absences of the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Experience has indicated that the most effective target for seizure control is the thalamic parvocellular centromedian subnucleus. PMID:17691321

  4. CAR T Cells Targeting Podoplanin Reduce Orthotopic Glioblastomas in Mouse Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Satoshi; Ohno, Masasuke; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kuramitsu, Shunichiro; Yamamichi, Akane; Kato, Akira; Motomura, Kazuya; Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Reiko; Ito, Ichiro; Senga, Takeshi; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Bigner, Darell D; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a 5-year overall survival rate of less than 10%. Podoplanin (PDPN) is a type I transmembrane mucin-like glycoprotein, expressed in the lymphatic endothelium. Several solid tumors overexpress PDPN, including the mesenchymal type of GBM, which has been reported to present the worst prognosis among GBM subtypes. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells can recognize predefined tumor surface antigens independent of MHC restriction, which is often downregulated in gliomas. We constructed a lentiviral vector expressing a third-generation CAR comprising a PDPN-specific antibody (NZ-1-based single-chain variable fragment) with CD28, 4-1BB, and CD3ζ intracellular domains. CAR-transduced peripheral blood monocytes were immunologically evaluated by calcein-mediated cytotoxic assay, ELISA, tumor size, and overall survival. The generated CAR T cells were specific and effective against PDPN-positive GBM cells in vitro. Systemic injection of the CAR T cells into an immunodeficient mouse model inhibited the growth of intracranial glioma xenografts in vivo. CAR T-cell therapy that targets PDPN would be a promising adoptive immunotherapy to treat mesenchymal GBM.

  5. Improving the Students' Spiritual Intelligence in English Writing through Whole Brain Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Didik

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to improve the students' spiritual intelligence in English writing through Whole Brain Learning strategy. Therefore, this study was conducted as a classroom action research. The research pocedure followed the cyclonic process of planning, action, observation, and reflection. This process was preceeded by…

  6. Quality Education Improvement: Yemen and the Problem of the "Brain Drain"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthanna, Abdulghani

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the problems that hinder improvement of the quality of education in Yemen, with a particular focus on higher education institutions. It discusses in particular the problem of the brain drain and why this phenomenon is occurring in Yemen. Semi-structured interviews with three professors at higher education…

  7. Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Effects Did Not Improve Organ Quality in Brain-Dead Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebolledo, Rolando A.; Liu, Bo; Akhtar, Mohammed Z.; Ottens, Petra J.; Zhang, Jian-ning; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Effect of glucocorticoid administration on improving the outcomes of kidney and liver allografts has not been clearly elucidated. This study investigated the effect of prednisolone administration after onset of brain death (BD) on kidney and liver in a controlled rat model of BD. BD was induced in r

  8. Brain "fog," inflammation and obesity : key aspects of neuropsychiatric disorders improved by luteolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoharis Constantin Theoharides

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain fog is a constellation of symptoms that include reduced cognition, inability to concentrate and multitask, as well as loss of short and long term memory. Brain fog characterizes patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, celiac disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, mastocytosis and postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS, as well as minimal cognitive impairment, an early clinical presentation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Brain fog may be due to inflammatory molecules, including adipocytokines and histamine released from mast cells (MCs further stimulating microglia activation, and causing focal brain inflammation. Recent reviews have described the potential use of natural flavonoids for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. The flavone luteolin has numerous useful actions that include: anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, microglia inhibition, neuroprotection, and memory increase. A liposomal luteolin formulation in olive fruit extract improved attention in children with ASDs and brain fog in mastocytosis patients. Methylated luteolin analogues with increased activity and better bioavailability could be developed into effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders and brain fog.

  9. Targeting oocyte maturation to improve fertility in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X Johné

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive aging is an increasingly pressing problem facing women in modern society, due to delay in child bearing. According to Statistics Canada, 52% of all Canadian births in 2011 were by women aged 30 years and older, up from 24% in 1981 ( http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-209-x/2013001/article/11784-eng.htm ). Women older than 35 years of age experience significantly increased risks of infertility, miscarriage and congenital birth defects, mostly due to poor quality of the eggs. Increasingly sophisticated, and often invasive, assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) have helped millions of women to achieve reproductive success. However, by and large, ARTs do not address the fundamental issue of reproductive aging in women: age-related decline in egg quality. More importantly, ARTs are not, and will never be, the main solution for the general population. Here, I attempt to review the scientific literature on age-related egg quality decline, based mostly on studies in mice and in humans. Emphasis is given to the brief period of time called oocyte maturation, which occurs just prior to ovulation. The rationale for this emphasis is that oocyte maturation represents a critical window where unfavorable ovarian conditions in older females contribute significantly to the decline of egg quality, and that science-based intervention during oocyte maturation represents the best chance of improving egg quality in older women. Finally, I summarize our own work in recent years on peri-ovulatory putrescine supplementation as a possible remedy for reproductive aging.

  10. Alzheimer's disease therapeutics targeted to the control of amyloid precursor protein translation: maintenance of brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Rogers, Jack T

    2014-04-15

    The neurotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ), a major cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is enhanced by iron, as found in the amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. By contrast, the long-known neuroprotective activity of APP is evident after α-secretase cleavage of the precursor to release sAPPα, and depends on the iron export actions of APP itself. The latter underlie its neurotrophic and protective effects in facilitating the homeostatic actions of ferroportin mediated-iron export. Thus APP-dependent iron export may alleviate oxidative stress by minimizing labile iron thus protecting neurons from iron overload during stroke and hemorrhage. Consistent with this, altered phosphorylation of iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) and its signaling processes play a critical role in modulating APP translation via the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of its transcript. The APP 5'UTR region encodes a functional iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop that represents a potential target for modulating APP production. Targeted regulation of APP gene expression via the modulation of 5'UTR sequence function represents a novel approach for the potential treatment of AD since altering APP translation can be used to improve both the protective brain iron balance and provide anti-amyloid efficacy. Approved drugs including paroxetine and desferrioxamine and several novel compounds have been identified that suppress abnormal metal-promoted Aβ accumulation with a subset of these acting via APP 5'UTR-dependent mechanisms to modulate APP translation and cleavage to generate the non-toxic sAPPα.

  11. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  12. Targeting alertness to improve cognition in older adults: A preliminary report of benefits in executive function and skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vleet, Thomas M; DeGutis, Joseph M; Merzenich, Michael M; Simpson, Gregory V; Zomet, Ativ; Dabit, Sawsan

    2016-09-01

    Efficient self-regulation of alertness declines with age exacerbating normal declines in performance across multiple cognitive domains, including learning and skill acquisition. Previous cognitive intervention studies have shown that it is possible to enhance alertness in patients with acquired brain injury and marked attention impairments, and that this benefit generalizes to improvements in more global cognitive functions. In the current preliminary studies, we sought to test whether this approach, that targets both tonic (over a period of minutes) and phasic (moment-to-moment) alertness, can improve key executive functioning declines in older adults, and enhance the rate of skill acquisition. The results of both Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that, compared to active control (AC) training, alertness training significantly enhanced performance in several validated executive function measures. In Experiment 2, alertness training significantly improved skill acquisition compared to AC training in a well-characterized speed of processing (SOP) task, with the largest benefits shown in the most challenging SOP blocks. The results of the current study suggest that targeting intrinsic alertness through cognitive training provides a novel approach to improve executive functions in older adults and may be a useful adjunct treatment to enhance benefits gained in other clinically validated treatments. PMID:27372902

  13. INFARCT DETECTION IN BRAIN MRI USING IMPROVED SEGMENTATION ALGORITHM AND VOLUME VISUALIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen Kumar E; Sumithra M G; Sunil Kumar P

    2013-01-01

    In the present days, for the human body anatomical study and for the treatment planning medicalscience very much depend on the medical imaging technology and medical images. Specifically for thehuman brain, MRI widely prefers and using for the imaging. But by nature medical images are complex andnoisy.This leads to the necessity of processes that reduces difficulties in analysis and improves quality ofoutput.This paper discuss about an improved segmentation algorithm for infarct detection in ...

  14. Combined liquid and solid-phase extraction improves quantification of brain estrogen content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eChao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy in quantifying brain-derived steroid hormones (‘neurosteroids’ has become increasingly important for understanding the modulation of neuronal activity, development, and physiology. Relative to other neuroactive compounds and classical neurotransmitters, steroids pose particular challenges with regard to isolation and analysis, owing to their lipid solubility. Consequently, anatomical studies of the distribution of neurosteroids have relied primarily on the expression of neurosteroid synthesis enzymes. To evaluate the distribution of synthesis enzymes vis-à-vis the actual steroids themselves, traditional steroid quantification assays, including radioimmunoassays (RIA, have successfully employed liquid extraction methods (e.g., ether, dichloromethane or methanol to isolate steroids from microdissected brain tissue. Due to their sensitivity, safety and reliability, the use of commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA for laboratory quantification of steroids in plasma and brain has become increasingly widespread. However, EIAs rely on enzymatic reactions in vitro, making them sensitive to interfering substances in brain tissue and thus producing unreliable results. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of a protocol for combined, two-stage liquid/solid phase extraction as compared to conventional liquid extraction alone for the isolation of estradiol (E2 from brain tissue. We employ the songbird model system, in which brain steroid production is pronounced and linked to neural mechanisms of learning and plasticity. This study outlines a combined liquid-solid phase extraction protocol that improves the performance of a commercial EIA for the quantification of brain E2 content. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our optimized method for evaluating the region specificity of brain E2 content, compare these results to established anatomy of the estrogen synthesis enzyme and estrogen receptor, and discuss the nature of potential EIA interfering

  15. In vivo evaluation of 18F-labeled TCO for pre-targeted PET imaging in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The tetrazine-trans-cylooctene cycloaddition using radiolabeled tetrazine or radiolabeled trans-cyclooctene (TCO) has been reported to be a very fast, selective and bioorthogonal reaction that could be useful for in vivo radiolabeling of molecules. We wanted to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution profile and brain uptake of 18F-labeled TCO ([18F]TCO) to assess its potential for pre-targeted imaging in the brain. Methods: We evaluated the in vivo behavior of [18F]TCO via an ex vivo biodistribution study complemented by in vivo μPET imaging at 5, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 240 min post tracer injection. An in vivo metabolite study was performed at 5 min, 30 min and 120 min post [18F]TCO injection by RP-HPLC analysis of plasma and brain extracts. Incubation with human liver microsomes was performed to further evaluate the metabolite profile of the tracer. Results: μPET imaging and ex-vivo biodistribution revealed an high initial brain uptake of [18F]TCO (3.8%ID/g at 5 min pi) followed by a washout to 3.0%ID/g at 30 min pi. Subsequently the brain uptake increased again to 3.7%ID/g at 120 min pi followed by a slow washout until 240 min pi (2.9%ID/g). Autoradiography confirmed homogenous brain uptake. On the μPET images bone uptake became gradually visible after 120 min pi and was clearly visible at 240 min pi. The metabolite study revealed a fast metabolization of [18F]TCO in plasma and brain into three main polar radiometabolites. Conclusions: Although [18F]TCO has previously been described to be a useful tracer for radiolabeling of tetrazine modified targeting molecules, our study indicates that its utility for in vivo chemistry and pre-targeted imaging will be limited. Although [18F]TCO clearly enters the brain, it is quickly metabolized with a non-specific accumulation of radioactivity in the brain and bone

  16. Transient disruption of vascular barriers using focused ultrasound and microbubbles for targeted drug delivery in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS) which includes the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and other factors, prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the brain and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels (blood-tumor barrier; BTB), along with several other factors, creates additional hurdles for drug treatment of brain tumors. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB/BTB, but they have their own limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Magnetic Resonance Imaging guided Focused Ultrasound (MRIgFUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and BTB. The purpose of this thesis was to use this alternative approach to deliver chemotherapeutic agents through the BBB/BTB for brain tumor treatment in a rodent model to overcome the hinderances encountered in prior approaches tested for drug delivery in the CNS. The results presented in thesis demonstrate that MRIgFUS can be used to achieve consistent and reproducible BBB/BTB disruption in rats. It enabled us to achieve clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (~ 4.8+/-0.5 microg/g) delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60 s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 microl/kg), and liposomoal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX) dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting doxorubicin concentration was reduced by 32% when the agent was injected 10 minute after the last sonication. Three weekly sessions of FUS and Lipo-DOX appeared to be safe in the rat brain, despite some minor tissue damage. Importantly, the severe neurotoxicity seen in earlier works using other approaches does not appear to occur with delivery via FUS-BBB disruption. The resuls from three weekly treatments of FUS and Lipo-DOX in a rat glioma model are highly

  17. Correlating learning and memory improvements to long-term potentiation in patients with brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingfu Peng; Qian Yu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Brain injury patients often exhibit learning and memory functional deficits.Long-term potentiation(LTP)is a representative index for studying learning and memory cellular models; the LTP index correlates to neural plasticity. OBJECTIVE:This study was designed to investigate correlations of learning and memory functions to LTP in brain injury patients,and to summarize the research advancements in mechanisms underlying brain functional improvements after rehabilitation intervention. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY:Using the terms "brain injuries,rehabilitation,learning and memory,long-term potentiation",manuscripts that were published from 2000-2007 were retrieved from the PubMed database.At the same time,manuscripts published from 2000-2007 were also retrieved from the Database of Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals with the same terms in the Chinese language.A total of 64 manuscripts were obtained and primarily screened.Inclusion criteria:studies on learning and memory,as well as LTP in brain injury patients,and studies focused on the effects of rehabilitation intervention on the two indices; studies that were recently published or in high-impact journals.Exclusion criteria:repetitive studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION:The included manuscripts primarily focused on correlations between learning and memory and LTP,the effects of brain injury on learning and memory,as well as LTP,and the effects of rehabilitation intervention on learning and memory after brain injury.The included 39 manuscripts were clinical,basic experimental,or review studies. DATA SYNTHESIS:Learning and memory closely correlates to LTP.The neurobiological basis of learning and memory is central nervous system plasticity,which involves neural networks,neural circuits,and synaptic connections,in particular,synaptic plasticity.LTP is considered to be an ideal model for studying synaptic plasticity,and it is also a classic model for studying neural plasticity of learning and memory.Brain injury

  18. CHEMO- AND TARGET THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER WITH METASTATIC BRAIN LESIONS

    OpenAIRE

    D. R. Naskhletashvili; V. A. Gorbunova; E. A. Moskvina

    2014-01-01

    Results of studies performed have shown high efficiency of drug therapy for treatment of patients with breast cancer (BC) with brain metastases. The best results regarding survival rate have been achieved for treatment of BC patients with brain metastases and HER2 hyperexpression. At present, studies are performed regarding examination of new anticancer drugs and their use in combination with radiotherapy for treatment of BC patients with brain metastases. It is necessary to perform studies o...

  19. REACHING TO PROPRIOCEPTIVELY DEFINED TARGETS IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE: EFFECTS OF DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, D.; HENRIQUES, D. Y.; Snider, J.; Song, D.; POIZNER, H.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) provides a unique window into human brain function since it can reversibly alter the functioning of specific brain circuits. Basal ganglia–cortical circuits are thought to be excessively noisy in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), based in part on the lack of specificity of proprioceptive signals in basal ganglia–thalamic–cortical circuits in monkey models of the disease. PD patients are known to have deficits in proprioception,...

  20. CHEMO- AND TARGET THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER WITH METASTATIC BRAIN LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Naskhletashvili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of studies performed have shown high efficiency of drug therapy for treatment of patients with breast cancer (BC with brain metastases. The best results regarding survival rate have been achieved for treatment of BC patients with brain metastases and HER2 hyperexpression. At present, studies are performed regarding examination of new anticancer drugs and their use in combination with radiotherapy for treatment of BC patients with brain metastases. It is necessary to perform studies of efficiency of various schemes of drug therapy depending on biological properties of the primary tumor. The issue of sequence of application of drug therapy and radiotherapy for metastatic brain lesions also remains actual.

  1. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPases:Targets of oxidative stress in brain aging and neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asma; Zaidi

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase(PMCA)pumps play an important role in the maintenance of precise levels of intracellular Ca2+[Ca2+]i,essential to the functioning of neurons.In this article,we review evidence showing age-related changes of the PMCAs in synaptic plasma membranes(SPMs).PMCA activity and protein levels in SPMs diminish progressively with increasing age. The PMCAs are very sensitive to oxidative stress and undergo functional and structural changes when exposed to oxidants of physiological relevance.The major signatures of oxidative modification in the PMCAs are rapid inactivation,conformational changes,aggregation, internalization from the plasma membrane and proteolytic degradation.PMCA proteolysis appears to be mediated by both calpains and caspases.The predominance of one proteolytic pathway vs the other,the ensuing pattern of PMCA degradation and its consequence on pump activity depends largely on the type of insult,its intensity and duration.Experimental reduction of PMCA expression not only alters the dynamics of cellular Ca2+ handling but also has a myriad of downstream conse-quences on various aspects of cell function,indicating a broad role of these pumps.Age-and oxidation-related down-regulation of the PMCAs may play an important role in compromised neuronal function in the aging brain and its several-fold increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease,and stroke.Therapeutic approaches that protect the PMCAs and stabilize[Ca2+]i homeostasis may be capable of slowing and/or preventing neuronal degeneration.The PMCAs are therefore emerging as a new class of drug targets for therapeutic interventions in various chronic degenerative disorders.

  2. Process on Drug Delivery for Brain Targeting%脑靶向制剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振振; 陆洋; 杜守颖

    2012-01-01

    介绍了近年来脑靶向制剂的研究现状,为新型中药脑靶向制剂的研究和开发提供参考.通过查阅国内外相关文献资料并进行分析、归纳和总结,解释了血脑屏障的生理结构特点,介绍了常用的促进药物透过血脑屏障的方法;通过了解脑靶向制剂的给药方式及新剂型研究(β-环糊精包合物、前体药物、脂质体、纳米粒、微乳、原位凝胶),阐述了中药经鼻腔给药发挥中枢治疗作用的优势和可行性,认为中药在脑靶向给药方面必将有更加广阔的应用前景.%Process on drug delivery for brain targeting was summarized to provide basis for traditional Chinese mediline (TCM). Literatures about the development of brain-targeted preparation in recent years were reviewed and analyzed. This paper not only described the physiological structure characteristics of blood-brain-barrier, but also introduced some common methods for promoting drugs through the blood-brain-barrier. The paper also described the administration methods and new preparations (?CD, prodrug, liposomes, nanoparticles, micro emulsion, in situ gel) to understand the advantages and feasibility of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) nasal administration. Brain-targeted preparations of TCM had wide development prospect.

  3. Magnetic nanoformulation of azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate for targeted delivery across the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainulabedin M Saiyed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Zainulabedin M Saiyed, Nimisha H Gandhi, Madhavan PN Nair1Department of Immunology, College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Despite significant advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, the prevalence of neuroAIDS remains high. This is mainly attributed to inability of antiretroviral therapy (ART to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB, thus resulting in insufficient drug concentration within the brain. Therefore, development of an active drug targeting system is an attractive strategy to increase the efficacy and delivery of ART to the brain. We report herein development of magnetic azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate (AZTTP liposomal nanoformulation and its ability to transmigrate across an in vitro BBB model by application of an external magnetic field. We hypothesize that this magnetically guided nanoformulation can transverse the BBB by direct transport or via monocyte-mediated transport. Magnetic AZTTP liposomes were prepared using a mixture of phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol. The average size of prepared liposomes was about 150 nm with maximum drug and magnetite loading efficiency of 54.5% and 45.3%, respectively. Further, magnetic AZTTP liposomes were checked for transmigration across an in vitro BBB model using direct or monocyte-mediated transport by application of an external magnetic field. The results show that apparent permeability of magnetic AZTTP liposomes was 3-fold higher than free AZTTP. Also, the magnetic AZTTP liposomes were efficiently taken up by monocytes and these magnetic monocytes showed enhanced transendothelial migration compared to normal/non-magnetic monocytes in presence of an external magnetic field. Thus, we anticipate that the developed magnetic nanoformulation can be used for targeting active nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors to the brain by application of an external magnetic force and thereby eliminate the brain HIV reservoir and help

  4. Mechanisms underlying brain monitoring during anesthesia: limitations, possible improvements, and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Currently, anesthesiologists use clinical parameters to directly measure the depth of anesthesia (DoA). This clinical standard of monitoring is often combined with brain monitoring for better assessment of the hypnotic component of anesthesia. Brain monitoring devices provide indices allowing for an immediate assessment of the impact of anesthetics on consciousness. However, questions remain regarding the mechanisms underpinning these indices of hypnosis. By briefly describing current knowledge of the brain's electrical activity during general anesthesia, as well as the operating principles of DoA monitors, the aim of this work is to simplify our understanding of the mathematical processes that allow for translation of complex patterns of brain electrical activity into dimensionless indices. This is a challenging task because mathematical concepts appear remote from clinical practice. Moreover, most DoA algorithms are proprietary algorithms and the difficulty of exploring the inner workings of mathematical models represents an obstacle to accurate simplification. The limitations of current DoA monitors - and the possibility for improvement - as well as perspectives on brain monitoring derived from recent research on corticocortical connectivity and communication are also discussed. PMID:27066200

  5. Chronic intermittent fasting improves cognitive functions and brain structures in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaoliao Li

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major health issue. Obesity started from teenagers has become a major health concern in recent years. Intermittent fasting increases the life span. However, it is not known whether obesity and intermittent fasting affect brain functions and structures before brain aging. Here, we subjected 7-week old CD-1 wild type male mice to intermittent (alternate-day fasting or high fat diet (45% caloric supplied by fat for 11 months. Mice on intermittent fasting had better learning and memory assessed by the Barnes maze and fear conditioning, thicker CA1 pyramidal cell layer, higher expression of drebrin, a dendritic protein, and lower oxidative stress than mice that had free access to regular diet (control mice. Mice fed with high fat diet was obese and with hyperlipidemia. They also had poorer exercise tolerance. However, these obese mice did not present significant learning and memory impairment or changes in brain structures or oxidative stress compared with control mice. These results suggest that intermittent fasting improves brain functions and structures and that high fat diet feeding started early in life does not cause significant changes in brain functions and structures in obese middle-aged animals.

  6. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: Improving target volume delineation

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma are known to infiltrate the brain parenchyma instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In clinical practice, a uniform margin is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth: Anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain...

  7. Brain targeting effect of camptothecin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles in rat after intravenous administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, S. M.; Sarmento, B.; Nunes, C.;

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to investigate the ability of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to deliver camptothecin into the brain parenchyma after crossing the blood-brain barrier. For that purpose, camptothecin-loaded SLN with mean size below 200 nm, low polydispersity index (94%) were produced...

  8. Magnetic resonance monitoring of focused ultrasound/magnetic nanoparticle targeting delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chu, Po-Chun; Wu, Jia-Shin; Tseng, I-Chou; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The superparamagnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) allow them to be guided by an externally positioned magnet and also provide contrast for MRI. However, their therapeutic use in treating CNS pathologies in vivo is limited by insufficient local accumulation and retention resulting from their inability to traverse biological barriers. The combined use of focused ultrasound and magnetic targeting synergistically delivers therapeutic MNPs across the blood–brain barrier to enter th...

  9. How does the motor relearning program improve neurological function of brain ischemia monkeys?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yin; Zhongtang Feng; Zhen Gu; Lei Pan; Lu Gan; Dongdong Qin; Bo Yang; Jin Guo; Xintian Hu; Tinghua Wang

    2013-01-01

    The motor relearning program can significantly improve various functional disturbance induced by ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. However, its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In injured brain tissues, glial fibrillary acidic protein and neurofilament protein changes can reflect the condition of injured neurons and astrocytes, while vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor changes can indicate angiogenesis. In the present study, we induced ischemic brain injury in the rhesus macaque by electrocoagulation of the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery. The motor relearning program was conducted for 60 days from the third day after model establishment. Immunohistochemistry and single-photon emission CT showed that the numbers of glial fibrillary acidic protein-, neurofilament protein-, vascular endothelial growth factorand basic fibroblast growth factor-positive cells were significantly increased in the infarcted side compared with the contralateral hemisphere following the motor relearning program. Moreover, cerebral blood flow in the infarcted side was significantly improved. The clinical rating scale for stroke was used to assess neurological function changes in the rhesus macaque following the motor relearning program. Results showed that motor function was improved, and problems with consciousness, self-care ability and balance function were significantly ameliorated. These findings indicate that the motor relearning program significantly promoted neuronal regeneration, repair and angiogenesis in the surroundings of the infarcted hemisphere, and improve neurological function in the rhesus macaque following brain ischemia.

  10. Brain-targeted co-delivery of therapeutic gene and peptide by multifunctional nanoparticles in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; An, Sai; Li, Jianfeng; Kuang, Yuyang; He, Xi; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Bin; Jiang, Chen

    2016-02-01

    Multifunctional nanocarriers are increasingly promising for disease treatment aimed to regulate multiple pathological dysfunctions and overcome barriers in drug delivery. Here we develop a multifunctional nanocarrier for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment by achieving therapeutic gene and peptide co-delivery to brain based on PEGylated dendrigraft poly-l-lysines (DGLs) via systemic administration. The dendritic amine-rich structure of DGLs provides plenty reaction sites and positive charge for drug loading. Successful co-delivery of drugs overcoming the blood-brain barrier by brain-targeted ligand modification was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The pharmacodynamics study of the system following multiple-dosing treatment was verified in transgenic AD mice. Down-regulation of the key enzyme in amyloid-β formation was achieved by delivering non-coding RNA plasmid. Simultaneous delivery of the therapeutic peptide into brain leads to reduction of neurofibrillary tangles. Meanwhile, memory loss rescue in AD mice was also observed. Taken together, the multifunctional nanocarrier provides an excellent drug co-delivery platform for brain diseases.

  11. Overview of progress on the improvement projects for the LANSCE accelerator and target facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three projects have been initiated since 1994 to improve the performance of the accelerator and target facilities for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LANSCE Reliability Improvement Project (LRIP) was separated into two phases. Phase 1, completed in 1995, targeted near-term improvements to beam reliability and availability that could be completed in one-year's time. Phase 2, now underway and scheduled for completion in May 1998, consists of two projects: (a) implementation of direct H-injection for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) and (b) an upgrade of the target/moderator system for the short pulse spallation neutron (SPSS) source. The latter will reduce the target change-out time from about 10 months to about three weeks. The third project, the SPSS Enhancement Project, is aimed at increasing the PSR output beam current to 200 microA at 30 Hz and providing up to seven new neutron scattering instruments

  12. Solid lipid nanoparticles as a vehicle for brain-targeted drug delivery: two new strategies of functionalization with apolipoprotein E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rute Neves, Ana; Fontes Queiroz, Joana; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Reis, Salette

    2015-12-01

    Nanotechnology can be an important tool to improve the permeability of some drugs for the blood-brain barrier. In this work we created a new system to enter the brain by functionalizing solid lipid nanoparticles with apolipoprotein E, aiming to enhance their binding to low-density lipoprotein receptors on the blood-brain barrier endothelial cells. Solid lipid nanoparticles were successfully functionalized with apolipoprotein E using two distinct strategies that took advantage of the strong interaction between biotin and avidin. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed spherical nanoparticles, and dynamic light scattering gave a Z-average under 200 nm, a polydispersity index below 0.2, and a zeta potential between -10 mV and -15 mV. The functionalization of solid lipid nanoparticles with apolipoprotein E was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy and fluorimetric assays. In vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated by MTT and LDH assays in the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) cell line, a human blood-brain barrier model, and revealed no toxicity up to 1.5 mg ml-1 over 4 h of incubation. The brain permeability was evaluated in transwell devices with hCMEC/D3 monolayers, and a 1.5-fold increment in barrier transit was verified for functionalized nanoparticles when compared with non-functionalized ones. The results suggested that these novel apolipoprotein E-functionalized nanoparticles resulted in dynamic stable systems capable of being used for an improved and specialized brain delivery of drugs through the blood-brain barrier.

  13. The recently identified P2Y-like receptor GPR17 is a sensor of brain damage and a new target for brain repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lecca

    promoted the expression of myelin basic protein, confirming progression toward mature oligodendrocytes. Thus, GPR17 may act as a "sensor" that is activated upon brain injury on several embryonically distinct cell types, and may play a key role in both inducing neuronal death inside the ischemic core and in orchestrating the local remodeling/repair response. Specifically, we suggest GPR17 as a novel target for therapeutic manipulation to foster repair of demyelinating wounds, the types of lesions that also occur in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  14. Improvement of therapeutic index for brain tumors with daily image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guidance maximizes the therapeutic index of brain irradiation by decreasing setup uncertainty. As dose-volume data emerge defining the tolerance of critical normal structures responsible for neuroendocrine function and neurocognition, minimizing clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) expansion of targets near these structures potentially lessens long-term toxicity. We reviewed the treatment records of 29 patients with brain tumors, with a total of 517 fractions analyzed. The CTV was uniformly expanded by 3 mm to create the PTV for all cases. We determined the effect of patient specific factors (prescribed medications, weight gain, tumor location) and image-guidance technique on setup uncertainty and plotted the mean +/- standard deviation for each factor. ANOVA was used to determine significance between these factors on setup uncertainty. We determined the impact of applying the initial three fraction variation as custom PTV-expansion on dose to normal structures. The initial 3 mm margin encompassed 88% of all measured shifts from daily imaging for all fractions. There was no difference (p = n.s.) in average setup uncertainty between CBCT or kV imaging for all patients. Vertical, lateral, longitudinal, and 3D shifts were similar (p = n.s.) between days 1, 2, and 3 imaging and later fractions. Patients prescribed sedatives experienced increased setup uncertainty (p < 0.05), while weight gain, corticosteroid administration, and anti-seizure medication did not associate with increased setup uncertainty. Patients with targets near OAR with individualized margins led to decreased OAR dose. No reductions to targets occurred with individualized PTVs. Daily imaging allows application of individualized CTV expansion to reduce dose to OAR responsible for neurocognition, learning, and neuroendocrine function below doses shown to correlate with long-term morbidity. The demonstrated reduction in dose to OAR in this study has implications for quality

  15. Report: Central nervous system (CNS) toxicity caused by metal poisoning: Brain as a target organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Syeda Rubina; Zaidi, Syed Raza Ali; Batool, Madeeha; Bhatti, Amanat Ali; Durrani, Arjumand Iqbal; Mahmood, Zaid

    2015-07-01

    People relate the neural disorders with either inheritance or psychological violence but there might be some other reasons responsible for the ailment of people that do not have such a background. The present study explains the chronic effect of heavy toxic metals on nervous system. During experimentation, rabbits used as laboratory animals, were given test metals in their diet. Concentration of metals given to them in the diet was less than their tolerable dietary intake. Behavioral changes were observed during experimentation. Periodic increase in the metal concentration was seen in the blood sample of rabbits. They were slaughtered after a period of eight months of slow poisoning. Histological examination of brain tissues was performed. The brain samples were analyzed by Atomic absorption spectroscopy and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry to find the retention of heavy metals in mammalian brain. Concentration of lead, mercury and cadmium in the blood samples of occupationally exposed people and patients with neurological disorders at the time of neurosurgery was determined by using the same techniques. During circulation, toxic metals passes through the nerve capillaries to settle down in the brain. Heavy metals cross the blood brain barrier and 'may retain themselves in it. Brain tumors and biopsy samples of patients with neurological disorder were also analyzed to relate neurotoxicity and heavy metal poisoning. Results obtained shows that lead, mercury and cadmium retain themselves in the brain for longer period of time and are one of the causes of neurotoxicity.

  16. Label-free live brain imaging and targeted patching with third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Stefan; Negrean, Adrian; Lodder, Johannes C.; de Kock, Christiaan P. J.; Testa Silva, Guilherme; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Louise Groot, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The ability to visualize neurons inside living brain tissue is a fundamental requirement in neuroscience and neurosurgery. Especially the development of a noninvasive probe of brain morphology with micrometer-scale resolution is highly desirable, as it would provide a noninvasive approach to optical biopsies in diagnostic medicine. Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (2PLSM) is a powerful tool in this regard, and has become the standard for minimally invasive high-resolution imaging of living biological samples. However, while 2PLSM-based optical methods provide sufficient resolution, they have been hampered by the requirement for fluorescent dyes to provide image contrast. Here we demonstrate high-contrast imaging of live brain tissue at cellular resolution, without the need for fluorescent probes, using optical third-harmonic generation (THG). We exploit the specific geometry and lipid content of brain tissue at the cellular level to achieve partial phase matching of THG, providing an alternative contrast mechanism to fluorescence. We find that THG brain imaging allows rapid, noninvasive label-free imaging of neurons, white-matter structures, and blood vessels simultaneously. Furthermore, we exploit THG-based imaging to guide micropipettes towards designated neurons inside live tissue. This work is a major step towards label-free microscopic live brain imaging, and opens up possibilities for the development of laser-guided microsurgery techniques in the living brain. PMID:21444784

  17. Factors that may improve outcomes of early traumatic brain injury care: prospective multicenter study in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Brazinova, Alexandra; Majdan, Marek; Leitgeb, Johannes; Trimmel, Helmut; Mauritz, Walter; ,

    2015-01-01

    Background Existing evidence concerning the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients underlines the importance of appropriate treatment strategies in both prehospital and early in-hospital care. The objectives of this study were to analyze the current state of early TBI care in Austria with its physician-based emergency medical service. Subsequently, identified areas for improvement were transformed into treatment recommendations. The proposed changes were implemented in participat...

  18. Tracking Multiple Video Targets with an Improved GM-PHD Tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracking multiple moving targets from a video plays an important role in many vision-based robotic applications. In this paper, we propose an improved Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD tracker with weight penalization to effectively and accurately track multiple moving targets from a video. First, an entropy-based birth intensity estimation method is incorporated to eliminate the false positives caused by noisy video data. Then, a weight-penalized method with multi-feature fusion is proposed to accurately track the targets in close movement. For targets without occlusion, a weight matrix that contains all updated weights between the predicted target states and the measurements is constructed, and a simple, but effective method based on total weight and predicted target state is proposed to search the ambiguous weights in the weight matrix. The ambiguous weights are then penalized according to the fused target features that include spatial-colour appearance, histogram of oriented gradient and target area and further re-normalized to form a new weight matrix. With this new weight matrix, the tracker can correctly track the targets in close movement without occlusion. For targets with occlusion, a robust game-theoretical method is used. Finally, the experiments conducted on various video scenarios validate the effectiveness of the proposed penalization method and show the superior performance of our tracker over the state of the art.

  19. Tracking Multiple Video Targets with an Improved GM-PHD Tracker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Yu, Hui; Liu, Honghai; Li, Youfu

    2015-12-03

    Tracking multiple moving targets from a video plays an important role in many vision-based robotic applications. In this paper, we propose an improved Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) tracker with weight penalization to effectively and accurately track multiple moving targets from a video. First, an entropy-based birth intensity estimation method is incorporated to eliminate the false positives caused by noisy video data. Then, a weight-penalized method with multi-feature fusion is proposed to accurately track the targets in close movement. For targets without occlusion, a weight matrix that contains all updated weights between the predicted target states and the measurements is constructed, and a simple, but effective method based on total weight and predicted target state is proposed to search the ambiguous weights in the weight matrix. The ambiguous weights are then penalized according to the fused target features that include spatial-colour appearance, histogram of oriented gradient and target area and further re-normalized to form a new weight matrix. With this new weight matrix, the tracker can correctly track the targets in close movement without occlusion. For targets with occlusion, a robust game-theoretical method is used. Finally, the experiments conducted on various video scenarios validate the effectiveness of the proposed penalization method and show the superior performance of our tracker over the state of the art.

  20. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W.; Xie, X. Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors. PMID:26926067

  1. Target Selection Recommendations Based on Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation Surgeries on Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Houg Wang; Lin Zhang; Laura Sperry; John Olichney; Sarah Tomaszewski Farias; Kiarash Shahlaie; Norika Malhado Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review examines the evidence that deep brain stimulation (DBS) has extensive impact on nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).Data Sources: We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to September, 2015, using various search terms and their combinations including PD, NMSs, DBS, globus pallidus intemus (GPi), subthalamic nucleus (STN), and ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus.Study Selection: We included data from peer-reviewed journals on impacts of DBS on neuropsychological profiles, sensory function, autonomic symptoms, weight changes, and sleep disturbances.For psychological symptoms and cognitive impairment, we tried to use more reliable proofs: Random, control, multicenter, large sample sizes, and long period follow-up clinical studies.We categorized the NMSs into four groups: those that would improve definitively following DBS;those that are not significantly affected by DBS;those that remain controversial on their surgical benefit;and those that can be worsened by DBS.Results: In general, it seems to be an overall beneficial effect of DBS on NMSs, such as sensory, sleep, gastrointestinal, sweating, cardiovascular, odor, urological symptoms, and sexual dysfunction, GPi-DBS may produce similar results;Both STN and Gpi-DBS are safe with regard to cognition and psychology over long-term follow-up, though verbal fluency decline is related to DBS;The impact of DBS on behavioral addictions and dysphagia is still uncertain.Conclusions: As the motor effects of STN-DBS and GPi-DBS are similar, NMSs may determine the target choice in surgery of future patients.

  2. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. Methods: A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using CAD software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Results: Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2° ± 1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. Conclusions: The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs

  3. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarghami, Niloufar, E-mail: nzargham@uwo.ca; Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Talluri, Srikanth; Dick, Frederick A. [Department of Biochemistry, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Foster, Paula J. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chambers, Ann F. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. Methods: A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using CAD software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Results: Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2° ± 1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. Conclusions: The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs.

  4. Intranasal haloperidol-loaded miniemulsions for brain targeting: Evaluation of locomotor suppression and in-vivo biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Setouhy, Doaa Ahmed; Ibrahim, A B; Amin, Maha M; Khowessah, Omneya M; Elzanfaly, Eman S

    2016-09-20

    Haloperidol is a commonly prescribed antipsychotic drug currently administered as oral and injectable preparations. This study aimed to prepare haloperidol intranasal miniemulsion helpful for psychiatric emergencies and exhibiting lower systemic exposure and side effects associated with non-target site delivery. Haloperidol miniemulsions were successfully prepared by spontaneous emulsification adopting 2(3) factorial design. The effect of three independent variables at two levels each namely; oil type (Capmul®-Capryol™90), lipophilic emulsifier type (Span 20-Span 80) and HLB value (12-14) on globule size, PDI and percent locomotor activity inhibition in mice was evaluated. The optimized formula (F4, Capmul®, Tween 80/Span 20, HLB 14) showed globule size of 209.5±0.98nm, PDI of 0.402±0.03 and locomotor inhibition of 83.89±9.15% with desirability of 0.907. Biodistribution study following intranasal and intravenous administration of the radiolabeled (99m)Tc mucoadhesive F4 revealed that intranasal administration achieved 1.72-fold higher and 6 times faster peak brain levels compared with intravenous administration. Drug targeting efficiency percent and brain/blood exposure ratios remained above 100% and 1 respectively after intranasal instillation compared to a maximum brain/blood exposure ratio of 0.8 post intravenous route. Results suggested the CNS delivery of major fraction of haloperidol via direct transnasal to brain pathway that can be a promising alternative to oral and parenteral routes in chronic and acute situations. Haloperidol concentration of 275.6ng/g brain 8h post intranasal instillation, higher than therapeutic concentration range of haloperidol (0.8 to 5.15ng/ml), suggests possible sustained delivery of the drug through nasal route. PMID:27154259

  5. Brain Histamine N-Methyltransferase As a Possible Target of Treatment for Methamphetamine Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Takemura, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    Stereotypical behaviors induced by methamphetamine (METH) overdose are one of the overt symptoms of METH abuse, which can be easily assessed in animal models. Currently, there is no successful treatment for METH overdose. There is increasing evidence that elevated levels of brain histamine can attenuate METH-induced behavioral abnormalities, which might therefore constitute a novel therapeutic treatment for METH abuse and METH overdose. In mammals, histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT) is the sole enzyme responsible for degrading histamine in the brain. Metoprine, one of the most potent HMT inhibitors, can cross the blood–brain barrier and increase brain histamine levels by inhibiting HMT. Consequently, this compound can be a candidate for a prototype of drugs for the treatment of METH overdose. PMID:26966348

  6. Repeated CT scan in improving the reproducibility of grass tumor volume for moving target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To find a method to improve the range accuracy of moving target such as peripheral lung tumors, since a single CT snapshot may not be accurate during the treatment process.Methods: A simple harmonic motion phantom, embedded with a cube and a circular ball, was used to simulate the tumor motion. Individualized moving targets were scanned 24 times with different amplitudes and frequencies. Then the images were fused from every 1, 2 or 3 sets of CT scans. The GTV volume variation of circular target and the length variation of the cube target along the z axis were contoured and analyzed. Results: As motion amplitude increased, the maximum of both circular target volume and cube target length was increased, while the minimum of the factors was decreased. Motion frequency affected the target volume less than amplitude. For a cube target with the length of 3.3 cm at stationary phase, when motion frequencies was 20 and motion amplitude was 2 cm, the maximal length was 2. 4 times of the minimal length (5. 1 cm vs. 2. 1 cm). When it came to the cube target groups fused from every 1,2 and 3 sets of CT scans, the average length and standard deviation were (3.77 ± 1.20)cm, (4.18 ±0. 91)cm and (4.52 ±0. 59)cm, respectively. With the increase of fused scan number, targets became bigger, the standard deviation decreased, and the change of center positions was decreased. Conclusions: The motion amplitude, frequency and the number of CT scans are the main factors affecting target definition, though, the optimized scanning phase is not certained. When 4DCT and respiration gating technique are not available,the efficient and practical method to solve this problem is to scan the target three or more times and fuse them in planning system, which will generate a larger, more reproducible GTV volume for moving targets. (authors)

  7. Improved Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm for MR Brain Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Vasuda,

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation is an important aspect of medical image processing, where Clustering approach is widely used in biomedical applications particularly for brain tumor detection in abnormal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI. Fuzzy clustering using Fuzzy C- Means (FCM algorithm proved to be superior over the other clustering approaches in terms of segmentation efficiency. But the major drawback of the FCM algorithm is the huge computational time required for convergence. Theeffectiveness of the FCM algorithm in terms of computational rate is improved by modifying the cluster center and membership value updation criterion. In this paper, convergence rate is compared between the conventional FCM and the Improved FCM.

  8. Sexually dimorphic gene regulation in brain as a target for endocrine disrupters: Developmental exposure of rats to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The developing neuroendocrine brain represents a potential target for endocrine active chemicals. The UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, but also interferes with the thyroid axis. We investigated effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 4-MBC in the same rat offspring at brain and reproductive organ levels. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. mRNA of estrogen target genes involved in control of sexual behavior and gonadal functions was measured by real-time RT-PCR in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO) of adult offspring. 4-MBC exposure affected mRNA levels of ER alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), preproenkephalin (PPE) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in a sex- and region-specific manner. In order to assess possible changes in sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were gonadectomized on day 70, injected with estradiol (E2, 10 or 50 μg/kg s.c.) or vehicle on day 84, and sacrificed 6 h later. The acute induction of PR mRNA, and repression (at 6 h) of PPE mRNA by E2 was enhanced by 4-MBC in male and female VMH and female MPO, whereas male MPO exhibited reduced responsiveness of both genes. Steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 mRNA levels were increased in female VMH and MPO. The data indicate profound sex- and region-specific alterations in the regulation of estrogen target genes at brain level. Effect patterns in baseline and E2-induced gene expression differ from those in uterus and prostate

  9. Improved Poly (D,L-lactide) nanoparticles-based formulation for hair follicle targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Silva, R.; Ribeiro, Artur J.; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Gomes, A. C.; Paulo, Artur Cavaco

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hair follicles are widely recognized as the preferential target and site of accumulation for nanoparticles after topical application. This feature is of particular importance for hair cosmetics, having the potential to refine the treatment of several hair follicle-related disorders. The aim of this work was to improve the preparation of Poly (D,L-lactide) (PLA) nanoparticles for in vivo follicular target and drug delivery. Methods Envisaging a future industrial scale-up of ...

  10. Functional improvement after carotid endarterectomy: demonstrated by gait analysis and acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, G. E.; Yoo, J. Y.; Kim, D. G.; Moon, D. H. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Scientific documentation of neurologic improvement following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has not been established. The purpose of this prospective study is to investigate whether CEA performed for the internal carotid artery flow lesion improves gait and cerebrovascular hemodynamic status in patients with gait disturbance. We prospectively performed pre- and postCEA gait analysis and acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT (Acz-SPECT) with Tc-99m ECD in 91 patients (M/F: 81/10, mean age: 64.1 y) who had gait disturbance before receiving CEA. Gait performance was assessed using a Vicon 370 motion analyzer. The gait improvement after CEA was correlated to cerebrovascular hemodynamic change as well as symptom duration. 12 hemiparetic stroke patients (M/F=9/3, mean age: 51 y) who did not receive CEA as a control underwent gait analysis twice in a week interval to evaluate whether repeat testing of gait performance shows learning effect. Of 91 patients, 73 (80%) patients showed gait improvement (change of gait speed > 10%) and 42 (46%) showed marked improvement (change of gait speed > 20%), but no improvement was observed in control group at repeat test. Post-operative cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement was noted in 49 (54%) of 91 patients. There was marked gait improvement in patients group with cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement compared to no change group (p<0.05). Marked gait improvement and cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement were noted in 53% and 61% of the patient who had less than 3 month history of symptom compared to 31% and 24% of the patients who had longer than 3 months, respectively (p<0.05). Marked gait improvement was obtained in patients who had improvement of cerebrovascular hemodynamic status on Acz-SPECT after CEA. These results suggest functional improvement such as gait can result from the improved perfusion of misery perfusion area, which is viable for a longer period compared to literatures previously reported.

  11. For veterans with mild traumatic brain injury, improved posttraumatic stress disorder severity and sleep correlated with symptomatic improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne S. Ruff, PhD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This was an observational study of a cohort of 63 Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI associated with an explosion. They had headaches, residual neurological deficits (NDs on neurological examination, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and were seen on average 2.5 years after their last mTBI. We treated them with sleep hygiene counseling and oral prazosin. We monitored headache severity, daytime sleepiness using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, cognitive performance using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment test, and the presence of NDs. We quantitatively measured olfaction and assessed PTSD severity using the PTSD Checklist-Military Version. Nine weeks after starting sleep counseling and bedtime prazosin, the veterans’ headache severity decreased, cognitive function as assayed with a brief screening tool improved, and daytime sleepiness diminished. Six months after completing treatment, the veterans demonstrated additional improvement in headache severity and daytime sleepiness and their improvements in cognitive function persisted. There were no changes in the prevalence of NDs or olfaction scores. Clinical improvements correlated with reduced PTSD severity and daytime sleepiness. The data suggested that reduced clinical manifestations following mTBI correlated with PTSD severity and improvement in sleep, but not the presence of NDs or olfaction impairment.

  12. 19F molecular MR imaging for detection of brain tumor angiogenesis: in vivo validation using targeted PFOB nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) targeted contrast agents has emerged as a promising diagnostic approach in cancer research to detect associated bio-markers. In this work, the potential of 19F MRI was investigated to detect angiogenesis with αvβ3-targeted perfluoro-octylbromide nanoparticles (PFOB NP) in a U87 glioblastoma mouse model at 7 Tesla. Mice were injected intravenously with targeted or non-targeted NP and 19F images were immediately acquired for 90 min using a PFOB-dedicated MRI sequence. Mice infused with targeted NP exhibited higher concentrations in tumors than mice of the control group, despite the presence of nonspecific signal originating from the blood. Imaging results were corroborated by histology and fluorescence imaging, suggesting specific binding of targeted NP to αvβ3 integrin. Two other groups of mice were injected 24 h before imaging to allow blood clearance but no significant differences were found between both groups, probably due to a loss of specificity of PFOB NP. This is the first demonstration of the ability of 19F MRI to detect αvβ3 -integrin endothelial expression in brain tumors in vivo. (authors)

  13. A dual brain-targeting curcumin-loaded polymersomes ameliorated cognitive dysfunction in intrahippocampal amyloid-β1–42-injected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tingting; Sun, Zhiguo; Lu, Ying; Gao, Jie; Zou, Hao; Xie, Fangyuan; Zhang, Guoqing; Xu, Hao; Sun, Duxin; Yu, Yuan; Zhong, Yanqiang

    2016-01-01

    Due to the impermeability of the blood–brain barrier and the nonselective distribution of drugs in the brain, the therapeutic access to intractable neurological disorders is challenging. In this study, dual brain-targeting polymersomes (POs) functionalized by transferrin and Tet-1 peptide (Tf/Tet-1-POs) promoted the transportation of curcumin into the brain and provided neuroprotection. The modification of the ligands that bind to the surface of POs was revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The cell uptake of a coculture model of mouse brain capillary endothelial cells with neurons showed that the Tf/Tet-1-POs had significant transportation properties and possessed affinity for neurons. The pharmacokinetic analysis showed that the blood–brain barrier permeability–surface efficiency of the Tf/Tet-1-POs was 0.28 mL/h/g and that the brain tissue uptake rate (% ID/g) was 0.08, which were significant compared with the controls (P<0.05). The curcumin-encapsulated Tf/Tet-1-POs provided neuroprotection and ameliorated cognitive dysfunction in intrahippocampal amyloid-β1–42-injected mice. These results suggest that the dual brain-targeting POs are more capable of drug delivery to the brain that can be exploited as a multiple noninvasive vehicle for targeting therapeutics.

  14. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Its Role in Early Neural Development and in Adult and Aged Brain Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Lombó, Carla; Gonsebatt, María E

    2016-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) integrates signals triggered by energy, stress, oxygen levels, and growth factors. It regulates ribosome biogenesis, mRNA translation, nutrient metabolism, and autophagy. mTOR participates in various functions of the brain, such as synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, memory, and learning. mTOR is present during early neural development and participates in axon and dendrite development, neuron differentiation, and gliogenesis, among other processes. Furthermore, mTOR has been shown to modulate lifespan in multiple organisms. This protein is an important energy sensor that is present throughout our lifetime its role must be precisely described in order to develop therapeutic strategies and prevent diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to present our current understanding of the functions of mTOR in neural development, the adult brain and aging. PMID:27378854

  15. Design, synthesis and preliminary bio-evaluation of glucose-cholesterol derivatives as ligands for brain targeting liposomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lei; Wei Fan; Xian Kun Li; Shan Wang; Li Hai; Yong Wu

    2011-01-01

    A series of glucose-cholesterol derivatives 8a-8e as ligands for brain targeting liposomes were synthesized. The preparation of compound 6 involved temporary protection of glucose with chlorotrimethylsilicane and hexamethyldisilazane followed by selectively hydrolyzed. The known cholesteryl tosylate 1 were coupled to ethylene glycols to afford alcohol 2a-2e. Substitution and deprotection of alcohol 2a-2e furnished the acids 4a-4e, which was condensed with compound 6 to get compounds 7a-7e, and then was deprotected in tetrahydrofuran with TEA to obtain the title compounds. As a model drug, tegafur was entrapped by liposomes coupled with 8b, and preliminary in vivo evaluation shown 8b could enhance the ability of liposomes delivering tegafur across the blood brain barrier.

  16. A new improved method for assessing brain deformation after decompressive craniectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim L Fletcher

    Full Text Available Decompressive craniectomy (DC is a surgical intervention used following traumatic brain injury to prevent or alleviate raised intracranial pressure. However the clinical effectiveness of the intervention remains in doubt. The location of the craniectomy (unilateral or bifrontal might be expected to change the brain deformation associated with the operation and hence the clinical outcome. As existing methods for assessing brain deformation have several limitations, we sought to develop and validate a new improved method.Computed tomography (CT scans were taken from 27 patients who underwent DC (17 bifrontal patients and 10 unilateral patients. Pre-operative and post-operative images were processed and registered to determine the change in brain position associated with the operation. The maximum deformation in the herniated brain, the change in volume and estimates of the craniectomy area were determined from the images. Statistical comparison was made using the Pearson's correlation coefficient r and a Welch's two-tailed T-test, with statistical significance reported at the 5% level.There was a reasonable correlation between the volume increase and the maximum brain displacement (r = 0.64, a low correlation between the volume increase and the craniectomy area (r = 0.30 and no correlation between the maximum displacement and the craniectomy area (r = -0.01. The maximum deformation was significantly lower (P  = 0.023 in the bifrontal patients (mean = 22.5 mm compared with the unilateral patients (mean = 29.8 mm. Herniation volume was significantly lower (P = 0.023 in bifrontal (mean = 50.0 ml than unilateral patients (mean = 107.3 ml. Craniectomy area was not significantly different for the two craniectomy locations (P = 0.29.A method has been developed to quantify changes in brain deformation due to decompressive craniectomy from CT images and allow comparison between different craniectomy locations

  17. A TOOL FOR STRATEGIC TARGET SETTING ON DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasushi; Katayama, Arata

    A tool for strategic development and improvement of remediation technologies was proposed to set a target specification by applying the RNSOIL, an evaluation index of remediation technologies for contaminated soil. Under the scenario of agricultural site contamination with dieldrin and its remediation, improving items and the target values of the bioremediation using charcoal material (charcoal bioremediation), as a developing technology, were determined. The development target was that the RNSOIL value of charcoal bioremediation fell below that of high temperature thermal desorption as a competing technology. Sensitivity assessments of the RNSOIL selected a remediation period and an incubation volume for bacterial growth and settlement in the charcoal as improving properties. Risk assessment and life cycle inventory analysis was introduced to determine a human health risk due to contaminant, and a total cost of remediation or a CO2 emission accompanied with remediation, as evaluating factors of RNSOIL, respectively. Assessment based on the RNSOIL was able to show clearly improving items for achieving the target or items with great effect for improvement.

  18. Tailored polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles for the delivery of drug conjugate: dual strategy for brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Udita; Chashoo, Gousia; Sharma, Parduman Raj; Kumar, Ashok; Saxena, Ajit Kumar; Vyas, S P

    2015-02-01

    The object of the present study was to investigate the glioma targeting propensity of folic acid (F) decorated polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (PLNs) encapsulating cyclo-[Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys] (cRGDfK) modified paclitaxel (PtxR-FPLNs). The prepared PLNs were supposed to bypass the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efficiently and subsequently target integrin rich glioma cells. The developed formulations were characterized for size, shape, drug entrapment efficiency, and in vitro release profile. PtxR-FPLNs demonstrated highest in vitro inhibitory effect, cell apoptosis and cell uptake. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies showed efficacy of PtxR-FPLNs in vivo. In vivo anti-tumor studies clearly revealed that the median survival time for Balb/C mice treated with PtxR-FPLNs (42 days) was extended significantly as compared to PtxR-PLNs (35 days), free PtxR (18 days), Ptx-FPLNs (38 days), Ptx-PLNs (30 days), free Ptx (14 days) and control group (12 days). From the results it can be concluded that the developed dual targeted nanoformulation was able to efficiently cross the BBB and significantly deliver higher amounts of drug to brain tumor for better therapeutic outcome.

  19. Experimental new automatic tools for robotic stereotactic neurosurgery: towards "no hands" procedure of leads implantation into a brain target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, P; Arena, P; Cantelli, L; Spampinato, G; Sposato, S; Cozzolino, S; Demarinis, P; Muscato, G

    2016-07-01

    The use of robotics in neurosurgery and, particularly, in stereotactic neurosurgery, is becoming more and more adopted because of the great advantages that it offers. Robotic manipulators easily allow to achieve great precision, reliability, and rapidity in the positioning of surgical instruments or devices in the brain. The aim of this work was to experimentally verify a fully automatic "no hands" surgical procedure. The integration of neuroimaging to data for planning the surgery, followed by application of new specific surgical tools, permitted the realization of a fully automated robotic implantation of leads in brain targets. An anthropomorphic commercial manipulator was utilized. In a preliminary phase, a software to plan surgery was developed, and the surgical tools were tested first during a simulation and then on a skull mock-up. In such a way, several tools were developed and tested, and the basis for an innovative surgical procedure arose. The final experimentation was carried out on anesthetized "large white" pigs. The determination of stereotactic parameters for the correct planning to reach the intended target was performed with the same technique currently employed in human stereotactic neurosurgery, and the robotic system revealed to be reliable and precise in reaching the target. The results of this work strengthen the possibility that a neurosurgeon may be substituted by a machine, and may represent the beginning of a new approach in the current clinical practice. Moreover, this possibility may have a great impact not only on stereotactic functional procedures but also on the entire domain of neurosurgery. PMID:27194228

  20. Evaluation of a modified Fitts law brain-computer interface target acquisition task in able and motor disabled individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, E. A.; Radwin, R. G.; Wilson, J. A.; Williams, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a communication system that takes recorded brain signals and translates them into real-time actions, in this case movement of a cursor on a computer screen. This work applied Fitts' law to the evaluation of performance on a target acquisition task during sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training. Fitts' law, which has been used as a predictor of movement time in studies of human movement, was used here to determine the information transfer rate, which was based on target acquisition time and target difficulty. The information transfer rate was used to make comparisons between control modalities and subject groups on the same task. Data were analyzed from eight able-bodied and five motor disabled participants who wore an electrode cap that recorded and translated their electroencephalogram (EEG) signals into computer cursor movements. Direct comparisons were made between able-bodied and disabled subjects, and between EEG and joystick cursor control in able-bodied subjects. Fitts' law aptly described the relationship between movement time and index of difficulty for each task movement direction when evaluated separately and averaged together. This study showed that Fitts' law can be successfully applied to computer cursor movement controlled by neural signals.

  1. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, John P., E-mail: john.kirkpatrick@dm.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Wang, Zhiheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Sampson, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  2. Microvesicles from brain-extract—treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  3. Design requirements and potential target users for brain-computer interfaces – recommendations from rehabilitation professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, F.; Plass-Oude Bos, D.; Blokland, Y.M.; Wijk, R. van; Farquhar, J.D.R.

    2014-01-01

    It is an implicit assumption in the field of brain-computer interfacing (BCI) that BCIs can be satisfactorily used to access augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods by people with severe physical disabilities. A one-day workshop and focus group interview was held to investigate this

  4. OUR APPROACH TOWARDS DEVELOPING A SPECIFIC TUMOR-TARGETED MRI CONTRAST AGENT FOR THE BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; BULTE, JWM; DELEY, L; THE, TH; KAMMAN, RL; HULSTAERT, CE; BLAAUW, EH; MA, LD

    1993-01-01

    This review presents various aspects of the technological development, and their assessment in the design of a contrast agent for MRI, tailored to visualise tumours in the brain. First, it was demonstrated that magnetite as a contrast agent exhibited a much stronger relaxivity than gadolinium. The p

  5. Flashing characters with famous faces improves ERP-based brain-computer interface performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, T.; Schulz, S. M.; Grünzinger, C.; Kübler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Currently, the event-related potential (ERP)-based spelling device, often referred to as P300-Speller, is the most commonly used brain-computer interface (BCI) for enhancing communication of patients with impaired speech or motor function. Among numerous improvements, a most central feature has received little attention, namely optimizing the stimulus used for eliciting ERPs. Therefore we compared P300-Speller performance with the standard stimulus (flashing characters) against performance with stimuli known for eliciting particularly strong ERPs due to their psychological salience, i.e. flashing familiar faces transparently superimposed on characters. Our results not only indicate remarkably increased ERPs in response to familiar faces but also improved P300-Speller performance due to a significant reduction of stimulus sequences needed for correct character classification. These findings demonstrate a promising new approach for improving the speed and thus fluency of BCI-enhanced communication with the widely used P300-Speller.

  6. The immunology of traumatic brain injury: a prime target for Alzheimer’s disease prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giunta Brian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A global health problem, traumatic brain injury (TBI is especially prevalent in the current era of ongoing world military conflicts. Its pathological hallmark is one or more primary injury foci, followed by a spread to initially normal brain areas via cascades of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines resulting in an amplification of the original tissue injury by microglia and other central nervous system immune cells. In some cases this may predispose individuals to later development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The inflammatory-based progression of TBI has been shown to be active in humans for up to 17 years post TBI. Unfortunately, all neuroprotective drug trials have failed, and specific treatments remain less than efficacious. These poor results might be explained by too much of a scientific focus on neurons without addressing the functions of microglia in the brain, which are at the center of proinflammatory cytokine generation. To address this issue, we provide a survey of the TBI-related brain immunological mechanisms that may promote progression to AD. We discuss these immune and microglia-based inflammatory mechanisms involved in the progression of post-trauma brain damage to AD. Flavonoid-based strategies to oppose the antigen-presenting cell-like inflammatory phenotype of microglia will also be reviewed. The goal is to provide a rationale for investigations of inflammatory response following TBI which may represent a pathological link to AD. In the end, a better understanding of neuroinflammation could open therapeutic avenues for abrogation of secondary cell death and behavioral symptoms that may mediate the progression of TBI to later AD.

  7. Targeting of 111In-Labeled Dendritic Cell Human Vaccines Improved by Reducing Number of Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarntzen, E.H.J.G.; Srinivas, M.; Bonetto, F.J.; Cruz, L.J.; Verdijk, P.; Schreibelt, G.; Rakt, M.W.M.M. van de; Lesterhuis, W.J.; Riel, M. van; Punt, C.J.A.; Adema, G.J.; Heerschap, A.; Figdor, C.G.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticancer dendritic cell (DC) vaccines require the DCs to relocate to lymph nodes (LN) to trigger immune responses. However, these migration rates are typically very poor. Improving the targeting of ex vivo generated DCs to LNs might increase vaccine efficacy and reduce costs. We investiga

  8. 60 years of advances in neuropsychopharmacology for improving brain health, renewed hope for progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Mark J; Goodwin, Guy M; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Ögren, Sven Ove

    2015-05-01

    Pharmacotherapy is effective in helping many patients suffering from psychiatric and neurological disorders, and both psychotherapeutic and stimulation-based techniques likewise have important roles to play in their treatment. However, therapeutic progress has recently been slow. Future success for improving the control and prevention of brain disorders will depend upon deeper insights into their causes and pathophysiological substrates. It will also necessitate new and more rigorous methods for identifying, validating, developing and clinically deploying new treatments. A field of Research and Development (R and D) that remains critical to this endeavour is Neuropsychopharmacology which transformed the lives of patients by introducing pharmacological treatments for psychiatric disorder some 60 years ago. For about half of this time, the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) has fostered efforts to enhance our understanding of the brain, and to improve the management of psychiatric disorders. Further, together with partners in academia and industry, and in discussions with regulators and patients, the ECNP is implicated in new initiatives to achieve this goal. This is then an opportune moment to survey the field, to analyse what we have learned from the achievements and failures of the past, and to identify major challenges for the future. It is also important to highlight strategies that are being put in place in the quest for more effective treatment of brain disorders: from experimental research and drug discovery to clinical development and collaborative ventures for reinforcing "R and D". The present article sets the scene, then introduces and interlinks the eight articles that comprise this Special Volume of European Neuropsychopharmacology. A broad-based suite of themes is covered embracing: the past, present and future of "R and D" for psychiatric disorders; complementary contributions of genetics and epigenetics; efforts to improve the

  9. Combined MRI and MRS improves pre-therapeutic diagnoses of pediatric brain tumors over MRI alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nelson, Marvin D. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Moore, Kevin R. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilles, Floyd H. [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Pathology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio [All Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); Blueml, Stefan [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles/Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The specific goal of this study was to determine whether the inclusion of MRS had a measureable and positive impact on the accuracy of pre-surgical MR examinations of untreated pediatric brain tumors over that of MRI alone in clinical practice. Final imaging reports of 120 pediatric patients with newly detected brain tumors who underwent combined MRI/MRS examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Final pathology was available in all cases. Group A comprised 60 subjects studied between June 2001 and January 2005, when MRS was considered exploratory and radiologists utilized only conventional MRI to arrive at a diagnosis. For group B, comprising 60 subjects studied between January 2005 and March 2008, the radiologists utilized information from both MRI and MRS. Furthermore, radiologists revisited group A (blind review, time lapse >4 years) to determine whether the additional information from MRS would have altered their interpretation. Sixty-three percent of patients in group A were diagnosed correctly, whereas in 10 % the report was partially correct with the final tumor type mentioned (but not mentioned as most likely tumor), while in 27 % of cases the reports were wrong. For group B, the diagnoses were correct in 87 %, partially correct in 5 %, and incorrect in 8 % of the cases, which is a significant improvement (p < 0.005). Re-review of combined MRI and MRS of group A resulted 87 % correct, 7 % partially correct, and 7 % incorrect diagnoses, which is a significant improvement over the original diagnoses (p < 0.05). Adding MRS to conventional MRI significantly improved diagnostic accuracy in preoperative pediatric patients with untreated brain tumors. (orig.)

  10. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  11. Improved OAM-Based Radar Targets Detection Using Uniform Concentric Circular Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingtuan Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Without any relative moves or beam scanning, the novel Orbital-Angular-Momentum- (OAM- based radar targets detection technique using uniform concentric circular arrays (UCCAs shows the azimuthal estimation ability, which provides new perspective for radar system design. However, the main estimation method, that is, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, under this scheme suffers from low resolution. As a solution, this paper rebuilds the OAM-based radar targets detection model and introduces the multiple signal classification (MUSIC algorithm to improve the resolution for detecting targets within the main lobes. The spatial smoothing technique is proposed to tackle the coherent problem brought by the proposed model. Analytical study and simulation demonstrate the superresolution estimation capacity the MUSIC algorithm can achieve for detecting targets within the main lobes. The performance of the MUSIC algorithm to detect targets not illuminated by the main lobes is further evaluated. Despite the fact that MUSIC algorithm loses the resolution advantage under this case, its estimation is more robust than that of the FFT method. Overall, the proposed MUSIC algorithm for the OAM-based radar system demonstrates the superresolution ability for detecting targets within the main lobes and good robustness for targets out of the main lobes.

  12. Multiple target tracking and classification improvement using data fusion at node level using acoustic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarla, T. R.; Whipps, Gene

    2005-05-01

    Target tracking and classification using passive acoustic signals is difficult at best as the signals are contaminated by wind noise, multi-path effects, road conditions, and are generally not deterministic. In addition, microphone characteristics, such as sensitivity, vary with the weather conditions. The problem is further compounded if there are multiple targets, especially if some are measured with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) than the others and they share spectral information. At the U. S. Army Research Laboratory we have conducted several field experiments with a convoy of two, three, four and five vehicles traveling on different road surfaces, namely gravel, asphalt, and dirt roads. The largest convoy is comprised of two tracked vehicles and three wheeled vehicles. Two of the wheeled vehicles are heavy trucks and one is a light vehicle. We used a super-resolution direction-of-arrival estimator, specifically the minimum variance distortionless response, to compute the bearings of the targets. In order to classify the targets, we modeled the acoustic signals emanated from the targets as a set of coupled harmonics, which are related to the engine-firing rate, and subsequently used a multivariate Gaussian classifier. Independent of the classifier, we find tracking of wheeled vehicles to be intermittent as the signals from vehicles with high SNR dominate the much quieter wheeled vehicles. We used several fusion techniques to combine tracking and classification results to improve final tracking and classification estimates. We will present the improvements (or losses) made in tracking and classification of all targets. Although improvements in the estimates for tracked vehicles are not noteworthy, significant improvements are seen in the case of wheeled vehicles. We will present the fusion algorithm used.

  13. Brain tumor segmentation in MR slices using improved GrowCut algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chunhong; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Shi, Zhifeng; Mao, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The detection of brain tumor from MR images is very significant for medical diagnosis and treatment. However, the existing methods are mostly based on manual or semiautomatic segmentation which are awkward when dealing with a large amount of MR slices. In this paper, a new fully automatic method for the segmentation of brain tumors in MR slices is presented. Based on the hypothesis of the symmetric brain structure, the method improves the interactive GrowCut algorithm by further using the bounding box algorithm in the pre-processing step. More importantly, local reflectional symmetry is used to make up the deficiency of the bounding box method. After segmentation, 3D tumor image is reconstructed. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method on MR slices with synthetic tumors and actual clinical MR images. Result of the proposed method is compared with the actual position of simulated 3D tumor qualitatively and quantitatively. In addition, our automatic method produces equivalent performance as manual segmentation and the interactive GrowCut with manual interference while providing fully automatic segmentation.

  14. Targeted brain derived neurotropic factors (BDNF delivery across the blood-brain barrier for neuro-protection using magnetic nano carriers: an in-vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheesh Pilakka-Kanthikeel

    Full Text Available Parenteral use of drugs; such as opiates exert immunomodulatory effects and serve as a cofactor in the progression of HIV-1 infection, thereby potentiating HIV related neurotoxicity ultimately leading to progression of NeuroAIDS. Morphine exposure is known to induce apoptosis, down regulate cAMP response element-binding (CREB expression and decrease in dendritic branching and spine density in cultured cells. Use of neuroprotective agent; brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF, which protects neurons against these effects, could be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of opiate addiction. Previous studies have shown that BDNF was not transported through the blood brain barrier (BBB in-vivo.; and hence it is not effective in-vivo. Therefore development of a drug delivery system that can cross BBB may have significant therapeutic advantage. In the present study, we hypothesized that magnetically guided nanocarrier may provide a viable approach for targeting BDNF across the BBB. We developed a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP based carrier bound to BDNF and evaluated its efficacy and ability to transmigrate across the BBB using an in-vitro BBB model. The end point determinations of BDNF that crossed BBB were apoptosis, CREB expression and dendritic spine density measurement. We found that transmigrated BDNF was effective in suppressing the morphine induced apoptosis, inducing CREB expression and restoring the spine density. Our results suggest that the developed nanocarrier will provide a potential therapeutic approach to treat opiate addiction, protect neurotoxicity and synaptic density degeneration.

  15. Creatine target engagement with brain bioenergetics: a dose-ranging phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of adolescent females with SSRI-resistant depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Douglas G.; Forrest, Lauren N.; Shi, Xianfeng; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L.; Huber, Rebekah S.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often begins during adolescence and is projected to become the leading cause of global disease burden by the year 2030. Yet, approximately 40 % of depressed adolescents fail to respond to standard antidepressant treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Converging evidence suggests that depression is related to brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Our previous studies of MDD in adult and adolescent females suggest that augmentation of SSRI pharmacotherapy with creatine monohydrate (CM) may improve MDD outcomes. Neuroimaging with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) can measure the high-energy phosphorus metabolites in vivo that reflect mitochondrial function. These include phosphocreatine (PCr), a substrate for the creatine kinase reaction that produces adenosine triphosphate. As part of the National Institute of Mental Health’s experimental medicine initiative, we conducted a placebo-controlled doseranging study of adjunctive CM for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD. Participants were randomized to receive placebo or CM 2, 4 or 10 g daily for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-treatment 31P-MRS scans were used to measure frontal lobe PCr, to assess CM’s target engagement with cerebral energy metabolism. Mean frontal lobe PCr increased by 4.6, 4.1 and 9.1 % in the 2, 4 and 10 g groups, respectively; in the placebo group, PCr fell by 0.7 %. There was no group difference in adverse events, weight gain or serum creatinine. Regression analysis of PCr and depression scores across the entire sample showed that frontal lobe PCr was inversely correlated with depression scores (p = 0.02). These results suggest that CM achieves target engagement with brain bioenergetics and that the target is correlated with a clinical signal. Further study of CM as a treatment for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD is warranted. PMID:26907087

  16. Creatine target engagement with brain bioenergetics: a dose-ranging phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of adolescent females with SSRI-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Douglas G; Forrest, Lauren N; Shi, Xianfeng; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L; Huber, Rebekah S; Renshaw, Perry F

    2016-08-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often begins during adolescence and is projected to become the leading cause of global disease burden by the year 2030. Yet, approximately 40 % of depressed adolescents fail to respond to standard antidepressant treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Converging evidence suggests that depression is related to brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Our previous studies of MDD in adult and adolescent females suggest that augmentation of SSRI pharmacotherapy with creatine monohydrate (CM) may improve MDD outcomes. Neuroimaging with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) can measure the high-energy phosphorus metabolites in vivo that reflect mitochondrial function. These include phosphocreatine (PCr), a substrate for the creatine kinase reaction that produces adenosine triphosphate. As part of the National Institute of Mental Health's experimental medicine initiative, we conducted a placebo-controlled dose-ranging study of adjunctive CM for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD. Participants were randomized to receive placebo or CM 2, 4 or 10 g daily for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-treatment (31)P-MRS scans were used to measure frontal lobe PCr, to assess CM's target engagement with cerebral energy metabolism. Mean frontal lobe PCr increased by 4.6, 4.1 and 9.1 % in the 2, 4 and 10 g groups, respectively; in the placebo group, PCr fell by 0.7 %. There was no group difference in adverse events, weight gain or serum creatinine. Regression analysis of PCr and depression scores across the entire sample showed that frontal lobe PCr was inversely correlated with depression scores (p = 0.02). These results suggest that CM achieves target engagement with brain bioenergetics and that the target is correlated with a clinical signal. Further study of CM as a treatment for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD is warranted. PMID:26907087

  17. Creatine target engagement with brain bioenergetics: a dose-ranging phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of adolescent females with SSRI-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Douglas G; Forrest, Lauren N; Shi, Xianfeng; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L; Huber, Rebekah S; Renshaw, Perry F

    2016-08-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often begins during adolescence and is projected to become the leading cause of global disease burden by the year 2030. Yet, approximately 40 % of depressed adolescents fail to respond to standard antidepressant treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Converging evidence suggests that depression is related to brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Our previous studies of MDD in adult and adolescent females suggest that augmentation of SSRI pharmacotherapy with creatine monohydrate (CM) may improve MDD outcomes. Neuroimaging with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) can measure the high-energy phosphorus metabolites in vivo that reflect mitochondrial function. These include phosphocreatine (PCr), a substrate for the creatine kinase reaction that produces adenosine triphosphate. As part of the National Institute of Mental Health's experimental medicine initiative, we conducted a placebo-controlled dose-ranging study of adjunctive CM for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD. Participants were randomized to receive placebo or CM 2, 4 or 10 g daily for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-treatment (31)P-MRS scans were used to measure frontal lobe PCr, to assess CM's target engagement with cerebral energy metabolism. Mean frontal lobe PCr increased by 4.6, 4.1 and 9.1 % in the 2, 4 and 10 g groups, respectively; in the placebo group, PCr fell by 0.7 %. There was no group difference in adverse events, weight gain or serum creatinine. Regression analysis of PCr and depression scores across the entire sample showed that frontal lobe PCr was inversely correlated with depression scores (p = 0.02). These results suggest that CM achieves target engagement with brain bioenergetics and that the target is correlated with a clinical signal. Further study of CM as a treatment for adolescent females with SSRI-resistant MDD is warranted.

  18. Mononuclear phagocyte intercellular crosstalk facilitates transmission of cell-targeted nanoformulated antiretroviral drugs to human brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanmogne GD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Georgette D Kanmogne1, Sangya Singh1, Upal Roy1, Xinming Liu1, JoEllyn McMillan1, Santhi Gorantla1, Shantanu Balkundi1, Nathan Smith1, Yazen Alnouti2, Nagsen Gautam2, You Zhou3, Larisa Poluektova1, Alexander Kabanov2, Tatiana Bronich2, Howard E Gendelman11Departments of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; 3Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USAAbstract: Despite the successes of antiretroviral therapy (ART, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders remain prevalent in infected people. This is due, in part, to incomplete ART penetration across the blood–brain barrier (BBB and lymph nodes and to the establishment of viral sanctuaries within the central nervous system. In efforts to improve ART delivery, our laboratories developed a macrophage-carriage system for nanoformulated crystalline ART (nanoART (atazanavir, ritonavir, indinavir, and efavirenz. We demonstrate that nanoART transfer from mononuclear phagocytes (MP to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC can be realized through cell-to-cell contacts, which can facilitate drug passage across the BBB. Coculturing of donor MP containing nanoART with recipient HBMEC facilitates intercellular particle transfer. NanoART uptake was observed in up to 52% of HBMEC with limited cytotoxicity. Folate coating of nanoART increased MP to HBMEC particle transfer by up to 77%. To translate the cell assays into relevant animal models of disease, ritonavir and atazanavir nanoformulations were injected into HIV-1-infected NOD/scid-γcnull mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Atazanavir and ritonavir levels in brains of mice treated with folate-coated nanoART were three- to four-fold higher than in mice treated with noncoated particles. This was associated with decreased viral load in the spleen and

  19. Multiparametric MRI and targeted prostate biopsy: Improvements in cancer detection, localization, and risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Wysock, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that increases the accurate localization of prostate cancer at the time of MRI targeted biopsy, thereby enhancing clinical risk assessment, and improving the ability to appropriately counsel patients regarding therapy. Material and methods We used MEDLINE/PubMed to conduct a comprehensive search of the English medical literature. Articles were reviewed, data was extracted, analyzed, and summarized. In this review, we discuss the mp-MRI prostate exam, its role in targeted prostate biopsy, along with clinical applications and outcomes of MRI targeted biopsies. Results Mp-MRI, consisting of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and possibly MR spectroscopy, has demonstrated improved specificity in prostate cancer detection as compared to conventional T2-weighted images alone. An MRI suspicion score has been developed and is depicted using an institutional Likert or, more recently, a standardized reporting scale (PI-RADS). Techniques of MRI-targeted biopsy include in-gantry MRI guided biopsy, TRUS-guided visual estimation biopsy, and software co-registered MRI-US guided biopsy (MRI-US fusion). Among men with no previous biopsy, MRI-US fusion biopsy demonstrates up to a 20% increase in detection of clinically significant cancers compared to systematic biopsy while avoiding a significant portion of low risk disease. These data suggest a potential role in reducing over-detection and, ultimately, over-treatment. Among men with previous negative biopsy, 72–87% of cancers detected by MRI targeted biopsy are clinically significant. Among men with known low risk cancer, repeat biopsy by MR-targeting improves risk stratification in selecting men appropriate for active surveillance secondarily reducing the need for repetitive biopsy during surveillance. Conclusions Use of mp-MRI for targeting prostate biopsies has the potential to reduce the

  20. D-Cycloserine improves functional outcome after traumatic brain injury with wide therapeutic window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeleye, A.; Biegon, A.; Adeleye, A.; Shohami, E.; Nachman, D.; Alexandrovich, A.; Trembovler, V.; Yaka, R.; Shoshan, Y.; Dhawan, J.; Biegon, A.

    2009-12-01

    It has been long thought that hyperactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors underlies neurological decline after traumatic brain injury. However, all clinical trials with NMDA receptor antagonists failed. Since NMDA receptors are down-regulated from 4 h to 2 weeks after brain injury, activation at 24 h, rather than inhibition, of these receptors, was previously shown to be beneficial in mice. Here, we tested the therapeutic window, dose regimen and mechanism of action of the NMDA receptor partial agonist d-cycloserine (DCS) in traumatic brain injury. Male mice were subjected to trauma using a weight-drop model, and administered 10 mg/kg (i.p.) DCS or vehicle once (8, 16, 24, or 72 h) twice (24 and 48 h) or three times (24, 48 and 72 h). Functional recovery was assessed for up to 60 days, using a Neurological Severity Score that measures neurobehavioral parameters. In all groups in which treatment was begun at 24 or 72 h neurobehavioral function was significantly better than in the vehicle-treated groups. Additional doses, on days 2 and 3 did not further improve recovery. Mice treated at 8 h or 16 h post injury did not differ from the vehicle-treated controls. Co-administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 completely blocked the protective effect of DCS given at 24 h. Infarct volume measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining at 48 h or by cresyl violet at 28 days was not affected by DCS treatment. Since DCS is used clinically for other indications, the present study offers a novel approach for treating human traumatic brain injury with a therapeutic window of at least 24 h.

  1. Brain activation predicts treatment improvement in patients with major depressive disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samson, Andrea C

    2012-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with alterations in brain function that might be useful for therapy evaluation. The current study aimed to identify predictors for therapy improvement and to track functional brain changes during therapy. Twenty-one drug-free patients with MDD underwent functional MRI twice during performance of an emotional perception task: once before and once after 4 weeks of antidepressant treatment (mirtazapine or venlafaxine). Twelve healthy controls were investigated once with the same methods. A significant difference between groups was a relative greater activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in the patients vs. controls. Before treatment, patients responding better to pharmacological treatment showed greater activation in the dorsomedial PFC (dmPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (pCC) and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) when viewing of negative emotional pictures was compared with the resting condition. Activations in the caudate nucleus and insula contrasted for emotional compared to neutral stimuli were also associated with successful treatment. Responders had also significantly higher levels of activation, compared to non-responders, in a range of other brain regions. Brain activation related to treatment success might be related to altered self-referential processes and a differential response to external emotional stimuli, suggesting differences in the processing of emotionally salient stimuli between those who are likely to respond to pharmacological treatment and those who will not. The present investigation suggests the pCC, dmPFC, SFG, caudate nucleus and insula may have a key role as a biological marker for treatment response and predictor for therapeutic success.

  2. Next-generation sequencing in routine brain tumor diagnostics enables an integrated diagnosis and identifies actionable targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahm, Felix; Schrimpf, Daniel; Jones, David T W; Meyer, Jochen; Kratz, Annekathrin; Reuss, David; Capper, David; Koelsche, Christian; Korshunov, Andrey; Wiestler, Benedikt; Buchhalter, Ivo; Milde, Till; Selt, Florian; Sturm, Dominik; Kool, Marcel; Hummel, Manuela; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Mawrin, Christian; Schüller, Ulrich; Jungk, Christine; Wick, Antje; Witt, Olaf; Platten, Michael; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Wick, Wolfgang; von Deimling, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    With the number of prognostic and predictive genetic markers in neuro-oncology steadily growing, the need for comprehensive molecular analysis of neuropathology samples has vastly increased. We therefore developed a customized enrichment/hybrid-capture-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) gene panel comprising the entire coding and selected intronic and promoter regions of 130 genes recurrently altered in brain tumors, allowing for the detection of single nucleotide variations, fusions, and copy number aberrations. Optimization of probe design, library generation and sequencing conditions on 150 samples resulted in a 5-workday routine workflow from the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sample to neuropathological report. This protocol was applied to 79 retrospective cases with established molecular aberrations for validation and 71 prospective cases for discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Concordance of NGS compared to established, single biomarker methods was 98.0 %, with discrepancies resulting from one case where a TERT promoter mutation was not called by NGS and three ATRX mutations not being detected by Sanger sequencing. Importantly, in samples with low tumor cell content, NGS was able to identify mutant alleles that were not detectable by traditional methods. Information derived from NGS data identified potential targets for experimental therapy in 37/47 (79 %) glioblastomas, 9/10 (90 %) pilocytic astrocytomas, and 5/14 (36 %) medulloblastomas in the prospective target discovery cohort. In conclusion, we present the settings for high-throughput, adaptive next-generation sequencing in routine neuropathology diagnostics. Such an approach will likely become highly valuable in the near future for treatment decision making, as more therapeutic targets emerge and genetic information enters the classification of brain tumors. PMID:26671409

  3. Investigating the cubosomal ability for transnasal brain targeting: In vitro optimization, ex vivo permeation and in vivo biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Fatma Elzahraa; Elsayed, Ibrahim; Gad, Mary Kamal; Badr, Ahmed; Mohamed, Magdi Ibrahim

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to enhance the risperidone delivery to the brain through the transnasal route via optimization of cubosomal gel. Cubosomes were prepared using glycerol mono-oleate (GMO), Pluronic F127 (PF127) and Tween 80 (T80). The prepared formulae were characterized by testing their particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release and transmission electron microscopy. Central composite design was planned for the formulae optimization and the selected formula (containing PF127 with concentration 15 mg/g GMO and T80 with concentration of 20mg/L) was re-prepared in presence of gelling polymer (gellan gum or polyox). The optimal cubosomal gel (containing 0.4% w/v polyox) had been subjected to ex-vivo permeation, histopathological evaluation and in vivo biodistribution studies. It showed significantly higher transnasal permeation and better distribution to the brain, when compared to the used control (drug solution and/or suspension). Finally, the cubosomal gel could be considered as a promising carrier for brain targeting of CNS acting drugs through the transnasal route.

  4. Improving the survivability of Nb-encapsulated Ga targets for the production of 68Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, H. T.; Claytor, T. N.; Hunter, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Kelsey, C. T., IV; Engle, J. W.; Connors, M. A.; Nortier, F. M.; Runde, W. H.; Moddrell, C.; Lenz, J. W.; John, K. D.

    2013-03-01

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF), radioisotopes are produced for medical, scientific, and industrial applications by irradiating various targets with a 100 MeV, 230 μA proton beam. The medical isotope germanium-68 is produced by irradiating Nb capsules containing molten Ga target material. During irradiation, the Nb is subjected to intense radiation damage, corrosive attack by Ga, and mechanical and thermally-induced stresses for an extended period. Maintaining the structural integrity of the Nb target capsules during irradiation is crucial to contain the molten Ga target and the radioisotope product. In the present work, we focus on potential material related factors and assess the effect of the Nb stock material on target durability. We do so by comparing post-irradiation target mortality information to data collected during pre-irradiation ultrasound testing and X-ray imaging. We also explore possible failure mechanisms by using MCNP6 simulations and ANSYS codes to predict the induced atom displacement levels, hydrogen gas built-up, temperature distribution, and mechanical stresses. Our analysis, performed entirely in the context of an aggressive production program that allows for only limited diagnostic interference, suggests that using Nb stock with reasonably large and uniform grains is the most important factor in reducing early target failure at integrated beam current values face of the rear window at <60 mAh. We discuss possible failure mechanisms of failed targets that were fabricated using the same stock material and grain structure and then irradiated to integrated beam current values of up to 60 mAh and more. Based on these observations, we have enacted new specifications for Nb stock material quality, target design, and limits on integrated beam current. These changes have resulted in improved Nb capsule survivability.

  5. Targeting neural endophenotypes of eating disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Katharine A Dunlop; Blake eWoodside; Jonathan eDownar

    2016-01-01

    The term eating disorders (ED) encompasses a wide variety of disordered eating and compensatory behaviors, and so the term is associated with considerable clinical and phenotypic heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes optimizing treatment techniques difficult. One class of treatments is non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS). NIBS, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are accessible forms of neuromodulation that alter...

  6. Targeting Neural Endophenotypes of Eating Disorders with Non-invasive Brain Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Katharine A Dunlop; Woodside, Blake; Downar, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The term “eating disorders” (ED) encompasses a wide variety of disordered eating and compensatory behaviors, and so the term is associated with considerable clinical and phenotypic heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes optimizing treatment techniques difficult. One class of treatments is non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS). NIBS, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), are accessible forms of neuromodulation that al...

  7. Enhanced brain targeting of temozolomide in polysorbate-80 coated polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Xin-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Xin-Hua Tian1, Xiao-Ning Lin1, Feng Wei1, Wei Feng1, Zhi-Chun Huang1, Peng Wang1, Lei Ren2, Yi Diao11Department of Neurosurgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China; 2Research Center of Biomedical Engineering, Xiamen, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA) nanoparticles coated with polysorbate-80 have been extensively proposed for delivering drugs into the animal brain and have shown great potential for thera...

  8. Reduced brain somatostatin in mood disorders: a common pathophysiological substrate and drug target?

    OpenAIRE

    Li-ChunLin; EtienneSibille

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of affect dysregulation has progressively increased, but the pharmacological treatments remain inadequate. Here, we summarize the current literature on deficits in somatostatin, an inhibitory modulatory neuropeptide, in major depression and other neurological disorders that also include mood disturbances. We focus on direct evidence in the human postmortem brain, and review rodent genetic and pharmacological studies probing the role of the somatostatin sys...

  9. New agents for targeting of IL-13RA2 expressed in primary human and canine brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Debinski

    Full Text Available Interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13RA2 is over-expressed in a vast majority of human patients with high-grade astrocytomas like glioblastoma. Spontaneous astrocytomas in dogs resemble human disease and have been proposed as translational model system for investigation of novel therapeutic strategies for brain tumors. We have generated reagents for both detection and therapeutic targeting of IL-13RA2 in human and canine brain tumors. Peptides from three different regions of IL-13RA2 with 100% sequence identity between human and canine receptors were used as immunogens for generation of monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant canine mutant IL-13 (canIL-13.E13K and canIL-13.E13K based cytotoxin were also produced. The antibodies were examined for their immunoreactivities in western blots, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and cell binding assays using human and canine tumor specimen sections, tissue lysates and established cell lines; the cytotoxin was tested for specific cell killing. Several isolated MAbs were immunoreactive to IL-13RA2 in western blots of cell and tissue lysates from glioblastomas from both human and canine patients. Human and canine astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas were also positive for IL-13RA2 to various degrees. Interestingly, both human and canine meningiomas also exhibited strong reactivity. Normal human and canine brain samples were virtually negative for IL-13RA2 using the newly generated MAbs. MAb 1E10B9 uniquely worked on tissue specimens and western blots, bound live cells and was internalized in GBM cells over-expressing IL-13RA2. The canIL-13.E13K cytotoxin was very potent and specific in killing canine GBM cell lines. Thus, we have obtained several monoclonal antibodies against IL-13RA2 cross-reacting with human and canine receptors. In addition to GBM, other brain tumors, such as high grade oligodendrogliomas, meningiomas and canine choroid plexus papillomas, appear to express the receptor at high levels

  10. Phase improvement via the Phantom Derivative technique: ancils that are related to the target structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzini, Benedetta; Cascarano, Giovanni Luca; Giacovazzo, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    Density modification is a general standard technique which may be used to improve electron density derived from experimental phasing and also to refine densities obtained by ab initio approaches. Here, a novel method to expand density modification is presented, termed the Phantom derivative technique, which is based on non-existent structure factors and is of particular interest in molecular replacement. The Phantom derivative approach uses randomly generated ancil structures with the same unit cell as the target structure to create non-existent derivatives of the target structure, called phantom derivatives, which may be used for ab initio phasing or for refining the available target structure model. In this paper, it is supposed that a model electron density is available: it is shown that ancil structures related to the target obtained by shifting the target by origin-permissible translations may be employed to refine model phases. The method enlarges the concept of the ancil, is as efficient as the canonical approach using random ancils and significantly reduces the CPU refinement time. The results from many real test cases show that the proposed methods can substantially improve the quality of electron-density maps from molecular-replacement-based phases. PMID:27050134

  11. Cathepsin B is a New Drug Target for Traumatic Brain Injury Therapeutics: Evidence for E64d as a Promising Lead Drug Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eHook

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There currently is no therapeutic drug treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI despite decades of experimental clinical trials. This may be because the mechanistic pathways for improving TBI outcomes have yet to be identified and exploited. As such, there remains a need to seek out new molecular targets and their drug candidates to find new treatments for TBI. This review presents supporting evidence for cathepsin B, a cysteine protease, as a potentially important drug target for TBI. Cathepsin B expression is greatly up-regulated in TBI animal models, as well as in trauma patients. Importantly, knockout of the cathepsin B gene in TBI mice results in substantial improvements of TBI-caused deficits in behavior, pathology, and biomarkers, as well as improvements in related injury models. During the process of TBI-induced injury, cathepsin B likely escapes the lysosome, its normal subcellular location, into the cytoplasm or extracellular matrix (ECM where its unleashed proteolytic power causes destruction via necrotic, apoptotic, autophagic, and activated glia-induced cell death, together with ECM breakdown and inflammation. Significantly, chemical inhibitors of cathepsin B are effective for improving deficits in TBI and related injuries including ischemia, cerebral bleeding, cerebral aneurysm, edema, pain, infection, nephritis, epilepsy, rheumatoid arthritis, pancreatitis, Huntington’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. The inhibitor E64d shows prominent efficacy for amelioration of TBI-caused deficits in preclinical models. In clinical trials, E64d has been shown to be safe based on its toxicological profile and, thus, illustrates the compound as an excellent candidate for drug development. These data support the overall conclusion that drug development of cathepsin B inhibitors, with E64d or a novel analog as a lead drug candidate, should be accelerated to improve the outcomes of TBI and related injuries.

  12. Ghrelin and the brain-gut axis as a pharmacological target for appetite control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; El-Salhy, Magdy; Hausken, Trygve; Gundersen, Doris; Chopin, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Appetite regulation is highly complex and involves a large number of orexigenic and anorexigenic peptide hormones. These are small, processed, secreted peptides derived from larger prepropeptide precursors. These peptides are important targets for the development of therapeutics for obesity, a global health epidemic. As a case study, we consider the ghrelin axis. The ghrelin axis is likely to be a particularly useful drug target, as it also plays a role in energy homeostasis, adipogenesis, insulin regulation and reward associated with food intake. Ghrelin is the only known circulating gut orexigenic peptide hormone. As it appears to play a role in diet-induced obesity, blocking the action of ghrelin is likely to be effective for treating and preventing obesity. The ghrelin peptide has been targeted using a number of approaches, with ghrelin mirror-image oligonucleotides (Spiegelmers) and immunotherapy showing some promise. The ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, may also provide a useful target and a number of antagonists and inverse agonists have been developed. A particularly promising new target is the enzyme which octanoylates ghrelin, ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), and drugs that inhibit GOAT are likely to circumvent pharmacological issues associated with approaches that directly target ghrelin or its receptor.

  13. Improved target detection and bearing estimation utilizing fast orthogonal search for real-time spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Abdalla; Nourledin, Aboelamgd; El-Sheimy, Naser; Theriault, Jim; Campbell, Scott

    2009-06-01

    The problem of target detection and tracking in the ocean environment has attracted considerable attention due to its importance in military and civilian applications. Sonobuoys are one of the capable passive sonar systems used in underwater target detection. Target detection and bearing estimation are mainly obtained through spectral analysis of received signals. The frequency resolution introduced by current techniques is limited which affects the accuracy of target detection and bearing estimation at a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This research investigates the development of a bearing estimation method using fast orthogonal search (FOS) for enhanced spectral estimation. FOS is employed in this research in order to improve both target detection and bearing estimation in the case of low SNR inputs. The proposed methods were tested using simulated data developed for two different scenarios under different underwater environmental conditions. The results show that the proposed method is capable of enhancing the accuracy for target detection as well as bearing estimation especially in cases of a very low SNR.

  14. Improving the quality of small animal brain pinhole SPECT imaging by Bayesian reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohlberg, Antti [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Lensu, Sanna [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Kuopio (Finland); Department of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland); Jolkkonen, Jukka [Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Kuopio, Kuopio (Finland); Tuomisto, Leena [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Kuopio (Finland); Ruotsalainen, Ulla [Institute of Signal Processing, DMI, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland); Kuikka, Jyrki T. [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, 70211, Kuopio (Finland); Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The possibility of using existing hardware makes pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) attractive when pursuing the ultra-high resolution required for small animal brain imaging. Unfortunately, the poor sensitivity and the heavy weight of the collimator hamper the use of pinhole SPECT in animal studies by generating noisy and misaligned projections. To improve the image quality we have developed a new Bayesian reconstruction method, pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP), which prevents the excessive noise accumulation from the projections to the reconstructed image. The PH-MRP algorithm was used to reconstruct data acquired with our small animal rotating device, which was designed to reduce the rotation orbit misalignments. Phantom experiments were performed to test the device and compare the PH-MRP with the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) and pinhole ordered subsets maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (PH-OSEM) reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of the system for small animal brain imaging was studied with Han-Wistar rats injected with {sup 123}I-epidepride and {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxy methylene diphosphonate. Considering all the experiments, no shape distortions due to orbit misalignments were encountered and remarkable improvements in noise characteristics and also in overall image quality were observed when the PH-MRP was applied instead of the FDK or PH-OSEM. In addition, the proposed methods utilise existing hardware and require only a certain amount of construction and programming work, making them easy to implement. (orig.)

  15. Improving the quality of small animal brain pinhole SPECT imaging by Bayesian reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using existing hardware makes pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) attractive when pursuing the ultra-high resolution required for small animal brain imaging. Unfortunately, the poor sensitivity and the heavy weight of the collimator hamper the use of pinhole SPECT in animal studies by generating noisy and misaligned projections. To improve the image quality we have developed a new Bayesian reconstruction method, pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP), which prevents the excessive noise accumulation from the projections to the reconstructed image. The PH-MRP algorithm was used to reconstruct data acquired with our small animal rotating device, which was designed to reduce the rotation orbit misalignments. Phantom experiments were performed to test the device and compare the PH-MRP with the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) and pinhole ordered subsets maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (PH-OSEM) reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of the system for small animal brain imaging was studied with Han-Wistar rats injected with 123I-epidepride and 99mTc-hydroxy methylene diphosphonate. Considering all the experiments, no shape distortions due to orbit misalignments were encountered and remarkable improvements in noise characteristics and also in overall image quality were observed when the PH-MRP was applied instead of the FDK or PH-OSEM. In addition, the proposed methods utilise existing hardware and require only a certain amount of construction and programming work, making them easy to implement. (orig.)

  16. Improving the quality of small animal brain pinhole SPECT imaging by Bayesian reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlberg, Antti; Lensu, Sanna; Jolkkonen, Jukka; Tuomisto, Leena; Ruotsalainen, Ulla; Kuikka, Jyrki T

    2004-07-01

    The possibility of using existing hardware makes pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) attractive when pursuing the ultra-high resolution required for small animal brain imaging. Unfortunately, the poor sensitivity and the heavy weight of the collimator hamper the use of pinhole SPECT in animal studies by generating noisy and misaligned projections. To improve the image quality we have developed a new Bayesian reconstruction method, pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP), which prevents the excessive noise accumulation from the projections to the reconstructed image. The PH-MRP algorithm was used to reconstruct data acquired with our small animal rotating device, which was designed to reduce the rotation orbit misalignments. Phantom experiments were performed to test the device and compare the PH-MRP with the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) and pinhole ordered subsets maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (PH-OSEM) reconstruction algorithms. The feasibility of the system for small animal brain imaging was studied with Han-Wistar rats injected with (123)I-epidepride and (99m)Tc-hydroxy methylene diphosphonate. Considering all the experiments, no shape distortions due to orbit misalignments were encountered and remarkable improvements in noise characteristics and also in overall image quality were observed when the PH-MRP was applied instead of the FDK or PH-OSEM. In addition, the proposed methods utilise existing hardware and require only a certain amount of construction and programming work, making them easy to implement. PMID:14991246

  17. Protecting Neural Structures and Cognitive Function During Prolonged Space Flight by Targeting the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Molecular Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. A.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main activity-dependent neurotrophin in the human nervous system. BDNF is implicated in production of new neurons from dentate gyrus stem cells (hippocampal neurogenesis), synapse formation, sprouting of new axons, growth of new axons, sprouting of new dendrites, and neuron survival. Alterations in the amount or activity of BDNF can produce significant detrimental changes to cortical function and synaptic transmission in the human brain. This can result in glial and neuronal dysfunction, which may contribute to a range of clinical conditions, spanning a number of learning, behavioral, and neurological disorders. There is an extensive body of work surrounding the BDNF molecular network, including BDNF gene polymorphisms, methylated BDNF gene promoters, multiple gene transcripts, varied BDNF functional proteins, and different BDNF receptors (whose activation differentially drive the neuron to neurogenesis or apoptosis). BDNF is also closely linked to mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1alpha, which can influence brain and muscle metabolic efficiency. BDNF AS A HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT COUNTERMEASURE TARGET Earth-based studies reveal that BDNF is negatively impacted by many of the conditions encountered in the space environment, including oxidative stress, radiation, psychological stressors, sleep deprivation, and many others. A growing body of work suggests that the BDNF network is responsive to a range of diet, nutrition, exercise, drug, and other types of influences. This section explores the BDNF network in the context of 1) protecting the brain and nervous system in the space environment, 2) optimizing neurobehavioral performance in space, and 3) reducing the residual effects of space flight on the nervous system on return to Earth

  18. Targeting the ecology within: The role of the gut-brain axis and human microbiota in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skosnik, Patrick D; Cortes-Briones, Jose A

    2016-08-01

    Despite major advances in our understanding of the brain using traditional neuroscience, reliable and efficacious treatments for drug addiction have remained elusive. Hence, the time has come to utilize novel approaches, particularly those drawing upon contemporary advances in fields outside of established neuroscience and psychiatry. Put another way, the time has come for a paradigm shift in the addiction sciences. Apropos, a revolution in the area of human health is underway, which is occurring at the nexus between enteric microbiology and neuroscience. It has become increasingly clear that the human microbiota (the vast ecology of bacteria residing within the human organism), plays an important role in health and disease. This is not surprising, as it has been estimated that bacteria living in the human body (approximately 1kg of mass, roughly equivalent to that of the human brain) outnumber human cells 10 to 1. While advances in the understanding of the role of microbiota in other areas of human health have yielded intriguing results (e.g., Clostridium difficile, irritable bowel syndrome, autism, etc.), to date, no systematic programs of research have examined the role of microbiota in drug addiction. The current hypothesis, therefore, is that gut dysbiosis plays a key role in addictive disorders. In the context of this hypothesis, this paper provides a rationale for future research to target the "gut-brain axis" in addiction. A brief background of the gut-brain axis is provided, along with a series of hypothesis-driven ideas outlining potential treatments for addiction via manipulations of the "ecology within." PMID:27372861

  19. Attenuated traumatic axonal injury and improved functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice lacking Sarm1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Nils; Bouley, James; Sikoglu, Elif M; An, Jiyan; Moore, Constance M; King, Jean A; Bowser, Robert; Freeman, Marc R; Brown, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a critical, early event in many acute and chronic neurological disorders. It has been consistently observed after traumatic brain injury, but whether axon degeneration is a driver of traumatic brain injury remains unclear. Molecular pathways underlying the pathology of traumatic brain injury have not been defined, and there is no efficacious treatment for traumatic brain injury. Here we show that mice lacking the mouse Toll receptor adaptor Sarm1 (sterile α/Armadillo/Toll-Interleukin receptor homology domain protein) gene, a key mediator of Wallerian degeneration, demonstrate multiple improved traumatic brain injury-associated phenotypes after injury in a closed-head mild traumatic brain injury model. Sarm1(-/-) mice developed fewer β-amyloid precursor protein aggregates in axons of the corpus callosum after traumatic brain injury as compared to Sarm1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, mice lacking Sarm1 had reduced plasma concentrations of the phophorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H, indicating that axonal integrity is maintained after traumatic brain injury. Strikingly, whereas wild-type mice exibited a number of behavioural deficits after traumatic brain injury, we observed a strong, early preservation of neurological function in Sarm1(-/-) animals. Finally, using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy we found tissue signatures consistent with substantially preserved neuronal energy metabolism in Sarm1(-/-) mice compared to controls immediately following traumatic brain injury. Our results indicate that the SARM1-mediated prodegenerative pathway promotes pathogenesis in traumatic brain injury and suggest that anti-SARM1 therapeutics are a viable approach for preserving neurological function after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26912636

  20. Attenuated traumatic axonal injury and improved functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice lacking Sarm1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Nils; Bouley, James; Sikoglu, Elif M; An, Jiyan; Moore, Constance M; King, Jean A; Bowser, Robert; Freeman, Marc R; Brown, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a critical, early event in many acute and chronic neurological disorders. It has been consistently observed after traumatic brain injury, but whether axon degeneration is a driver of traumatic brain injury remains unclear. Molecular pathways underlying the pathology of traumatic brain injury have not been defined, and there is no efficacious treatment for traumatic brain injury. Here we show that mice lacking the mouse Toll receptor adaptor Sarm1 (sterile α/Armadillo/Toll-Interleukin receptor homology domain protein) gene, a key mediator of Wallerian degeneration, demonstrate multiple improved traumatic brain injury-associated phenotypes after injury in a closed-head mild traumatic brain injury model. Sarm1(-/-) mice developed fewer β-amyloid precursor protein aggregates in axons of the corpus callosum after traumatic brain injury as compared to Sarm1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, mice lacking Sarm1 had reduced plasma concentrations of the phophorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H, indicating that axonal integrity is maintained after traumatic brain injury. Strikingly, whereas wild-type mice exibited a number of behavioural deficits after traumatic brain injury, we observed a strong, early preservation of neurological function in Sarm1(-/-) animals. Finally, using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy we found tissue signatures consistent with substantially preserved neuronal energy metabolism in Sarm1(-/-) mice compared to controls immediately following traumatic brain injury. Our results indicate that the SARM1-mediated prodegenerative pathway promotes pathogenesis in traumatic brain injury and suggest that anti-SARM1 therapeutics are a viable approach for preserving neurological function after traumatic brain injury.

  1. Neurologic music therapy improves executive function and emotional adjustment in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H; Gardiner, James C; Holmberg, Dawn; Horwitz, Javan; Kent, Luanne; Andrews, Garrett; Donelan, Beth; McIntosh, Gerald R

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the immediate effects of neurologic music therapy (NMT) on cognitive functioning and emotional adjustment with brain-injured persons. Four treatment sessions were held, during which participants were given a pre-test, participated in 30 min of NMT that focused on one aspect of rehabilitation (attention, memory, executive function, or emotional adjustment), which was followed by post-testing. Control participants engaged in a pre-test, 30 min of rest, and then a post-test. Treatment participants showed improvement in executive function and overall emotional adjustment, and lessening of depression, sensation seeking, and anxiety. Control participants improved in emotional adjustment and lessening of hostility, but showed decreases in measures of memory, positive affect, and sensation seeking. PMID:19673815

  2. Neurologic music therapy improves executive function and emotional adjustment in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H; Gardiner, James C; Holmberg, Dawn; Horwitz, Javan; Kent, Luanne; Andrews, Garrett; Donelan, Beth; McIntosh, Gerald R

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the immediate effects of neurologic music therapy (NMT) on cognitive functioning and emotional adjustment with brain-injured persons. Four treatment sessions were held, during which participants were given a pre-test, participated in 30 min of NMT that focused on one aspect of rehabilitation (attention, memory, executive function, or emotional adjustment), which was followed by post-testing. Control participants engaged in a pre-test, 30 min of rest, and then a post-test. Treatment participants showed improvement in executive function and overall emotional adjustment, and lessening of depression, sensation seeking, and anxiety. Control participants improved in emotional adjustment and lessening of hostility, but showed decreases in measures of memory, positive affect, and sensation seeking.

  3. Genome-wide identification of Bcl11b gene targets reveals role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    Full Text Available B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 11B (Bcl11b is a transcription factor showing predominant expression in the striatum. To date, there are no known gene targets of Bcl11b in the nervous system. Here, we define targets for Bcl11b in striatal cells by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with genome-wide expression profiling. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed that 694 genes were significantly altered in striatal cells over-expressing Bcl11b, including genes showing striatal-enriched expression similar to Bcl11b. ChIP-seq analysis demonstrated that Bcl11b bound a mixture of coding and non-coding sequences that were within 10 kb of the transcription start site of an annotated gene. Integrating all ChIP-seq hits with the microarray expression data, 248 direct targets of Bcl11b were identified. Functional analysis on the integrated gene target list identified several zinc-finger encoding genes as Bcl11b targets, and further revealed a significant association of Bcl11b to brain-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin signaling. Analysis of ChIP-seq binding regions revealed significant consensus DNA binding motifs for Bcl11b. These data implicate Bcl11b as a novel regulator of the BDNF signaling pathway, which is disrupted in many neurological disorders. Specific targeting of the Bcl11b-DNA interaction could represent a novel therapeutic approach to lowering BDNF signaling specifically in striatal cells.

  4. Derivation of injury-responsive dendritic cells for acute brain targeting and therapeutic protein delivery in the stroke-injured rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Manley

    Full Text Available Research with experimental stroke models has identified a wide range of therapeutic proteins that can prevent the brain damage caused by this form of acute neurological injury. Despite this, we do not yet have safe and effective ways to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured brain, and this remains a major obstacle for clinical translation. Current targeted strategies typically involve invasive neurosurgery, whereas systemic approaches produce the undesirable outcome of non-specific protein delivery to the entire brain, rather than solely to the injury site. As a potential way to address this, we developed a protein delivery system modeled after the endogenous immune cell response to brain injury. Using ex-vivo-engineered dendritic cells (DCs, we find that these cells can transiently home to brain injury in a rat model of stroke with both temporal and spatial selectivity. We present a standardized method to derive injury-responsive DCs from bone marrow and show that injury targeting is dependent on culture conditions that maintain an immature DC phenotype. Further, we find evidence that when loaded with therapeutic cargo, cultured DCs can suppress initial neuron death caused by an ischemic injury. These results demonstrate a non-invasive method to target ischemic brain injury and may ultimately provide a way to selectively deliver therapeutic compounds to the injured brain.

  5. Chemical Conjugation of the Neuropeptide Kyotorphin and Ibuprofen Enhances Brain Targeting and Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Marta M. B.; Pinto, Antónia R. T.; Domingues, Marco M.; Serrano, Isa D.; Heras i Corominas, Montserrat; Bardají Rodríguez, Eduard; Tavares, Isaura R.; Castanho, Miguel Augusto Rico Botas

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical potential of natural analgesic peptides is mainly hampered by their inability to cross the blood-brain barrier, BBB. Increasing peptide-cell membrane affinity through drug design is a promising strategy to overcome this limitation. To address this challenge, we grafted ibuprofen (IBP), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, to kyotorphin (l-Tyr-l-Arg, KTP), an analgesic neuropeptide unable to cross BBB. Two new KTP derivatives, IBP-KTP (IbKTP-OH) and IBP-KTP-amide (IbKTP-NH...

  6. 大鼠脑立体定向手术校正的三种方法%THREE METHODS OF CORRECTING THE TARGET SITE IN THE RAT BRAIN ON STEREOTAXIC COORDINATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王少锦; 孙彦辉; 赵志国; 杨天祝

    2001-01-01

    Objective The present paper introduces an integrated method for stereotaxic operation on the rat brain, using three different procedures for correcting the brain targeting site.Methods Before the ordinary method for correcting the target site ,on the stereotaxic instrument the target site was exposured and the stereotaxic coordinates were corrected in fixed brain , and then unfixed brain, respectively.Results As the application of three methods is set up,the defect of every method can be removed and the course of experiment can be shorten,so the efficiency of the tanget site in the rat brainon stereotaxic coordinates is improved.Conclusion With fewer animals and fewer preliminary tests the brain target site can be corrected accurately.%目的介绍三种方法相结合的大鼠脑立体定位术程序书。方法在一般以切片观察确定靶位之前,先后分别将经过固定的死鼠、活鼠,固定在大鼠脑立体定位仪上,暴露靶点并校正靶坐标。结果三种方法结合运用后,克服了每种方法的缺点,缩短了预实验时间,提高了大鼠脑立体定向手术的效率。结论以少量的动物,经过较少次预实验,即能打准大鼠脑靶。

  7. Comparison of Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Targeting Accuracy and Procedure Duration between 1.5-and 3-Tesla Interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems: An Initial 12-Month Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Southwell, DG; Narvid, JA; Martin, AJ; Qasim, SE; Starr, PA; Larson, PS

    2016-01-01

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) allows deep brain stimulator lead placement under general anesthesia. While the accuracy of lead targeting has been described for iMRI systems utilizing 1.5-tesla magnets, a similar assessment of 3-tesla iMRI procedures has not been performed.To compare targeting accuracy, the number of lead targeting attempts, and surgical duration between procedures performed on 1.5- and 3-tesla iMRI systems.Radial targeting error, the number of targeting att...

  8. Insulin-Associated Neuroinflammatory Pathways as Therapeutic Targets for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo-López, Christian D.; Kim-Lee, Jennifer H.; Hernandez, Diana; Acosta, Sandra A.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by an abrupt blow or exchange of force against the head and can be categorized as mild, moderate, and severe. The secondary cell death after TBI displays ischemic-like patterns including neuroinflammation. The scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation (CD) 36 is a lipid-associated protein capable of transducing intracellular signals to promote inflammatory mechanisms within different cell types. Expression and activation of CD36 is closely related to dyslipidemia secondary to diabetes. Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been documented as a co-morbidity factor in TBI, in that patients with a history of diabetes present with more severe brain damage and slower recovery from TBI than non-diabetic patients. Indeed, a strict regulation of blood serum glucose by the use of insulin promotes a better outcome for TBI patients. Based on these recent findings, we now advance the hypothesis that CD36 via DM insulin-associated pathways is closely involved in TBI chronic pathology. PMID:24332562

  9. [Improvement in zinc nutrition due to zinc transporter-targeting strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Taiho

    2016-07-01

    Adequate intake of zinc from the daily diet is indispensable to maintain health. However, the dietary zinc content often fails to fulfill the recommended daily intake, leading to zinc deficiency and also increases the risk of developing chronic diseases, particularly in elderly individuals. Therefore, increased attention is required to overcome zinc deficiency and it is important to improve zinc nutrition in daily life. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter, ZIP4, functions as a component that is essential for zinc absorption. In this manuscript, we present a brief overview regarding zinc deficiency. Moreover, we review a novel strategy, called "ZIP4-targeting", which has the potential to enable efficient zinc absorption from the diet. ZIP4-targeting strategy is possibly a major step in preventing zinc deficiency and improving human health. PMID:27455817

  10. Ovarian cancer stem cells: Can targeted therapy lead to improved progression-free survival?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christen; L; Walters; Haygood; Rebecca; C; Arend; J; Michael; Straughn; Donald; J; Buchsbaum

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant effort and research funds, epithelial ovarian cancer remains a very deadly disease. There are no effective screening methods that discover early stage disease; the majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced disease. Treatment modalities consist primarily of radical debulking surgery followed by taxane and platinum-based chemotherapy. Newer therapies including limited targeted agents and intraperitoneal delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs have improved disease-free intervals, but failed to yield longlasting cures in most patients. Chemotherapeutic resistance, particularly in the recurrent setting, plagues the disease. Targeting the pathways and mechanisms behind the development of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer could lead to significant improvement in patient outcomes. In many malignancies, including blood and other solid tumors, there is a subgroup of tumor cells, separate from the bulk population, called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These CSCs are thought to be the cause of metastasis, recurrence and resistance. However, todate, ovarian CSCs have been difficult to identify, isolate, and target. It is felt by many investigators that finding a putative ovarian CSC and a chemotherapeutic agent to target it could be the key to a cure for this deadly disease. This review will focus on recent advances in this arena and discuss some of the controversies surrounding the concept.

  11. The Improvement of DS Evidence Theory and Its Application in IR/MMW Target Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ATR system has a broad application prospect in the military field, especially in the field of modern defense technology. When paradoxes are in existence in ATR system due to adverse battlefield environment, integration cannot be effectively and reliably carried out only by traditional DS evidence theory. In this paper, a modified DS evidence theory is presented and applied in IR/MMW target recognition system. The improvement of DS evidence theory is realized by three parts: the introduction of sensor priority and evidence credibility to realize the discount processing of evidences, the modification of DS combination rule to enhance the accuracy of synthesis results, and the compound decision-making rule. The application of the modified algorithm in IR/MMW system is designed to deal with paradoxes, improve the target recognition rate, and ensure the reliability of target recognition system. Experiments are given to illustrate that the introduction of the modified DS evidence theory in IR/MMW system is better able to realize satisfactory target recognition performance through multisensor information fusion than any single-mode system.

  12. Targeting Noncognitive Skills to Improve Cognitive Outcomes: Evidence from a Remedial Education Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Holmlund, Helena; Silva, Olmo

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research highlights the importance of non-cognitive skills as determinants of young people's cognitive outcomes at school. However, little evidence exists about the effects of policies that specifically target students' non-cognitive skills as a way to improve educational achievements. In this paper, we shed light on this issue by studying a remedial education programme aimed at English secondary school pupils at risk of school exclusion and with worsening educational trajec...

  13. Administration of sesamol improved blood-brain barrier function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanGilder, R L; Kelly, K A; Chua, M D; Ptachcinski, R L; Huber, Jason D

    2009-07-01

    Uncontrolled or poorly controlled blood glucose during diabetes is an important factor in worsened vascular function. While evidence suggests that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a prominent role in development of microangiopathy of the retina, kidney, and nerves, the role oxidative stress plays on blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and structure has lagged behind. In this study, a natural antioxidant, sesamol, was administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats to examine the role that oxidative stress plays on BBB structure and function. Experiments were conducted at 56 days after STZ injection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats randomly were divided into four treatment groups CON--control; STZ--STZ-induced diabetes; CON + S--control + sesamol; STZ + S--STZ-induced diabetes + sesamol. Functional and structural changes to the BBB were measured by in situ brain perfusion and western blot analysis of changes in tight junction protein expression. Oxidative stress markers were visualized by fluorescent confocal microscopy and assayed by spectrophotometric analysis. Results demonstrated that the increased BBB permeability observed in STZ-induced diabetic rats was attenuated in STZ + S rats to levels observed in CON. Sesamol treatment reduced the negative impact of STZ-induced diabetes on tight junction protein expression in isolated cerebral microvessels. Oxidative stress markers were elevated in STZ as compared to CON. STZ + S displayed an improved antioxidant capacity which led to a reduced expression of superoxide and peroxynitrite and reduced lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, this study showed that sesamol treatment enhanced antioxidant capacity of the diabetic brain and led to decreased perturbation of hyperglycemia-induced changes in BBB structure and function.

  14. Potential applications of image-guided radiotherapy for brain metastases and glioblastoma to improve patient quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and brain metastasis remains a challenge because of the poor survival and the potential for brain damage following radiation. Despite concurrent chemotherapy and radiation dose escalation, local recurrence remains the predominant pattern of failure in GBM most likely secondary to repopulation of cancer stem cells. Even though radiotherapy is highly effective for local control of radio-resistant tumors such as melanoma and renal cell cancer, systemic disease progression is the cause of death in most patients with brain metastasis. Preservation of quality of life of cancer survivors is the main issue for patients with brain metastasis. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT by virtue of precise radiation dose delivery may reduce treatment time of patients with GBM without excessive toxicity and potentially improve neurocognitive function with preservation of local control in patients with brain metastasis. Future prospective trials for primary brain tumors or brain metastasis should include IGRT to assess its efficacy to improve patient quality of life.

  15. Pro-region engineering for improved yeast display and secretion of brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael L; Malott, Thomas M; Metcalf, Kevin J; Puguh, Arthya; Chan, Jonah R; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-03-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a promising therapeutic candidate for a variety of neurological diseases. However, it is difficult to produce as a recombinant protein. In its native mammalian context, BDNF is first produced as a pro-protein with subsequent proteolytic removal of the pro-region to yield mature BDNF protein. Therefore, in an attempt to improve yeast as a host for heterologous BDNF production, the BDNF pro-region was first evaluated for its effects on BDNF surface display and secretion. Addition of the wild-type pro-region to yeast BDNF production constructs improved BDNF folding both as a surface-displayed and secreted protein in terms of binding its natural receptors TrkB and p75, but titers remained low. Looking to further enhance the chaperone-like functions provided by the pro-region, two rounds of directed evolution were performed, yielding mutated pro-regions that further improved the display and secretion properties of BDNF. Subsequent optimization of the protease recognition site was used to control whether the produced protein was in pro- or mature BDNF forms. Taken together, we have demonstrated an effective strategy for improving BDNF compatibility with yeast protein engineering and secretion platforms. PMID:26580314

  16. Cognitive improvement following transvenous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongfei Li; Chun Yang; Rongmei Qu; Huiying Yang; Meichun Yu; Hui Tao; Jingxing Dai; Lin Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The effects of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADMSC) transplantation for the repair of traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. The present study observed neurological functional changes in a rat model of traumatic brain injury following ADMSC transplantation via the tail vein.Cell transplants were observed in injured cerebral cortex, and expression of brain-derived nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the injured hippocampus following transplantation. Results demonstrated that transvenous ADMSC transplants migrated to the injured cerebral cortex and significantly improved cognitive function.

  17. Melatonin Improves Outcomes of Heatstroke in Mice by Reducing Brain Inflammation and Oxidative Damage and Multiple Organ Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here that when untreated mice underwent heat stress, they displayed thermoregulatory deficit (e.g., animals display hypothermia during room temperature exposure, brain (or hypothalamic inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment (e.g., decreased plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone during heat stress, multiple organ dysfunction or failure, and lethality. Melatonin therapy significantly reduced the thermoregulatory deficit, brain inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment, multiple organ dysfunction, and lethality caused by heat stroke. Our data indicate that melatonin may improve outcomes of heat stroke by reducing brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and multiple organ dysfunction.

  18. Earth Science Data and Models for Improved Targeting of Humanitarian Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.

    2011-01-01

    Humanitarian assistance to developing countries has long focused on countries that have political, economic and strategic interest to the United States. Recent changes in global security concerns have heightened the perception that humanitarian action is becoming increasingly politicized. This is seen to be largely driven by the 'global war on terror' along with a push by donors and the United Nations for closer integration between humanitarian action and diplomatic, military and other spheres of engagement in conflict and crisis-affected states (HPG 2010). As we enter an era of rising commodity prices and increasing uncertainty in global food production due to a changing climate, scientific data and analysis will be increasingly important to improve the targeting of humanitarian assistance. Earth science data enables appropriate humanitarian response to complex food emergencies that arise in regions outside the areas of current strategic and security focus. As the climate changes, new places will become vulnerable to food insecurity and will need emergency assistance. Earth science data and multidisciplinary models will enable an information-based comparison of need that goes beyond strategic and political considerations to identify new hotspots of food insecurity as they emerge. These analyses will improve aid targeting and timeliness while reducing strategic risk by highlighting new regions at risk of crisis in a rapidly changing world. Improved targeting with respect to timing and location could reduce cost while increasing the likelihood that those who need aid get it.

  19. Blending of brain-machine interface and vision-guided autonomous robotics improves neuroprosthetic arm performance during grasping

    OpenAIRE

    Downey, John E; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Muelling, Katharina; Venkatraman, Arun; Valois, Jean-Sebastien; Hebert, Martial; Bagnell, J. Andrew; Schwartz, Andrew B.; Collinger, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) offer great potential for restoring upper limb function. However, grasping objects is a complicated task and the signals extracted from the brain may not always be capable of driving these movements reliably. Vision-guided robotic assistance is one possible way to improve BMI performance. We describe a method of shared control where the user controls a prosthetic arm using a BMI and receives assistance with positioning ...

  20. Acute and chronic elevation of erythropoietin in the brain improves exercise performance in mice without inducing erythropoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schuler, Beat; Vogel, Johannes; Grenacher, Beat; Jacobs, Robert A.; Arras, Margarete; Gassmann, Max

    2012-01-01

    Application of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo) improves exercise capacity by stimulating red blood cell production that, in turn, enhances oxygen delivery and utilization. Apart from this, when applied at high doses, rhEpo crosses the blood-brain barrier, triggering protective neuronal effects. Here we show a fundamental new role by which the presence of Epo in the brain augments exercise performance without altering red blood cell production. Two different animal models, the transge...

  1. Rosemary extract improves cognitive deficits in a rats model of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury associated with reduction of astrocytosis and neuronal degeneration in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hai; Xu, Lincheng; Zhang, Rongping; Cao, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Li; Guo, Zeyun; Qu, Yongqiang; Yu, Jianyun

    2016-05-27

    In this study, we investigated whether Rosemary extract (RE) improved cognitive deficits in repetitive mild Traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) rats and its potential mechanisms. The present results showed that rmTBI caused cognitive deficits, such as increased latency to find platform and decreased time spent in target quadrant in Morris water maze (MWM). These behavioral alterations were accompanying with the increased neuronal degeneration and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells, increased Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, decreased activity of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) and Catalase (CAT), elevated protein level of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in hippocampus. Treatment with RE prevented these changes above. Our findings confirmed the effect of rosemary extract on improvement of cognitive deficits and suggested its mechanisms might be mediated by anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory. Therefore, rosemary extract may be a potential treatment to improve cognitive deficits in rmTBI patients. PMID:27113205

  2. Soybean andtempeh total isolfavones improved antioxidant activities in normal and scopolamine-induced rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aliya Ahmad; Vasudevan Mani; Kalavathy Ramasamy; Atish Prakash; Abu Bakar Abdul Majeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To highlight the comparative studies between total isoflavone extracts from soybean and tempeh on the neuronal oxidative stress and antioxidant activities. Methods: The total isoflavones were administered orally for 15 days with 3 selected doses (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg). Piracetam (400 mg/kg,p.o.) was used as a standard drug while scopolamine (1 mg/kg,i.p.) was used as a drug that promoted amnesia in selected groups. The oxidative markers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide) were measured in brain homogenate. The antioxidant activities evaluated were catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione. Results: Our results showed that soybean and tempeh isoflavones significantly improved the levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione while decreased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide in both the brain of normal as well as scopolamine-induced animals. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that soybean and tempeh isoflavones could be useful in the management and prevention of age-related neurodegenerative changes including Alzheimer’s disease through its antioxidant activities.

  3. Perceptions of communicative competence after traumatic brain injury: implications for ecologically-driven intervention targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Allen, Elizabeth M; Prelock, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between non-verbal behaviours and perceptions of the communication abilities of an individual with anomia secondary to traumatic brain injury (TBI). Thirty-four university students studying Communication Sciences and Disorders were randomly assigned to watch or listen to six short clips of an individual with TBI engaged in conversation. Participants rated the individual on communication parameters from a modified version of the Pragmatic Protocol and four other dependent measures of communicative competence. A significant positive correlation was identified between perceptions of gestures and ratings of overall communicative competence, and between perceptions of hand and arm movements and ratings of overall communicative competence. Participant raters who viewed the individual's movements as inappropriate also rated her overall communication abilities less favourably. This finding highlights individuality in perception of communication competence and the importance of assessing communication partners' perceptions in a client's environment to determine socially relevant treatment goals.

  4. Metal Nanoparticles as Targeted Carriers Circumventing the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintov, A C; Velasco-Aguirre, C; Gallardo-Toledo, E; Araya, E; Kogan, M J

    2016-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles have been proposed as a carrier and a therapeutic agent in biomedical field because of their unique physiochemical properties. Due to these physicochemical properties, they can be used in different fields of biomedicine. In relation to this, plasmonic nanoparticles can be used for detection and photothermal destruction of tumor cells or toxic protein aggregates, and magnetic iron nanoparticles can be used for imaging and for hyperthermia of tumor cells. In addition, both therapy and imaging can be combined in one nanoparticle system, in a process called theranostics. Metal nanoparticles can be synthesized to modulate their size and shape, and conjugated with different ligands, which allow their application in drug delivery, diagnostics, and treatment of central nervous system diseases. This review is focused on the potential applications of metal nanoparticles and their capability to circumvent the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although many articles have demonstrated delivery of metal nanoparticles to the brain by crossing the BBB after systemic administration, the percentage of the injected dose that reaches this organ is low in comparison to others, especially the liver and spleen. In connection with this drawback, we elaborate the architecture of the BBB and review possible mechanisms to cross this barrier by engineered nanoparticles. The potential uses of metal nanoparticles for treatment of disorders as well as related neurotoxicological considerations are also discussed. Finally, we bring up for discussion a direct and relatively simpler solution to the problem. We discuss this in detail after having proposed the use of the intranasal administration route as a way to circumvent the BBB. This route has not been extensively studied yet for metal nanoparticles, although it could be used as a research tool for mechanistic understanding and toxicity as well as an added value for medical practice. PMID:27678178

  5. Targeting accuracy and closing timeline of the microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Teichert, Tobias; Wu, Shih-Ying; Wang, Shutao; Downs, Matthew; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-11-01

    The delivery of drugs to specific neural targets faces two fundamental problems: Most drugs do not cross the blood-brain barrier and those that do spread to all parts of the brain. To date there exists only one non-invasive methodology with the potential to solve these problems: selective blood-brain barrier disruption using micro-bubble enhanced focused ultrasound. We have recently developed a single-element 500 kHz spherical transducer ultrasound setup for use in the non-human primate. Using this system for selective blood-brain barrier disruption is technically no more challenging than positioning a TMS coil, and does not rely on MRI-guided targeting or expensive phased array ultrasound systems. So far, however, the targeting accuracy that can be achieved with this system has not been quantified systematically. Here we tested the accuracy of the system by targeting the caudate nucleus of the basal ganglia in two macaque monkeys. Our results show that average in-plane error of the system is on the order of 2 mm and targeting error in depth, i.e., along the ultrasound path, is even smaller and averaged 1.2 mm. In summary, targeting accuracy of our system is good enough to enable the selective delivery of drugs to specific sub-structures of the basal ganglia.

  6. Common and distinct neural targets of treatment: changing brain function in substance addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Konova, Anna B.; Moeller, Scott J.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging offers an opportunity to examine the neurobiological effects of therapeutic interventions for human drug addiction. Using activation likelihood estimation, the aim of the current meta-analysis was to quantitatively summarize functional neuroimaging studies of pharmacological and cognitive-based interventions for drug addiction, with an emphasis on their common and distinct neural targets. More exploratory analyses also contrasted subgroups of studies based on specific study and s...

  7. Targeting SRC in glioblastoma tumors and brain metastases: rationale and preclinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ahluwalia, Manmeet; de Groot, John; Liu, Wei; Gladson, Candece L.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an extremely aggressive, infiltrative tumor with a poor prognosis. The regulatory approval of bevacizumab for recurrent GBM has confirmed that molecularly targeted agents have potential for GBM treatment. Preclinical data showing that SRC and SRC-family kinases (SFKs) mediate intracellular signaling pathways controlling key biologic/oncogenic processes provide a strong rationale for investigating SRC/SFK inhibitors, eg, dasatinib, in GBM and clinical studies are underway...

  8. An Improved Brain Storm Optimization with Differential Evolution Strategy for Applications of ANNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijian Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain Storm Optimization (BSO algorithm is a swarm intelligence algorithm inspired by human being’s behavior of brainstorming. The performance of BSO is maintained by the creating process of ideas, but when it cannot find a better solution for some successive iterations, the result will be so inefficient that the population might be trapped into local optima. In this paper, we propose an improved BSO algorithm with differential evolution strategy and new step size method. Firstly, differential evolution strategy is incorporated into the creating operator of ideas to allow BSO jump out of stagnation, owing to its strong searching ability. Secondly, we introduce a new step size control method that can better balance exploration and exploitation at different searching generations. Finally, the proposed algorithm is first tested on 14 benchmark functions of CEC 2005 and then is applied to train artificial neural networks. Comparative experimental results illustrate that the proposed algorithm performs significantly better than the original BSO.

  9. Deep Learning Based Imaging Data Completion for Improved Brain Disease Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongjian; Zhang, Wenlu; Suk, Heung-Il; Wang, Li; Li, Jiang; Shen, Dinggang; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-01-01

    Combining multi-modality brain data for disease diagnosis commonly leads to improved performance. A challenge in using multi-modality data is that the data are commonly incomplete; namely, some modality might be missing for some subjects. In this work, we proposed a deep learning based framework for estimating multi-modality imaging data. Our method takes the form of convolutional neural networks, where the input and output are two volumetric modalities. The network contains a large number of trainable parameters that capture the relationship between input and output modalities. When trained on subjects with all modalities, the network can estimate the output modality given the input modality. We evaluated our method on the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, where the input and output modalities are MRI and PET images, respectively. Results showed that our method significantly outperformed prior methods. PMID:25320813

  10. Accuracy and safety of targeting using intraoperative "O-arm" during placement of deep brain stimulation electrodes without electrophysiological recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the accuracy of targeting using intraoperative "O-arm" during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Intraoperative O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) images were obtained to confirm the accuracy of placement. The difference between intended and actual target coordinates was calculated based on intraoperative images and postoperative CT scan. Euclidian vector error was obtained to estimate the directional error. Correlation of targeting error with the pneumocephalus and the deviation from the planned trajectory was also estimated. Twenty eight DBS leads (globus pallidus internus [GPi], n=13; subthalamic nucleus [STN], n=9; ventralis intermedius nucleus [VIM], n=6) were implanted in 20 patients using the stereotactic Leksell frame (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) under general anesthesia over a period of 1year. The mean age was 63.6±standard error of the mean (SEM) 15.7years and 60% of patients were males. The mean absolute difference (+SEM) between intended and actual target in x, y and z coordinates based on intraoperative CT scan was 0.65±0.09 (p=0.84), 0.58±0.08 (p=0.98), 1.13±0.10 (p=0.08), respectively, and postoperative (1month) CT scan was 0.82±0.15 (p=0.89), 0.55±0.11 (p=0.97), and 1.58±0.29 (p=0.08), respectively. The Euclidean vector error was 1.59±0.10 and 2.16±0.26 based on intraoperative and postoperative images, respectively. There was no statistically significant targeting error based on fusion of intraoperative CT images to either preoperative CT scan or MRI as registration series, the presence of pneumocephalus, deviation from planned trajectory or the anatomical target (STN versus VIM versus GPi) (p>0.05). Superficial skin infection was encountered in a single patient in this study. The mean total operating room time was 193.5±74.6 minutes. None of the patients required revision in our study. DBS leads can be implanted safely and accurately using intraoperative O-arm with a frame based targeting

  11. Intravenous Administration of Simvastatin Improves Cognitive Outcome following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountney, Andrea; Boutté, Angela M; Gilsdorf, Janice; Lu, Xi-Chun; Tortella, Frank C; Shear, Deborah A

    2016-08-15

    Simvastatin is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor commonly used to reduce serum cholesterol. The beneficial effects of oral simvastatin have been reported in pre-clinical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current study was designed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of simvastatin in a model of severe penetrating TBI using an intravenous (IV) route of administration. Rats were subjected to unilateral frontal penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI), and simvastatin was delivered intravenously at 30 min and 6 h post-injury and continued once daily for either 4 or 10 days post-PBBI. Motor function was assessed on the rotarod and cognitive performance was evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM) task. Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and the astrocytic biomarker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), were quantified at 1 h, 4 h, and 24 h post-injury. Histopathological damage was assessed at the terminal end-point. Rotarod testing revealed significant motor deficits in all injury groups but no significant simvastatin-induced therapeutic benefits. All PBBI-injured animals showed cognitive impairment on the MWM test; however, 10-day simvastatin treatment mitigated these effects. Animals showed significantly improved latency to platform and retention scores, whereas the 4-day treatment regimen failed to produce any significant improvements. Biomarker and cytokine analysis showed that IV simvastatin significantly reduced GFAP, interleukin (IL)-1α, and IL-17 serum levels by 4.0-, 2.6-, and 7.0-fold, respectively, at 4 h post-injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate that IV simvastatin provides significant protection against injury-induced cognitive dysfunction and reduces TBI-specific biomarker levels. Further research is warranted to identify the optimal dose and therapeutic window for IV delivery of simvastatin in models of severe TBI. PMID:26542887

  12. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Paula A; Turecki, Gustavo; Robison, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow to emerge. The transcription factor ΔFosB is induced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HPC) of rodents in response to stress or cocaine, and its expression in these regions is thought to regulate their "top down" control of reward circuitry, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we use biochemistry to examine the expression of the FosB family of transcription factors and their potential gene targets in PFC and HPC postmortem samples from depressed patients and cocaine addicts. We demonstrate that ΔFosB and other FosB isoforms are downregulated in the HPC but not the PFC in the brains of both depressed and addicted individuals. Further, we show that potential ΔFosB transcriptional targets, including GluA2, are also downregulated in the HPC but not PFC of cocaine addicts. Thus, we provide the first evidence of FosB gene expression in human HPC and PFC in these psychiatric disorders, and in light of recent findings demonstrating the critical role of HPC ΔFosB in rodent models of learning and memory, these data suggest that reduced ΔFosB in HPC could potentially underlie cognitive deficits accompanying chronic cocaine abuse or depression. PMID:27494187

  13. Improved sequence learning with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: evidence for treatment-specific network modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-02-22

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA-STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation.

  14. Brain specificity of diffuse optical imaging: improvements from superficial signal regression and tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Gregg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS is a portable monitor of cerebral hemodynamics with wide clinical potential. However, in fNIRS, the vascular signal from the brain is often obscured by vascular signals present in the scalp and skull. In this paper, we evaluate two methods for improving in vivo data from adult human subjects through the use of high-density diffuse optical tomography (DOT. First, we test whether we can extend superficial regression methods (which utilize the multiple source-detector pair separations from sparse optode arrays to application with DOT imaging arrays. In order to accomplish this goal, we modify the method to remove physiological artifacts from deeper sampling channels using an average of shallow measurements. Second, DOT provides three-dimensional image reconstructions and should explicitly separate different tissue layers. We test whether DOT's depth-sectioning can completely remove superficial physiological artifacts. Herein, we assess improvements in signal quality and reproducibility due to these methods using a well-characterized visual paradigm and our high-density DOT system. Both approaches remove noise from the data, resulting in cleaner imaging and more consistent hemodynamic responses. Additionally, the two methods act synergistically, with greater improvements when the approaches are used together.

  15. Preparation and evaluation of sustained-release solid dispersions co-loading gastrodin with borneol as an oral brain-targeting enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Cai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Borneol is a traditional Chinese medicine that can promote drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and distribution to the brain. However, stomach irritation may occur when high doses of borneol are used. In the present work, gastrodin, the main bioactive ingredient of the traditional Chinese drug “Tianma” (Rhizoma Gastrodiae was used as a model drug to explore reasonable application of borneol. Sustained-release solid dispersions (SRSDs for co-loading gastrodin and borneol were prepared using ethylcellulose as a sustained release matrix and hydroxy-propyl methylcellulose as a retarder. The dispersion state of drug within the SRSDs was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffractometry. The results indicated that both gastrodin and borneol were molecularly dispersed in an amorphous form. Assay of in vitro drug release demonstrated that the dissolution profiles of gastrodin and borneol from the SRSDs both fitted the Higuchi model. Subsequently, gastric mucosa irritation and the brain targeting of the SRSDs were evaluated. Compared with the free mixture of gastrodin and borneol, brain targeting of SRSDs was slightly weaker (brain targeting index: 1.83 vs. 2.09, but stomach irritation obviously reduced. Sustained-release technology can be used to reduce stomach irritation caused by borneol while preserving sufficient transport capacity for oral brain-targeting drug delivery.

  16. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldo, Stefano; Quader, Mohammed; Salloum, Fadi N; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  17. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation (HTx is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  18. Improving cancer therapies by targeting the physical and chemical hallmarks of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2016-09-28

    Tumors are highly heterogeneous at the patient, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. This multi-scale heterogeneity poses significant challenges for effective therapies, which ideally must not only distinguish between tumorous and healthy tissue, but also fully address the wide variety of tumorous sub-clones. Commonly used therapies either leverage a biological phenotype of cancer cells (e.g. high rate of proliferation) or indiscriminately kill all the cells present in a targeted volume. Tumor microenvironment (TME) targeting represents a promising therapeutic direction, because a number of TME hallmarks are conserved across different tumor types, despite the underlying genetic heterogeneity. Historically, TME targeting has largely focused on the cells that support tumor growth (e.g. vascular endothelial cells). However, by viewing the intrinsic physical and chemical alterations in the TME as additional therapeutic opportunities rather than barriers, a new class of TME-inspired treatments has great promise to complement or replace existing therapeutic strategies. In this review we summarize the physical and chemical hallmarks of the TME, and discuss how these tumor characteristics either currently are, or may ultimately be targeted to improve cancer therapies. PMID:26724680

  19. Baseline and Target Values for PV Forecasts: Toward Improved Solar Power Forecasting: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Lehman, Brad; Simmons, Joseph; Campos, Edwin; Banunarayanan, Venkat

    2015-08-05

    Accurate solar power forecasting allows utilities to get the most out of the solar resources on their systems. To truly measure the improvements that any new solar forecasting methods can provide, it is important to first develop (or determine) baseline and target solar forecasting at different spatial and temporal scales. This paper aims to develop baseline and target values for solar forecasting metrics. These were informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of solar power output. forecasting metrics. These were informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of solar power output.

  20. Effective Leveraging of Targeted Search Spaces for Improving Peptide Identification in Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Avinash K; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2015-12-01

    In shotgun proteomics, peptides are typically identified using database searching, which involves scoring acquired tandem mass spectra against peptides derived from standard protein sequence databases such as Uniprot, Refseq, or Ensembl. In this strategy, the sensitivity of peptide identification is known to be affected by the size of the search space. Therefore, creating a targeted sequence database containing only peptides likely to be present in the analyzed sample can be a useful technique for improving the sensitivity of peptide identification. In this study, we describe how targeted peptide databases can be created based on the frequency of identification in the global proteome machine database (GPMDB), the largest publicly available repository of peptide and protein identification data. We demonstrate that targeted peptide databases can be easily integrated into existing proteome analysis workflows and describe a computational strategy for minimizing any loss of peptide identifications arising from potential search space incompleteness in the targeted search spaces. We demonstrate the performance of our workflow using several data sets of varying size and sample complexity. PMID:26569054

  1. The anti-dementia drug candidate, (-)-clausenamide, improves memory impairment through its multi-target effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shifeng; Liu, Shaolin; Duan, Wenzhen; Cheng, Yong; Jiang, Xueying; Zhu, Chuanjiang; Tang, Kang; Wang, Runsheng; Xu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoying; Yu, Xiaoming; Wu, Kemei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Muzou; Huang, Huiyong; Zhang, Juntian

    2016-06-01

    Multi-target drugs, such as the cocktail therapy used for treating AIDS, often show stronger efficacy than single-target drugs in treating complicated diseases. This review will focus on clausenamide (clau), a small molecule compound originally isolated from the traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Clausenalansium. The finding of four chiral centers in clau molecules predicted the presence of 16 clau enantiomers, including (-)-clau and (+)-clau. All of the predicted enantiomers have been successfully synthesized via innovative chemical approaches, and pharmacological studies have demonstrated (-)-clau as a eutomer and (+)-clau as a distomer in improving cognitive function in both normal physiological and pathological conditions. Mechanistically, the nootropic effect of (-)-clau is mediated by its multi-target actions, which include mild elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, modulation of the cholinergic system, regulation of synaptic plasticity, and activation of cellular and molecular signaling pathways involved in learning and memory. Furthermore, (-)-clau suppresses the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by inhibiting multiple etiological processes: (1) beta amyloid protein-induced intracellular Ca(2+) overload and apoptosis and (2) tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration. In conclusion, the nature of the multi-target actions of (-)-clau substantiates it as a promising chiral drug candidate for enhancing human cognition in normal conditions and treating memory impairment in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26812265

  2. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  3. Brain Training Game Improves Executive Functions and Processing Speed in the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Nouchi; Yasuyuki Taki; Hikaru Takeuchi; Hiroshi Hashizume; Yuko Akitsuki; Yayoi Shigemune; Atsushi Sekiguchi; Yuka Kotozaki; Takashi Tsukiura; Yukihito Yomogida; Ryuta Kawashima

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The beneficial effects of brain training games are expected to transfer to other cognitive functions, but these beneficial effects are poorly understood. Here we investigate the impact of the brain training game (Brain Age) on cognitive functions in the elderly. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-two elderly volunteers were recruited through an advertisement in the local newspaper and randomly assigned to either of two game groups (Brain Age, Tetris). This study was completed by 14 of th...

  4. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  5. Prospective comparative evaluation of planning target volume margin for brain intensity modulated radiotherapy utilizing hybrid online imaging modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new advancement in daily monitoring of patient positioning is the use of hybrid technologies where two separate online imaging modalities are integrated to achieve precise treatment delivery. Our center has a set-up that integrates Elekta Linear accelerator device (EPID with BrainLAB ExacTrac imaging for the first time in the world. We calculated planning target volume (PTV margin for brain radiotherapy with thermoplastic mask immobilization with conventional EPID and BrainLAB ExacTrac image guidance system. Materials and Methods: EPID (iViewGT and ExacTrac verification images of 32 patients in total 784 radiotherapy sessions were acquired and analyzed. Systematic (Σ and random errors (σ were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and anteroposterior directions. PTV margins calculated using van Herk (2.5 Σ +0.7 σ formula for each imaging system. Result: Of total 784 sessions EPID image were obtained in 723 sessions, ExacTrac obtained in 431 sessions. In cranio-caudal direction, the systematic error, random error, and the calculated PTV margin were 0.09 cm, 0.12 cm, and 0.31 cm, respectively, with EPID image and 0.17 cm, 0.13 cm, and 0.51 cm, respectively, with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.11 cm, 0.15 cm, and 0.40 cm with EPID and 0.16 cm, 0.10 cm, and 0.47 cm, respectively, with ExacTrac image. The same parameters for anteroposterior were 0.10 cm, 0.13 cm, 0.37 cm with EPID and 0.144 cm, 0.10 cm, and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac image. Pearson's correlation coefficient was found to be 0.66, 0.67, 0.62 in these three directions. Conclusion: With dual imaging modalities, our calculated adequate PTV margin for brain radiotherapy cases are 0.51 cm, 0.47 cm, is 0.43 cm in cranio-caudal, right-left, and anteroposterior directions, respectively.

  6. Targeting Multiple-Myeloma-Induced Immune Dysfunction to Improve Immunotherapy Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rutella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a plasma cell malignancy associated with high levels of monoclonal (M protein in the blood and/or serum. MM can occur de novo or evolve from benign monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS. Current translational research into MM focuses on the development of combination therapies directed against molecularly defined targets and that are aimed at achieving durable clinical responses. MM cells have a unique ability to evade immunosurveillance through several mechanisms including, among others, expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg, reduced T-cell cytotoxic activity and responsiveness to IL-2, defects in B-cell immunity, and induction of dendritic cell (DC dysfunction. Immune defects could be a major cause of failure of the recent immunotherapy trials in MM. This article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular determinants of immune evasion in patients with MM and highlights how these pathways can be targeted to improve patients’ clinical outcome.

  7. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). PMID:27626423

  8. Targeting the thrombin receptor modulates inflammation and astrogliosis to improve recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovic, Maja; Yoon, Hyesook; Wu, Jianmin; Mustafa, Karim; Scarisbrick, Isobel A

    2016-09-01

    The deregulation of serine protease activity is a common feature of neurological injury, but little is known regarding their mechanisms of action or whether they can be targeted to facilitate repair. In this study we demonstrate that the thrombin receptor (Protease Activated Receptor 1, (PAR1)) serves as a critical translator of the spinal cord injury (SCI) proteolytic microenvironment into a cascade of pro-inflammatory events that contribute to astrogliosis and functional decline. PAR1 knockout mice displayed improved locomotor recovery after SCI and reduced signatures of inflammation and astrogliosis, including expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, and STAT3 signaling. SCI-associated elevations in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were also reduced in PAR1-/- mice and co-ordinate improvements in tissue sparing and preservation of NeuN-positive ventral horn neurons, and PKCγ corticospinal axons, were observed. PAR1 and its agonist's thrombin and neurosin were expressed by perilesional astrocytes and each agonist increased the production of IL-6 and STAT3 signaling in primary astrocyte cultures in a PAR1-dependent manner. In turn, IL-6-stimulated astrocytes increased expression of PAR1, thrombin, and neurosin, pointing to a model in which PAR1 activation contributes to increased astrogliosis by feedforward- and feedback-signaling dynamics. Collectively, these findings identify the thrombin receptor as a key mediator of inflammation and astrogliosis in the aftermath of SCI that can be targeted to reduce neurodegeneration and improve neurobehavioral recovery. PMID:27145117

  9. Clinical usefulness of brain-computer interface-controlled functional electrical stimulation for improving brain activity in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Evaluating the effect of brain-computer interface (BCI)-based functional electrical stimulation (FES) training on brain activity in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) was the aim of this study. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomized into a BCI-FES group (n=9) and a functional electrical stimulation (FES) control group (n=9). Subjects in the BCI-FES group received wrist and hand extension training with FES for 30 minutes per day, 5 times per week for 6 weeks under the BCI-based program. The FES group received wrist and hand extension training with FES for the same amount of time. Sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) and middle beta waves (M-beta) were measured in frontopolar regions 1 and 2 (Fp1, Fp2) to determine the effects of BCI-FES training. [Results] Significant improvements in the SMR and M-beta of Fp1 and Fp2 were seen in the BCI-FES group. In contrast, significant improvement was only seen in the SMR and M-beta of Fp2 in the control group. [Conclusion] The results of the present study suggest that BCI-controlled FES training may be helpful in improving brain activity in patients with cerebral palsy and may be applied as effectively as traditional FES training. PMID:27799677

  10. Targeting Kv1.3 channels to reduce white matter pathology after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Thomas M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Colley, Beverly S; Phillips, Linda L

    2016-09-01

    Axonal injury is present in essentially all clinically significant cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While no effective treatment has been identified to date, experimental TBI models have shown promising axonal protection using immunosuppressants FK506 and Cyclosporine-A, with treatment benefits attributed to calcineurin inhibition or protection of mitochondrial function. However, growing evidence suggests neuroprotective efficacy of these compounds may also involve direct modulation of ion channels, and in particular Kv1.3. The present study tested whether blockade of Kv1.3 channels, using Clofazimine (CFZ), would alleviate TBI-induced white matter pathology in rodents. Postinjury CFZ administration prevented suppression of compound action potential (CAP) amplitude in the corpus callosum of adult rats following midline fluid percussion TBI, with injury and treatment effects primarily expressed in unmyelinated CAPs. Kv1.3 protein levels in callosal tissue extracts were significantly reduced postinjury, but this loss was prevented by CFZ treatment. In parallel, CFZ also attenuated the injury-induced elevation in pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1-β. The effects of CFZ on glial function were further studied using mixed microglia/astrocyte cell cultures derived from P3-5 mouse corpus callosum. Cultures of callosal glia challenged with lipopolysaccharide exhibited a dramatic increase in IL1-β levels, accompanied by reactive morphological changes in microglia, both of which were attenuated by CFZ treatment. These results support a cell specific role for Kv1.3 signaling in white matter pathology after TBI, and suggest a treatment approach based on the blockade of these channels. This therapeutic strategy may be especially efficacious for normalizing neuro-glial interactions affecting unmyelinated axons after TBI. PMID:27302680

  11. Validation of new 3D post processing algorithm for improved maximum intensity projections of MR angiography acquisitions in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosmans, H.; Verbeeck, R.; Vandermeulen, D.; Suetens, P.; Wilms, G.; Maaly, M.; Marchal, G.; Baert, A.L. [Louvain Univ. (Belgium)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a new post processing algorithm for improved maximum intensity projections (mip) of intracranial MR angiography acquisitions. The core of the post processing procedure is a new brain segmentation algorithm. Two seed areas, background and brain, are automatically detected. A 3D region grower then grows both regions towards each other and this preferentially towards white regions. In this way, the skin gets included into the final `background region` whereas cortical blood vessels and all brain tissues are included in the `brain region`. The latter region is then used for mip. The algorithm runs less than 30 minutes on a full dataset on a Unix workstation. Images from different acquisition strategies including multiple overlapping thin slab acquisition, magnetization transfer (MT) MRA, Gd-DTPA enhanced MRA, normal and high resolution acquisitions and acquisitions from mid field and high field systems were filtered. A series of contrast enhanced MRA acquisitions obtained with identical parameters was filtered to study the robustness of the filter parameters. In all cases, only a minimal manual interaction was necessary to segment the brain. The quality of the mip was significantly improved, especially in post Gd-DTPA acquisitions or using MT, due to the absence of high intensity signals of skin, sinuses and eyes that otherwise superimpose on the angiograms. It is concluded that the filter is a robust technique to improve the quality of MR angiograms.

  12. Leveraging anatomical information to improve transfer learning in brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronkiewicz, Mark; Larson, Eric; Lee, Adrian K. C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) represent a technology with the potential to rehabilitate a range of traumatic and degenerative nervous system conditions but require a time-consuming training process to calibrate. An area of BCI research known as transfer learning is aimed at accelerating training by recycling previously recorded training data across sessions or subjects. Training data, however, is typically transferred from one electrode configuration to another without taking individual head anatomy or electrode positioning into account, which may underutilize the recycled data. Approach. We explore transfer learning with the use of source imaging, which estimates neural activity in the cortex. Transferring estimates of cortical activity, in contrast to scalp recordings, provides a way to compensate for variability in electrode positioning and head morphologies across subjects and sessions. Main results. Based on simulated and measured electroencephalography activity, we trained a classifier using data transferred exclusively from other subjects and achieved accuracies that were comparable to or surpassed a benchmark classifier (representative of a real-world BCI). Our results indicate that classification improvements depend on the number of trials transferred and the cortical region of interest. Significance. These findings suggest that cortical source-based transfer learning is a principled method to transfer data that improves BCI classification performance and provides a path to reduce BCI calibration time.

  13. Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Higher Control of the Oculomotor System in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Rebelo, Pedro; Kennard, Christopher; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; FitzGerald, James J

    2015-09-23

    from one circuit within the brain to another, as a result of overactivity of certain nerve cells. By demonstrating that stimulation of an area called the globus pallidus interna partially reverses deficits in voluntary control of eye movements, this study shows that stimulation can improve information flow between circuits, probably by calming down the overactive cells. PMID:26400935

  14. Standardizing ICU management of pediatric traumatic brain injury is associated with improved outcomes at discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Lynnger, Thomas M; Shannon, Chevis N; Le, Truc M; Greeno, Amber; Chung, Dai; Lamb, Fred S; Wellons, John C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The goal of critical care in treating traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to reduce secondary brain injury by limiting cerebral ischemia and optimizing cerebral blood flow. The authors compared short-term outcomes as defined by discharge disposition and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores in children with TBI before and after the implementation of a protocol that standardized decision-making and interventions among neurosurgeons and pediatric intensivists. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective pre- and postprotocol study of 128 pediatric patients with severe TBI, as defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores accounting for injury severity and clinical parameters. Favorable discharge disposition included discharge home. Unfavorable discharge disposition included discharge to an inpatient facility or death. RESULTS Demographics were similar between the treatment periods, as was injury severity as assessed by GCS score (mean 5.43 preprotocol, mean 5.28 postprotocol; p = 0.67). The ordered logistic regression model demonstrated an odds ratio of 4.0 of increasingly favorable outcome in the postprotocol cohort (p = 0.007). Prior to protocol implementation, 63 patients (64%) had unfavorable discharge disposition and 36 patients (36%) had favorable discharge disposition. After protocol implementation, 9 patients (31%) had unfavorable disposition, while 20 patients (69%) had favorable disposition (p = 0.002). In the preprotocol group, 31 patients (31%) died while 6 patients (21%) died after protocol implementation (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Discharge disposition and mortality rates in pediatric patients with severe TBI improved after implementation of a standardized protocol among caregivers based on best-practice guidelines. PMID:26451717

  15. Improved fidelity of brain microstructure mapping from single-shell diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taquet, Maxime; Scherrer, Benoit; Boumal, Nicolas; Peters, Jurriaan M; Macq, Benoit; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is sensitive to alterations in the diffusion of water molecules caused by microstructural barriers. Different microstructural compartments are characterized by differences in DWI signal. Diffusion tensor imaging conflates the signal from these compartments into a single tensor, which poorly represents multiple white matter fascicles and extra-axonal space. Diffusion compartment imaging (DCI) models overcome this limitation by providing parametric representations for the signal contribution of each compartment, thereby improving the fidelity of brain microstructure mapping. However, current approaches fail to identify DCI model parameters from conventional single-shell DWI with the desired accuracy. It has been demonstrated that part of this inaccuracy is due to the ill-posedness of the estimation of DCI model parameters from conventional single-shell acquisitions. In this paper, we propose to regularize the estimation problem for single-shell DWI by learning a prior distribution of DCI model parameters from DWI acquired at multiple b-values in an external population of subjects. We demonstrate that this population-informed prior enables, for the first time, accurate estimation of DCI models from single-shell DWI typically acquired in clinical practice. We validated our approach on synthetic and in vivo data of healthy subjects and patients with autism spectrum disorder. We applied the approach to population studies of brain microstructure in autism and found that introducing a population-informed prior leads to reliable detection of group differences. Our algorithm enables novel investigation from large existing DWI datasets in normal development and in disease and injury. PMID:26529580

  16. The relative contributions of scatter and attenuation corrections toward improved brain SPECT quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence indicates that scatter and attenuation are major confounds to objective diagnosis of brain disease by quantitative SPECT. There is considerable debate, however, as to the relative importance of scatter correction (SC) and attenuation correction (AC), and how they should be implemented. The efficacy of SC and AC for 99mTc brain SPECT was evaluated using a two-compartment fully tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic head phantom. Four correction schemes were implemented: uniform broad-beam AC, non-uniform broad-beam AC, uniform SC+AC, and non-uniform SC+AC. SC was based on non-stationary deconvolution scatter subtraction, modified to incorporate a priori knowledge of either the head contour (uniform SC) or transmission map (non-uniform SC). The quantitative accuracy of the correction schemes was evaluated in terms of contrast recovery, relative quantification (cortical:cerebellar activity), uniformity ((coefficient of variation of 230 macro-voxels) x100%), and bias (relative to a calibration scan). Our results were: uniform broad-beam (μ=0.12cm-1) AC (the most popular correction): 71% contrast recovery, 112% relative quantification, 7.0% uniformity, +23% bias. Non-uniform broad-beam (soft tissue μ=0.12cm-1) AC: 73%, 114%, 6.0%, +21%, respectively. Uniform SC+AC: 90%, 99%, 4.9%, +12%, respectively. Non-uniform SC+AC: 93%, 101%, 4.0%, +10%, respectively. SC and AC achieved the best quantification; however, non-uniform corrections produce only small improvements over their uniform counterparts. SC+AC was found to be superior to AC; this advantage is distinct and consistent across all four quantification indices. (author)

  17. A white matter lesion-filling approach to improve brain tissue volume measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Valverde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis white matter (WM lesions can affect brain tissue volume measurements of voxel-wise segmentation methods if these lesions are included in the segmentation process. Several authors have presented different techniques to improve brain tissue volume estimations by filling WM lesions before segmentation with intensities similar to those of WM. Here, we propose a new method to refill WM lesions, where contrary to similar approaches, lesion voxel intensities are replaced by random values of a normal distribution generated from the mean WM signal intensity of each two-dimensional slice. We test the performance of our method by estimating the deviation in tissue volume between a set of 30 T1-w 1.5 T and 30 T1-w 3 T images of healthy subjects and the same images where: WM lesions have been previously registered and afterwards replaced their voxel intensities to those between gray matter (GM and WM tissue. Tissue volume is computed independently using FAST and SPM8. When compared with the state-of-the-art methods, on 1.5 T data our method yields the lowest deviation in WM between original and filled images, independently of the segmentation method used. It also performs the lowest differences in GM when FAST is used and equals to the best method when SPM8 is employed. On 3 T data, our method also outperforms the state-of-the-art methods when FAST is used while performs similar to the best method when SPM8 is used. The proposed technique is currently available to researchers as a stand-alone program and as an SPM extension.

  18. IMPROVING BIOMASS LOGISTICS COST WITHIN AGRONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CONSTRAINTS AND BIOMASS QUALITY TARGETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; David J. Muth; William Smith

    2012-10-01

    Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

  19. Irradiation of the potential cancer stem cell niches in the adult brain improves progression-free survival of patients with malignant glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults. The mechanisms leading to glioblastoma are not well understood but animal studies support that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in neural stem cells (NSC) is required and sufficient to induce glial cancers. This suggests that the NSC niches in the brain may harbor cancer stem cells (CSCs), Thus providing novel therapy targets. We hypothesize that higher radiation doses to these NSC niches improve patient survival by eradicating CSCs. Methods 55 adult patients with Grade 3 or Grade 4 glial cancer treated with radiotherapy at UCLA between February of 2003 and May of 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Using radiation planning software and patient radiological records, the SVZ and SGL were reconstructed for each of these patients and dosimetry data for these structures was calculated. Results Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we show that patients whose bilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) received greater than the median SVZ dose (= 43 Gy) had a significant improvement in progression-free survival if compared to patients who received less than the median dose (15.0 vs 7.2 months PFS; P = 0.028). Furthermore, a mean dose >43 Gy to the bilateral SVZ yielded a hazard ratio of 0.73 (P = 0.019). Importantly, similarly analyzing total prescription dose failed to illustrate a statistically significant impact. Conclusions Our study leads us to hypothesize that in glioma targeted radiotherapy of the stem cell niches in the adult brain could yield significant benefits over radiotherapy of the primary tumor mass alone and that damage caused by smaller fractions of radiation maybe less efficiently detected by the DNA repair mechanisms in CSCs. PMID:20663133

  20. Target localization accuracy in a respiratory phantom using BrainLAB ExacTrac and 4DCT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Jason E; Parker, Brent C; Neck, Daniel W; Henkelmann, Greg; Rosen, Isaac I

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of measuring the motion of an internal target using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scanning and the BrainLAB ExacTrac X-ray imaging system. Displacements of a metal coil implanted in a commercial respiratory phantom were measured in each system and compared to the known motion. A commercial respiratory motion phantom containing a metal coil as a surrogate target was used. Phantom longitudinal motions were sinusoidal with a 4.0 second period and amplitudes ranging from 5-25 mm. We acquired 4DCT and ExacTrac images of the coil at specified respiratory phases and recorded the coordinates of the coil ends. Coil displacement relative to the 0% phase (full-inhale) position were computed for the ExacTrac and 4DCT imaging systems. Coil displacements were compared to known displacements based on the phantom's sinusoidal motion. Coil length distortion due to 4DCT phase binning was compared to the known physical length of the coil (31 mm). The maximum localization error for both coil endpoints for all motion settings was 3.5 mm for the 4DCT and 0.8 mm for the ExacTrac gating system. Coil length errors measured on the 4DCT were less than 0.8 mm at end inhale/exhale phases, but up to 8.3 mm at mid-inhalation phases at the largest motion amplitude (25 mm). Due to the fast image acquisition time (100 ms), no coil distortion was observable in the ExacTrac system. 4DCT showed problems imaging the coil during mid-respiratory phases of higher velocity (phases 20%-30% and 70%-80%) due to distortion caused by residual motion within the 4DCT phase bin. The ExacTrac imaging system was able to accurately localize the coil in the respiratory phantom over all phases of respiration. For our clinic, where end-respiration phases from 4DCT may be used for treatment planning calculations, the ExacTrac system is used to measure internal target motion. With the ExacTrac system, planning target size and motion uncertainties are minimized, potentially

  1. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and siRNA for glioma therapy by a brain targeting system: angiopep-2-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Hao, Yongwei; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yalin; Meng, Dehui; Li, Dong; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    It is very challenging to treat brain cancer because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricting therapeutic drug or gene to access the brain. In this research project, angiopep-2 (ANG) was used as a brain-targeted peptide for preparing multifunctional ANG-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs), which encapsulated both doxorubicin (DOX) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) siRNA, designated as ANG/PLGA/DOX/siRNA. This system could efficiently deliver DOX and siRNA into U87MG cells leading to significant cell inhibition, apoptosis and EGFR silencing in vitro. It demonstrated that this drug system was capable of penetrating the BBB in vivo, resulting in more drugs accumulation in the brain. The animal study using the brain orthotopic U87MG glioma xenograft model indicated that the ANG-targeted co-delivery of DOX and EGFR siRNA resulted in not only the prolongation of the life span of the glioma-bearing mice but also an obvious cell apoptosis in glioma tissue.

  2. Target Localization Based on Improved DV-Hop Algorithm in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The node localization technology of wireless sensor networks is essential and prerequisite to many applications, which it is one of the important support technologies for wireless sensor networks. The node localization is to get the position information of blind node by using location information of few known nodes and some special mechanisms. This paper primarily investigates a kind of target localization technology based on the improved DV-Hop algorithm in wireless sensor networks. We firstly compute the distances measured by RSSI and the mean value of one-hop distance. Then we can use the differences between the mean and the actual distance to get the error correction between the total distance and average one-hop distance. Replace trilateration with hybrid localization of MIN-MAX and weighted least square method. Finally, simulation experiment results show the improved algorithm can effectively carry out the network localization, thus has a certain of practical value

  3. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation.

  4. Improved MOEA/D for Dynamic Weapon-Target Assignment Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang∗; Rennong Yang; Jialiang Zuo; Xiaoning Jing

    2015-01-01

    Conducting reasonable weapon⁃target assignment ( WTA) with near real time can bring the maximum awards with minimum costs which are especially significant in the modern war. A framework of dynamic WTA ( DWTA) model based on a series of staged static WTA ( SWTA) models is established where dynamic factors including time window of target and time window of weapon are considered in the staged SWTA model. Then, a hybrid algorithm for the staged SWTA named Decomposition⁃Based Dynamic Weapon⁃target Assignment ( D⁃DWTA) is proposed which is based on the framework of multi⁃objective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition ( MOEA/D) with two major improvements:one is the coding based on constraint of resource to generate the feasible solutions, and the other is the tabu search strategy to speed up the convergence. Comparative experiments prove that the proposed algorithm is capable of obtaining a well⁃converged and well diversified set of solutions on a problem instance and meets the time demand in the battlefield environment.

  5. Improving detection of low SNR targets using moment-based detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shannon R.; Steward, Bryan J.; Hawks, Michael; Gross, Kevin C.

    2016-05-01

    Increases in the number of cameras deployed, frame rate, and detector array sizes have led to a dramatic increase in the volume of motion imagery data that is collected. Without a corresponding increase in analytical manpower, much of the data is not analyzed to full potential. This creates a need for fast, automated, and robust methods for detecting signals of interest. Current approaches fall into two categories: detect-before-track (DBT), which are fast but often poor at detecting dim targets, and track-before-detect (TBD) methods which can offer better performance but are typically much slower. This research seeks to contribute to the near real time detection of low SNR, unresolved moving targets through an extension of earlier work on higher order moments anomaly detection, a method that exploits both spatial and temporal information but is still computationally efficient and massively parallelizable. It was found that intelligent selection of parameters can improve probability of detection by as much as 25% compared to earlier work with higherorder moments. The present method can reduce detection thresholds by 40% compared to the Reed-Xiaoli anomaly detector for low SNR targets (for a given probability of detection and false alarm).

  6. Ballistic strength training compared with usual care for improving mobility following traumatic brain injury: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Williams

    2016-07-01

    Discussion: Strength training in neurological rehabilitation is highly topical because muscle weakness has been identified as the primary impairment leading to mobility limitations in many neurological populations. This project represents the first international study of ballistic strength training after traumatic brain injury. The novelty of ballistic strength training is that the exercises attempt to replicate how lower limb muscles work, by targeting the high angular velocities attained during walking and higher level activities.

  7. Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the ischemic brain and improves functional outcome after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunling; Chopp, Michael; Cui, Yisheng; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ruilan; Zhang, Li; Lu, Mei; Szalad, Alexandra; Doppler, Edith; Hitzl, Monika; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2010-11-15

    Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation mimicking the action of neurotrophic factors and has beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. The present study investigated the effect of Cerebrolysin on neurogenesis in a rat model of embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Treatment with Cerebrolysin at doses of 2.5 and 5 ml/kg significantly increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine-positive (BrdU(+)) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells and doublecortin (DCX) immunoreactivity (migrating neuroblasts) in the ipsilateral SVZ and striatal ischemic boundary 28 days after stroke when the treatment was initiated 24 hr after stroke. The treatment also reduced TUNEL(+) cells by ∼50% in the ischemic boundary. However, treatment with Cerebrolysin at a dose of 2.5 ml/kg initiated at 24 and 48 hr did not significantly reduce infarct volume but substantially improved neurological outcomes measured by an array of behavioral tests 21 and 28 days after stroke. Incubation of SVZ neural progenitor cells from ischemic rats with Cerebrolysin dose dependently augmented BrdU(+) cells and increased the number of Tuj1(+) cells (a marker of immature neurons). Blockage of the PI3K/Akt pathway abolished Cerebrolysin-increased BrdU(+) cells. Moreover, Cerebrolysin treatment promoted neural progenitor cell migration. Collectively, these data indicate that Cerebrolysin treatment when initiated 24 and 48 hr after stroke enhances neurogenesis in the ischemic brain and improves functional outcome and that Cerebrolysin-augmented proliferation, differentiation, and migration of adult SVZ neural progenitor cells contribute to Cerebrolysin-induced neurogenesis, which may be related to improvement of neurological outcome. The PI3K/Akt pathway mediates Cerebrolysin-induced progenitor cell proliferation.

  8. Solubilization of flurbiprofen into aptamer-modified PEG-PLA micelles for targeted delivery to brain-derived endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Chaofeng; Dave, Nimita; Hu, Jing; Desai, Pankaj; Pauletti, Giovanni; Bai, Shuhua; Hao, Jiukuan

    2013-01-01

    Novel aptamer-functionalized polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) (APP) micelles were developed with the objective to target the transferrin receptor on brain endothelial cells. Flurbiprofen, a potential drug for therapeutic management of Alzheimer's disease (AD), was loaded into the APP micelles using the co-solvent evaporation method. Results indicated that 9.03% (w/w) of flurbiprofen was entrapped in APP with good retention capacity in vitro. Targeting potential of APPs was investigated using the transferring receptor-expressing murine brain endothelial bEND5 cell line. APPs significantly enhanced surface association of micelles to bEND5 cells as quantified by fluorescence spectroscopy. Most importantly, APPs significantly enhanced intracellular flurbiprofen delivery when compared to unmodified micelles. These results suggest that APP micelles may offer an effective strategy to deliver therapeutically effective flurbiprofen concentrations into the brain for AD patients.

  9. Improved soybean oil quality by targeted mutagenesis of the fatty acid desaturase 2 gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, William; Coffman, Andrew; Clasen, Benjamin M; Demorest, Zachary L; Lowy, Anita; Ray, Erin; Retterath, Adam; Stoddard, Thomas; Juillerat, Alexandre; Cedrone, Frederic; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Soybean oil is high in polyunsaturated fats and is often partially hydrogenated to increase its shelf life and improve oxidative stability. The trans-fatty acids produced through hydrogenation pose a health threat. Soybean lines that are low in polyunsaturated fats were generated by introducing mutations in two fatty acid desaturase 2 genes (FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B), which in the seed convert the monounsaturated fat, oleic acid, to the polyunsaturated fat, linoleic acid. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) were engineered to recognize and cleave conserved DNA sequences in both genes. In four of 19 transgenic soybean lines expressing the TALENs, mutations in FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B were observed in DNA extracted from leaf tissue; three of the four lines transmitted heritable FAD2-1 mutations to the next generation. The fatty acid profile of the seed was dramatically changed in plants homozygous for mutations in both FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B: oleic acid increased from 20% to 80% and linoleic acid decreased from 50% to under 4%. Further, mutant plants were identified that lacked the TALEN transgene and only carried the targeted mutations. The ability to create a valuable trait in a single generation through targeted modification of a gene family demonstrates the power of TALENs for genome engineering and crop improvement.

  10. Targeting brains, producing responsibilities: the use of neuroscience within British social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, Tineke; Pickersgill, Martyn

    2015-05-01

    Concepts and findings 'translated' from neuroscientific research are finding their way into UK health and social policy discourse. Critical scholars have begun to analyse how policies tend to 'misuse' the neurosciences and, further, how these discourses produce unwarranted and individualizing effects, rooted in middle-class values and inducing guilt and anxiety. In this article, we extend such work while simultaneously departing from the normative assumptions implied in the concept of 'misuse'. Through a documentary analysis of UK policy reports focused on the early years, adolescence and older adults, we examine how these employ neuroscientific concepts and consequently (re)define responsibility. In the documents analysed, responsibility was produced in three different but intersecting ways: through a focus on optimisation, self-governance, and vulnerability. Our work thereby adds to social scientific examinations of neuroscience in society that show how neurobiological terms and concepts can be used to construct and support a particular imaginary of citizenship and the role of the state. Neuroscience may be leveraged by policy makers in ways that (potentially) reduce the target of their intervention to the soma, but do so in order to expand the outcome of the intervention to include the enhancement of society writ large. By attending as well to more critical engagements with neuroscience in policy documents, our analysis demonstrates the importance of being mindful of the limits to the deployment of a neurobiological idiom within policy settings. Accordingly, we contribute to increased empirical specificity concerning the impacts and translation of neuroscientific knowledge in contemporary society whilst refusing to take for granted the idea that the neurosciences necessarily have a dominant role (to play). PMID:25792340

  11. Asthma phenotyping: a necessity for improved therapeutic precision and new targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a common heterogeneous disease with a complex pathophysiology that carries a significant mortality rate and high morbidity. Current therapies based on inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists remain effective in a large proportion of patients with asthma, but ~10% (considered to have 'severe asthma') do not respond to these treatments even at high doses or with the use of oral corticosteroids. Analytical clustering methods have revealed phenotypes that include dependence on high-dose corticosteroid treatment, severe airflow obstruction and recurrent exacerbations associated with an allergic background and late onset of disease. One severe phenotype is eosinophilic inflammation-predominant asthma, with late-onset disease, rhinosinusitis, aspirin sensitivity and exacerbations. Blood and sputum eosinophilia have been used to distinguish patients with high Th2 inflammation and to predict therapeutic response to treatments targeted towards Th2-associated cytokines. New therapies in the form of humanized antibodies against Th2 targets, such as anti-IgE, anti-IL4Rα, anti-IL-5 and anti-IL-13 antibodies, have shown encouraging results in terms of reduction in exacerbations and improvement in airflow in patients with a 'Th2-high' expression profile and blood eosinophilia. Research efforts are now focusing on elucidating the phenotypes underlying the non-Th2-high (or Th2-low) group, which constitutes ~50% of severe asthma cases. There is an increasing need to use biomarkers to indicate the group of patients who will respond to a specifically targeted treatment. The use of improved tools to measure activity of disease, a better definition of severe asthma and the delineation of inflammatory pathways with omics analyses using computational tools, will lead to better-defined phenotypes for specific therapies. PMID:26076339

  12. Spatial targeting of conservation tillage to improve water quality and carbon retention benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conservation tillage reduces soil erosion and improves water quality in agricultural watersheds. However, the benefits of conservation tillage in carbon sequestration are the subject of controversy. Public funds are provided to farms to encourage the adoption of conservation tillage. Given the economic costs, the targeting of areas likely to achieve the greatest environmental benefits has become an important policy-making issue. A geographic information system (GIS) based modelling framework which integrated hydrologic, soil organic matter, and farm models to evaluate the spatial targeting of conservation tillage was presented. A case study applying the framework in the Fairchild Creek watershed in Ontario indicated that targeting conservation tillage based on sediment abatement goals can achieve comparable carbon retention benefits in terms of the percentage reduction of base carbon losses. Targeted subcatchments for conservation tillage varied across the watershed based on benefit to cost ratios. Conservation tillage patterns based on carbon retention goals showed similar results to sediment abatement goals but slight differences were observed because of different carbon content in the soils. The results indicated that sediment abatement may be used as an indicator in setting up program goals. The impacts of conservation programs can then be evaluated based on calibrated and validated hydrologic models in conjunction with monitoring data. Results also showed that setting carbon retention may lead to higher costs in order to achieve corresponding sediment abatement benefits. Carbon retention may not be suitable for setting as a stand-alone environmental goal for conservation programs because of the difficulties in verifying the impacts and the discrepancies between carbon and sediment benefits. It was concluded that the modelling results have important policy implications for the design of conservation stewardship programs that aim to achieve environmental

  13. Multiclass imbalance learning:Improving classification of pediatric brain tumors from magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Wilson, Martin P; Gill, Simrandip K.; Manias, Karen A; Davies, Nigel P; Peet, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Classification of pediatric brain tumors from (1) H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can aid diagnosis and management of brain tumors. However, varied incidence of the different tumor types leads to imbalanced class sizes and introduces difficulties in classifying rare tumor groups. This study assessed different imbalanced multiclass learning techniques and compared the use of complete spectra and quantified metabolite profiles for classification of three main childhood brain tu...

  14. Brain tumor-targeted therapy by systemic delivery of siRNA with Transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Guo, Xi-Ying; Yang, Ting; Yu, Min-Zhi; Chen, Da-Wei; Wang, Jian-Cheng

    2016-08-20

    Treatment of brain tumor remains a great challenge worldwide. Development of a stable, safe, and effective siRNA delivery system which is able to cross the impermeable blood-brain barrier (BBB) and target glioma cells is necessary. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effects of intravenous administration of T7 peptide modified core-shell nanoparticles (named T7-LPC/siRNA NPs) on brain tumors. Layer-by-layer assembling of protamine/chondroitin sulfate/siRNA/cationic liposomes followed by T7 peptide modification has been carried out in order to obtain a targeted siRNA delivery system. In vitro cellular uptake experiments demonstrated a higher intracellular fluorescence intensity of siRNA in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) and U87 glioma cells when treated with T7-LPC/siRNA NPs compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In the co-culture model of BMVECs and U87 cells, a significant down-regulation of EGFR protein expression occurred in the U87 glioma cells after treatment with the T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs. Moreover, the T7-LPC/siRNA NPs had an advantage in penetrating into a deep region of the tumor spheroid compared with PEG-LPC/siRNA NPs. In vivo imaging revealed that T7-LPC/siRNA NPs accumulated more specifically in brain tumor tissues than the non-targeted NPs. Also, in vivo tumor therapy experiments demonstrated that the longest survival period along with the greatest downregulation of EGFR expression in tumor tissues was observed in mice with an intracranial U87 glioma treated with T7-LPC/siEGFR NPs compared with mice receiving other formulations. Therefore, we believe that these transferrin receptor-mediated core-shell nanoparticles are an important potential siRNA delivery system for brain tumor-targeted therapy.

  15. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate (r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM(-1) s(-1). In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian

  16. Conjugation Magnetic PAEEP-PLLA Nanoparticles with Lactoferrin as a Specific Targeting MRI Contrast Agent for Detection of Brain Glioma in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Binhua; Wang, Siqi; Rao, Rong; Liu, Xuhan; Xu, Haibo; Wu, Yun; Yang, Xiangliang; Liu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis of malignant brain gliomas is largely based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast agents. In recent years, nano-sized contrast agents have been developed for improved MRI diagnosis. In this study, oleylamine-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (OAM-MNPs) were synthesized with thermal decomposition method and encapsulated in novel amphiphilic poly(aminoethyl ethylene phosphate)/poly(L-lactide) (PAEEP-PLLA) copolymer nanoparticles. The OAM-MNP-loaded PAEEP-PLLA nanoparticles (M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were further conjugated with lactoferrin (Lf) for glioma tumor targeting. The Lf-conjugated M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs (Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs) were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The average size of OAM-MNPs, M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs, and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were 8.6 ± 0.3, 165.7 ± 0.6, and 218.2 ± 0.4 nm, with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.185 ± 0.023, 0.192 ± 0.021, and 0.224 ± 0.036, respectively. TEM imaging showed that OAM-MNPs were monodisperse and encapsulated in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. TGA analysis showed that the content of iron oxide nanoparticles was 92.8 % in OAM-MNPs and 45.2 % in Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs. VSM results indicated that both OAM-MNPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were superparamagnetic, and the saturated magnetic intensity were 77.1 and 74.8 emu/g Fe. Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs exhibited good biocompatibility in cytotoxicity assay. The high cellular uptake of Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs in C6 cells indicated that Lf provided effective targeting for the brain tumor cells. The T 2 relaxation rate ( r 2) of M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs and Lf-M-PAEEP-PLLA-NPs were calculated to be 167.2 and 151.3 mM-1 s-1. In MRI on Wistar rat-bearing glioma tumor, significant contrast enhancement could clearly appear at 4 h after injection and last 48 h. Prussian blue staining of the section clearly

  17. Brain structural connectivity increases concurrent with functional improvement: Evidence from diffusion tensor MRI in children with cerebral palsy during therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë A. Englander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy (CP refers to a heterogeneous group of permanent but non-progressive movement disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain (Bax et al., 2005. Because of its serious long-term consequences, effective interventions that can help improve motor function, independence, and quality of life are critically needed. Our ongoing longitudinal clinical trial to treat children with CP is specifically designed to meet this challenge. To maximize the potential for functional improvement, all children in this trial received autologous cord blood transfusions (with order randomized with a placebo administration over 2 years in conjunction with more standard physical and occupational therapies. As a part of this trial, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is used to improve our understanding of how these interventions affect brain development, and to develop biomarkers of treatment efficacy. In this report, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and subsequent brain connectome analyses were performed in a subset of children enrolled in the clinical trial (n = 17, who all exhibited positive but varying degrees of functional improvement over the first 2-year period of the study. Strong correlations between increases in white matter (WM connectivity and functional improvement were demonstrated; however no significant relationships between either of these factors with the age of the child at time of enrollment were identified. Thus, our data indicate that increases in brain connectivity reflect improved functional abilities in children with CP. In future work, this potential biomarker can be used to help differentiate the underlying mechanisms of functional improvement, as well as to identify treatments that can best facilitate functional improvement upon un-blinding of the timing of autologous cord blood transfusions at the completion of this study.

  18. Improved Cognitive Function After Transcranial, Light-Emitting Diode Treatments in Chronic, Traumatic Brain Injury: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Saltmarche, Anita; Krengel, Maxine H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases, where cognition improved following treatment with red and near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs), applied transcranially to forehead and scalp areas, are presented. Background: Significant benefits have been reported following application of transcranial, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to humans with acute stroke and mice with acute TBI. These are the first case reports documenting improved cognitive function in chronic, TBI pati...

  19. Improving the care of people with traumatic brain injury through the Neurotrauma Evidence Translation (NET) program: protocol for a program of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sally E; Bosch, Marije; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A; Tavender, Emma J; Bragge, Peter; Chau, Marisa; Pitt, Veronica; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Gruen, Russell L

    2012-01-01

    The Neurotrauma Evidence Translation (NET) program was funded in 2009 to increase the uptake of research evidence in the clinical care of patients who have sustained traumatic brain injury. This paper reports the rationale and plan for this five-year knowledge translation research program. The overarching aims of the program are threefold: to improve outcomes for people with traumatic brain injury; to create a network of neurotrauma clinicians and researchers with expertise in knowledge translation and evidence-based practice; and to contribute knowledge to the field of knowledge translation research. The program comprises a series of interlinked projects spanning varying clinical environments and disciplines relevant to neurotrauma, anchored within four themes representing core knowledge translation activities: reviewing research evidence; understanding practice; developing and testing interventions for practice change; and building capacity for knowledge translation in neurotrauma. The program uses a range of different methods and study designs, including: an evidence fellowship program; conduct of and training in systematic reviews; mixed method study designs to describe and understand factors that influence current practices (e.g., semi-structured interviews and surveys); theory-based methods to develop targeted interventions aiming to change practice; a cluster randomised trial to test the effectiveness of a targeted theory-informed intervention; stakeholder involvement activities; and knowledge translation events such as consensus conferences. PMID:22866892

  20. Improving the care of people with traumatic brain injury through the Neurotrauma Evidence Translation (NET program: protocol for a program of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Sally E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Neurotrauma Evidence Translation (NET program was funded in 2009 to increase the uptake of research evidence in the clinical care of patients who have sustained traumatic brain injury. This paper reports the rationale and plan for this five-year knowledge translation research program. The overarching aims of the program are threefold: to improve outcomes for people with traumatic brain injury; to create a network of neurotrauma clinicians and researchers with expertise in knowledge translation and evidence-based practice; and to contribute knowledge to the field of knowledge translation research. The program comprises a series of interlinked projects spanning varying clinical environments and disciplines relevant to neurotrauma, anchored within four themes representing core knowledge translation activities: reviewing research evidence; understanding practice; developing and testing interventions for practice change; and building capacity for knowledge translation in neurotrauma. The program uses a range of different methods and study designs, including: an evidence fellowship program; conduct of and training in systematic reviews; mixed method study designs to describe and understand factors that influence current practices (e.g., semi-structured interviews and surveys; theory-based methods to develop targeted interventions aiming to change practice; a cluster randomised trial to test the effectiveness of a targeted theory-informed intervention; stakeholder involvement activities; and knowledge translation events such as consensus conferences.

  1. Improving the care of people with traumatic brain injury through the Neurotrauma Evidence Translation (NET) program: protocol for a program of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sally E; Bosch, Marije; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A; Tavender, Emma J; Bragge, Peter; Chau, Marisa; Pitt, Veronica; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Gruen, Russell L

    2012-01-01

    The Neurotrauma Evidence Translation (NET) program was funded in 2009 to increase the uptake of research evidence in the clinical care of patients who have sustained traumatic brain injury. This paper reports the rationale and plan for this five-year knowledge translation research program. The overarching aims of the program are threefold: to improve outcomes for people with traumatic brain injury; to create a network of neurotrauma clinicians and researchers with expertise in knowledge translation and evidence-based practice; and to contribute knowledge to the field of knowledge translation research. The program comprises a series of interlinked projects spanning varying clinical environments and disciplines relevant to neurotrauma, anchored within four themes representing core knowledge translation activities: reviewing research evidence; understanding practice; developing and testing interventions for practice change; and building capacity for knowledge translation in neurotrauma. The program uses a range of different methods and study designs, including: an evidence fellowship program; conduct of and training in systematic reviews; mixed method study designs to describe and understand factors that influence current practices (e.g., semi-structured interviews and surveys); theory-based methods to develop targeted interventions aiming to change practice; a cluster randomised trial to test the effectiveness of a targeted theory-informed intervention; stakeholder involvement activities; and knowledge translation events such as consensus conferences.

  2. Improving the performance of brain-computer interface through meditation practicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Parvaneh; Erfanian, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive tasks using motor imagery have been used for generating and controlling EEG activity in most brain-computer interface (BCI). Nevertheless, during the performance of a particular mental task, different factors such as concentration, attention, level of consciousness and the difficulty of the task, may be affecting the changes in the EEG activity. Accordingly, training the subject to consistently and reliably produce and control the changes in the EEG signals is a critical issue in developing a BCI system. In this work, we used meditation practice to enhance the mind controllability during the performance of a mental task in a BCI system. The mental states to be discriminated are the imaginative hand movement and the idle state. The experiments were conducted on two groups of subject, meditation group and control group. The time-frequency analysis of EEG signals for meditation practitioners showed an event-related desynchronization (ERD) of beta rhythm before imagination during resting state. In addition, a strong event-related synchronization (ERS) of beta rhythm was induced in frequency around 25 Hz during hand motor imagery. The results demonstrated that the meditation practice can improve the classification accuracy of EEG patterns. The average classification accuracy was 88.73% in the meditation group, while it was 70.28% in the control group. An accuracy as high as 98.0% was achieved in the meditation group.

  3. Improved two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue through temporal gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Vini; Drury, Jack; Choy, Julian M C; Stricker, Christian; Bachor, Hans-A; Daria, Vincent R

    2015-10-01

    We optimize two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue by temporally gating an incident laser to reduce the photon flux while optimizing the maximum fluorescence signal from the acquired images. Temporal gating produces a bunch of ~10 femtosecond pulses and the fluorescence signal is improved by increasing the bunch-pulse energy. Gating is achieved using an acousto-optic modulator with a variable gating frequency determined as integral multiples of the imaging sampling frequency. We hypothesize that reducing the photon flux minimizes the photo-damage to the cells. Our results, however, show that despite producing a high fluorescence signal, cell viability is compromised when the gating and sampling frequencies are equal (or effectively one bunch-pulse per pixel). We found an optimum gating frequency range that maintains the viability of the cells while preserving a pre-set fluorescence signal of the acquired two-photon images. The neurons are imaged while under whole-cell patch, and the cell viability is monitored as a change in the membrane's input resistance. PMID:26504651

  4. Sustained Delivery of Nicotinamide Limits Cortical Injury and Improves Functional Recovery Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Goffus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we have demonstrated that nicotinamide (NAM, a neuroprotective soluble B-group vitamin, improves recovery of function following traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, no prior studies have examined whether NAM is beneficial following continuous infusions over 7 days post-TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preclinical efficacy of NAM treatment as it might be delivered clinically; over several days by slow infusion. Rats were prepared with either unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI injuries or sham procedures and divided into three groups: CCI-NAM, CCI-vehicle and sham. Thirty minutes following CCI, Alzet osmotic mini-pumps were implanted subcutaneously. NAM was delivered at a rate of 50 mg/kg/day for 7 days immediately post-CCI. On day 7 following injury, the pumps were removed and blood draws were collected for serum NAM and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ analyses. Starting on day 2 post-CCI, animals were tested on a battery of sensorimotor tests (bilateral tactile adhesive removal, locomotor placing and limb-use asymmetry. Continuous infusion of NAM resulted in a significant serum elevation in NAM, but not NAD+. Statistical analyses of the tactile removal and locomotor placing data revealed that continuous administration of NAM significantly reduced the initial magnitude of the injury deficit and improved overall recovery compared to the vehicle-treated animals. NAM treatment also significantly decreased limb-use asymmetries compared to vehicle-treated animals. The overall extent of the cortical damage was also reduced by NAM treatment. No detrimental effects were seen following continuous infusion. The present results suggest that NAM delivered via a clinically relevant therapeutic regimen may truncate behavioral damage following TBI. Thus our results offer strong support for translation into the clinical population.

  5. A method for characterizing and improving the damage resistance of the outer metallic coating on IFE Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Landon J.

    2009-01-01

    A very smooth, highly-reflective coating on IFE (Inertial Fusion Energy) targets is essential for direct-drive ignition. An Au/Pd (gold-palladium alloy) is sputter coated onto the surface of an IFE target to improve the energy release from the target compression and thermonuclear reaction. It is also necessary to reflect the black body infrared radiation experienced while traveling into the chamber and preserve the extremely delicate frozen deuterium and tritium ice inside. The coating must r...

  6. The Effects of "Brain Gym" as a General Education Intervention: Improving Academic Performance and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Sherri S.

    2010-01-01

    "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act" ("IDEA") and "No Child Left Behind" ("NCLB") now mandate that all at-risk students receive empirical, scientific research-based interventions. "Brain Gym" is a movement-based program designed to address a diverse range of students' academic and behavior needs by promoting whole-brain learning. However,…

  7. The Brain-Compatible Classroom: Using What We Know about Learning To Improve Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlauer, Laura

    This book summarizes current brain research and shows how teachers can use this knowledge in the classroom every day. It explores how the brain works, how students' emotions and stress affect their ability to learn, how the physical classroom environment influences learning, and what forms of assessment work best. An introduction discusses the…

  8. Family-Based Training Program Improves Brain Function, Cognition, and Behavior in Lower Socioeconomic Status Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulak, Eric; Stevens, Courtney; Bell, Theodore A.; Fanning, Jessica; Klein, Scott; Isbell, Elif; Neville, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of several years of research, the authors have employed psychophysics, electrophysiological (ERP) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study the development and neuroplasticity of the human brain. During this time, they observed that different brain systems and related functions display markedly different degrees or…

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  10. Targeting the microenvironment of pancreatic cancer: overcoming treatment barriers and improving local immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, J; Alewine, C; Figg, W D; Duffy, A

    2016-07-01

    Historically, patients diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic cancer have faced a grim prognosis. The survival benefit seen with systemic chemotherapies and even combinations thereof have been disappointing. However, growing data suggest that the microenvironment of pancreatic cancer may be contributing to this poor prognosis. This microenvironment has a dense fibrotic stroma, and is hypoxic and highly immunosuppressive, all of which pose barriers to treatment. Newer strategies looking to disrupt the fibrotic stroma, target hypoxic areas, and improve local immune responses in the tumor microenvironment are currently undergoing clinical evaluation and seem to offer great promise. In addition to these therapies, preclinical work evaluating novel cytotoxic agents including nanoparticles has also been encouraging. While much research still needs to be done, these strategies offer new hope for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26661112

  11. Analysis of Cancer-Targeting Alkylphosphocholine Analogue Permeability Characteristics Using a Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Blood-Brain Barrier Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul A; Al-Ahmad, Abraham J; Qian, Tongcheng; Zhang, Ray R; Wilson, Hannah K; Weichert, Jamey P; Palecek, Sean P; Kuo, John S; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-09-01

    Cancer-targeting alkylphosphocholine (APC) analogues are being clinically developed for diagnostic imaging, intraoperative visualization, and therapeutic applications. These APC analogues derived from chemically synthesized phospholipid ethers were identified and optimized for cancer-targeting specificity using extensive structure-activity studies. While they strongly label human brain cancers associated with disrupted blood-brain barriers (BBB), APC permeability across intact BBB remains unknown. Three of our APC analogues, CLR1404 (PET radiotracer), CLR1501 (green fluorescence), and CLR1502 (near-infrared fluorescence), were tested for permeability across a BBB model composed of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells (iPSC-derived BMECs). This in vitro BBB system has reproducibly consistent high barrier integrity marked by high transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER > 1500 Ω-cm(2)) and functional expression of drug efflux transporters. The radioiodinated and fluorescent APC analogues demonstrated fairly low permeability across the iPSC-BMEC (35 ± 5.7 (CLR1404), 54 ± 3.2 (CLR1501), and 26 ± 4.9 (CLR1502) × 10(-5) cm/min) compared with BBB-impermeable sucrose (13 ± 2.5) and BBB-permeable diazepam (170 ± 29). Only the fluorescent APC analogues (CLR1501, CLR1502) underwent BCRP and MRP polarized drug efflux transport in the brain-to-blood direction of the BBB model, and this efflux can be specifically blocked with pharmacological inhibition. None of the tested APC analogues appeared to undergo substantial P-gp transport. Limited permeability of the APC analogues across an intact BBB into normal brain likely contributes to the high tumor to background ratios observed in initial human trials. Moreover, addition of fluorescent moieties to APCs resulted in greater BMEC efflux via MRP and BCRP, and may affect fluorescence-guided applications. Overall, the characterization of APC analogue permeability across human BBB

  12. Improvement of Zinc Coating Weight Control for Transition of Target Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien Ming; Lin, Jeong Hwa; Hsu, Tse Wei; Lin, Rui Rong [China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung (China)

    2010-06-15

    The product specification of the Continuous Hot Dip Galvanizing Line (CGL) changes and varies constantly with different customers' requirements, especially in the zinc coating weight which is from 30 to 150 g/m{sup 2} on each side. Since the coating weight of zinc changes often, it is very important to reduce time spent in the transfer of target values changed for low production cost and yield loss. The No.2 CGL in China Steel Corporation (CSC) has improved the control of the air knife which is designed by Siemens VAI. CSC proposed an experiment design which is an L{sub 9}(3{sup 4}) orthogonal array to find the relations between zinc coating weight and the process parameters, such as the line speed, air pressure, gap of air knife and air knife position. A non-linear regression formula was derived from the experimental results and applied in the mathematical model. A new air knife feedforward control system, which is coupled with the regression formula, the air knife control system and the process computer, is implemented into the line. The practical plant operation results have been presented to show the transfer time is obviously shortened while zinc coating weight target changing and the product rejected ratio caused by zinc coating weight out of specification is significantly reduced from 0.5% to 0.15%.

  13. Improvement of Zinc Coating Weight Control for Transition of Target Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The product specification of the Continuous Hot Dip Galvanizing Line (CGL) changes and varies constantly with different customers' requirements, especially in the zinc coating weight which is from 30 to 150 g/m2 on each side. Since the coating weight of zinc changes often, it is very important to reduce time spent in the transfer of target values changed for low production cost and yield loss. The No.2 CGL in China Steel Corporation (CSC) has improved the control of the air knife which is designed by Siemens VAI. CSC proposed an experiment design which is an L9(34) orthogonal array to find the relations between zinc coating weight and the process parameters, such as the line speed, air pressure, gap of air knife and air knife position. A non-linear regression formula was derived from the experimental results and applied in the mathematical model. A new air knife feedforward control system, which is coupled with the regression formula, the air knife control system and the process computer, is implemented into the line. The practical plant operation results have been presented to show the transfer time is obviously shortened while zinc coating weight target changing and the product rejected ratio caused by zinc coating weight out of specification is significantly reduced from 0.5% to 0.15%

  14. An improved systematic approach to predicting transcription factor target genes using support vector machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cui

    Full Text Available Biological prediction of transcription factor binding sites and their corresponding transcription factor target genes (TFTGs makes great contribution to understanding the gene regulatory networks. However, these approaches are based on laborious and time-consuming biological experiments. Numerous computational approaches have shown great potential to circumvent laborious biological methods. However, the majority of these algorithms provide limited performances and fail to consider the structural property of the datasets. We proposed a refined systematic computational approach for predicting TFTGs. Based on previous work done on identifying auxin response factor target genes from Arabidopsis thaliana co-expression data, we adopted a novel reverse-complementary distance-sensitive n-gram profile algorithm. This algorithm converts each upstream sub-sequence into a high-dimensional vector data point and transforms the prediction task into a classification problem using support vector machine-based classifier. Our approach showed significant improvement compared to other computational methods based on the area under curve value of the receiver operating characteristic curve using 10-fold cross validation. In addition, in the light of the highly skewed structure of the dataset, we also evaluated other metrics and their associated curves, such as precision-recall curves and cost curves, which provided highly satisfactory results.

  15. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-01

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance.

  16. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  17. Metallothionein-I overexpression alters brain inflammation and stimulates brain repair in transgenic mice with astrocyte-targeted interleukin-6 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Camats, Jordi; Giralt, Mercedes;

    2003-01-01

    injury, such as a cryolesion, demonstrate a neuroprotective role of IL-6. Thus, the GFAP-IL-6 mice showed faster tissue repair and decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis compared with control litter-mate mice. The neuroprotective factors metallothionein-I+II (MT-I+II) were upregulated by the cryolesion...... the inflammatory response, decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis significantly, and increased brain tissue repair in comparison with either GFAP-IL-6 or control litter-mate mice. Overall, the results demonstrate that brain MT-I+II proteins are fundamental neuroprotective factors.......Transgenic expression of IL-6 in the CNS under the control of the GFAP gene promoter, glial fibrillary acidic protein-interleukin-6 (GFAP-IL-6) mice, raises an inflammatory response and causes significant brain damage. However, the results obtained in the GFAP-IL-6 mice after a traumatic brain...

  18. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  19. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  20. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  1. A novel heterocyclic compound targeting the dopamine transporter improves performance in the radial arm maze and modulates dopamine receptors D1-D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Aher, Yogesh D; Kalaba, Predrag; Aher, Nilima Y; Zehl, Martin; Korz, Volker; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Miklosi, Andras G; Zanon, Lisa; Neuhaus, Winfried; Höger, Harald; Langer, Thierry; Urban, Ernst; Leban, Johann; Lubec, Gert

    2016-10-01

    A series of compounds targeting the dopamine transporter (DAT) haS been shown to improve memory performance most probably by re-uptake inhibition. Although specific DAT inhibitors are available, there is limited information about specificity, mechanism and in particular the effect on dopamine receptors. It was therefore the aim of the study to test the DAT inhibitor 4-(diphenyl-methanesulfinylmethyl)-2-methyl-thiazole (code: CE-111), synthetized in our laboratory for the specificity to target DAT, for the effects upon spatial memory and for induced dopamine receptor modulation. Re-uptake inhibition was tested for DAT (IC50=3.2μM), serotonin transporter, SERT (IC50=272291μM) and noradrenaline transporter, NET (IC50=174μM). Spatial memory was studied in the radial arm maze (RAM) in male Sprague-Dawley rats that were intraperitoneally injected with CE-111 (1 or 10mg/kg body weight). Performance in the RAM was improved using 1 and 10mg/kg body weight of CE-111. Training and treatment effects on presynaptic, postsynaptic and extrasynaptic D1 and D2- receptors and dopamine receptor containing complexes as well as on activated DAT were observed. CE-111 was crossing the blood-brain barrier comparable to modafinil and was identified as effective to improve memory performance in the RAM. Dopamine re-uptake inhibition along with modulations in dopamine receptors are proposed as potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:27288589

  2. Intravascular clearance of disseminating Cryptococcus neoformans in the brain can be improved by enhancing neutrophil recruitment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Donglei; Zhang, Mingshun; Liu, Gongguan; Wu, Hui; Li, Chang; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Xiquan; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-07-01

    Extrapulmonary dissemination of Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is one of the most critical steps in the development of meningoencephalitis. Here, we report that clearance of the disseminating C. neoformans occurs within the brain microvasculature. Interestingly, the efficiency of the intravascular clearance in the brain is reduced compared to that in the lung. Intravascular clearance is mainly mediated by neutrophils, and complement C5a receptor signaling is crucial for mediating neutrophil recruitment in the vasculature. C. neoformans stimulated actin polymerization of neutrophils is critically involved in their recruitment to the lung, which is associated with the unique vascular structure detected in the lung. The relatively lower efficiency of fungal clearance in the brain vasculature correlates with less efficient recruitment of neutrophils. Accordingly, intravascular clearance of C. neoformans in the brain could be remarkably improved by increasing the recruitment of neutrophils. We conclude that neutrophils have the ability to eliminate C. neoformans arrested in the vasculature. However, insufficient recruitment of neutrophils limited the optimal clearance of this microorganism in the brain. These results imply that a therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing the accumulation of neutrophils could help prevent cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:27109176

  3. Synthesis of tumor-targeted folate conjugated fluorescent magnetic albumin nanoparticles for enhanced intracellular dual-modal imaging into human brain tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqin; Tu, Miaomiao; Tian, Baoming; Yi, Yanjie; Wei, ZhenZhen; Wei, Fang

    2016-11-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs), utilized as carriers are attractive materials widely applied in biomedical fields, but target-specific SPIO NPs with lower toxicity and excellent biocompatibility are still lacking for intracellular visualization in human brain tumor diagnosis and therapy. Herein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide, i.e. γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (BSA-SPIO NPs), are synthesized. Tumor-specific ligand folic acid (FA) is then conjugated onto BSA-SPIO NPs to fabricate tumor-targeted NPs, FA-BSA-SPIO NPs as a contrast agent for MRI imaging. The FA-BSA-SPIO NPs are also labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for intracellular visualization after cellular uptake and internalization by glioma U251 cells. The biological effects of the FA-BSA-SPIO NPs are investigated in human brain tumor U251 cells in detail. These results show that the prepared FA-BSA-SPIO NPs display undetectable cytotoxicity, excellent biocompatibility, and potent cellular uptake. Moreover, the study shows that the made FA-BSA-SPIO NPs are effectively internalized for MRI imaging and intracellular visualization after FITC labeling in the targeted U251 cells. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that the fabricated FITC-FA-BSA-SPIO NPs hold promising perspectives by providing a dual-modal imaging as non-toxic and target-specific vehicles in human brain tumor treatment in future.

  4. mirTarPri: improved prioritization of microRNA targets through incorporation of functional genomics data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small (19-25 nt non-coding RNAs. This important class of gene regulator downregulates gene expression through sequence-specific binding to the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTRs of target mRNAs. Several computational target prediction approaches have been developed for predicting miRNA targets. However, the predicted target lists often have high false positive rates. To construct a workable target list for subsequent experimental studies, we need novel approaches to properly rank the candidate targets from traditional methods. We performed a systematic analysis of experimentally validated miRNA targets using functional genomics data, and found significant functional associations between genes that were targeted by the same miRNA. Based on this finding, we developed a miRNA target prioritization method named mirTarPri to rank the predicted target lists from commonly used target prediction methods. Leave-one-out cross validation has proved to be successful in identifying known targets, achieving an AUC score up to 0. 84. Validation in high-throughput data proved that mirTarPri was an unbiased method. Applying mirTarPri to prioritize results of six commonly used target prediction methods allowed us to find more positive targets at the top of the prioritized candidate list. In comparison with other methods, mirTarPri had an outstanding performance in gold standard and CLIP data. mirTarPri was a valuable method to improve the efficacy of current miRNA target prediction methods. We have also developed a web-based server for implementing mirTarPri method, which is freely accessible at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/mirTarPri.

  5. Improved differentiation between MS and vascular brain lesions using FLAIR* at 7 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilsdonk, Iris D.; Wattjes, Mike P.; Lopez-Soriano, Alexandra; Jong, Marcus C. de; Graaf, Wolter L. de; Conijn, Mandy M.A.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, De Boelelaan 1118, HZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijer, Joost P.A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Polman, Chris H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Luijten, Peter R. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Geurts, Jeroen J.G. [VU University, Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Geerlings, Mirjam I. [University Medical Center, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate whether a new magnetic resonance image (MRI) technique called T2*-weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR*) can differentiate between multiple sclerosis (MS) and vascular brain lesions, at 7 Tesla (T). We examined 16 MS patients and 16 age-matched patients with (risk factors for) vascular disease. 3D-FLAIR and T2*-weighted images were combined into FLAIR* images. Lesion type and intensity, perivascular orientation and presence of a hypointense rim were analysed. In total, 433 cerebral lesions were detected in MS patients versus 86 lesions in vascular patients. Lesions in MS patients were significantly more often orientated in a perivascular manner: 74 % vs. 47 % (P < 0.001). Ten MS lesions (2.3 %) were surrounded by a hypointense rim on FLAIR*, and 24 MS lesions (5.5 %) were hypointense on T2*. No lesions in vascular patients showed any rim or hypointensity. Specificity of differentiating MS from vascular lesions on 7-T FLAIR* increased when the presence of a central vessel was taken into account (from 63 % to 88 %), most obviously for deep white matter lesions (from 69 % to 94 %). High sensitivity remained (81 %). 7-T FLAIR* improves differentiation between MS and vascular lesions based on lesion location, perivascular orientation and presence of hypointense (rims around) lesions. circle A new MRI technique T2*-weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR*) was investigated. circle FLAIR* at 7-T MRI combines FLAIR and T2* images into a single image. circle FLAIR* at 7 T does not require enhancement with contrast agents. (orig.)

  6. A hypothesis on improving foreign accents by optimizing variability in vocal learning brain circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Simmonds

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid vocal motor learning is observed when acquiring a language in early childhood, or learning to speak another language later in life. Accurate pronunciation is one of the hardest things for late learners to master and they are almost always left with a non-native accent. Here I propose a novel hypothesis that this accent could be improved by optimizing variability in vocal learning brain circuits during learning. Much of the neurobiology of human vocal motor learning has been inferred from studies on songbirds. Jarvis (2004 proposed the hypothesis that as in songbirds there are two pathways in humans: one for learning speech (the striatal vocal learning pathway, and one for production of previously learnt speech (the motor pathway. Learning new motor sequences necessary for accurate non-native pronunciation is challenging and I argue that in late learners of a foreign language the vocal learning pathway becomes inactive prematurely. The motor pathway is engaged once again and learners maintain their original native motor patterns for producing speech, resulting in speaking with a foreign accent. Further, I argue that variability in neural activity within vocal motor circuitry generates vocal variability that supports accurate non-native pronunciation. Recent theoretical and experimental work on motor learning suggests that variability in the motor movement is necessary for the development of expertise. I propose that there is little trial-by-trial variability when using the motor pathway. When using the vocal learning pathway variability gradually increases, reflecting an exploratory phase in which learners try out different ways of pronouncing words, before decreasing and stabilizing once the ‘best’ performance has been identified. The hypothesis proposed here could be tested using behavioral interventions that optimize variability and engage the vocal learning pathway for longer, with the prediction that this would allow learners to

  7. Improved differentiation between MS and vascular brain lesions using FLAIR* at 7 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether a new magnetic resonance image (MRI) technique called T2*-weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR*) can differentiate between multiple sclerosis (MS) and vascular brain lesions, at 7 Tesla (T). We examined 16 MS patients and 16 age-matched patients with (risk factors for) vascular disease. 3D-FLAIR and T2*-weighted images were combined into FLAIR* images. Lesion type and intensity, perivascular orientation and presence of a hypointense rim were analysed. In total, 433 cerebral lesions were detected in MS patients versus 86 lesions in vascular patients. Lesions in MS patients were significantly more often orientated in a perivascular manner: 74 % vs. 47 % (P < 0.001). Ten MS lesions (2.3 %) were surrounded by a hypointense rim on FLAIR*, and 24 MS lesions (5.5 %) were hypointense on T2*. No lesions in vascular patients showed any rim or hypointensity. Specificity of differentiating MS from vascular lesions on 7-T FLAIR* increased when the presence of a central vessel was taken into account (from 63 % to 88 %), most obviously for deep white matter lesions (from 69 % to 94 %). High sensitivity remained (81 %). 7-T FLAIR* improves differentiation between MS and vascular lesions based on lesion location, perivascular orientation and presence of hypointense (rims around) lesions. circle A new MRI technique T2*-weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR*) was investigated. circle FLAIR* at 7-T MRI combines FLAIR and T2* images into a single image. circle FLAIR* at 7 T does not require enhancement with contrast agents. (orig.)

  8. Improvement of brain segmentation accuracy by optimizing non-uniformity correction using N3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weili; Chee, Michael W L; Zagorodnov, Vitali

    2009-10-15

    Smoothly varying and multiplicative intensity variations within MR images that are artifactual, can reduce the accuracy of automated brain segmentation. Fortunately, these can be corrected. Among existing correction approaches, the nonparametric non-uniformity intensity normalization method N3 (Sled, J.G., Zijdenbos, A.P., Evans, A.C., 1998. Nonparametric method for automatic correction of intensity nonuniformity in MRI data. IEEE Trans. Med. Imag. 17, 87-97.) is one of the most frequently used. However, at least one recent study (Boyes, R.G., Gunter, J.L., Frost, C., Janke, A.L., Yeatman, T., Hill, D.L.G., Bernstein, M.A., Thompson, P.M., Weiner, M.W., Schuff, N., Alexander, G.E., Killiany, R.J., DeCarli, C., Jack, C.R., Fox, N.C., 2008. Intensity non-uniformity correction using N3 on 3-T scanners with multichannel phased array coils. NeuroImage 39, 1752-1762.) suggests that its performance on 3 T scanners with multichannel phased-array receiver coils can be improved by optimizing a parameter that controls the smoothness of the estimated bias field. The present study not only confirms this finding, but additionally demonstrates the benefit of reducing the relevant parameter values to 30-50 mm (default value is 200 mm), on white matter surface estimation as well as the measurement of cortical and subcortical structures using FreeSurfer (Martinos Imaging Centre, Boston, MA). This finding can help enhance precision in studies where estimation of cerebral cortex thickness is critical for making inferences. PMID:19559796

  9. A hypothesis on improving foreign accents by optimizing variability in vocal learning brain circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    Rapid vocal motor learning is observed when acquiring a language in early childhood, or learning to speak another language later in life. Accurate pronunciation is one of the hardest things for late learners to master and they are almost always left with a non-native accent. Here, I propose a novel hypothesis that this accent could be improved by optimizing variability in vocal learning brain circuits during learning. Much of the neurobiology of human vocal motor learning has been inferred from studies on songbirds. Jarvis (2004) proposed the hypothesis that as in songbirds there are two pathways in humans: one for learning speech (the striatal vocal learning pathway), and one for production of previously learnt speech (the motor pathway). Learning new motor sequences necessary for accurate non-native pronunciation is challenging and I argue that in late learners of a foreign language the vocal learning pathway becomes inactive prematurely. The motor pathway is engaged once again and learners maintain their original native motor patterns for producing speech, resulting in speaking with a foreign accent. Further, I argue that variability in neural activity within vocal motor circuitry generates vocal variability that supports accurate non-native pronunciation. Recent theoretical and experimental work on motor learning suggests that variability in the motor movement is necessary for the development of expertise. I propose that there is little trial-by-trial variability when using the motor pathway. When using the vocal learning pathway variability gradually increases, reflecting an exploratory phase in which learners try out different ways of pronouncing words, before decreasing and stabilizing once the "best" performance has been identified. The hypothesis proposed here could be tested using behavioral interventions that optimize variability and engage the vocal learning pathway for longer, with the prediction that this would allow learners to develop new motor

  10. Helium preconditioning protects the brain against hypoxia/ischemia injury via improving the neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Peixi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Wenwu; Yin, Na

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether helium preconditioning (He-PC) is able to exert neuroprotective effects via improving focal neurovascular niche in a neonatal rat hypoxia/ischemia (HI) brain injury model. Seven day old rat pups were divided into control group, HI group and He-PC group. HI was induced by exposure to 8% oxygen for 90min one day after preconditioning with 70% helium-30% oxygen for three 5-min periods. At 3 and 7 days, the brain was collected for the detection of inflammation related factors (tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-10) and growth/neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF] and nerve growth factor [NGF]); at 7 days, neurobehaviors were evaluated, and the brain was collected for the detection of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) by PCR, protein expression of angiogenesis related molecules (VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1) by Western blotting and microvessel density (MCD) by immunohistochemistry for vWF. Results showed He-PC was able to reduce TNF-α and IL-1β, further increase IL-10, BDNF, bFGF and NGF, elevate the mRNA expression of VEGF and Ang-1, increase the protein expression of VEGF, Ang-1, Tie-2 and Flt-1, promote angiogenesis and improve neurobehaviors as compared to HI group. These findings suggest that He-PC may improve the post-stroke neurovascular niche to exert neuroprotective effects on neonatal HI brain injury. PMID:27515290

  11. Intestine-targeted DGAT1 inhibition improves obesity and insulin resistance without skin aberrations in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Tsuda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 catalyzes the final committed step in triglyceride biosynthesis. DGAT1 null mice are known to be resistant to diet-induced obesity, and more insulin sensitive relative to the wild-type; however, the mice exhibit abnormalities in the skin. This work determined whether the intestine-targeted DGAT1 inhibitor could improve obesity and insulin resistance without skin aberrations in mice. DESIGN AND METHODS: We synthesized 2 DGAT1 inhibitors: Compound A, described in the patent application from the Japan Tobacco, and Compound B (A-922500, reported by Abbott Laboratories. Both compounds were evaluated for inhibitory activities against DGAT1 enzymes and effects on the skin in mice in vivo. Compound B was further investigated for effects on obesity and insulin resistance in diet-induced-obese (DIO mice. RESULTS: The 2 compounds comparably inhibited the DGAT1 enzyme activity and the cellular triglyceride synthesis in vitro, while they showed different distribution patterns in mice in vivo. Compound A, which distributed systemically, caused skin aberrations, while Compound B, which preferentially distributed to the intestine, improved obesity and insulin resistance without skin aberrations in DIO mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the intestine is the key tissue in which DGAT1 plays a role in promoting obesity and insulin resistance.

  12. Proteomics meets blood banking: identification of protein targets for the improvement of platelet quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Peter; Devine, Dana V

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has brought new perspectives to the fields of hematology and transfusion medicine in the last decade. The steady improvement of proteomic technology is propelling novel discoveries of molecular mechanisms by studying protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein interactions. This review article focuses on the application of proteomics to the identification of molecular mechanisms leading to the deterioration of blood platelets during storage - a critical aspect in the provision of platelet transfusion products. Several proteomic approaches have been employed to analyse changes in the platelet protein profile during storage and the obtained data now need to be translated into platelet biochemistry in order to connect the results to platelet function. Targeted biochemical applications then allow the identification of points for intervention in signal transduction pathways. Once validated and placed in a transfusion context, these data will provide further understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to platelet storage lesion. Future aspects of proteomics in blood banking will aim to make use of protein markers identified for platelet storage lesion development to monitor proteome changes when alterations such as the use of additive solutions or pathogen reduction strategies are put in place in order to improve platelet quality for patients.

  13. For veterans with mild traumatic brain injury, improved posttraumatic stress disorder severity and sleep correlated with symptomatic improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne S. Ruff, PhD; Traci Piero, NP‐C, MSN; Xiao-Feng Wang, PhD; Ronald G. Riechers II, MD; Robert L. Ruff, MD, PhD

    2012-01-01

    This was an observational study of a cohort of 63 Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) associated with an explosion. They had headaches, residual neurological deficits (NDs) on neurological examination, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and were seen on average 2.5 years after their last mTBI. We treated them with sleep hygiene counseling and oral prazosin. We monitored headache severity, daytime sleepiness using the Epwort...

  14. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji-Ae, E-mail: jpark@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Young, E-mail: jykim@kirams.re.kr [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images.

  15. [Improving the management of rare brain cancers with the POLA network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziev, Robert; Ravin, Mylène; Carpentier, Catherine; Dehais, Caroline

    2014-04-01

    The national POLA network is dedicated to the management of certain rare brain tumours, mainly anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, anaplastic oligoastrocytomas and glioblastomas with oligodendroglioma component. The nursing team and the patient are at the heart of the organisation.

  16. Targeting EGFR and COX-2 as a potential treatment improvement strategy in cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular targeting, i.e. use of agents that counteract molecular processes that are dysregulated in cancer cells, which may be responsible for tumor radio-or chemoresistance, is a recently extensively investigated approach to further improve radiotherapy, chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Many potential targets for augmentation of radio (or chemo) response have been identified including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, mutated ras and angiogenic molecules. Agents that selectively inhibit these molecules are becoming available at a rapid rate, and many of them have been shown in preclinical testing to be highly effective in improving tumor radioresponse or chemoresponse, without significantly affecting normal tissues. The interaction of EGFR and COX-2 inhibitors with radiation has attracted a flare of investigational interest, and is over-viewed here. EGFR is frequently overexpressed or mutated in many types of cancer, which is associated with more aggressive tumor behavior and poorer tumor response to cytotoxic agents, including radiation. Blockade of EGFR or interference with its downstream signaling processes can improve tumor treatment. Our own studies, using human tumor xenografts, demonstrated that blocking EGFR with C225 anti-EGFR antibody produces a dramatic enhancement of tumor radioresponse, and even more dramatic response when radiation is combined with chemotherapeutic agents. C225 acts by a number of mechanisms including inhibition of DNA repair from radiation damage, enhancement of apoptosis and tumor necrosis, and by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activation by small molecule agents, such as Iressa or Tarceva, is another approach in interfering with EGFR-signaling, which also showed potent enhancing effect on tumor radioresponse. There are two COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. While COX-1 is a ubiquitous constitutive enzyme having housekeeping physiological function, COX-2 is an

  17. Improving players' control over the NeuroSky brain-computer interface

    OpenAIRE

    Kristín Guðmundsdóttir 1963

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In mid-2009, NeuroSky released the first consumer brain-computer interface (BCI). MindGames, since that time, has been developing games which players control with their powers of concentration and relaxation via consumer brain-computer interfaces. At present, all users of these novel interfaces are inexperienced, and have trouble controlling them. Therefore MindGames would like to develop a method for helping as people to learn as quickly as possible to activate the "relaxation" a...

  18. Naringin Improves Neuronal Insulin Signaling, Brain Mitochondrial Function, and Cognitive Function in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Yan, Junqiang; Chen, Jing; Wu, Wenlan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    The epidemic and experimental studies have confirmed that the obesity induced by high-fat diet not only caused neuronal insulin resistance, but also induced brain mitochondrial dysfunction as well as learning impairment in mice. Naringin has been reported to posses biological functions which are beneficial to human cognitions, but its protective effects on HFD-induced cognitive deficits and underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. In the present study Male C57BL/6 J mice were fed either a control or high-fat diet for 20 weeks and then randomized into four groups treated with their respective diets including control diet, control diet + naringin, high-fat diet (HFD), and high-fat diet + naringin (HFDN). The behavioral performance was assessed by using novel object recognition test and Morris water maze test. Hippocampal mitochondrial parameters were analyzed. Then the protein levels of insulin signaling pathway and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hippocampus were detected by Western blot method. Our results showed that oral administration of naringin significantly improved the learning and memory abilities as evidenced by increasing recognition index by 52.5% in the novel object recognition test and inducing a 1.05-fold increase in the crossing-target number in the probe test, and ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction in mice caused by HFD consumption. Moreover, naringin significantly enhanced insulin signaling pathway as indicated by a 34.5% increase in the expression levels of IRS-1, a 47.8% decrease in the p-IRS-1, a 1.43-fold increase in the p-Akt, and a 1.89-fold increase in the p-GSK-3β in the hippocampus of the HFDN mice versus HFD mice. Furthermore, the AMPK activity significantly increased in the naringin-treated (100 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) group. These findings suggest that an enhancement in insulin signaling and a decrease in mitochondrial dysfunction through the activation of AMPK may be one of the mechanisms that naringin

  19. Post-mortem Findings in Huntington’s Deep Brain Stimulation: A Moving Target Due to Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Hilliard, Justin D.; Carbunaru, Samuel; Yachnis, Anthony T.; Bloom, Joshua; Keeling, Peyton; Awe, Lisa; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be effective for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and primary dystonia. However, mixed results have been reported in Huntington’s disease (HD). Case Report A single case of HD DBS was identified from the University of Florida DBS Brain Tissue Network. The clinical presentation, evolution, surgical planning, DBS parameters, clinical outcomes, and brain pathological changes are summarized. Discussion This case of HD DBS revealed th...

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor:an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Guo; Hui Zhou; Jie Lu; Yi Qu; Dan Yu; Yu Tong

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repairvia the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions.

  1. Continuous Monitoring and Intrafraction Target Position Correction During Treatment Improves Target Coverage for Patients Undergoing SBRT Prostate Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, D. Michael, E-mail: lovelocm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Messineo, Alessandra P. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cox, Brett W. [North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the potential benefits of continuous monitoring of prostate position and intervention (CMI) using 2-mm displacement thresholds during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment to those of a conventional image-guided procedure involving single localization prior to treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine patients accrued to a prostate SBRT dose escalation protocol were implanted with radiofrequency transponder beacons. The planning target volume (PTV) margin was 5 mm in all directions, except for 3 mm in the posterior direction. The prostate was kept within 2 mm of its planned position by the therapists halting dose delivery and, if necessary, correcting the couch position. We computed the number, type, and time required for interventions and where the prostate would have been during dose delivery had there been, instead, a single image-guided setup procedure prior to each treatment. Distributions of prostate displacements were computed as a function of time. Results: After the initial setup, 1.7 interventions per fraction were required, with a concomitant increase in time for dose delivery of approximately 65 seconds. Small systematic drifts in prostate position in the posterior and inferior directions were observed in the study patients. Without CMI, intrafractional motion would have resulted in approximately 10% of patients having a delivered dose that did not meet our clinical coverage requirement, that is, a PTV D95 of >90%. The posterior PTV margin required for 95% of the dose to be delivered with the target positioned within the PTV was computed as a function of time. The margin necessary was found to increase by 2 mm every 5 minutes, starting from the time of the imaging procedure. Conclusions: CMI using a tight 2-mm displacement threshold was not only feasible but was found to deliver superior PTV coverage compared with the conventional image-guided procedure in the SBRT setting.

  2. Protective efficacy of mitochondrial targeted antioxidant MitoQ against dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and cell death in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Gudup, Satish; Sunkaria, Aditya; Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Sharma, Deep Raj; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-12-01

    Dichlorvos is a synthetic insecticide that belongs to the family of chemically related organophosphate (OP) pesticides. It can be released into the environment as a major degradation product of other OPs, such as trichlorfon, naled, and metrifonate. Dichlorvos exerts its toxic effects in humans and animals by inhibiting neural acetylcholinesterase. Chronic low-level exposure to dichlorvos has been shown to result in inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I and cytochrome oxidase in rat brain, resulting in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. MitoQ is an antioxidant, selectively targeted to mitochondria and protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in dichlorvos induced neurodegeneration, then MitoQ should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of MitoQ (100 μmol/kg body wt/day) reduced dichlorvos (6 mg/kg body wt/day) induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased MnSOD activity and glutathione levels) with decreased lipid peroxidation, protein and DNA oxidation. In addition, MitoQ also suppressed DNA fragmentation, cyt c release and caspase-3 activity in dichlorvos treated rats compared to the control group. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that MitoQ attenuates dichlorvos induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that MitoQ may be beneficial against OP (dichlorvos) induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21784090

  3. Videogame-based group therapy to improve self-awareness and social skills after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Llorens, Roberto; Noé, Enrique; Ferri, Joan; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Background This study determines the feasibility of different approaches to integrative videogame-based group therapy for improving self-awareness, social skills, and behaviors among traumatic brain injury (TBI) victims and retrieves participant feedback. Methods Forty-two adult TBI survivors were included in a longitudinal study with a pre- and post-assessments. The experimental intervention involved weekly one-hour sessions conducted over six months. Participants were assessed using the Sel...

  4. Regulation of Schwann cell proliferation and migration by miR-1 targeting brain-derived neurotrophic factor after peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng Yi; Ying Yuan; Qianqian Chen; Xinghui Wang; Leilei Gong; Jie Liu; Xiaosong Gu; Shiying Li

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a global problem that causes disability and severe socioeconomic burden. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) benefits peripheral nerve regeneration and becomes a promising therapeutic molecule. In the current study, we found that microRNA-1 (miR-1) directly targeted BDNF by binding to its 3′-UTR and caused both mRNA degradation and translation suppression of BDNF. Moreover, miR-1 induced BDNF mRNA degradation primarily through binding to target site 3 rather th...

  5. Enriched environment improves the cognitive effects from traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, S; Lin, R; Haim, L; Baratz-Goldstien, R; Rubovitch, V; Vaisman, N; Pick, C G

    2014-09-01

    To date, there is yet no established effective treatment (medication or cognitive intervention) for post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with chronic sequelae. Enriched environment (EE) has been recognized of importance in brain regulation, behaviour and physiology. Rodents reared in, or pre-exposed to EE, recovered better from brain insults. Using the concussive head trauma model of minimal TBI in mice, we evaluated the effect of transition to EE following a weight-drop (30g or 50g) induced mTBI on behavioural and cognitive parameters in mice in the Novel Object Recognition task, the Y- and the Elevated Plus mazes. In all assays, both mTBI groups (30g, 50g) housed in normal conditions were equally and significantly impaired 6 weeks post injury in comparison with the no-mTBI (pjuggling training and intensive cognitive stimulation. PMID:24906196

  6. Improving the prediction of the brain disposition for orally administered drugs using BDDCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broccatelli, Fabio; Larregieu, Caroline A.; Cruciani, Gabriele;

    2012-01-01

    In modeling blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage, in silico models have yielded ~80% prediction accuracy, and are currently used in early drug discovery. Being derived from molecular structural information only, these models do not take into account the biological factors responsible for the in vivo...... outcome. Passive permeability and P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) efflux have been successfully recognized to impact xenobiotic extrusion from the brain, as Pgp is known to play a role in limiting the BBB penetration of oral drugs in humans. However, these two properties alone fail to explain the BBB...... were found to markedly distribute throughout the brain; this includes a number of BDDCS class 1 drugs shown to be Pgp substrates. This new perspective provides a further interpretation of how Pgp influences the sedative effects of H1-histamine receptor antagonists....

  7. Topology of whole-brain functional MRI networks: Improving the truncated scale-free model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Vargas, E.; Mitchell, D. G. V.; Greening, S. G.; Wahl, L. M.

    2014-07-01

    Networks of connections within the human brain have been the subject of intense recent research, yet their topology is still only partially understood. We analyze weighted networks calculated from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during task performance. Expanding previous work in the area, our analysis retains all of the connections between all of the voxels in the full brain fMRI data, computing correlations between approximately 200,000 voxels per subject for 10 subjects. We evaluate the extent to which this rich dataset can be described by existing models of scale-free or exponentially truncated scale-free topology, comparing results across a large number of more complex topological models as well. Our results suggest that the novel “log quadratic” model presented in this paper offers a significantly better fit to networks of functional connections at the voxel level in the human brain.

  8. Targeting Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism to Improve Glucose Metabolism in Cardiometabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan W.E. Jocken

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease prevalence on the rise, there is a growing need for improved strategies to prevent or treat obesity and insulin resistance, both of which are major risk factors for these chronic diseases. Impairments in adipose tissue lipid metabolism seem to play a critical role in these disorders. In the classical picture of intracellular lipid breakdown, cytosolic lipolysis was proposed as the sole mechanism for triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipocytes. Recent evidence suggests involvement of several hormones, membrane receptors, and intracellular signalling cascades, which has added complexity to the regulation of cytosolic lipolysis. Interestingly, a specific form of autophagy, called lipophagy, has been implicated as alternative lipolytic pathway. Defective regulation of cytosolic lipolysis and lipophagy might have substantial effects on lipid metabolism, thereby contributing to adipose tissue dysfunction, insulin resistance, and related cardiometabolic (cMet diseases. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of classical lipolysis and lipophagy in adipocyte lipid metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, the question of whether modulation of adipocyte lipolysis and lipophagy might be a potential therapeutic target to combat cMet disorders will be addressed.

  9. Research Progress on Brain-targeted Nano-carrier Systems%脑靶向纳米载体系统的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余克富; 李新刚; 霍记平; 赵志刚

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the latest research progress on brain-targeted nano-carrier systems. Methods:Recent published literatures on brain-targeted nano-carrier systems for the treatment of central nervous system diseases were col ected, analyzed and summarized. Results and conclusion:The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered to be the major obstacle in treating central nervous system diseases. BBB can make brain far away from harmful substances and maintain the steady state of microenvironment of brain. Meanwhile BBB also gives rise to the poor penetration of drugs into brain. With the development of nanotechnology, the nanocarriers such as liposomes, nanoparticles, micel es, nanogel, microemulsion and solid lipid nanoparticles for delivering drugs make it possible to transport drugs across the BBB. Therefore, possible strategies for brain-targeting could be available.%目的:综述脑靶向纳米载体系统的研究进展。方法:收集相关最新发表的文献,对纳米载体给药系统透过血脑屏障对中构神经系统疾病的治疗进行分析总结。结果与结论:血脑屏障成为治疗神经系统疾病过程的一道难题,血脑屏障既可以保护大脑不受外界有害物质的侵害,维持脑部内环境的稳定,同时也限制了药物进入脑部发挥其治疗作用。随着纳米技术的发展,纳米药物载体系统(如脂质体,聚合物纳米粒,胶束,纳米凝胶,微乳和固体脂质纳米粒)的应用使药物的跨血脑屏障转运和脑内传递成为可能。这将该变脑部疾病的治疗策略。

  10. Improved dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy using nonrigid registration on sequential SPECT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao, Edwin C. I.; Mok, Greta S. P., E-mail: gretamok@umac.mo [Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau SAR (China); Wu, Nien-Yun [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shyh-Jen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Song, Na [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Voxel-level and patient-specific 3D dosimetry for targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) typically involves serial nuclear medicine scans. Misalignment of the images can result in reduced dosimetric accuracy. Since the scans are typically performed over a period of several days, there will be patient movement between scans and possible nonrigid organ deformation. This work aims to implement and evaluate the use of nonrigid image registration on a series of quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) images for TRT dosimetry. Methods: A population of 4D extended cardiac torso phantoms, comprised of three In-111 Zevalin biokinetics models and three anatomical variations, was generated based on the patient data. The authors simulated QSPECT acquisitions at five time points. At each time point, individual organ and whole-body deformation between scans were modeled by translating/rotating organs and the body up to 5°/voxels, keeping ≤5% difference in organ volume. An analytical projector was used to generate realistic noisy projections for a medium energy general purpose collimator. Projections were reconstructed using OS-EM algorithm with geometric collimator detector response, attenuation, and scatter corrections. The QSPECT images were registered using organ-based nonrigid image registration method. The cumulative activity in each voxel was obtained by integrating the activity over time. Dose distribution images were obtained by convolving the cumulative activity images with a Y-90 dose kernel. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) for organs-of-interest were analyzed. Results: After nonrigid registration, the mean differences in organ doses compared to the case without misalignment were improved from (−15.50 ± 5.59)% to (−2.12 ± 1.05)% and (−7.28 ± 2.30)% to (−0.23 ± 0.71)% for the spleen and liver, respectively. For all organs, the cumulative DVHs showed improvement after nonrigid registration and the normalized absolute error of differential DVHs ranged from 6.79% to

  11. Brain-Based Teaching Strategies for Improving Students' Memory, Learning, and Test-Taking Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Judy

    2007-01-01

    The past two decades have provided extraordinary progress in our understanding of the nature of learning. Never before have neuroscience and classroom instruction been so closely linked. Now, educators can find evidence-based neuroimaging and brain-mapping studies to determine the most effective ways to teach, as advances in technology enable…

  12. Intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain damage : long-term cognitive and sensorimotor improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donega, Vanessa; van Velthoven, Cindy T J; Nijboer, Cora H; van Bel, Frank; Kas, Martien J H; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration via the intranasal route could become an effective therapy to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. We analyzed long-term effects of intranasal MSC treatment on lesion size, sensorimotor and cognitive behavior, and determined the therapeutic wi

  13. Adding chemo after radiation treatment improves survival for adults with a type of brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received chemotherapy following completion of radiation therapy lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a NIH-supported random

  14. Cerebral transplantation of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells improves cellular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heile, Anna M B; Wallrapp, Christine; Klinge, Petra M;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: "Naked" human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are neuro-protective in experimental brain injury (TBI). In a controlled cortical impact (CCI) rat model, we investigated whether encapsulated MSC (eMSC) act similarly, and whether efficacy is augmented using cells transfected to produce the neu...

  15. Pre-capture multiplexing improves efficiency and cost-effectiveness of targeted genomic enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearer A Eliot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted genomic enrichment (TGE is a widely used method for isolating and enriching specific genomic regions prior to massively parallel sequencing. To make effective use of sequencer output, barcoding and sample pooling (multiplexing after TGE and prior to sequencing (post-capture multiplexing has become routine. While previous reports have indicated that multiplexing prior to capture (pre-capture multiplexing is feasible, no thorough examination of the effect of this method has been completed on a large number of samples. Here we compare standard post-capture TGE to two levels of pre-capture multiplexing: 12 or 16 samples per pool. We evaluated these methods using standard TGE metrics and determined the ability to identify several classes of genetic mutations in three sets of 96 samples, including 48 controls. Our overall goal was to maximize cost reduction and minimize experimental time while maintaining a high percentage of reads on target and a high depth of coverage at thresholds required for variant detection. Results We adapted the standard post-capture TGE method for pre-capture TGE with several protocol modifications, including redesign of blocking oligonucleotides and optimization of enzymatic and amplification steps. Pre-capture multiplexing reduced costs for TGE by at least 38% and significantly reduced hands-on time during the TGE protocol. We found that pre-capture multiplexing reduced capture efficiency by 23 or 31% for pre-capture pools of 12 and 16, respectively. However efficiency losses at this step can be compensated by reducing the number of simultaneously sequenced samples. Pre-capture multiplexing and post-capture TGE performed similarly with respect to variant detection of positive control mutations. In addition, we detected no instances of sample switching due to aberrant barcode identification. Conclusions Pre-capture multiplexing improves efficiency of TGE experiments with respect to hands-on time

  16. AN in vitro evaluation of a carmustine-loaded Nano-co-Plex for potential magnetic-targeted intranasal delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilo, Olufemi D; Choonara, Yahya E; Strydom, André M; du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2016-03-16

    Targeted delivery of carmustine (BCNU), an efficient brain tumor therapeutic, has been challenged with bioavailability issues due to the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). The currently effective delivery approach is by implants at the site of the tumor, but this is highly invasive. The intranasal route, which is non-invasive and bypasses the BBB, may be alternative route for delivering BCNU to the brain. In this work, polyvinyl alcohol/polyethyleneimine/fIuorecein isothiocyanate complex (Polyplex) coated iron-oxide nanoparticles (Magnetite) were synthesized employing co-precipitation, epoxidation and EDC/NHS coupling reactions. The Polyplex coated magnetite (Nano-co-Plex) was loaded with BCNU for potential magnetically targeted delivery to the brain following intranasal administration. The Nano-co-Plex was characterized employing Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Zetasize analysis. Results revealed superparamagnetic hexagonally shaped "core-shell" nanoparticles with cell labeling attributes, of size ranging between 30-50 nm, and a zeta potential value of + 32 ± 2 mV. The Nano-co-Plex synthesized was found to possess high degree of crystallinity with 32% Polyplex coating. The loading and release studies indicated a time-dependent loading with maximum loading capacity of 176.82 μg BCNU/mg of the carrier and maximum release of 75.8% of the loaded BCNU. Cytotoxicity of the BCNU-loaded Nano-co-Plex displayed superiority over the conventional BCNU towards human glioblastoma (HG) cells. Cell studies revealed enhanced uptake and internalization of BCNU-loaded Nano-co-plex in HG cells in the presence of an external magnetic field. These Nano-co-Plexes may be ideal as an intranasal magnetic drug targeting device for BCNU delivery. PMID:26806465

  17. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by 1HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere®). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors

  18. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Kulhari, Hitesh [CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Medicinal Chemistry & Pharmacology Division (India); Jeengar, Manish Kumar [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Departmentof Pharmacology (India); Khan, Wahid, E-mail: wahid@niperhyd.ac.in; Sistla, Ramakrishna, E-mail: sistla@iict.res.in, E-mail: rksistla@yahoo.com [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India)

    2015-06-15

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by {sup 1}HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere{sup ®}). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors.

  19. Grammar improvement following deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic and the pedunculopontine nuclei in advanced Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Sergio; Moschella, Vincenzo; Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Galati, Salvatore; Costa, Alberto; Mazzone, Paolo; Stanzione, Paolo

    2009-09-01

    Combined deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic (STN) and pedunculopontine (PPN) nuclei has been recently proposed as surgical treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. STN stimulation alone has been shown to provide selective improvement of the grammatical aspect of language. We studied five advanced Parkinson's disease patients who underwent combined deep brain stimulation (STN + PPN). Overall cognitive profile did not change. On the contrary, an interesting trend towards reduction of ungrammatical errors (particularly substitution of free and inflectional morphemes) was found when stimulating the STN, and also the PPN, when the STN was switched off. These findings replicate previous observations on the STN, and provide the rationale for further investigation of the role of the PPN in processing linguistic grammar.

  20. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Leuner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g. might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease (AD. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, these new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions.