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Sample records for brain health multiple

  1. Brain Tumors - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Tumors URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/braintumors.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  2. Brain Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that combining good nutrition with mental, social and physical activities may have a greater benefit in maintaining or improving brain health than any single activity. At the Alzheimer’s Association ...

  3. Brain Health: Translating Scientific Evidence Into Clinical Practice in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Soelberg Sørensen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain volume loss (BVL progresses more rapidly in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS than in healthy individuals, and brain atrophy begins early in the course of the disease. The objective of this symposium was to emphasise the importance of care and preservation of the brain within treatment protocols for MS so that early and appropriate management can be initiated to preserve brain volume and function. Prof Per Solberg Sørensen chaired the symposium and welcomed the speakers. Prof Heinz Wiendl gave a presentation on BVL in MS and described its underlying pathophysiology. Dr Andreas Lysandropoulos illustrated how information on BVL is clinically relevant and can be taken from clinical studies to assist clinical practice and decision-making. The final presentation was given by Prof Andrew Chan who highlighted the important role of brain atrophy in decision-making for early treatment and presented recent data for two treatments for MS: teriflunomide and the monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab. The symposium was concluded by a short question and answer session.

  4. Health Literacy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Health Literacy URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Health Literacy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  5. Polyphenols and brain health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vauzour David

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that diet and lifestyle can play an important role in delaying the onset or halting the progression of age-related health disorders and to improve cognitive function. A growing number of dietary intervention studies in humans and animals and in particular those using polyphenol-rich diets have been proposed to exert a multiplicity of neuroprotective actions within the brain, including a potential to protect neurons against injury induced by neurotoxins, an ability to suppress neuroinflammation and a potential to promote memory, learning, and cognitive functions. These effects appear to be underpinned by two common processes. First, they are capable of interactions with critical protein and lipid kinase signalling cascades in the brain, leading to an inhibition of apoptosis triggered by neurotoxic species and to a promotion of neuronal survival and synaptic plasticity. Second, they induce beneficial effects on the vascular system, leading to changes in cerebrovascular blood flow capable of causing enhance vascularisation and neurogenesis, two events important in the maintenance of cognitive performances. Together, these processes act to maintain brain homeostasis and play important roles in neuronal stress adaptation and thus polyphenols might have the potential to prevent the progression of neurodegenerative pathologies.

  6. Brain Health Fitness: Beyond Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Raksha; Chapman, Sandra B.; Rackley, Audette; Zientz, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The greatest accomplishment of the 20th century--the doubling of the human lifespan--has brought issues related to brain health to the forefront of public health policy. Given that our bodies are outlasting our minds, maximizing brain health is the scientific cause of this millennium. In this paper, we address three major issues related to…

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anna; (Josh Yamada, Yoshiya

    2017-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy has been the traditional treatment of choice for patients with multiple brain metastases. Although stereotactic radiosurgery is widely accepted for the management to up to 4 brain metastases, its use is still controversial in cases of 5 or more brain metastases. Randomized trials have suggested that stereotactic radiosurgery alone is appropriate in up to 4 metastases without concomitant whole brain radiation. Level 1 evidence also suggests that withholding whole brain radiation may also reduce the impact of radiation on neurocognitive function and also may even offer a survival advantage. A recent analysis of a large multicentre prospective database has suggested that there are no differences in outcomes such as the likelihood of new metastasis or leptomeningeal disease in cases of 2-10 brain metastases, nor in overall survival. Hence in the era of prolonged survival with stage IV cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery is a reasonable alternative to whole brain radiation in order to minimize the impact of treatment upon quality of life without sacrificing overall survival.

  8. Multiple Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Are Associated with Increased Rates of Health Symptoms and Gulf War Illness in a Cohort of 1990–1991 Gulf War Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. Yee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research demonstrated a relation between traumatic brain injury (TBI, health symptoms and diagnosis of Gulf War Illness (GWI in Gulf War Veterans, but no study has examined the impact of multiple mild TBIs (mTBIs. A total of 229 male Gulf War Veterans from the Ft Devens Cohort were categorized by a number of mTBIs reported. One-way ANOVA and chi-square test of independence were used to test for differences in total reported health symptoms and diagnosis of chronic multisymptom illness (CMI or Kansas GWI criteria, two of the most common case definitions of GWI. A total of 72 veterans reported no mTBIs (31.4%, 26 reported one mTBI (11.4%, 25 reported two mTBIs (10.9%, and 106 veterans reported sustaining three or more mTBIs (46.3%. Veterans reporting two or more mTBIs (p < 0.01 or three or more mTBIs (p < 0.001 endorsed significantly higher rates of health symptoms than Veterans reporting no mTBIs. Significantly higher rates of CMI (p = 0.035 and Kansas GWI criteria (p < 0.001 were seen in the three or more mTBI group. Results suggest two mTBIs increase risk of health symptoms, but three mTBIs may be the threshold needed to sustain chronic symptom reporting needed for a formal diagnosis. These findings highlight the importance of implementing policies and procedures monitoring head injuries in military personnel.

  9. Child Mental Health - Multiple Languages

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    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Child Mental Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/childmentalhealth.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  10. Asian American Health - Multiple Languages

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    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asian American Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/asianamericanhealth.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  11. Baby Health Checkup - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Baby Health Checkup URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/babyhealthcheckup.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  12. Mental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chin (Laiholh) Karen (S’gaw Karen) Kinyarwanda (Rwanda) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul- ... Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Swahili (Kiswahili) Tigrinya (tigriññā / ትግርኛ) HealthReach ...

  13. Health Facilities - Multiple Languages

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    ... Chin (Laiholh) Karen (S’gaw Karen) Kinyarwanda (Rwanda) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul- ... Pax̌tō / پښتو ) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Swahili (Kiswahili) HealthReach resources will open ...

  14. Seniors' Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 한국어) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Tagalog (Filipino) (Tagalog) Urdu (اردو) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) HealthReach resources will open ... Tagalog (Tagalog (Filipino)) PDF Federal Emergency Management Agency Urdu (اردو) Expand Section Prepare for Emergencies Now: Information ...

  15. Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hmong (Hmoob) Karen (S’gaw Karen) Korean (한국어) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul-fuṣḥá) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) HealthReach resources will ...

  16. Clinical Relevance of Brain Volume Measures in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Stefano, Nicola; Airas, Laura; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with an inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathology. Axonal loss and neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course and may lead to irreversible neurological impairment. Changes in brain volume, observed from the earliest stage of MS and proceed......Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with an inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathology. Axonal loss and neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course and may lead to irreversible neurological impairment. Changes in brain volume, observed from the earliest stage of MS...... in a disease with complex pathological substrates such as MS. Brain volume loss has been correlated with disability progression and cognitive impairment in MS, with the loss of grey matter volume more closely correlated with clinical measures than loss of white matter volume. Preventing brain volume loss may...

  17. Multiple Brain Markers are Linked to Age-Related Variation in Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P.; Rieckmann, Anna; Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related alterations in brain structure and function have been challenging to link to cognition due to potential overlapping influences of multiple neurobiological cascades. We examined multiple brain markers associated with age-related variation in cognition. Clinically normal older humans aged 65–90 from the Harvard Aging Brain Study (N = 186) were characterized on a priori magnetic resonance imaging markers of gray matter thickness and volume, white matter hyperintensities, fractional anisotropy (FA), resting-state functional connectivity, positron emission tomography markers of glucose metabolism and amyloid burden, and cognitive factors of processing speed, executive function, and episodic memory. Partial correlation and mediation analyses estimated age-related variance in cognition shared with individual brain markers and unique to each marker. The largest relationships linked FA and striatum volume to processing speed and executive function, and hippocampal volume to episodic memory. Of the age-related variance in cognition, 70–80% was accounted for by combining all brain markers (but only ∼20% of total variance). Age had significant indirect effects on cognition via brain markers, with significant markers varying across cognitive domains. These results suggest that most age-related variation in cognition is shared among multiple brain markers, but potential specificity between some brain markers and cognitive domains motivates additional study of age-related markers of neural health. PMID:25316342

  18. Defining Optimal Brain Health in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B.; Furie, Karen L.; Iadecola, Costantino; Smith, Eric E.; Waddy, Salina P.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Bae, Hee-Joon; Bauman, Mary Ann; Dichgans, Martin; Duncan, Pamela W.; Girgus, Meighan; Howard, Virginia J.; Lazar, Ronald M.; Seshadri, Sudha; Testai, Fernando D.; van Gaal, Stephen; Yaffe, Kristine; Wasiak, Hank; Zerna, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive function is an important component of aging and predicts quality of life, functional independence, and risk of institutionalization. Advances in our understanding of the role of cardiovascular risks have shown them to be closely associated with cognitive impairment and dementia. Because many cardiovascular risks are modifiable, it may be possible to maintain brain health and to prevent dementia in later life. The purpose of this American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association presidential advisory is to provide an initial definition of optimal brain health in adults and guidance on how to maintain brain health. We identify metrics to define optimal brain health in adults based on inclusion of factors that could be measured, monitored, and modified. From these practical considerations, we identified 7 metrics to define optimal brain health in adults that originated from AHA’s Life’s Simple 7: 4 ideal health behaviors (nonsmoking, physical activity at goal levels, healthy diet consistent with current guideline levels, and body mass index <25 kg/m2) and 3 ideal health factors (untreated blood pressure <120/<80 mm Hg, untreated total cholesterol <200 mg/dL, and fasting blood glucose <100 mg/dL). In addition, in relation to maintenance of cognitive health, we recommend following previously published guidance from the AHA/American Stroke Association, Institute of Medicine, and Alzheimer’s Association that incorporates control of cardiovascular risks and suggest social engagement and other related strategies. We define optimal brain health but recognize that the truly ideal circumstance may be uncommon because there is a continuum of brain health as demonstrated by AHA’s Life’s Simple 7. Therefore, there is opportunity to improve brain health through primordial prevention and other interventions. Furthermore, although cardiovascular risks align well with brain health, we acknowledge that other factors differing from those related to

  19. Multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Fang, A; Nguyen, B T; Raphel, J K; Jagannathan, L; Raghavan, R; Bryan, R N; Miller, G A

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of developing multiple, complementary, fully labeled electronic brain atlases and an atlas-based neuroimaging system for analysis, quantification, and real-time manipulation of cerebral structures in two and three dimensions, we have digitized, enhanced, segmented, and labeled the following print brain atlases: Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain by Talairach and Tournoux, Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain by Schaltenbrand and Wahren, Referentially Oriented Cerebral MRI Anatomy by Talairach and Tournoux, and Atlas of the Cerebral Sulci by Ono, Kubik, and Abernathey. Three-dimensional extensions of these atlases have been developed as well. All two- and three-dimensional atlases are mutually preregistered and may be interactively registered with an actual patient's data. An atlas-based neuroimaging system has been developed that provides support for reformatting, registration, visualization, navigation, image processing, and quantification of clinical data. The anatomical index contains about 1,000 structures and over 400 sulcal patterns. Several new applications of the brain atlas database also have been developed, supported by various technologies such as virtual reality, the Internet, and electronic publishing. Fusion of information from multiple atlases assists the user in comprehensively understanding brain structures and identifying and quantifying anatomical regions in clinical data. The multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system have substantial potential impact in stereotactic neurosurgery and radiotherapy by assisting in visualization and real-time manipulation in three dimensions of anatomical structures, in quantitative neuroradiology by allowing interactive analysis of clinical data, in three-dimensional neuroeducation, and in brain function studies.

  20. Single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dror Limon, MD

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: In single-fraction SRS for patients with multiple BM, smaller total tumor volume, higher total dose, and lower volume of normal brain receiving >12 Gy were associated with increased survival. These data suggest that using SRS for the treatment of multiple BM is efficacious and that outcomes may be affected more by total tumor volume than by the number of lesions.

  1. Brain atrophy in clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, D T; Griffin, C M; Parker, G J M; Kapoor, R; Thompson, A J; Miller, D H

    2002-02-01

    Brain atrophy measured by MRI is a potentially useful tool for monitoring disease progression in multiple sclerosis. The location, extent and mechanisms of brain atrophy in early disease are not well documented. Using quantitative MRI, this study investigated whole brain, grey and white matter atrophy in clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and its relationship to lesion measures. Data came from 27 normal control subjects (14 females and 13 males, mean age 36.1 years) and 26 subjects with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (18 females and eight males, mean age 35.1 years, mean delay from first symptom to scan 1.8 years, median Expanded Disability Status Scale score 1.0). All had three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient recall (3D FSPGR), T(1)-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium-enhanced and T(2)-weighted scans. The 3D FSPGR images were automatically segmented into grey and white matter and cerebrospinal fluid using SPM99. 3D FSPGR hypo-intense, T(2) hyper-intense, T(1) hypo-intense and T(1) post-gadolinium-enhancing lesion volumes were determined by semi-automatic lesion segmentation. The SPM99 output was combined with the 3D FSPGR lesion segmentations to quantify tissue volumes as fractions of total intracranial volumes, producing values for the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), white matter fraction (WMF) and grey matter fraction (GMF). Comparing multiple sclerosis with control subjects, BPF, GMF and WMF were significantly reduced (P lesion volumes were inversely related to BPF (T(2) r = -0.78, P lesion volumes were not correlated with any fractional volumes. These results indicate that significant brain atrophy, affecting both grey and white matter, occurs early in the clinical course of multiple sclerosis. The lack of correlation between lesion load measures and WMF suggests that pathological changes in white matter may occur by mechanisms which are at least partly independent from overt lesion genesis in early multiple sclerosis.

  2. Coronaviruses in brain tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dessau, R B; Lisby, G; Frederiksen, J L

    2001-01-01

    Brain tissue from 25 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and as controls brain tissue from 36 patients without neurological disease was tested for the presence of human coronaviral RNA. Four PCR assays with primers specific for N-protein of human coronavirus strain 229E and ...... in the proportion of positive signals from the MS patients compared to controls. Evidence for a chronic infection with the human coronaviruses strain 229E or OC43 in brain tissue from patients with MS or controls has not been found in this study.......Brain tissue from 25 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and as controls brain tissue from 36 patients without neurological disease was tested for the presence of human coronaviral RNA. Four PCR assays with primers specific for N-protein of human coronavirus strain 229E...... and three PCR assays with primers specific for the nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus strain OC43 were performed. Sporadic positive PCR assays were observed in both patients and controls in some of the PCR assays. However, these results were not reproducible and there was no difference...

  3. Cavernous angioma of brain stem mimicking multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honczarenko, K; Fryze, C; Nowacki, P; Osuch, Z; Grzelec, H; Fabian, A

    1995-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy was admitted to our Department due to peripheral palsy of right VII and bilateral of the VI cranial nerves, spasticity, cerebellar symptoms as well as to dysphagia and dysarthria. In general, he was hospitalized 13 times because of the disease of a relapsing-remitting and next progressive course. He died 31 years after onset of the disease. Multiple sclerosis was diagnosed. Brain autopsy revealed tumor involving almost all brain stem structures and a part of right cerebellar hemisphere. Histologically, cavernous angioma was diagnosed.

  4. Resting State Brain Entropy Alterations in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqing Zhou

    Full Text Available Brain entropy (BEN mapping provides a novel approach to characterize brain temporal dynamics, a key feature of human brain. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI, reliable and spatially distributed BEN patterns have been identified in normal brain, suggesting a potential use in clinical populations since temporal brain dynamics and entropy may be altered in disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize BEN in multiple sclerosis (MS, a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people. Since currently there is no cure for MS, developing treatment or medication that can slow down its progression represents a high research priority, for which validating a brain marker sensitive to disease and the related functional impairments is essential. Because MS can start long time before any measurable symptoms and structural deficits, assessing the dynamic brain activity and correspondingly BEN may provide a critical way to study MS and its progression. Because BEN is new to MS, we aimed to assess BEN alterations in the relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS patients using a patient versus control design, to examine the correlation of BEN to clinical measurements, and to check the correlation of BEN to structural brain measures which have been more often used in MS studies. As compared to controls, RRMS patients showed increased BEN in motor areas, executive control area, spatial coordinating area, and memory system. Increased BEN was related to greater disease severity as measured by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS and greater tissue damage as indicated by the mean diffusivity. Patients also showed decreased BEN in other places, which was associated with less disability or fatigue, indicating a disease-related BEN re-distribution. Our results suggest BEN as a novel and useful tool for characterizing RRMS.

  5. Resting State Brain Entropy Alterations in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fuqing; Zhuang, Ying; Gong, Honghan; Zhan, Jie; Grossman, Murray; Wang, Ze

    2016-01-01

    Brain entropy (BEN) mapping provides a novel approach to characterize brain temporal dynamics, a key feature of human brain. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI), reliable and spatially distributed BEN patterns have been identified in normal brain, suggesting a potential use in clinical populations since temporal brain dynamics and entropy may be altered in disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize BEN in multiple sclerosis (MS), a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people. Since currently there is no cure for MS, developing treatment or medication that can slow down its progression represents a high research priority, for which validating a brain marker sensitive to disease and the related functional impairments is essential. Because MS can start long time before any measurable symptoms and structural deficits, assessing the dynamic brain activity and correspondingly BEN may provide a critical way to study MS and its progression. Because BEN is new to MS, we aimed to assess BEN alterations in the relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients using a patient versus control design, to examine the correlation of BEN to clinical measurements, and to check the correlation of BEN to structural brain measures which have been more often used in MS studies. As compared to controls, RRMS patients showed increased BEN in motor areas, executive control area, spatial coordinating area, and memory system. Increased BEN was related to greater disease severity as measured by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and greater tissue damage as indicated by the mean diffusivity. Patients also showed decreased BEN in other places, which was associated with less disability or fatigue, indicating a disease-related BEN re-distribution. Our results suggest BEN as a novel and useful tool for characterizing RRMS.

  6. Multiple ring-enhancing lesions of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple ring-enhancing lesions of the brain are one of the most commonly encountered abnormalities on neuroimaging. These can be caused by a variety of infectious, neoplastic, inflammatory or vascular diseases. Distinguishing non-neoplastic causes from neoplastic lesions is extremely important because a misdiagnosis can lead to unwarranted neurosurgery and exposure to toxic chemotherapy or potentially harmful brain irradiation. Diligent clinical evaluation and a battery of tests are required for making a definitive diagnosis. Newer advanced diagnostic techniques, such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, perfusion-weighted MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography may help in establishing the etiology. However, early brain biopsy is often needed because several of these diseases are potentially life-threatening.

  7. Child Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Japanese (日本語) Karen (S’gaw Karen) Kinyarwanda (Rwanda) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul- ... Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) HealthReach resources will ...

  8. Brain atrophy and lesion load predict long term disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Veronica; Agosta, Federica; Hulst, Hanneke E

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS).......To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  9. Anatomical brain connectivity can assess cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzali, M; Spanò, B; Parker, G J M; Giulietti, G; Castelli, M; Basile, B; Rossi, S; Serra, L; Magnani, G; Nocentini, U; Caltagirone, C; Centonze, D; Cercignani, M

    2013-08-01

    Brain disconnection plays a major role in determining cognitive disabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS). We recently developed a novel diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) tractography approach, namely anatomical connectivitity mapping (ACM), that quantifies structural brain connectivity. Use of ACM to assess structural connectivity modifications in MS brains and ascertain their relationship with the patients' Paced-Auditory-Serial-Addition-Test (PASAT) scores. Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients (n = 25) and controls (n = 25) underwent MRI at 3T, including conventional images, T1-weighted volumes and DW-MRI. Volumetric scans were coregistered to fractional anisotropy (FA) images, to obtain parenchymal FA maps for both white and grey matter. We initiated probabilistic tractography from all parenchymal voxels, obtaining ACM maps by counting the number of streamlines passing through each voxel, then normalizing by the total number of streamlines initiated. The ACM maps were transformed into standard space, for statistical use. RRMS patients had reduced grey matter volume and FA, consistent with previous literature. Also, we showed reduced ACM in the thalamus and in the head of the caudate nucleus, bilaterally. In our RRMS patients, ACM was associated with PASAT scores in the corpus callosum, right hippocampus and cerebellum. ACM opens a new perspective, clarifying the contribution of anatomical brain disconnection to clinical disabilities in MS.

  10. Clinical correlations of brain lesion distribution in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vellinga, M M; Geurts, J J G; Rostrup, E

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore relations between spatial distribution of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, and disability. In MS, the presence of asymptomatic brain lesions challenges the prediction of disability based on conventional brain MRI. Hypothesizing that symptomatology may partly be determined...... by lesion location, this retrospective study explored relations between lesion location and disability using voxelwise analyses in standard space. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using nonparametric permutation-based statistics, voxelwise lesion probability on T2 lesion masks was related to expanded disability...... significantly (P disability and disease duration, and was higher in progressive than in relapsing disease. When controlled for lesion load (LL), no significant clusters survived. Presence and number of spinal cord lesions did not correlate with lesion probability in any location, and did...

  11. Construction of Individual Morphological Brain Networks with Multiple Morphometric Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlan Yang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, researchers have increased attentions to the morphological brain network, which is generally constructed by measuring the mathematical correlation across regions using a certain morphometric feature, such as regional cortical thickness and voxel intensity. However, cerebral structure can be characterized by various factors, such as regional volume, surface area, and curvature. Moreover, most of the morphological brain networks are population-based, which has limitations in the investigations of individual difference and clinical applications. Hence, we have extended previous studies by proposing a novel method for realizing the construction of an individual-based morphological brain network through a combination of multiple morphometric features. In particular, interregional connections are estimated using our newly introduced feature vectors, namely, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the concatenation of seven morphometric features. Experiments were performed on a healthy cohort of 55 subjects (24 males aged from 20 to 29 and 31 females aged from 20 to 28 each scanned twice, and reproducibility was evaluated through test–retest reliability. The robustness of morphometric features was measured firstly to select the more reproducible features to form the connectomes. Then the topological properties were analyzed and compared with previous reports of different modalities. Small-worldness was observed in all the subjects at the range of the entire network sparsity (20–40%, and configurations were comparable with previous findings at the sparsity of 23%. The spatial distributions of the hub were found to be significantly influenced by the individual variances, and the hubs obtained by averaging across subjects and sparsities showed correspondence with previous reports. The intraclass coefficient of graphic properties (clustering coefficient = 0.83, characteristic path length = 0.81, betweenness centrality = 0.78 indicates

  12. Botanical phenolics and brain health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Albert Y.; Wang, Qun; Simonyi, Agnes; Sun, Grace Y.

    2009-01-01

    The high demand for molecular oxygen, the enrichment of polyunsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids and the relatively low abundance of antioxidant defense enzymes are factors rendering cells in the central nervous system (CNS) particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain has been implicated as a common underlying factor for the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. While ROS are generated by enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions in the mitochondria and cytoplasm under normal conditions, excessive production under pathological conditions is associated with activation of Ca2+-dependent enzymes including proteases, phospholipases, nucleases, and alterations of signaling pathways which subsequently lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, release of inflammatory factors and apoptosis. In recent years, there is considerable interest to investigate anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic compounds from different botanical sources. In this review, we describe oxidative mechanisms associated with AD, PD, and stroke, and evaluate neuroprotective effects of phenolic compounds, such as resveratrol from grape and red wine, curcumin from turmeric, apocynin from Picrorhiza kurroa, and epi-gallocatechin from green tea. The main goal is to provide a better understanding of the mode of action of these compounds and assess their use as therapeutics to ameliorate age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19191039

  13. Apparatus dependence of normal brain tissue dose in stereotactic radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Petti, Paula; Wang, Brian; Descovich, Martina; Chuang, Cynthia; Barani, Igor J; Kunwar, Sandeep; Shrieve, Dennis C; Sahgal, Arjun; Larson, David A

    2011-06-01

    Technical improvements in commercially available radiosurgery platforms have made it practical to treat a large number of intracranial targets. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the dose to normal brain when planning radiosurgery to multiple targets is apparatus dependent. The authors selected a single case involving a patient with 12 metastatic lesions widely distributed throughout the brain as visualized on contrast-enhanced CT. Target volumes and critical normal structures were delineated with Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion software. The imaging studies including the delineated contours were digitally exported into the CyberKnife and Novalis multileaf collimator-based planning systems for treatment planning using identical target dose goals and dose-volume constraints. Subsets of target combinations (3, 6, 9, or 12 targets) were planned separately to investigate the relationship of number of targets and radiosurgery platform to the dose to normal brain. Despite similar target dose coverage and dose to normal structures, the dose to normal brain was strongly apparatus dependent. A nonlinear increase in dose to normal brain volumes with increasing number of targets was also noted. The dose delivered to normal brain is strongly dependent on the radiosurgery platform. How general this conclusion is and whether apparatus-dependent differences are related to differences in hardware design or differences in dose-planning algorithms deserve further investigation.

  14. Emotional arousal and multiple memory systems in the mammalian brain

    OpenAIRE

    Packard, Mark G.; Jarid eGoodman

    2012-01-01

    Emotional arousal induced by stress and/or anxiety can exert complex effects on learning and memory processes in mammals. Recent studies have begun to link study of the influence of emotional arousal on memory with earlier research indicating that memory is organized in multiple systems in the brain that differ in terms of the “type” of memory they mediate. Specifically, these studies have examined whether emotional arousal may have a differential effect on the “cognitive” and stimulus-respon...

  15. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  16. Whole brain white matter changes revealed by multiple diffusion metrics in multiple sclerosis: A TBSS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan, Yunyun, E-mail: xiaoyun81.love@163.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); He, Yong, E-mail: yong.h.he@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yu, Chunshui, E-mail: csyuster@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: jun_wang@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Huang, Jing, E-mail: sainthj@126.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Ye, Jing, E-mail: jingye.2007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Parizel, Paul M., E-mail: paul.parizel@ua.ac.be [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, 8 Belgium (Belgium); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shu, Ni, E-mail: nshu55@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To investigate whole brain white matter changes in multiple sclerosis (MS) by multiple diffusion indices, we examined patients with diffusion tensor imaging and utilized tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method to analyze the data. Methods: Forty-one relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 41 age- and gender-matched normal controls were included in this study. Diffusion weighted images were acquired by employing a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence on a 1.5 T MR scanner. Voxel-wise analyses of multiple diffusion metrics, including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were performed with TBSS. Results: The MS patients had significantly decreased FA (9.11%), increased MD (8.26%), AD (3.48%) and RD (13.17%) in their white matter skeletons compared with the controls. Through TBSS analyses, we found abnormal diffusion changes in widespread white matter regions in MS patients. Specifically, decreased FA, increased MD and increased RD were involved in whole-brain white matter, while several regions exhibited increased AD. Furthermore, white matter regions with significant correlations between the diffusion metrics and the clinical variables (the EDSS scores, disease durations and white matter lesion loads) in MS patients were identified. Conclusion: Widespread white matter abnormalities were observed in MS patients revealed by multiple diffusion metrics. The diffusion changes and correlations with clinical variables were mainly attributed to increased RD, implying the predominant role of RD in reflecting the subtle pathological changes in MS.

  17. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  18. Multiple brain metastases irradiation with Eleka Axesse stereotactic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, P. V.; Polovnikov, E. S.; Orlov, K. Yu.; Krutko, A. V.; Kirilova, I. A.; Moskalev, A. V.; Filatova, E. V.; Zheravin, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Brain metastases are one of the factors complicating the treatment of a malignant tumor. Radiation therapy, especially radiosurgery, plays an important role in the modern treatment practice. During 2011-2016, 32 patients (from 29 to 67 years old) with multiple brain metastases underwent the treatment with SRS or SRT in our center. The number of secondary lesions varied from 2 to 11. Eight patients underwent microsurgery resection. Seven patients had recurrence after whole brain radiotherapy. Thirty patient underwent single fraction SRS and two patients with large metastases (bigger than 3 cm) underwent fractionated SRT. The treatment was done with dedicated linear accelerator stereotactic system Elekta Axesse (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). Different stereotactic fixation devices were used, namely, Leksell G frame, non-invasive HeadFIX frame, and reinforced thermoplastic mask (IMRT perforation). All treatments included a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique and of Inage Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) technique. All lesions were treated from a single isocenter, which allowed reducing the treatment time and overall dose to the patient's body. All patients suffered the treatment satisfactorily. No adverse reactions or complications were met in any case during or right after the treatment. Different stereotactic fixation devices and modern treatment techniques allowed creating an optimal, safe and comfortable way for patient treatment. The treatment time was from 15 to 50 minutes. Patient position verification after or during the treatment demonstrated good accuracy for all fixation types and low level of intrafraction motion.

  19. Brain atrophy at onset and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients during the disease onset predicts long term disability. METHODS: MS patients with follow-up time of at least 7 years from disease onset and with baseline and second magnetic resonance 12 months later were included to measure brain atrophy. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was categorized in three groups, EDSS=0, EDSS=1 and 2.5 and EDSS>2.5, and used as disability measure. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included. Mean atrophy during the first year in patients that reached an EDSS≥3 was -0.76±0.45 %, in patients with an EDSS between 1 and 2.5 was -0.59±0.56, while in patients with an EDSS of 0 it was -0.38±0.42 (p=0.003. DISCUSSION: Brain atrophy rates during the first year of disease were predictive of disease progression in our population.

  20. Undiagnosed Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as Multiple Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Grzywacz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases from gastrointestinal malignancies are exceedingly rare occurrences that carry a very poor prognosis. This holds especially true in cases where brain metastases from esophageal primaries are the initial presentation of a previously unidentified gastrointestinal malignancy. Our patient, a 60-year-old male with a past history of a right temporal teratoma, family history of breast cancer, and no smoking history, presented with a chief complaint of recurrent headaches. His history of present illness and physical examination included a two-month history of frontal headache, progressive fatigue, and unintentional weight loss. He underwent an extensive initial workup including CT-head, CT-abdomen/pelvis, CT-chest, bone scan, tumor marker analysis, and MRI-brain. The initial head CT revealed multiple intracranial lesions suspicious for malignancy. A PET scan later revealed his primary to be a malignancy of the distal esophagus. His treatment course thus far has been aggressive, consisting of surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy with capcetibine-oxaliplatin as well as paclitaxel-carboplatin, and radiation therapy. He has had several recurrences since starting treatment, but has continued to maintain a good performance status with only minor symptoms. Currently, the patient has survived for 17 months after his diagnosis of stage IV (T3, N2, M1 moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and is undergoing treatment with trastuzumab and stereotactic radiosurgery. This report demonstrates that although cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma that present as brain metastases typically carry a poor prognosis, with early and aggressive treatment patients can survive well past one year after diagnosis.

  1. The optimal hormonal replacement modality selection for multiple organ procurement from brain-dead organ donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhibao Mi,1 Dimitri Novitzky,2 Joseph F Collins,1 David KC Cooper3 1Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA Maryland Health Care Systems, Perry Point, MD, USA; 2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Thomas E Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The management of brain-dead organ donors is complex. The use of inotropic agents and replacement of depleted hormones (hormonal replacement therapy is crucial for successful multiple organ procurement, yet the optimal hormonal replacement has not been identified, and the statistical adjustment to determine the best selection is not trivial. Traditional pair-wise comparisons between every pair of treatments, and multiple comparisons to all (MCA, are statistically conservative. Hsu’s multiple comparisons with the best (MCB – adapted from the Dunnett’s multiple comparisons with control (MCC – has been used for selecting the best treatment based on continuous variables. We selected the best hormonal replacement modality for successful multiple organ procurement using a two-step approach. First, we estimated the predicted margins by constructing generalized linear models (GLM or generalized linear mixed models (GLMM, and then we applied the multiple comparison methods to identify the best hormonal replacement modality given that the testing of hormonal replacement modalities is independent. Based on 10-year data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS, among 16 hormonal replacement modalities, and using the 95% simultaneous confidence intervals, we found that the combination of thyroid hormone, a corticosteroid, antidiuretic hormone, and insulin was the best modality for multiple organ procurement for transplantation. Keywords: best treatment selection, brain-dead organ donors, hormonal replacement, multiple binary endpoints, organ procurement, multiple comparisons

  2. Relating brain damage to brain plasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, Valentina; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Jbabdi, Saad; Wise, Richard G; Pozzilli, Carlo; Palace, Jacqueline; Matthews, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Failure of adaptive plasticity with increasing pathology is suggested to contribute to progression of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, functional impairments can be reduced with practice, suggesting that brain plasticity is preserved even in patients with substantial damage. . Here, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to probe systems-level mechanisms of brain plasticity associated with improvements in visuomotor performance in MS patients and related to measures of microstructural damage. 23 MS patients and 12 healthy controls underwent brain fMRI during the first practice session of a visuomotor task (short-term practice) and after 2 weeks of daily practice with the same task (longer-term practice). Participants also underwent a structural brain MRI scan. Patients performed more poorly than controls at baseline. Nonetheless, with practice, patients showed performance improvements similar to controls and independent of the extent of MRI measures of brain pathology. Different relationships between performance improvements and activations were found between groups: greater short-term improvements were associated with lower activation in the sensorimotor, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal cortices for patients, whereas greater long-term improvements correlated with smaller activation reductions in the visual cortex of controls. Brain plasticity for visuomotor practice is preserved in MS patients despite a high burden of cerebral pathology. Cognitive systems different from those acting in controls contribute to this plasticity in patients. These findings challenge the notion that increasing pathology is accompanied by an outright failure of adaptive plasticity, supporting a neuroscientific rationale for recovery-oriented strategies even in chronically disabled patients.

  3. Automatic segmentation of MR brain images in multiple sclerosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Ramesh T. V.; Erickson, Bradley J.

    1996-04-01

    A totally automatic scheme for segmenting brain from extracranial tissues and to classify all intracranial voxels as CSF, gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), or abnormality such as multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions is presented in this paper. It is observed that in MR head images, if a tissue's intensity values are normalized, its relationship to the other tissues is essentially constant for a given type of image. Based on this approach, the subcutaneous fat surrounding the head is normalized to classify other tissues. Spatially registered 3 mm MR head image slices of T1 weighted, fast spin echo [dual echo T2 weighted and proton density (PD) weighted images] and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are used for segmentation. Subcutaneous fat surrounding the skull was identified based on intensity thresholding from T1 weighted images. A multiparametric space map was developed for CSF, GM and WM by normalizing each tissue with respect to the mean value of corresponding subcutaneous fat on each pulse sequence. To reduce the low frequency noise without blurring the fine morphological high frequency details an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to all images before segmentation. An initial slice by slice classification was followed by morphological operations to delete any brides connecting extracranial segments. Finally 3-dimensional region growing of the segmented brain extracts GM, WM and pathology. The algorithm was tested on sequential scans of 10 patients with MS lesions. For well registered sequences, tissues and pathology have been accurately classified. This procedure does not require user input or image training data sets, and shows promise for automatic classification of brain and pathology.

  4. Unified approach for multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation on brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajja, Balasrinivasa Rao; Datta, Sushmita; He, Renjie; Mehta, Meghana; Gupta, Rakesh K; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of large number of false lesion classification on segmented brain MR images is a major problem in the accurate determination of lesion volumes in multiple sclerosis (MS) brains. In order to minimize the false lesion classifications, a strategy that combines parametric and nonparametric techniques is developed and implemented. This approach uses the information from the proton density (PD)- and T2-weighted and fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. This strategy involves CSF and lesion classification using the Parzen window classifier. Image processing, morphological operations, and ratio maps of PD- and T2-weighted images are used for minimizing false positives. Contextual information is exploited for minimizing the false negative lesion classifications using hidden Markov random field-expectation maximization (HMRF-EM) algorithm. Lesions are delineated using fuzzy connectivity. The performance of this algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on 23 MS patients. Similarity index, percentages of over, under, and correct estimations of lesions are computed by spatially comparing the results of present procedure with expert manual segmentation. The automated processing scheme detected 80% of the manually segmented lesions in the case of low lesion load and 93% of the lesions in those cases with high lesion load.

  5. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, A.C.; Zheng, W.; Haacke, E.M.; Webb, S.; Nichol, H.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  6. Inflammation at the Blood–Brain Barrier in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizee, M.R.; van Doorn, R.P.; Prat, A.; de Vries, H.E.; Fricker, G.; Ott, M.; Mahringer, A.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier is specialized to function as a barrier to protect the central nervous system (CNS) by restricting entry of unwanted molecules and immune cells into the brain and inversely, to prevent CNS-born agents from reaching the systemic circulation. The blood–brain barrier

  7. Brain-immune communication psychoneuroimmunology of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, S; Ziemssen, T

    2008-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system are two extremely complex and highly adaptive systems. In the face of a real or anticipated threat, be it physical (eg, infection) or psychological (eg, psychosocial stress) in nature, the two systems act in concert to provide optimal adaptation to the demanding internal or environmental conditions. During instances of well being, the communication between these two systems is well tuned and balanced. However, a disturbed crosstalk between the CNS and the immune system is thought to play a major role in a wide series of disorders characterized by a hyporesponsive or hyperresponsive immune system. In multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease, an excess of inflammatory processes seems to be a hallmark and there is growing evidence for a disturbed communication between the CNS and the immune system as a crucial pathogenic factor. While the exact mechanisms for these phenomena are still poorly understood, the young discipline of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), which focuses on the mechanism underlying the brain to immune crosstalk, might offer some insights into the existing pathogenic mechanisms. Findings from the field of PNI might also help to gain a better understanding regarding the origin and course of MS clinical symptoms such as fatigue and depression.

  8. Intracranial Tumor Cell Migration and the Development of Multiple Brain Metastases in Malignant Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trude G. Simonsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A majority of patients with melanoma brain metastases develop multiple lesions, and these patients show particularly poor prognosis. To develop improved treatment strategies, detailed insights into the biology of melanoma brain metastases, and particularly the development of multiple lesions, are needed. The purpose of this preclinical investigation was to study melanoma cell migration within the brain after cell injection into a well-defined intracerebral site. METHODS: A-07, D-12, R-18, and U-25 human melanoma cells transfected with green fluorescent protein were injected stereotactically into the right cerebral hemisphere of nude mice. Moribund mice were killed and autopsied, and the brain was evaluated by fluorescence imaging or histological examination. RESULTS: Intracerebral inoculation of melanoma cells produced multiple lesions involving all regions of the brain, suggesting that the cells were able to migrate over substantial distances within the brain. Multiple modes of transport were identified, and all transport modes were observed in all four melanoma lines. Thus, the melanoma cells were passively transported via the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the meninges and ventricles, they migrated actively along leptomeningeal and brain parenchymal blood vessels, and they migrated actively along the surfaces separating different brain compartments. CONCLUSION: Migration of melanoma cells after initial arrest, extravasation, and growth at a single location within the brain may contribute significantly to the development of multiple melanoma brain metastases.

  9. Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jens F; Sunde, Niels A; Bergholt, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation......Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation...

  10. Activating whole brain® innovation: A means of nourishing multiple intelligence in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Louise De Boer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The interconnectedness of the constructs ‘whole brain® thinking’ and ‘multiple intelligence’ forms the epicentre of this article. We depart from the premise that when whole brain® thinking is activated multiple intelligence can be nourished. When this becomes evident in a higher education practice it can be claimed that such a practice is innovative. Whole brain® thinking that informs intelligence and vice versa is inevitable when it comes to facilitating learning with a view to promoting quality learning in the context of higher education. If higher education is concerned about the expectations of industry and the world of work there is no other option as to prepare students in such a way that they develo as holistic – whole brained and intelligent – employers, employees and entrepreneurs who take responsibility for maximising their full potential. Becoming a self-regulated professional and being reflexive are some of the attributes of the 21st century which should be cultivated in all students. Research on whole brain® thinking and multiple intelligence shows that these human attributes form an integral part of one’s interaction with life – one’s environment and especially people as integral part of the environment. This focus on people highlights the need for developing soft skills within every curriculum. The epistemological underpinning of our reporting of experience in practice and research of the application of the principals of the constructs is meta- reflective in nature. Instead of a typical traditional stance to research we do not report on the numerous sets of data obtained over a period of more than 15 years. Our approach is that of a meta-reflective narrative as most of the studies we were involved in and still are, are reflective as it is most often than not action research-driven. And action research is a reflective process. We report on evidence-based practice that includes fields of specialisation such as

  11. Effect of physical exercise on brain and lipid metabolism in mouse models of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdebine, Léo; Gallelli, Cristina Anna; Rastelli, Marialetizia; Sampathkumar, Nirmal Kumar; Grenier, Julien

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous demyelinating disease characterized by cyclic loss and repair of myelin sheaths associated with chronic inflammation and neuronal loss. This degenerative pathology is accompanied by modified levels of oxysterols (oxidative derivatives of cholesterol, implicated in cholesterol metabolism), highlighted in the brain, blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. The pathological accumulation of such derivatives is thought to participate in the onset and progression of the disease through their implication in inflammation, oxidative stress, demyelination and neurodegeneration. In this context, physical exercise is envisaged as a complementary resource to ameliorate therapeutic strategies. Indeed, physical activity exerts beneficial effects on neuronal plasticity, decreases inflammation and oxidative stress and improves blood-brain integrity in extents that could be beneficial for brain health. The present review attempts to summarize the available data on the positive effect of physical exercise to highlight possible links between physical activity and modulation of cholesterol/oxysterol homeostasis in MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A customizable 3-dimensional digital atlas of the canary brain in multiple modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vellema, Michiel; Verschueren, Jacob; Van Meir, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    throughout their lives. This trait makes this bird species particularly valuable to study the functional relationship between the continued plasticity in the singing behavior and alterations in the anatomy and physiology of the brain. In order to optimally interpret these types of studies, a detailed...... understanding of the brain anatomy is essential. Because traditional 2-dimensional brain atlases are limited in the information they can provide about the anatomy of the brain, here we present a 3-dimensional MRI-based atlas of the canary brain. Using multiple imaging protocols we were able to maximize......, histological, explant, and tracer studies....

  13. Dynamics and heterogeneity of brain damage in multiple sclerosis

    KAUST Repository

    Kotelnikova, Ekaterina

    2017-10-26

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease driving inflammatory and degenerative processes that damage the central nervous system (CNS). However, it is not well understood how these events interact and evolve to evoke such a highly dynamic and heterogeneous disease. We established a hypothesis whereby the variability in the course of MS is driven by the very same pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the disease, the autoimmune attack on the CNS that leads to chronic inflammation, neuroaxonal degeneration and remyelination. We propose that each of these processes acts more or less severely and at different times in each of the clinical subgroups. To test this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model that was constrained by experimental data (the expanded disability status scale [EDSS] time series) obtained from a retrospective longitudinal cohort of 66 MS patients with a long-term follow-up (up to 20 years). Moreover, we validated this model in a second prospective cohort of 120 MS patients with a three-year follow-up, for which EDSS data and brain volume time series were available. The clinical heterogeneity in the datasets was reduced by grouping the EDSS time series using an unsupervised clustering analysis. We found that by adjusting certain parameters, albeit within their biological range, the mathematical model reproduced the different disease courses, supporting the dynamic CNS damage hypothesis to explain MS heterogeneity. Our analysis suggests that the irreversible axon degeneration produced in the early stages of progressive MS is mainly due to the higher rate of myelinated axon degeneration, coupled to the lower capacity for remyelination. However, and in agreement with recent pathological studies, degeneration of chronically demyelinated axons is not a key feature that distinguishes this phenotype. Moreover, the model reveals that lower rates of axon degeneration and more rapid remyelination make relapsing MS more resilient than the

  14. Intellectual enrichment lessens the effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumowski, James F; Wylie, Glenn R; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2010-06-15

    Learning and memory impairments are prevalent among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, such deficits are only weakly associated with MS disease severity (brain atrophy). The cognitive reserve hypothesis states that greater lifetime intellectual enrichment lessens the negative impact of brain disease on cognition, thereby helping to explain the incomplete relationship between brain disease and cognitive status in neurologic populations. The literature on cognitive reserve has focused mainly on Alzheimer disease. The current research examines whether greater intellectual enrichment lessens the negative effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in patients with MS. Forty-four persons with MS completed neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory, and a vocabulary-based estimate of lifetime intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy was estimated with third ventricle width measured from 3-T magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo MRIs. Hierarchical regression was used to predict learning and memory with brain atrophy, intellectual enrichment, and the interaction between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy predicted worse learning and memory, and intellectual enrichment predicted better learning; however, these effects were moderated by interactions between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Specifically, higher intellectual enrichment lessened the negative impact of brain atrophy on both learning and memory. These findings help to explain the incomplete relationship between multiple sclerosis disease severity and cognition, as the effect of disease on cognition is attenuated among patients with higher intellectual enrichment. As such, intellectual enrichment is supported as a protective factor against disease-related cognitive impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  15. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle Juhl

    2015-01-01

    in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison...... with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood-brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood-brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging...... fluid as well as levels of CXCL10 and MMP9 in the cerebrospinal fluid. These findings suggest that blood-brain barrier permeability, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging, may provide novel pathological information as a marker of neuroinflammation related to multiple sclerosis, to some extent...

  16. musical mnemonics aid verbal memory and induce learning related brain plasticity in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Michael eThaut; David ePeterson; gerald c mcintosh; Volker eHoemberg

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music andrhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory weinvestigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis and ifmusic assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measuredsystems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music assi...

  17. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning – Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Michael H. Thaut; Peterson, David A.; gerald c mcintosh; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during ...

  18. Pseudomonas Sepsis and Multiple Brain Abscesses in a Newborn Infant Following Neurosurgical Procedure for Meningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgili Gökmen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postneurosurgical brain abscess carries a high risk of neurologic morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation: A newborn infant had Pseudomonas sepsis and multiple brain abscesses after meningocele repair, and was successfully treated medically. Conclusion: Prompt recognition of this life-threatening condition is crucial.

  19. Living with Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Print Share Glossary previous page Related Topics Cancer COPD Delirium Dementia Depression Diabetes Falls Prevention High Blood Pressure Managing Multiple Health Problems Nutrition Osteoporosis Stroke Related Documents PDF Living With Multiple ...

  20. A topology-preserving approach to the segmentation of brain images with multiple sclerosis lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Shiee, Navid; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Ozturk, Arzu; Reich, Daniel S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new fully automatic method for the segmentation of brain images that contain multiple sclerosis white matter lesions. Multichannel magnetic resonance images are used to delineate multiple sclerosis lesions while segmenting the brain into its major structures. The method is an atlas-based segmentation technique employing a topological atlas as well as a statistical atlas. An advantage of this approach is that all segmented structures are topologically constrained, thereby allowin...

  1. A customizable 3-dimensional digital atlas of the canary brain in multiple modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellema, Michiel; Verschueren, Jacob; Van Meir, Vincent; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2011-07-15

    Songbirds are well known for their ability to learn their vocalizations by imitating conspecific adults. This uncommon skill has led to many studies examining the behavioral and neurobiological processes involved in vocal learning. Canaries display a variable, seasonally dependent, vocal behavior throughout their lives. This trait makes this bird species particularly valuable to study the functional relationship between the continued plasticity in the singing behavior and alterations in the anatomy and physiology of the brain. In order to optimally interpret these types of studies, a detailed understanding of the brain anatomy is essential. Because traditional 2-dimensional brain atlases are limited in the information they can provide about the anatomy of the brain, here we present a 3-dimensional MRI-based atlas of the canary brain. Using multiple imaging protocols we were able to maximize the number of detectable brain regions, including most of the areas involved in song perception, learning, and production. The brain atlas can readily be used to determine the stereotactic location of delineated brain areas at any desirable head angle. Alternatively the brain data can be used to determine the ideal orientation of the brain for stereotactic injections, electrophysiological recordings, and brain sectioning. The 3-dimensional canary brain atlas presented here is freely available and is easily adaptable to support many types of neurobiological studies, including anatomical, electrophysiological, histological, explant, and tracer studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Brain microbiota disruption within inflammatory demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branton, W. G.; Lu, J. Q.; Surette, M. G.; Holt, R. A.; Lind, J.; Laman, J. D.; Power, C.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities reside in healthy tissues but are often disrupted during disease. Bacterial genomes and proteins are detected in brains from humans, nonhuman primates, rodents and other species in the absence of neurological disease. We investigated the composition and abundance of microbiota

  3. The multiple roles of Fatty Acid Handling Proteins in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine SF Moullé

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are essential components of a living organism as energy source but also as constituent of the membrane lipid bilayer. In addition fatty acid (FA derivatives interact with many signaling pathways. FAs have amphipathic properties and therefore require being associated to protein for both transport and intracellular trafficking. Here we will focus on several fatty acid handling proteins, among which the fatty acid translocase/CD36 (FAT/CD36, members of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs, and lipid chaperones fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs. A decade of extensive studies has helped decipher the mechanism of action of these proteins in peripheral tissue with high lipid metabolism. However, considerably less information is available regarding their role in the brain, despite the high lipid content of this tissue. This review will primarily focus on the recent studies that have highlighted the crucial role of lipid handling proteins in brain FA transport, neuronal differentiation and development, cognitive processes and brain diseases. Finally a special focus will be made on the recent studies that have revealed the role of FAT/CD36 in brain lipid sensing and nervous control of energy balance.

  4. Comparison of doses received by the hippocampus in patients treated with single isocenter– vs multiple isocenter–based stereotactic radiation therapy to the brain for multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algan, Ozer, E-mail: oalgan@ouhsc.edu; Giem, Jared; Young, Julie; Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Hossain, Sabbir

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiation therapy using a single isocenter (SI)–based or multiple isocenter (MI)–based treatment planning in patients with less than 4 brain metastases. In total, 10 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrating 2-3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study, and 2 sets of stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans (SI vs MI) were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences, and doses received by the hippocampus and the brain were calculated and compared between the 2 treatment techniques. A total of 23 lesions in 10 patients were evaluated. The median tumor volume, the right hippocampus volume, and the left hippocampus volume were 3.15, 3.24, and 2.63 mL, respectively. In comparing the 2 treatment plans, there was no difference in the planning target volume (PTV) coverage except in the tail for the dose-volume histogram (DVH) curve. The only statistically significant dosimetric parameter was the V{sub 100}. All of the other measured dosimetric parameters including the V{sub 95}, V{sub 99}, and D{sub 100} were not significantly different between the 2 treatment planning techniques. None of the dosimetric parameters evaluated for the hippocampus revealed any statistically significant difference between the MI and SI plans. The total brain doses were slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose region, although this difference was not statistically different. The use of SI-based treatment plan resulted in a 35% reduction in beam-on time. The use of SI treatments for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain when compared with MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  5. How does the brain affect cardiovascular health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Bezsheiko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article the mechanisms of stress response regulation by the brain are reviewed, as well as the data from a new study in this area, which was focused on a detailed analysis of brain activity changes in people with excessive cardiovascular stress response.

  6. The health workforce crisis: the brain drain scourge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ike, Samuel O

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of the health workforce crisis engendered by brain drain particularly in Africa, and nay more especially Nigeria, has been assuming increasingly alarming proportions in the past three decades. The challenge it poses in meeting the manpower needs in the healthcare sector as well as in the larger economy of the sending countries is enormous. This paper thus sets out to highlight the scope of this brain drain, its effects and the reasons sustaining it, as well as makes concrete suggestions to help stern the tide. A review of the literature on brain drain with particular emphasis on the health workforce sector was done, with focus on Africa, and specifically Nigeria. Literature search was done using mainly the Medline, as well as local journals. The historical perspectives, with the scope of external and internal brain drain are explored. The glaring effects of brain drain both in the global workforce terrain and specifically in the health sectors are portrayed. The countries affected most and the reasons for brain drain are outlined. Strategic steps to redress the brain drain crisis are proffered in this paper. The health workforce crisis resulting from brain drain must be brought to the front-burner of strategic policy decisions leading to paradigm shift in political, social and economic conditions that would serve as incentives to curb the scourge.

  7. Using multiple imputation to efficiently correct cerebral MRI whole brain lesion and atrophy data in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Alicia S; Egorova, Svetlana; Anderson, Mark C; Polgar-Turcsanyi, Mariann; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Guttmann, Charles R G; Bakshi, Rohit; Healy, Brian C

    2015-10-01

    Automated segmentation of brain MRI scans into tissue classes is commonly used for the assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, manual correction of the resulting brain tissue label maps by an expert reader remains necessary in many cases. Since automated segmentation data awaiting manual correction are "missing", we proposed to use multiple imputation (MI) to fill-in the missing manually-corrected MRI data for measures of normalized whole brain volume (brain parenchymal fraction-BPF) and T2 hyperintense lesion volume (T2LV). Automated and manually corrected MRI measures from 1300 patients enrolled in the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB) were identified. Simulation studies were conducted to assess the performance of MI with missing data both missing completely at random and missing at random. An imputation model including the concurrent automated data as well as clinical and demographic variables explained a high proportion of the variance in the manually corrected BPF (R(2)=0.97) and T2LV (R(2)=0.89), demonstrating the potential to accurately impute the missing data. Further, our results demonstrate that MI allows for the accurate estimation of group differences with little to no bias and with similar precision compared to an analysis with no missing data. We believe that our findings provide important insights for efficient correction of automated MRI measures to obviate the need to perform manual correction on all cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential Moderators of Physical Activity on Brain Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina L. Leckie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related cognitive decline is linked to numerous molecular, structural, and functional changes in the brain. However, physical activity is a promising method of reducing unfavorable age-related changes. Physical activity exerts its effects on the brain through many molecular pathways, some of which are regulated by genetic variants in humans. In this paper, we highlight genes including apolipoprotein E (APOE, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT along with dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, as potential moderators of the effect of physical activity on brain health. There are a growing number of studies indicating that physical activity might mitigate the genetic risks for disease and brain dysfunction and that the combination of greater amounts of DHA intake with physical activity might promote better brain function than either treatment alone. Understanding whether genes or other lifestyles moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive health is necessary for delineating the pathways by which brain health can be enhanced and for grasping the individual variation in the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on the brain and cognition. There is a need for future research to continue to assess the factors that moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive function.

  9. Glutamate gene polymorphisms predict brain volumes in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbis, E.M.M.; Inkster, B.; Vounou, M.; Naegelin, Y.; Kappos, L.; Radue, E.W.; Matthews, P.M.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Barkhof, F.; Polman, C.H.; Montana, G.; Geurts, J.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several genetic markers have been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility; however, uncovering the genetic aetiology of the complex phenotypic expression of MS has been more difficult so far. The most common approach in imaging genetics is based on mass-univariate linear

  10. Multiple brain metastases - current management and perspectives for treatment with electrochemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert, Mette; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Gehl, Julie

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the advanced oncological treatments of cancer, an overall increase in cancer incidence, and better diagnostic tools, the incidence of brain metastases is on the rise. This review addresses the current treatment options for patients with multiple brain metastases, presenting...... electrochemotherapy (ECT) as one of the new experimental treatments for this group of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Neurosurgery, stereotactic surgery, and whole-brain radiotherapy are the evidence-based treatments that can be applied for patients with multiple brain metastases. Treatment with chemotherapy and molecularly...... targeted agents may also be warranted. Several experimental treatments are emerging, one of which is ECT, an effective cancer treatment comprising electric pulses given by electrodes in the tumor tissue, causing electroporation of the cell membrane, and thereby augmenting uptake and the cytotoxicity...

  11. Distinct brain imaging characteristics of autoantibody-mediated CNS conditions and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurynczyk, Maciej; Geraldes, Ruth; Probert, Fay; Woodhall, Mark R; Waters, Patrick; Tackley, George; DeLuca, Gabriele; Chandratre, Saleel; Leite, Maria I; Vincent, Angela; Palace, Jacqueline

    2017-03-01

    Brain imaging characteristics of MOG antibody disease are largely unknown and it is unclear whether they differ from those of multiple sclerosis and AQP4 antibody disease. The aim of this study was to identify brain imaging discriminators between those three inflammatory central nervous system diseases in adults and children to support diagnostic decisions, drive antibody testing and generate disease mechanism hypotheses. Clinical brain scans of 83 patients with brain lesions (67 in the training and 16 in the validation cohort, 65 adults and 18 children) with MOG antibody (n = 26), AQP4 antibody disease (n = 26) and multiple sclerosis (n = 31) recruited from Oxford neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis clinical services were retrospectively and anonymously scored on a set of 29 predefined magnetic resonance imaging features by two independent raters. Principal component analysis was used to perform an overview of patients without a priori knowledge of the diagnosis. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to build models separating diagnostic groups and identify best classifiers, which were then tested on an independent cohort set. Adults and children with MOG antibody disease frequently had fluffy brainstem lesions, often located in pons and/or adjacent to fourth ventricle. Children across all conditions showed more frequent bilateral, large, brainstem and deep grey matter lesions. MOG antibody disease spontaneously separated from multiple sclerosis but overlapped with AQP4 antibody disease. Multiple sclerosis was discriminated from MOG antibody disease and from AQP4 antibody disease with high predictive values, while MOG antibody disease could not be accurately discriminated from AQP4 antibody disease. Best classifiers between MOG antibody disease and multiple sclerosis were similar in adults and children, and included ovoid lesions adjacent to the body of lateral ventricles, Dawson's fingers, T1 hypointense lesions (multiple

  12. Modeling disease severity in multiple sclerosis using electronic health records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqi Xia

    Full Text Available To optimally leverage the scalability and unique features of the electronic health records (EHR for research that would ultimately improve patient care, we need to accurately identify patients and extract clinically meaningful measures. Using multiple sclerosis (MS as a proof of principle, we showcased how to leverage routinely collected EHR data to identify patients with a complex neurological disorder and derive an important surrogate measure of disease severity heretofore only available in research settings.In a cross-sectional observational study, 5,495 MS patients were identified from the EHR systems of two major referral hospitals using an algorithm that includes codified and narrative information extracted using natural language processing. In the subset of patients who receive neurological care at a MS Center where disease measures have been collected, we used routinely collected EHR data to extract two aggregate indicators of MS severity of clinical relevance multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS and brain parenchymal fraction (BPF, a measure of whole brain volume.The EHR algorithm that identifies MS patients has an area under the curve of 0.958, 83% sensitivity, 92% positive predictive value, and 89% negative predictive value when a 95% specificity threshold is used. The correlation between EHR-derived and true MSSS has a mean R(2 = 0.38±0.05, and that between EHR-derived and true BPF has a mean R(2 = 0.22±0.08. To illustrate its clinical relevance, derived MSSS captures the expected difference in disease severity between relapsing-remitting and progressive MS patients after adjusting for sex, age of symptom onset and disease duration (p = 1.56×10(-12.Incorporation of sophisticated codified and narrative EHR data accurately identifies MS patients and provides estimation of a well-accepted indicator of MS severity that is widely used in research settings but not part of the routine medical records. Similar approaches

  13. Brain-drain and health care delivery in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Misau, Yusuf Abdu; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Gerei, Adamu Bakari

    2010-01-01

    Migration of health workers ‘Brain drain’ is defined as the movement of health personnel in search of a better standard of living and life quality, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide. The debate about migration of health workers from the developing to the developed world has remained pertinent for decades now. Regardless of the push and pull factors, migration of health care workers from developing coun...

  14. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  15. Exercise therapy in multiple sclerosis and its effects on function and the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    to clinically relevant improvements in physical function, but should be considered an adjunct to specific task-based training. Exercise has also shown positive effects on the brain, including improvements in brain volume and cognition. In summary, exercise therapy is a safe and potent nonpharmacological......Exercise therapy is a promising nonpharmacological therapy in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although exercise training may induce a transient worsening of symptoms in some MS patients, it is generally considered safe and does not increase the risk of relapses. Exercise training can lead...... intervention in MS, with beneficial effects on both functional capacity and the brain....

  16. Multiplicity in public health supply systems: a learning agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Bornbusch, Alan; Bates, James

    2013-01-01

    Supply chain integration—merging products for health programs into a single supply chain—tends to be the dominant model in health sector reform. However, multiplicity in a supply system may be justified as a risk management strategy that can better ensure product availability, advance specific health program objectives, and increase efficiency.

  17. Multiple sclerosis: Pregnancy and women's health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendibe Bilbao, M; Boyero Durán, S; Bárcena Llona, J; Rodriguez-Antigüedad, A

    2016-08-18

    The course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is influenced by sex, pregnancy and hormonal factors. To analyse the influence of the above factors in order to clarify the aetiopathogenic mechanisms involved in the disease. We conducted a comprehensive review of scientific publications in the PubMed database using a keyword search for 'multiple sclerosis', 'MS', 'EAE', 'pregnancy', 'hormonal factors', 'treatment', and related terms. We reviewed the advances presented at the meeting held by the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) in March 2013 in London, as well as recommendations by international experts. We provide recommendations for counselling and treating women with MS prior to and during pregnancy and after delivery. Current findings on the effects of treatment on the mother, fetus, and newborn are also presented. We issue recommendations for future research in order to address knowledge gaps and clarify any inconsistencies in currently available data. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional Connectivity of Multiple Brain Regions Required for the Consolidation of Social Recognition Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimizu, Toshiyuki; Kenney, Justin W; Okano, Emiko; Kadoma, Kazune; Frankland, Paul W; Kida, Satoshi

    2017-04-12

    Social recognition memory is an essential and basic component of social behavior that is used to discriminate familiar and novel animals/humans. Previous studies have shown the importance of several brain regions for social recognition memories; however, the mechanisms underlying the consolidation of social recognition memory at the molecular and anatomic levels remain unknown. Here, we show a brain network necessary for the generation of social recognition memory in mice. A mouse genetic study showed that cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription is required for the formation of social recognition memory. Importantly, significant inductions of the CREB target immediate-early genes c-fos and Arc were observed in the hippocampus (CA1 and CA3 regions), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and amygdala (basolateral region) when social recognition memory was generated. Pharmacological experiments using a microinfusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin showed that protein synthesis in these brain regions is required for the consolidation of social recognition memory. These findings suggested that social recognition memory is consolidated through the activation of CREB-mediated gene expression in the hippocampus/mPFC/ACC/amygdala. Network analyses suggested that these four brain regions show functional connectivity with other brain regions and, more importantly, that the hippocampus functions as a hub to integrate brain networks and generate social recognition memory, whereas the ACC and amygdala are important for coordinating brain activity when social interaction is initiated by connecting with other brain regions. We have found that a brain network composed of the hippocampus/mPFC/ACC/amygdala is required for the consolidation of social recognition memory.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we identify brain networks composed of multiple brain regions for the consolidation of social recognition memory. We

  19. Brain-drain and health care delivery in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misau, Yusuf Abdu; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Gerei, Adamu Bakari

    2010-09-01

    Migration of health workers 'Brain drain' is defined as the movement of health personnel in search of a better standard of living and life quality, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide. The debate about migration of health workers from the developing to the developed world has remained pertinent for decades now. Regardless of the push and pull factors, migration of health care workers from developing countries to developed ones, have done more harm than good on the health care deliveries in the developing countries. This article reviews the literature on the effects of cross-border migration of health care professionals.

  20. Health Problems in Pregnancy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) French (français) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul-fuṣḥá) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) HealthReach resources will ...

  1. Multiple Determinants of Whole and Regional Brain Volume among Terrestrial Carnivorans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eli M.; Holekamp, Kay E.; Lundrigan, Barbara L.; Arsznov, Bradley M.; Sakai, Sharleen T.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian brain volumes vary considerably, even after controlling for body size. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this variation, most research in mammals on the evolution of encephalization has focused on primates, leaving the generality of these explanations uncertain. Furthermore, much research still addresses only one hypothesis at a time, despite the demonstrated importance of considering multiple factors simultaneously. We used phylogenetic comparative methods to investigate simultaneously the importance of several factors previously hypothesized to be important in neural evolution among mammalian carnivores, including social complexity, forelimb use, home range size, diet, life history, phylogeny, and recent evolutionary changes in body size. We also tested hypotheses suggesting roles for these variables in determining the relative volume of four brain regions measured using computed tomography. Our data suggest that, in contrast to brain size in primates, carnivoran brain size may lag behind body size over evolutionary time. Moreover, carnivore species that primarily consume vertebrates have the largest brains. Although we found no support for a role of social complexity in overall encephalization, relative cerebrum volume correlated positively with sociality. Finally, our results support negative relationships among different brain regions after accounting for overall endocranial volume, suggesting that increased size of one brain regions is often accompanied by reduced size in other regions rather than overall brain expansion. PMID:22719890

  2. Bone Health in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Zikan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a gait disorder characterized by acute episodes of neurological defects leading to progressive disability. Patients with MS have multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures, such as progressive immobilization, long-term glucocorticoids (GCs treatment or vitamin D deficiency. The duration of motor disability appears to be a major contributor to the reduction of bone strength. The long term immobilization causes a marked imbalance between bone formation and resorption with depressed bone formation and a marked disruption of mechanosensory network of tightly connected osteocytes due to increase of osteocyte apoptosis. Patients with higher level of disability have also higher risk of falls that combined with a bone loss increases the frequency of bone fractures. There are currently no recommendations how to best prevent and treat osteoporosis in patients with MS. However, devastating effect of immobilization on the skeleton in patients with MS underscores the importance of adequate mechanical stimuli for maintaining the bone structure and its mechanical competence. The physical as well as pharmacological interventions which can counteract the bone remodeling imbalance, particularly osteocyte apoptosis, will be promising for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with MS.

  3. Food, mood, and brain health: implications for the modern clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Laura; Ramsey, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Improved, innovative strategies are needed for the prevention and promotion of recovery from mental illness as these disorders leading cause of disability worldwide. This article will review the evidence linking dietary pattern to brain-based illnesses and provide an overview of the mechanisms that underlie the association between brain health and the food we eat. Considerations for dietary intervention will be discussed including encouraging a shift towards a traditional or whole foods dietary pattern.

  4. Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2017-10-01

    The brain-gut-microbiota axis has been put forward as a new paradigm in neuroscience, which may be of relevance to mental illness. The mechanisms of signal transmission in the brain-gut-microbiota axis are complex and involve bidirectional communications that enable gut microbes to communicate with the brain and the brain to communicate with the microbes. This review assesses the potential usefulness and limitations of the paradigm. A selective literature review was conducted to evaluate the current knowledge in clinical and preclinical brain-gut-microbiota interactions as related to psychiatric disorders. Most published studies in the field are preclinical, and there is so far a lack of clinical studies. Preliminary studies in psychiatric populations support the view of a dysbiosis in some conditions, but studies are often small scale and marred by potential confounding variables. Preclinical studies support the view that psychobiotics ("bacteria which when ingested in adequate amounts have a positive mental health benefit") might be of use in treating some patients with mental health difficulties. To date, we have no well-conducted studies in clinical populations, although there are some studies in healthy volunteers. A cocktail of probiotics has been shown to alter brain activity as monitored by functional magnetic resonance imaging, and Bifidobacterium longum was reported to alter brain electrical activity. It has yet to be convincingly demonstrated that the exciting findings of psychobiotic efficacy demonstrated in preclinical models of psychiatric illness will translate to patients.

  5. Perceived mental health and needs for mental health services following trauma with and without brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Marie-Christine; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Lavoie, André

    2009-02-01

    To compare self-reported mental health in trauma survivors with and without brain injury; to describe factors associated with lower mental health; and to compare needs in terms of mental health services and perceived access limitations to such services. Cross-sectional community survey. A total of 405 trauma survivors (239 with traumatic brain injury and 166 without) interviewed 2-4 years post-injury. Short Form-12 mental health scales and a survey measuring perceived needs for mental health services, and access limitations. Injury survivors with and without traumatic brain injury are similarly affected on subjective reports of global mental health, vitality, role changes, and social functioning except for cognitive complaints. Variables associated with lower mental health in trauma survivors include younger age, being a woman, shorter time since injury, higher pain, lower social support, and presence of cognitive problems. Although individuals with traumatic brain injury report slightly more mental health problems and more need for mental health services, proportionally to their needs, more individuals without traumatic brain injury report access limitations to mental health services. Mental health problems affect important proportions of trauma survivors, either with or without traumatic brain injury. More effort should be made to facilitate access to mental health services for all trauma survivors.

  6. Detection of Protein Aggregates in Brain and Cerebrospinal Fluid Derived from Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique eDavid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the properties of soluble oligomers species of amyloidogenic proteins, derived from different proteins with little sequence homology, have indicated that they share a common structure and may share similar pathogenic mechanisms. Amyloid β, tau protein as well as amyloid precursor protein normally associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease were found in lesions and plaques of Multiple Sclerosis patients. The Objective of the study is to investigate whether brain and CSF samples derived from Multiple Sclerosis patients demonstrate the presence of soluble oligomers normally associated with protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease.We have used anti-oligomer monoclonal antibodies to immunodetect soluble oligomers in CSF and brain tissues derived from Multiple Sclerosis patients. In this report, we describe the presence of soluble oligomers in the brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid of Multiple Sclerosis patients detected with our monoclonal anti-oligomer antibodies with Western blot. These results might suggest that protein aggregation plays a role in Multiple Sclerosis pathogenesis although further and more refined studies are needed to confirm the role of soluble aggregates in Multiple Sclerosis.

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery alone for multiple brain metastases? A review of clinical and technical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Ma, Lijun; Verbakel, Wilko; Larson, David; Brown, Paul D

    2017-04-01

    Over the past three decades several randomized trials have enabled evidence-based practice for patients presenting with limited brain metastases. These trials have focused on the role of surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with or without whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). As a result, it is clear that local control should be optimized with surgery or SRS in patients with optimal prognostic factors presenting with up to 4 brain metastases. The routine use of adjuvant WBRT remains debatable, as although greater distant brain control rates are observed, there is no impact on survival, and modern outcomes suggest adverse effects from WBRT on patient cognition and quality of life. With dramatic technologic advances in radiation oncology facilitating the adoption of SRS into mainstream practice, the optimal management of patients with multiple brain metastases is now being put forward. Practice is evolving to SRS alone in these patients despite a lack of level 1 evidence to support a clinical departure from WBRT. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of the evidence for patients presenting with limited and multiple metastases, and to present an in-depth analysis of the technology and dosimetric issues specific to the treatment of multiple metastases. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Delineating multiple functions of VEGF-A in the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Tamar; Keshet, Eli

    2013-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (abbreviated throughout this review as VEGF) is mostly known for its angiogenic activity, for its activity as a vascular permeability factor, and for its vascular survival activity [1]. There is a growing body of evidence, however, that VEGF fulfills additional less 'traditional' functions in multiple organs, both during development, as well as homeostatic functions in fully developed organs. This review focuses on the multiple roles of VEGF in the adult brain and is less concerned with the roles played by VEGF during brain development, functions described elsewhere in this review series. Most functions of VEGF that are essential for proper brain development are, in fact, dispensable in the adult brain as was clearly demonstrated using a conditional brain-specific VEGF loss-of-function (LOF) approach. Thus, in contrast to VEGF LOF in the developing brain, a process which is detrimental for the growth and survival of blood vessels and leads to massive neuronal apoptosis [2-4], continued signaling by VEGF in the mature brain is no longer required for maintaining already established cerebral vasculature and its inhibition does not cause appreciable vessel regression, hypoxia or apoptosis [4-7]. Yet, VEGF continues to be expressed in the adult brain in a constitutive manner. Moreover, VEGF is expressed in the adult brain in a region-specific manner and in distinctive spatial patterns incompatible with an angiogenic role (see below), strongly suggesting angiogenesis-independent and possibly also perfusion-independent functions. Here we review current knowledge on some of these 'non-traditional', often unexpected homeostatic VEGF functions, including those unrelated to its effects on the brain vasculature. These effects could be mediated directly (on non-vascular cells expressing cognate VEGF receptors) or indirectly (via the endothelium). Experimental approaches aimed at distinguishing between these possibilities for each particular

  9. Genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis: Brain structure and cognitive function in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W; Roshchupkin, Gennady V; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, André G; Niessen, Wiro J; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Adams, Hieab Hh

    2017-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects brain structure and cognitive function and has a heritable component. Over a 100 common genetic risk variants have been identified, but most carriers do not develop MS. For other neurodegenerative diseases, risk variants have effects outside patient populations, but this remains uninvestigated for MS. To study the effect of MS-associated genetic variants on brain structure and cognitive function in the general population. We studied middle-aged and elderly individuals (mean age = 65.7 years) from the population-based Rotterdam Study. We determined 107 MS variants and additionally created a risk score combining all variants. Magnetic resonance imaging ( N = 4710) was performed to obtain measures of brain macrostructure, white matter microstructure, and gray matter voxel-based morphometry. A cognitive test battery ( N = 7556) was used to test a variety of cognitive domains. The MS risk score was associated with smaller gray matter volume over the whole brain (βstandardized = -0.016; p = 0.044), but region-specific analyses did not survive multiple testing correction. Similarly, no significant associations with brain structure were observed for individual variants. For cognition, rs2283792 was significantly associated with poorer memory (β = -0.064; p = 3.4 × 10-5). Increased genetic susceptibility to MS may affect brain structure and cognition in persons without disease, pointing to a "hidden burden" of MS.

  10. [H-3]dihydroalprenolol binding to beta adrenergic receptors in multiple sclerosis brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, E; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    By using immunocytochemistry we previously reported the absence of beta(2) adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in multiple sclerosis (MS) white matter. Here, we measured beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptor concentrations in postmortem brain sections of six MS patients and six controls by using

  11. In vivo magnetic resonance diffusion measurement in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty...

  12. Determinants of brain iron in multiple sclerosis A quantitative 3T MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, M.B.; Langkammer, C.; Ropele, S.; Petrovic, K.; Wallner-Blazek, M.; Loitfelder, M.; Jehna, M.; Bachmaier, G.; Schmidt, R.; Enzinger, C.; Fuchs, S.; Fazekas, F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Abnormal high cerebral iron deposition may be implicated in chronic neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). R2* relaxometry has been recently validated in a postmortem study to indicate brain iron accumulation in a quantitative manner. We used this technique to assess

  13. A topology-preserving approach to the segmentation of brain images with multiple sclerosis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiee, Navid; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Ozturk, Arzu; Reich, Daniel S; Calabresi, Peter A; Pham, Dzung L

    2010-01-15

    We describe a new fully automatic method for the segmentation of brain images that contain multiple sclerosis white matter lesions. Multichannel magnetic resonance images are used to delineate multiple sclerosis lesions while segmenting the brain into its major structures. The method is an atlas-based segmentation technique employing a topological atlas as well as a statistical atlas. An advantage of this approach is that all segmented structures are topologically constrained, thereby allowing subsequent processing such as cortical unfolding or diffeomorphic shape analysis techniques. Evaluation with both simulated and real data sets demonstrates that the method has an accuracy competitive with state-of-the-art MS lesion segmentation methods, while simultaneously segmenting the whole brain.

  14. Onset of multiple sclerosis before adulthood leads to failure of age-expected brain growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert-Broche, Bérengère; Fonov, Vladimir; Narayanan, Sridar; Arnold, Douglas L; Araujo, David; Fetco, Dumitru; Till, Christine; Sled, John G; Banwell, Brenda; Collins, D Louis

    2014-12-02

    To determine the impact of pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) on age-expected brain growth. Whole brain and regional volumes of 36 patients with relapsing-remitting MS onset prior to 18 years of age were segmented in 185 longitudinal MRI scans (2-11 scans per participant, 3-month to 2-year scan intervals). MRI scans of 25 age- and sex-matched healthy normal controls (NC) were also acquired at baseline and 2 years later on the same scanner as the MS group. A total of 874 scans from 339 participants from the NIH-funded MRI study of normal brain development acquired at 2-year intervals were used as an age-expected healthy growth reference. All data were analyzed with an automatic image processing pipeline to estimate the volume of brain and brain substructures. Mixed-effect models were built using age, sex, and group as fixed effects. Significant group and age interactions were found with the adjusted models fitting brain volumes and normalized thalamus volumes (p brain growth for the MS group, and an even greater failure of thalamic growth. In patients with MS, T2 lesion volume correlated with a greater reduction in age-expected thalamic volume. To exclude any scanner-related influence on our data, we confirmed no significant interaction of group in the adjusted models between the NC and NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development groups. Our results provide evidence that the onset of MS during childhood and adolescence limits age-expected primary brain growth and leads to subsequent brain atrophy, implicating an early onset of the neurodegenerative aspect of MS. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Changing multiple health behaviors: smoking and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Edwin D; Francis, Jennifer L; Carmack Taylor, Cindy L; Scarinci, Isabel C; Brantley, Phillip J

    2003-04-01

    Previous stage of change research examining health behaviors has tended to examine one behavior at a time. However, one recent study by King et al. (1996) examined the relationship between smoking and exercise across cognitive-behavioral mediators (i.e., decisional balance and self-efficacy) shown to be important in predicting readiness to change. In this study, we seek to replicate the study of King et al. (1996) in a low-income sample, the majority of whom are women, with at least one chronic illness who are attending primary care clinics. Data were obtained from 270 adult outpatients attending four public primary care clinics in Louisiana. Smoking and exercise stage of change were not related. Significant relationships existed between the cognitive variables of smoking and exercise. No significant differences existed within exercise stage of change on the cognitive variables of smoking, and vice versa, no significant differences were noted within smoking stage of change on the cognitive variables of exercise. Smoking and exercise appear to be specific health behaviors that are independent constructs in this particular sample. However, caution should be taken when interpreting the findings since 75% of the sample had at least one chronic illness.

  16. Multiple-role dilemmas for military mental health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W Brad; Bacho, Roderick; Heim, Mark; Ralph, John

    2006-04-01

    Military psychologists and psychiatrists frequently face ethical quandaries involving boundary crossings, or extratherapy contact, and multiple relationships. A multiple relationship is defined as necessarily engaging psychotherapy patients in nonclinical roles, such as coworker, superior officer, neighbor, or friend. In contrast to their civilian counterparts, military mental health professionals must often engage patients in many different contexts and roles. In this article, we consider the distinctive features of mental health practice in the military and offer military providers several practice guidelines for avoiding harm to patients in military settings. This article is also designed to enhance sensitivity to multiple-role risks among nonpsychiatric providers.

  17. Multiple Pathways Linking Racism to Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Camara Jules P.; Burford, Tanisha I.; Cage, Brandi N.; Nelson, Travette McNair; Shearon, Sheronda; Thompson, Adrian; Green, Steven

    2012-01-01

    This commentary discusses advances in the conceptual understanding of racism and selected research findings in the social neurosciences. The traditional stress and coping model holds that racism constitutes a source of aversive experiences that, when perceived by the individual, eventually lead to poor health outcomes. Current evidence points to additional psychophysiological pathways linking facets of racist environments with physiological reactions that contribute to disease. The alternative pathways emphasize prenatal experiences, subcortical emotional neural circuits, conscious and preconscious emotion regulation, perseverative cognitions, and negative affective states stemming from racist cognitive schemata. Recognition of these pathways challenges change agents to use an array of cognitive and self-controlling interventions in mitigating racism’s impact. Additionally, it charges policy makers to develop strategies that eliminate deep-seated structural aspects of racism in society. PMID:22518195

  18. Multiple Sclerosis and Catastrophic Health Expenditure in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juyani, Yaser; Hamedi, Dorsa; Hosseini Jebeli, Seyede Sedighe; Qasham, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    There are many disabling medical conditions which can result in catastrophic health expenditure. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the most costly medical conditions through the world which encounter families to the catastrophic health expenditures. This study aims to investigate on what extent Multiple sclerosis patients face catastrophic costs. This study was carried out in Ahvaz, Iran (2014). The study population included households that at least one of their members suffers from MS. To analyze data, Logit regression model was employed by using the default software STATA12. 3.37% of families were encountered with catastrophic costs. Important variables including brand of drug, housing, income and health insurance were significantly correlated with catastrophic expenditure. This study suggests that although a small proportion of MS patients met the catastrophic health expenditure, mechanisms that pool risk and cost (e.g. health insurance) are required to protect them and improve financial and access equity in health care.

  19. Social connectedness, mental health and the adolescent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamblin, M; Murawski, C; Whittle, S; Fornito, A

    2017-09-01

    Social relationships promote health and wellbeing. Brain regions regulating social behavior continue to develop throughout adolescence, as teens learn to navigate their social environment with increasing sophistication. Adolescence is also a time of increased risk for the development of psychiatric disorders, many of which are characteristically associated with social dysfunction. In this review, we consider the links between adolescent brain development and the broader social environment. We examine evidence that individual differences in social ability, partly determined by genetic influences on brain structure and function, impact the quality and quantity of social ties during adolescence and that, conversely, the structure of one's social network exerts complex yet profound influences on individual behavior and mental health. In this way, the brain and social environment sculpt each other throughout the teenage years to influence one's social standing amongst peers. Reciprocal interactions between brain maturation and the social environment at this critical developmental stage may augment risk or promote resilience for mental illness and other health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cortical brain volume abnormalities associated with few or multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyssandra Dos Santos Tascone

    Full Text Available New research on assessing neuropsychiatric manifestations of Alzheimer´s Disease (AD involves grouping neuropsychiatric symptoms into syndromes. Yet this approach is limited by high inter-subject variability in neuropsychiatric symptoms and a relatively low degree of concordance across studies attempting to cluster neuropsychiatric symptoms into syndromes. An alternative strategy that involves dichotomizing AD subjects into those with few versus multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms is both consonant with real-world clinical practice and can contribute to understanding neurobiological underpinnings of neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD patients. The aim of this study was to address whether the number of neuropsychiatric symptoms (i.e., presence of few [≤2] versus multiple [≥3] symptoms in AD would be associated with degree of significant gray matter (GM volume loss. Of particular interest was volume loss in brain regions involved in memory, emotional processing and salience brain networks, including the prefrontal, lateral temporal and parietal cortices, anterior cingulate gyrus, temporo-limbic structures and insula. We recruited 19 AD patients and 13 healthy controls, which underwent an MRI and neuropsychiatric assessment. Regional brain volumes were determined using voxel-based morphometry and other advanced imaging processing methods. Our results indicated the presence of different patterns of GM atrophy in the two AD subgroups relative to healthy controls. AD patients with multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations showed more evident GM atrophy in the left superior temporal gyrus and insula as compared with healthy controls. In contrast, AD subjects with few neuropsychiatric symptoms displayed more GM atrophy in prefrontal regions, as well as in the dorsal anterior cingulate ad post-central gyri, as compared with healthy controls. Our findings suggest that the presence of multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms is more related to the degree of

  1. The Outdoor Air Pollution and Brain Health Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle L.; Elder, Alison; Auten, Rick L.; Bilbo, Staci D.; Chen, Honglei; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.; Costa, Daniel; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Dorman, David C.; Gold, Diane; Gray, Kimberly; Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Kaufman, Joel D.; Kleinman, Michael T.; Kirshner, Annette; Lawler, Cindy; Miller, David S.; Nadadur, Sri; Ritz, Beate; Semmens, Erin O.; Tonelli, Leonardo H.; Veronesi, Bellina; Wright, Robert O.; Wright, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that outdoor air pollution may have a significant impact on central nervous system (CNS) health and disease. To address this issue, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Institute of Health convened a panel of research scientists that was assigned the task of identifying research gaps and priority goals essential for advancing this growing field and addressing an emerging human health concern. Here, we review recent findings that have established the effects of inhaled air pollutants in the brain, explore the potential mechanisms driving these phenomena, and discuss the recommended research priorities/approaches that were identified by the panel. PMID:22981845

  2. Nonrigid registration of multiple sclerosis brain images using lesion inpainting for morphometry or lesion mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdika, Michaël; Pelletier, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    Morphometric studies of medical images often include a nonrigid registration step from a subject to a common reference. The presence of white matter multiple sclerosis lesions will distort and bias the output of the registration. In this article, we present a method to remove this bias by filling such lesions to make the brain look like a healthy brain before the registration. We finally propose a dedicated method to fill the lesions and present numerical results showing that our method outperforms current state of the art method. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Planarian shows decision-making behavior in response to multiple stimuli by integrative brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Hoshino, Hajime; Yamashita, Taiga; Shimoyama, Seira; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Planarians belong to an evolutionarily early group of organisms that possess a central nervous system including a well-organized brain with a simple architecture but many types of neurons. Planarians display a number of behaviors, such as phototaxis and thermotaxis, in response to external stimuli, and it has been shown that various molecules and neural pathways in the brain are involved in controlling these behaviors. However, due to the lack of combinatorial assay methods, it remains obscure whether planarians possess higher brain functions, including integration in the brain, in which multiple signals coming from outside are coordinated and used in determining behavioral strategies. In the present study, we designed chemotaxis and thigmotaxis/kinesis tracking assays to measure several planarian behaviors in addition to those measured by phototaxis and thermotaxis assays previously established by our group, and used these tests to analyze planarian chemotactic and thigmotactic/kinetic behaviors. We found that headless planarian body fragments and planarians that had specifically lost neural activity following regeneration-dependent conditional gene knockdown (Readyknock) of synaptotagmin in the brain lost both chemotactic and thigmotactic behaviors, suggesting that neural activity in the brain is required for the planarian's chemotactic and thigmotactic behaviors. Furthermore, we compared the strength of phototaxis, chemotaxis, thigmotaxis/kinesis, and thermotaxis by presenting simultaneous binary stimuli to planarians. We found that planarians showed a clear order of predominance of these behaviors. For example, when planarians were simultaneously exposed to 400 lux of light and a chemoattractant, they showed chemoattractive behavior irrespective of the direction of the light source, although exposure to light of this intensity alone induces evasive behavior away from the light source. In contrast, when the light intensity was increased to 800 or 1600 lux and

  4. Functional Brain Network Changes Associated with Maintenance of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh A Helekar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis (MS functional changes in connectivity due to cortical reorganization could lead to cognitive impairment (CI, or reflect a re-adjustment to reduce the clinical effects of widespread tissue damage. Such alterations in connectivity could result in changes in neural activation as assayed by executive function tasks. We examined cognitive function in MS patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment and age-matched controls. We evaluated brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during the successful performance of the Wisconsin-card sorting (WCS task by MS patients, showing compensatory maintenance of normal function, as measured by response latency and error rate. To assess changes in functional connectivity throughout the brain, we performed a global functional brain network analysis by computing voxel by voxel correlations on the fMRI time series data and carrying out a hierarchical cluster analysis. We found that during the WCS task there is a significant reduction in the number of smaller size brain functional networks, and a change in the brain areas representing the nodes of these networks in MS patients compared to age-matched controls. There is also a concomitant increase in the strength of functional connections between brain loci separated at intermediate scale distances in these patients. These functional alterations might reflect compensatory neuroplastic reorganization underlying maintenance of relatively normal cognitive function in the face of white matter lesions and cortical atrophy produced by MS.

  5. Neuroplasticity and Clinical Practice: Building Brain Power for Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Shaffer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review is on driving neuroplasticity in a positive direction using evidence-based interventions that also have the potential to improve general health. One goal is to provide an overview of the many ways new neuroscience can inform treatment protocols to empower and motivate clients to make the lifestyle choices that could help build brain power and could increase adherence to healthy lifestyle changes that have also been associated with simultaneously enhancing vigorous longevity, health, happiness and wellness. Another goal is to explore the use of a focus in clinical practice on helping clients appreciate this new evidence and use evolving neuroscience in establishing individualized goals, designing strategies for achieving them and increasing treatment compliance. The timing is urgent for such interventions with goals of enhancing brain health across the lifespan and improving statistics on dementia worldwide.

  6. Single or multiple frequency generators in on-going brain activity: A mechanistic whole-brain model of empirical MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deco, Gustavo; Cabral, Joana; Woolrich, Mark W; Stevner, Angus B A; van Hartevelt, Tim J; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2017-05-15

    During rest, envelopes of band-limited on-going MEG signals co-vary across the brain in consistent patterns, which have been related to resting-state networks measured with fMRI. To investigate the genesis of such envelope correlations, we consider a whole-brain network model assuming two distinct fundamental scenarios: one where each brain area generates oscillations in a single frequency, and a novel one where each brain area can generate oscillations in multiple frequency bands. The models share, as a common generator of damped oscillations, the normal form of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation operating at the critical border between the steady state and the oscillatory regime. The envelopes of the simulated signals are compared with empirical MEG data using new methods to analyse the envelope dynamics in terms of their phase coherence and stability across the spectrum of carrier frequencies. Considering the whole-brain model with a single frequency generator in each brain area, we obtain the best fit with the empirical MEG data when the fundamental frequency is tuned at 12Hz. However, when multiple frequency generators are placed at each local brain area, we obtain an improved fit of the spatio-temporal structure of on-going MEG data across all frequency bands. Our results indicate that the brain is likely to operate on multiple frequency channels during rest, introducing a novel dimension for future models of large-scale brain activity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. musical mnemonics aid verbal memory and induce learning related brain plasticity in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eThaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music andrhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory weinvestigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis and ifmusic assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measuredsystems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music assisted learning.Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG in alpha andbeta frequency bands in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. The study sample was randomlydivided into 2 groups, either hearing a spoken or musical (sung presentation of Rey’s Auditory VerbalLearning Test (RAVLT. We defined the learning-related synchronization (LRS as the percent changein EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent wordencoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and spoken conditions in low alpha andupper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better wordorder memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. Theevidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization inprefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicitin musical stimuli enhances ‘deep encoding’ during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neuraldynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS

  8. Quantitative assessment of MS plaques and brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis using semiautomatic segmentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Eskola, Hannu; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    1997-05-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain is useful in multiple sclerosis (MS) in order to obtain reliable indices of disease progression. The goal of this project was to estimate the total volume of gliotic and non gliotic plaques in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis with the help of a semiautomatic segmentation method developed at the Ragnar Granit Institute. Youth developed program running on a PC based computer provides de displays of the segmented data, in addition to the volumetric analyses. The volumetric accuracy of the program was demonstrated by segmenting MR images of fluid filed syringes. An anatomical atlas is to be incorporated in the segmentation system to estimate the distribution of MS plaques in various neural pathways of the brain. A total package including MS plaque volume estimation, estimation of brain atrophy and ventricular enlargement, distribution of MS plaques in different neural segments of the brain has ben planned for the near future. Our study confirmed that total lesion volumes in chronic MS disease show a poor correlation to EDSS scores but show a positive correlation to neuropsychological scores. Therefore accurate total volume measurements of MS plaques using the developed semiautomatic segmentation technique helped us to evaluate the degree of neuropsychological impairment.

  9. MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE THEORY AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING:A BRAIN-BASED PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Arnold

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Gardner's Multiple Intelligences theory is presented as a cognitive perspective on intelligence which has profound implications for education in general. More specifically, it has led to the application of eight of these frames to language teaching and learning. In this chapter, we will argue in favour of the application of MIT to the EFL classroom, using as support some of the major insights for language teaching from brain science.

  10. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Ralph O. Suarez, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL CORPORATION, BOSTON MA 02115 REPORT DATE: October...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER CHIL REN’ HOSPITAL CORPORATION, THE OFFICE OF SPONSORED PROGRAMS 300 LONGWOOD AVEBOSTON MA 02115 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING...surgical site. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Functional brain mapping using fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS

  11. Quantifying brain tissue volume in multiple sclerosis with automated lesion segmentation and filling

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde, Sergi; Oliver, Arnau; Roura, Eloy; Pareto, Deborah; Vilanova, Joan C.; Ramió-Torrentà, LLuís; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Montalban, Xavier; Rovira, Àlex; Lladó, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Lesion filling has been successfully applied to reduce the effect of hypo-intense T1-w Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions on automatic brain tissue segmentation. However, a study of fully automated pipelines incorporating lesion segmentation and lesion filling on tissue volume analysis has not yet been performed. Here, we analyzed the % of error introduced by automating the lesion segmentation and filling processes in the tissue segmentation of 70 clinically isolated syndrome patient images. Fir...

  12. Brain-drain and health care delivery in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Abdu Misau

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Migration of health workers ‘Brain drain’ is defined as the movement of health personnel in search of a better standard of living and life quality, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide. The debate about migration of health workers from the developing to the developed world has remained pertinent for decades now. Regardless of the push and pull factors, migration of health care workers from developing countries to developed ones, have done more harm than good on the health care deliveries in the developing countries. This article reviews the literature on the effects of cross-border migration of health care professionals.

  13. Health care seeking behaviour and utilisation in a multiple health insurance system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chomi, Eunice Nahyuha; Mujinja, Phares G M; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many countries striving to achieve universal health insurance coverage have done so by means of multiple health insurance funds covering different population groups. However, existence of multiple health insurance funds may also cause variation in access to health care, due to the dif......BACKGROUND: Many countries striving to achieve universal health insurance coverage have done so by means of multiple health insurance funds covering different population groups. However, existence of multiple health insurance funds may also cause variation in access to health care, due...... to the differential revenue raising capacities and benefit packages offered by the various funds resulting in inequity and inefficiency within the health system. This paper examines how the existence of multiple health insurance funds affects health care seeking behaviour and utilisation among members...... of the Community Health Fund, the National Health Insurance Fund and non-members in two districts in Tanzania. METHODS: Using household survey data collected in 2011 with a sample of 3290 individuals, the study uses a multinomial logit model to examine the influence of predisposing, enabling and need...

  14. Treatment of Single or Multiple Brain Metastases by Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Nagai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinical outcomes of a 4-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT study using helical tomotherapy for brain metastases. Between August 2009 and June 2013, 54 patients with a total of 128 brain metastases underwent SRT using tomotherapy. A total dose of 28 or 28.8 Gy at 80% isodose was administered in 4 fractions for all tumors. The mean gross tumor volume (GTV was 1.9 cc. Local control (LC rates at 6, 12, and 18 months were 96%, 91%, and 88%, respectively. The 12-month LC rates for tumors with GTV ≤0.25, >0.25 and ≤1, and >1 cc were 98%, 82%, and 93%, respectively; the rates were 92% for tumors >3 cc and 100% for >10 cc. The 6-month rates for freedom from distant brain failure were 57%, 71%, and 55% for patients with 1, 2, and >3 brain metastases, respectively. No differences were significant. No major complications were observed. The 4-fraction SRT protocol provided excellent tumor control with minimal toxicity. Distant brain failure was not so frequent, even in patients with multiple tumors. The results of the current study warrant a prospective randomized study comparing single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS with SRT in this patient population.

  15. A deep convolutional neural network-based automatic delineation strategy for multiple brain metastases stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Hrycushko, Brian; Wardak, Zabi; Lau, Steven; Lu, Weiguo; Yan, Yulong; Jiang, Steve B; Zhen, Xin; Timmerman, Robert; Nedzi, Lucien; Gu, Xuejun

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and automatic brain metastases target delineation is a key step for efficient and effective stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment planning. In this work, we developed a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN) algorithm for segmenting brain metastases on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets. We integrated the CNN-based algorithm into an automatic brain metastases segmentation workflow and validated on both Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation challenge (BRATS) data and clinical patients' data. Validation on BRATS data yielded average DICE coefficients (DCs) of 0.75±0.07 in the tumor core and 0.81±0.04 in the enhancing tumor, which outperformed most techniques in the 2015 BRATS challenge. Segmentation results of patient cases showed an average of DCs 0.67±0.03 and achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.98±0.01. The developed automatic segmentation strategy surpasses current benchmark levels and offers a promising tool for SRS treatment planning for multiple brain metastases.

  16. A deep convolutional neural network-based automatic delineation strategy for multiple brain metastases stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    Full Text Available Accurate and automatic brain metastases target delineation is a key step for efficient and effective stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS treatment planning. In this work, we developed a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN algorithm for segmenting brain metastases on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets. We integrated the CNN-based algorithm into an automatic brain metastases segmentation workflow and validated on both Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation challenge (BRATS data and clinical patients' data. Validation on BRATS data yielded average DICE coefficients (DCs of 0.75±0.07 in the tumor core and 0.81±0.04 in the enhancing tumor, which outperformed most techniques in the 2015 BRATS challenge. Segmentation results of patient cases showed an average of DCs 0.67±0.03 and achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.98±0.01. The developed automatic segmentation strategy surpasses current benchmark levels and offers a promising tool for SRS treatment planning for multiple brain metastases.

  17. The choroid plexus in health and in disease: dialogues into and out of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Fernanda; Sousa, João Carlos; Brito, Maria Alexandra; Pahnke, Jens; Santos, Cecilia; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Palha, Joana Almeida

    2017-11-01

    This article brings the choroid plexus into the context of health and disease. It is remarkable that the choroid plexus, composed by a monolayer of epithelial cells that lie in a highly vascularized stroma, floating within the brain ventricles, gets so little attention in major physiology and medicine text books and in the scientific literature in general. Consider that it is responsible for producing most of the about 150mL of cerebrospinal fluid that fills the brain ventricles and the subarachnoid space and surrounds the spinal cord in the adult human central nervous system, which is renewed approximately 2-3 times daily. As such, its activity influences brain metabolism and function, which will be addressed. Reflect that it contains an impressive number of receptors and transporters, both in the apical and basolateral sides of the epithelial cells, and as such is a key structure for the communication between the brain and the periphery. This will be highlighted in the context of neonatal jaundice, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Realize that the capillaries that irrigate the choroid plexus stroma do not possess tight junctions and that the blood flow to the choroid plexus is five times higher than that in the brain parenchyma, allowing for a rapid sensing system and delivery of molecules such as nutrients and metals as will be revised. Recognize that certain drugs reach the brain parenchyma solely through the choroid plexus epithelia, which has potential to be manipulated in diseases such as neonatal jaundice and Alzheimer's disease as will be discussed. Without further notice, it must be now clear that understanding the choroid plexus is necessary for comprehending the brain and how the brain is modulated and modulates all other systems, in health and in disease. This review article intends to address current knowledge on the choroid plexus, and to motivate the scientific community to consider it when studying normal brain physiology and diseases of

  18. A putative Alzheimer's disease risk allele in PCK1 influences brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongqi Xia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction are neurodegenerative features of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. We used a candidate gene approach to address whether genetic variants implicated in susceptibility to late onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD influence brain volume and cognition in MS patients.MS subjects were genotyped for five single nucleotide polymorphisms (snps associated with susceptibility to AD: PICALM, CR1, CLU, PCK1, and ZNF224. We assessed brain volume using Brain Parenchymal Fraction (BPF measurements obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI data and cognitive function using the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT. Genotypes were correlated with cross-sectional BPF and SDMT scores using linear regression after adjusting for sex, age at symptom onset, and disease duration. 722 MS patients with a mean (±SD age at enrollment of 41 (±10 years were followed for 44 (±28 months. The AD risk-associated allele of a non-synonymous SNP in the PCK1 locus (rs8192708G is associated with a smaller average brain volume (P=0.0047 at the baseline MRI, but it does not impact our baseline estimate of cognition. PCK1 is additionally associated with higher baseline T2-hyperintense lesion volume (P=0.0088. Finally, we provide technical validation of our observation in a subset of 641 subjects that have more than one MRI study, demonstrating the same association between PCK1 and smaller average brain volume (P=0.0089 at the last MRI visit.Our study provides suggestive evidence for greater brain atrophy in MS patients bearing the PCK1 allele associated with AD-susceptibility, yielding new insights into potentially shared neurodegenerative process between MS and late onset AD.

  19. Improved patient-reported health impact of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonell, Richard; Nagels, Guy; Laplaud, David-Axel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease that negatively impacts patients' lives. OBJECTIVE: ENABLE assessed the effect of long-term prolonged-release (PR) fampridine (dalfampridine extended release in the United States) treatment on patient-perceived health impact in patients...

  20. Melatonin Improves Outcomes of Heatstroke in Mice by Reducing Brain Inflammation and Oxidative Damage and Multiple Organ Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here that when untreated mice underwent heat stress, they displayed thermoregulatory deficit (e.g., animals display hypothermia during room temperature exposure, brain (or hypothalamic inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment (e.g., decreased plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone during heat stress, multiple organ dysfunction or failure, and lethality. Melatonin therapy significantly reduced the thermoregulatory deficit, brain inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment, multiple organ dysfunction, and lethality caused by heat stroke. Our data indicate that melatonin may improve outcomes of heat stroke by reducing brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and multiple organ dysfunction.

  1. Association between physical activity and brain health in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Christian; Brooks, Samantha J; Kullberg, Joel; Nordenskjöld, Richard; Burgos, Jonathan; Le Grevès, Madeleine; Kilander, Lena; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Johansson, Lars; Ahlström, Håkan; Lind, Lars; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2013-01-01

    In the present cross-sectional study, we examined physical activity (PA) and its possible association with cognitive skills and brain structure in 331 cognitively healthy elderly. Based on the number of self-reported light and hard activities for at least 30 minutes per week, participants were assigned to 4 groups representing different levels of PA. The cognitive skills were assessed by the Mini Mental State Examination score, a verbal fluency task, and the Trail-making test as a measure of visuospatial orientation ability. Participants also underwent a magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Multiple regression analysis revealed that greater PA was associated with a shorter time to complete the Trail-making test, and higher levels of verbal fluency. Further, the level of self-reported PA was positively correlated with brain volume, white matter, as well as a parietal lobe gray matter volume, situated bilaterally at the precuneus. These present cross-sectional results indicate that PA is a lifestyle factor that is linked to brain structure and function in late life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, J L

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit...... of brain mass was used. This quantity was found by introducing the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) as a measure of concentration of Gd-DTPA in the brain tissue in the mathematical model for the transcapillary transport over the BBB. High accordance between the observed data points and the model was found...

  3. The "brain drain" of health care workers: causes, solutions and the example of Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, Aisha K

    2012-07-18

    Despite much media attention being given to the physician shortage in Canada in recent years, this shortage pales in comparison to that seen in many middle- and low-income countries. A major cause of the shortage in these countries is the migration of health care workers from developing to developed nations, a phenomenon known as the "brain drain". The loss of these workers is having devastating impacts globally, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. Causes of the "brain drain" are numerous and include poor working conditions in poorer countries and active recruitment by richer countries. Jamaica has been one of the countries in the Caribbean hardest hit by mass migration of health care workers. The multiple dimensions of Jamaica's health worker "brain drain" illustrate both the complexity of the issues reviewed in this commentary, and the net loss for low- and middle-income countries. Creative and sustainable solutions to the problem are actively being sought globally, but will require commitment and support from all nations as well as from international funding bodies if meaningful impacts on health are to be realized.

  4. Cellular distribution of glucose and monocarboxylate transporters in human brain white matter and multiple sclerosis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Philip G; Michailidou, Iliana; Witte, Maarten E; Mizee, Mark R; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Het Hof, Bert; Reijerkerk, Arie; Pellerin, Luc; van der Valk, Paul; de Vries, Helga E; van Horssen, Jack

    2014-07-01

    To ensure efficient energy supply to the high demanding brain, nutrients are transported into brain cells via specific glucose (GLUT) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT). Mitochondrial dysfunction and altered glucose metabolism are thought to play an important role in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we investigated the cellular localization of key GLUT and MCT proteins in human brain tissue of non-neurological controls and MS patients. We show that in control brain tissue GLUT and MCT proteins were abundantly expressed in a variety of central nervous system cells, particularly in microglia and endothelial cells. In active MS lesions, GLUTs and MCTs were highly expressed in infiltrating leukocytes and reactive astrocytes. Astrocytes manifest increased MCT1 staining and maintain GLUT expression in inactive lesions, whereas demyelinated axons exhibit significantly reduced GLUT3 and MCT2 immunoreactivity in inactive lesions. Finally, we demonstrated that the co-transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), an important protein involved in energy metabolism, is highly expressed in reactive astrocytes in active MS lesions. Overexpression of PGC-1α in astrocyte-like cells resulted in increased production of several GLUT and MCT proteins. In conclusion, we provide for the first time a comprehensive overview of key nutrient transporters in white matter brain samples. Moreover, our data demonstrate an altered expression of these nutrient transporters in MS brain tissue, including a marked reduction of axonal GLUT3 and MCT2 expression in chronic lesions, which may impede efficient nutrient supply to the hypoxic demyelinated axons thereby contributing to the ongoing neurodegeneration in MS. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Neuroinflammation and its relationship to changes in brain volume and white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Gourab; Colasanti, Alessandro; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Gunn, Roger N; Malik, Omar; Ciccarelli, Olga; Nicholas, Richard; Van Vlierberghe, Eline; Van Hecke, Wim; Searle, Graham; Santos-Ribeiro, Andre; Matthews, Paul M

    2017-11-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging is an important tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis patients. However, magnetic resonance imaging alone provides limited information for predicting an individual patient's disability progression. In part, this is because magnetic resonance imaging lacks sensitivity and specificity for detecting chronic diffuse and multi-focal inflammation mediated by activated microglia/macrophages. The aim of this study was to test for an association between 18 kDa translocator protein brain positron emission tomography signal, which arises largely from microglial activation, and measures of subsequent disease progression in multiple sclerosis patients. Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis (seven with secondary progressive disease and 14 with a relapsing remitting disease course) underwent T1- and T2-weighted and magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and after 1 year. Positron emission tomography scanning with the translocator protein radioligand 11C-PBR28 was performed at baseline. Brain tissue and lesion volumes were segmented from the T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and relative 11C-PBR28 uptake in the normal-appearing white matter was estimated as a distribution volume ratio with respect to a caudate pseudo-reference region. Normal-appearing white matter distribution volume ratio at baseline was correlated with enlarging T2-hyperintense lesion volumes over the subsequent year (ρ = 0.59, P = 0.01). A post hoc analysis showed that this association reflected behaviour in the subgroup of relapsing remitting patients (ρ = 0.74, P = 0.008). By contrast, in the subgroup of secondary progressive patients, microglial activation at baseline was correlated with later progression of brain atrophy (ρ = 0.86, P = 0.04). A regression model including the baseline normal-appearing white matter distribution volume ratio, T2 lesion volume and normal-appearing white matter magnetization

  6. Differential Diagnosis Tool for Parkinsonian Syndrome Using Multiple Structural Brain Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Ota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical differentiation of parkinsonian syndromes such as the Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P and cerebellar subtype (MSA-C from Parkinson's disease is difficult in the early stage of the disease. To identify the correlative pattern of brain changes for differentiating parkinsonian syndromes, we applied discriminant analysis techniques by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. T1-weighted volume data and diffusion tensor images were obtained by MRI in eighteen patients with MSA-C, 12 patients with MSA-P, 21 patients with Parkinson’s disease, and 21 healthy controls. They were evaluated using voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics, respectively. Discriminant functions derived by step wise methods resulted in correct classification rates of 0.89. When differentiating these diseases with the use of three independent variables together, the correct classification rate was the same as that obtained with step wise methods. These findings support the view that each parkinsonian syndrome has structural deviations in multiple brain areas and that a combination of structural brain measures can help to distinguish parkinsonian syndromes.

  7. Mental Health and Health-Related Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis Caregivers in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Leibach, Gillian G.; Stern, Marilyn; Arelis, Adriana Aguayo; Islas, Miguel Angel Macias; Barajas, Brenda Viridiana Rábago

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) rates are increasing in Latin America, and caregiving for an individual with MS is associated with poorer mental and physical health outcomes. No existing research has examined the relation between mental health and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in MS caregivers in Latin America.

  8. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning - Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H; Peterson, David A; McIntosh, Gerald C; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey's auditory verbal learning test. We defined the "learning-related synchronization" (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances "deep encoding" during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS.

  9. Multivariate synchrony modules identified through multiple subject community detection in functional brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Marcos E; Bernat, Edward M; Aviyente, Selin

    2011-01-01

    The functional connectivity of the human brain may be described by modeling interactions among its neural assemblies as a graph composed of vertices and edges. It has recently been shown that functional brain networks belong to a class of scale-free complex networks for which graphs have helped define an association between function and topology. These networks have been shown to possess a heterogenous structure composed of clusters, dense regions of strongly associated nodes, which represent multivariate relationships among nodes. Network clustering algorithms classify the nodes based on a similarity measure representing the bivariate relationships and similar to unsupervised learning is performed without a priori information. In this paper, we propose a method for partitioning a set of networks representing different subjects and reveal a community structure common to multiple subjects. We apply this community identifying algorithm to functional brain networks during a cognitive control task, in particular the error-related negativity (ERN), to evaluate how the brain organizes itself during error-monitoring.

  10. Multiple race reporting for children in a national health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J D; Lucas, J B

    2000-01-01

    The 1997 standard for race and ethnicity data from the Office of Management and Budget requires the collection of data for multiple race groups. The aims of this study were to compare characteristics of multiple race children and describe race reporting for children within interracial and multiple race families. Descriptive statistics were estimated using the 1993-1995 National Health Interview Surveys. In this time period, 2.6% of children had more than one race reported. Multiple race children were a diverse group who differed from each other and their single race counterparts. For example, the percent of children reported as both Black and White who lived in a two-parent household (58.9%), was significantly less than the corresponding percents for other multiple race children (65.8%-79.6%), and between the corresponding percents for single race Black (42.7%) and single race White children (83.2%). The relationships between parental race and child's race varied. Although 3.1% of children in two-parent households lived with interracial parents, fewer than half of these children had more than one race reported. Sociodemographic variables were not associated with child's reported race among interracial families. These findings indicate that generalizations about multiple race children for research or policy purposes will be problematic.

  11. Comparative Brain Stem Lesions on MRI of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis, Neuromyelitis Optica, and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhuang; Shen, Liping; Long, Youming; Huang, Junqi; Hu, Xueqiang

    2011-01-01

    Background Brain stem lesions are common in patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives To investigate comparative brain stem lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. Methods Sixty-five adult patients with ADEM (n = 17), NMO (n = 23), and MS (n = 25) who had brain stem lesions on MRI were enrolled. Morphological features of brain stem lesions among these diseases were assessed. Results Patients with ADEM had a higher frequency of midbrain lesions than did patients with NMO (94.1% vs. 17.4%, P<0.001) and MS (94.1% vs. 40.0%, P<0.001); patients with NMO had a lower frequency of pons lesions than did patients with MS (34.8% vs. 84.0%, P<0.001) and ADEM (34.8% vs. 70.6%, P = 0.025); and patients with NMO had a higher frequency of medulla oblongata lesions than did patients with ADEM (91.3% vs. 35.3%, P<0.001) and MS (91.3% vs. 36.0%, P<0.001). On the axial section of the brain stem, the majority (82.4%) of patients with ADEM showed lesions on the ventral part; the brain stem lesions in patients with NMO were typically located in the dorsal part (91.3%); and lesions in patients with MS were found in both the ventral (44.0%) and dorsal (56.0%) parts. The lesions in patients with ADEM (100%) and NMO (91.3%) had poorly defined margins, while lesions of patients with MS (76.0%) had well defined margins. Brain stem lesions in patients with ADEM were usually bilateral and symmetrical (82.4%), while lesions in patients with NMO (87.0%) and MS (92.0%) were asymmetrical or unilateral. Conclusions Brain stem lesions showed various morphological features among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. The different lesion locations may be helpful in distinguishing these diseases. PMID:21853047

  12. Comparative brain stem lesions on MRI of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqi Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain stem lesions are common in patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, neuromyelitis optica (NMO, and multiple sclerosis (MS. OBJECTIVES: To investigate comparative brain stem lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. METHODS: Sixty-five adult patients with ADEM (n = 17, NMO (n = 23, and MS (n = 25 who had brain stem lesions on MRI were enrolled. Morphological features of brain stem lesions among these diseases were assessed. RESULTS: Patients with ADEM had a higher frequency of midbrain lesions than did patients with NMO (94.1% vs. 17.4%, P<0.001 and MS (94.1% vs. 40.0%, P<0.001; patients with NMO had a lower frequency of pons lesions than did patients with MS (34.8% vs. 84.0%, P<0.001 and ADEM (34.8% vs. 70.6%, P = 0.025; and patients with NMO had a higher frequency of medulla oblongata lesions than did patients with ADEM (91.3% vs. 35.3%, P<0.001 and MS (91.3% vs. 36.0%, P<0.001. On the axial section of the brain stem, the majority (82.4% of patients with ADEM showed lesions on the ventral part; the brain stem lesions in patients with NMO were typically located in the dorsal part (91.3%; and lesions in patients with MS were found in both the ventral (44.0% and dorsal (56.0% parts. The lesions in patients with ADEM (100% and NMO (91.3% had poorly defined margins, while lesions of patients with MS (76.0% had well defined margins. Brain stem lesions in patients with ADEM were usually bilateral and symmetrical (82.4%, while lesions in patients with NMO (87.0% and MS (92.0% were asymmetrical or unilateral. CONCLUSIONS: Brain stem lesions showed various morphological features among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. The different lesion locations may be helpful in distinguishing these diseases.

  13. Whole brain irradiation with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Local tumour control and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlke, Oliver; Wucherpfennig, David; Prokic, Vesna [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Fels, Franziska [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); St. Josefs Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenburg (Germany); Frings, Lars [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Freiburg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Egger, Karl [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Weyerbrock, Astrid [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-01-16

    Hippocampal-avoidance whole brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) for multiple brain metastases may prevent treatment-related cognitive decline, compared to standard WBRT. Additionally, simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) on individual metastases may further improve the outcome. Here, we present initial data concerning local tumour control (LTC), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity and safety for this new irradiation technique. Twenty patients, enrolled between 2011 and 2013, were treated with HA-WBRT (30 Gy in 12 fractions, D{sub 98} {sub %} to hippocampus ≤ 9 Gy) and a SIB (51 Gy) on multiple (2-13) metastases using a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) approach based on 2-4 arcs. Metastases were evaluated bidimensionally along the two largest diameters in contrast-enhanced three-dimensional T1-weighed MRI. Median follow-up was 40 weeks. The median time to progression of boosted metastases has not been reached yet, corresponding to a LTC rate of 73 %. Median intracranial PFS was 40 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year PFS of 45.3 %. Median OS was 71.5 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year OS of 60 %. No obvious acute or late toxicities grade > 2 (NCI CTCAE v4.03) were observed. D{sub mean} to the bilateral hippocampi was 6.585 Gy ± 0.847 (α/β = 2 Gy). Two patients developed a new metastasis in the area of hippocampal avoidance. HA-WBRT (simultaneous integrated protection, SIP) with SIB to metastases is a safe and tolerable regime that shows favorable LTC for patients with multiple brain metastases, while it has the potential to minimize the side-effect of cognitive deterioration. (orig.) [German] Die Hippocampus-schonende Ganzhirnbestrahlung (HS-GHB) kann im Vergleich zur Standard-GHB die Verschlechterung der neurokognitiven Funktion verhindern. Zusaetzlich vermag ein simultan integrierter Boost (SIB) auf die Metastasen die Prognose der betroffenen Patienten weiter zu verbessern. In dieser Studie praesentieren wir erste Ergebnisse

  14. Neural Substrate of Group Mental Health: Insights from Multi-Brain Reference Frame in Functional Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Ray

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary mental health practice primarily centers around the neurobiological and psychological processes at the individual level. However, a more careful consideration of interpersonal and other group-level attributes (e.g., interpersonal relationship, mutual trust/hostility, interdependence, and cooperation and a better grasp of their pathology can add a crucial dimension to our understanding of mental health problems. A few recent studies have delved into the interpersonal behavioral processes in the context of different psychiatric abnormalities. Neuroimaging can supplement these approaches by providing insight into the neurobiology of interpersonal functioning. Keeping this view in mind, we discuss a recently developed approach in functional neuroimaging that calls for a shift from a focus on neural information contained within brain space to a multi-brain framework exploring degree of similarity/dissimilarity of neural signals between multiple interacting brains. We hypothesize novel applications of quantitative neuroimaging markers like inter-subject correlation that might be able to evaluate the role of interpersonal attributes affecting an individual or a group. Empirical evidences of the usage of these markers in understanding the neurobiology of social interactions are provided to argue for their application in future mental health research.

  15. Risk distribution across multiple health insurance funds in rural Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chomi, Eunice Nahyuha; Mujinja, Phares Gamba; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multiple insurance funds serving different population groups may compromise equity due to differential revenue raising capacity and an unequal distribution of high risk members among the funds. This occurs when the funds exist without mechanisms in place to promote income and risk...... cross-subsidisation across the funds. This paper analyses whether the risk distribution varies across the Community Health Fund (CHF) and National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) in two districts in Tanzania. Specifically we aim to 1) identify risk factors associated with increased utilisation of health...... services and 2) compare the distribution of identified risk factors among the CHF, NHIF and non-member households. METHODS: Data was collected from a survey of 695 households. A multivariate logisitic regression model was used to identify risk factors for increased health care utilisation. Chi-square tests...

  16. Longitudinal patterns and predictors of multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Andrea F; Visser, Leenke; Verhulst, Frank C; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    Background. Most studies on multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents have cross-sectionally studied a limited number of health behaviors or determinants. Purpose. To examine the prevalence, longitudinal patterns and predictors of individual and multiple health risk behaviors among

  17. Personalising exercise recommendations for brain health: considerations and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barha, Cindy K; Galea, Liisa A; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Erickson, Kirk I; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2017-04-01

    The societal value of strategies that delay the onset and progression of dementia cannot be overstated. Physical activity-unstructured and structured-is a promising, cost-effective strategy for the promotion of brain health. However, a large degree of variation exists in its efficacy. Therefore, to increase its utility as 'medication' for healthy cognitive ageing, it is imperative to identify key moderators and mediators of the positive effects of targeted exercise training on brain health. In this commentary, we focus on the type of targeted exercise training, the determinants of individual variation, including biological sex and genotypic factors, and the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its influence on the brain. We argue that a better understanding of these factors will allow for evidence-based, personalised, tailored exercise recommendations that go beyond the one-size-fits-all approach to successfully combat dementia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Functional brain imaging predicts public health campaign success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; O'Donnell, Matthew Brook; Tompson, Steven; Gonzalez, Richard; Dal Cin, Sonya; Strecher, Victor; Cummings, Kenneth Michael; An, Lawrence

    2016-02-01

    Mass media can powerfully affect health decision-making. Pre-testing through focus groups or surveys is a standard, though inconsistent, predictor of effectiveness. Converging evidence demonstrates that activity within brain systems associated with self-related processing can predict individual behavior in response to health messages. Preliminary evidence also suggests that neural activity in small groups can forecast population-level campaign outcomes. Less is known about the psychological processes that link neural activity and population-level outcomes, or how these predictions are affected by message content. We exposed 50 smokers to antismoking messages and used their aggregated neural activity within a 'self-localizer' defined region of medial prefrontal cortex to predict the success of the same campaign messages at the population level (n = 400,000 emails). Results demonstrate that: (i) independently localized neural activity during health message exposure complements existing self-report data in predicting population-level campaign responses (model combined R(2) up to 0.65) and (ii) this relationship depends on message content-self-related neural processing predicts outcomes in response to strong negative arguments against smoking and not in response to compositionally similar neutral images. These data advance understanding of the psychological link between brain and large-scale behavior and may aid the construction of more effective media health campaigns. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. An improved approach to align and embed multiple brain samples in a gelatin-based matrix for simultaneous histological processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamoto-Combs, Kumi; Manocha, Gunjan D; Puig, Kendra; Combs, Colin K

    2016-03-01

    Preparation and processing of free-floating histological sections involve a series of steps. The amount of labor, particularly sectioning and mounting, quickly multiplies as the number of samples increases. Embedding tissue samples in a flexible matrix allows simultaneous handling of multiple samples and preserves the integrity of the tissue during histological processing. However, aligning multiple asymmetrical samples, for example small-animal brains, in a particular orientation requires skillful arrangement and securing of the samples by pinning onto a solid surface. Consequently, costly technical services offered by contract research organizations are often sought. An improved approach to align and embed multiple whole or half rodent brain samples into a gelatin-based matrix is described. Using a template specifically designed to form arrayed mouse brain-shaped cavities, a "receiving matrix" is prepared. Inserting brain samples directly into the cavities allows the samples to be effortlessly positioned into a uniform orientation and embedded in a block of matrix. Multiple mouse brains were arrayed in a uniform orientation in a gelatin matrix block with ease using the receiving matrix. The gelatin-embedded brains were simultaneously sectioned and stained, and effortlessly mounted onto glass slides. The improved approach allowed multiple whole or half mouse brains to be easily arrayed without pinning the samples onto a solid surface and prevented damages or shifting of the samples during embedding. The new approach to array multiple brain samples provides a simple way to prepare gelatin-embedded whole or half brain arrays of commercial quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain networks of temporal preparation: A multiple regression analysis of neuropsychological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviño, Mónica; Correa, Ángel; Lupiáñez, Juan; Funes, María Jesús; Catena, Andrés; He, Xun; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2016-11-15

    There are only a few studies on the brain networks involved in the ability to prepare in time, and most of them followed a correlational rather than a neuropsychological approach. The present neuropsychological study performed multiple regression analysis to address the relationship between both grey and white matter (measured by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with brain lesion) and different effects in temporal preparation (Temporal orienting, Foreperiod and Sequential effects). Two versions of a temporal preparation task were administered to a group of 23 patients with acquired brain injury. In one task, the cue presented (a red versus green square) to inform participants about the time of appearance (early versus late) of a target stimulus was blocked, while in the other task the cue was manipulated on a trial-by-trial basis. The duration of the cue-target time intervals (400 versus 1400ms) was always manipulated within blocks in both tasks. Regression analysis were conducted between either the grey matter lesion size or the white matter tracts disconnection and the three temporal preparation effects separately. The main finding was that each temporal preparation effect was predicted by a different network of structures, depending on cue expectancy. Specifically, the Temporal orienting effect was related to both prefrontal and temporal brain areas. The Foreperiod effect was related to right and left prefrontal structures. Sequential effects were predicted by both parietal cortex and left subcortical structures. These findings show a clear dissociation of brain circuits involved in the different ways to prepare in time, showing for the first time the involvement of temporal areas in the Temporal orienting effect, as well as the parietal cortex in the Sequential effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  2. A pyramidal approach for automatic segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachai, C; Zhu, Y M; Grimaud, J; Hermier, M; Dromigny-Badin, A; Boudraa, A; Gimenez, G; Confavreux, C; Froment, J C

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) lesion load of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most objective approach for a better understanding of the history of the pathology, either natural or modified by therapies. To achieve an accurate and reproducible quantification of MS lesions in conventional brain MRI, an automatic segmentation algorithm based on a multiresolution approach using pyramidal data structures is proposed. The systematic pyramidal decomposition in the frequency domain provides a robust and flexible low level tool for MR image analysis. Context-dependent rules regarding MRI findings in MS are used as high level considerations for automatic lesion detection.

  3. Quantitative measures of walking and strength provide insight into brain corticospinal tract pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora E Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative measures of strength and walking are associated with brain corticospinal tract pathology. The addition of these quantitative measures to basic clinical information explains more of the variance in corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy and magnetization transfer ratio than the basic clinical information alone. Outcome measurement for multiple sclerosis clinical trials has been notoriously challenging; the use of quantitative measures of strength and walking along with tract-specific imaging methods may improve our ability to monitor disease change over time, with intervention, and provide needed guidelines for developing more effective targeted rehabilitation strategies.

  4. Brain drain and health workforce distortions in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Sherr

    Full Text Available Trained human resources are fundamental for well-functioning health systems, and the lack of health workers undermines public sector capacity to meet population health needs. While external brain drain from low and middle-income countries is well described, there is little understanding of the degree of internal brain drain, and how increases in health sector funding through global health initiatives may contribute to the outflow of health workers from the public sector to donor agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs, and the private sector.An observational study was conducted to estimate the degree of internal and external brain drain among Mozambican nationals qualifying from domestic and foreign medical schools between 1980-2006. Data were collected 26-months apart in 2008 and 2010, and included current employment status, employer, geographic location of employment, and main work duties.Of 723 qualifying physicians between 1980-2006, 95.9% (693 were working full-time, including 71.1% (493 as clinicians, 20.5% (142 as health system managers, and 6.9% (48 as researchers/professors. 25.5% (181 of the sample had left the public sector, of which 62.4% (113 continued working in-country and 37.6% (68 emigrated from Mozambique. Of those cases of internal migration, 66.4% (75 worked for NGOs, 21.2% (24 for donor agencies, and 12.4% (14 in the private sector. Annual incidence of physician migration was estimated to be 3.7%, predominately to work in the growing NGO sector. An estimated 36.3% (41/113 of internal migration cases had previously held senior-level management positions in the public sector.Internal migration is an important contributor to capital flight from the public sector, accounting for more cases of physician loss than external migration in Mozambique. Given the urgent need to strengthen public sector health systems, frank reflection by donors and NGOs is needed to assess how hiring practices may undermine the very systems they

  5. Doses of Nearby Nature Simultaneously Associated with Multiple Health Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. C. Cox

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to nature provides a wide range of health benefits. A significant proportion of these are delivered close to home, because this offers an immediate and easily accessible opportunity for people to experience nature. However, there is limited information to guide recommendations on its management and appropriate use. We apply a nature dose-response framework to quantify the simultaneous association between exposure to nearby nature and multiple health benefits. We surveyed ca. 1000 respondents in Southern England, UK, to determine relationships between (a nature dose type, that is the frequency and duration (time spent in private green space and intensity (quantity of neighbourhood vegetation cover of nature exposure and (b health outcomes, including mental, physical and social health, physical behaviour and nature orientation. We then modelled dose-response relationships between dose type and self-reported depression. We demonstrate positive relationships between nature dose and mental and social health, increased physical activity and nature orientation. Dose-response analysis showed that lower levels of depression were associated with minimum thresholds of weekly nature dose. Nearby nature is associated with quantifiable health benefits, with potential for lowering the human and financial costs of ill health. Dose-response analysis has the potential to guide minimum and optimum recommendations on the management and use of nearby nature for preventative healthcare.

  6. Doses of Nearby Nature Simultaneously Associated with Multiple Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel T C; Shanahan, Danielle F; Hudson, Hannah L; Fuller, Richard A; Anderson, Karen; Hancock, Steven; Gaston, Kevin J

    2017-02-09

    Exposure to nature provides a wide range of health benefits. A significant proportion of these are delivered close to home, because this offers an immediate and easily accessible opportunity for people to experience nature. However, there is limited information to guide recommendations on its management and appropriate use. We apply a nature dose-response framework to quantify the simultaneous association between exposure to nearby nature and multiple health benefits. We surveyed ca. 1000 respondents in Southern England, UK, to determine relationships between (a) nature dose type, that is the frequency and duration (time spent in private green space) and intensity (quantity of neighbourhood vegetation cover) of nature exposure and (b) health outcomes, including mental, physical and social health, physical behaviour and nature orientation. We then modelled dose-response relationships between dose type and self-reported depression. We demonstrate positive relationships between nature dose and mental and social health, increased physical activity and nature orientation. Dose-response analysis showed that lower levels of depression were associated with minimum thresholds of weekly nature dose. Nearby nature is associated with quantifiable health benefits, with potential for lowering the human and financial costs of ill health. Dose-response analysis has the potential to guide minimum and optimum recommendations on the management and use of nearby nature for preventative healthcare.

  7. A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Carrozza, Francesco [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy); Cantore, Giampaolo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda); and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

  8. Health care seeking behaviour and utilisation in a multiple health insurance system: does insurance affiliation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomi, Eunice Nahyuha; Mujinja, Phares G M; Enemark, Ulrika; Hansen, Kristian; Kiwara, Angwara Dennis

    2014-03-19

    Many countries striving to achieve universal health insurance coverage have done so by means of multiple health insurance funds covering different population groups. However, existence of multiple health insurance funds may also cause variation in access to health care, due to the differential revenue raising capacities and benefit packages offered by the various funds resulting in inequity and inefficiency within the health system. This paper examines how the existence of multiple health insurance funds affects health care seeking behaviour and utilisation among members of the Community Health Fund, the National Health Insurance Fund and non-members in two districts in Tanzania. Using household survey data collected in 2011 with a sample of 3290 individuals, the study uses a multinomial logit model to examine the influence of predisposing, enabling and need characteristics on the probability of seeking care and choice of provider. Generally, health insurance is found to increase the probability of seeking care and reduce delays. However, the probability, timing of seeking care and choice of provider varies across the CHF and NHIF members. Reducing fragmentation is necessary to provide opportunities for redistribution and to promote equity in utilisation of health services. Improvement in the delivery of services is crucial for achievement of improved access and financial protection and for increased enrolment into the CHF, which is essential for broadening redistribution and cross-subsidisation to promote equity.

  9. Increased determinism in brain electrical activity occurs in association with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrubba, Simona; Minagar, Alireza; Chesson, Andrew L; Frilot, Clifton; Marino, Andrew A

    2012-04-01

    Increased determinism (decreased complexity) of brain electrical activity has been associated with some brain diseases. Our objective was to determine whether a similar association occurred for multiple sclerosis (MS). Ten subjects with a relapsing-remitting course of MS who were in remission were studied; the controls were age- and gender-matched clinically normal subjects. Recurrence plots were calculated using representative electroencephalogram (EEG) epochs (1-7 seconds) from six derivations; the plots were quantified using the nonlinear variables percent recurrence (%R) and percent determinism (%D). The results were averaged over all derivations for each participant, and the means were compared between the groups. As a linear control procedure the groups were also compared using spectral analysis. The mean±SD of %R for the MS subjects was 6·6±1·3%, compared with 5·1±1·3% in the normal group (P = 0·017), indicating that brain activity in the subjects with MS was less complex, as hypothesized. The groups were not distinguishable using %D or spectral analysis. Taken together with our earlier report that %R could be used to discriminate between MS and normal subjects based on the ability to exhibit evoked potentials, the evidence suggests that complexity analysis of the EEG has potential for development as a diagnostic test for MS.

  10. Improved CSF classification and lesion detection in MR brain images with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Yulian; Miron, Shmuel; Achiron, Anat; Greenspan, Hayit

    2007-03-01

    The study deals with the challenging task of automatic segmentation of MR brain images with multiple sclerosis lesions (MSL). Multi-Channel data is used, including "fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery" (fast FLAIR or FF), and statistical modeling tools are developed, in order to improve cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) classification and to detect MSL. Two new concepts are proposed for use within an EM framework. The first concept is the integration of prior knowledge as it relates to tissue behavior in different MRI modalities, with special attention given to the FF modality. The second concept deals with running the algorithm on a subset of the input that is most likely to be noise- and artifact-free data. This enables a more reliable learning of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) parameters for brain tissue statistics. The proposed method focuses on the problematic CSF intensity distribution, which is a key to improved overall segmentation and lesion detection. A level-set based active contour stage is performed for lesion delineation, using gradient and shape properties combined with previously learned region intensity statistics. In the proposed scheme there is no need for preregistration of an atlas, a common characteristic in brain segmentation schemes. Experimental results on real data are presented.

  11. Estimating multimodal brain connectivity in multiple sclerosis: an exploratory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Matteo; Giulietti, Giovanni; Spano, Barbara; Bozzali, Marco; Cercignani, Mara; Conforto, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Graph-theoretical approaches have become a popular way to model brain data collected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both from the structural and the functional perspectives. In structural networks, tract-based mapping allows to model different aspects of brain structures by means of the specific characteristics of the different MRI modalities. However, there has been little effort to join the information carried by each modality and to understand what level of common variance is shown in these data. In this paper, we proposed a combined approach based on graph theory and factor analysis to model magnetization transfer and microstructural properties in 18 relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 17 healthy controls. After defining the common factors and outlining their relationships with MRI data, we evaluated between-group differences using global and local graph measures. The results showed that one common factor describes brain structures in terms of myelin and global integrity, and such factor is able to highlight specific between-group differences.

  12. Brain tissue segmentation using q-entropy in multiple sclerosis magnetic resonance images

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    Diniz, P.R.B.; Brum, D.G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Santos, A. C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Clinica Medica; Murta-Junior, L.O.; Araujo, D.B. de, E-mail: murta@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2010-01-15

    The loss of brain volume has been used as a marker of tissue destruction and can be used as an index of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we tested a new method for tissue segmentation based on pixel intensity threshold using generalized Tsallis entropy to determine a statistical segmentation parameter for each single class of brain tissue. We compared the performance of this method using a range of different q parameters and found a different optimal q parameter for white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the conclusion that the differences in structural correlations and scale invariant similarities present in each tissue class can be accessed by generalized Tsallis entropy, obtaining the intensity limits for these tissue class separations. In order to test this method, we used it for analysis of brain magnetic resonance images of 43 patients and 10 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The values found for the entropic q index were 0.2 for cerebrospinal fluid, 0.1 for white matter and 1.5 for gray matter. With this algorithm, we could detect an annual loss of 0.98% for the patients, in agreement with literature data. Thus, we can conclude that the entropy of Tsallis adds advantages to the process of automatic target segmentation of tissue classes, which had not been demonstrated previously. (author)

  13. Brain tissue segmentation using q-entropy in multiple sclerosis magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R.B. Diniz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of brain volume has been used as a marker of tissue destruction and can be used as an index of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we tested a new method for tissue segmentation based on pixel intensity threshold using generalized Tsallis entropy to determine a statistical segmentation parameter for each single class of brain tissue. We compared the performance of this method using a range of different q parameters and found a different optimal q parameter for white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Our results support the conclusion that the differences in structural correlations and scale invariant similarities present in each tissue class can be accessed by generalized Tsallis entropy, obtaining the intensity limits for these tissue class separations. In order to test this method, we used it for analysis of brain magnetic resonance images of 43 patients and 10 healthy controls matched for gender and age. The values found for the entropic q index were 0.2 for cerebrospinal fluid, 0.1 for white matter and 1.5 for gray matter. With this algorithm, we could detect an annual loss of 0.98% for the patients, in agreement with literature data. Thus, we can conclude that the entropy of Tsallis adds advantages to the process of automatic target segmentation of tissue classes, which had not been demonstrated previously.

  14. The effect of inflammation and its reduction on brain plasticity in multiple sclerosis: MRI evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, Valentina; d'Ambrosio, Alessandro; Petsas, Nikolaos; Wise, Richard G; Sbardella, Emilia; Allen, Marek; Tona, Francesca; Fanelli, Fulvia; Foster, Catherine; Carnì, Marco; Gallo, Antonio; Pantano, Patrizia; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Brain plasticity is the basis for systems-level functional reorganization that promotes recovery in multiple sclerosis (MS). As inflammation interferes with plasticity, its pharmacological modulation may restore plasticity by promoting desired patterns of functional reorganization. Here, we tested the hypothesis that brain plasticity probed by a visuomotor adaptation task is impaired with MS inflammation and that pharmacological reduction of inflammation facilitates its restoration. MS patients were assessed twice before (sessions 1 and 2) and once after (session 3) the beginning of Interferon beta (IFN beta), using behavioural and structural MRI measures. During each session, 2 functional MRI runs of a visuomotor task, separated by 25-minutes of task practice, were performed. Within-session between-run change in task-related functional signal was our imaging marker of plasticity. During session 1, patients were compared with healthy controls. Comparison of patients' sessions 2 and 3 tested the effect of reduced inflammation on our imaging marker of plasticity. The proportion of patients with gadolinium-enhancing lesions reduced significantly during IFN beta. In session 1, patients demonstrated a greater between-run difference in functional MRI activity of secondary visual areas and cerebellum than controls. This abnormally large practice-induced signal change in visual areas, and in functionally connected posterior parietal and motor cortices, was reduced in patients in session 3 compared with 2. Our results suggest that MS inflammation alters short-term plasticity underlying motor practice. Reduction of inflammation with IFN beta is associated with a restoration of this plasticity, suggesting that modulation of inflammation may enhance recovery-oriented strategies that rely on patients' brain plasticity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2431-2445, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dual-Sensitivity Multiple Sclerosis Lesion and CSF Segmentation for Multichannel 3T Brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dominik S; Guttmann, Charles R G; Tummala, Subhash; Moscufo, Nicola; Cavallari, Michele; Tauhid, Shahamat; Bakshi, Rohit; Weiner, Howard L

    2018-01-01

    A pipeline for fully automated segmentation of 3T brain MRI scans in multiple sclerosis (MS) is presented. This 3T morphometry (3TM) pipeline provides indicators of MS disease progression from multichannel datasets with high-resolution 3-dimensional T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) contrast. 3TM segments white (WM) and gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to assess atrophy and provides WM lesion (WML) volume. To address nonuniform distribution of noise/contrast (eg, posterior fossa in 3D-FLAIR) of 3T magnetic resonance imaging, the method employs dual sensitivity (different sensitivities for lesion detection in predefined regions). We tested this approach by assigning different sensitivities to supratentorial and infratentorial regions, and validated the segmentation for accuracy against manual delineation, and for precision in scan-rescans. Intraclass correlation coefficients of .95, .91, and .86 were observed for WML and CSF segmentation accuracy and brain parenchymal fraction (BPF). Dual sensitivity significantly reduced infratentorial false-positive WMLs, affording increases in global sensitivity without decreasing specificity. Scan-rescan yielded coefficients of variation (COVs) of 8% and .4% for WMLs and BPF and COVs of .8%, 1%, and 2% for GM, WM, and CSF volumes. WML volume difference/precision was .49 ± .72 mL over a range of 0-24 mL. Correlation between BPF and age was r = .62 (P = .0004), and effect size for detecting brain atrophy was Cohen's d = 1.26 (standardized mean difference vs. healthy controls). This pipeline produces probability maps for brain lesions and tissue classes, facilitating expert review/correction and may provide high throughput, efficient characterization of MS in large datasets. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Neuroimaging.

  16. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning – Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H.; Peterson, David A.; McIntosh, Gerald C.; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey’s auditory verbal learning test. We defined the “learning-related synchronization” (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances “deep encoding” during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS. PMID:24982626

  17. An effective method for computerized prediction and segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudipta; Bhattacharyya, Debnath; Bandyopadhyay, Samir Kumar; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the major diseases and the progressive MS lesion formation often leads to cognitive decline and physical disability. A quick and perfect method for estimating the number and size of MS lesions in the brain is very important in estimating the progress of the disease and effectiveness of treatments. But, the accurate identification, characterization and quantification of MS lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is extremely difficult due to the frequent change in location, size, morphology variation, intensity similarity with normal brain tissues, and inter-subject anatomical variation of brain images. This paper presents a method where adaptive background generation and binarization using global threshold are the key steps for MS lesions detection and segmentation. After performing three phase level set, we add third phase segmented region with contour of brain to connect the normal tissues near the boundary. Then remove all lesions except maximum connected area and corpus callosum of the brain to generate adaptive background. The binarization method is used to select threshold based on entropy and standard deviation preceded by non-gamut image enhancement. The background image is then subtracted from binarized image to find out segmented MS lesions. The step of subtraction of background from binarized image does not generate spurious lesions. Binarization steps correctly identify the MS lesions and reduce over or under segmentation. The average Kappa index is 94.88%, Jacard index is 90.43%, correct detection ration is 92.60284%, false detection ratio is 2.55% and relative area error is 5.97% for proposed method. Existing recent methods does not have such accuracy and low value of error rate both mathematically as well as visually due to many spurious lesions generation and over segmentation problems. Proposed method accurately identifies the size and number of lesions as well as location of lesions detection as a radiologist

  18. Rebalancing brain drain: exploring resource reallocation to address health worker migration and promote global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Timothy Ken; Liang, Bryan Albert

    2012-09-01

    Global public health is threatened by an imbalance in health worker migration from resource-poor countries to developed countries. This "brain drain" results in health workforce shortages, health system weakening, and economic loss and waste, threatening the well-being of vulnerable populations and effectiveness of global health interventions. Current structural imbalances in resource allocation and global incentive structures have resulted in 57 countries identified by WHO as having a "critical shortage" of health workers. Yet current efforts to strengthen domestic health systems have fallen short in addressing this issue. Instead, global solutions should focus on sustainable forms of equitable resource sharing. This can be accomplished by adoption of mandatory global resource and staff-sharing programs in conjunction with implementation of state-based health services corps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Covariance among multiple health risk behaviors in adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla de la Haye

    Full Text Available In a diverse group of early adolescents, this study explores the co-occurrence of a broad range of health risk behaviors: alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use; physical inactivity; sedentary computing/gaming; and the consumption of low-nutrient energy-dense food. We tested differences in the associations of unhealthy behaviors over time, and by gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.Participants were 8360 students from 16 middle schools in California (50% female; 52% Hispanic, 17% Asian, 16% White, and 15% Black/multiethnic/other. Behaviors were measured with surveys in Spring 2010 and Spring 2011. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess if an underlying factor accounted for the covariance of multiple behaviors, and composite reliability methods were used to determine the degree to which behaviors were related.The measured behaviors were explained by two moderately correlated factors: a 'substance use risk factor' and an 'unhealthy eating and sedentary factor'. Physical inactivity did not reflect the latent factors as expected. There were few differences in the associations among these behaviors over time or by demographic characteristics.Two distinct, yet related groups of health compromising behaviors were identified that could be jointly targeted in multiple health behavior change interventions among early adolescents of diverse backgrounds.

  20. Multiple criteria decision analysis for health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Praveen; Duenas, Alejandra

    2012-12-01

    Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) has been suggested by some researchers as a method to capture the benefits beyond quality adjusted life-years in a transparent and consistent manner. The objectives of this article were to analyze the possible application of MCDA approaches in health technology assessment and to describe their relative advantages and disadvantages. This article begins with an introduction to the most common types of MCDA models and a critical review of state-of-the-art methods for incorporating multiple criteria in health technology assessment. An overview of MCDA is provided and is compared against the current UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence health technology appraisal process. A generic MCDA modeling approach is described, and the different MCDA modeling approaches are applied to a hypothetical case study. A comparison of the different MCDA approaches is provided, and the generic issues that need consideration before the application of MCDA in health technology assessment are examined. There are general practical issues that might arise from using an MCDA approach, and it is suggested that appropriate care be taken to ensure the success of MCDA techniques in the appraisal process. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Denoising of brain DW-MR data by single and multiple diffusion kernels Denoising of brain DW-MR data by single and multiple diffusion kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzar Ashtari

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Las imágenes por resonancia magnética pesadas en difusión son ampliamente utilizadaspara el estudio de las estructuras cerebrales dentro de la materia blanca del cerebro. Sinembargo, recuperar las orientaciones de los axones puede ser susceptible a errores por elruido dentro de la señal. Una regularización espacial puede mejorar la estimación, perodebe ser realizada cuidadosamente dado que puede remover información espacial ó introducirfalsas orientaciones. En este trabajo se investigaron las ventajas de aplicar un filtroanisotrópico basado en simples y múltiples kerneles de orientación de manojos de axones.Para esto, hemos calculado kerneles locales de difusión basados en modelos de tensoresde difusión y multi tensores de difusión. Mostraremos los beneficios de nuestra propuestaen 3 tipos diferentes de imágenes obtenidas por resonancia magnética pesada en difusión:Datos sintéticos, imágenes humanas tomadas en vivo, y datos obtenidos de un fantasmasimulador de difusión.Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging is widely used to study the structure ofthe fiber pathways of white matter in the brain. However, the recovered axon orientationscan be prone to error because of the low signal to noise ratio. Spatial regularization canreduce the error, but it must be done carefully so that real spatial information is not removedand false orientations are not introduced. In this paper we investigate the advantagesof applying an anisotropic filter based on single and multiple axon bundle orientation kernels.To this end, we compute local diffusion kernels based on Diffusion Tensor and multiDiffusion Tensor models. We show the benefits of our approach to three different types ofDW-MRI data: synthetic, in vivo human, and acquired from a diffusion phantom.

  2. Epigenetic gene regulation in the adult mammalian brain: multiple roles in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Farah D

    2011-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the life-span and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring Multiple Identities as a Health Care Ethnographer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Ledger MPhil, RMT

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous discussions about the role of the ethnographer have weighed the advantages and disadvantages of occupying insider or outsider positions, or dual practitioner-researcher identities. In the author's experience, additional identities can come to the fore when a seasoned health professional returns to the field as a novice ethnographer. In this article she reflects on ways in which she shifted between the identities of researcher, therapist, friend, and student in her ethnography about music therapy service development. These experiences are presented to reveal the inherent complexity of the researcher role and to encourage health care ethnographers to consider ways in which they can hold multiple identities in their own research.

  4. Self-reported health promotion and disability progression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Nagels, Guy; De Keyser, Jacques; Haentjens, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior may be associated with disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives: To investigate health-promoting behavior as measured by the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, which includes the subscales of health responsibility, physical activity, nutrition,

  5. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit......, and the results were comparable to results obtained from similar studies using positron emission tomography. The improved possibility of quantitating the defect of the BBB by MRI may give new information about pathogenesis or etiology, and leads to improved methods in monitoring the efficacy of treatments...... of brain mass was used. This quantity was found by introducing the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) as a measure of concentration of Gd-DTPA in the brain tissue in the mathematical model for the transcapillary transport over the BBB. High accordance between the observed data points and the model was found...

  6. Deep sequencing for the detection of virus-like sequences in the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis: detection of GBV-C in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriesel, John D; Hobbs, Maurine R; Jones, Brandt B; Milash, Brett; Nagra, Rashed M; Fischer, Kael F

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of unknown origin that affects the central nervous system of an estimated 400,000 Americans. GBV-C or hepatitis G is a flavivirus that is found in the serum of 1-2% of blood donors. It was originally associated with hepatitis, but is now believed to be a relatively non-pathogenic lymphotropic virus. Fifty frozen specimens from the brains of deceased persons affected by MS were obtained along with 15 normal control brain specimens. RNA was extracted and ribosomal RNAs were depleted before sequencing on the Illumina GAII. These 36 bp reads were compared with a non-redundant database derived from the 600,000+ viral sequences in GenBank organized into 4080 taxa. An individual read successfully aligned to the viral database was considered to be a "hit". Normalized MS specimen hit rates for each viral taxon were compared to the distribution of hits in the normal controls. Seventeen MS and 11 control brain extracts were sequenced, yielding 4-10 million sequences ("reads") each. Over-representation of sequence from at least one of 12 viral taxa was observed in 7 of the 17 MS samples. Sequences resembling other viruses previously implicated in the pathogenesis of MS were not significantly enriched in any of the diseased brain specimens. Sequences from GB virus C (GBV-C), a flavivirus not previously isolated from brain, were enriched in one of the MS samples. GBV-C in this brain specimen was confirmed by specific amplification in this single MS brain specimen, but not in the 30 other MS brain samples available. The entire 9.4 kb sequence of this GBV-C isolate is reported here. This study shows the feasibility of deep sequencing for the detection of occult viral infections in the brains of deceased persons with MS. The first isolation of GBV-C from human brain is reported here.

  7. Deep sequencing for the detection of virus-like sequences in the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis: detection of GBV-C in human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Kriesel

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a demyelinating disease of unknown origin that affects the central nervous system of an estimated 400,000 Americans. GBV-C or hepatitis G is a flavivirus that is found in the serum of 1-2% of blood donors. It was originally associated with hepatitis, but is now believed to be a relatively non-pathogenic lymphotropic virus. Fifty frozen specimens from the brains of deceased persons affected by MS were obtained along with 15 normal control brain specimens. RNA was extracted and ribosomal RNAs were depleted before sequencing on the Illumina GAII. These 36 bp reads were compared with a non-redundant database derived from the 600,000+ viral sequences in GenBank organized into 4080 taxa. An individual read successfully aligned to the viral database was considered to be a "hit". Normalized MS specimen hit rates for each viral taxon were compared to the distribution of hits in the normal controls. Seventeen MS and 11 control brain extracts were sequenced, yielding 4-10 million sequences ("reads" each. Over-representation of sequence from at least one of 12 viral taxa was observed in 7 of the 17 MS samples. Sequences resembling other viruses previously implicated in the pathogenesis of MS were not significantly enriched in any of the diseased brain specimens. Sequences from GB virus C (GBV-C, a flavivirus not previously isolated from brain, were enriched in one of the MS samples. GBV-C in this brain specimen was confirmed by specific amplification in this single MS brain specimen, but not in the 30 other MS brain samples available. The entire 9.4 kb sequence of this GBV-C isolate is reported here. This study shows the feasibility of deep sequencing for the detection of occult viral infections in the brains of deceased persons with MS. The first isolation of GBV-C from human brain is reported here.

  8. A comprehensive approach to the segmentation of multichannel three-dimensional MR brain images in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Sushmita; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate classification and quantification of brain tissues is important for monitoring disease progression, measurement of atrophy, and correlating magnetic resonance (MR) measures with clinical disability. Classification of MR brain images in the presence of lesions, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), is particularly challenging. Images obtained with lower resolution often suffer from partial volume averaging leading to false classifications. While partial volume averaging can be reduced by a...

  9. a Computational Model for Lesion Dynamics in Multiple Sclerosis of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, T. R. Krishna; Sen, Surajit; Ramanathan, Murali

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disabling disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is characterized by lesions with inflammatory cells, axons with the insulating myelin sheath damaged, and axonal loss. The causes of MS are not known and there is as yet no cure. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a physically motivated network model for lesion formation in the brain. The parsimonious network model contained two elements: (i) a spatially spreading pathological process causing cell damage and death leading to neuro-degeneration and, (ii) generation of alarm signals by the damaged cells that lead to activation of programmed death of cells surrounding the lesions in an attempt to contain the spatial spread of the pathologic process. Simulation results with a range of network geometries indicated that the model was capable of describing lesion progression and arrest. The modeling results also demonstrated dynamical complexity with sensitivity to initial conditions.

  10. A New Method for Segmentation of Multiple Sclerosis (MS Lesions on Brain MR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Jafari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Automatic segmentation of multiple sclerosis (MS lesions in brain MRI has been widely investigated in recent years with the goal of helping MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. In this study we applied gaussian mixture model (GMM to segment MS lesions in MR images. Usually, GMM is optimized using expectation-maximization (EM algorithm. One of the drawbacks of this optimization method is that, it does not convergence to optimal maximum or minimum. Starting from different initial points and saving best result, is a strategy which is used to reach the near optimal. This approach is time consuming and we used another way to initiate the EM algorithm. Also, FAST- Trimmed Likelihood Estimator (FAST-TLE algorithm was applied to determine which voxels should be rejected. The automatically segmentation outputs were scored by two specialists and the results show that our method has capability to segment the MS lesions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC score of 0.82.

  11. Motor Imagery Learning Modulates Functional Connectivity of Multiple Brain Systems in Resting State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Background Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning. PMID:24465577

  12. Motor imagery learning modulates functional connectivity of multiple brain systems in resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning.

  13. Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: neural correlates and the role of non-invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa A. Chalah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and the major cause of non-traumatic disability in young adults. Fatigue is a frequent symptom reported by the majority of MS patients during their disease course and drastically af-fects their quality of life. Despite its significant prevalence and impact, the underlying patho-physiological mechanisms are not well elucidated. MS fatigue is still considered the result of multifactorial and complex constellations, and is commonly classified into primary fatigue related to the pathological changes of the disease itself, and secondary fatigue attributed to mimicking symptoms, comorbid sleep and mood disorders, and medications side effects. Data from neuroimaging, neurophysiology, neuroendocrine and neuroimmune studies have raised hypotheses regarding the origin of this symptom, some of which have succeeded in identifying an association between MS fatigue and structural or functional abnormalities within various brain networks. Hence, the aim of this work is to reappraise the neural correlates of MS fatigue and to discuss the rationale for the emergent use of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques as potential treatments. This will include a presentation of the various NIBS modalities and a proposition of their potential mechanisms of action in this context. Specific issues related to the value of transcranial direct current stimulation will be addressed.

  14. Neuroaxonal regeneration is more pronounced in early multiple sclerosis than in traumatic brain injury lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Lucas; Merkler, Doron; König, Fatima B; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The extent of irreversible neuroaxonal damage is the key determinant of permanent disability in traumatic and inflammatory conditions of the central nervous system (CNS). Structural damage is nevertheless in part compensated by neuroplastic events. However, it is unknown whether the same kinetics and mechanisms of neuroaxonal de- and regeneration take place in inflammatory and traumatic conditions. We analyzed neuroaxonal degeneration and plasticity in early multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Neuroaxonal degeneration identified by the presence of SMI31+ chromatolytic neurons and SMI32+ axonal profiles were characteristic features of leukocortical TBI lesions. Axonal transport disturbances as determined by amyloid precursor protein (APP)+ spheroids were present in both TBI and MS lesions to a similar degree. Neurons expressing growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) and synaptophysin (Syn) were found under both pathological conditions. However, axonal swellings immunopositive for GAP43 and Syn clearly prevailed in subcortical MS lesions, suggesting a higher regenerative potential in MS. In this context, GAP43+/APP+ axonal spheroid ratios correlated with macrophage infiltration in TBI and MS lesions, supporting the idea that phagocyte activation might promote neuroplastic events. Furthermore, axonal GAP43+ and Syn+ swellings correlated with prolonged survival after TBI, indicating a sustained regenerative response. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  15. Hierarchical brain tissue segmentation and its application in multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tianhu; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Moonis, Gul; Schwartz, Eric; Balcer, Laura

    2005-04-01

    Based on Fuzzy Connectedness (FC) object delineation principles and algorithms, a hierarchical brain tissue segmentation technique has been developed for MR images. After MR image background intensity inhomogeneity correction and intensity standardization, three FC objects for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM) are generated via FC object delineation, and an intracranial (IC) mask is created via morphological operations. Then, the IC mask is decomposed into parenchymal (BP) and CSF masks, while the BP mask is separated into WM and GM masks. WM mask is further divided into pure and dirty white matter masks (PWM and DWM). In Multiple Sclerosis studies, a severe white matter lesion (LS) mask is defined from DWM mask. Based on the segmented brain tissue images, a histogram-based method has been developed to find disease-specific, image-based quantitative markers for characterizing the macromolecular manifestation of the two diseases. These same procedures have been applied to 65 MS (46 patients and 19 normal subjects) and 25 AD (15 patients and 10 normal subjects) data sets, each of which consists of FSE PD- and T2-weighted MR images. Histograms representing standardized PD and T2 intensity distributions and their numerical parameters provide an effective means for characterizing the two diseases. The procedures are systematic, nearly automated, robust, and the results are reproducible.

  16. Serotonin: A mediator of the gut-brain axis in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Tsveta S; Dijkstra, Christine D; de Vries, Helga E

    2017-11-01

    The significance of the gut microbiome for the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been established, although the underlying signaling mechanisms of this interaction have not been sufficiently explored. We address this point and use serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT))-a microbial-modulated neurotransmitter (NT) as a showcase to demonstrate that NTs regulated by the gut microbiome are potent candidates for mediators of the gut-brain axis in demyelinating disorders. Methods, Results, and Conclusion: Our comprehensive overview of literature provides evidence that 5-HT levels in the gut are controlled by the microbiome, both via secretion and through regulation of metabolites. In addition, we demonstrate that the gut microbiome can influence the formation of the serotonergic system (SS) in the brain. We also show that SS alterations have been related to MS directly-altered expression of 5-HT transporters in central nervous system (CNS) and indirectly-beneficial effects of 5-HT modulating drugs on the course of the disease and higher prevalence of depression in patients with MS. Finally, we discuss briefly the role of other microbiome-modulated NTs such as γ-aminobutyric acid and dopamine in MS to highlight a new direction for future research aiming to relate microbiome-regulated NTs to demyelinating disorders.

  17. Combining multiple features for error detection and its application in brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jijun; Lin, Qinguang; Xiao, Ran; Ding, Lei

    2016-02-04

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is an assistive technology that conveys users' intentions by decoding various brain activities and translating them into control commands, without the need of verbal instructions and/or physical interactions. However, errors existing in BCI systems affect their performance greatly, which in turn confines the development and application of BCI technology. It has been demonstrated viable to extract error potential from electroencephalography recordings. This study proposed a new approach of fusing multiple-channel features from temporal, spectral, and spatial domains through two times of dimensionality reduction based on neural network. 26 participants (13 males, mean age = 28.8 ± 5.4, range 20-37) took part in the study, who engaged in a P300 speller task spelling cued words from a 36-character matrix. In order to evaluate the generalization ability across subjects, the data from 16 participants were used for training and the rest for testing. The total classification accuracy with combination of features is 76.7 %. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and area under ROC curve (AUC) further indicate the superior performance of the combination of features over any single features in error detection. The average AUC reaches 0.7818 with combined features, while 0.7270, 0.6376, 0.7330 with single temporal, spectral, and spatial features respectively. The proposed method combining multiple-channel features from temporal, spectral, and spatial domain has better classification performance than any individual feature alone. It has good generalization ability across subject and provides a way of improving error detection, which could serve as promising feedbacks to promote the performance of BCI systems.

  18. Multiple blood-brain barrier transport mechanisms limit bumetanide accumulation, and therapeutic potential, in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren; Hampel, Philip; Kaczmarek, Edith; Töllner, Kathrin; Erker, Thomas; Sweet, Douglas H; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence that bumetanide, which has been used over decades as a potent loop diuretic, also exerts effects on brain disorders, including autism, neonatal seizures, and epilepsy, which are not related to its effects on the kidney but rather mediated by inhibition of the neuronal Na-K-Cl cotransporter isoform NKCC1. However, following systemic administration, brain levels of bumetanide are typically below those needed to inhibit NKCC1, which critically limits its clinical use for treating brain disorders. Recently, active efflux transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been suggested as a process involved in the low brain:plasma ratio of bumetanide, but it is presently not clear which transporters are involved. Understanding the processes explaining the poor brain penetration of bumetanide is needed for developing strategies to improve the brain delivery of this drug. In the present study, we administered probenecid and more selective inhibitors of active transport carriers at the BBB directly into the brain of mice to minimize the contribution of peripheral effects on the brain penetration of bumetanide. Furthermore, in vitro experiments with mouse organic anion transporter 3 (Oat3)-overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary cells were performed to study the interaction of bumetanide, bumetanide derivatives, and several known inhibitors of Oats on Oat3-mediated transport. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that the uptake and efflux of bumetanide at the BBB is much more complex than previously thought. It seems that both restricted passive diffusion and active efflux transport, mediated by Oat3 but also organic anion-transporting polypeptide (Oatp) Oatp1a4 and multidrug resistance protein 4 explain the extremely low brain concentrations that are achieved after systemic administration of bumetanide, limiting the use of this drug for targeting abnormal expression of neuronal NKCC1 in brain diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Metabolic resting-state brain networks in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Ko, Ji Hyun; Tang, Chris C; Nazem, Amir; Sako, Wataru; Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-02-24

    The delineation of resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain relies on the analysis of temporal fluctuations in functional MRI signal, representing a small fraction of total neuronal activity. Here, we used metabolic PET, which maps nonfluctuating signals related to total activity, to identify and validate reproducible RSN topographies in healthy and disease populations. In healthy subjects, the dominant (first component) metabolic RSN was topographically similar to the default mode network (DMN). In contrast, in Parkinson's disease (PD), this RSN was subordinated to an independent disease-related pattern. Network functionality was assessed by quantifying metabolic RSN expression in cerebral blood flow PET scans acquired at rest and during task performance. Consistent task-related deactivation of the "DMN-like" dominant metabolic RSN was observed in healthy subjects and early PD patients; in contrast, the subordinate RSNs were activated during task performance. Network deactivation was reduced in advanced PD; this abnormality was partially corrected by dopaminergic therapy. Time-course comparisons of DMN loss in longitudinal resting metabolic scans from PD and Alzheimer's disease subjects illustrated that significant reductions appeared later for PD, in parallel with the development of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, in Alzheimer's disease significant reductions in network expression were already present at diagnosis, progressing over time. Metabolic imaging can directly provide useful information regarding the resting organization of the brain in health and disease.

  20. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  2. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among correctional health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhasz, James E

    2013-04-01

    This study explored the prevalence of misconceptions of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among a sample of correctional health care professionals. Prior research has identified a high prevalence of TBI among criminal offenders, and misconceptions about TBI exist among laypersons and nonexpert professionals. Participants (N = 155) completed a 25-item survey about the sequelae of TBI. Results were compared with previous studies. This sample performed significantly better than laypersons and commensurable to other nonexpert professionals. Misconceptions were higher on items related to loss of consciousness, memory, and recovery. Gender, prior familiarity to someone with a history of TBI, and prior training in TBI accounted for statistically fewer misconceptions. The findings support the need for continued training and increased awareness about TBI among inmates.

  3. Beauty, brains or health: trends in ovum recipient preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Homero; Lee, Joseph; Rodriguez-Purata, Jorge; Witkin, Georgia; Sandler, Benjamin; Copperman, Alan B

    2014-10-01

    What do ovum donation (OD) recipients request most from their ideal donor: beauty, brains, health or physical self-resemblance? Previous data have shown recipients primarily requested "similar appearance or gene pool." We consider the possibility that these criteria may have changed due to a positive social shift towards OD participation and have evaluated recipients' requests for donor criteria over a span of 5 years. Donor trait preferences of OD recipients (n=438) enrolled in a private, academic OD program from 2008-2012 were assessed in this retrospective cohort analysis. Requests were categorized by appearance, ethnicity, intellect, ability, and mental health. Statistical analyses were conducted by Cochran-Armitage trend tests with significance at ptrend did not reach statistical significance. Our study demonstrates an increase in the percentage of OD recipients' requests for health, athleticism, and intelligence over our 5-year analysis. It appears that the current recipient is more likely to request a donor with practical traits that would serve their offspring overall quality of life rather than self-reflective traits such as physical resemblance or their genetic composition. We believe that improved awareness and acceptance of OD as a treatment of infertility will continue to inform practical considerations and approaches toward donor recruitment and the donor-recipient matching process.

  4. Integrating Health Promotion Into Physical Therapy Practice to Improve Brain Health and Prevent Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Ellen; Kirk-Sanchez, Neva; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2017-07-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common cause of dementia, and brain pathology appears years before symptoms are evident. Primary prevention through health promotion can incorporate lifestyle improvement across the lifespan. Risk factor assessment and identifying markers of disease might also trigger preventive measures needed for high-risk individuals and groups. Many potential risk factors are modifiable through exercise, and may be responsive to early intervention strategies to reduce the downward slope toward disability. Through the use of common clinical tests to identify cognitive and noncognitive functional markers of disease, detection and intervention can occur at earlier stages, including preclinical stages of disease. Physical activity and exercise interventions to address modifiable risk factors and impairments can play a pivotal role in the prevention and delay of functional decline, ultimately reducing the incidence of dementia. This article discusses prevention, prediction, plasticity, and participation in the context of preserving brain health and preventing Alzheimer disease and related dementias in aging adults. Rehabilitation professionals have opportunities to slow disease progression through research, practice, and education initiatives. From a clinical perspective, interventions that target brain health through lifestyle changes and exercise interventions show promise for preventing stroke and associated neurovascular diseases in addition to dementia. Physical therapists are well positioned to integrate primary health promotion into practice for the prevention of dementia and other neurological conditions in older adults.

  5. The brain as a complex system: plasticity at multiple scales and criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tony; Miller, Paul

    2015-03-01

    As a complex system, a successful organism is one that can react effectively to environmental fluctuations. Not only should its response repertoire be commensurate with the number of independent conditions that it encounters, behavioral and environmental variations need to be matched at the appropriate scales. In the cortex, neuronal clusters, not individual cells, operate at the proper scale that is necessary to generate appropriate responses to external states of the world. Single neurons, however, serve on a finer scale to mediate interactions between neuronal assemblies. The distinction of scales is significant, as plasticity mechanisms can operate on various spatial and temporal scales. The brain has apparently evolved complex-system strategies to calibrate its own dynamics at multiple scales. This makes the joint study of local balance and global homeostasis fundamentally important, where criticality emerges as a signature of a computationally powerful system. We show via simulations how plasticity mechanisms at multiple scales are inextricably tied to spike-based neuronal avalanches, which are microscopic in origin and poorly predictive of animal behavior, and cluster-based avalanches, which are manifest macroscopically and are relevant to cognition and behavior.

  6. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yun Mi [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Nine patients with multiple ({>=}4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10- 12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application.

  7. Iran's Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey - 2010: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Arash; Karimi-Shahanjarini, Akram; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Elahi, Elham; Beheshtian, Maryam; Shakibazadeh, Elham; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad; Zakeri, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-05-01

    There is an international emphasis on providing timely and high quality data to monitor progress of countries toward Millennium Development Goals. Iran's Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey (IrMIDHS) aimed to provide valid information on population and health outcomes to monitor progress in achieving national priorities and health programs and to assist policy makers to design effective strategies for improving health outcomes and equity in access to care. A cross-sectional multi-stage stratified cluster-random survey is conducted through face-to-face household interviews. The sampling frame is developed using Iran's 2006 population and housing census. Provincial samples ranging are from a minimum of 400 households per province to 6400 households in Tehran province. Cluster size is 10 households. The target sample includes 3096 clusters: 2187 clusters in urban and 909 clusters in rural areas. IrMIDHS instruments include three questionnaires: Household questionnaire, women aged 15-54 questionnaire, children under five questionnaire, supervision and quality assessment checklists and data collection sheets and standard weight and height measurement tools for under-five children. A cascading decentralized training method is used for training data collection and supervision teams. Quality assurance procedures are defined for the five steps of conducting the survey including: Sampling, training data collection and training teams, survey implementation, data entry and analysis. A multi-layer supervision and monitoring procedure is established. All the questionnaires are double entered. IrMIDHS will provide valuable data for policymakers in Iran. Designing and implementation of the study involve contributions from academics as well as program managers and policy makers. The collaborative nature of the study may facilitate better usage of its results.

  8. Risk distribution across multiple health insurance funds in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomi, Eunice Nahyuha; Mujinja, Phares Gamba; Enemark, Ulrika; Hansen, Kristian; Kiwara, Angwara Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Multiple insurance funds serving different population groups may compromise equity due to differential revenue raising capacity and an unequal distribution of high risk members among the funds. This occurs when the funds exist without mechanisms in place to promote income and risk cross-subsidisation across the funds. This paper analyses whether the risk distribution varies across the Community Health Fund (CHF) and National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) in two districts in Tanzania. Specifically we aim to 1) identify risk factors associated with increased utilisation of health services and 2) compare the distribution of identified risk factors among the CHF, NHIF and non-member households. Data was collected from a survey of 695 households. A multivariate logisitic regression model was used to identify risk factors for increased health care utilisation. Chi-square tests were performed to test whether the distribution of identified risk factors varied across the CHF, NHIF and non-member households. There was a higher concentration of identified risk factors among CHF households compared to those of the NHIF. Non-member households have a similar wealth status to CHF households, but a lower concentration of identified risk factors. Mechanisms for broader risk spreading and cross-subsidisation across the funds are necessary for the promotion of equity. These include risk equalisation to adjust for differential risk distribution and revenue raising capacity of the funds. Expansion of CHF coverage is equally important, by addressing non-financial barriers to CHF enrolment to encourage wealthy non-members to join, as well as subsidised membership for the poorest.

  9. Multiple frequencies sequential coding for SSVEP-based brain-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangsong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP-based brain-computer interface (BCI has become one of the most promising modalities for a practical noninvasive BCI system. Owing to both the limitation of refresh rate of liquid crystal display (LCD or cathode ray tube (CRT monitor, and the specific physiological response property that only a very small number of stimuli at certain frequencies could evoke strong SSVEPs, the available frequencies for SSVEP stimuli are limited. Therefore, it may not be enough to code multiple targets with the traditional frequencies coding protocols, which poses a big challenge for the design of a practical SSVEP-based BCI. This study aimed to provide an innovative coding method to tackle this problem. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we present a novel protocol termed multiple frequencies sequential coding (MFSC for SSVEP-based BCI. In MFSC, multiple frequencies are sequentially used in each cycle to code the targets. To fulfill the sequential coding, each cycle is divided into several coding epochs, and during each epoch, certain frequency is used. Obviously, different frequencies or the same frequency can be presented in the coding epochs, and the different epoch sequence corresponds to the different targets. To show the feasibility of MFSC, we used two frequencies to realize four targets and carried on an offline experiment. The current study shows that: 1 MFSC is feasible and efficient; 2 the performance of SSVEP-based BCI based on MFSC can be comparable to some existed systems. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed protocol could potentially implement much more targets with the limited available frequencies compared with the traditional frequencies coding protocol. The efficiency of the new protocol was confirmed by real data experiment. We propose that the SSVEP-based BCI under MFSC might be a promising choice in the future.

  10. P08.23MULTIPLE CALCIFIED BRAIN METASTASES IN A MALE PATIENT WITH INVASIVE DUCTAL BREAST CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Ressl, N.; Haindl, M.; Schenk, T.; Ungersboeck, K.; Sedivy, R.; Oberndorfer, S.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer in men is a rare disease and accounts for 1.6% of all malignancies of the breast. We report a case of a 51-year-old man with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast with multiple calcified brain metastases. After modified radical mastectomy he received adjuvant chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin, hormonal therapy and trastuzumab. About one year after initial diagnosis he developed a generalized epileptic seizure. Neuroradiological imaging (MRI) revealed multiple ...

  11. Evaluation of health-related quality of life in Lithuanian brain tumor patients using the EORTC brain cancer module

    OpenAIRE

    Bunevičius, Adomas; Tamašauskas, Šarūnas; Tamašauskas, Arimantas; Deltuva, Vytenis Pranas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is considered an important outcome measure in neuro-oncology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the brain cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-BN20) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) in Lithuanian brain tumor patients. Material and Methods. One hundred consecutive patients (71% of women; mean age, 58±14 years) admitted for elective brain tum...

  12. The Role of Exercise-Induced Cardiovascular Adaptation in Brain Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Regular aerobic exercise improves brain health; however, a potential dose-response relationship and the underling physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Existing data support the following hypotheses: 1) exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation plays an important role in improving brain perfusion, structure, and function, and 2) a hormetic relation seems to exist between the intensity of exercise and brain health, which needs to be further elucidated.

  13. Gut Microbiome and Infant Health: Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Host Genetic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Romisher, Rachael; Poveda, Samantha; Forte, Shaina; Starkweather, Angela; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-09-01

    The development of the neonatal gut microbiome is influenced by multiple factors, such as delivery mode, feeding, medication use, hospital environment, early life stress, and genetics. The dysbiosis of gut microbiota persists during infancy, especially in high-risk preterm infants who experience lengthy stays in the Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant microbiome evolutionary trajectory is essentially parallel with the host (infant) neurodevelopmental process and growth. The role of the gut microbiome, the brain-gut signaling system, and its interaction with the host genetics have been shown to be related to both short and long term infant health and bio-behavioral development. The investigation of potential dysbiosis patterns in early childhood is still lacking and few studies have addressed this host-microbiome co-developmental process. Further research spanning a variety of fields of study is needed to focus on the mechanisms of brain-gut-microbiota signaling system and the dynamic host-microbial interaction in the regulation of health, stress and development in human newborns.

  14. Recommendations to improve imaging and analysis of brain lesion load and atrophy in longitudinal studies of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrenken, H.; Jenkinson, M.; Horsfield, M.A.; Battaglini, M.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Rostrup, E.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Fisher, E.; Zijdenbos, A.; Ashburner, J.; Miller, D. H.; Filippi, M.; Fazekas, F.; Rovaris, M.; Rovira, A.; Barkhof, F.; De Stefano, N.

    2013-01-01

    Focal lesions and brain atrophy are the most extensively studied aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the image acquisition and analysis techniques used can be further improved, especially those for studying within-patient changes of lesion load and atrophy longitudinally. Improved accuracy and

  15. Mean upper cervical cord area (MUCCA) measurement in long-standing multiple sclerosis: Relation to brain findings and clinical disability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daams, M.; Weiler, F.; Steenwijk, M.D.; Hahn, H.K.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Vrenken, H.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Balk, L.J.; Tewarie, P.; Tillema, J.M.; Killestein, J.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Barkhof, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The majority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) present with spinal cord pathology. Spinal cord atrophy is thought to be a marker of disease severity, but in long-disease duration its relation to brain pathology and clinical disability is largely unknown. Objective: Our aim was to

  16. CX(3)CL1 and CX(3)CR1 expression in human brain tissue : Noninflammatory control versus multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Haastert, ES; Kuipers, HF; Van Den Elsen, PJ; De Groot, CJ; Van Der Valk, P; Ravid, R; Biber, K

    An important role for CX(3)CL1 in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration has been suggested in recent publications. In this study, we compared the expression of CX(3)CL1 and its receptor CX(3)CR1 in human brain tissue derived from control patients without neurological complications and in multiple

  17. Efficacy and toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy in patients with multiple cerebral metastases from malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauswald Henrik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To retrospectively access outcome and toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT in patients with multiple brain metastases (BM from malignant melanoma (MM. Patients and methods Results of 87 patients (median age 58 years; 35 female, 52 male treated by WBRT for BM of MM between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed. Total dose applied was either 30 Gy in 10 fractions (n = 56 or 40 Gy in 20 fractions (n = 31. All but 9 patients suffered from extra-cerebral metastases. Prior surgical resection of BM was performed in 18 patients, salvage stereotactic radiosurgery in 13 patients. Results Mean follow-up was 8 months (range, 0–57 months, the 6- and 12-months overall-(OS survival rates were 29.2% and 16.5%, respectively. The median OS was 3.5 months. In cerebral follow-up imaging 6 (11 patients showed a complete (partial remission, while 11 (17 patients had stable disease (intra-cerebral tumor progression. In comparison of total dose, the group treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions achieved a significant longer OS (p = 0.003, median 3.1 vs. 5.6 months. Furthermore, DS-GPA score (p  Conclusion Treatment of BM from MM with WBRT is tolerated well and some remissions of BM could be achieved. An advantage for higher treatment total doses was seen. However, outcome is non-satisfying, and further improvements in treatment of BM from MM are warranted.

  18. Fingolimod prevents blood-brain barrier disruption induced by the sera from patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Nishihara

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Effect of fingolimod in multiple sclerosis (MS is thought to involve the prevention of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid tissues, thereby reducing autoaggressive lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system across blood-brain barrier (BBB. However, brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs represent a possible additional target for fingolimod in MS patients by directly repairing the function of BBB, as S1P receptors are also expressed by BMECs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of fingolimod on BMECs and clarified whether fingolimod-phosphate restores the BBB function after exposure to MS sera. METHODS: Changes in tight junction proteins, adhesion molecules and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER in BMECs were evaluated following incubation in conditioned medium with or without fingolimod/fingolimod-phosphate. In addition, the effects of sera derived from MS patients, including those in the relapse phase of relapse-remitting (RR MS, stable phase of RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS, on the function of BBB in the presence of fingolimod-phosphate were assessed. RESULTS: Incubation with fingolimod-phosphate increased the claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in BMECs, although it did not change the amount of occludin, ICAM-1 or MelCAM proteins. Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate restored the changes in the claudin-5 and VCAM-1 protein/mRNA levels and TEER values in BMECs after exposure to MS sera. CONCLUSIONS: Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate prevents BBB disruption caused by both RRMS and SPMS sera via the upregulation of claudin-5 and downregulation of VCAM-1 in BMECs, suggesting that fingolimod-phosphate is capable of directly modifying the BBB. BMECs represent a possible therapeutic target for fingolimod in MS patients.

  19. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  20. Context, emotion, and the strategic pursuit of goals: interactions among multiple brain systems controlling motivated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Aaron J; McDonald, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Motivated behavior exhibits properties that change with experience and partially dissociate among a number of brain structures. Here, we review evidence from rodent experiments demonstrating that multiple brain systems acquire information in parallel and either cooperate or compete for behavioral control. We propose a conceptual model of systems interaction wherein a ventral emotional memory network involving ventral striatum (VS), amygdala, ventral hippocampus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex triages behavioral responding to stimuli according to their associated affective outcomes. This system engages autonomic and postural responding (avoiding, ignoring, approaching) in accordance with associated stimulus valence (negative, neutral, positive), but does not engage particular operant responses. Rather, this emotional system suppresses or invigorates actions that are selected through competition between goal-directed control involving dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and habitual control involving dorsolateral striatum (DLS). The hippocampus provides contextual specificity to the emotional system, and provides an information rich input to the goal-directed system for navigation and discriminations involving ambiguous contexts, complex sensory configurations, or temporal ordering. The rapid acquisition and high capacity for episodic associations in the emotional system may unburden the more complex goal-directed system and reduce interference in the habit system from processing contingencies of neutral stimuli. Interactions among these systems likely involve inhibitory mechanisms and neuromodulation in the striatum to form a dominant response strategy. Innate traits, training methods, and task demands contribute to the nature of these interactions, which can include incidental learning in non-dominant systems. Addition of these features to reinforcement learning models of decision-making may better align theoretical predictions with behavioral and neural correlates in

  1. Quantifying brain tissue volume in multiple sclerosis with automated lesion segmentation and filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Valverde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lesion filling has been successfully applied to reduce the effect of hypo-intense T1-w Multiple Sclerosis (MS lesions on automatic brain tissue segmentation. However, a study of fully automated pipelines incorporating lesion segmentation and lesion filling on tissue volume analysis has not yet been performed. Here, we analyzed the % of error introduced by automating the lesion segmentation and filling processes in the tissue segmentation of 70 clinically isolated syndrome patient images. First of all, images were processed using the LST and SLS toolkits with different pipeline combinations that differed in either automated or manual lesion segmentation, and lesion filling or masking out lesions. Then, images processed following each of the pipelines were segmented into gray matter (GM and white matter (WM using SPM8, and compared with the same images where expert lesion annotations were filled before segmentation. Our results showed that fully automated lesion segmentation and filling pipelines reduced significantly the % of error in GM and WM volume on images of MS patients, and performed similarly to the images where expert lesion annotations were masked before segmentation. In all the pipelines, the amount of misclassified lesion voxels was the main cause in the observed error in GM and WM volume. However, the % of error was significantly lower when automatically estimated lesions were filled and not masked before segmentation. These results are relevant and suggest that LST and SLS toolboxes allow the performance of accurate brain tissue volume measurements without any kind of manual intervention, which can be convenient not only in terms of time and economic costs, but also to avoid the inherent intra/inter variability between manual annotations.

  2. Automatic segmentation and volumetry of multiple sclerosis brain lesions from MR images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The location and extent of white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are important criteria for diagnosis, follow-up and prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS. Clinical trials have shown that quantitative values, such as lesion volumes, are meaningful in MS prognosis. Manual lesion delineation for the segmentation of lesions is, however, time-consuming and suffers from observer variability. In this paper, we propose MSmetrix, an accurate and reliable automatic method for lesion segmentation based on MRI, independent of scanner or acquisition protocol and without requiring any training data. In MSmetrix, 3D T1-weighted and FLAIR MR images are used in a probabilistic model to detect white matter (WM lesions as an outlier to normal brain while segmenting the brain tissue into grey matter, WM and cerebrospinal fluid. The actual lesion segmentation is performed based on prior knowledge about the location (within WM and the appearance (hyperintense on FLAIR of lesions. The accuracy of MSmetrix is evaluated by comparing its output with expert reference segmentations of 20 MRI datasets of MS patients. Spatial overlap (Dice between the MSmetrix and the expert lesion segmentation is 0.67 ± 0.11. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC equals 0.8 indicating a good volumetric agreement between the MSmetrix and expert labelling. The reproducibility of MSmetrix' lesion volumes is evaluated based on 10 MS patients, scanned twice with a short interval on three different scanners. The agreement between the first and the second scan on each scanner is evaluated through the spatial overlap and absolute lesion volume difference between them. The spatial overlap was 0.69 ± 0.14 and absolute total lesion volume difference between the two scans was 0.54 ± 0.58 ml. Finally, the accuracy and reproducibility of MSmetrix compare favourably with other publicly available MS lesion segmentation algorithms, applied on the same data using default

  3. Automatic segmentation and volumetry of multiple sclerosis brain lesions from MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Sima, Diana M; Ribbens, Annemie; Cambron, Melissa; Maertens, Anke; Van Hecke, Wim; De Mey, Johan; Barkhof, Frederik; Steenwijk, Martijn D; Daams, Marita; Maes, Frederik; Van Huffel, Sabine; Vrenken, Hugo; Smeets, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The location and extent of white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important criteria for diagnosis, follow-up and prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Clinical trials have shown that quantitative values, such as lesion volumes, are meaningful in MS prognosis. Manual lesion delineation for the segmentation of lesions is, however, time-consuming and suffers from observer variability. In this paper, we propose MSmetrix, an accurate and reliable automatic method for lesion segmentation based on MRI, independent of scanner or acquisition protocol and without requiring any training data. In MSmetrix, 3D T1-weighted and FLAIR MR images are used in a probabilistic model to detect white matter (WM) lesions as an outlier to normal brain while segmenting the brain tissue into grey matter, WM and cerebrospinal fluid. The actual lesion segmentation is performed based on prior knowledge about the location (within WM) and the appearance (hyperintense on FLAIR) of lesions. The accuracy of MSmetrix is evaluated by comparing its output with expert reference segmentations of 20 MRI datasets of MS patients. Spatial overlap (Dice) between the MSmetrix and the expert lesion segmentation is 0.67 ± 0.11. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) equals 0.8 indicating a good volumetric agreement between the MSmetrix and expert labelling. The reproducibility of MSmetrix' lesion volumes is evaluated based on 10 MS patients, scanned twice with a short interval on three different scanners. The agreement between the first and the second scan on each scanner is evaluated through the spatial overlap and absolute lesion volume difference between them. The spatial overlap was 0.69 ± 0.14 and absolute total lesion volume difference between the two scans was 0.54 ± 0.58 ml. Finally, the accuracy and reproducibility of MSmetrix compare favourably with other publicly available MS lesion segmentation algorithms, applied on the same data using default parameter

  4. Evaluating intensity normalization on MRIs of human brain with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohak; Xiao, Yiming; Subbanna, Nagesh; Francis, Simon; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2011-04-01

    Intensity normalization is an important pre-processing step in the study and analysis of Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of human brains. As most parametric supervised automatic image segmentation and classification methods base their assumptions regarding the intensity distributions on a standardized intensity range, intensity normalization takes on a very significant role. One of the fast and accurate approaches proposed for intensity normalization is that of Nyul and colleagues. In this work, we present, for the first time, an extensive validation of this approach in real clinical domain where even after intensity inhomogeneity correction that accounts for scanner-specific artifacts, the MRI volumes can be affected from variations such as data heterogeneity resulting from multi-site multi-scanner acquisitions, the presence of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and the stage of disease progression in the brain. Using the distributional divergence criteria, we evaluate the effectiveness of the normalization in rendering, under the distributional assumptions of segmentation approaches, intensities that are more homogenous for the same tissue type while simultaneously resulting in better tissue type separation. We also demonstrate the advantage of the decile based piece-wise linear approach on the task of MS lesion segmentation against a linear normalization approach over three image segmentation algorithms: a standard Bayesian classifier, an outlier detection based approach and a Bayesian classifier with Markov Random Field (MRF) based post-processing. Finally, to demonstrate the independence of the effectiveness of normalization from the complexity of segmentation algorithm, we evaluate the Nyul method against the linear normalization on Bayesian algorithms of increasing complexity including a standard Bayesian classifier with Maximum Likelihood parameter estimation and a Bayesian classifier with integrated data priors, in addition to the above Bayesian classifier

  5. Fat-saturated post gadolinium T1 imaging of the brain in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saeed, Osama; Sheikh, Mehraj (Dept. of Radiology, Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait)), email: osamas@hsc.edu.kw; Ismail, Mohammed (Ibn Sina Hospital (Kuwait)); Athyal, Reji (Amiri Hospital (Kuwait))

    2011-06-15

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of vital importance in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Imaging sequences better demonstrating enhancing lesions can help in detecting active MS plaques. Purpose To evaluate the role of fat-saturated gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) images of the brain in MS and to assess the benefit of performing this additional sequence in the detection of enhancing lesions. Material and Methods In a prospective study over a six-month period, 70 consecutive patients with clinically diagnosed MS were enrolled. These constituted 14 male and 56 female patients between the ages of 21 and 44 years. All the patients underwent brain MRIs on a 1.5 Tesla Magnet. Gadolinium-enhanced T1 images with and without fat saturation were compared and results were recorded and analyzed using a conspicuity score and McNemar test. Results There were a total of 157 lesions detected in 70 patients on post-contrast T1W fat-saturated images compared with 139 lesions seen on the post-contrast T1W fast spin-echo (FSE) images. This was because 18 of the lesions (11.5%) were only seen on the fat-saturated images. In addition, 15 lesions were more conspicuous on the fat saturation sequence (9.5%). The total conspicuity score obtained, including all the lesions, was 2.24 +/-0.60 (SD). Using the two-tailed McNemar test for quantitative analysis, the P value obtained was <0.0001. Conclusion T1W fat-saturated gadolinium-enhanced images show better lesion enhancement than T1W images without fat saturation

  6. Quantifying brain tissue volume in multiple sclerosis with automated lesion segmentation and filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Sergi; Oliver, Arnau; Roura, Eloy; Pareto, Deborah; Vilanova, Joan C; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Montalban, Xavier; Rovira, Àlex; Lladó, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Lesion filling has been successfully applied to reduce the effect of hypo-intense T1-w Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions on automatic brain tissue segmentation. However, a study of fully automated pipelines incorporating lesion segmentation and lesion filling on tissue volume analysis has not yet been performed. Here, we analyzed the % of error introduced by automating the lesion segmentation and filling processes in the tissue segmentation of 70 clinically isolated syndrome patient images. First of all, images were processed using the LST and SLS toolkits with different pipeline combinations that differed in either automated or manual lesion segmentation, and lesion filling or masking out lesions. Then, images processed following each of the pipelines were segmented into gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) using SPM8, and compared with the same images where expert lesion annotations were filled before segmentation. Our results showed that fully automated lesion segmentation and filling pipelines reduced significantly the % of error in GM and WM volume on images of MS patients, and performed similarly to the images where expert lesion annotations were masked before segmentation. In all the pipelines, the amount of misclassified lesion voxels was the main cause in the observed error in GM and WM volume. However, the % of error was significantly lower when automatically estimated lesions were filled and not masked before segmentation. These results are relevant and suggest that LST and SLS toolboxes allow the performance of accurate brain tissue volume measurements without any kind of manual intervention, which can be convenient not only in terms of time and economic costs, but also to avoid the inherent intra/inter variability between manual annotations.

  7. Iron-related gene variants and brain iron in multiple sclerosis and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemeier, Jesper; Ramanathan, Murali; Schweser, Ferdinand; Dwyer, Michael G; Lin, Fuchun; Bergsland, Niels; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Zivadinov, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Brain iron homeostasis is known to be disturbed in multiple sclerosis (MS), yet little is known about the association of common gene variants linked to iron regulation and pathological tissue changes in the brain. In this study, we investigated the association of genetic determinants linked to iron regulation with deep gray matter (GM) magnetic susceptibility in both healthy controls (HC) and MS patients. Four hundred (400) patients with MS and 150 age- and sex-matched HCs were enrolled and obtained 3 T MRI examination. Three (3) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with iron regulation were genotyped: two SNPs in the human hereditary hemochromatosis protein gene HFE : rs1800562 (C282Y mutation) and rs1799945 (H63D mutation), as well as the rs1049296 SNP in the transferrin gene (C2 mutation). The effects of disease and genetic status were studied using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) voxel-based analysis (VBA) and region-of-interest (ROI) analysis of the deep GM. The general linear model framework was used to compare groups. Analyses were corrected for age and sex, and adjusted for false discovery rate. We found moderate increases in susceptibility in the right putamen of participants with the C282Y (+ 6.1 ppb) and H63D (+ 6.9 ppb) gene variants vs. non-carriers, as well as a decrease in thalamic susceptibility of progressive MS patients with the C282Y mutation (left: - 5.3 ppb, right: - 6.7 ppb, p < 0.05). Female MS patients had lower susceptibility in the caudate (- 6.0 ppb) and putamen (left: - 3.9 ppb, right: - 4.6 ppb) than men, but only when they had a wild-type allele (p < 0.05). Iron-gene linked increases in putamen susceptibility (in HC and relapsing remitting MS) and decreases in thalamus susceptibility (in progressive MS), coupled with apparent sex interactions, indicate that brain iron in healthy and disease states may be influenced by genetic factors.

  8. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases with Single-Isocenter VMAT: Optimizing Treatment Geometry to Reduce Normal Brain Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Snyder, K; Liu, C; Huang, Y; Li, H; Chetty, I; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an optimization algorithm to reduce normal brain dose by optimizing couch and collimator angles for single isocenter multiple targets treatment of stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Three metastatic brain lesions were retrospectively planned using single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Three matrices were developed to calculate the projection of each lesion on Beam’s Eye View (BEV) by the rotating couch, collimator and gantry respectively. The island blocking problem was addressed by computing the total area of open space between any two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. The couch and collimator angles resulting in the smallest open areas were the optimized angles for each treatment arc. Two treatment plans with and without couch and collimator angle optimization were developed using the same objective functions and to achieve 99% of each target volume receiving full prescription dose of 18Gy. Plan quality was evaluated by calculating each target’s Conformity Index (CI), Gradient Index (GI), and Homogeneity index (HI), and absolute volume of normal brain V8Gy, V10Gy, V12Gy, and V14Gy. Results: Using the new couch/collimator optimization strategy, dose to normal brain tissue was reduced substantially. V8, V10, V12, and V14 decreased by 2.3%, 3.6%, 3.5%, and 6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the conformity index, gradient index, and homogeneity index between two treatment plans with and without the new optimization algorithm. Conclusion: We have developed a solution to the island blocking problem in delivering radiation to multiple brain metastases with shared isocenter. Significant reduction in dose to normal brain was achieved by using optimal couch and collimator angles that minimize total area of open space between any of the two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. This technique has been integrated into Eclipse treatment system using scripting API.

  9. Associations between multiple health risk behaviors and mental health among Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-ling; Wang, Pei-gang; Qu, Geng-cong; Yuan, Shuai; Phongsavan, Philayrath; He, Qi-qiang

    2016-01-01

    Although there is substantial evidence that health risk behaviors increase risks of premature morbidity and mortality, little is known about the multiple health risk behaviors in Chinese college students. Here, we investigated the prevalence of multiple health risk behaviors and its relation to mental health among Chinese college students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Wuhan, China from May to June 2012. The students reported their health risk behaviors using self-administered questionnaires. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the self-rating depression scale and self-rating anxiety scale, respectively. A total of 2422 college students (1433 males) aged 19.7 ± 1.2 years were participated in the study. The prevalence of physical inactivity, sleep disturbance, poor dietary behavior, Internet addiction disorder (IAD), frequent alcohol use and current smoking was 62.0, 42.6, 29.8, 22.3, 11.6 and 9.3%, respectively. Significantly increased risks for depression and anxiety were found among students with frequent alcohol use, sleep disturbance, poor dietary behavior and IAD. Two-step cluster analysis identified two different clusters. Participants in the cluster with more unhealthy behaviors showed significantly increased risk for depression (odds ratio (OR): 2.21; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.83, 2.67) and anxiety (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.85, 2.92). This study indicates that a relatively high prevalence of multiple health risk behaviors was found among Chinese college students. Furthermore, the clustering of health risk behaviors was significantly associated with increased risks for depression and anxiety.

  10. Prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Health District III, Murcia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candeliere-Merlicco, Antonio; Valero-Delgado, Francisco; Martínez-Vidal, Salvadora; Lastres-Arias, María Del Carmen; Aparicio-Castro, Eladio; Toledo-Romero, Francisco; Villaverde-González, Ramón

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) varies throughout the world, and available epidemiological data suggest a progressively increasing prevalence of MS in Spain. The objective of this study was to calculate MS prevalence in Health District III of the autonomous community of Murcia in Spain. This is an observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study. The prevalence of MS in Health District III in the Region of Murcia, which includes the municipalities of Lorca, Totana, Águilas, Puerto Lumbreras and Aledo, was calculated from the total population (171,040 inhabitants), and among native Spanish citizens only (137,659 persons). Healthcare and demographic data were obtained from three sources: 1) OMI-AP: the local primary care computer system containing the medical records of all subscribers; 2) the medical record database of the Hospital Rafael Mendez (the single hospital in the district); and 3) the records of the AEMA III Multiple Sclerosis Association to which patients from this healthcare district belong. Data from these three sources were combined to check the accuracy and completeness of the patient records. The prevalence of MS among the general population of this district, including non-Spanish individuals, was 71.9 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI=60-85). Prevalence among the native Spanish population was 82.0 per 100,000 (95% CI=68-98). Considering prevalence by sex, it was 118.1 per 100,000 (95% CI: 95-146) in the female native Spanish population, and 45.4 per 100,000 (95% CI: 31-64) in the male native Spanish population. The prevalence in the native Spanish population in this district was calculated by sex and age (grouped by decades). A peak was observed among women aged between 20 and 29 years: 234.2 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI: 151-361). Our results suggest that the population in this healthcare district presents a risk of MS similar to that recently reported in other regions of Spain, which is higher than in previous decades. Copyright

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Concurrent Urodynamic Testing Identifies Brain Structures Involved in Micturition Cycle in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari, Rose; Karmonik, Christof; Shy, Michael; Fletcher, Sophie; Boone, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, which is common in patients with multiple sclerosis, has a significant impact on quality of life. In this study we sought to determine brain activity processes during the micturition cycle in female patients with multiple sclerosis and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. We report brain activity on functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneous urodynamic testing in 23 ambulatory female patients with multiple sclerosis. Individual functional magnetic resonance imaging activation maps at strong desire to void and at initiation of voiding were calculated and averaged at Montreal Neuroimaging Institute. Areas of significant activation were identified in these average maps. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with elicitable neurogenic detrusor overactivity or detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Group analysis of all patients at strong desire to void yielded areas of activation in regions associated with executive function (frontal gyrus), emotional regulation (cingulate gyrus) and motor control (putamen, cerebellum and precuneus). Comparison of the average change in activation between previously reported healthy controls and patients with multiple sclerosis showed predominantly stronger, more focal activation in the former and lower, more diffused activation in the latter. Patients with multiple sclerosis who had demonstrable neurogenic detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia showed a trend toward distinct brain activation at full urge and at initiation of voiding respectively. We successfully studied brain activation during the entire micturition cycle in female patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and multiple sclerosis using a concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging/urodynamic testing platform. Understanding the central neural processes involved in specific parts of micturition in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction may identify areas

  12. The gender of face stimuli is represented in multiple regions in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eKaul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Face perception in humans is mediated by activation in a network of brain areas. Conventionalunivariate fMRI data analysis has not localized differential responses to viewing male ascompared with viewing female faces within this network. We tested whether we could detectneural response patterns specific to viewing male vs. female faces in forty participants.Replicating earlier work, face stimuli evoked activation in the core (inferior occipital gyrus(IOG, fusiform gyrus (FG and superior temporal sulcus (STS, as well as extended(amygdala, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, insula (INS, and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC regionsof the face network. Multivariate pattern classification of activity within these regions revealedsuccessful decoding of gender information, significantly above chance, in the IOG, FG, STS,IFG, INS and OFC, but not in the amygdala. Multiple control regions indicated that this resultmight be restricted to face-responsive regions. Our findings suggest that gender information isdistributed across the face network and is represented in the core regions that process invariantfacial features, as well as the extended regions that process changeable aspects of faces.

  13. Revisiting Brain Atrophy and Its Relationship to Disability in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiee, Navid; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Zackowski, Kathleen M.; Farrell, Sheena K.; Harrison, Daniel M.; Newsome, Scott D.; Ratchford, John N.; Caffo, Brian S.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Pham, Dzung L.; Reich, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain atrophy is a well-accepted imaging biomarker of multiple sclerosis (MS) that partially correlates with both physical disability and cognitive impairment. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on MRI scans of 60 MS cases and 37 healthy volunteers, we measured the volumes of white matter (WM) lesions, cortical gray matter (GM), cerebral WM, caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, ventricles, and brainstem using a validated and completely automated segmentation method. We correlated these volumes with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), MS Severity Scale (MSSS), MS Functional Composite (MSFC), and quantitative measures of ankle strength and toe sensation. Normalized volumes of both cortical and subcortical GM structures were abnormally low in the MS group, whereas no abnormality was found in the volume of the cerebral WM. High physical disability was associated with low cerebral WM, thalamus, and brainstem volumes (partial correlation coefficients ∼0.3–0.4) but not with low cortical GM volume. Thalamus volumes were inversely correlated with lesion load (r = −0.36, p<0.005). Conclusion The GM is atrophic in MS. Although lower WM volume is associated with greater disability, as might be expected, WM volume was on average in the normal range. This paradoxical result might be explained by the presence of coexisting pathological processes, such as tissue damage and repair, that cause both atrophy and hypertrophy and that underlie the observed disability. PMID:22615886

  14. Revisiting brain atrophy and its relationship to disability in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Shiee

    Full Text Available Brain atrophy is a well-accepted imaging biomarker of multiple sclerosis (MS that partially correlates with both physical disability and cognitive impairment.Based on MRI scans of 60 MS cases and 37 healthy volunteers, we measured the volumes of white matter (WM lesions, cortical gray matter (GM, cerebral WM, caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, ventricles, and brainstem using a validated and completely automated segmentation method. We correlated these volumes with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS, MS Severity Scale (MSSS, MS Functional Composite (MSFC, and quantitative measures of ankle strength and toe sensation. Normalized volumes of both cortical and subcortical GM structures were abnormally low in the MS group, whereas no abnormality was found in the volume of the cerebral WM. High physical disability was associated with low cerebral WM, thalamus, and brainstem volumes (partial correlation coefficients ~0.3-0.4 but not with low cortical GM volume. Thalamus volumes were inversely correlated with lesion load (r = -0.36, p<0.005.The GM is atrophic in MS. Although lower WM volume is associated with greater disability, as might be expected, WM volume was on average in the normal range. This paradoxical result might be explained by the presence of coexisting pathological processes, such as tissue damage and repair, that cause both atrophy and hypertrophy and that underlie the observed disability.

  15. Automatic multiple sclerosis lesion detection in brain MRI by FLAIR thresholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Mariano; Oliver, Arnau; Roura, Eloy; Freixenet, Jordi; Vilanova, Joan C; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Rovira, Alex; Lladó, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used to detect and segment multiple sclerosis lesions due to the detailed and rich information provided. We present a modified expectation-maximisation algorithm to segment brain tissues (white matter, grey matter, and cerebro-spinal fluid) as well as a partial volume class containing fluid and grey matter. This algorithm provides an initial segmentation in which lesions are not separated from tissue, thus a second step is needed to find them. This second step involves the thresholding of the FLAIR image, followed by a regionwise refinement to discard false detections. To evaluate the proposal, we used a database with 45 cases comprising 1.5T imaging data from three different hospitals with different scanner machines and with a variable lesion load per case. The results for our database point out to a higher accuracy when compared to two of the best state-of-the-art approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Automatic detection of gadolinium-enhancing multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MRI using conditional random fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Shah, Mohak; Francis, Simon J; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2012-06-01

    Gadolinium-enhancing lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are of great interest since they are markers of disease activity. Identification of gadolinium-enhancing lesions is particularly challenging because the vast majority of enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures, particularly blood vessels. Furthermore, these lesions are typically small and in close proximity to vessels. In this paper, we present an automatic, probabilistic framework for segmentation of gadolinium-enhancing lesions in MS using conditional random fields. Our approach, through the integration of different components, encodes different information such as correspondence between the intensities and tissue labels, patterns in the labels, or patterns in the intensities. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on 80 multimodal clinical datasets acquired from relapsing-remitting MS patients in the context of multicenter clinical trials. The experimental results exhibit a sensitivity of 98% with a low false positive lesion count. The performance of the proposed algorithm is also compared to a logistic regression classifier, a support vector machine and a Markov random field approach. The results demonstrate superior performance of the proposed algorithm at successfully detecting all of the gadolinium-enhancing lesions while maintaining a low false positive lesion count.

  17. Independent modulators mediate spectra of multiple brain processes in a VR-based driving experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shang-Wen; Huang, Ruey-Song; Ko, Li-Wei; Jeng, Jong-Liang; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2009-04-01

    This study explores the use of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) applied to normalized logarithmic spectral changes in the activities of brain processes separated by spatial filters learned from electroencephalogram (EEG) data using a temporal ICA. EEG data were collected during 1-2 hour virtual-reality based driving experiments, in which subjects were instructed to maintain their cruising position and compensate for randomly induced drifts using the steering wheel. ICA was first applied to 30-channel EEG data to separate the recorded signals into a sum of maximally temporally independent components (ICs) for each of 15 subjects. Logarithmic spectra of IC activities were then submitted to PCA-ICA to find spectrally fixed and temporally independent modulator (IM) processes. The second ICA detected and modeled independent co-modulatory systems that multiplicatively affect the activities of spatially distinct IC processes. Across subjects, we found two consistent temporally independent modulators: theta-beta and alpha modulators that mediate spectral activations of the distinct cortical areas when the participants experience waves of alternating alertness and drowsiness during long hour simulated driving. Furthermore, the time courses of the theta-beta modulator were highly correlated with concurrent changes in subject driving error (a behavioral index of drowsiness).

  18. Evaluating the effect of multiple sclerosis lesions on automatic brain structure segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Villà, Sandra; Valverde, Sergi; Cabezas, Mariano; Pareto, Deborah; Vilanova, Joan C; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Rovira, Àlex; Oliver, Arnau; Lladó, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, many automatic brain structure segmentation methods have been proposed. However, these methods are commonly tested with non-lesioned brains and the effect of lesions on their performance has not been evaluated. Here, we analyze the effect of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions on three well-known automatic brain structure segmentation methods, namely, FreeSurfer, FIRST and multi-atlas fused by majority voting, which use learning-based, deformable and atlas-based strategies, respectively. To perform a quantitative analysis, 100 synthetic images of MS patients with a total of 2174 lesions are simulated on two public databases with available brain structure ground truth information (IBSR18 and MICCAI'12). The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) differences and the volume differences between the healthy and the simulated images are calculated for the subcortical structures and the brainstem. We observe that the three strategies are affected when lesions are present. However, the effects of the lesions do not follow the same pattern; the lesions either make the segmentation method underperform or surprisingly augment the segmentation accuracy. The obtained results show that FreeSurfer is the method most affected by the presence of lesions, with DSC differences (generated - healthy) ranging from - 0.11 ± 0.54 to 9.65 ± 9.87, whereas FIRST tends to be the most robust method when lesions are present (- 2.40 ± 5.54 to 0.44 ± 0.94). Lesion location is not important for global strategies such as FreeSurfer or majority voting, where structure segmentation is affected wherever the lesions exist. On the other hand, FIRST is more affected when the lesions are overlaid or close to the structure of analysis. The most affected structure by the presence of lesions is the nucleus accumbens (from - 1.12 ± 2.53 to 1.32 ± 4.00 for the left hemisphere and from - 2.40 ± 5.54 to 9.65 ± 9.87 for the right hemisphere), whereas the structures that show

  19. Evaluating the effect of multiple sclerosis lesions on automatic brain structure segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra González-Villà

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many automatic brain structure segmentation methods have been proposed. However, these methods are commonly tested with non-lesioned brains and the effect of lesions on their performance has not been evaluated. Here, we analyze the effect of multiple sclerosis (MS lesions on three well-known automatic brain structure segmentation methods, namely, FreeSurfer, FIRST and multi-atlas fused by majority voting, which use learning-based, deformable and atlas-based strategies, respectively. To perform a quantitative analysis, 100 synthetic images of MS patients with a total of 2174 lesions are simulated on two public databases with available brain structure ground truth information (IBSR18 and MICCAI’12. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC differences and the volume differences between the healthy and the simulated images are calculated for the subcortical structures and the brainstem. We observe that the three strategies are affected when lesions are present. However, the effects of the lesions do not follow the same pattern; the lesions either make the segmentation method underperform or surprisingly augment the segmentation accuracy. The obtained results show that FreeSurfer is the method most affected by the presence of lesions, with DSC differences (generated − healthy ranging from −0.11 ± 0.54 to 9.65 ± 9.87, whereas FIRST tends to be the most robust method when lesions are present (−2.40 ± 5.54 to 0.44 ± 0.94. Lesion location is not important for global strategies such as FreeSurfer or majority voting, where structure segmentation is affected wherever the lesions exist. On the other hand, FIRST is more affected when the lesions are overlaid or close to the structure of analysis. The most affected structure by the presence of lesions is the nucleus accumbens (from −1.12 ± 2.53 to 1.32 ± 4.00 for the left hemisphere and from −2.40 ± 5.54 to 9.65 ± 9.87 for the right hemisphere, whereas the

  20. Multiple crises and global health: New and necessary frontiers of health politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrecker, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The world economy is entering an era of multiple crises, involving finance, food security and global environmental change. This article assesses the implications for global public health, describes the contours of post-2007 crises in food security and finance, and then briefly indicates the probable health impacts. There follows a discussion of the crisis of climate change, one that will unfold over a longer time frame but with manifestations that may already be upon us. The article then discusses the political economy of responses to these crises, noting the formidable obstacles that exist to equitable resolution. The article concludes by noting the threat that such crises present to recent progress in global health, arguing that global health researchers and practitioners must become more familiar with the relevant social processes, and that proposed solutions that neglect the continuing importance of the nation-state are misdirected. PMID:22657093

  1. Multiple brain tumor nodule resections under direct visualization of a neuronavigated endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, X

    2007-08-01

    With neuronavigation-assistance, endoscopic neurosurgery has a variety of advantages for brain tumor resection. However, intraoperative neuronavigation has to be operated by frequently alternating a neuronavigation wand and moving the microscope back-and-forth on the surgical field while the microscope is being used for surgery, except when using stereo overlays in the operating microscope aligned to the operative scene. In our practice, our surgical endoscope was used as a sole optical device and was also calibrated as a virtual wand targeting to tumor nodules while the operation was being performed under its simultaneous visualization. This paper gives a brief description and technical report of applications of image-guided endoscopy in two cases with multiple tumor nodules. A 0-degree, 4-mm rigid endoscopes (DCI; Storz and Co., Tuttlingen, Germany) and Voyager SX navigation system by Z-KAT (Marconi, USA) were used for both cases, a 32-year-old woman with multiple hemangioblastomas and a 46-year-old man with two recurrent astrocytomas. The endoscope has a digital video output, which was registered with reference calibration for rendered image-guided stereoscopic views. The neuronavigation screen was formatted to provide axial, coronal, and sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images demonstrating the location and trajectory of the endoscope's tip. Endoscope angles of 0 degrees and 30 degrees were used interchangeably during surgery. For both posterior fossa tumors, an entry point on the skull was identified using "virtual endoscopy" to visualize the intracranial anatomy and lesions. A 3-cm linear skin incision for both cases was made at the entry point guided by the endoscope's video output and a 3-dimensional (3-D) rendered image on the navigation system. Three tumor nodules in the first patient, and two nodules in the second, were removed directly under navigated-endoscopic visualization on one monitor with 3D imaging-guidance images on the other side-by-side. The

  2. Do multiple micronutrient interventions improve child health, growth, and development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Goldenberg, Tamar; Allen, Lindsay H

    2011-11-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are common and often co-occur in many developing countries. Several studies have examined the benefits of providing multiple micronutrient (MMN) interventions during pregnancy and childhood, but the implications for programs remain unclear. The key objective of this review is to summarize what is known about the efficacy of MMN interventions during early childhood on functional outcomes, namely, child health, survival, growth, and development, to guide policy and identify gaps for future research. We identified review articles including meta-analyses and intervention studies that evaluated the benefits of MMN interventions (3 or more micronutrients) in children (child morbidity, anemia, and growth. Two studies found no effects on child mortality. The findings for respiratory illness and diarrhea are mixed, although suggestive of benefit when provided as fortified foods. There is evidence from several controlled trials (>25) and 2 meta-analyses that MMN interventions improve hemoglobin concentrations and reduce anemia, but the effects were small compared to providing only iron or iron with folic acid. Two recent meta-analyses and several intervention trials also indicated that MMN interventions improve linear growth compared to providing a placebo or single nutrients. Much less is known about the effects on MMN interventions during early childhood on motor and mental development. In summary, MMN interventions may result in improved outcomes for children in settings where micronutrient deficiencies are widespread.

  3. Longitudinal patterns and predictors of multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Andrea F.; Visser, Leenke; Verhulst, Frank C.; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundMost studies on multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents have cross-sectionally studied a limited number of health behaviors or determinants. PurposeTo examine the prevalence, longitudinal patterns and predictors of individual and multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents.

  4. The Microbiome-Gut-Brain Axis in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2017-03-01

    Gut microbes are capable of producing most neurotransmitters found in the human brain. Evidence is accumulating to support the view that gut microbes influence central neurochemistry and behavior. Irritable bowel syndrome is regarded as the prototypic disorder of the brain-gut-microbiota axis that can be responsive to probiotic therapy. Translational studies indicate that certain bacteria may have an impact on stress responses and cognitive functioning. Manipulating the gut microbiota with psychobiotics, prebiotics, or even antibiotics offers a novel approach to altering brain function and treating gut-brain axis disorders, such as depression and autism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between resting-state brain network topological organization and creative ability: Evidence from a multiple linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Bingqing; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Aiying; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Li, Junchao; Cai, Yuxuan; Gao, Mengxia; Gao, Zhenni; Chang, Song; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated a tight linkage between resting-state functional connectivity of the human brain and creative ability. This study aimed to further investigate the association between the topological organization of resting-state brain networks and creativity. Therefore, we acquired resting-state fMRI data from 22 high-creativity participants and 22 low-creativity participants (as determined by their Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking scores). We then constructed functional brain networks for each participant and assessed group differences in network topological properties before exploring the relationships between respective network topological properties and creative ability. We identified an optimized organization of intrinsic brain networks in both groups. However, compared with low-creativity participants, high-creativity participants exhibited increased global efficiency and substantially decreased path length, suggesting increased efficiency of information transmission across brain networks in creative individuals. Using a multiple linear regression model, we further demonstrated that regional functional integration properties (i.e., the betweenness centrality and global efficiency) of brain networks, particularly the default mode network (DMN) and sensorimotor network (SMN), significantly predicted the individual differences in creative ability. Furthermore, the associations between network regional properties and creative performance were creativity-level dependent, where the difference in the resource control component may be important in explaining individual difference in creative performance. These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate of creativity and may facilitate objective identification of creative ability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. HTLV-I associated myelopathy with multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuo; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Yorifuji, Shirou; Tarui, Seiichiro

    1988-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman was admitted with complaints of urinary incontinence and gait disturbance, both of which had progressed slowly without any sign of remission. Family history was not contributory. Neurologically, extreme spasticity was recoginized in the lower limbs. Babinski sign was positive bilaterally. Flower-like atypical lymphocytes were seen in blood. Positive anti-HTLV-I antibody was confirmed in serum and spinal fluid by western blot. She was diagnosed as having HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM). CT reveald calcification in bilateral globus pallidus, and MRI revealed multiple spotty areas in cerebral white matter and brain stem, but no spinal cord lesion was detectable. Electrophysiologically, brain stem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) suggested the presence of bilateral brain stem lesions. Neither median nor posterior tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials were evoked, a finding suggesting the existence of spinal cord lesion. In this case, the lesion was not confined to spinal cord, it was also observed in brain stem and cerebral white matter. Such distinct lesions in cerebral white matter and brain stem have not been reported in patients with HAM. It is suggested that HTLV-I is probably associated with cerebral white matter and brain stem.

  7. Protect Your Brain (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-21

    At least three and a half million people in the U.S. sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI), either with or without other injuries. This podcast discusses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of brain injuries.  Created: 3/21/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 3/21/2013.

  8. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  9. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eFissler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control, and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  10. Physical and mental health status of survivors of multiple cancer diagnoses: findings from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrykowski, Michael A

    2012-07-15

    Little research has identified the physical and mental health status of survivors of multiple primary cancer diagnoses. By using data from the population-based 2009 National Health Information Survey, 154 survivors of multiple primary cancer diagnoses, 1427 survivors of a single cancer diagnosis, and 25,004 individuals without a history of cancer diagnosis were identified. The multiple cancer group was compared with the single cancer and no cancer groups with regard to physical and mental health status using analysis of covariance and binary logistic regression. Relative to the no cancer group, the multiple cancer group reported significantly poorer mental health status, greater lifetime, recent, and current prevalence of a variety of medical conditions and comorbidities, and more health-related disability. Although observed group differences between the multiple cancer and single cancer groups were less pronounced than those between the multiple cancer and no cancer groups, a consistent pattern was also evident; the multiple cancer group reported significantly poorer status relative to the single cancer group across a range of mental and physical health and illness-related disability indices. Diagnosis of 2 or more primary cancers (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers) is associated with increased risk for poorer physical and mental health status over and above that associated with diagnosis of a single primary cancer. Survivors of multiple and single primary cancer diagnoses should be considered as distinct subgroups, and increased attention should be devoted to the unique status and needs of survivors of multiple primary cancer diagnoses. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  11. "MASSIVE" brain dataset: Multiple acquisitions for standardization of structural imaging validation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeling, Martijn; Tax, Chantal M W; Vos, Sjoerd B; Luijten, Peter R; Leemans, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we present the MASSIVE (Multiple Acquisitions for Standardization of Structural Imaging Validation and Evaluation) brain dataset of a single healthy subject, which is intended to facilitate diffusion MRI (dMRI) modeling and methodology development. MRI data of one healthy subject (female, 25 years) were acquired on a clinical 3 Tesla system (Philips Achieva) with an eight-channel head coil. In total, the subject was scanned on 18 different occasions with a total acquisition time of 22.5 h. The dMRI data were acquired with an isotropic resolution of 2.5 mm3 and distributed over five shells with b-values up to 4000 s/mm2 and two Cartesian grids with b-values up to 9000 s/mm2 . The final dataset consists of 8000 dMRI volumes, corresponding B0 field maps and noise maps for subsets of the dMRI scans, and ten three-dimensional FLAIR, T1 -, and T2 -weighted scans. The average signal-to-noise-ratio of the non-diffusion-weighted images was roughly 35. This unique set of in vivo MRI data will provide a robust framework to evaluate novel diffusion processing techniques and to reliably compare different approaches for diffusion modeling. The MASSIVE dataset is made publically available (both unprocessed and processed) on www.massive-data.org. Magn Reson Med 77:1797-1809, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Graph Theory-Based Brain Connectivity for Automatic Classification of Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocevar, Gabriel; Stamile, Claudio; Hannoun, Salem; Cotton, François; Vukusic, Sandra; Durand-Dubief, Françoise; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, we introduce a method to classify Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients into four clinical profiles using structural connectivity information. For the first time, we try to solve this question in a fully automated way using a computer-based method. The main goal is to show how the combination of graph-derived metrics with machine learning techniques constitutes a powerful tool for a better characterization and classification of MS clinical profiles. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four MS patients [12 Clinical Isolated Syndrome (CIS), 24 Relapsing Remitting (RR), 24 Secondary Progressive (SP), and 17 Primary Progressive (PP)] along with 26 healthy controls (HC) underwent MR examination. T1 and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were used to obtain structural connectivity matrices for each subject. Global graph metrics, such as density and modularity, were estimated and compared between subjects' groups. These metrics were further used to classify patients using tuned Support Vector Machine (SVM) combined with Radial Basic Function (RBF) kernel. Results: When comparing MS patients to HC subjects, a greater assortativity, transitivity, and characteristic path length as well as a lower global efficiency were found. Using all graph metrics, the best F-Measures (91.8, 91.8, 75.6, and 70.6%) were obtained for binary (HC-CIS, CIS-RR, RR-PP) and multi-class (CIS-RR-SP) classification tasks, respectively. When using only one graph metric, the best F-Measures (83.6, 88.9, and 70.7%) were achieved for modularity with previous binary classification tasks. Conclusion: Based on a simple DTI acquisition associated with structural brain connectivity analysis, this automatic method allowed an accurate classification of different MS patients' clinical profiles.

  13. Evidence of impaired brain activity balance after passive sensorimotor stimulation in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Petsas

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Examination of sensorimotor activation alone in multiple sclerosis (MS patients may not yield a comprehensive view of cerebral response to task stimulation. Additional information may be obtained by examining the negative BOLD response (deactivation. Aim of this work was to characterize activation and deactivation patterns during passive hand movements in MS patients. METHODS: 13 relapsing remitting-MS patients (RRMS, 18 secondary progressive-MS patients (SPMS and 15 healthy controls (HC underwent an fMRI study during passive right-hand movements. Activation and deactivation contrasts in the three groups were entered into ANOVA, age and gender corrected. Post-hoc analysis was performed with one-sample and two-sample t-tests. For each patient we obtained lesion volume (LV from both T1- and T2-weighted images. RESULTS: Activations showed a progressive extension to the ipsilateral brain hemisphere according to the group and the clinical form (HC

  14. Elk-1 a transcription factor with multiple facets in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    antoine eBesnard

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The ternary complex factor (TCF Elk-1 is a transcription factor that regulates immediate early gene (IEG expression via the Serum Response Element (SRE DNA consensus site. Elk-1 is associated with a dimer of Serum Response Factor (SRF at the SRE site, and its phosphorylation occurs at specific residues in response to Mitogen Activated protein Kinases, including c-Jun-Nterminal Kinase (JNK, p38/MAPK and ERK (Extracellular-signal Regulated Kinases. This phosphorylation event is critical for triggering SRE-dependent transcription. Although MAPKs are fundamental actors for the instatement and maintenance of memory, and much investigation of their downstream signaling partners have been done, no data yet clearly implicate Elk-1 in these processes. This is partly due to the complexity of Elk-1 sub-cellular localization, and hence functions, within neurons. Elk-1 is present in its resting state in the cytoplasm, where it colocalizes with mitochondrial proteins or microtubules. In this particular sub-cellular compartment, overexpression of Elk-1 is toxic for neuronal cells. When phosphorylated by the MAPK/ERK, Elk-1 translocates to the nucleus where it is implicated in regulating chromatin remodeling, SRE-dependent transcription, and neuronal differentiation. Another post-translational modification is sumoylation, which relocalizes Elk-1 in the cytoplasm. Thus, Elk-1 plays a dual role in neuronal functions: pro-apoptotic within the cytoplasm, and pro-differentiation within the nucleus. To address the role of Elk-1 in the brain, one must be aware of its multiple facets, and design molecular tools that will shut down Elk-1 expression, trafficking or activation, in specific neuronal compartments. We summarize in this review the known molecular functions of Elk-1, its regulation in neuronal cells, and present evidence of its possible implication in model systems of synaptic plasticity, experience-learning, but also in psychiatric or neurodegenerative

  15. Graph Theory-Based Brain Connectivity for Automatic Classification of Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kocevar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this work, we introduce a method to classify Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients into four clinical profiles using structural connectivity information. For the first time, we try to solve this question in a fully automated way using a computer-based method. The main goal is to show how the combination of graph-derived metrics with machine learning techniques constitutes a powerful tool for a better characterization and classification of MS clinical profiles.Materials and methods: Sixty-four MS patients (12 Clinical Isolated Syndrome (CIS, 24 Relapsing Remitting (RR, 24 Secondary Progressive (SP, and 17 Primary Progressive (PP along with 26 healthy controls (HC underwent MR examination. T1 and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI were used to obtain structural connectivity matrices for each subject. Global graph metrics, such as density and modularity, were estimated and compared between subjects’ groups. These metrics were further used to classify patients using tuned Support Vector Machine (SVM combined with Radial Basic Function (RBF kernel.Results: When comparing MS patients to HC subjects, a greater assortativity, transitivity and characteristic path length as well as a lower global efficiency were found. Using all graph metrics, the best F-Measures (91.8%, 91.8%, 75.6% and 70.6% were obtained for binary (HC-CIS, CIS-RR, RR-PP and multi-class (CIS-RR-SP classification tasks, respectively. When using only one graph metric, the best F-Measures (83.6%, 88.9% and 70.7% were achieved for modularity with previous binary classification tasks.Conclusion: Based on a simple DTI acquisition associated with structural brain connectivity analysis, this automatic method allowed an accurate classification of different MS patients’ clinical profiles.

  16. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry analysis-A new approach for protein mapping in multiple sclerosis brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Nischwitz, Sandra; Deininger, Sören-Oliver; Hornung, Joachim; König, Fatima Barbara; Stadelmann, Christine; Turck, Christoph W; Weber, Frank

    2017-03-15

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system characterized by recurrent inflammatory demyelinating lesions in the early disease stage. Lesion formation and mechanisms leading to lesion remyelination are not fully understood. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry imaging (MALDI-IMS) is a technology which analyses proteins and peptides in tissue, preserves their spatial localization, and generates molecular maps within the tissue section. In a pilot study we employed MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to profile and identify peptides and proteins expressed in normal-appearing white matter, grey matter and multiple sclerosis brain lesions with different extents of remyelination. The unsupervised clustering analysis of the mass spectra generated images which reflected the tissue section morphology in luxol fast blue stain and in myelin basic protein immunohistochemistry. Lesions with low remyelination extent were defined by compounds with molecular weight smaller than 5300Da, while more completely remyelinated lesions showed compounds with molecular weights greater than 15,200Da. An in-depth analysis of the mass spectra enabled the detection of cortical lesions which were not seen by routine luxol fast blue histology. An ion mass, mainly distributed at the rim of multiple sclerosis lesions, was identified by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry as thymosin beta-4, a protein known to be involved in cell migration and in restorative processes. The ion mass of thymosin beta-4 was profiled by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry in brain slides of 12 multiple sclerosis patients and validated by immunohistochemical analysis. In summary, our results demonstrate the ability of the MALDI-IMS technology to map proteins within the brain parenchyma and multiple sclerosis lesions and to identify potential markers involved in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis and/or remyelination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Health-related quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Tonny Solveig; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Nysom, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To identify predictors for health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in survivors of childhood brain tumors and its relationship to cognitive function. PROCEDURE: One hundred twenty-six consecutive Danish childhood brain tumor patients treated 1970-1997 and being 7.9-40.4 years at follow...

  18. Which symptoms contribute the most to patients' perception of health in multiple sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rivka; Cutter, Gary; Friendly, Michael; Kister, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a polysymptomatic disease. Little is known about relative contributions of the different multiple sclerosis symptoms to self-perception of health. To investigate the relationship between symptom severity in 11 domains affected by multiple sclerosis and self-rated health. Multiple sclerosis patients in two multiple sclerosis centers assessed self-rated health with a validated instrument and symptom burden with symptoMScreen, a validated battery of Likert scales for 11 domains commonly affected by multiple sclerosis. Pearson correlations and multivariate linear regressions were used to investigate the relationship between symptoMScreen scores and self-rated health. Among 1865 multiple sclerosis outpatients (68% women, 78% with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, mean age 46.38 ± 12.47 years, disease duration 13.43 ± 10.04 years), average self-rated health score was 2.30 ('moderate to good'). Symptom burden (composite symptoMScreen score) highly correlated with self-rated health (r = 0.68, P multiple sclerosis outpatients' perception of health, followed by gait dysfunction and fatigue. These findings suggest that 'invisible disability' may be more important to patients' sense of wellbeing than physical disability, and challenge the notion that physical disability should be the primary outcome measure in multiple sclerosis.

  19. Recommendations to improve imaging and analysis of brain lesion load and atrophy in longitudinal studies of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrenken, H; Jenkinson, M; Horsfield, M A

    2013-01-01

    Focal lesions and brain atrophy are the most extensively studied aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the image acquisition and analysis techniques used can be further improved, especially those for studying within-patient changes of lesion load and atrophy longitudinally. Improved accuracy...... resonance image analysis methods for assessing brain lesion load and atrophy, this paper makes recommendations to improve these measures for longitudinal studies of MS. Briefly, they are (1) images should be acquired using 3D pulse sequences, with near-isotropic spatial resolution and multiple image...... contrasts to allow more comprehensive analyses of lesion load and atrophy, across timepoints. Image artifacts need special attention given their effects on image analysis results. (2) Automated image segmentation methods integrating the assessment of lesion load and atrophy are desirable. (3) A standard...

  20. Longitudinal patterns and predictors of multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents: The TRAILS study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Winter, Anea F; Visser, Leenke; Verhulst, Frank C; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    ...). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the influence of gender, self-control, parental health risk behaviors, parental monitoring and socioeconomic factors on the number of health risk...

  1. Cellular distribution of glucose and monocarboxylate transporters in human brain white matter and multiple sclerosis lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, P.G.; Michailidou, I.; Witte, M.E.; Mizee, M.R.; van der Pol, SM; Hof, B.; Reijerkerk, A.; Pellerin, L.; van der Valk, P.; de Vries, H.E.; van Horssen, J.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure efficient energy supply to the high demanding brain, nutrients are transported into brain cells via specific glucose (GLUT) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT). Mitochondrial dysfunction and altered glucose metabolism are thought to play an important role in the progression of

  2. Changes in the Cell Population in Brain White Matter in Multiple System Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nykjaer, Charlotte Havelund; Brudek, Tomasz; Salvesen, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: To establish the extent of involvement of the white matter in the disease, we have used stereology to quantify the total number of neurons and glial cells (oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia) in the brains from 10 MSA patients and 11 controls. RESULTS: The mean total number...... of white matter interstitial neurons in the patient brains was 0.5 × 10(9) (coefficient of variation = standard deviation/mean = 0.37), which was significantly lower than the 1.1 × 10(9) (0.41) in the control brains (P = .001) and equal to a reduction by ∼50%. The patient brains had a significantly higher...... found widespread microgliosis without concomitant astrogliosis in brain white matter in MSA patients and demonstrated an absence of significant oligodendrocyte degeneration. The exact role of oligodendrocytes in MSA pathogenesis, including neurodegeneration, remains to be elucidated. © 2017...

  3. Cocktail-Dosing Microdialysis Study to Simultaneously Assess Delivery of Multiple Organic-Cationic Drugs to the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Atsushi; Okura, Takashi; Higuchi, Kei; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2016-02-01

    Brain microdialysis is a powerful tool to estimate brain-to-plasma unbound concentration ratio at the steady state (Kp,uu) of compounds by direct measurement of the unbound concentration in brain interstitial fluid. Here, we evaluated a method to estimate Kp,uu values of multiple organic-cationic drugs simultaneously, by means of brain microdialysis combined with cocktail dosing. Five cationic drugs (diphenhydramine, memantine, oxycodone, pyrilamine, and tramadol), substrates of the proton-coupled organic cation antiport system, were selected as model drugs, and compared under single-dosing and cocktail-dosing conditions. We selected doses of the drugs at which no significant drug-drug interaction occurs at the proton-coupled organic cation antiport system in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This was confirmed by uptake studies in hCMEC/D3 cells, an in vitro BBB model. The Kp,uu values after cocktail administration were in the range of 1.8-5.2, and were in good agreement with those after single administration. These results suggest that the microdialysis method with cocktail dosing is suitable to estimate Kp,uu values of several cationic drugs simultaneously, if there is no drug-drug interaction during BBB transport. The method could be useful for evaluating drug candidates with high Kp,uu values at an early stage in the development of central nervous system-acting drugs. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Restructuring brain drain: strengthening governance and financing for health worker migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2013-01-15

    Health worker migration from resource-poor countries to developed countries, also known as ''brain drain'', represents a serious global health crisis and a significant barrier to achieving global health equity. Resource-poor countries are unable to recruit and retain health workers for domestic health systems, resulting in inadequate health infrastructure and millions of dollars in healthcare investment losses. Using acceptable methods of policy analysis, we first assess current strategies aimed at alleviating brain drain and then propose our own global health policy based solution to address current policy limitations. Although governments and private organizations have tried to address this policy challenge, brain drain continues to destabilise public health systems and their populations globally. Most importantly, lack of adequate financing and binding governance solutions continue to fail to prevent health worker brain drain. In response to these challenges, the establishment of a Global Health Resource Fund in conjunction with an international framework for health worker migration could create global governance for stable funding mechanisms encourage equitable migration pathways, and provide data collection that is desperately needed.

  5. Multiple signaling pathways direct the initiation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression in cultured brain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Iacovitti, L

    1997-10-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the synergistic interaction of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and a second co-activator molecule can novelly induce expression of the CA biosynthetic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in non-TH expressing neurons of the striatum. Several co-activators have been identified, including substances present in L6 muscle cell extract (X. Du et al., J. Neurosci. 14 (1994) 7688-7694) catecholamines, such as dopamine (DA) (X. Du and L. Iacovitti, J. Neurosci. 15 (1995) 5420-5427; X. Du et al., Brain Res. 680 (1995) 229-233) and activators of protein kinase C (PKC) such as TPA (X. Du and L. Iacovitti, J. Neurochem. 68 (1997) 564-569). In the present study, we investigated whether activators of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway also serve as effective co-activators of aFGF in the induction of TH gene expression. In addition, the combinatorial effects of the various TH-inducing agents were also evaluated. We found that, as with other co-activating molecules, the PKA stimulants IBMX and forskolin had no TH-inducing capacity when administered alone. However, co-treatment of 10 ng/ml aFGF with either (250 microM) IBMX or (10 microM) forskolin resulted in the novel expression of TH in 25% of plated neurons. The number of TH-expressing neurons was increased to 55% in aFGF-treated cultures co-incubated with aFGF and both (250 microM) IBMX and (10 microM) forskolin. Time course studies indicated that TH induction was rapid (peaking within 24 h) and enduring (lasting 4 days in culture). Induction of TH by aFGF and IBMX/forskolin was partially blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase, such as H7, H8 and H89, as well as pretreatment with protein (cyclohexamide) or RNA synthesis (amanitin and actinomycin D) inhibitors. The concomitant addition of combinations of co-activator molecules (DA, TPA and IBMX/forskolin) and aFGF resulted in the additive induction of TH. Maximal expression of TH (80% of striatal neurons) was accomplished when

  6. An exercise-based randomized controlled trial on brain, cognition, physical health and mental health in overweight/obese children (ActiveBrains project): Rationale, design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas-Sánchez, Cristina; Mora-González, José; Migueles, Jairo H; Martín-Matillas, Miguel; Gómez-Vida, José; Escolano-Margarit, María Victoria; Maldonado, José; Enriquez, Gala María; Pastor-Villaescusa, Belén; de Teresa, Carlos; Navarrete, Socorro; Lozano, Rosa María; de Dios Beas-Jiménez, Juan; Estévez-López, Fernando; Mena-Molina, Alejandra; Heras, María José; Chillón, Palma; Campoy, Cristina; Muñoz-Hernández, Victoria; Martínez-Ávila, Wendy Daniela; Merchan, María Elisa; Perales, José C; Gil, Ángel; Verdejo-García, Antonio; Aguilera, Concepción M; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Labayen, Idoia; Catena, Andrés; Ortega, Francisco B

    2016-03-01

    The new and recent advances in neuroelectric and neuroimaging technologies provide a new era for further exploring and understanding how brain and cognition function can be stimulated by environmental factors, such as exercise, and particularly to study whether physical exercise influences brain development in early ages. The present study, namely the ActiveBrains project, aims to examine the effects of a physical exercise programme on brain and cognition, as well as on selected physical and mental health outcomes in overweight/obese children. A total of 100 participants aged 8 to 11 years are randomized into an exercise group (N=50) or a control group (N=50). The intervention lasts 20-weeks, with 3-5 sessions per week of 90 min each, and is mainly focused on high-intensity aerobic exercise yet also includes muscle-strengthening exercises. The extent to what the intervention effect remains 8-months after the exercise programme finishes is also studied in a subsample. Brain structure and function and cognitive performance are assessed using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic recordings. Secondary outcomes include physical health outcomes (e.g. physical fitness, body fatness, bone mass and lipid-metabolic factors) and mental health outcomes (e.g. chronic stress indicators and overall behavioural and personality measurements such as anxiety or depression). This project will substantially contribute to the existing knowledge and will have an impact on societies, since early stimulation of brain development might have long lasting consequences on cognitive performance, academic achievement and in the prevention of behavioural problems and the promotion of psychological adjustment and mental health. Clinical trials. Gov identifier: NCT02295072. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Glucose Transporters in Brain: In Health and in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Neurons need a continuous supply of glucose, the major source of energy for mammalian brain metabolism. The central nervous system is protected by three main physiological cell barriers. Cell membranes are impermeable for glucose, therefore glucose is transferred across the cell membranes by specific transport proteins: sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUTs), encoded by SLC2 genes, and sodium-dependent glucose transporters (for example SGLTs), encoded by SLC5 genes. Human brain expresses 10 GLUT proteins and 10 proteins encoded by SLC5 genes. In patients with brain diseases, particularly Alzheimer's (AD) and Huntington's diseases, abnormalities in neuronal glucose metabolism have been showed. The levels of GLUT1 and GLUT3, the major brain glucose transporters, are decreased, especially in the cerebral cortex. Therefore, in AD, hypometabolism of glucose and deficits in energy are observed. Production of ATP from glucose metabolism in sporadic AD declines to 50% and the tendency to decline continues throughout the progression of the disease. This decrease is correlated with O-GlcAcetylation and tau hyperphosphorylation, as the compensatory mechanisms in AD are the utilization of endogenous brain substances and drastic increase in GLUT2 levels. The present review focuses on the changes in the expression of glucose transporters due to AD.

  8. Longitudinal patterns and predictors of multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents: The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, Andrea F; Visser, Leenke; Verhulst, Frank C; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-03-01

    Most studies on multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents have cross-sectionally studied a limited number of health behaviors or determinants. To examine the prevalence, longitudinal patterns and predictors of individual and multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents. Eight health risk behaviors (no regular consumption of fruit, vegetables or breakfast, overweight or obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, alcohol use and cannabis use) were assessed in a prospective population study (second and third wave). Participants were assessed in three waves between ages 10 and 17 (2001-2008; n=2230). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the influence of gender, self-control, parental health risk behaviors, parental monitoring and socioeconomic factors on the number of health risk behaviors adjusted for preceding multiple health risk behaviors (analysis: 2013-2014). Rates of >5 health risk behaviors were high: 3.6% at age 13.5 and 10.2% at age 16. Smoking at age 13.5 was frequently associated with health risk behaviors at age 16. No regular consumption of fruit, vegetables and breakfast, overweight or obesity, physical inactivity and smoking predicted the co-occurrence of health risk behaviors at follow-up. Significant predictors of the development of multiple health risk behaviors were adolescents' levels of self-control, socioeconomic status and maternal smoking. Multiple health risk behaviors are common among adolescents. Individual and social factors predict changes in multiple health risk behaviors, showing that prevention targeting multiple risk behaviors is needed. Special attention should be paid to adolescents with low self-control and families with low socioeconomic status or a mother who smokes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stemming the Impact of Health Professional Brain Drain from Africa: A Systemic Review of Policy Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbudzi, Edward

    2013-06-25

    Africa has been losing professionally trained health workers who are the core of the health system of this continent for many years. Faced with an increased burden of disease and coupled by a massive exodus of the health workforce, the health systems of many African nations are risking complete paralysis. Several studies have suggested policy options to reduce brain drain from Africa. The purpose of this paper is to review possible policies, which can stem the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa. A systemic literature review was conducted. Cinahl, Science Direct and PubMed databases were searched with the following terms: health professional brain drain from Africa and policies for reducing impact of brain drain from Africa. References were also browsed for relevant articles. A total of 425 articles were available for the study but only 23 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review identified nine policy options, which were being implemented in Africa, but the most common was task shifting which had success in several African countries. This review has demonstrated that there is considerable consensus on task shifting as the most appropriate and sustainable policy option for reducing the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa.

  10. Stemming the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa: a systemic review of policy options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zimbudzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Africa has been losing professionally trained health workers who are the core of the health system of this continent for many years. Faced with an increased burden of disease and coupled by a massive exodus of the health workforce, the health systems of many African nations are risking complete paralysis. Several studies have suggested policy options to reduce brain drain from Africa. The purpose of this paper is to review possible policies, which can stem the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa. A systemic literature review was conducted. Cinahl, Science Direct and PubMed databases were searched with the following terms: health professional brain drain from Africa and policies for reducing impact of brain drain from Africa. References were also browsed for relevant articles. A total of 425 articles were available for the study but only 23 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review identified nine policy options, which were being implemented in Africa, but the most common was task shifting which had success in several African countries. This review has demonstrated that there is considerable consensus on task shifting as the most appropriate and sustainable policy option for reducing the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa.

  11. Protect Your Brain (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-21

    Recent high-profile cases among professional athletes have called attention to the serious problem of traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, but the problem isn’t limited to playing fields. In 2009, at least three and a half million people in the U.S. sustained a TBI, either with or without other injuries. In this podcast, Dr. Lisa McGuire discusses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of brain injuries.  Created: 3/21/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 3/21/2013.

  12. Knowledge-based 3D segmentation of the brain in MR images for quantitative multiple sclerosis lesion tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elizabeth; Cothren, Robert M., Jr.; Tkach, Jean A.; Masaryk, Thomas J.; Cornhill, J. Fredrick

    1997-04-01

    Brain segmentation in magnetic resonance (MR) images is an important step in quantitative analysis applications, including the characterization of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions over time. Our approach is based on a priori knowledge of the intensity and three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships of structures in MR images of the head. Optimal thresholding and connected-components analysis are used to generate a starting point for segmentation. A 3D radial search is then performed to locate probable locations of the intra-cranial cavity (ICC). Missing portions of the ICC surface are interpolated in order to exclude connected structures. Partial volume effects and inter-slice intensity variations in the image are accounted for automatically. Several studies were conducted to validate the segmentation. Accuracy was tested by calculating the segmented volume and comparing to known volumes of a standard MR phantom. Reliability was tested by comparing calculated volumes of individual segmentation results from multiple images of the same subject. The segmentation results were also compared to manual tracings. The average error in volume measurements for the phantom was 1.5% and the average coefficient of variation of brain volume measurements of the same subject was 1.2%. Since the new algorithm requires minimal user interaction, variability introduced by manual tracing and interactive threshold or region selection was eliminated. Overall, the new algorithm was shown to produce a more accurate and reliable brain segmentation than existing manual and semi-automated techniques.

  13. Health Without Care? Vulnerability, Medical Brain Drain, and Health Worker Responsibilities in Underserved Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksekdag, Yusuf

    2017-02-21

    There is a consensus that the effects of medical brain drain, especially in the Sub-Saharan African countries, ought to be perceived as more than a simple misfortune. Temporary restrictions on the emigration of health workers from the region is one of the already existing policy measures to tackle the issue-while such a restrictive measure brings about the need for quite a justificatory work. A recent normative contribution to the debate by Gillian Brock provides a fruitful starting point. In the first step of her defence of emigration restrictions, Brock provides three reasons why skilled workers themselves would hold responsibilities to assist with respect to vital needs of their compatriots. These are fair reciprocity, duty to support vital institutions, and attending to the unintended harmful consequences of one's actions. While the first two are explained and also largely discussed in the literature, the third requires an explication on how and on which basis skilled workers would have a responsibility as such. In this article, I offer a vulnerability approach with its dependency aspect that may account for why the health workers in underserved contexts would have a responsibility to attend to the unintended side effects of their actions that may lead to a vital risk of harm for the population. I discuss HIV/AIDS care in Zimbabwe as a case in point in order to show that local health workers may have responsibilities to assist the population who are vulnerable to their mobility.

  14. Gadobutrol Versus Gadopentetate Dimeglumine or Gadobenate Dimeglumine Before DCE-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Multiple Sclerosis, Grade II-IV Glioma, or Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Multiple Sclerosis; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  15. The auditory and non-auditory brain areas involved in tinnitus. An emergent property of multiple parallel overlapping subnetworks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven eVanneste

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound source. It is characterized by sensory components such as the perceived loudness, the lateralization, the tinnitus type (pure tone, noise-like and associated emotional components, such as distress and mood changes. Source localization of qEEG data demonstrate the involvement of auditory brain areas as well as several non-auditory brain areas such as the anterior cingulate cortex (dorsal and subgenual, auditory cortex (primary and secondary, dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, supplementary motor area, orbitofrontal cortex (including the inferior frontal gyrus, parahippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus, in different aspects of tinnitus. Explaining these non-auditory brain areas as constituents of separable subnetworks, each reflecting a specific aspect of the tinnitus percept increases the explanatory power of the non-auditory brain areas involvement in tinnitus. Thus the unified percept of tinnitus can be considered an emergent property of multiple parallel dynamically changing and partially overlapping subnetworks, each with a specific spontaneous oscillatory pattern and functional connectivity signature.

  16. A comprehensive approach to the segmentation of multichannel three-dimensional MR brain images in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sushmita; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2013-01-01

    Accurate classification and quantification of brain tissues is important for monitoring disease progression, measurement of atrophy, and correlating magnetic resonance (MR) measures with clinical disability. Classification of MR brain images in the presence of lesions, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), is particularly challenging. Images obtained with lower resolution often suffer from partial volume averaging leading to false classifications. While partial volume averaging can be reduced by acquiring volumetric images at high resolution, image segmentation and quantification can be technically challenging. In this study, we integrated the brain anatomical knowledge with non-parametric and parametric statistical classifiers for automatically classifying tissues and lesions on high resolution multichannel three-dimensional images acquired on 60 MS brains. The results of automatic lesion segmentation were reviewed by the expert. The agreement between results obtained by the automated analysis and the expert was excellent as assessed by the quantitative metrics, low absolute volume difference percent (36.18 ± 34.90), low average symmetric surface distance (1.64 mm ± 1.30 mm), high true positive rate (84.75 ± 12.69), and low false positive rate (34.10 ± 16.00). The segmented results were also in close agreement with the corrected results as assessed by Bland-Altman and regression analyses. Finally, our lesion segmentation was validated using the MS lesion segmentation grand challenge dataset (MICCAI 2008).

  17. A comprehensive approach to the segmentation of multichannel three-dimensional MR brain images in multiple sclerosis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sushmita; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate classification and quantification of brain tissues is important for monitoring disease progression, measurement of atrophy, and correlating magnetic resonance (MR) measures with clinical disability. Classification of MR brain images in the presence of lesions, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), is particularly challenging. Images obtained with lower resolution often suffer from partial volume averaging leading to false classifications. While partial volume averaging can be reduced by acquiring volumetric images at high resolution, image segmentation and quantification can be technically challenging. In this study, we integrated the brain anatomical knowledge with non-parametric and parametric statistical classifiers for automatically classifying tissues and lesions on high resolution multichannel three-dimensional images acquired on 60 MS brains. The results of automatic lesion segmentation were reviewed by the expert. The agreement between results obtained by the automated analysis and the expert was excellent as assessed by the quantitative metrics, low absolute volume difference percent (36.18 ± 34.90), low average symmetric surface distance (1.64 mm ± 1.30 mm), high true positive rate (84.75 ± 12.69), and low false positive rate (34.10 ± 16.00). The segmented results were also in close agreement with the corrected results as assessed by Bland–Altman and regression analyses. Finally, our lesion segmentation was validated using the MS lesion segmentation grand challenge dataset (MICCAI 2008). PMID:24179773

  18. Impact of maternal cigarette smoke exposure on brain and kidney health outcomes in female offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yik L; Saad, Sonia; Al-Odat, Ibrahim; Zaky, Amgad A; Oliver, Brian; Pollock, Carol; Li, Weihong; Jones, Nicole M; Chen, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Increased oxidative stress in the brain can lead to increased sympathetic tone that may further induce kidney dysfunction. Previously we have shown that maternal cigarette smoke exposure (SE) leads to significantly increased oxidative stress and inflammation in both brain and kidney, as well as reduced brain and kidney mitochondrial activity. This is closely associated with significant kidney underdevelopment and abnormal function in adulthood in the male offspring. This study aimed to investigate the impact of maternal SE on brain and kidney health in the female offspring. In this study, the mouse dams were exposed to two cigarettes, twice daily for 6 weeks prior to gestation, during pregnancy and lactation. Brains and kidneys from the female offspring were collected at 20 days (P20) and 13 weeks (W13) and were subject to further analysis. We found that mRNA expression of brain inflammatory markers interleukin-1 receptor and Toll-like receptor 4 were significantly increased in the SE offspring at both P20 and W13. Their brain mitochondrial activity markers were however increased at W13 with increased antioxidant activity. Kidney development and function in the female SE offspring were not different from the control offspring. We concluded that although brain inflammatory markers were upregulated in the SE female offspring, they were protected from some of the indicators of brain oxidative stress, such as endogenous antioxidant and mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as abnormal kidney development and function in adulthood. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Is the effect of coping styles disease specific? : relationships with emotional distress and quality of life in acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, Ingrid; Bol, Yvonne; Stapert, Sven; Köhler, Sebastian; van Heugten, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of coping styles and the relationships linking coping to emotional distress and quality of life in patients with acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis. METHOD: Cross-sectional cohort study of 143 patients with acquired brain injury and 310 patients with

  20. Multiple sclerosis patients lacking oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid have less global and regional brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Voevodskaya, Olga; Imrell, Kerstin; Stawiarz, Leszek; Spulber, Gabriela; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Hillert, Jan; Westman, Eric; Karrenbauer, Virginija Danylaité

    2014-09-15

    To investigate whether multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with and without cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal immunoglobulin G bands (OCB) differ in brain atrophy. Twenty-eight OCB-negative and thirty-five OCB-positive patients were included. Larger volumes of total CSF and white matter (WM) lesions; smaller gray matter (GM) volume in the basal ganglia, diencephalon, cerebellum, and hippocampus; and smaller WM volume in corpus callosum, periventricular-deep WM, brainstem, and cerebellum, were observed in OCB-positives. OCB-negative patients, known to differ genetically from OCB-positives, are characterized by less global and regional brain atrophy. This finding supports the notion that OCB-negative MS patients may represent a clinically relevant MS subgroup. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  2. Imaging and clinical characteristics of children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility changes in the brain on susceptibility-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Tetsu [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aida, Noriko; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Shishikura, Ayako [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Miyata, Daiki [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Circulation Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Microsusceptibility changes in the brain are well known to correspond with microbleeds or micrometal fragments in adults, but this phenomenon has not been explored well in children. To assess imaging and clinical characteristics of children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility changes using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Between 2006 and 2008, 12 children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility on SWI without corresponding abnormal signal on conventional MRI were identified and were retrospectively assessed. The locations of foci of microsusceptibility included the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, brainstem and cerebellar white matter, without any clear systematic anatomic distribution. CT (n = 5) showed no calcification at the locations corresponding to the microsusceptibility on SWI. Conventional MR imaging showed white matter volume loss (n = 5), delayed myelination (n = 2), acute infarction (n = 1), chronic infarction (n = 1), meningitis (n = 1), slight signal abnormality in the white matter (n = 1) and no abnormal findings (n = 1). Follow-up SWI (n = 3) showed no change of the microsusceptibility foci. Interestingly, all children had a history of heart surgery under extracorporeal circulation for congenital heart disease. Multiple foci of microsusceptibility can be seen in the brain on SWI in children with congenital heart disease who underwent heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation. (orig.)

  3. Biological fiducial point based registration for multiple brain tissues reconstructed from different imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiqun; Zhou, Gangping; Geng, Xingyun; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Kui; Tang, Lemin; Zhou, Guomin; Dong, Jiancheng

    2013-10-01

    With the development of computer aided navigation system, more and more tissues shall be reconstructed to provide more useful information for surgical pathway planning. In this study, we aimed to propose a registration framework for different reconstructed tissues from multi-modalities based on some fiducial points on lateral ventricles. A male patient with brain lesion was admitted and his brain scans were performed by different modalities. Then, the different brain tissues were segmented in different modality with relevant suitable algorithms. Marching cubes were calculated for three dimensional reconstructions, and then the rendered tissues were imported to a common coordinate system for registration. Four pairs of fiducial markers were selected to calculate the rotation and translation matrix using least-square measure method. The registration results were satisfied in a glioblastoma surgery planning as it provides the spatial relationship between tumors and surrounding fibers as well as vessels. Hence, our framework is of potential value for clinicians to plan surgery.

  4. Mercury exposure and neurochemical biomarkers in multiple brain regions of Wisconsin river otters (Lontra canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbos, Peter; Strom, Sean; Basu, Niladri

    2013-04-01

    River otters are fish-eating wildlife that bioaccumulate high levels of mercury (Hg). Mercury is a proven neurotoxicant to mammalian wildlife, but little is known about the underlying, sub-clinical effects. Here, the overall goal was to increase understanding of Hg's neurological risk to otters. First, Hg values across several brain regions and tissues were characterized. Second, in three brain regions with known sensitivity to Hg (brainstem, cerebellum, and occipital cortex), potential associations among Hg levels and neurochemical biomarkers [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor] were explored. There were no significant differences in Hg levels across eight brain regions (rank order, highest to lowest: frontal cortex, cerebellum, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, parietal cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem, and thalamus), with mean values ranging from 0.7 to 1.3 ug/g dry weight. These brain levels were significantly lower than mean values in the muscle (2.1 ± 1.4 ug/g), liver (4.7 ± 4.3 ug/g), and fur (8.8 ± 4.8 ug/g). While a significant association was found between Hg and NMDA receptor levels in the brain stem (P = 0.028, rp = -0.293), no relationships were found in the cerebellum and occipital cortex. For the GABA receptor, no relationships were found. The lack of consistent Hg-associated neurochemical changes is likely due to low brain Hg levels in these river otters, which are amongst the lowest reported.

  5. Multiple Roles and Women's Mental Health in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Heather; Glynn, Keva; Ansara, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Research on the relationship between women's social roles and mental health has been equivocal. Although a greater number of roles often protect mental health, certain combinations can lead to strain. Our study explored the moderating affects of different role combinations on women's mental health by examining associations with socioeconomic status and differences in women's distress (depressive symptoms, personal stress (role strain) and chronic stress (role strain plus environmental stressors). Key Findings Women with children, whether single or partnered, had a higher risk of personal stress. Distress, stress and chronic stress levels of mothers, regardless of employment, or marital status, are staggeringly high. Single, unemployed mothers were significantly more likely than all other groups to experience financial stress and food insecurity. For partnered mothers, rates of personal stress and chronic stress were significantly lower among unemployed partnered mothers. Married and partnered mothers reported better mental health than their single counterparts. Lone, unemployed mothers were twice as likely to report a high level of distress compared with other groups. Lone mothers, regardless of employment status, were more likely to report high personal and chronic stress. Data Gaps and Recommendations National health surveys need to collect more data on the characteristics of women's work environment and their care giving responsibilities. Questions on household composition should include inter-generational households, same sex couples and multifamily arrangements. Data disaggregation by ethno-racial background would be helpful. Data should be collected on perceived quality of domestic and partnership roles and division of labours. PMID:15345066

  6. Research and analyze of physical health using multiple regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Kyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the research which is trying to create a mathematical model of the "healthy people" using the method of regression analysis. The factors are the physical parameters of the person (such as heart rate, lung capacity, blood pressure, breath holding, weight height coefficient, flexibility of the spine, muscles of the shoulder belt, abdominal muscles, squatting, etc.., and the response variable is an indicator of physical working capacity. After performing multiple regression analysis, obtained useful multiple regression models that can predict the physical performance of boys the aged of fourteen to seventeen years. This paper represents the development of regression model for the sixteen year old boys and analyzed results.

  7. Defining Optimal Brain Health in Adults: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B; Furie, Karen L; Iadecola, Costantino; Smith, Eric E; Waddy, Salina P; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Bae, Hee-Joon; Bauman, Mary Ann; Dichgans, Martin; Duncan, Pamela W; Girgus, Meighan; Howard, Virginia J; Lazar, Ronald M; Seshadri, Sudha; Testai, Fernando D; van Gaal, Stephen; Yaffe, Kristine; Wasiak, Hank; Zerna, Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive function is an important component of aging and predicts quality of life, functional independence, and risk of institutionalization. Advances in our understanding of the role of cardiovascular risks have shown them to be closely associated with cognitive impairment and dementia. Because many cardiovascular risks are modifiable, it may be possible to maintain brain health and to prevent dementia in later life. The purpose of this American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association presidential advisory is to provide an initial definition of optimal brain health in adults and guidance on how to maintain brain health. We identify metrics to define optimal brain health in adults based on inclusion of factors that could be measured, monitored, and modified. From these practical considerations, we identified 7 metrics to define optimal brain health in adults that originated from AHA's Life's Simple 7: 4 ideal health behaviors (nonsmoking, physical activity at goal levels, healthy diet consistent with current guideline levels, and body mass index brain health but recognize that the truly ideal circumstance may be uncommon because there is a continuum of brain health as demonstrated by AHA's Life's Simple 7. Therefore, there is opportunity to improve brain health through primordial prevention and other interventions. Furthermore, although cardiovascular risks align well with brain health, we acknowledge that other factors differing from those related to cardiovascular health may drive cognitive health. Defining optimal brain health in adults and its maintenance is consistent with the AHA's Strategic Impact Goal to improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20% and to reduce deaths resulting from cardiovascular disease and stroke by 20% by the year 2020. This work in defining optimal brain health in adults serves to provide the AHA/American Stroke Association with a foundation for a new strategic direction going forward in cardiovascular health

  8. Hippocampus-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy and Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Multiple Brain Metastases From Lung Adenocarcinoma: Early Response and Dosimetric Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Hye Ryun; Suh, Yang Gun; Kim, Jun Won; Choi, Chihwan; Baek, Jong Geal; Cho, Jaeho

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the volume response and treatment outcome after hippocampus-sparing whole-brain radiotherapy (HS-WBRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) using tomotherapy were evaluated. Patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma and multiple brain metastases who had a Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70 and exhibited well-controlled extracranial disease were treated. The prescribed dose was administered in 10 to 14 fractions as 25 to 28 Gy to whole-brain parenchyma, as 40 to 48 Gy to the gross metastatic lesion, and as 30 to 42 Gy to a 5-mm margin to the metastatic lesion. Double-dose gadolinium contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 1-mm slice thickness was performed before treatment and at 1, 4, and 7 months post-treatment. The tumor volume reduction ratio was calculated for each follow-up. Between July 2011 and September 2012, 11 patients with 70 lesions were included in this analysis. The median number of lesions per patient was 4 (range, 2-15). The median initial tumor volume was 0.235 cm(3) (range, 0.020-10.140 cm(3)). The treatment plans were evaluated regarding conformation number (CN), target coverage (TC), and homogeneity index (HI). The median follow-up duration was 14 months (range, 3-25 months) and the 1-year intracranial control rate was 67%. The tumor volume reduction was most prominent during the first month with a median reduction rate of 0.717 (range, -0.190 to 1.000). Complete remission was seen in 22 (33%) lesions, and 45 (64%) lesions showed more than 65% reduction in tumor volume. The CN, TC, and HI values were comparable to that of previous studies, and the mean hippocampal dose was 13.65 Gy. No treatment breaks or ≥ G3 acute toxicities were observed during or after treatment. The HS-WBRT with SIB in patients with multiple brain metastases was effective and feasible for volume reduction and showed excellent intracranial control. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. A Simple and Efficient Methodology To Improve Geometric Accuracy in Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery: Implementation in Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaiskos, Pantelis, E-mail: pkaraisk@med.uoa.gr [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Gamma Knife Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Roussakis, Arkadios [CT and MRI Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Torrens, Michael [Gamma Knife Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Seimenis, Ioannis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. Methods and Materials: The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, “average” image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (<2 cm) metastases treated with GK radiation surgery. Results: Phantom study results showed that use of average MR images eliminates the effect of sequence-dependent distortions, leading to a total spatial uncertainty of less than 0.3 mm, attributed mainly to gradient nonlinearities. In brain metastases patients, non-eliminated sequence-dependent distortions lead to target localization uncertainties of up to 1.3 mm (mean: 0.51 ± 0.37 mm) with respect to the corresponding target locations in the “average” MRI series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets.

  10. MO-G-201-04: Knowledge-Based Planning for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemer, B [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Shiraishi, S [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, J; Sanghvi, P; Moore, K

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter, linac-based SRS for multiple brain metastases (multi-mets) can deliver highly conformal radiation doses and reduce overall patient treatment time compared to other therapy techniques. This study aims to quantify the dosimetric benefits of knowledge-based planning (KBP) for multi-met treatments. Methods: Using a previously-published KBP methodology (an artificial neural network (ANN) trained on single-target linac-based SRS plans), 3D dose distribution predictions for multi-met patients were obtained by treating each brain lesion as a solitary target and subsequently combining individual predictions into a single distribution using a dose-weighted geometric averaging to obtain the best results in the inter-target space. 17 previously-treated multi-met plans, with target numbers ranging from N=2–5, were used to validate the ANN predictions and subsequent KBP auto-planning routine. The fully-deliverable KBP plans were developed by converting dose distribution predictions into patient-specific optimization objectives while maintaining identical target normalizations (typically PTV V100%=D98%). Plan quality improvements were quantified by the difference between SRS quality metrics (QMs): δdQM=QM(clinical)-QM(KBP). QMs of interest were: gradient measure (GM), conformity index (CI), brain V10 and V5, brainstem D0.1cc and heterogeneity index (HI). Finally, overall plan quality was judged via blinded plan comparison by SRS-specializing physicians. Results: Two clinical plans were found to be significant outliers wherein plan quality was dramatically worse than KBP. Despite indicating KBP superiority, these were removed from the QM analysis to prevent skewing the results. In the remaining cases, clinical and KBP QMs were nearly identical with modest improvements in the KBP sample: δGM=0.12±0.56mm, δCI=−0.01±0.04, Brain δV10=0.8±2.6cc, brain δV5=6.3 ±10.7cc, brainstem δD0.1cc=0.06±1.19Gy and δHI= −0.04±0.05. Ultimately, 13/17 KBP

  11. Research Priorities to Advance the Health and Health Care of Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisminetzky, Mayra; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Magaziner, Jay S; Allore, Heather G; Anzuoni, Kathryn; Boyd, Cynthia M; Gill, Thomas M; Go, Alan S; Greenspan, Susan L; Hanson, Leah R; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kitzman, Dalane W; Larson, Eric B; Naylor, Mary D; Shirley, Benjamin E; Tai-Seale, Ming; Teri, Linda; Tinetti, Mary E; Whitson, Heather E; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2017-07-01

    To prioritize research topics relevant to the care of the growing population of older adults with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). Survey of experts in MCC practice, research, and policy. Topics were derived from white papers, funding announcements, or funded research projects relating to older adults with MCCs. Survey conducted through the Health Care Systems Research Network (HCSRN) and Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers (OAICs) Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure and Network Growth Initiative, a joint endeavor of the HCSRN and OAICs. Individuals affiliated with the HCSRN or OAICs and national MCC experts, including individuals affiliated with funding agencies having MCC-related grant portfolios. A "top box" methodology was used, counting the number of respondents selecting the top response on a 5-point Likert scale and dividing by the total number of responses to calculate a top box percentage for each of 37 topics. The highest-ranked research topics relevant to the health and healthcare of older adults with MCCs were health-related quality of life in older adults with MCCs; development of assessment tools (to assess, e.g., symptom burden, quality of life, function); interactions between medications, disease processes, and health outcomes; disability; implementation of novel (and scalable) models of care; association between clusters of chronic conditions and clinical, financial, and social outcomes; role of caregivers; symptom burden; shared decision-making to enhance care planning; and tools to improve clinical decision-making. Study findings serve to inform the development of a comprehensive research agenda to address the challenges relating to the care of this "high-need, high-cost" population and the healthcare delivery systems responsible for serving it. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Brain-Gut-Microbe Communication in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eGrenham

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional signalling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is regulated at neural, hormonal and immunological levels. This construct is known as the brain-gut axis and is vital for maintaining homeostasis. Bacterial colonisation of the intestine plays a major role in the post-natal development and maturation of the immune and endocrine systems. These processes are key factors underpinning central nervous system (CNS signalling. Recent research advances have seen a tremendous improvement in our understanding of the scale, diversity and importance of the gut microbiome. This has been reflected in the form of a revised nomenclature to the more inclusive brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis and a sustained research effort to establish how communication along this axis contributes to both normal and pathological conditions. In this review, we will briefly discuss the critical components of this axis and the methodological challenges that have been presented in attempts to define what constitutes a normal microbiota and chart its temporal development. Emphasis is placed on the new research narrative that confirms the critical influence of the microbiota on mood and behaviour. Mechanistic insights are provided with examples of both neural and humoral routes through which these effects can be mediated. The evidence supporting a role for the enteric flora in brain-gut axis disorders is explored with the spotlight on the clinical relevance for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a stress-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. We also critically evaluate the therapeutic opportunities arising from this research and consider in particular whether targeting the microbiome might represent a valid strategy for the management of CNS disorders and ponder the pitfalls inherent in such an approach. Despite the considerable challenges that lie ahead, this is an exciting area of research and one that is destined to remain the centre of focus for some

  13. A tumefactive multiple sclerosis lesion in the brain: An uncommon site with atypical magnetic resonance image findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis (MS) is a rare type of demyelinating disease. Typical magnetic resonance (MR) image findings show incomplete ring enhancement with a mild mass effect. This lesion is otherwise indistinguishable from other mass-like lesions in the brain. Knowledge of the MR imaging findings for tumefactive MS is thus helpful for correct diagnosis and appropriate therapy. In this report we describe the MR image findings for pathology-confirmed tumefactive MS in an uncommon location, alongside a discussion of its aggressive features.

  14. Crowdsourcing Precision Cerebrovascular Health: Imaging and Cloud Seeding A Million Brains Initiative™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Liebeskind

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Crowdsourcing, an unorthodox approach in medicine, creates an unusual paradigm to study precision cerebrovascular health, eliminating the relative isolation and non-standardized nature of current imaging data infrastructure, while shifting emphasis to the astounding capacity of big data in the cloud. This perspective envisions the use of imaging data of the brain and vessels to orient and seed A Million Brains Initiative™ that may leapfrog incremental advances in stroke and rapidly provide useful data to the sizable population around the globe prone to the devastating effects of stroke and vascular substrates of dementia. Despite such variability in the type of data available and other limitations, the data hierarchy logically starts with imaging and can be enriched with almost endless types and amounts of other clinical and biological data. Crowdsourcing allows an individual to contribute to aggregated data on a population, while preserving their right to specific information about their own brain health. The cloud now offers endless storage, computing prowess and neuroimaging applications for post-processing that is searchable and scalable. Collective expertise is a windfall of the crowd in the cloud and particularly valuable in an area such as cerebrovascular health. The rise of precision medicine, rapidly evolving technological capabilities of cloud computing and the global imperative to limit the public health impact of cerebrovascular disease converge in the imaging of A Million Brains Initiative™. Crowdsourcing secure data on brain health may provide ultimate generalizability, enable focused analyses, facilitate clinical practice and accelerate research efforts.

  15. Cognitive Load in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pupillometric Assessment of Multiple Attentional Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    completed the Weschler Test of Adult Reading (71) to estimate premorbid IQ, as crystallized verbal abilities are resilient to injury (52). They also...related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Brain Research 1119:215-26 27. Honey GD, Bullmore ET, Sharma T. 2002. De-coupling of cognitive

  16. Multiple trauma and mental health in former Ugandan child soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Adam, Hubertus

    2010-10-01

    The present study examines the effect of war and domestic violence on the mental health of child soldiers in a sample consisting of 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age: 11-17 years, female: 49%). All children had experienced at least 1 war-related event and 78% were additionally exposed to at least 1 incident of domestic violence. Prevalences of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder were 33%, and 36%, respectively. Behavioral and emotional problems above clinical cutoff were measured in 61%. No gender differences were found regarding mental health outcomes. War experience and domestic violence were significantly associated with all mental health outcomes. The authors' findings point to the detrimental effects of domestic violence in addition to traumatizing war experiences in child soldiers.

  17. Multiplicity of effects and health benefits of resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lolita Kuršvietienė

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is mainly found in grapes and red wine, also in some plants and fruits, such as peanuts, cranberries, pistachios, blueberries and bilberries. Moreover, nowadays this compound is available as purified preparation and dietary supplement. Resveratrol provides a wide range of benefits, including cardiovascular protective, antiplatelet, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, blood glucose-lowering and anticancer activities, hence it exhibits a complex mode of action. During the recent years, these properties have been widely studied in animal and human models, both in vitro and in vivo. This paper is intended to present information published during the recent years on the biological activities and multiple effects of resveratrol.

  18. The role of nutrition on cognition and brain health in ageing: a targeted approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Jim M; Moulton, Christopher J; Cohen, Neal J

    2015-12-01

    Animal experiments and cross-sectional or prospective longitudinal research in human subjects suggest a role for nutrition in cognitive ageing. However, data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) that seek causal evidence for the impact of nutrients on cognitive ageing in humans often produce null results. Given that RCT test hypotheses in a rigorous fashion, one conclusion could be that the positive effects of nutrition on the aged brain observed in other study designs are spurious. On the other hand, it may be that the design of many clinical trials conducted thus far has been less than optimal. In the present review, we offer a blueprint for a more targeted approach to the design of RCT in nutrition, cognition and brain health in ageing that focuses on three key areas. First, the role of nutrition is more suited for the maintenance of health rather than the treatment of disease. Second, given that cognitive functions and brain regions vary in their susceptibility to ageing, those that especially deteriorate in senescence should be focal points in evaluating the efficacy of an intervention. Third, the outcome measures that assess change due to nutrition, especially in the cognitive domain, should not necessarily be the same neuropsychological tests used to assess gross brain damage or major pathological conditions. By addressing these three areas, we expect that clinical trials of nutrition, cognition and brain health in ageing will align more closely with other research in this field, and aid in revealing the true nature of nutrition's impact on the aged brain.

  19. Traumatic brain injury, diabetic neuropathy and altered-psychiatric health: The fateful triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Hassan, Hadi; Dia, Batoul; Choucair, Khalil; Eid, Stephanie A; Najdi, Farah; Baki, Lama; Talih, Farid; Eid, Assaad A; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a detrimental medical condition particularly when accompanied by diabetes. There are several comorbidities going along with diabetes including, but not limited to, kidney failure, obesity, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, stroke, neuropathies and amputations. Unlike diabetes type 1, diabetes type 2 is more common in adults who simultaneously suffer from other comorbid conditions making them susceptible to repetitive fall incidents and sustaining head trauma. The resulting brain insult exacerbates current psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, which, in turn, increases the risk of sustaining further brain traumas. The relationship between diabetes, traumatic brain injury and psychiatric health constitutes a triad forming a non-reversible vicious cycle. At the proteomic and psychiatric levels, cellular, molecular and behavioral alterations have been reported with the induction of non-traumatic brain injury in diabetic models such as stroke. However, research into traumatic brain injury has not been systematically investigated. Thus, in cases of diabetic neuropathy complicated with traumatic brain injury, utilizing fine structural and analytical techniques allows the identification of key biological markers that can then be used as innovative diagnostics as well as novel therapeutic targets in an attempt to treat diabetes and its sequelae especially those arising from repetitive mild brain trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adolescent Maturity and the Brain: The Promise and Pitfalls of Neuroscience Research in Adolescent Health Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sara B.; Blum, Robert W.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal neuroimaging studies demonstrate that the adolescent brain continues to mature well into the 20s. This has prompted intense interest in linking neuromaturation to maturity of judgment. Public policy is struggling to keep up with burgeoning interest in cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging. However, empirical evidence linking neurodevelopmental processes and adolescent real-world behavior remains sparse. Nonetheless, adolescent brain development research is already shaping public policy debates about when individuals should be considered mature for policy purposes. With this in mind, in this article we summarize what is known about adolescent brain development and what remains unknown, as well as what neuroscience can and cannot tell us about the adolescent brain and behavior. We suggest that a conceptual framework that situates brain science in the broader context of adolescent developmental research would help to facilitate research-to-policy translation. Furthermore, although contemporary discussions of adolescent maturity and the brain often use a deficit-based approach, there is enormous opportunity for brain science to illuminate the great strengths and potentialities of the adolescent brain. So, too, can this information inform policies that promote adolescent health and well-being. PMID:19699416

  1. Health risk implications from simultaneous exposure to multiple environmental contaminants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Water quality has deteriorated in the upper Olifants River system, South Africa, as a result of land use activities which include mining, agriculture and industries. A health risk assessment was conducted from 2009 to 2011 in the catchment...

  2. Long-Term Survival in a Patient with Multiple Brain Metastases from Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Gamma Knife Radiosurgery on Four Occasions: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer L. Elaimy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases are the most common cancerous neoplasm in the brain. The treatment of these lesions is challenging and often includes a multimodality management approach with whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and neurosurgery options. Although advances in biomedical imaging technologies and the treatment of extracranial cancer have led to the overall increase in the survival of brain metastases patients, the finding that select patients survive several years remains puzzling. For this reason, we present the case of a 70-year-old patient who was diagnosed with multiple brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer five years ago and is currently alive following treatment with chemotherapy for the primary cancer and whole-brain radiation therapy and Gamma Knife radiosurgery on four separate occasions for the neurological cancer. Since the diagnosis of brain metastases five years ago, the patient’s primary cancer has remained controlled. Furthermore, multiple repeat GKRS procedures provided this patient with high levels of local tumor control, which in combination with a stable primary cancer led to an extended period of survival and a highly functional life. Further analysis and clinical research will be valuable in assessing the durability of multiple GKRS for brain metastases patients who experience long-term survival.

  3. A systematic review of effective interventions for reducing multiple health risk behaviors in adolescence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hale, Daniel R; Fitzgerald-Yau, Natasha; Viner, Russell Mark

    2014-01-01

    ... (tobacco use, alcohol use, illicit drug use, risky sexual behavior, aggressive acts). We identified 44 randomized controlled trials of universal or selective interventions and were effective for multiple health risk behaviors...

  4. Neuroenhancement: enhancing brain and mind in health and in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Vincent P; Parasuraman, Raja

    2014-01-15

    Humans have long used cognitive enhancement methods to expand the proficiency and range of the various mental activities that they engage in, including writing to store and retrieve information, and computers that allow them to perform myriad activities that are now commonplace in the internet age. Neuroenhancement describes the use of neuroscience-based techniques for enhancing cognitive function by acting directly on the human brain and nervous system, altering its properties to increase performance. Cognitive neuroscience has now reached the point where it may begin to put theory derived from years of experimentation into practice. This special issue includes 16 articles that employ or examine a variety of neuroenhancement methods currently being developed to increase cognition in healthy people and in patients with neurological or psychiatric illness. This includes transcranial electromagnetic stimulation methods, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), along with deep brain stimulation, neurofeedback, behavioral training techniques, and these and other techniques in conjunction with neuroimaging. These methods can be used to improve attention, perception, memory and other forms of cognition in healthy individuals, leading to better performance in many aspects of everyday life. They may also reduce the cost, duration and overall impact of brain and mental illness in patients with neurological and psychiatric illness. Potential disadvantages of these techniques are also discussed. Given that the benefits of neuroenhancement outweigh the potential costs, these methods could potentially reduce suffering and improve quality of life for everyone, while further increasing our knowledge about the mechanisms of human cognition. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Choosing a Doctor or Health Care Service - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul- ... Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Ukrainian (українська ) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) HealthReach ...

  6. Multiple cystic and focal encephalomalacia in infancy and childhood with brain stem damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J F; Rodeck, C

    1975-07-01

    Two cases are described in which damage to the brain stem was associated with extensive necrosis of the cerebral hemisphere. In the first case--a monochorionic twin--there was clear evidence that injury of an ischaemic or hypoxic type had occurred during fetal life and some evidence that an inadequate share of the placental circulation was an important aetiological factor. In the second case death occurred 4 yr after an asphyxial episode at birth. The lesions in the hemispheres and brain stem were extensive, although less than in the first example. The lesions are discussed in the context of our knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the developing nervous system. Although they cannot as yet be fitted into the concepts of "critical periods" and "vulnerable periods" of development, this is perhaps because observations on human cases are scanty in comparison with the extensive animal studies which have been reported. The lesions are contrasted and compared with those seen in animals.

  7. Formal Derivation of Lotka-Volterra-Haken Amplitude Equations of Task-Related Brain Activity in Multiple, Consecutively Performed Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.

    The Lotka-Volterra-Haken equations have been frequently used in ecology and pattern formation. Recently, the equations have been proposed by several research groups as amplitude equations for task-related patterns of brain activity. In this theoretical study, the focus is on the circular causality aspect of pattern formation systems as formulated within the framework of synergetics. Accordingly, the stable modes of a pattern formation system inhibit the unstable modes, whereas the unstable modes excite the stable modes. Using this circular causality principle it is shown that under certain conditions the Lotka-Volterra-Haken amplitude equations can be derived from a general model of brain activity akin to the Wilson-Cowan model. The model captures the amplitude dynamics for brain activity patterns in experiments involving several consecutively performed multiple-choice tasks. This is explicitly demonstrated for two-choice tasks involving grasping and walking. A comment on the relevance of the theoretical framework for clinical psychology and schizophrenia is given as well.

  8. Global and regional brain atrophy is associated with low or retrograde facial vein flow in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Jakimovski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased collateral facial vein (FV flow may be associated with structural damage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. The objective was to assess differences in FV flow and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-derived outcomes in MS. The study included 136 MS patients who underwent neck and head vascular system examination by echo-color Doppler. Inflammatory MRI markers were assessed on a 3T MRI using a semi-automated edge detection and contouring/ thresholding technique. MRI volumetric outcomes of whole brain (WB, gray matter (GM, white matter (WM, cortex, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF, deep gray matter (DGM, thalamus, caudate nucleus (CN, putamen, globus pallidus (GP, and hippocampus were calculated. Independent t-test and ANCOVA, adjusted for age, were used to compare groups based on FV flow quartiles. Thirty-four MS patients with FV flow ≤327.8 mL/min (lowest quartile had significantly lower WB (P327.8 mL/min (higher quartiles. There were no differences in T1-, T2- and gadolinium- enhancing lesion volumes between the quartile groups. The lack of an association between FV blood flow and inflammatory MRI measures in MS patients, but an association with brain atrophy, suggests that the severity of neurodegenerative process may be related to hemodynamic alterations. MS patients with more advanced global and regional brain atrophy showed low or retrograde FV volume flow.

  9. Lack of Correlation between Benign Brain Tumors and Markers of Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2015-04-01

    Case control studies implicating dental X-rays in the genesis of intracranial meningiomas have yielded conflicting results. To further evaluate what risk, if any, that intracranial meningioma might be associated with dental X-rays, we examined the association of benign brain tumor incidence with the number of dentists and other correlates of oral health in U.S. states and the District of Columbia. We compared these correlations to the association of the same markers of oral health with Alzheimer's death rates. Poor oral health, especially periodontal disease, is a well-established risk factor for dementia. Pearson correlations, number of cases (49, no data from Kansas or Maryland) and significance (2 tailed p values) of benign brain tumor incidence and parameters of oral health are presented. None of the correlations approached statistical significance. In contrast, Alzheimer's deaths by state were negatively correlated with number of dentists and other markers of oral health. Our finding of a total lack of correlation between benign brain tumors and markers of oral health and, by implication, dental X-rays, suggests there may be no relationship between dental X-rays and meningioma or other benign brain tumors. This conclusion is strengthened by our demonstration of the known negative correlation between Alzheimer's and dental care.

  10. Variable dose interplay effects across radiosurgical apparatus in treating multiple brain metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Lijun; Nichol, Alan; Hossain, Sabbir; Wang, Brian; Petti, Paula; Vellani, Rosemin; Higby, Chris; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Barani, Igor; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Normal brain tissue doses have been shown to be strongly apparatus dependent for multi-target stereotactic radiosurgery. In this study, we investigated whether inter-target dose interplay effects across contemporary radiosurgical treatment platforms are responsible for such an observation. Methods For the study, subsets ( \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepack...

  11. The alpha secretase ADAM10: A metalloprotease with multiple functions in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saftig, Paul; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F

    2015-12-01

    Proteins belonging to the 'A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase' (ADAM) family are membrane-anchored proteases that are able to cleave the extracellular domains of several membrane-bound proteins in a process known as 'ectodomain shedding'. In the central nervous system, ADAM10 has attracted the most attention, since it was described as the amyloid precursor protein α-secretase over ten years ago. Despite the excitement over the potential of ADAM10 as a novel drug target in Alzheimer disease, the physiological functions of ADAM10 in the brain are not yet well understood. This is largely because of the embryonic lethality of ADAM10-deficient mice, which results from the loss of cleavage and signaling of the Notch receptor, another ADAM10 substrate. However, the recent generation of conditional ADAM10-deficient mice and the identification of further ADAM10 substrates in the brain has revealed surprisingly numerous and fundamental functions of ADAM10 in the development of the embryonic brain and also in the homeostasis of adult neuronal networks. Mechanistically, ADAM10 controls these functions by utilizing unique postsynaptic substrates in the central nervous system, in particular synaptic cell adhesion molecules, such as neuroligin-1, N-cadherin, NCAM, Ephrin A2 and A5. Consequently, a dysregulation of ADAM10 activity is linked to psychiatric and neurological diseases, such as epilepsy, fragile X syndrome and Huntington disease. This review highlights the recent progress in understanding the substrates and function as well as the regulation and cell biology of ADAM10 in the central nervous system and discusses the value of ADAM10 as a drug target in brain diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Voluntary Exercise Preconditioning Activates Multiple Antiapoptotic Mechanisms and Improves Neurological Recovery after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zaorui; Sabirzhanov, Boris; Wu, Junfang; Faden, Alan I; Stoica, Bogdan A

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity can attenuate neuronal loss, reduce neuroinflammation, and facilitate recovery after brain injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms of exercise-induced neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or its modulation of post-traumatic neuronal cell death. Voluntary exercise, using a running wheel, was conducted for 4 weeks immediately preceding (preconditioning) moderate-level controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model in mice. Compared to nonexercised controls, exercise preconditioning (pre-exercise) improved recovery of sensorimotor performance in the beam walk task, as well as cognitive/affective functions in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and tail-suspension tests. Further, pre-exercise reduced lesion size, attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus, and decreased microglial activation in the cortex. In addition, exercise preconditioning activated the brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway before trauma and amplified the injury-dependent increase in heat shock protein 70 expression, thus attenuating key apoptotic pathways. The latter include reduction in CCI-induced up-regulation of proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-homology 3-only Bcl-2 family molecules (Bid, Puma), decreased mitochondria permeabilization with attenuated release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), reduced AIF translocation to the nucleus, and attenuated caspase activation. Given these neuroprotective actions, voluntary physical exercise may serve to limit the consequences of TBI.

  13. Motor programme activating therapy influences adaptive brain functions in multiple sclerosis: clinical and MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasova, Kamila; Prochazkova, Marie; Tintera, Jaroslav; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Zimova, Denisa; Stetkarova, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    There is still little scientific evidence for the efficacy of neurofacilitation approaches and their possible influence on brain plasticity and adaptability. In this study, the outcome of a new kind of neurofacilitation approach, motor programme activating therapy (MPAT), was evaluated on the basis of a set of clinical functions and with MRI. Eighteen patients were examined four times with standardized clinical tests and diffusion tensor imaging to monitor changes without therapy, immediately after therapy and 1 month after therapy. Moreover, the strength of effective connectivity was analysed before and after therapy. Patients underwent a 1-h session of MPAT twice a week for 2 months. The data were analysed by nonparametric tests of association and were subsequently statistically evaluated. The therapy led to significant improvement in clinical functions, significant increment of fractional anisotropy and significant decrement of mean diffusivity, and decrement of effective connectivity at supplementary motor areas was observed immediately after the therapy. Changes in clinical functions and diffusion tensor images persisted 1 month after completing the programme. No statistically significant changes in clinical functions and no differences in MRI-diffusion tensor images were observed without physiotherapy. Positive immediate and long-term effects of MPAT on clinical and brain functions, as well as brain microstructure, were confirmed.

  14. Oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and increased brain atrophy in early stages of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine if the presence of oligoclonal bands (OB at early stages of multiple sclerosis was associated with higher brain atrophy, when compared with patients without OB. METHODS: Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients with less than two years of disease onset and OB detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were included. SIENAX was used for total brain volume (TBV, gray matter volume (GMV, and white matter volume (WMV. RESULTS: Forty patients were included, 29 had positive IgG-OB. No differences were found between positive and negative patients in gender, expanded disability status scale (EDSS, treatment received, and T2/T1 lesion load. TBV in positive IgG-OB patients was 1.5 mm³ x 10(6 compared with 1.64 mm³ x 10(6 in the negative ones (p=0.02. GMV was 0.51 mm³ x 10(6 in positive IgG-OB compared with 0.62 mm³ x 10(6 in negative ones (p=0.002. No differences in WMV (p=0.09 were seen. CONCLUSIONS: IgG-OB in the CSF was related to neurodegeneration magnetic resonance (MR markers in early RRMS.

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with multiple brain metastases (JLGK0901): a multi-institutional prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Serizawa, Toru; Shuto, Takashi; Akabane, Atsuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Kawagishi, Jun; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Sato, Yasunori; Jokura, Hidefumi; Yomo, Shoji; Nagano, Osamu; Kenai, Hiroyuki; Moriki, Akihito; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kida, Yoshihisa; Iwai, Yoshiyasu; Hayashi, Motohiro; Onishi, Hiroaki; Gondo, Masazumi; Sato, Mitsuya; Akimitsu, Tomohide; Kubo, Kenji; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Shibasaki, Toru; Goto, Tomoaki; Takanashi, Masami; Mori, Yoshimasa; Takakura, Kintomo; Saeki, Naokatsu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Momoshima, Suketaka; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    %) patients with two to four tumours and six (3%) patients with five to ten tumours. The proportion of patients who had one or more treatment-related adverse event of any grade did not differ significantly between the two groups of patients with multiple tumours (50 [9%] patients with two to four tumours vs 18 [9%] with five to ten; p=0·89). Four patients died, mainly of complications relating to stereotactic radiosurgery (two with one tumour and one each in the other two groups). Our results suggest that stereotactic radiosurgery without WBRT in patients with five to ten brain metastases is non-inferior to that in patients with two to four brain metastases. Considering the minimal invasiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery and the fewer side-effects than with WBRT, stereotactic radiosurgery might be a suitable alternative for patients with up to ten brain metastases. Japan Brain Foundation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical application of gamma knife dose verification method in multiple brain tumors : modified variable ellipsoid modeling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Beong Ik; Lee, Jae Min; Cho, Won Ho; Kang, Dong Wan; Kim, Choong Rak; Choi, Byung Kwan

    2013-02-01

    The Leksell Gamma Knife® (LGK) is based on a single-fraction high dose treatment strategy. Therefore, independent verification of the Leksell GammaPlan® (LGP) is important for ensuring patient safety and minimizing the risk of treatment errors. Although several verification techniques have been previously developed and reported, no method has ever been tested statistically on multiple LGK target treatments. The purpose of this study was to perform and to evaluate the accuracy of a verification method (modified variable ellipsoid modeling technique, MVEMT) for multiple target treatments. A total of 500 locations in 10 consecutive patients with multiple brain tumor targets were included in this study. We compared the data from an LGP planning system and MVEMT in terms of dose at random points, maximal dose points, and target volumes. All data was analyzed by t-test and the Bland-Altman plot, which are statistical methods used to compare two different measurement techniques. No statistical difference in dose at the 500 random points was observed between LGP and MVEMT. Differences in maximal dose ranged from -2.4% to 6.1%. An average distance of 1.6 mm between the maximal dose points was observed when comparing the two methods. Statistical analyses demonstrated that MVEMT was in excellent agreement with LGP when planning for radiosurgery involving multiple target treatments. MVEMT is a useful, independent tool for planning multiple target treatment that provides statistically identical data to that produced by LGP. Findings from the present study indicate that MVEMT can be used as a reference dose verification system for multiple tumors.

  17. Variable dose interplay effects across radiosurgical apparatus in treating multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Nichol, Alan; Hossain, Sabbir; Wang, Brian; Petti, Paula; Vellani, Rosemin; Higby, Chris; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Barani, Igor; Shrieve, Dennis C; Larson, David A; Sahgal, Arjun

    2014-11-01

    Normal brain tissue doses have been shown to be strongly apparatus dependent for multi-target stereotactic radiosurgery. In this study, we investigated whether inter-target dose interplay effects across contemporary radiosurgical treatment platforms are responsible for such an observation. For the study, subsets ([Formula: see text] and 12) of a total of 12 targets were planned at six institutions. Treatment platforms included the (1) Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX), (2) CyberKnife, (3) Novalis linear accelerator equipped with a 3.0-mm multi-leaf collimator (MLC), and the (4) Varian Truebeam flattening-filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator also equipped with a 2.5 mm MLC. Identical dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical structures were applied for each apparatus. All treatment plans were developed at individual centers, and the results were centrally analyzed. We found that dose-volume constraints were satisfied by each apparatus with some differences noted in certain structures such as the lens. The peripheral normal brain tissue doses were lowest for the PFX and highest for TrueBeam FFF and CyberKnife treatment plans. Comparing the volumes of normal brain receiving 12 Gy, TrueBeam FFF, Novalis, and CyberKnife were 180-290% higher than PFX. The mean volume of normal brain-per target receiving 4-Gy increased by approximately 3.0 cc per target for TrueBeam, 2.7 cc per target for CyberKnife, 2.0 cc per target for Novalis, and 0.82 cc per target for PFX. The beam-on time was shortest with the TrueBeam FFF (e.g., 6-9 min at a machine output rate of 1,200 MU/min) and longest for the PFX (e.g., 50-150 mins at a machine output rate of 350 cGy/min). The volumes of normal brain receiving 4 and 12 Gy were higher, and increased more swiftly per target, for Linac-based SRS platforms than for PFX. Treatment times were shortest with TrueBeam FFF.

  18. Strategies for implementing health promotion programs in multiple American Indian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerly, Catherine Carmel; Laing, Shannon S; Day, Anya-Victoria G; Blackinton, Paulina M; Pingatore, Noel L; Haverkate, Richard T; Heany, Julia F

    2009-04-01

    American Indians experience significant health disparities compared to the general U.S. population. The Steps to a Healthier Anishinaabe program adopted a unique framework to implement health promotion intervention activities in multiple American Indian communities in Michigan. By enabling each community to tailor interventions to their specific culture and health priorities, the program is characterized by a culturally competent and community-driven approach to decrease the impact of chronic diseases on the health of Michigan's American Indians. This article describes the community-based framework and argues that multisite, community-tailored health promotion programs are a promising approach to reducing health disparities in minority populations.

  19. Normal-appearing brain t1 relaxation time predicts disability in early primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredonia, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Olga; Khaleeli, Zhaleh; Tozer, Daniel J; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J

    2007-03-01

    To investigate whether patients with early primary progressive multiple sclerosis show changes in T1 relaxation time (T1-RT) in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and normal-appearing gray matter (NAGM) during 2 years and whether T1-RT at baseline predicts disability. Twenty-one patients and 12 control subjects were studied at baseline and after 2 years. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) scores were assessed. T1 relaxation time histograms of NAWM and NAGM were obtained in all subjects, and mean, peak height, and peak location of the histograms were measured. Paired t tests were used to compare baseline and 2-year histogram values in patients and control subjects. To investigate whether T1-RT predicted clinical changes, multiple linear regression analysis was used. Patients showed increases in NAWM and NAGM T1-RT mean and peak location during follow-up, and significant decreases in NAWM and NAGM peak height. Baseline NAWM T1-RT mean values and peak height predicted disability at 2 years, as measured with the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score. T1 relaxometry is a good marker of disease progression and has prognostic potential in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

  20. Coffee consumption and health: umbrella review of meta-analyses of multiple health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Robin; Kennedy, Oliver J; Roderick, Paul; Fallowfield, Jonathan A; Hayes, Peter C; Parkes, Julie

    2017-11-22

    Objectives  To evaluate the existing evidence for associations between coffee consumption and multiple health outcomes. Design  Umbrella review of the evidence across meta-analyses of observational and interventional studies of coffee consumption and any health outcome. Data sources  PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and screening of references. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies  Meta-analyses of both observational and interventional studies that examined the associations between coffee consumption and any health outcome in any adult population in all countries and all settings. Studies of genetic polymorphisms for coffee metabolism were excluded. Results  The umbrella review identified 201 meta-analyses of observational research with 67 unique health outcomes and 17 meta-analyses of interventional research with nine unique outcomes. Coffee consumption was more often associated with benefit than harm for a range of health outcomes across exposures including high versus low, any versus none, and one extra cup a day. There was evidence of a non-linear association between consumption and some outcomes, with summary estimates indicating largest relative risk reduction at intakes of three to four cups a day versus none, including all cause mortality (relative risk 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.79 to 0.88), cardiovascular mortality (0.81, 0.72 to 0.90), and cardiovascular disease (0.85, 0.80 to 0.90). High versus low consumption was associated with an 18% lower risk of incident cancer (0.82, 0.74 to 0.89). Consumption was also associated with a lower risk of several specific cancers and neurological, metabolic, and liver conditions. Harmful associations were largely nullified by adequate adjustment for smoking, except in pregnancy, where high versus low/no consumption was associated with low birth weight (odds ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.67), preterm birth in the first (1.22, 1.00 to 1.49) and second (1

  1. Multimodal neuroimaging of male and female brain structure in health and disease across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Thompson, Paul M

    2017-01-02

    Sex differences in brain development and aging are important to identify, as they may help to understand risk factors and outcomes in brain disorders that are more prevalent in one sex compared with the other. Brain imaging techniques have advanced rapidly in recent years, yielding detailed structural and functional maps of the living brain. Even so, studies are often limited in sample size, and inconsistent findings emerge, one example being varying findings regarding sex differences in the size of the corpus callosum. More recently, large-scale neuroimaging consortia such as the Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics through Meta Analysis Consortium have formed, pooling together expertise, data, and resources from hundreds of institutions around the world to ensure adequate power and reproducibility. These initiatives are helping us to better understand how brain structure is affected by development, disease, and potential modulators of these effects, including sex. This review highlights some established and disputed sex differences in brain structure across the life span, as well as pitfalls related to interpreting sex differences in health and disease. We also describe sex-related findings from the ENIGMA consortium, and ongoing efforts to better understand sex differences in brain circuitry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. General health status measures for people with cognitive impairment: learning disability and acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemsma, R P; Forbes, C A; Glanville, J M; Eastwood, A J; Kleijnen, J

    2001-01-01

    Currently there is a wide range of health status measures that aim to assess general health status in people with cognitive impairment. However, the validity and/or applicability to this patient group are largely unknown. This has implications for the assessment of treatment outcomes and rehabilitation, for prognostic purposes, for planning services, and for determining the benefits and adverse effects of health technologies targeted at these patient groups. (1) To identify the general health status measures that have been validated in patients with cognitive impairment. (2) To assess the extent to which these measures have been validated. (3) To draw out the implications of the findings for the use of existing measures and for future primary research in this area. METHODS. Studies that assessed general health status in people with cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury (traumatic brain injury, cerebro-vascular accident or multiple sclerosis (MS)) or learning disability (LD) were included in the review. Studies that used general health status instruments measuring only one general health dimension, and studies that only featured participants with cognitive impairment due to dementia were excluded. METHODS. A wide range of relevant databases were searched for studies on cognitive impairment, general health status measures, and validation of health status measures. A handsearch of general health status bibliographies was also conducted. Data were collected on the general health status measure used, the population characteristics, aims of the study, validity details, and conclusions. The review includes data from 71 studies, reported in 83 separate publications. In total 34 different general health status measures were described in the 83 publications, with the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) the most frequently used measures (20 and 19 studies, respectively). These studies included a total of 98 instrument validations, 52 of

  3. Location of brain lesions predicts conversion of clinically isolated syndromes to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgio, Antonio; Battaglini, Marco; Rocca, Maria Assunta

    2013-01-01

    and clinical follow-up at 1 year were collected for 1,165 patients with CIS. On T2-weighted MRI, we generated lesion probability maps of white matter (WM) lesion location and frequency. Voxelwise analyses were performed with a nonparametric permutation-based approach (p ...: In CIS patients with hemispheric, multifocal, and brainstem/cerebellar onset, lesion probability map clusters were seen in clinically eloquent brain regions. Significant lesion clusters were not found in CIS patients with optic nerve and spinal cord onset. At 1 year, clinically definite MS developed...

  4. Identification of multiple post-translational modifications in the porcine brain specific p25alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J; Hedegaard, Claus; Lundvig, Ditte

    2008-01-01

    -synuclein and is a potent stimulator of alpha-synuclein aggregation. P25alpha is a phosphoprotein and post-translational modifications (PTMs) may play a role in its disease-related abnormalities. To investigate the spectrum of PTMs on p25alpha we cloned porcine p25alpha and isolated the protein from porcine brain. Using......- and trimethylation, citrullination and a HexNAc group. The modifications are localized within p25alpha's unfolded terminal domains and suggest that their functional states are regulated. This comprehensive mapping of p25alpha's PTMs will form the basis for future functional studies and investigations of p25alpha...

  5. Multiple Intelligence Theory and Foreign Language Learning: A Brain-Based Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jane; Fonseca, Mª Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Gardner's Multiple Intelligences theory is presented as a cognitive perspective on intelligence which has profound implications for education in general. More specifically, it has led to the application of eight of these frames to language teaching and learning. In this chapter, we will argue in favour of the application of MIT to the EFL…

  6. Temporal brain dynamics of multiple object processing: the flexibility of individuation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Mazza

    Full Text Available The ability to process concurrently multiple visual objects is fundamental for a coherent perception of the world. A core component of this ability is the simultaneous individuation of multiple objects. Many studies have addressed the mechanism of object individuation but it remains unknown whether the visual system mandatorily individuates all relevant elements in the visual field, or whether object indexing depends on task demands. We used a neural measure of visual selection, the N2pc component, to evaluate the flexibility of multiple object individuation. In three ERP experiments, participants saw a variable number of target elements among homogenous distracters and performed either an enumeration task (Experiment 1 or a detection task, reporting whether at least one (Experiment 2 or a specified number of target elements (Experiment 3 was present. While in the enumeration task the N2pc response increased as a function of the number of targets, no such modulation was found in Experiment 2, indicating that individuation of multiple targets is not mandatory. However, a modulation of the N2pc similar to the enumeration task was visible in Experiment 3, further highlighting that object individuation is a flexible mechanism that binds indexes to object properties and locations as needed for further object processing.

  7. Xylohypha bantiana Multiple Brain Abscesses in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid F AlHabib

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Xylohypha bantiana is a rare cause of cerebral fungal infection (phaeohyphomycosis. We report on a 72-year-old man who, while taking several immunosuppressive medications for systemic lupus erythematosus, presented with multiple bilateral cerebral abscesses caused by X bantiana. The lesions were not surgically amenable and the patient died two months after discontinuing antifungal therapy.

  8. Identification of multiple post-translational modifications in the porcine brain specific p25α

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, A.J.; Hedegaard, C.; Lundvig, D.; Sundbye, S.; Issinger, O.G.; Jensen, O.N.; Jensen, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    P25α is a protein normally expressed in oligodendrocytes and subcellular relocalization of p25α occurs in multiple system atrophy, Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia along with ectopic expression in neurons. Moreover, it accumulates in Lewy body inclusions with aggregated α-synuclein and is

  9. Automatic segmentation and volumetry of multiple sclerosis brain lesions from MR images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, S.; Sima, D.M.; Ribbens, A.; Cambron, M.; Maertens, A.; Van Hecke, W.; De Meij, J.; Barkhof, F.; Steenwijk, M.D.; Daams, M.; Maes, F.; Van Huffel, S.; Vrenken, H.; Smeets, D.

    2015-01-01

    The location and extent of white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important criteria for diagnosis, follow-up and prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Clinical trials have shown that quantitative values, such as lesion volumes, are meaningful in MS prognosis. Manual lesion

  10. Non-invasive measurement of brain damage in a primate model of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T Hart, B.A.; Vogels, J.; Bauer, J.; Brok, H.P.M.; Blezer, E.

    2004-01-01

    Early recognition of whether a product has potential as a new therapy for treating multiple sclerosis (MS) relies upon the quality of the animal models used in the preclinical trials. The promising effects of new treatments in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) have

  11. Serotonin: A mediator of the gut-brain axis in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malinova, Tsveta S.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; de Vries, Helga E.

    2017-01-01

    The significance of the gut microbiome for the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been established, although the underlying signaling mechanisms of this interaction have not been sufficiently explored. We address this point and use serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT))-a

  12. B cells populating the multiple sclerosis brain mature in the draining cervical lymph nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N.H. Stern (Joel N. H.); G. Yaari (Gur); J. Vander Heiden (Jason); G.M. Church (George); W.F. Donahue (William F.); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier); A.J. Huttner (Anita J.); J.D. Laman (Jon); R.M. Nagra (Rashed M.); A. Nylander (Alyssa); D. Pitt (David); S. Ramanan (Sriram); B.A. Siddiqui (Bilal A.); F. Vigneault (Francois); S.H. Kleinstein (Steven H.); D.A. Hafler (David); K. O'Connor (Kevin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMultiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by autoimmunemediated demyelination and neurodegeneration. The CNS of patients withMSharbors expanded clones of antigen-experienced B cells that reside in distinct compartments including

  13. Multiple brain networks underpinning word learning from fluent speech revealed by independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barroso, Diana; Ripollés, Pablo; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Mohammadi, Bahram; Münte, Thomas F; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth

    2015-04-15

    Although neuroimaging studies using standard subtraction-based analysis from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have suggested that frontal and temporal regions are involved in word learning from fluent speech, the possible contribution of different brain networks during this type of learning is still largely unknown. Indeed, univariate fMRI analyses cannot identify the full extent of distributed networks that are engaged by a complex task such as word learning. Here we used Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to characterize the different brain networks subserving word learning from an artificial language speech stream. Results were replicated in a second cohort of participants with a different linguistic background. Four spatially independent networks were associated with the task in both cohorts: (i) a dorsal Auditory-Premotor network; (ii) a dorsal Sensory-Motor network; (iii) a dorsal Fronto-Parietal network; and (iv) a ventral Fronto-Temporal network. The level of engagement of these networks varied through the learning period with only the dorsal Auditory-Premotor network being engaged across all blocks. In addition, the connectivity strength of this network in the second block of the learning phase correlated with the individual variability in word learning performance. These findings suggest that: (i) word learning relies on segregated connectivity patterns involving dorsal and ventral networks; and (ii) specifically, the dorsal auditory-premotor network connectivity strength is directly correlated with word learning performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple source positions in time-domain optical brain imaging: a novel approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Oliver; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Walter, Alfred; Macdonald, Rainer

    2013-06-01

    Multi-source operation in time-domain optical brain imaging often relies on the use of piezomechanical fiber switches which limit the speed when recording dynamic processes. The concept presented in this work overcomes this limitation by multiplexing on the nanosecond and microsecond time scales. In particular, the source positions were encoded by different delays on the nanosecond time scale. Multiplexing of wavelengths on the microsecond time scale (e.g. within 100 μs) was achieved by burst-mode operation of picosecond diode lasers in combination with addressing of different memory blocks in time-correlated single photon counting by means of routing inputs. This concept was implemented for 4 detectors and 5 source optodes yielding 12 measurement channels per hemisphere. In order to largely equalize the count rates for all source-detector pairs with minimal overall losses, a setup was developed that enabled the freely adjustable distribution of laser power to the various source optodes. It was based on polarization splitters and motorized broadband polarization rotators. The method was successfully demonstrated in an in vivo experiment employing two different types of motor activation of the brain.

  15. Health-related quality of life and rehabilitation cost following intensive care unit stay in multiple trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiannis, Pantelis; Katsoulas, Theodoros; Fildissis, George; Intas, George; Galanis, Peter; Kosta, Natalia; Zidianakis, Vasilios; Baltopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in multiple trauma patients due to motor vehicle crashes during a follow-up period of 2 years after discharge from an intensive care unit (ICU) and the effect of income and financial cost of rehabilitation in HRQOL. The study was a prospective observational study of multiple trauma patients from January 2009 to January 2011 who were hospitalized in a general, medical, and surgical ICU of a district hospital in Athens, Greece. Eighty-five patients with multiple traumas due to motor vehicle crashes and with an ICU stay of more than 24 hours were included in the study. HRQOL was assessed by a general questionnaire, the EuroQol 5D. Increased monthly household income and absence of traumatic brain injuries were associated with an improved EQ-VAS score. The frequency of severe problems in mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression decreased over time. The financial cost of rehabilitation was initially high but decreased over time. Severely injured victims of motor vehicle crashes suffer from serious problems in terms of HRQOL which is gradually improved even 2 years after hospital discharge. In addition, HRQOL is significantly related to income. Resources used for rehabilitation decrease over time, but even at 24 months, the patients still use half of the amount as compared with the cost of the first 6 months after trauma.

  16. A Life-Long Approach to Physical Activity for Brain Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Macpherson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that engaging in lifelong Physical activity (PA can help delay the onset of many chronic lifestyle related and non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type two diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases. Additionally, growing evidence also documents the importance of PA for brain health, with numerous studies indicating regular engagement in physical activities may be protective against cognitive decline and dementia in late life. Indeed, the link between PA and brain health may be different at each stage of life from childhood, mid-life and late life. Building on this emerging body of multidisciplinary research, this review aims to summarize the current body of evidence linking regular PA and brain health across the lifespan. Specifically, we will focus on the relationship between PA and brain health at three distinct stages of life: childhood and adolescence, mid-life, late life in cognitively healthy adults and later life in adults living with age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD.

  17. The multiple time scales of sleep dynamics as a challenge for modelling the sleeping brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Eckehard; Claussen, Jens Christian; Achermann, Peter

    2011-10-13

    A particular property of the sleeping brain is that it exhibits dynamics on very different time scales ranging from the typical sleep oscillations such as sleep spindles and slow waves that can be observed in electroencephalogram (EEG) segments of several seconds duration over the transitions between the different sleep stages on a time scale of minutes to the dynamical processes involved in sleep regulation with typical time constants in the range of hours. There is an increasing body of work on mathematical and computational models addressing these different dynamics, however, usually considering only processes on a single time scale. In this paper, we review and present a new analysis of the dynamics of human sleep EEG at the different time scales and relate the findings to recent modelling efforts pointing out both the achievements and remaining challenges.

  18. Automatic segmentation and volumetry of multiple sclerosis brain lesions from MR images

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Saurabh; Sima, Diana M.; Ribbens, Annemie; Cambron, Melissa; Maertens, Anke; Van Hecke, Wim; De Mey, Johan; Barkhof, Frederik; Steenwijk,Martijn D.; Daams, Marita; Maes, Frederik; van Huffel, Sabine; Vrenken, Hugo; Smeets, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The location and extent of white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important criteria for diagnosis, follow-up and prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Clinical trials have shown that quantitative values, such as lesion volumes, are meaningful in MS prognosis. Manual lesion delineation for the segmentation of lesions is, however, time-consuming and suffers from observer variability. In this paper, we propose MSmetrix, an accurate and reliable automatic method for lesion ...

  19. Occupational stress and psychopathology in health professionals: an explorative study with the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliceto, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Spencer-Thomas, Sally; Ferracuti, Stefano; Erbuto, Denise; Lester, David; Candilera, Gabriella; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Occupational stress is a multivariate process involving sources of pressure, psycho-physiological distress, locus of control, work dissatisfaction, depression, anxiety, mental health disorders, hopelessness, and suicide ideation. Healthcare professionals are known for higher rates of occupational-related distress (burnout and compassion fatigue) and higher rates of suicide. The purpose of this study was to explain the relationships between occupational stress and some psychopathological dimensions in a sample of health professionals. We investigated 156 nurses and physicians, 62 males and 94 females, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess occupational stress [occupational stress inventory (OSI)], temperament (temperament evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego autoquestionnaire), and hopelessness (Beck hopelessness scale). The best Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes model with five OSI predictors yielded the following results: χ2(9) = 14.47 (p = 0.11); χ2/df = 1.60; comparative fit index = 0.99; root mean square error of approximation = 0.05. This model provided a good fit to the empirical data, showing a strong direct influence of casual variables such as work dissatisfaction, absence of type A behavior, and especially external locus of control, psychological and physiological distress on latent variable psychopathology. Occupational stress is in a complex relationship with temperament and hopelessness and also common among healthcare professionals.

  20. Multiple sclerosis and palliative care - perceptions of severely affected multiple sclerosis patients and their health professionals: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In Germany, patients severely affected by Multiple Sclerosis (MS) do not routinely come into contact with palliative care, even if possibly beneficial. This study was aimed at investigating how severely affected MS patients and their health professionals perceive palliative care to determine how to better approach these patients in Germany about this topic. Methods 15 patients feeling severely affected by MS and 23 health professionals experienced with MS patients (3 social workers, 7 nurses, and 13 physicians) in both in-/outpatient and rural/ urban settings participated in this qualitative study in Germany. Semi-structured interviews (patients, health professionals) and focus groups (health professionals) were conducted, transcribed verbatim and analyzed via qualitative content analysis. Results MS patients were mostly unfamiliar with the term “palliative care” or were aware of it only in relation to cancer and dying. They did not view it as relevant to themselves. Health professionals predominantly associated palliative care with dying cancer patients, if familiar with it at all. Most physicians doubted its relevance for neurological patients and denied MS as a cause of death. Nevertheless, most felt they already offered their patients sufficient palliative care, or thought that it could not meet MS patients’ complex needs. Most nurses and social workers recognized deficits in existing care structures and regarded palliative care as an opportunity for MS patients. Conclusion MS patients’, and health professionals’ restricted, death-associated awareness of palliative care leads to discomfort, fear or rejection of this idea. Therefore, a defined concept of palliative care emphasizing opportunities for severely affected MS patients and considering early integration should be spread throughout the German MS community as an additional layer of support for this patient group. PMID:24641905

  1. Promoting brain health through exercise and diet in older adults: a physiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philippa A; Pialoux, Vincent; Corbett, Dale; Drogos, Lauren; Erickson, Kirk I; Eskes, Gail A; Poulin, Marc J

    2016-08-15

    The rise in incidence of age-related cognitive impairment is a global health concern. Ageing is associated with a number of changes in the brain that, collectively, contribute to the declines in cognitive function observed in older adults. Structurally, the ageing brain atrophies as white and grey matter volumes decrease. Oxidative stress and inflammation promote endothelial dysfunction thereby hampering cerebral perfusion and thus delivery of energy substrates and nutrients. Further, the development of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles contributes to neuronal loss. Of interest, there are substantial inter-individual differences in the degree to which these physical and functional changes impact upon cognitive function as we grow older. This review describes how engaging in physical activity and cognitive activities and adhering to a Mediterranean style diet promote 'brain health'. From a physiological perspective, we discuss the effects of these modifiable lifestyle behaviours on the brain, and how some recent human trials are beginning to show some promise as to the effectiveness of lifestyle behaviours in combating cognitive impairment. Moreover, we propose that these lifestyle behaviours, through numerous mechanisms, serve to increase brain, cerebrovascular and cognitive reserve, thereby preserving and enhancing cognitive function for longer. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  2. Health Care Professionals' Evaluation of Quality of Life Issues in Patients With Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Natalie; Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying; Sahgal, Arjun; Zeng, Liang; Koo, Kaitlin; Chow, Edward

    2012-12-01

    The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Brain (FACT-Br) is a brain specific Quality of life (QOL) tool used for patients in the primary and metastatic cancer population. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the QOL issues health care professionals (HCPs) find most important when caring for brain metastases patients. HCPs were asked to rate whether each of the 23 FACT-Br subscale items were relevant to patients or not. In the survey, HCPs indicated the 5 to 10 top issues affecting the QOL of patients with brain metastases. Demographic information such as gender, years of experience, and health care specialty were recorded. A total of 46 HCPs participated in the study, 89% of HCPs ranked the need for help in caring for themselves as the most relevant item for patients with brain metastases. Other highly relevant items included the concern of getting headaches (81%) and weakness in arms or legs (78%). The lowest rated items included the ability to put thoughts together (8%), ability to write as they used to (11%) and also the ability to read as they used to (14%). It is very important to determine the issues that HCPs think are most important to patients in an attempt to harmonize these with those of patients. Future studies should compare the items that HCPs rate as most relevant to those that patients rate to ensure agreeability.

  3. Lifelong Brain Health is a Lifelong Challenge: From Evolutionary Principles to Empirical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Although the human brain is exceptional in size and information processing capabilities, it is similar to other mammals with regards to the factors that promote its optimal performance. Three such factors are the challenges of physical exercise, food deprivation/fasting, and social/intellectual engagement. Because it evolved, in part, for success in seeking and acquiring food, the brain functions best when the individual is hungry and physically active, as typified by the hungry lion stalking and chasing its prey. Indeed, studies of animal models and human subjects demonstrate robust beneficial effects of regular exercise and intermittent energy restriction/fasting on cognitive function and mood, particularly in the contexts of aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. Unfortunately, the agricultural revolution and the invention of effort-sparing technologies have resulted in a dramatic reduction or elimination of vigorous exercise and fasting, leaving only intellectual challenges to bolster brain function. In addition to disengaging beneficial adaptive responses in the brain, sedentary overindulgent lifestyles promote obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, all of which may increase the risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. It is therefore important to embrace the reality of the requirements for exercise, intermittent fasting and critical thinking for optimal brain health throughout life, and to recognize the dire consequences for our aging population of failing to implement such brain-healthy lifestyles. PMID:25576651

  4. Lifelong brain health is a lifelong challenge: from evolutionary principles to empirical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Mark P

    2015-03-01

    Although the human brain is exceptional in size and information processing capabilities, it is similar to other mammals with regard to the factors that promote its optimal performance. Three such factors are the challenges of physical exercise, food deprivation/fasting, and social/intellectual engagement. Because it evolved, in part, for success in seeking and acquiring food, the brain functions best when the individual is hungry and physically active, as typified by the hungry lion stalking and chasing its prey. Indeed, studies of animal models and human subjects demonstrate robust beneficial effects of regular exercise and intermittent energy restriction/fasting on cognitive function and mood, particularly in the contexts of aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. Unfortunately, the agricultural revolution and the invention of effort-sparing technologies have resulted in a dramatic reduction or elimination of vigorous exercise and fasting, leaving only intellectual challenges to bolster brain function. In addition to disengaging beneficial adaptive responses in the brain, sedentary overindulgent lifestyles promote obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, all of which may increase the risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. It is therefore important to embrace the reality of the requirements for exercise, intermittent fasting and critical thinking for optimal brain health throughout life, and to recognize the dire consequences for our aging population of failing to implement such brain-healthy lifestyles. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Analyses of prognostic factors in cases of non-small cell lung cancer with multiple brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomei Gong,1 Daoan Zhou,1 Shixiong Liang,1 Caicun Zhou2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Aim: To observe the therapeutic efficacy and prognostic factors that influence survival rates in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with multiple brain metastases (BMs, more than three and less than ten. Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on the clinical data of 209 NSCLC patients with multiple BMs and were admitted to our hospital between March 2007 and November 2012. All BM patients received whole-brain radiotherapy. Two hundred patients received combined chemotherapy during the treatment process; 99 received targeted drug therapy; and nine got only symptomatic and supportive treatment. Survival time was defined as the period from the start of BM therapy to the patient’s death or end of the follow-up period. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate the median survival time, and the 6-month, 1-, and 2-year cumulative survival rates, as well as to plot the survival curves. The patients’ cultural background included their socioeconomic status, level of education, their understanding of the disease, and the degree of care and support they received from their family members. Log-rank test was employed to test the differences in the survival rates between the subgroups. Cox multivariate regression analyses were used to analyze the various factors influencing the prognoses of NSCLC with multiple BMs. Results: The follow-up duration was between 1 and 87 months. The median survival time for all BM patients was 12.1 months (95% confidence interval 9.37–14.83. The 6-month, 1-, and 2-year cumulative survival rates were 80%, 50.2%, and 10.7%, respectively. Univariate analyses revealed that the independent factors influencing survival prognoses included Karnofsky Performance Status score, control of the

  6. Peripheral VH4+ Plasmablasts Demonstrate Autoreactive B Cell Expansion Toward Brain Antigens in Early Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Jacqueline R.; Ireland, Sara J.; Chkheidze, Rati; Rounds, William H.; Lim, Joseph; Johnson, Jordan; Ramirez, Denise M.O.; Ligocki, Ann J.; Chen, Ding; Guzman, Alyssa A.; Woodhall, Mark; Wilson, Patrick C.; Meffre, Eric; White, Charles; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Waters, Patrick; Cowell, Lindsay G.; Stowe, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmablasts are a highly differentiated, antibody secreting B cell subset whose prevalence correlates with disease activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). For most patients experiencing partial transverse myelitis (PTM), plasmablasts are elevated in the blood at the first clinical presentation of disease (known as clinically isolated syndrome or CIS). In this study we found that many of these peripheral plasmablasts are autoreactive and recognize primarily gray matter targets in brain tissue. These plasmablasts express antibodies that over-utilize immunoglobulin heavy chain V-region subgroup 4 (VH4) genes, and the highly mutated VH4+ plasmablast antibodies recognize intracellular antigens of neurons and astrocytes. Most of the autoreactive, highly mutated VH4+ plasmablast antibodies recognize only a portion of cortical neurons, indicating that the response may be specific to neuronal subgroups or layers. Furthermore, CIS-PTM patients with this plasmablast response also exhibit modest reactivity toward neuroantigens in the plasma IgG antibody pool. Taken together, these data indicate that expanded VH4+ peripheral plasmablasts in early MS patients recognize brain gray matter antigens. Peripheral plasmablasts may be participating in the autoimmune response associated with MS, and provide an interesting avenue for investigating the expansion of autoreactive B cells at the time of the first documented clinical event. PMID:27730299

  7. Right parietal cortex and calculation processing: intraoperative functional mapping of multiplication and addition in patients affected by a brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Puppa, Alessandro; De Pellegrin, Serena; d'Avella, Elena; Gioffrè, Giorgio; Munari, Marina; Saladini, Marina; Salillas, Elena; Scienza, Renato; Semenza, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    The role of parietal areas in number processing is well known. The significance of intraoperative functional mapping of these areas has been only partially explored, however, and only a few discordant data are available in the surgical literature with regard to the right parietal lobe. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of simple calculation in cortical electrostimulation of right-handed patients affected by a right parietal brain tumor. Calculation mapping in awake surgery was performed in 3 right-handed patients affected by high-grade gliomas located in the right parietal lobe. Preoperatively, none of the patients presented with calculation deficits. In all 3 cases, after sensorimotor and language mapping, cortical and intraparietal sulcus areas involved in single-digit multiplication and addition calculations were mapped using bipolar electrostimulation. In all patients, different sites of the right parietal cortex, mainly in the inferior lobule, were detected as being specifically related to calculation (multiplication or addition). In 2 patients the intraparietal sulcus was functionally specific for multiplication. No functional sites for language were detected. All sites functional for calculation were spared during tumor resection, which was complete in all cases without postoperative neurological deficits. These findings provide intraoperative data in support of an anatomofunctional organization for multiplication and addition within the right parietal area. Furthermore, the study shows the potential clinical relevance of intraoperative mapping of calculation in patients undergoing surgery in the right parietal area. Further and larger studies are needed to confirm these data and assess whether mapped areas are effectively essential for function.

  8. Children with mathematical learning disability fail in recruiting verbal and numerical brain regions when solving simple multiplication problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Prado, Jérôme; Booth, James R

    2014-08-01

    Greater skill in solving single-digit multiplication problems requires a progressive shift from a reliance on numerical to verbal mechanisms over development. Children with mathematical learning disability (MD), however, are thought to suffer from a specific impairment in numerical mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that this impairment might prevent MD children from transitioning toward verbal mechanisms when solving single-digit multiplication problems. Brain activations during multiplication problems were compared in MD and typically developing (TD) children (3rd to 7th graders) in numerical and verbal regions which were individuated by independent localizer tasks. We used small (e.g., 2 × 3) and large (e.g., 7 × 9) problems as these problems likely differ in their reliance on verbal versus numerical mechanisms. Results indicate that MD children have reduced activations in both the verbal (i.e., left inferior frontal gyrus and left middle temporal to superior temporal gyri) and the numerical (i.e., right superior parietal lobule including intra-parietal sulcus) regions suggesting that both mechanisms are impaired. Moreover, the only reliable activation observed for MD children was in the numerical region when solving small problems. This suggests that MD children could effectively engage numerical mechanisms only for the easier problems. Conversely, TD children showed a modulation of activation with problem size in the verbal regions. This suggests that TD children were effectively engaging verbal mechanisms for the easier problems. Moreover, TD children with better language skills were more effective at engaging verbal mechanisms. In conclusion, results suggest that the numerical- and language-related processes involved in solving multiplication problems are impaired in MD children. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Translocator positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of brain glial cell activation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Gourab; Violante, Ines R; Scott, Gregory; Zimmerman, Karl; Santos-Ribeiro, Andre; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Gunn, Roger N; Malik, Omar; Ciccarelli, Olga; Nicholas, Richard; Matthews, Paul M

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterised by a diffuse inflammatory response mediated by microglia and astrocytes. Brain translocator protein (TSPO) positron-emission tomography (PET) and [myo-inositol] magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were used together to assess this. To explore the in vivo relationships between MRS and PET [11C]PBR28 in MS over a range of brain inflammatory burden. A total of 23 patients were studied. TSPO PET imaging with [11C]PBR28, single voxel MRS and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were undertaken. Disability was assessed by Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC). [11C]PBR28 uptake and [ myo-inositol] were not associated. When the whole cohort was stratified by higher [11C]PBR28 inflammatory burden, [ myo-inositol] was positively correlated to [11C]PBR28 uptake (Spearman's ρ = 0.685, p = 0.014). Moderate correlations were found between [11C]PBR28 uptake and both MRS creatine normalised N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentration and grey matter volume. MSFC was correlated with grey matter volume (ρ = 0.535, p = 0.009). There were no associations between other imaging or clinical measures. MRS [ myo-inositol] and PET [11C]PBR28 measure independent inflammatory processes which may be more commonly found together with more severe inflammatory disease. Microglial activation measured by [11C]PBR28 uptake was associated with loss of neuronal integrity and grey matter atrophy.

  10. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  11. Altered α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin isoform levels in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo

    2016-01-01

    Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease......-specific transcription patterns in frontal cortex in PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and MSA, and thus may mediate the development of α-synucleinopathies. In this study, the differential expression of α-synuclein isoforms on transcriptional and translational levels was ascertained in MSA patients in comparison with PD...

  12. Health outcomes associated with military deployment: mild traumatic brain injury, blast, trauma, and combat associations in the Florida National Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderploeg, Rodney D; Belanger, Heather G; Horner, Ronnie D; Spehar, Andrea M; Powell-Cope, Gail; Luther, Stephen L; Scott, Steven G

    2012-11-01

    To determine the association between specific military deployment experiences and immediate and longer-term physical and mental health effects, as well as examine the effects of multiple deployment-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) on health outcomes. Online survey of cross-sectional cohort. Odds ratios were calculated to assess the association between deployment-related factors (ie, physical injuries, exposure to potentially traumatic deployment experiences, combat, blast exposure, and mild TBI) and current health status, controlling for potential confounders, demographics, and predeployment experiences. Nonclinical. Members (N=3098) of the Florida National Guard (1443 deployed, 1655 not deployed). Not applicable. Presence of current psychiatric diagnoses and health outcomes, including postconcussive and non-postconcussive symptoms. Surveys were completed an average of 31.8 months (SD=24.4, range=0-95) after deployment. Strong, statistically significant associations were found between self-reported military deployment-related factors and current adverse health status. Deployment-related mild TBI was associated with depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and postconcussive symptoms collectively and individually. Statistically significant increases in the frequency of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and a postconcussive symptom complex were seen comparing single to multiple TBIs. However, a predeployment TBI did not increase the likelihood of sustaining another TBI in a blast exposure. Associations between blast exposure and abdominal pain, pain on deep breathing, shortness of breath, hearing loss, and tinnitus suggested residual barotrauma. Combat exposures with and without physical injury were each associated not only with PTSD but also with numerous postconcussive and non-postconcussive symptoms. The experience of seeing others wounded or killed or experiencing the death of a buddy or leader was associated with indigestion and headaches but

  13. Bike Desks in the Classroom: Energy Expenditure, Physical Health, Cognitive Performance, Brain Functioning, and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeyns, Tine; de Geus, Bas; Bailey, Stephen; Decroix, Lieselot; Van Cutsem, Jeroen; De Pauw, Kevin; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity is positively associated with physical health, cognitive performance, brain functioning and academic performance. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of bike desks in the classroom on adolescents' energy expenditure, physical health, cognitive performance, brain functioning and academic performance. Forty-four adolescents were randomly assigned to control group (CG) or intervention group (IG). During 5 months, the IG used a bike desk for 4 class hours/week. Energy expenditure was measured during 6 consecutive days. Anthropometric parameters, aerobic fitness, academic performance, cognitive performance and brain functioning were assessed before (T0) and after (T1) the intervention. Energy expenditure of the IG was significantly higher during the class hours in which they used the bike desks relative to normal class hours. The CG had a significantly higher BMI at T1 relative to T0 while this was not significantly different for the IG. Aerobic fitness was significantly better in the IG at T1 relative to T0. No significant effects on academic performance cognitive performance and brain functioning were observed. As the implementation of bike desks in the classroom did not interfere with adolescents' academic performance, this can be seen as an effective means of reducing in-class sedentary time and improving adolescents' physical health.

  14. Feedback-related brain activity predicts learning from feedback in multiple-choice testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Different event-related potentials (ERPs) have been shown to correlate with learning from feedback in decision-making tasks and with learning in explicit memory tasks. In the present study, we investigated which ERPs predict learning from corrective feedback in a multiple-choice test, which combines elements from both paradigms. Participants worked through sets of multiple-choice items of a Swahili-German vocabulary task. Whereas the initial presentation of an item required the participants to guess the answer, corrective feedback could be used to learn the correct response. Initial analyses revealed that corrective feedback elicited components related to reinforcement learning (FRN), as well as to explicit memory processing (P300) and attention (early frontal positivity). However, only the P300 and early frontal positivity were positively correlated with successful learning from corrective feedback, whereas the FRN was even larger when learning failed. These results suggest that learning from corrective feedback crucially relies on explicit memory processing and attentional orienting to corrective feedback, rather than on reinforcement learning.

  15. Long-term music training tunes how the brain temporally binds signals from multiple senses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hweeling; Noppeney, Uta

    2011-12-20

    Practicing a musical instrument is a rich multisensory experience involving the integration of visual, auditory, and tactile inputs with motor responses. This combined psychophysics-fMRI study used the musician's brain to investigate how sensory-motor experience molds temporal binding of auditory and visual signals. Behaviorally, musicians exhibited a narrower temporal integration window than nonmusicians for music but not for speech. At the neural level, musicians showed increased audiovisual asynchrony responses and effective connectivity selectively for music in a superior temporal sulcus-premotor-cerebellar circuitry. Critically, the premotor asynchrony effects predicted musicians' perceptual sensitivity to audiovisual asynchrony. Our results suggest that piano practicing fine tunes an internal forward model mapping from action plans of piano playing onto visible finger movements and sounds. This internal forward model furnishes more precise estimates of the relative audiovisual timings and hence, stronger prediction error signals specifically for asynchronous music in a premotor-cerebellar circuitry. Our findings show intimate links between action production and audiovisual temporal binding in perception.

  16. Hybrid EEG-fNIRS Asynchronous Brain-Computer Interface for Multiple Motor Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccino, Alessio Paolo; Keles, Hasan Onur; Omurtag, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) have demonstrated great promise for neuroprosthetics and assistive devices. Here we aim to investigate methods to combine Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in an asynchronous Sensory Motor rhythm (SMR)-based BCI. We attempted to classify 4 different executed movements, namely, Right-Arm-Left-Arm-Right-Hand-Left-Hand tasks. Previous studies demonstrated the benefit of EEG-fNIRS combination. However, since normally fNIRS hemodynamic response shows a long delay, we investigated new features, involving slope indicators, in order to immediately detect changes in the signals. Moreover, Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs) have been applied to both EEG and fNIRS signals. 15 healthy subjects took part in the experiments and since 25 trials per class were available, CSPs have been regularized with information from the entire population of participants and optimized using genetic algorithms. The different features have been compared in terms of performance and the dynamic accuracy over trials shows that the introduced methods diminish the fNIRS delay in the detection of changes.

  17. Hybrid EEG-fNIRS Asynchronous Brain-Computer Interface for Multiple Motor Tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Paolo Buccino

    Full Text Available Non-invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI have demonstrated great promise for neuroprosthetics and assistive devices. Here we aim to investigate methods to combine Electroencephalography (EEG and functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS in an asynchronous Sensory Motor rhythm (SMR-based BCI. We attempted to classify 4 different executed movements, namely, Right-Arm-Left-Arm-Right-Hand-Left-Hand tasks. Previous studies demonstrated the benefit of EEG-fNIRS combination. However, since normally fNIRS hemodynamic response shows a long delay, we investigated new features, involving slope indicators, in order to immediately detect changes in the signals. Moreover, Common Spatial Patterns (CSPs have been applied to both EEG and fNIRS signals. 15 healthy subjects took part in the experiments and since 25 trials per class were available, CSPs have been regularized with information from the entire population of participants and optimized using genetic algorithms. The different features have been compared in terms of performance and the dynamic accuracy over trials shows that the introduced methods diminish the fNIRS delay in the detection of changes.

  18. Health-Promoting Home and Workplace Neighborhoods: Associations With Multiple Facets of Men's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, Simon; Meunier, Sophie; Cloutier, Lyne; Auger, Nathalie; Roy, Bernard; Tremblay, Gilles; de Montigny, Francine; Gaboury, Isabelle; Bernard, François-Olivier; Lavoie, Brigitte; Dion, Harold; Houle, Janie

    2017-11-01

    Despite the importance of healthy settings for health promotion, little is known about how neighborhood characteristics affect men's health. The present study aims to explore the associations between perceptions of home and workplace neighborhoods with diverse health outcomes, and to examine mediating mechanisms. A sample of 669 men members of labor unions in Quebec, Canada, completed a questionnaire assessing social and physical aspects of their work and home neighborhoods (the Health-Promoting Neighborhood Questionnaire) as well as subjective and objective health outcomes (perceived health, positive mental health, body mass index) and potential mediators (health behaviors, self-efficacy). Structural equation modeling (path analysis) revealed that the Health-Promoting Neighborhood Questionnaire was associated with all three health outcomes, either directly or indirectly through health behaviors and self-efficacy. Both home and workplace neighborhoods were associated with men's health, home neighborhood being more strongly associated. The findings suggest that physical and social aspects of neighborhood might contribute to men's health. The study highlights positive environmental levers for urban planners, policy makers, and health professionals to promote men's health.

  19. Health-Promoting Home and Workplace Neighborhoods: Associations With Multiple Facets of Men’s Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, Simon; Meunier, Sophie; Cloutier, Lyne; Auger, Nathalie; Roy, Bernard; Tremblay, Gilles; de Montigny, Francine; Gaboury, Isabelle; Bernard, François-Olivier; Lavoie, Brigitte; Dion, Harold; Houle, Janie

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of healthy settings for health promotion, little is known about how neighborhood characteristics affect men’s health. The present study aims to explore the associations between perceptions of home and workplace neighborhoods with diverse health outcomes, and to examine mediating mechanisms. A sample of 669 men members of labor unions in Quebec, Canada, completed a questionnaire assessing social and physical aspects of their work and home neighborhoods (the Health-Promoting Neighborhood Questionnaire) as well as subjective and objective health outcomes (perceived health, positive mental health, body mass index) and potential mediators (health behaviors, self-efficacy). Structural equation modeling (path analysis) revealed that the Health-Promoting Neighborhood Questionnaire was associated with all three health outcomes, either directly or indirectly through health behaviors and self-efficacy. Both home and workplace neighborhoods were associated with men’s health, home neighborhood being more strongly associated. The findings suggest that physical and social aspects of neighborhood might contribute to men’s health. The study highlights positive environmental levers for urban planners, policy makers, and health professionals to promote men’s health. PMID:29073845

  20. Using an eHealth Intervention to Stimulate Health Behavior for the Prevention of Cognitive Decline in Dutch Adults: A Study Protocol for the Brain Aging Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalbers, Teun; Baars, Maria Ae; Qin, Li; de Lange, Annet; Kessels, Roy Pc; Olde Rikkert, Marcel Gm

    2015-11-10

    Internet-delivered intervention programs are an effective way of changing health behavior in an aging population. The same population has an increasing number of people with cognitive decline or cognitive impairments. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors such as physical activity, nutrition, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep, and stress all influence the probability of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study aims to answer two questions: (1) Is the use of a self-motivated, complex eHealth intervention effective in changing multiple health behaviors related to cognitive aging in Dutch adults in the work force, especially those aged 40 and over? and (2) Does this health behavior change result in healthier cognitive aging patterns and contribute to preventing or delaying future onset of neurodegenerative syndromes? The Brain Aging Monitor study uses a quasi-experimental 2-year pre-posttest design. The Brain Aging Monitor is an online, self-motivated lifestyle intervention program. Recruitment is done both in medium to large organizations and in the Dutch general population over the age of 40. The main outcome measure is the relationship between lifestyle change and cognitive aging. The program uses different strategies and modalities such as Web content, email, online newsletters, and online games to aid its users in behavior change. To build self-regulatory skills, the Brain Aging Monitor offers its users goal-setting activities, skill-building activities, and self-monitoring. Study results are expected to be published in early 2016. This study will add to the body of evidence on the effectiveness of eHealth intervention programs with the combined use of state-of-the-art applied games and established behavior change techniques. This will lead to new insights on how to use behavior change techniques and theory in multidimensional lifestyle eHealth research, and how these techniques and theories apply when they are used in a setting

  1. Plan Quality and Treatment Efficiency for Radiosurgery to Multiple Brain Metastases: Non-Coplanar RapidArc vs Gamma Knife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisong eLiu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study compares the dosimetry and efficiency of two modern radiosurgery (SRS modalities for multiple brain metastases (Gamma Knife and LINAC-based RapidArc/volumetric modulated arc therapy, with a special focus on the comparison of low dose spread.Methods: Six patients with three or four small brain metastases were used in this study. The size of targets varied from 0.1 ~ 10.5 cc. SRS doses were prescribed according to size of lesions. SRS plans were made using both Gamma Knife® Perfexion and a single-isocenter, multiple non-coplanar RapidArc®. Dosimetric parameters analyzed included RTOG conformity index (CI, gradient index (GI, 12 Gy isodose volume (V12Gy for each target, and the dose spread (Dspread for each plan. Dspread reflects SRS plan’s capability of confining radiation to within the local vicinity of the lesion and to not spread out to the surrounding normal brain tissues. Each plan has a dose (Dspread, such that once dose decreases below Dspread (on total tissue DVH, isodose volume starts increasing dramatically. Dspread is defined as that dose when volume increase first exceeds 20 cc per 0.1 Gy dose decrease. Results: RapidArc SRS has smaller CI (1.19 ±0.14 vs. 1.50 ± 0.16, p<0.001 and larger GI (4.77 ± 1.49 vs. 3.65 ± 0.98, p <0.01. V12Gy results were comparable (2.73 ± 1.38 cc vs. 3.06 ± 2.20 cc, p = 0.58. Moderate to lower dose spread, V6, V4.5, and V3, were also equivalent. Gamma Knife plans achieved better very low dose spread (≤3 Gy and also had slightly smaller Dspread, 1.9 Gy vs 2.5 Gy. Total treatment time for Gamma Knife is estimated between 60~100 min. Gamma Knife treatments are between 3~5 times longer compared to RapidArc treatment techniques.Conclusion: Dosimetric parameters reflecting prescription dose conformality (CI, dose fall off (GI, radiation necrosis indicator (V12Gy, and dose spread (Dspread were compared between Gamma Knife SRS and RapidArc SRS for multi-mets. RapidArc plans have

  2. The Brain Drain Potential of Students in the African Health and Nonhealth Sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Crush

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The departure of health professionals to Europe and North America is placing an intolerable burden on public health systems in many African countries. Various retention, recall, and replacement policies to ameliorate the impact of this brain drain have been suggested, none of which have been particularly successful to date. The key question for the future is whether the brain drain of health sector skills is likely to continue and whether the investment of African countries in training health professionals will continue to be lost through emigration. This paper examines the emigration intentions of trainee health professionals in six Southern African countries. The data was collected by the Southern African Migration Program (SAMP in a survey of final-year students across the region which included 651 students training for the health professions. The data also allows for the comparison of health sector with other students. The analysis presented in this paper shows very high emigration potential amongst all final-year students. Health sector students do show a slightly higher inclination to leave than those training to work in other sectors. These findings present a considerable challenge for policy makers seeking to encourage students to stay at home and work after graduation.

  3. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin ... healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  4. Evaluation of health-related quality of life in Lithuanian brain tumor patients using the EORTC brain cancer module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevičius, Adomas; Tamašauskas, Šarūnas; Tamašauskas, Arimantas; Deltuva, Vytenis

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is considered an important outcome measure in neuro-oncology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the brain cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-BN20) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) in Lithuanian brain tumor patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS. One hundred consecutive patients (71% of women; mean age, 58 ± 14 years) admitted for elective brain tumor surgery were evaluated for HRQoL using the QLQ-BN20, QLQ-C30 (a core EORTC questionnaire for cancer patients), and SF-36 scale; for motor dysfunction (clinical examination); for cognitive dysfunction (Mini-Mental State Examination); and for disability (Barthel Index). RESULTS. The QLQ-BN20 subscales had an adequate internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.75-0.90). Motor dysfunction on neurological examination was associated with greater motor dysfunction on the QLQ-BN20; greater disability, with greater future uncertainty, motor dysfunction, communication deficits, headaches, seizures, drowsiness, itchy skin, weakness of legs, and poor bladder control on the QLQ-BN20; and cognitive dysfunction, with greater future uncertainty, visual deficits, motor dysfunction, communication deficits, headaches, drowsiness, and weakness of legs symptoms on the QLQ-BN20, suggesting an adequate clinical validity of the QLQ-BN20. A score for motor dysfunction on the QLQ-BN20 correlated with a score for motor dysfunction on the QLQ-C30 and SF-36 scales; a score for headache on the QLQ-BN20, with a score for pain on the QLQ-C30 and SF-36 scales; and a score for drowsiness symptoms on the QLQ-BN20, with a score for fatigue on the QLQ-C30. CONCLUSIONS. The Lithuanian version of the EORTC-QLQ-BN20 scale has acceptable psychometric properties and can be reliably used for the assessment of HRQoL in brain tumor patients.

  5. CHOOSING A HEALTH INSTITUTION WITH MULTIPLE CORRESPONDENCE ANALYSIS AND CLUSTER ANALYSIS IN A POPULATION BASED STUDY

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    ASLI SUNER

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple correspondence analysis is a method making easy to interpret the categorical variables given in contingency tables, showing the similarities, associations as well as divergences among these variables via graphics on a lower dimensional space. Clustering methods are helped to classify the grouped data according to their similarities and to get useful summarized data from them. In this study, interpretations of multiple correspondence analysis are supported by cluster analysis; factors affecting referred health institute such as age, disease group and health insurance are examined and it is aimed to compare results of the methods.

  6. Prospect of brain-machine interface in motor disabilities: the future support for multiple sclerosis patient to improve quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, M; Singh, Av; Zamboni, P

    2014-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurological disorder, which has impacted health related quality of life (HRQoL) more intensively than any other neurological disorder. The approaches to improve the health standard in MS patient are still a subject of primary importance in medical practice and seek a lot of experimental exploration. The present review briefly explains the anomaly in neuron anatomy and dysfunction in signal transmission arising in the context with the chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), a recent hypothesis related with MS pathophysiology. Subsequently, it insights brain-machine interface (BMI) as an alternative approach to improve the HRQoL of MS subjects. Information sources were searched from peer-reviewed data bases (Medline, BioMed Central, PubMed) and grey-literature databases for data published in 2000 or later. We also did systemic search in edited books, articles in seminar papers, reports extracted from newspapers and scientific magazines, articles accessed from internet; mostly using PubMed, Google search engine and Wikipedia. Out of approximately 178, 240 research articles obtained using selected keywords, those articles were included in the present study which addresses the latest definitions of HRQol and latest scientific and ethical developments in the research of MS and BMI. The article presented a brief survey of CCSVI mediated MS and BMI-approach as a treatment to serve the patients suffering from disabilities as a result of MS, followed by successful precedence of BMI approach. Apart from these, the major findings of selected research articles including the development of parameters to define HRQoL, types and development of BMIs and its role in interconnecting brain with actuators, along with CCSVI being a possible cause of MS have formed the foundations to conclude the findings of the present review article. We propose a perspective BMI approach and promises it holds for future research to improve HRQoL in

  7. Meningoencephalitis and new onset of seizures in an patient with normal brain CT and multiple lesions on MRI

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    Vidal, Jose E.; Spichler, Anne; Oliveira, Augusto C.P. de; Lomar, Andre Villela [Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2004-02-01

    Toxoplasmic encephalitis is the most common cerebral mass lesion in patients with AIDS. The definitive diagnosis requires direct demonstration of the tachyzoite form of Toxoplasma gondii in cerebral tissue. The presumptive diagnosis is based on serology, clinical and radiological features, and on response to anti-Toxoplasma therapy. Typically, patients have a subacute presentation of focal neurological signs, with multiple lesions in computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the neurological and CT scan spectrum is broad. We report a case of toxoplasmic encephalitis in a heterosexual man without prior history of HIV infection. He was admitted with four days of headache, confusion, and new onset of seizures. His brain CT disclosed no alterations and MRI revealed multiple lesions. Empirical specific anti-Toxoplasma therapy was initiated and the patient experienced excellent clinical and radiological improvement. His HIV tests were positive and the CD{sub 4}{sup +} cell count was 74 cells/ml (8.5 %). On follow up, three months later, the general state of the patient was good, without neurological sequelae and with a normal MRI. We concluded that toxoplasmic encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis in sexually active individuals, including cases without prior history or suspicion of HIV infection, and no abnormalities on CT scan. (author)

  8. Differential diagnosis of posterior fossa brain tumors: Multiple discriminant analysis of Tl-SPECT and FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Moritaka; Okada, Tomohisa; Okada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the combined capability of thallium-201 (Tl)-SPECT and fluorine-18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-PET for differential diagnosis of posterior fossa brain tumors using multiple discriminant analysis.This retrospective study was conducted under approval of the institutional review board. In the hospital information system, 27 patients with posterior fossa intra-axial tumor between January 2009 and June 2015 were enrolled and grouped as the following 7 entities: low grade glioma (LGG) 6, anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) 2, glioblastoma (GBM) 3, medulloblastoma (MB) 3, hemangioblastoma (HB) 6, metastatic tumor (Mets) 3, and malignant lymphoma (ML) 4. Tl and FDG uptakes were measured at the tumors and control areas, and several indexes were derived. Using indexes selected by the stepwise method, discriminant analysis was conducted with leave-one-out cross-validation.The predicted accuracy for tumor classification was 70.4% at initial analysis and 55.6% at cross-validation to differentiate 7 tumor entities. HB, LGG, and ML were well-discriminated, but AA was located next to LGG. GBM, MB, and Mets largely overlapped and could not be well distinguished even applying multiple discriminant analysis. Correct classification in the original and cross-validation analyses was 44.4% and 33.3% for Tl-SPECT and 55.6% and 48.1% for FDG-PET.

  9. Selective processing of multiple features in the human brain: effects of feature type and salience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Menton McGinnis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying targets in a stream of items at a given constant spatial location relies on selection of aspects such as color, shape, or texture. Such attended (target features of a stimulus elicit a negative-going event-related brain potential (ERP, termed Selection Negativity (SN, which has been used as an index of selective feature processing. In two experiments, participants viewed a series of Gabor patches in which targets were defined as a specific combination of color, orientation, and shape. Distracters were composed of different combinations of color, orientation, and shape of the target stimulus. This design allows comparisons of items with and without specific target features. Consistent with previous ERP research, SN deflections extended between 160-300 ms. Data from the subsequent P3 component (300-450 ms post-stimulus were also examined, and were regarded as an index of target processing. In Experiment A, predominant effects of target color on SN and P3 amplitudes were found, along with smaller ERP differences in response to variations of orientation and shape. Manipulating color to be less salient while enhancing the saliency of the orientation of the Gabor patch (Experiment B led to delayed color selection and enhanced orientation selection. Topographical analyses suggested that the location of SN on the scalp reliably varies with the nature of the to-be-attended feature. No interference of non-target features on the SN was observed. These results suggest that target feature selection operates by means of electrocortical facilitation of feature-specific sensory processes, and that selective electrocortical facilitation is more effective when stimulus saliency is heightened.

  10. Metabolic stress responses in Drosophila are modulated by brain neurosecretory cells that produce multiple neuropeptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Kahsai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, neurosecretory cells that release peptide hormones play a prominent role in the regulation of development, growth, metabolism, and reproduction. Several types of peptidergic neurosecretory cells have been identified in the brain of Drosophila with release sites in the corpora cardiaca and anterior aorta. We show here that in adult flies the products of three neuropeptide precursors are colocalized in five pairs of large protocerebral neurosecretory cells in two clusters (designated ipc-1 and ipc-2a: Drosophila tachykinin (DTK, short neuropeptide F (sNPF and ion transport peptide (ITP. These peptides were detected by immunocytochemistry in combination with GFP expression driven by the enhancer trap Gal4 lines c929 and Kurs-6, both of which are expressed in ipc-1 and 2a cells. This mix of colocalized peptides with seemingly unrelated functions is intriguing and prompted us to initiate analysis of the function of the ten neurosecretory cells. We investigated the role of peptide signaling from large ipc-1 and 2a cells in stress responses by monitoring the effect of starvation and desiccation in flies with levels of DTK or sNPF diminished by RNA interference. Using the Gal4-UAS system we targeted the peptide knockdown specifically to ipc-1 and 2a cells with the c929 and Kurs-6 drivers. Flies with reduced DTK or sNPF levels in these cells displayed decreased survival time at desiccation and starvation, as well as increased water loss at desiccation. Our data suggest that homeostasis during metabolic stress requires intact peptide signaling by ipc-1 and 2a neurosecretory cells.

  11. Lyso-glycosphingolipids mobilize calcium from brain microsomes via multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Pelled, Dori; Riebeling, Christian; Futerman, Anthony H

    2003-11-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the GSL (glycosphingolipid), GlcCer (glucosylceramide), modulates Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and from microsomes by sensitizing the RyaR (ryanodine receptor), a major Ca2+-release channel of the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the lyso derivative of GlcCer, namely GlcSph (glucosylsphingosine), induced Ca2+ release via a mechanism independent of the RyaR [Lloyd-Evans, Pelled, Riebeling, Bodennec, de-Morgan, Waller, Schiffmann and Futerman (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23594-23599]. We now systematically examine the mechanism by which GlcSph and other lyso-GSLs modulate Ca2+ mobilization from rat brain cortical and cerebellar microsomes. GlcSph, lactosylsphingosine and galactosylsphingosine all mobilized Ca2+, but at significantly higher concentrations than those required for GlcCer-mediated sensitization of the RyaR. GlcSph-induced Ca2+ mobilization was partially blocked by heparin, an inhibitor of the Ins(1,4,5) P3 receptor, and also partially blocked by thapsigargin or ADP, inhibitors of SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase), but completely blocked when both acted together. In contrast, neither lactosylsphingosine nor galactosylsphingosine had any effect on Ca2+ release via either the Ins(1,4,5) P3 receptor or SERCA, but acted as agonists of the RyaR. Finally, and surprisingly, all three lyso-GSLs reversed inhibition of SERCA by thapsigargin. We conclude that different lyso-GSLs modulate Ca2+ mobilization via different mechanisms, and discuss the relevance of these findings to the GSL storage diseases in which lyso-GSLs accumulate.

  12. Metabolic Stress Responses in Drosophila Are Modulated by Brain Neurosecretory Cells That Produce Multiple Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahsai, Lily; Kapan, Neval; Dircksen, Heinrich; Winther, Åsa M. E.; Nässel, Dick R.

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, neurosecretory cells that release peptide hormones play a prominent role in the regulation of development, growth, metabolism, and reproduction. Several types of peptidergic neurosecretory cells have been identified in the brain of Drosophila with release sites in the corpora cardiaca and anterior aorta. We show here that in adult flies the products of three neuropeptide precursors are colocalized in five pairs of large protocerebral neurosecretory cells in two clusters (designated ipc-1 and ipc-2a): Drosophila tachykinin (DTK), short neuropeptide F (sNPF) and ion transport peptide (ITP). These peptides were detected by immunocytochemistry in combination with GFP expression driven by the enhancer trap Gal4 lines c929 and Kurs-6, both of which are expressed in ipc-1 and 2a cells. This mix of colocalized peptides with seemingly unrelated functions is intriguing and prompted us to initiate analysis of the function of the ten neurosecretory cells. We investigated the role of peptide signaling from large ipc-1 and 2a cells in stress responses by monitoring the effect of starvation and desiccation in flies with levels of DTK or sNPF diminished by RNA interference. Using the Gal4-UAS system we targeted the peptide knockdown specifically to ipc-1 and 2a cells with the c929 and Kurs-6 drivers. Flies with reduced DTK or sNPF levels in these cells displayed decreased survival time at desiccation and starvation, as well as increased water loss at desiccation. Our data suggest that homeostasis during metabolic stress requires intact peptide signaling by ipc-1 and 2a neurosecretory cells. PMID:20628603

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): An essential nutrient and a nutraceutical for brain health and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes; Fritsche, Kevin L; Chuang, Dennis Y; Hannink, Mark; Gu, Zezong; Greenlief, C Michael; Yao, Jeffrey K; Lee, James C; Beversdorf, David Q

    2017-03-10

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) enriched in phospholipids in the brain and retina, is known to play multi-functional roles in brain health and diseases. While arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), DHA is linked to action of the Ca2+-independent iPLA2. DHA undergoes enzymatic conversion by 15-lipoxygenase (Alox 15) to form oxylipins including resolvins and neuroprotectins, which are powerful lipid mediators. DHA can also undergo non-enzymatic conversion by reacting with oxygen free radicals (ROS), which cause the production of 4-hydoxyhexenal (4-HHE), an aldehyde derivative which can form adducts with DNA, proteins and lipids. In studies with both animal models and humans, there is evidence that inadequate intake of maternal n-3 PUFA may lead to aberrant development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). What is less certain is whether consumption of n-3 PUFA is important in maintaining brain health throughout one's life span. Evidence mostly from non-human studies suggests that DHA intake above normal nutritional requirements might modify the risk/course of a number of diseases of the brain. This concept has fueled much of the present interest in DHA research, in particular, in attempts to delineate mechanisms whereby DHA may serve as a nutraceutical and confer neuroprotective effects. Current studies have revealed ability for the oxylipins to regulation of cell redox homeostasis through the Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2/Antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) anti-oxidant pathway, and impact signaling pathways associated with neurotransmitters, and modulation of neuronal functions involving brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). This review is aimed at describing recent studies elaborating these mechanisms with special regard to aging and Alzheimer's disease, autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Copyright

  14. Cardiovascular health in young adulthood and structural brain MRI in midlife: The CARDIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancks, Michael P; Allen, Norrina B; Dubey, Prachi; Launer, Lenore J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Reis, Jared P; Sidney, Stephen; Yano, Yuichiro; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2017-08-15

    To examine the association between the American Heart Association (AHA) Life's Simple 7 (LS7) metric and brain structure. We determined cardiovascular health (CVH) according to the AHA LS7, assigning 0, 1, or 2 points for meeting poor, intermediate, or ideal criteria for the 7 components (range 0-14) at baseline (aged 18-30 years in 1985-1986) and year 25 follow-up examination for 518 participants of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) brain MRI substudy. Visit-based CVH score and average score was assessed in relation to percent of intracranial volume of normal tissue of the whole brain, gray matter, and white matter, and abnormal tissue volume of white matter at year 25 using multivariable linear, logistic, and quantile regression, after adjustment for age, sex, race, field center, educational attainment, and alcohol consumption. Mean percentage of whole brain volume, normal gray matter, and normal white matter was 81.3% (±2.5), 42.9% (±2.0), and 38.4% (±2.0). Greater CVH score at baseline (per each additional point at year 0: 0.1%, 95% confidence limits 0.01-0.3; p brain volume (per each additional point in average score: 0.2%, 95% confidence limits 0.04-0.3; p gray or white matter volume or abnormal white matter volume. Maintaining ideal levels of cardiovascular health, determined by the LS7, in young adulthood is associated with greater whole brain volume in middle age but not regional differences in structure. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Adaptive testing for multiple traits in a proportional odds model with applications to detect SNP-brain network associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2017-04-01

    There has been increasing interest in developing more powerful and flexible statistical tests to detect genetic associations with multiple traits, as arising from neuroimaging genetic studies. Most of existing methods treat a single trait or multiple traits as response while treating an SNP as a predictor coded under an additive inheritance mode. In this paper, we follow an earlier approach in treating an SNP as an ordinal response while treating traits as predictors in a proportional odds model (POM). In this way, it is not only easier to handle mixed types of traits, e.g., some quantitative and some binary, but it is also potentially more robust to the commonly adopted additive inheritance mode. More importantly, we develop an adaptive test in a POM so that it can maintain high power across many possible situations. Compared to the existing methods treating multiple traits as responses, e.g., in a generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach, the proposed method can be applied to a high dimensional setting where the number of phenotypes (p) can be larger than the sample size (n), in addition to a usual small P setting. The promising performance of the proposed method was demonstrated with applications to the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) data, in which either structural MRI driven phenotypes or resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) derived brain functional connectivity measures were used as phenotypes. The applications led to the identification of several top SNPs of biological interest. Furthermore, simulation studies showed competitive performance of the new method, especially for p>n. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of brain MRI lesion volume measurements in multiple sclerosis. A comparison of techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, M; Horsfield, M A; Bressi, S; Martinelli, V; Baratti, C; Reganati, P; Campi, A; Miller, D H; Comi, G

    1995-12-01

    The measurement of MRI lesion load in multiple sclerosis is increasingly being used to evaluate the natural history of the disease and to monitor the efficacy of treatments. If, as might occur in multicentre studies, lesion load is measured by several observers in different patients or by the same observer in serial scans, it would be necessary to utilize a technique which provides results with high inter- and intra-observer agreements. This study was performed to evaluate the intra- and inter-observer agreement of semi-automated lesion volume measurement using thresholding, and to compare them with those obtained using an arbitrary scoring system (ASS) and a quantitative manual tracing method (MTM). Brain MRIs were obtained for 20 clinically definite multiple sclerosis patients and were evaluated independently by three observers. The median intra- and inter-observer agreements were, respectively, 88.5% (range 69.0-96.8%) and 79.0% (range 73.3-98.3%) using the ASS, 95.0% (range 85.1-99.4%) and 93.4% (range 77.3-98.3%) for the MTM, 96.3% (range 94.2-98.9%) and 93.7% (range 83.8-98.3%) for the semi-automated technique. The intra- and inter-observer agreements for the semi-automated technique increased to 98.5% (range 96.3-99.8%) and 96.1% (range 90.5-98.6%) when a consensus in the choice of threshold for lesion segmentation was reached. The intra- and inter-observer agreements were significantly greater for the semi-automated method compared with both the arbitrary scoring and the MTMs. The intra-observer variability for the semi-automated technique was significantly lower (P automatic thresholding technique to quantify lesion volumes in multiple sclerosis. The technique may prove useful in multicentre studies, in which a single observer is still preferable.

  17. Effect of Multiple Simultaneous Vaccines on Polio Seroresponse and Associated Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine given concurrently with meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine at 2, 3 and 4 months of age. Arch Dis Child 2007;92:11–6...responses to biological warfare vaccines in human vaccinees . Clin Infect Dis 2006;43:1–7. 20] Butler D. Admission on Gulf War vaccines spurs debate on...Naval Health Research Center Effect of Multiple, Simultaneous Vaccines on Polio Seroresponse and Associated Health Outcomes Michael P

  18. Medical and health economic assessment of radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radiotherapy for patients suffering from malignant neoplasms has developed greatly during the past decades. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS is one important radiotherapeutic option which is defined by a single and highly focussed application of radiation during a specified time interval. One of its important indications is the treatment of brain metastases. Objectives: The objective of this HTA is to summarise the current literature concerning the treatment of brain metastasis and to compare SRS as a single or additional treatment option to alternative treatment options with regard to their medical effectiveness/efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness as well as their ethical, social and legal implications. Methods: A structured search and hand search of identified literature are performed from January 2002 through August 2007 to identify relevant publications published in English or German. Studies targeting patients with single or multiple brain metastases are included. The methodological quality of included studies is assessed according to quality criteria, based on the criteria of evidence based medicine. Results: Of 1,495 publications 15 medical studies meet the inclusion criteria. Overall study quality is limited and with the exception of two randomized controlleed trials (RCT and two meta-analyses only historical cohort studies are identified. Reported outcome measures are highly variable between studies. Studies with high methodological quality provide evidence, that whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT in addition to SRS and SRS in addition to WBRT is associated with improved local tumour control rates and neurological function. However, only in patients with single brain metastasis, RPA-class 1 (RPA = Recursive partitioning analysis and certain primary tumour entities, this combination of SRS and WBRT is associated with superior survival compared to WBRT alone. Studies report no significant differences in adverse events between

  19. Regional brain atrophy and functional connectivity changes related to fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Javier Cruz Gómez

    Full Text Available Fatigue is one of the most frequent symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS, and recent studies have described a relationship between the sensorimotor cortex and its afferent and efferent pathways as a substrate of fatigue. The objectives of this study were to assess the neural correlates of fatigue in MS through gray matter (GM and white matter (WM atrophy, and resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC of the sensorimotor network (SMN. Eighteen healthy controls (HCs and 60 relapsing-remitting patients were assessed with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Patients were classified as fatigued (F or nonfatigued (NF. We investigated GM and WM atrophy using voxel-based morphometry, and rs-FC changes with a seed-based method and independent component analysis (ICA. F patients showed extended GM and WM atrophy focused on areas related to the SMN. High FSS scores were associated with reductions of WM in the supplementary motor area. Seed analysis of GM atrophy in the SMN showed that HCs presented increased rs-FC between the primary motor and somatosensory cortices while patients with high FSS scores were associated with decreased rs-FC between the supplementary motor area and associative somatosensory cortex. ICA results showed that NF patients presented higher rs-FC in the primary motor cortex compared to HCs and in the premotor cortex compared to F patients. Atrophy reduced functional connectivity in SMN pathways and MS patients consequently experienced high levels of fatigue. On the contrary, NF patients experienced high synchronization in this network that could be interpreted as a compensatory mechanism to reduce fatigue sensation.

  20. Health-related quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients with bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitkova, Marianna; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Krokavcova, Martina; Szilasiova, Jarmila; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction are often overlooked symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and can be associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim is to explore the association of bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction with HRQoL in MS patients

  1. Social support as a predictor of perceived health status in patients with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krokavcova, Martina; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gavelova, Miriam; Middel, Berrie; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to investigate whether different levels of perceived social support are associated with different levels of perceived health status in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods: Two hundred and seven MS patients (38.4 +/- 10.6 years, 66.2% female) completed

  2. Employment Status and Perceived Health Status in Younger and Older People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokavcova, Martina; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gavelova, Miriam; Middel, Berrie; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how employment is associated with perceived physical and mental health status in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical variables stratified by age. The sample consisted of 184 MS patients divided into a younger (less than 45 years) and an older (greater than or equal to 45 years) age…

  3. The representation of inflammatory signals in the brain – a model for subjective fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eHanken

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In multiple sclerosis (MS patients, fatigue is rated as one of the most common and disabling symptoms. However, the pathophysiology underlying this fatigue is not yet clear. Several lines of evidence suggest that immunological factors, such as elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, may contribute to subjective fatigue in MS patients. Proinflammatory cytokines represent primary mediators of immune-to-brain-communication, modulating changes in the neurophysiology of the central nervous system. Recently, we proposed a model arguing that fatigue in MS patients is a subjective feeling which is related to inflammation. Moreover, it implies that fatigue can be measured behaviorally only by applying specific cognitive tasks related to alertness and vigilance. In the present review we focus on the subjective feeling of MS-related fatigue. We examine the hypothesis that the subjective feeling of MS-related fatigue may be a variant of inflammation-induced sickness behavior, resulting from cytokine-mediated activity changes within brain areas involved in interoception and homeostasis including the insula, the anterior cingulate and the hypothalamus. We first present studies demonstrating a relationship between proinflammatory cytokines and subjective fatigue in healthy individuals, in people with inflammatory disorders, and particularly in MS patients. Subsequently, we discuss studies analyzing the impact of anti-inflammatory treatment on fatigue. In the next part of this review we present studies on the transmission and neural representation of inflammatory signals, with a special focus on possible neural concomitants of inflammation-induced fatigue. We also present two of our studies on the relationship between local gray and white matter atrophy and fatigue in MS patients. Finally, we discuss some implications of our findings and future perspectives.

  4. Acute stress evokes sexually dimorphic, stressor-specific patterns of neural activation across multiple limbic brain regions in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ankit; Chaudhari, Karina; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2018-03-01

    Stress enhances the risk for psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Stress responses vary across sex and may underlie the heightened vulnerability to psychopathology in females. Here, we examined the influence of acute immobilization stress (AIS) and a two-day short-term forced swim stress (FS) on neural activation in multiple cortical and subcortical brain regions, implicated as targets of stress and in the regulation of neuroendocrine stress responses, in male and female rats using Fos as a neural activity marker. AIS evoked a sex-dependent pattern of neural activation within the cingulate and infralimbic subdivisions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), lateral septum (LS), habenula, and hippocampal subfields. The degree of neural activation in the mPFC, LS, and habenula was higher in males. Female rats exhibited reduced Fos positive cell numbers in the dentate gyrus hippocampal subfield, an effect not observed in males. We addressed whether the sexually dimorphic neural activation pattern noted following AIS was also observed with the short-term stress of FS. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the amygdala, FS similar to AIS resulted in robust increases in neural activation in both sexes. The pattern of neural activation evoked by FS was distinct across sexes, with a heightened neural activation noted in the prelimbic mPFC subdivision and hippocampal subfields in females and differed from the pattern noted with AIS. This indicates that the sex differences in neural activation patterns observed within stress-responsive brain regions are dependent on the nature of stressor experience.

  5. Health technology assessment on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and clinically isolated syndromes (CIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: rik.achten@ugent.be; Deblaere, Karel [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: karel.deblaere@ugent.be

    2008-02-15

    This work is the result of a health technology assessment for the Flemish regional government, Belgium, performed in 2006. A search of the available literature in the databases Medline and EMBASE was performed to find evidence for a rational choice between CT and MRI techniques in the work-up of patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) with a suspicion for multiple sclerosis (MS), and in follow-up exams performed in such patients. From the presented evidence, in patients referred for CIS or MS, MR is superior to CT for detection and characterization of brain and spine lesions.

  6. Another kind of 'BOLD Response': answering multiple-choice questions via online decoded single-trial brain signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorger, Bettina; Dahmen, Brigitte; Reithler, Joel; Gosseries, Olivia; Maudoux, Audrey; Laureys, Steven; Goebel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The term 'locked-in'syndrome (LIS) describes a medical condition in which persons concerned are severely paralyzed and at the same time fully conscious and awake. The resulting anarthria makes it impossible for these patients to naturally communicate, which results in diagnostic as well as serious practical and ethical problems. Therefore, developing alternative, muscle-independent communication means is of prime importance. Such communication means can be realized via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) circumventing the muscular system by using brain signals associated with preserved cognitive, sensory, and emotional brain functions. Primarily, BCIs based on electrophysiological measures have been developed and applied with remarkable success. Recently, also blood flow-based neuroimaging methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), have been explored in this context. After reviewing recent literature on the development of especially hemodynamically based BCIs, we introduce a highly reliable and easy-to-apply communication procedure that enables untrained participants to motor-independently and relatively effortlessly answer multiple-choice questions based on intentionally generated single-trial fMRI signals that can be decoded online. Our technique takes advantage of the participants' capability to voluntarily influence certain spatio-temporal aspects of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal: source location (by using different mental tasks), signal onset and offset. We show that healthy participants are capable of hemodynamically encoding at least four distinct information units on a single-trial level without extensive pretraining and with little effort. Moreover, real-time data analysis based on simple multi-filter correlations allows for automated answer decoding with a high accuracy (94.9%) demonstrating the robustness of the presented method. Following our 'proof of concept', the

  7. Free serum haemoglobin is associated with brain atrophy in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Lewin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background A major cause of disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS is progressive brain atrophy, whose pathogenesis is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to identify protein biomarkers of brain atrophy in SPMS.   Methods We used surface-enhanced laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to carry out an unbiased search for serum proteins whose concentration correlated with the rate of brain atrophy, measured by serial MRI scans over a 2-year period in a well-characterized cohort of 140 patients with SPMS.  Protein species were identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.   Results There was a significant (p<0.004 correlation between the rate of brain atrophy and a rise in the concentration of proteins at 15.1 kDa and 15.9 kDa in the serum.  Tandem mass spectrometry identified these proteins as alpha-haemoglobin and beta-haemoglobin, respectively.  The abnormal concentration of free serum haemoglobin was confirmed by ELISA (p<0.001.  The serum lactate dehydrogenase activity was also highly significantly raised (p<10-12 in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.    Conclusions The results are consistent with the following hypothesis. In progressive multiple sclerosis, low-grade chronic intravascular haemolysis releases haemoglobin into the serum; the haemoglobin is subsequently translocated into the central nervous system (CNS across the damaged blood-brain barrier.  In the CNS, the haemoglobin and its breakdown products, including haem and iron, contribute to the neurodegeneration and consequent brain atrophy seen in progressive disease. We postulate that haemoglobin is a source of the iron whose deposition along blood vessels in multiple sclerosis plaques is associated with neurodegeneration.  If so, then chelators of haemoglobin, rather than chelators of free serum iron, may be effective in preventing this

  8. Brief multiple behavior interventions in a college student health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werch, Chudley E Chad; Bian, Hui; Moore, Michele J; Ames, Steve; DiClemente, Carlo C; Weiler, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

  9. The effect of multiple reminders on response patterns in a Danish health survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne I.; Ekholm, Ola; Kristensen, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    -administered health survey. METHODS: Data derive from the Danish National Health Survey 2010, in which 298 550 individuals (16 years of age or older) were invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey using a mixed-mode approach (paper and web questionnaires). At least two reminders were sent to non......BACKGROUND: Reminders are routinely applied in surveys to increase response rates and reduce the possibility of bias. This study examines the effect of multiple reminders on the response rate, non-response bias, prevalence estimates and exposure-outcome relations in a national self...... mailing respondents compared with only first mailing respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple reminders were an effective way to increase the response rate in a national Danish health survey. However, when differences do exist between respondents and non-respondents, the results suggest that second and third...

  10. Oral health status in patients with brain injury: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Pillai, Rajath; Futarmal Kothari, Simple

    2017-01-01

    Med, Embase, and Scopus electronic databases until January 2016 to identify studies presenting the assessment of the oral health status of patients afflicted with any kind of ABI. The search strategy was restricted to English-language publications, enrolling patients above 18 years. Studies on the association...... and higher colonization of Candida albicans in saliva, all of which significantly reduced after intervention. Oral health related quality (OHrQoL) of life was poorer in patients compared to the population. Conclusion: Stroke was the most predominant brain injury condition studied in the literature with few...

  11. Temporal Hierarchical Adaptive Texture CRF for Automatic Detection of Gadolinium-Enhancing Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in Brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Rivaz, Hassan; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2015-06-01

    We propose a conditional random field (CRF) based classifier for segmentation of small enhanced pathologies. Specifically, we develop a temporal hierarchical adaptive texture CRF (THAT-CRF) and apply it to the challenging problem of gad enhancing lesion segmentation in brain MRI of patients with multiple sclerosis. In this context, the presence of many nonlesion enhancements (such as blood vessels) renders the problem more difficult. In addition to voxel-wise features, the framework exploits multiple higher order textures to discriminate the true lesional enhancements from the pool of other enhancements. Since lesional enhancements show more variation over time as compared to the nonlesional ones, we incorporate temporal texture analysis in order to study the textures of enhanced candidates over time. The parameters of the THAT-CRF model are learned based on 2380 scans from a multi-center clinical trial. The effect of different components of the model is extensively evaluated on 120 scans from a separate multi-center clinical trial. The incorporation of the temporal textures results in a general decrease of the false discovery rate. Specifically, THAT-CRF achieves overall sensitivity of 95% along with false discovery rate of 20% and average false positive count of 0.5 lesions per scan. The sensitivity of the temporal method to the trained time interval is further investigated on five different intervals of 69 patients. Moreover, superior performance is achieved by the reviewed labelings of our model compared to the fully manual labeling when applied to the context of separating different treatment arms in a real clinical trial.

  12. Relationships between brain water content and diffusion tensor imaging parameters (apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy) in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Irwan, Roy; Potze, Jan Hendrik; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Mostert, Jop P.; Keyser, Jacques de [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Neurology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    Fifteen multiple sclerosis patients were examined by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to determine fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in a superventricular volume of interest of 8 x 8 x 2 cm{sup 3} containing gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissue. Point resolved spectroscopy 2D-chemical shift imaging of the same volume was performed without water suppression. The water contents and DTI parameters in 64 voxels of 2 cm{sup 3} were compared. The water content was increased in patients compared with controls (GM: 244{+-}21 vs. 194{+-}10 a.u.; WM: 245{+-}32 vs. 190{+-}11 a.u.), FA decreased (GM: 0.226{+-}0.038 vs. 0.270{+-}0.020; WM: 0.337{+-}0.044 vs. 0.402{+-}0.011) and ADC increased [GM: 1134{+-}203 vs. 899{+-}28 (x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s); WM: 901{+-}138 vs. 751{+-}17 (x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s)]. Correlations of water content with FA and ADC in WM were strong (r=-0.68, P<0.02; r=0.75; P<0.01, respectively); those in GM were weaker (r=-0.50, P<0.05; r=0.45, P<0.1, respectively). Likewise, FA and ADC were more strongly correlated in WM (r=-0.88; P<0.00001) than in GM (r=-0.69, P<0.01). The demonstrated relationship between DTI parameters and water content in multiple sclerosis patients suggests a potential for therapy monitoring in normal-appearing brain tissue. (orig.)

  13. The issue of multiple univariate comparisons in the context of neuroelectric brain mapping: an application in a neuromarketing experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, G; De Vico Fallani, F; Astolfi, L; Toppi, J; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; Salinari, S; Babiloni, F

    2010-08-30

    This paper presents some considerations about the use of adequate statistical techniques in the framework of the neuroelectromagnetic brain mapping. With the use of advanced EEG/MEG recording setup involving hundred of sensors, the issue of the protection against the type I errors that could occur during the execution of hundred of univariate statistical tests, has gained interest. In the present experiment, we investigated the EEG signals from a mannequin acting as an experimental subject. Data have been collected while performing a neuromarketing experiment and analyzed with state of the art computational tools adopted in specialized literature. Results showed that electric data from the mannequin's head presents statistical significant differences in power spectra during the visualization of a commercial advertising when compared to the power spectra gathered during a documentary, when no adjustments were made on the alpha level of the multiple univariate tests performed. The use of the Bonferroni or Bonferroni-Holm adjustments returned correctly no differences between the signals gathered from the mannequin in the two experimental conditions. An partial sample of recently published literature on different neuroscience journals suggested that at least the 30% of the papers do not use statistical protection for the type I errors. While the occurrence of type I errors could be easily managed with appropriate statistical techniques, the use of such techniques is still not so largely adopted in the literature. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of Phonatory Behavior and Voice Quality in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pützer, Manfred; Wokurek, Wolfgang; Moringlane, Jean Richard

    2017-07-01

    The effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on phonatory behavior and voice quality in eight patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) was examined instrumentally and perceptually. The acoustic signals of vowel productions obtained from patients (produced with and without stimulation) and from a group of 16 healthy control speakers were analyzed to prove statistically the changes of phonatory behavior and voice quality. This is a randomized study. Firstly, a new parametrization was used to determine phonatory behavior. Secondly, a perceptual evaluation of voice quality of the same speech material was performed. With stimulation, phonation has a greater tendency to be strained. The results of perceptual evaluation support this strained phonation behavior under stimulation, resulting in a smaller degree of breathiness ratings of all raters. Without stimulation, an impaired and partly disturbed adduction of the vocal folds can be shown. These findings are also supported in the perceptual experiment providing a higher degree of hoarseness ratings of all raters for these signals. High-frequency electrical impulses to the thalamus in patients with MS influence the phonatory behavior of their vocal folds. The results suggest the need for long-term monitoring of phonatory behavior during DBS to initiate adequate treatments without delay. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of Parkinson disease-related protein PINK1 with Alzheimer disease and multiple sclerosis brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmus, Micha M M; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Jansen, Quentin; Witte, Maarten E; van der Valk, Paul; Rozemuller, Annemieke J M; Drukarch, Benjamin; de Vries, Helga E; Van Horssen, Jack

    2011-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are hallmarks of various neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer disease (AD), and Parkinson disease (PD). Mutations in PINK1, a mitochondrial kinase, have been linked to the occurrence of early onset parkinsonism. Currently, various studies support the notion of a neuroprotective role for PINK1, as it protects cells from stress-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Because information about the distribution pattern of PINK1 in neurological diseases other than PD is scarce, we here investigated PINK1 expression in well-characterized brain samples derived from MS and AD individuals using immunohistochemistry. In control gray matter PINK1 immunoreactivity was observed in neurons, particularly neurons in layers IV-VI. Astrocytes were the most prominent cell type decorated by anti-PINK1 antibody in the white matter. In addition, PINK1 staining was observed in the cerebrovasculature. In AD, PINK1 was found to colocalize with classic senile plaques and vascular amyloid depositions, as well as reactive astrocytes associated with the characteristic AD lesions. Interestingly, PINK1 was absent from neurofibrillary tangles. In active demyelinating MS lesions we observed a marked astrocytic PINK1 immunostaining, whereas astrocytes in chronic lesions were weakly stained. Taken together, we observed PINK1 immunostaining in both AD and MS lesions, predominantly in reactive astrocytes associated with these lesions, suggesting that the increase in astrocytic PINK1 protein might be an intrinsic protective mechanism to limit cellular injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor correlate with the number of T2 MRI lesions in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comini-Frota, E.R. [Unidade de Neurologia, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, D.H. [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Miranda, E.C. [Ecoar Diagnostic Center, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Brum, D.G. [Hospital das Clínicas,Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto,Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Kaimen-Maciel, D.R. [Unidade de Neurologia, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Donadi, E.A. [Hospital das Clínicas,Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto,Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Teixeira, A.L. [Unidade de Neurologia, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-11-23

    The objective of the present study was to determine if there is a relationship between serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the number of T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T2/FLAIR) lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized the study of MS. However, MRI has limitations and the use of other biomarkers such as BDNF may be useful for the clinical assessment and the study of the disease. Serum was obtained from 28 MS patients, 18-50 years old (median 38), 21 women, 0.5-10 years (median 5) of disease duration, EDSS 1-4 (median 1.5) and 28 healthy controls, 19-49 years old (median 33), 19 women. BDNF levels were measured by ELISA. T1, T2/FLAIR and gadolinium-enhanced lesions were measured by a trained radiologist. BDNF was reduced in MS patients (median [range] pg/mL; 1160 [352.6-2640]) compared to healthy controls (1640 [632.4-4268]; P = 0.03, Mann-Whitney test) and was negatively correlated (Spearman correlation test, r = -0.41; P = 0.02) with T2/FLAIR (11-81 lesions, median 42). We found that serum BDNF levels were inversely correlated with the number of T2/FLAIR lesions in patients with MS. BDNF may be a promising biomarker of MS.

  17. A novel method for automatic determination of different stages of multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MR FLAIR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayati, Rasoul; Vafadust, Mansur; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Nabavi, S Massood

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to detect stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in order to exactly quantify involved voxels. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for automatic detection of different stages of MS lesions in the brain magnetic resonance (MR) images, in fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) studies. In the proposed method, firstly, MS lesion voxels are segmented in FLAIR images based on adaptive mixtures method (AMM) and Markov Random Field (MRF) model. Then, signal intensity of each lesion voxel is modeled as a linear combination of signals related to the normal and also abnormal parts, in the voxel. By applying an optimal threshold, voxels with new intensities are primarily classified into two stages: previously destructed (chronic) and on going destruction (acute) lesions. Finally, the acute lesions, according to their activities, are classified, by another optimal threshold, into two new stages, early and recent acute. Evaluation of the proposed method was performed by manual segmentation of chronic and enhanced (early) acute lesions in gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted (Gad-E-T1-w) images by studying T1-weighted (T1-w) and T2-weighted (T2-w) images, using similarity criteria. The results showed a good correlation between the lesions segmented by the proposed method and by experts manually. Thus, the suggested method is useful to reduce the need for paramagnetic materials in contrast enhanced MR imaging which is a routine procedure for separation of acute and chronic lesions.

  18. Lesion filling effect in regional brain volume estimations: a study in multiple sclerosis patients with low lesion load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareto, D; Sastre-Garriga, J; Aymerich, F X; Auger, C; Tintoré, M; Montalban, X; Rovira, A

    2016-05-01

    Regional brain volume estimation in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is prone to error due to white matter lesions being erroneously segmented as grey matter. The Lesion Segmentation Toolbox (LST) is an automatic tool that estimates a lesion mask based on 3D T2-FLAIR images and then uses this mask to fill the structural MRI image. The goal of this study was (1) to test the LST for estimating white matter lesion volume in a cohort of MS patients using 2D T2-FLAIR images, and (2) to evaluate the performance of the optimized LST on image segmentation and the impact on the calculated grey matter fraction (GMF). The study included 110 patients with a clinically isolated syndrome and 42 with a relapsing-remitting MS scanned on a 3.0-T MRI system. In a subset of consecutively selected patients, the lesion mask was semi-manually delineated over T2-FLAIR images. After establishing the optimized LST parameters, the corresponding regional fractions were calculated for the original, filled, and masked images. A high agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.955) was found between the (optimized) LST and the semi-manual lesion volume estimations. The GMF was significantly smaller when lesions were masked (mean difference -0.603, p lesion volume calculation seems reliable. GMFs are significantly reduced when a method to correct the contribution of MS lesions is used, and it may have an impact in assessing GMF differences between clinical cohorts.

  19. The correlates and course of multiple health risk behaviour in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Hale

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health risk behaviours often co-occur in adolescence. This may be partially explained by a set of common risk and protective factors. The current study examines the association between risk behaviours throughout adolescence and identifies common risk factors for multiple risk behaviour in late adolescence. Methods We use data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. We examined the association between risk behaviours at age 14 (n = 15,588, age 16 (n = 12,416 and age 19 (n = 9,548. The associations between age 19 risk behaviour and earlier risk behaviours and risk and protective factors were assessed longitudinally. Health risk behaviours included smoking, alcohol use, illicit drug use, delinquency and unsafe sexual behaviour. Results All risk behaviours were found to be associated with other risk behaviours with associations weakening through adolescence. A number of sociodemographic, interpersonal, school and family factors at age 14 predicted risk behaviour and multiple risk behaviour at 19, though predictors for heavy alcohol use often differed from other health risk behaviours. Past risk behaviour was a strong predictor of age 19 risk behaviour though many involved in only one form of risk behaviour in mid-adolescence do not progress to multiple risk behaviour. Conclusions Our findings reaffirm the links between health risk behaviours, but these diminish throughout adolescence with multiple risk behaviour usually initiated in mid-adolescence. Multiple risk behaviour is initiated in early or mid adolescence with a number of common risk factors explaining the co-occurrence of risk behaviours.

  20. The correlates and course of multiple health risk behaviour in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Daniel R; Viner, Russell M

    2016-05-31

    Health risk behaviours often co-occur in adolescence. This may be partially explained by a set of common risk and protective factors. The current study examines the association between risk behaviours throughout adolescence and identifies common risk factors for multiple risk behaviour in late adolescence. We use data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. We examined the association between risk behaviours at age 14 (n = 15,588), age 16 (n = 12,416) and age 19 (n = 9,548). The associations between age 19 risk behaviour and earlier risk behaviours and risk and protective factors were assessed longitudinally. Health risk behaviours included smoking, alcohol use, illicit drug use, delinquency and unsafe sexual behaviour. All risk behaviours were found to be associated with other risk behaviours with associations weakening through adolescence. A number of sociodemographic, interpersonal, school and family factors at age 14 predicted risk behaviour and multiple risk behaviour at 19, though predictors for heavy alcohol use often differed from other health risk behaviours. Past risk behaviour was a strong predictor of age 19 risk behaviour though many involved in only one form of risk behaviour in mid-adolescence do not progress to multiple risk behaviour. Our findings reaffirm the links between health risk behaviours, but these diminish throughout adolescence with multiple risk behaviour usually initiated in mid-adolescence. Multiple risk behaviour is initiated in early or mid adolescence with a number of common risk factors explaining the co-occurrence of risk behaviours.

  1. Defense Health: Coordinating Authority Needed for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    signs of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, or other manifestations of neurodegeneration, as well as epilepsy , in such members, in coordination...and the development of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders, as well as epilepsy . 11. To develop and...Treatment of PTSD in OIF/OEF Veterans 1 Acupuncture as a Novel Technique for Treating Insomnia in the Outpatient Traumatic Brain Injury Population

  2. Exercise Improves Physical Function and Mental Health of Brain Cancer Survivors: Two Exploratory Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Gregory T; Greenwood, Kenneth M; Singh, Favil; Tsoi, Daphne; Newton, Robert U

    2016-06-01

    Background Malignant brain tumors are unpredictable and incurable, with 5-year survival rates less than 30%. The poor prognosis combined with intensive treatment necessitates the inclusion of complementary and supportive therapies that optimize quality of life and reduce treatment-related declines in health. Exercise therapy has been shown to be beneficial in other cancer populations, but no evidence is available for brain cancer survivors. Therefore, we report results from 2 preliminary cases. Methods Two female patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme and oligodendroglioma participated in a structured and supervised 12-week exercise program. The program consisted of two 1-hour resistance and aerobic exercise sessions per week and additional self-managed aerobic sessions. Outcome measures of strength, cardiovascular fitness, and several psychological indicators (depression, anxiety, and quality of life) were recorded at baseline, after 6 weeks and at the conclusion of the intervention. Results Exercise was well tolerated; both participants completed all 24 sessions and the home-based component with no adverse effects. Objective outcome measures displayed positive responses relating to reduced morbidity. Similar positive responses were found for psychological outcomes. Scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale showed clinically meaningful improvements in depression and total distress. Conclusion These findings provide initial evidence that, despite the difficulties associated with brain cancer treatment and survivorship, exercise may be safe and beneficial and should be considered in the overall management of patients with brain cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Women's and Men's Differing Experiences of Health, Lifestyle, and Aging with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploughman, Michelle; Collins, Katie; Wallack, Elizabeth M; Monks, Michael; Mayo, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    The growing population of older people with multiple sclerosis (MS) has led to more interest in understanding factors associated with healthy aging. We aimed to determine whether older women and men with MS have different health and lifestyle behaviors and whether there are sex differences in contributors to perceived health. Data were obtained from a postal survey involving 743 Canadians older than 55 years with MS for at least 20 years. Sex differences in health, lifestyle, mood, and socioeconomics were examined using analysis of variance. Multiple regression was used to build explanatory models of health perception. Despite no differences in age, years with MS, disability, fatigue, or social support, older men (n = 166) experienced lower perceived health and lower resilience and participated less in life roles than older women (n = 577). Men experienced more depressive symptoms, and women reported more anxiety. Depression was the strongest predictor of health perception in both women and men (β = -2.40 and -5.19, respectively, for each 3-point increase in depressive symptoms). Other contributors included household participation, fatigue, resilience, and disability in women and physical activity, financial flexibility, and alcohol use in men. Older men exhibit poorer adaptation to aging with MS than older women.

  4. Sleep Loss and Its Effects on Health of Family Caregivers of Individuals with Primary Malignant Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Pawl, Jean D.; Lee, Shih-Yu; Clark, Patricia C.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep loss places caregivers at risk for poor health. Understanding correlates of sleep loss and relationships to health may enable improvement of health of caregivers of individuals with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBT). In this cross-sectional, descriptive study of 133 caregivers, relationships were examined between sleep loss and physical, mental, emotional, and social health at time of patient diagnosis. Sleep loss was not related to physical health. Shorter total sleep time was asso...

  5. A mixed methods study of multiple health behaviors among individuals with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Plow

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Individuals with stroke often have multiple cardiovascular risk factors that necessitate promoting engagement in multiple health behaviors. However, observational studies of individuals with stroke have typically focused on promoting a single health behavior. Thus, there is a poor understanding of linkages between healthy behaviors and the circumstances in which factors, such as stroke impairments, may influence a single or multiple health behaviors. Methods We conducted a mixed methods convergent parallel study of 25 individuals with stroke to examine the relationships between stroke impairments and physical activity, sleep, and nutrition. Our goal was to gain further insight into possible strategies to promote multiple health behaviors among individuals with stroke. This study focused on physical activity, sleep, and nutrition because of their importance in achieving energy balance, maintaining a healthy weight, and reducing cardiovascular risks. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected concurrently, with the former being prioritized over the latter. Qualitative data was prioritized in order to develop a conceptual model of engagement in multiple health behaviors among individuals with stroke. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed independently and then were integrated during the inference stage to develop meta-inferences. The 25 individuals with stroke completed closed-ended questionnaires on healthy behaviors and physical function. They also participated in face-to-face focus groups and one-to-one phone interviews. Results We found statistically significant and moderate correlations between hand function and healthy eating habits (r = 0.45, sleep disturbances and limitations in activities of daily living (r =  − 0.55, BMI and limitations in activities of daily living (r =  − 0.49, physical activity and limitations in activities of daily living (r = 0.41, mobility impairments and BMI (r

  6. Network science and the human brain: Using graph theory to understand the brain and one of its hubs, the amygdala, in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, David; Pollard, Harvey B

    2016-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, the emerging field of network science has revealed the key features of brain networks, which include small-world topology, the presence of highly connected hubs, and hierarchical modularity. The value of network studies of the brain is underscored by the range of network alterations that have been identified in neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, depression, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and many others. Here we briefly summarize the concepts of graph theory that are used to quantify network properties and describe common experimental approaches for analysis of brain networks of structural and functional connectivity. These range from tract tracing to functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, electroencephalography, and magnetoencephalography. We then summarize the major findings from the application of graph theory to nervous systems ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to more complex primate brains, including man. Focusing, then, on studies involving the amygdala, a brain region that has attracted intense interest as a center for emotional processing, fear, and motivation, we discuss the features of the amygdala in brain networks for fear conditioning and emotional perception. Finally, to highlight the utility of graph theory for studying dysfunction of the amygdala in mental illness, we review data with regard to changes in the hub properties of the amygdala in brain networks of patients with depression. We suggest that network studies of the human brain may serve to focus attention on regions and connections that act as principal drivers and controllers of brain function in health and disease. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among U.S. Army behavioral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Lonnie S

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the knowledge and misconceptions about traumatic brain injury (TBI) held by behavioral health care professionals providing services to an active-duty military population. Active duty U.S. Army psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, and psychiatric nurses from locations across the Department of Defense, and behavioral health professionals from a major military hospital (N = 181) were surveyed on 19 common myths and misconceptions about TBI (Gouvier, Prestholdt, & Warner, 1988). Eight new items were added to the survey to more specifically assess misconceptions pertaining to mild TBI (mTBI). Mean percentages for the subcomponents of the questionnaire suggested that responses were generally accurate for general information about brain damage (83.61% correct) but less accurate for unconsciousness (45.81%), amnesia or memory loss (53%), and recovery items (64.8%). The total percent correct was 51% on the new mTBI items with a sizable minority of the sample viewing mTBI as being associated with lengthier recovery and poorer outcome than what has been indicated by recent research. Overall, misconceptions, particularly about mTBI, are prevalent among U.S. Army behavioral health providers. These findings raise concern about the dissemination of TBI information to health care professionals in the U.S. Army and to military personnel who may not be receiving accurate information about TBI recovery. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Put the Family Back in Family Health History: A Multiple-Informant Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jielu; Marcum, Christopher S; Myers, Melanie F; Koehly, Laura M

    2017-05-01

    An accurate family health history is essential for individual risk assessment. This study uses a multiple-informant approach to examine whether family members have consistent perceptions of shared familial risk for four common chronic conditions (heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, and hypertension) and whether accounting for inconsistency in family health history reports leads to more accurate risk assessment. In 2012-2013, individual and family health histories were collected from 127 adult informants of 45 families in the Greater Cincinnati Area. Pedigrees were linked within each family to assess inter-informant (in)consistency regarding common biological family member's health history. An adjusted risk assessment based on pooled pedigrees of multiple informants was evaluated to determine whether it could more accurately identify individuals affected by common chronic conditions, using self-reported disease diagnoses as a validation criterion. Analysis was completed in 2015-2016. Inter-informant consistency in family health history reports was 54% for heart disease, 61% for Type 2 diabetes, 43% for high cholesterol, and 41% for hypertension. Compared with the unadjusted risk assessment, the adjusted risk assessment correctly identified an additional 7%-13% of the individuals who had been diagnosed, with a ≤2% increase in cases that were predicted to be at risk but had not been diagnosed. Considerable inconsistency exists in individual knowledge of their family health history. Accounting for such inconsistency can, nevertheless, lead to a more accurate genetic risk assessment tool. A multiple-informant approach is potentially powerful when coupled with technology to support clinical decisions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Depletion of brain functional connectivity enhancement leads to disability progression in multiple sclerosis: A longitudinal resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Anthony; Robinet, Emmanuelle; Guye, Maxime; Rousseau, Celia; Maarouf, Adil; Le Troter, Arnaud; Zaaraoui, Wafaa; Rico, Audrey; Crespy, Lydie; Soulier, Elisabeth; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Pelletier, Jean; Achard, Sophie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Audoin, Bertrand

    2016-11-01

    The compensatory effect of brain functional connectivity enhancement in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) remains controversial. To characterize the relationships between brain functional connectivity changes and disability progression in RRMS. Long-range connectivity, short-range connectivity, and density of connections were assessed using graph theoretical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired in 38 RRMS patients (disease duration: 120 ± 32 months) and 24 controls. All subjects were explored at baseline and all patients and six controls 2 years later. At baseline, levels of long-range and short-range brain functional connectivity were higher in patients compared to controls. During the follow-up, decrease in connections' density was inversely correlated with disability progression. Post-hoc analysis evidenced differential evolution of brain functional connectivity metrics in patients according to their level of disability at baseline: while patients with lowest disability at baseline experienced an increase in all connectivity metrics during the follow-up, patients with higher disability at baseline showed a decrease in the connectivity metrics. In these patients, decrease in the connectivity metrics was associated with disability progression. The study provides two main findings: (1) brain functional connectivity enhancement decreases during the disease course after reaching a maximal level, and (2) decrease in brain functional connectivity enhancement participates in disability progression. © The Author(s), 2016.

  10. MRI detection of hypointense brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis: T1 spin-echo vs. gradient-echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Sheena L.; Tauhid, Shahamat; Kim, Gloria; Chu, Renxin; Tummala, Subhash [Departments of Neurology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Laboratory for Neuroimaging Research, Partners MS Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hurwitz, Shelley [Departments of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Bakshi, Rohit, E-mail: rbakshi@bwh.harvard.edu [Departments of Neurology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Laboratory for Neuroimaging Research, Partners MS Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Departments of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Compared T1SE and T1GE in detecting hypointense brain lesions in MS patients. • T1GE detected a higher cerebral lesion volume and number than T1SE. • T1SE correlated significantly with disability, while T1GE did not. • Hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. - Abstract: Objective: Compare T1 spin-echo (T1SE) and T1 gradient-echo (T1GE) sequences in detecting hypointense brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Background: Chronic hypointense lesions on T1SE MRI scans are a surrogate of severe demyelination and axonal loss in MS. The role of T1GE images in the detection of such lesions has not been clarified. Design/methods: In 45 patients with MS [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score (mean ± SD) 3.5 ± 2.0; 37 relapsing-remitting (RR); 8 secondary progressive (SP)], cerebral T1SE, T1GE, and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Images were re-sampled to axial 5 mm slices before directly comparing lesion detectability using Jim (v.7, Xinapse Systems). Statistical methods included Wilcoxon signed rank tests to compare sequences and Spearman correlations to test associations. Results: Considering the entire cohort, T1GE detected a higher lesion volume (5.90 ± 6.21 vs. 4.17 ± 4.84 ml, p < 0.0001) and higher lesion number (27.82 ± 20.66 vs. 25.20 ± 20.43, p < 0.05) than T1SE. Lesion volume differences persisted when considering RR and SP patients separately (both p < 0.01). A higher lesion number by T1GE was seen only in the RR group (p < 0.05). When comparing correlations between lesion volume and overall neurologic disability (EDSS score), T1SE correlated with EDSS (Spearman r = 0.29, p < 0.05) while T1GE (r = 0.23, p = 0.13) and FLAIR (r = 0.24, p = 0.12) did not. Conclusion: Our data suggest that hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. Based on these results, we hypothesize that T1GE

  11. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment.

  12. Socio-economic inequality in multiple health complaints among adolescents: international comparative study in 37 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, Bjørn E; Currie, Candace; Boyce, Will

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To use comparable data from many countries to examine 1) socio-economic inequality in multiple health complaints among adolescents, 2) whether the countries' absolute wealth and economic inequality was associated with symptom load among adolescents, and 3) whether the countries......' absolute wealth and economic inequality explained part of the individual level socio-economic variation in health complaints. METHODS: The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) international study from 2005/06 provided data on 204,534 11-, 13- and 15-year old students from nationally random...... Affluence Scale FAS) and two macro level measures on the country's economic situation: wealth measured by Gross National Product (GNP) and distribution of income measured by the Gini coefficient. RESULTS: There was a significant socio-economic variation in health complaints in 31 of the 37 countries...

  13. Association of Ideal Cardiovascular Health With Vascular Brain Injury and Incident Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pase, Matthew P; Beiser, Alexa; Enserro, Danielle; Xanthakis, Vanessa; Aparicio, Hugo; Satizabal, Claudia L; Himali, Jayandra J; Kase, Carlos S; Vasan, Ramachandran S; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha

    2016-05-01

    The American Heart Association developed the ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) index as a simple tool to promote CVH; yet, its association with brain atrophy and dementia remains unexamined. Our aim was to investigate the prospective association of ideal CVH with vascular brain injury, including the 10-year risks of incident stroke and dementia, as well as cognitive decline and brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging, measured for ≈7 years. We studied 2750 stroke- and dementia-free Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort participants (mean age, 62±9 years; 45% men). Ideal CVH was quantified on a 7-point scale with 1 point awarded for each of the following: nonsmoking status, ideal body mass index, regular physical activity, healthy diet, as well as optimum blood pressure, cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose. Both recent (baseline) and remote (6.9 years earlier) ideal CVH scores were examined. Recent ideal CVH was associated with stroke (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.95), vascular dementia (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.81), frontal brain atrophy (P=0.003), and cognitive decline on tasks measuring visual memory and reasoning (Pvascular dementia, whole-brain atrophy, and cognitive decline, remote ideal CVH was associated with the incidence of all-cause dementia (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.97) and Alzheimer disease (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.98). Adherence to the American Heart Association's ideal CVH factors and behaviors, particularly in midlife, may protect against cerebrovascular disease and dementia. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Work participation and health-related characteristics of sickness absence beneficiaries with multiple somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A H; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Nielsen, M B D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim was to study whether high levels of multiple symptoms influenced sick-listed individuals' employment status or desire to return to work (RTW) and whether this was associated with social relations at work. Study design: A cross-sectional study nested in a clinical trial......-listing, and use of health care were register-data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses with adjustments were performed. Results: Beneficiaries with high SCL-SOM score (n = 218, 33%) reported poorer health, job satisfaction, a lower desire to RTW and more problems with supervisors. The risk of being...

  15. International Differences in Multiple Sclerosis Health Outcomes and Associated Factors in a Cross-sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace D. Reilly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a major cause of disability and poor quality of life (QOL. Previous studies have shown differences in MS health outcomes between countries. This study aimed to examine the associations between international regions and health outcomes in people with MS. Self-reported data were taken from the Health Outcomes and Lifestyle In a Sample of people with Multiple Sclerosis online survey collected in 2012. The 2,401 participants from 37 countries were categorized into three regions: Australasia, Europe, and North America. Differences were observed between regions in disability, physical and mental health QOL, fatigue, and depression, but most of these disappeared after adjusting for sociodemographic, disease, and lifestyle factors in multivariable regression models. However, adjusted odds for disability were higher in Europe [odds ratio (OR: 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.28 to 3.67] and North America (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.51 compared to Australasia. There may be other unmeasured factors that vary between regions, including differences in access and quality of healthcare services, determining disability in MS. When assessing differences in MS health outcomes, lifestyle factors and medication use should be taken into consideration.

  16. Multiple shocks, coping and welfare consequences: natural disasters and health shocks in the Indian Sundarbans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Sumit; Mazumdar, Papiya Guha; Kanjilal, Barun; Singh, Prashant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Based on a household survey in Indian Sundarbans hit by tropical cyclone Aila in May 2009, this study tests for evidence and argues that health and climatic shocks are essentially linked forming a continuum and with exposure to a marginal one, coping mechanisms and welfare outcomes triggered in the response is significantly affected. The data for this study is based on a cross-sectional household survey carried out during June 2010. The survey was aimed to assess the impact of cyclone Aila on households and consequent coping mechanisms in three of the worst-affected blocks (a sub-district administrative unit), viz. Hingalganj, Gosaba and Patharpratima. The survey covered 809 individuals from 179 households, cross cutting age and gender. A separate module on health-seeking behaviour serves as the information source of health shocks defined as illness episodes (ambulatory or hospitalized) experienced by household members. Finding reveals that over half of the households (54%) consider that Aila has dealt a high, damaging impact on their household assets. Result further shows deterioration of health status in the period following the incidence of Aila. Finding suggests having suffered multiple shocks increases the number of adverse welfare outcomes by 55%. Whereas, suffering either from the climatic shock (33%) or the health shock (25%) alone increases such risks by a much lesser extent. The multiple-shock households face a significantly higher degree of difficulty to finance expenses arising out of health shocks, as opposed to their counterparts facing only the health shock. Further, these households are more likely to finance the expenses through informal loans and credit from acquaintances or moneylenders. This paper presented empirical evidence on how natural and health shocks mutually reinforce their resultant impact, making coping increasingly difficult and present significant risks of welfare loss, having short as well as long-run development manifestations.

  17. Impaired ambulation and steroid therapy impact negatively on bone health in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyblova, M; Kalincik, T; Zikan, V; Havrdova, E

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis is higher amongst patients with multiple sclerosis in comparison with the general population. In addition to the general determinants of bone health, two factors may contribute to reduced bone mineral density in multiple sclerosis: physical disability and corticosteroid therapy. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of physical disability and steroid exposure on bone health in weight-bearing bones and spine and on the incidence of low-trauma fractures in multiple sclerosis. In this retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, associations between bone mineral density (at the femoral neck, total femur and the lumbar spine) and its change with disability or cumulative steroid dose were evaluated with random-effect models adjusted for demographic and clinical determinants of bone health. The incidence of low-trauma fractures during the study follow-up was evaluated with Andersen-Gill models. Overall, 474 and 438 patients were included in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses (follow-up 2347 patient-years), respectively. The effect of severely impaired gait was more apparent in weight-bearing bones (P ≤ 10(-15) ) than in spine (P = 0.007). The effect of cumulative steroid dose was relatively less pronounced but diffuse (P ≤ 10(-4) ). Risk of low-trauma fractures was associated with disability (P = 0.02) but not with cumulative steroid exposure and was greater amongst patients with severely impaired gait (annual risk 3.5% vs. 3.0%). Synergistic effects were found only between cumulative steroid dose in patients ambulatory without support (P = 0.02). Bone health and the incidence of low-trauma fractures in multiple sclerosis are more related to impaired gait than to extended corticosteroid therapy. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  18. Concurrent multiple health risk behaviors among adolescents in Luangnamtha province, Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple health risk behaviors (HRBs among adolescents pose a threat to their health, including HIV/AIDS. Health risk behaviors such as alcohol use, smoking, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors among youth have been shown to co-occur with each others. The objectives of this study was to estimate the prevalence of single and concurrent health risk behaviors and to explore how health risk behavior is associated with socio-demographic factors and peers' behaviors. Methods A cross sectional design was used to examine health risk behaviors of adolescents between the age 14 and 19 years living in the Luangnamtha province, Lao PDR. The study was conducted between June and August, 2008. An ordinal logistic regression model that simultaneously explored demographic factors and the influence of the behavior of peers on three categories of multiple HRBs (no risk, one risk, and two or more health risk behaviors was performed. Results A total of 1360 respondents, 669 (49.1% boys with mean age 16.7 ± 1.6 and 699 (50.9% girls aged 16.1 ± 1.5 were recruited into the study. The majority reported two or fewer risk behaviors. However, multiple risk behaviors increased with age for both sexes. About 46.8% (n = 637 reported no risk, 39.3 percent (n = 535 reported one risk, 8.1 percent (n = 110 reported two risks, and 5.8 percent reported more than two health risk behaviors. The protective factors among boys were school attendance (OR = .53, CI = .33-.86, being Hmong and Yao ethnicity (OR = .48, CI-.26-.90, while being above the age of 15 (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.33-3.60, Akha ethnicity (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.04-4.61, peer's smoking (OR = 3.11, 95% CI = 2.1-4.6, and peer's drinking alcohol (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.1-3.21 were significantly associated with the presence of multiple risk behaviors among boys. Having some education (OR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.06-0.45, and being of Hmong and Yao ethnicity (OR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.18-0.80 were factors that

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... Grants BRAIN Cell Census Launched How DNA Shapes Human Gene Expression More General Health Information from NIH ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disorder and to tailor the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  3. Anti-Integrin Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eiji Kawamoto; Susumu Nakahashi; Takayuki Okamoto; Hiroshi Imai; Motomu Shimaoka

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are the foremost family of cell adhesion molecules that regulate immune cell trafficking in health and diseases. Integrin alpha4 mediates organ-specific migration of immune cells to the inflamed brain, thereby playing the critical role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Anti-alpha4 integrin therapy aiming to block infiltration of autoreactive lymphocytes to the inflamed brain has been validated in several clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This paper pr...

  4. Resilience Mediates the Longitudinal Relationships Between Social Support and Mental Health Outcomes in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmel, Emily; Hughes, Abbey J; Alschuler, Kevin N; Ehde, Dawn M

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the longitudinal relationships between social support and subsequent mental health outcomes in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to examine resilience as a mediator between social support and subsequent mental health outcomes in this population. Observational, longitudinal cohort study. Participants were assessed at 4 time points over 12 months in the context of a previously reported randomized controlled trial. Telephone-based measures administered to community-based participants. Individuals (N=163) with MS and 1 or more of the following symptoms: depression, fatigue, and pain. Not applicable. Mental health outcomes included (1) depressive symptomatology, assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9; (2) anxious symptomatology, assessed using the short form of the Emotional Distress-Anxiety Scale from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System; and (3) general mental health status, assessed using the Mental Component Summary score from the Short Form-8 Health Survey. Resilience was assessed using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. At any given time, social support from significant others, family members, and friends was significantly associated with subsequent mental health outcomes for all 3 measures assessed (all P values social support significantly mediated the relationships between social support and subsequent mental health outcomes. After controlling for resilience, most of the direct relationships between social support and mental health outcomes were no longer significant. There are significant longitudinal relationships between social support, resilience, and mental health outcomes for people with MS. Given the mediating role of resilience in supporting better mental health outcomes, future clinical research and practice may benefit from an emphasis on resilience-focused psychological interventions. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Prioritizing the Determinants of Social-health Inequality in Iran: A Multiple Attribute Decision Making Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaboli, Rouhollah; Tourani, Sogand; Seyedin, Seyed Hesam; Oliaie Manesh, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    One of the main challenges of healthcare systems of developing countries is health inequality. Health inequality means inequality in individuals' ability and proper functioning, resulting in inequality in social status and living conditions, which thwarts social interventions implemented by the government. This study aimed to determine and prioritize the social determinants of health inequality in Iran. This was a mixed method study with two phases of qualitative and quantitative research. The study population consisted of experts dealing with social determinants of health. A purposive, stratified and non-random sampling method was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect qualitative data along with a multiple attribute decision making method for the quantitative phase of the research in which the TOPSIS technique was employed for prioritization. The qualitative findings were entered into NVivo for analysis, as were the quantitative data entered into MATLAB software. The results approved the suitability of the conceptual framework of social determinants of health suggested by the WHO (world health organization) for studying social determinants of health inequality; however, this framework general and theoretical rather than a guideline for practice. Thus, in this study, 15 themes and 31 sub-themes were determined as social determinants of social health inequality in Iran. Based on the findings of the quantitative phase of our research, socioeconomic status, living facilities such as housing, and social integrity had the greatest effect on decreasing health inequality. A major part of the inequality in health distribution is avoidable because they are mostly caused by adjustable factors like economic conditions, educational conditions, employment, living facilities, etc. As in the majority of developing countries the living and health conditions are the same as Iran, the findings of this study may be applicable for other developing countries.

  6. The effect of disease modifying therapies on brain atrophy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Tsivgoulis

    Full Text Available The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of disease-modifying drugs (DMD on brain atrophy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS using available randomized-controlled trial (RCT data.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis according to PRISMA guidelines of all available RCTs of patients with RRMS that reported data on brain volume measurements during the study period.We identified 4 eligible studies, including a total of 1819 RRMS patients (71% women, mean age 36.5 years, mean baseline EDSS-score: 2.4. The mean percentage change in brain volume was found to be significantly lower in DMD versus placebo subgroup (standardized mean difference: -0.19; 95%CI: -0.27--0.11; p<0.001. We detected no evidence of heterogeneity between estimates (I2 = 30%, p = 0.19 nor publication bias in the Funnel plots. Sensitivity analyses stratifying studies according to brain atrophy neuroimaging protocol disclosed no evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.16. In meta-regression analyses, the percentage change in brain volume was found to be inversely related with duration of observation period in both DMD (meta-regression slope = -0.03; 95% CI: -0.04--0.02; p<0.001 and placebo subgroups (meta-regression slope = -0.05; 95% CI: -0.06--0.04; p<0.001. However, the rate of percentage brain volume loss over time was greater in placebo than in DMD subgroup (p = 0.017, ANCOVA.DMD appear to be effective in attenuating brain atrophy in comparison to placebo and their benefit in delaying the rate of brain volume loss increases linearly with longer treatment duration.

  7. Preliminary Validation of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Deborah L; Iverson, Grant L; Panenka, William J; Silverberg, Noah D

    2017-10-16

    The purpose of this study is to examine the reliability, factor structure, and validity of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0 12 item version) in a sample of patients who were slow to recover from a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Participants were 79 adults with mTBI recruited from one of four specialty outpatient clinics in Vancouver, Canada. The WHODAS 2.0 12 item version is a disease-nonspecific measure of disability representing six International Classification of Disability, Functioning, and Health activity and participation domains including cognition, mobility, self-care, interpersonal functioning, life activities, and participation. Results of analyses showed that the WHODAS 2.0 had high internal consistency and adequate construct and concurrent validity. A three factor structure emerged in this sample. The scale differentiated between patients with good and those with poor outcomes based on post-concussion syndrome, psychiatric, and pain status. Participants with multiple comorbidities reported the most disability on the WHODAS. Concurrent validity was also supported by lower WHODAS scores in participants who had returned to work versus those who had not. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the psychometric properties of the WHODAS 2.0 in a sample of people with mTBI. In summary, the WHODAS was sensitive to post-concussion syndrome after mTBI, as well as to health conditions that commonly co-occur with mTBI (e.g., mental health problems and chronic pain).

  8. Multiple Healthful Dietary Patterns and Type 2 Diabetes in the Women's Health Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Frank B. Hu; Tinker, Lesley; Rosner, Bernard; Redline, Susan; Garcia, Lorena; Hingle, Melanie; Van Horn, Linda; Howard, Barbara V.; Levitan, Emily B.; Li, Wenjun; Manson, JoAnn E.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Rhee, Jinnie J.; Waring, Molly E.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between various diet quality indices and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains unsettled. We compared associations of 4 diet quality indices?the Alternate Mediterranean Diet Index, Healthy Eating Index 2010, Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Index?with reported T2D in the Women's Health Initiative, overall, by race/ethnicity, and with/without adjustment for overweight/obesity at enrollment (a potential mediator). This ...

  9. Analyzing multiple informant data from an evaluation of the health disparities collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, A James; Landon, Bruce E; Guadagnoli, Edward

    2007-02-01

    To use multivariate regression methods to analyze simultaneously data obtained from multiple respondents or data sources (informants) at health centers. Surveys of executive directors, medical directors, and providers from 65 community health centers (176 informants) who participated in an evaluation of the Health Disparities Collaboratives. Cross-sectional survey of staff at the health centers during 2003-2004. In order to illustrate this method, we analyze the association between informants' assessments of the culture of the center and participation in the collaborative, and the association between computer availability and the effort made by management to improve the quality of the care and services at their center. Multivariate regression models are used to pool information across informants while accounting for informant-specific effects and retaining informants in the analysis even if the data from some of them are missing. The results are compared with those obtained by traditional methods that use data from a single informant or average over informants' ratings. In both the Collaborative participation and quality improvement efforts analyses, the multivariate regression multiple informants' analysis found significant effects and differences between informants that traditional methods failed to find. Participating centers emphasized developmental (entrepreneurship, innovation, risk-taking) and rational culture. The effect of hierarchical culture (stability and bureaucracy) on participation depended on the informant; executive directors and medical providers were the most discrepant. In centers that participated in the Collaborative, the availability of computers was positively associated with the effort that management made toward improving quality. The multiple informants model provided the most precise estimates and alerts users to differential effects across informants. Because different informants may have different insights or experiences, it is

  10. Clustering and correlates of multiple health behaviours in 9-10 year old children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie K Elsenburg

    Full Text Available Sleep, physical activity, screen time and dietary behaviours influence health during childhood, but few studies have looked at all of these behaviours simultaneously and previous research has relied predominantly on self- or proxy-reports of physical activity and food frequency questionnaires for the assessment of diet.To assess the prevalence and clustering of health behaviours and examine the socio-demographic characteristics of children that fail to meet multiple health behaviour guidelines.Data are from the Sport, Physical activity and Eating behaviour: Environmental Determinants in Young people (SPEEDY study. Participants (n = 1472, 42.9% male were dichotomized based on whether or not they met public health guidelines for accelerometer-assessed physical activity, diet-diary assessed fruit/vegetable intake and fat/non-milk extrinsic sugar (NMES intake, and self-reported screen time and sleep duration. Behavioural clustering was assessed using an observed over expected ratio (O/E. Socio-demographic characteristics of participants that failed to meet multiple health behaviour guidelines were examined using ordinal logistic regression. Data were analysed in 2013.83.3% of children failed to meet guidelines for two or more health behaviours. The O/E ratio for two behavioural combinations significantly exceeded 1, both of which featured high screen time, insufficient fruit/vegetable consumption and excessive fat/NMES intake. Children who were older (Proportional odds ratio (95% confidence interval: 1.69 (1.21,2.37 and those that attended a school with a physical activity or diet-related policy (1.28 (1.01,1.62 were more likely to have a poor health behaviour profile. Girls (0.80 (0.64,0.99, participants with siblings (0.76 (0.61,0.94 and those with more highly educated parents (0.73 (0.56,0.94 were less likely to have a poor health behaviour profile.A substantial proportion of children failed to meet guidelines for multiple health behaviours

  11. Patient-specific 3D FLAIR for enhanced visualization of brain white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Refaat E; Pednekar, Amol S; Govindarajan, Koushik A; Sun, Xiaojun; Riascos, Roy F; Ramírez, María G; Hasan, Khader M; Lincoln, John A; Nelson, Flavia; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2017-08-01

    To improve the conspicuity of white matter lesions (WMLs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) using patient-specific optimization of single-slab 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen MS patients were enrolled in a prospective 3.0T MRI study. FLAIR inversion time and echo time were automatically optimized for each patient during the same scan session based on measurements of the relative proton density and relaxation times of the brain tissues. The optimization criterion was to maximize the contrast between gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), while suppressing cerebrospinal fluid. This criterion also helps increase the contrast between WMLs and WM. The performance of the patient-specific 3D FLAIR protocol relative to the fixed-parameter protocol was assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Patient-specific optimization achieved a statistically significant 41% increase in the GM-WM contrast ratio (P < 0.05) and 32% increase in the WML-WM contrast ratio (P < 0.01) compared with fixed-parameter FLAIR. The increase in WML-WM contrast ratio correlated strongly with echo time (P < 10-11 ). Two experienced neuroradiologists indicated substantially higher lesion conspicuity on the patient-specific FLAIR images over conventional FLAIR in 3-4 cases (intrarater correlation coefficient ICC = 0.72). In no case was the image quality of patient-specific FLAIR considered inferior to conventional FLAIR by any of the raters (ICC = 0.32). Changes in proton density and relaxation times render fixed-parameter FLAIR suboptimal in terms of lesion contrast. Patient-specific optimization of 3D FLAIR increases lesion conspicuity without scan time penalty, and has potential to enhance the detection of subtle and small lesions in MS. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:557-564. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. The role of MRI of the brain and spinal cord, and CSF examination for the diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P; Sandberg-Wollheim, M; Norrving, B

    2007-01-01

    The clinical applicability of the revised McDonald diagnostic criteria of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) was assessed in 17 patients with a longstanding PPMS diagnosis (mean 15 years). All patients were re-evaluated with clinical examinations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI......) of the brain and the spinal cord, extensive laboratory tests, and 12 patients underwent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination. No diagnosis more likely than PPMS was disclosed. All patients had brain and spinal cord lesions on MRI. In 15 patients the brain lesions and in 14 the spinal cord lesions fulfilled...... had CSF findings supporting the diagnosis PPMS. Thus, CSF analysis was required in addition to MRI in about one-third of the patients to establish the diagnosis of PPMS. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov...

  13. Ageing well: improving the management of patients with multiple chronic health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew L; Caughey, Gillian E; Vitry, Agnes I; Clark, Alice; Ryan, Philip; McDermott, Robyn A; Shakib, Sepehr; Luszcz, Mary A; Esterman, Adrian; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2011-10-01

    To identify and evaluate the management and care of older people with multiple chronic health problems (MCHP). Administrative health data from the Department of Veterans' Affairs and bio-social data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing are used to determine prevalence of MCHP, treatment patterns and patient outcomes. Focus groups and semistructured interviews are used to gain patient and health practitioner perspectives. The prevalence of MCHP in older people is high (65%) and is associated with increased use of health services, mortality and poorer self-rated health. Australian disease-specific guidelines fail to address MCHP, and treatment conflicts with the potential to cause harm, were common. Improvements in the care and management of older people with MCHP requires: a multifaceted approach, across the health-care system; better coordination of holistic, patient-centred multidisciplinary care; and effective communication and education of all stakeholders. The Health reform agenda in Australia provides an opportunity for change. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2011 ACOTA.

  14. Private health insurance and quality of life: perspectives of older Australians with multiple chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Black, Annie; Govett, Janelle; Yen, Laurann; McRae, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to explore in-depth issues relating to the health costs of chronic illness as identified in a previous study. A key theme that emerged from interviews carried out was the benefits and challenges of private health insurance (PHI) membership, and choices older Australians with multimorbidity make in accessing health services, with and without PHI. This is the focus of this paper. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 40 older people with multiple chronic conditions. Data were analysed using content analysis. Key motivators for maintaining PHI included: fear of an inability to access timely health care; the opportunity to exercise choice in service provider; a belief of being 'better off' both medically and financially, which was often ill-founded; and the core values of self reliance and independence. Most described financial pressure caused by rising PHI premiums as well as other out-of-pocket health related expenses. Many older people who can ill afford PHI still struggle to maintain it, potentially at the cost of their quality of life, based on beliefs about costs of health care that they have never properly assessed. The findings highlight the degree to which people whose resources are constrained are prepared to go to maintain access to private hospital care. Attention should be given to assisting older people to make informed and valid choices of health insurance derived from the facts, rather than being based on fear and assumptions.

  15. Gender differences in the prevalence and clustering of multiple health risk behaviours in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsotakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Vassilaki, Maria; Androulaki, Zacharenia; Philalithis, Anastas E

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the sex-stratified prevalence and clustering of 14 behavioural and metabolic health risk factors in emerging adulthood. The high prevalence and the clustering of risk factors multiply health consequences and increase the threat to the future health and quality of life of young adults. Descriptive cross-sectional study. During November-December 2012, we assessed 14 lifestyle characteristics of 1058 1st year university students' that were classified as: healthy (score = 0), unhealthy (score = 1) and high-risk unhealthy (score = 2). We subsequently created a Multiple Health Risk Behaviours Index by summing the score of each behaviour adjusted to 0-100. Only 0·3% of the students had one risk behaviour and 21·3% (male: 31·5%; female: 12·6%) had ≥10 of 14. Male students had higher risk index score. In adjusted regression analyses, female students had higher odds of reporting healthier behaviours in oral hygiene (tooth brushing), red meat and junk food consumption, binge drinking, cannabis/hashish/marijuana use and lower number of sexual partners and Body Mass Index. Male students reported higher physical activity. No statistically significant gender differences were noted for screen time/sedentary behaviours, condom use, smoking, sunburns, breakfast and fruit and vegetable consumption. Although health-compromising behaviours are highly prevalent in both men and women, they are gender-related, with males engaging in more health risk behaviours than females. Preventive interventions may need to focus on gender-informed approaches when targeting multiple health risk behaviours. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The microbiota-gut-brain axis as a key regulator of neural function and the stress response: Implications for human and animal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, N C; Dinan, T G; Ross, R P; Stanton, C; Clarke, G; Cryan, J F

    2017-07-01

    The brain-gut-microbiota axis comprises an extensive communication network between the brain, the gut, and the microbiota residing there. Development of a diverse gut microbiota is vital for multiple features of behavior and physiology, as well as many fundamental aspects of brain structure and function. Appropriate early-life assembly of the gut microbiota is also believed to play a role in subsequent emotional and cognitive development. If the composition, diversity, or assembly of the gut microbiota is impaired, this impairment can have a negative impact on host health and lead to disorders such as obesity, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and even potentially neuropsychiatric illnesses, including anxiety and depression. Therefore, much research effort in recent years has focused on understanding the potential of targeting the intestinal microbiota to prevent and treat such disorders. This review aims to explore the influence of the gut microbiota on host neural function and behavior, particularly those of relevance to stress-related disorders. The involvement of microbiota in diverse neural functions such as myelination, microglia function, neuronal morphology, and blood-brain barrier integrity across the life span, from early life to adolescence to old age, will also be discussed. Nurturing an optimal gut microbiome may also prove beneficial in animal science as a means to manage stressful situations and to increase productivity of farm animals. The implications of these observations are manifold, and researchers are hopeful that this promising body of preclinical work can be successfully translated to the clinic and beyond.

  17. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  18. Sleep Disorders Reduce Health-Related Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis (Nottingham Health Profile Data in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Veauthier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality of Life (QoL is decreased in multiple sclerosis (MS, but studies about the impact of sleep disorders (SD on health-related quality of Life (HRQoL are lacking. From our original cohort, a cross-sectional polysomnographic (PSG study in consecutive MS patients, we retrospectively analysed the previously unpublished data of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP. Those MS patients suffering from sleep disorders (n = 49 showed significantly lower HRQoL compared to MS patients without sleep disorders (n = 17. Subsequently, we classified the patients into four subgroups: insomnia (n = 17, restless-legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder and SD due to leg pain (n = 24, obstructive sleep apnea (n = 8 and patients without sleep disorder (n = 17. OSA and insomnia patients showed significantly higher NHP values and decreased HRQoL not only for the sleep subscale but also for the “energy” and “emotional” area of the NHP. In addition, OSA patients also showed increased NHP values in the “physical abilities” area. Interestingly, we did not find a correlation between the objective PSG parameters and the subjective sleep items of the NHP. However, this study demonstrates that sleep disorders can reduce HRQoL in MS patients and should be considered as an important confounder in all studies investigating HRQoL in MS.

  19. Is the effect of coping styles disease specific? Relationships with emotional distress and quality of life in acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Ingrid; Bol, Yvonne; Stapert, Sven; Köhler, Sebastian; van Heugten, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the use of coping styles and the relationships linking coping to emotional distress and quality of life in patients with acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis. Cross-sectional cohort study of 143 patients with acquired brain injury and 310 patients with multiple sclerosis in the chronic stage. Quality of life was measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-9), coping styles with the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS-T, task-oriented; CISS-E, emotion-oriented; CISS-A, avoidance), emotional distress with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Coping styles did not differ between types of multiple sclerosis and varied only little with regard to severity of disease. In both patient groups, task-oriented coping was most used followed by avoidance and emotion-oriented coping. Patients with multiple sclerosis used all styles to a greater extent. In acquired brain injury, lower CISS-E and lower HADS scores were associated with higher LiSat-9 scores. CISS-E had a direct effect on LiSat-9 and an indirect effect via HADS. In multiple sclerosis, next to lower CISS-E and lower HADS scores, higher CISS-A scores were also associated with higher LiSat-9 scores. CISS-E had an indirect effect and CISS-A had a direct and indirect effect on LiSat-9. In both patient groups, coping patterns are similar, and emotion-oriented coping negatively influences quality of life. Additionally, in multiple sclerosis, seeking emotional support and distraction (CISS-A) was positively associated with quality of life. Interventions to improve adaptive coping could be organized within a neurorehabilitation setting for both patient groups together.

  20. Technology-assisted programmes to promote leisure engagement in persons with acquired brain injury and profound multiple disabilities: two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; De Pace, Claudia; Chiapparino, Claudia; Ricci, Irene; Navarro, Jorge; Addante, Luigi M; Spica, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To evaluate technology-assisted programmes for enabling a woman and a man with brain injury and profound multiple disabilities to acquire leisure engagement. METHOD. The technology for the woman (Study I) involved a portable computer with mouse, a Clicker 4 software package, a touch/pressure microswitch, and an interface to connect the Clicker with the microswitch. This technology allowed the woman to choose with a simple hand response among four stimulus categories (e.g., watching a film and interacting with others), each of which included several alternatives. The technology for the man (Study II) involved a computer-based choice system that allowed him to select preferred songs through a microswitch-aided finger-movement response. RESULTS. Data showed that the two participants learned to use the technology available and selected among the stimulus events thus reaching positive leisure engagement. CONCLUSION. Technology-assisted programmes may provide persons with acquired brain injury and multiple disabilities leisure engagement opportunities.

  1. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica P

    2017-02-01

    Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141-148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299.

  2. [People with Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities as a Vulnerable Population Group in Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasseler, M

    2015-12-01

    This study intends to research experiences of employees of ambulatory and stationary residential facilities for people with mental and multiple disabilities and family members concerning the health care of the target group. A qualitative research design was applied. As a data collection tool expert interviews were used. Proxy-interviews of employees of ambulatory and stationary residential facilities for people with mental and multiple disabilities and of family members were carried out. In total, 21 interviews could be evaluated with the software program MAXQDA. In particular, the results show that interviewees experienced or perceived a lack of individual time, prescribed measurements, conducted interventions and measurements, etc in the health care field of independent physicians. Systematic, structural, qualification-related and financial limitations impede a high-quality care for the target group. Further studies are necessary to receive differentiated knowledge about the health situation of the target group and to optimize the health care provision. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Effects of environmental noise exposure on DNA methylation in the brain and metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liqiong; Li, Peng-Hui; Li, Hua; Colicino, Elena; Colicino, Silvia; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Ruiping; Feng, Xiaotian; Barrow, Timothy M; Cayir, Akin; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2017-02-01

    Environmental noise exposure is associated with adverse effects on human health including hearing loss, heart disease, and changes in stress-related hormone levels. Alteration in DNA methylation in response to environmental exposures is a well-known phenomenon and it is implicated in many human diseases. Understanding how environmental noise exposures affect DNA methylation patterns may help to elucidate the link between noise and adverse effects on health. In this pilot study we examined the effects of environmental noise exposure on DNA methylation of genes related to brain function and investigated whether these changes are related with metabolic health. We exposed four groups of male Wistar rats to moderate intensity noise (70-75dB with 20-4000Hz) at night for three days as short-term exposure, and for three weeks as long-term exposure. Noise exposure was limited to 45dB during the daytime. Control groups were exposed to only 45dB, day and night. We measured DNA methylation in the Bdnf, Comt, Crhr1, Mc2r, and Snca genes in tissue from four brain regions of the rats (hippocampus, frontal lobe, medulla oblongata, and inferior colliculus). Further, we measured blood pressure and body weight after long-term noise exposure. We found that environmental noise exposure is associated with gene-specific DNA methylation changes in specific regions of the brain. Changes in DNA methylation are significantly associated with changes in body weight (between Bdnf DNA methylation and Δ body weight: r=0.59, p=0.018; and between LINE-1 ORF DNA methylation and Δ body weight: =-0.80, p=0.0004). We also observed that noise exposure decreased blood pressure (p=0.038 for SBP, p=0.017 for DBP and p 0. 017 for MAP) and decreased body weight (β=-26g, p=0.008). In conclusion, environmental noise exposures can induce changes in DNA methylation in the brain, which may be associated with adverse effects upon metabolic health through modulation of response to stress-related hormones

  4. On one approach to health protection: Music of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotchev, Alexander; Radchenko, Grigoriy; Zemlianaia, Anna

    2017-10-18

    This review presents the current status of a method for prevention and timely correction of human functional disturbances that was first proposed by Russian neurologist Ya.I. Levin in 1998 and further developed by the authors. The approach is named "Music of the Brain" and is based on musical or music-like stimulation organized in strict accordance with the biopotentials of a patient's brain. Initial studies on the music of the brain approach were analyzed, and its limitations were noted. To enhance the efficiency and usability of the approach, several combinations of music therapy with neurofeedback technique - musical neurofeedback - were developed. Enhanced efficiency of the approach has been shown for correction of functional disturbances during pregnancy and for elimination of stress-induced states in high technology specialists. The use and advantages of musical neurofeedback technology for increasing human cognitive activity, correcting sleep disturbances and treatment of disorders of attention were verified. After further development and testing the approach may be suited for a wide range of therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in the protection of public health.

  5. Multiple Healthful Dietary Patterns and Type 2 Diabetes in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Hu, Frank B; Tinker, Lesley; Rosner, Bernard; Redline, Susan; Garcia, Lorena; Hingle, Melanie; Van Horn, Linda; Howard, Barbara V; Levitan, Emily B; Li, Wenjun; Manson, JoAnn E; Phillips, Lawrence S; Rhee, Jinnie J; Waring, Molly E; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between various diet quality indices and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains unsettled. We compared associations of 4 diet quality indices--the Alternate Mediterranean Diet Index, Healthy Eating Index 2010, Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Index--with reported T2D in the Women's Health Initiative, overall, by race/ethnicity, and with/without adjustment for overweight/obesity at enrollment (a potential mediator). This cohort (n = 101,504) included postmenopausal women without T2D who completed a baseline food frequency questionnaire from which the 4 diet quality index scores were derived. Higher scores on the indices indicated a better diet. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariate hazard ratios for T2D. Pearson coefficients for correlation among the indices ranged from 0.55 to 0.74. Follow-up took place from 1993 to 2013. During a median 15 years of follow-up, 10,815 incident cases of T2D occurred. For each diet quality index, a 1-standard-deviation higher score was associated with 10%-14% lower T2D risk (P diet were inversely associated with T2D in these postmenopausal women. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Health outcome prioritization to elicit preferences of older persons with multiple health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Terri R; Tinetti, Mary; Agostini, Joe; Iannone, Lynne; Towle, Virginia

    2011-05-01

    To develop and test a simple tool to elicit the preferences of older persons based on prioritization of universal health outcomes. Persons age ≥ 65 participating in a larger study were asked to rank 4 outcomes on a visual analogue scale: (1) maintaining independence, (2) staying alive, (3) reducing/eliminating pain, (4) reducing/eliminating other symptoms. Interviewers rated 73% of the 81 participants as having good to excellent understanding, and cognitive interviews demonstrated the tool captured how participants thought about trade-offs. Test-retest reliability was fair to poor for ranking most of the outcomes as either most or least important (kappa .28-1.0). Patient characteristics associated with ranking "keeping you alive" as most important have been shown to be associated with a preference for life-sustaining treatment, a related construct. There was substantial variability in the outcome ranked as most important. The task of ranking 4 universal health outcomes was well understood, captured what was important when considering trade-offs, and demonstrated content validity. However, test-retest reliability was fair to poor. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Occupational Therapy and Management of Multiple Chronic Conditions in the Context of Health Care Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelberg, Donald J.; Halle, Ashley D.; Mroz, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    One in four individuals living in the United States has multiple chronic conditions (MCCs), and the already high prevalence of MCCs continues to grow. This population has high rates of health care utilization yet poor outcomes, leading to elevated concerns about fragmented, low-quality care provided within the current health care system. Several national initiatives endeavor to improve care for the population with MCCs, and occupational therapy is uniquely positioned to contribute to these efforts for more efficient, effective, client-centered management of care. By integrating findings from the literature with current policy and practice, we aim to highlight the potential role for occupational therapy in managing MCCs within the evolving health care system. PMID:28027031

  8. A nurse-led mental health service for people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askey-Jones, Sally; Silber, Eli; Shaw, Pauline; Gray, Richard; David, Anthony S

    2012-06-01

    Mental health problems are under recognised and under treated in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). A nurse-led project linking MS and mental health services was evaluated. Data on all referrals and management from 2006 to 2008 were collected prospectively. 127 referrals were received. 82% had depression, 53% had anxiety (45% both). 42% were offered case management; 52% received Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), 55% required initiation or alteration of psychiatric medications and 19% were referred to secondary care; 16% had made suicidal plans. Significant improvements in depression at 6months occurred, but not anxiety or fatigue. This service provides a model of mental health provision for patients with long term neurological conditions, in particular MS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimizing parameter choice for FSL-Brain Extraction Tool (BET) on 3D T1 images in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Valeriu; Battaglini, M; Hoogstrate, W S

    2012-01-01

    Brain atrophy studies often use FSL-BET (Brain Extraction Tool) as the first step of image processing. Default BET does not always give satisfactory results on 3DT1 MR images, which negatively impacts atrophy measurements. Finding the right alternative BET settings can be a difficult and time...

  10. Modulation of brain activity by multiple lexical and word form variables in visual word recognition: A parametric fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, Olaf; Davis, Matthew H; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2008-09-01

    Psycholinguistic research has documented a range of variables that influence visual word recognition performance. Many of these variables are highly intercorrelated. Most previous studies have used factorial designs, which do not exploit the full range of values available for continuous variables, and are prone to skewed stimulus selection as well as to effects of the baseline (e.g. when contrasting words with pseudowords). In our study, we used a parametric approach to study the effects of several psycholinguistic variables on brain activation. We focussed on the variable word frequency, which has been used in numerous previous behavioural, electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies, in order to investigate the neuronal network underlying visual word processing. Furthermore, we investigated the variable orthographic typicality as well as a combined variable for word length and orthographic neighbourhood size (N), for which neuroimaging results are still either scarce or inconsistent. Data were analysed using multiple linear regression analysis of event-related fMRI data acquired from 21 subjects in a silent reading paradigm. The frequency variable correlated negatively with activation in left fusiform gyrus, bilateral inferior frontal gyri and bilateral insulae, indicating that word frequency can affect multiple aspects of word processing. N correlated positively with brain activity in left and right middle temporal gyri as well as right inferior frontal gyrus. Thus, our analysis revealed multiple distinct brain areas involved in visual word processing within one data set.

  11. Parenting Multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Parenting Multiples KidsHealth / For Parents / Parenting Multiples What's in ... your ability to take care of your babies. Parenting Issues With Multiples It may be difficult to ...

  12. Assessment and rehabilitation of driver skills: subjective experiences of people with multiple sclerosis and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Cherie; Morris, Libby; George, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    It is acknowledged in the literature that the physical and cognitive effects of the degenerative neurological condition of multiple sclerosis can impact upon driver safety. The aim of this study was to identify the experiences and needs of people with multiple sclerosis in relation to driver assessment and rehabilitation. Focus group discussions were conducted with people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who were: currently driving; no longer licensed or no longer driving and health professionals. The four themes that emerged from the data were: (1) from self-management to formal assessment - a journey of uncertainty and emotional dilemmas; (2) lost independence with grieving and adjustment by self and family; (3) alternative transport is challenging and unsatisfactory; (4) gaps in information and services exist. The results of this study highlight the need for ongoing support in relation to driving for people with MS, ranging from support for self-management, driving assessment and retraining, and preparation for loss of license. Standardised information needs to be developed and health professionals and licensing authorities require knowledge and skills to ensure driver assessment and rehabilitation processes and resources can better meet the needs of people with MS. There is a need for health professionals to examine driving in people with MS in a holistic manner taking into account the context for the person and the supports available. Self-management and self-assessment emerged as a preferred approach for the participants in this study, indicating that health professionals may need to engage with the process. Tools to support self-assessment of driving abilities for people with MS require further research. Indicators for review and formal assessment of driving abilities is needed. Alternative forms of transport require further investigation and improvement for people with MS.

  13. Developing and sustaining adolescent-friendly health services: A multiple case study from Ecuador and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Coe, Anna-Britt; San Sebastián, Miguel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2017-08-01

    Adolescent-Friendly Health Services (AFHSs) are those that are accessible, acceptable, equitable, appropriate and effective for different youth sub-populations. This study investigated the process through which four clinics in two countries - Peru and Ecuador - introduced, developed and sustained AFHSs. A multiple case study design was chosen, and data from each clinic were collected through document review, observations and informant interviews. National level data were also collected. Data were analysed following thematic analysis. The findings showed that the process of introducing, developing and sustaining AFHSs was long term, and required a creative team effort and collaboration between donors, public institutions and health providers. The motivation and external support was crucial to initiating and sustaining the implementation of AFHSs. Health facilities' transformation into AFHSs was linked to the broader organisation of country health systems, and the evolution of national adolescent health policies. In Peru, the centralised approach to AFHSs introduction facilitated the dissemination of a comprehensive national model to health facilities, but dependency on national directives made it more difficult to systemise them when ideological and organisational changes occurred. In Ecuador, a less centralised approach to introducing AFHSs made for easier integration of the AFHSs model.

  14. Community Health Worker Support for Disadvantaged Patients With Multiple Chronic Diseases: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangovi, Shreya; Mitra, Nandita; Grande, David; Huo, Hairong; Smith, Robyn A; Long, Judith A

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether a community health worker (CHW) intervention improved outcomes in a low-income population with multiple chronic conditions. We conducted a single-blind, randomized clinical trial in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2013-2014). Participants (n = 302) were high-poverty neighborhood residents, uninsured or publicly insured, and diagnosed with 2 or more chronic diseases (diabetes, obesity, tobacco dependence, hypertension). All patients set a disease-management goal. Patients randomly assigned to CHWs also received 6 months of support tailored to their goals and preferences. Support from CHWs (vs goal-setting alone) led to improvements in several chronic diseases (changes in glycosylated hemoglobin: -0.4 vs 0.0; body mass index: -0.3 vs -0.1; cigarettes per day: -5.5 vs -1.3; systolic blood pressure: -1.8 vs -11.2; overall P = .08), self-rated mental health (12-item Short Form survey; 2.3 vs -0.2; P = .008), and quality of care (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems; 62.9% vs 38%; P < .001), while reducing hospitalization at 1 year by 28% (P = .11). There were no differences in patient activation or self-rated physical health. A standardized CHW intervention improved chronic disease control, mental health, quality of care, and hospitalizations and could be a useful population health management tool for health care systems. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01900470.

  15. Multiple genetic imaging study of the association between cholesterol metabolism and brain functional alterations in individuals with risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Yuan, Yonggui; Shi, Yongmei; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-03-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease. Genes involved in cholesterol metabolism may play a role in the pathological changes of AD. However, the imaging genetics-based endophenotypes derived from polymorphisms in multiple functionally related genes are unclear in individuals with risk factors for AD. Forty-three amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects and 30 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of brain topological organization. Thirty-three previously suggested tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 12 candidate genes in the cholesterol metabolism pathway were further investigated. A cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach was then utilized to investigate disease-related differences between the groups based on genotype-by-aMCI interactions. The cholesterol metabolism pathway genes exerted widespread effects on the cortico-subcortical-cerebellar spontaneous brain activity. Meanwhile, left lateralization of global brain connectivity was associated with cholesterol metabolism pathway genes. The APOE rs429358 variation significantly influenced the brain network characteristics, affecting the activation of nodes as well as the connectivity of edges in aMCI subjects.The cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach may provide new opportunities to understand the mechanisms underlying AD and suggested that APOE rs429358 is a core genetic variation that is associated with disease-related differences in brain function.

  16. Multiplicity of cerebrospinal fluid functions: New challenges in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stopa Edward G

    2008-05-01

    and excretory benefits. Finally, CSF reabsorption via multiple pathways (olfactory and spinal arachnoidal bulk flow is likely complemented by fluid clearance across capillary walls (aquaporin 4 and arachnoid villi when CSFP and fluid retention are markedly elevated. A model is presented that links CSF and ISF homeostasis to coordinated fluxes of water and solutes at both the blood-CSF and blood-brain transport interfaces. Outline 1 Overview 2 CSF formation 2.1 Transcription factors 2.2 Ion transporters 2.3 Enzymes that modulate transport 2.4 Aquaporins or water channels 2.5 Receptors for neuropeptides 3 CSF pressure 3.1 Servomechanism regulatory hypothesis 3.2 Ontogeny of CSF pressure generation 3.3 Congenital hydrocephalus and periventricular regions 3.4 Brain response to elevated CSF pressure 3.5 Advances in measuring CSF waveforms 4 CSF flow 4.1 CSF flow and brain metabolism 4.2 Flow effects on fetal germinal matrix 4.3 Decreasing CSF flow in aging CNS 4.4 Refinement of non-invasive flow measurements 5 CSF volume 5.1 Hemodynamic factors 5.2 Hydrodynamic factors 5.3 Neuroendocrine factors 6 CSF turnover rate 6.1 Adverse effect of ventriculomegaly 6.2 Attenuated CSF sink action 7 CSF composition 7.1 Kidney-like action of CP-CSF system 7.2 Altered CSF biochemistry in aging and disease 7.3 Importance of clearance transport 7.4 Therapeutic manipulation of composition 8 CSF recycling in relation to ISF dynamics 8.1 CSF exchange with brain interstitium 8.2 Components of ISF movement in brain 8.3 Compromised ISF/CSF dynamics and amyloid retention 9 CSF reabsorption 9.1 Arachnoidal outflow resistance 9.2 Arachnoid villi vs. olfactory drainage routes 9.3 Fluid reabsorption along spinal nerves 9.4 Reabsorption across capillary aquaporin channels 10 Developing translationally effective models for restoring CSF balance 11 Conclusion

  17. Quantifying the relative importance of predictors in multiple linear regression analyses for public health studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yi-Chun E; Zhao, Yue; Kupper, Lawrence L; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2008-08-01

    Multiple linear regression analysis is widely used in many scientific fields, including public health, to evaluate how an outcome or response variable is related to a set of predictors. As a result, researchers often need to assess "relative importance" of a predictor by comparing the contributions made by other individual predictors in a particular regression model. Hence, development of valid statistical methods to estimate the relative importance of a set of predictors is of great interest. In this research, the authors considered the relative importance of a predictor when defined by that portion of the squared multiple correlation explained by the contribution of each predictor in the final model of interest. Here, a number of suggested relative importance indices motivated by this definition are reviewed, including the squared zero-order correlation, squared semipartial correlation, Product Measure (i.e., Pratt's Index), General Dominance Index, and Johnson's Relative Weight. The authors compared these indices using data sets from an occupational health study in which human inhalation exposure to styrene was measured and from a laboratory animal study on risk factors for atherosclerosis, and statistical properties using bootstrap methods were examined. The analysis suggests that the General Dominance Index and Johnson's Relative Weight are preferred methods for quantifying the relative importance of predictors in a multiple linear regression model. Johnson's Relative Weight involves significantly less computational burden than the General Dominance Index when the number of predictors in the final model is large.

  18. [Prediction model of health workforce and beds in county hospitals of Hunan by multiple linear regression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ru; Liu, Jiawang

    2011-12-01

    To construct prediction model for health workforce and hospital beds in county hospitals of Hunan by multiple linear regression. We surveyed 16 counties in Hunan with stratified random sampling according to uniform questionnaires,and multiple linear regression analysis with 20 quotas selected by literature view was done. Independent variables in the multiple linear regression model on medical personnels in county hospitals included the counties' urban residents' income, crude death rate, medical beds, business occupancy, professional equipment value, the number of devices valued above 10 000 yuan, fixed assets, long-term debt, medical income, medical expenses, outpatient and emergency visits, hospital visits, actual available bed days, and utilization rate of hospital beds. Independent variables in the multiple linear regression model on county hospital beds included the the population of aged 65 and above in the counties, disposable income of urban residents, medical personnel of medical institutions in county area, business occupancy, the total value of professional equipment, fixed assets, long-term debt, medical income, medical expenses, outpatient and emergency visits, hospital visits, actual available bed days, utilization rate of hospital beds, and length of hospitalization. The prediction model shows good explanatory and fitting, and may be used for short- and mid-term forecasting.

  19. Is the Scottish population living dangerously? Prevalence of multiple risk factors: the Scottish Health Survey 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster David H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk factors are often considered individually, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of combinations of multiple behavioural risk factors and their association with socioeconomic determinants. Methods Multinomial logistic regression was used to model the associations between socioeconomic factors and multiple risk factors from data in the Scottish Health Survey 2003. Prevalence of five key risk - smoking, alcohol, diet, overweight/obesity, and physical inactivity, and their risk in relation to demographic, individual and area socioeconomic factors were assessed. Results Full data were available on 6,574 subjects (80.7% of the survey sample. Nearly the whole adult population (97.5% reported to have at least one behavioural risk factor; while 55% have three or more risk factors; and nearly 20% have four or all five risk factors. The most important determinants for having four or five multiple risk factors were low educational attainment which conferred over a 3-fold increased risk compared to high education; and residence in the most deprived communities (relative to least deprived which had greater than 3-fold increased risk. Conclusions The prevalence of multiple behavioural risk factors was high and the prevalence of absence of all risk factors very low. These behavioural patterns were strongly associated with poorer socioeconomic circumstances. Policy to address factors needs to be joined up and better consider underlying socioeconomic circumstances.

  20. A Review of Dietary Ziziphus jujuba Fruit (Jujube): Developing Health Food Supplements for Brain Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Zhonggui; Qi, Airong; Yao, Ping; Zhou, Zhongyu; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2017-01-01

    The fruits of Ziziphus jujuba, known as jujube or Chinese date, are being consumed all around the world because of their health benefits, as both food and herbal medicine. Traditionally, one of the main functions of jujube, as described in herbal medicine, is to benefit our brain by calming down the mind and improving quality of sleep. Here, the activities of jujubes on nervous system are summarized and discussed. Jujube possesses neuroprotective activities, including protecting neuronal cells against neurotoxin stress, stimulating neuronal differentiation, increasing expression of neurotrophic factors, and promoting memory and learning. Flavonoid, cAMP, and jujuboside could be the potential bioactive ingredients to account for the aforesaid biological activities. These findings imply that jujube is a potential candidate for development of health supplements for prevention and/or treatment of neurological diseases.

  1. A Review of Dietary Ziziphus jujuba Fruit (Jujube): Developing Health Food Supplements for Brain Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Qi, Airong; Zhou, Zhongyu; Dong, Tina T. X.

    2017-01-01

    The fruits of Ziziphus jujuba, known as jujube or Chinese date, are being consumed all around the world because of their health benefits, as both food and herbal medicine. Traditionally, one of the main functions of jujube, as described in herbal medicine, is to benefit our brain by calming down the mind and improving quality of sleep. Here, the activities of jujubes on nervous system are summarized and discussed. Jujube possesses neuroprotective activities, including protecting neuronal cells against neurotoxin stress, stimulating neuronal differentiation, increasing expression of neurotrophic factors, and promoting memory and learning. Flavonoid, cAMP, and jujuboside could be the potential bioactive ingredients to account for the aforesaid biological activities. These findings imply that jujube is a potential candidate for development of health supplements for prevention and/or treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:28680447

  2. A Review of Dietary Ziziphus jujuba Fruit (Jujube: Developing Health Food Supplements for Brain Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fruits of Ziziphus jujuba, known as jujube or Chinese date, are being consumed all around the world because of their health benefits, as both food and herbal medicine. Traditionally, one of the main functions of jujube, as described in herbal medicine, is to benefit our brain by calming down the mind and improving quality of sleep. Here, the activities of jujubes on nervous system are summarized and discussed. Jujube possesses neuroprotective activities, including protecting neuronal cells against neurotoxin stress, stimulating neuronal differentiation, increasing expression of neurotrophic factors, and promoting memory and learning. Flavonoid, cAMP, and jujuboside could be the potential bioactive ingredients to account for the aforesaid biological activities. These findings imply that jujube is a potential candidate for development of health supplements for prevention and/or treatment of neurological diseases.

  3. The new brain: concepts, challenges, and opportunities for mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, David Andrew

    2012-04-01

    The new paradigm that the brain is able change itself (neuroplasticity) is acknowledged and teased out in terms of the ramifications for mental illnesses. Parallel studies in pain (central sensitization) and mirror neurones are examined to conceptually clarify these ramifications in relation to mental health, and to expand our understanding of empathy and social inclusion beyond good ideas to being a part of our nature. The paper then focuses on making clear what the concepts, challenges, and opportunities for mental health nursing might be; even advancing possibilities for recovery through better understanding the third space or intersubjective. What ramifications this has for mental health nursing is reviewed in terms of a paradigm change and the necessity for conceptual clarity, as it relates to the uniqueness of the person right before our very eyes. The author contends that to embrace this new paradigm is not only necessary but ethically obligatory, as it opens up new possibilities for understanding ourselves and this changeable person. © 2012 The Author. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. What is known about sexual health after pediatric acquired brain injury: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grahame; Simons-Coghill, Martine; Bates, Annerley; Gan, Caron

    2017-01-01

    Positive sexual development is a core task in the transition from childhood/adolescence to adulthood. Little is known about the extent of research addressing this topic after acquired brain injury (ABI). To identify publications (1980 to 2016) addressing positive sexual health among children/adolescents with ABI. A scoping review. A search conducted using OVID and PubMed databases yielded 2021 citations with 28 publications meeting the inclusion criteria (six reviews, one expert account, 19 observational and two intervention studies). Teenagers with ABI reported poorer body image, feeling less sexually or physically attractive than sex and age matched non brain-damaged controls. The one study with findings on sexual orientation, reported 15% of adolescents with ABI identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual. Precocious puberty was a rare outcome from ABI, but the most common focus of the publications (14/28). Finally, two case studies (genital touching and classroom masturbation respectively) found that behavioral interventions were an effective means of extinguishing inappropriate sexual behaviour after childhood ABI. Sexual health is a neglected area of research in post-ABI care for children/adolescents. A better understanding of the needs and challenges will help rehabilitation professionals and parents provide more informed and effective supports.

  5. Stress-induced perinatal and transgenerational epigenetic programming of brain development and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, Olena; Kovalchuk, Igor; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2015-01-01

    Research efforts during the past decades have provided intriguing evidence suggesting that stressful experiences during pregnancy exert long-term consequences on the future mental wellbeing of both the mother and her baby. Recent human epidemiological and animal studies indicate that stressful experiences in utero or during early life may increase the risk of neurological and psychiatric disorders, arguably via altered epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as miRNA expression, DNA methylation, and histone modifications are prone to changes in response to stressful experiences and hostile environmental factors. Altered epigenetic regulation may potentially influence fetal endocrine programming and brain development across several generations. Only recently, however, more attention has been paid to possible transgenerational effects of stress. In this review we discuss the evidence of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of stress exposure in human studies and animal models. We highlight the complex interplay between prenatal stress exposure, associated changes in miRNA expression and DNA methylation in placenta and brain and possible links to greater risks of schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, anxiety- or depression-related disorders later in life. Based on existing evidence, we propose that prenatal stress, through the generation of epigenetic alterations, becomes one of the most powerful influences on mental health in later life. The consideration of ancestral and prenatal stress effects on lifetime health trajectories is critical for improving strategies that support healthy development and successful aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple health risk behaviour in Czech adolescents: family, school and geographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kážmér, Ladislav; Dzúrová, Dagmara; Csémy, Ladislav; Spilková, Jana

    2014-09-01

    The study examines the relationship of family, school and geographic factors in relation to the prevalence of different health risk behaviours among Czech adolescents (aged 15-16 years) based on cross-sectional study design. Risk behaviours such as cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and marijuana use among adolescents have often been shown to co-occur with each other. Data from the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs 2007 were used. A total of 7616 students from the Czech Republic were analysed in the study. About two thirds of students (63.5%) did not engage in any type of considered health risk behaviour, 21.1% reported one risk, 10.8% two risks, and 4.6% three risks. Thus, in sum 15.4% of Czech, students were engaged in multiple risk behaviour forms. Separate multilevel logistic regression models were performed in order to explore the redistribution of factors on categories of multiple health risk behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Resource factors for mental health resilience in early childhood: An analysis with multiple methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that relatively little is known about the development of resilience in early childhood, this longitudinal study aimed to identify preschool resource factors associated with young children’s mental health resilience to family adversity. Methods A community sample of 474 young Australian children was assessed in preschool (mean age 4.59 years, 49% male), and again two years later after their transition into formal schooling. At each assessment, standard questionnaires were used to obtain ratings from both parents and teachers about the quality of children’s relationships with parents and teachers, children’s self-concept and self-control, mental health (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family adversities (including stressful life events and socioeconomic disadvantage). Results Greater exposure to cumulative family adversities was associated with both greater teacher- and parent-reported child mental health difficulties two years later. Multiple methodologies for operationalizing resilience were used to identify resources associated with resilient mental health outcomes. Higher quality child–parent and child-teacher relationships, and greater child self-concept and self-control were associated with resilient mental health outcomes. With the exception of child-teacher relationships, these resources were also prospective antecedents of subsequent resilient mental health outcomes in children with no pre-existing mental health difficulties. Child–parent relationships and child self-concept generally had promotive effects, being equally beneficial for children facing both low- and high-adversity. Child self-control demonstrated a small protective effect on teacher-reported outcomes, with greater self-control conferring greater protection to children under conditions of high-adversity. Conclusions Findings suggest that early intervention and prevention strategies that focus on fostering child-adult relationship quality, self

  8. "Naming and Framing": The Impact of Labeling on Health State Values for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Colin; Goodwin, Elizabeth; Hawton, Annie

    2017-08-01

    Health state valuation is a key input in many economic evaluations that inform resource allocation across competing healthcare interventions. Empirical evidence has shown that, in preference elicitation surveys, respondents may value a health state differently if they are aware of the condition causing it ('labeling effects'). This study investigates the impact of including a multiple sclerosis (MS) label for valuation of MS health states. Health state values for MS were elicited using two internet-based surveys in representative samples of the UK population ( n = 1702; n = 1788). In one survey respondents were not informed that health states were caused by MS. The second survey included a condition label for MS. Surveys were identical in all other ways. Health states were described using a MS-specific eight-dimensional classification system (MSIS-8D), and the time trade-off valuation technique was used. Differences between values for labeled and unlabeled states were assessed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression methods. Adding a MS condition label had a statistically significant effect on mean health state values, resulting in lower values for labeled MS states v. unlabeled states. The data suggest that the MS label had a more significant effect on values for less severe states, and no significant effect on values for the most severe states. The inclusion of the MS label had a differential impact across the dimensions of the MSIS-8D. Across the MSIS-8D, predicted values ranged from 0.079 to 0.883 for unlabeled states, and 0.066 to 0.861 for labeled states. Differences reported in health state values, using labeled and unlabeled states, demonstrate that condition labels affect the results of valuation studies, and can have important implications in decision-analytic modelling and in economic evaluations.

  9. Impact of deprivation on occurrence, outcomes and health care costs of people with multiple morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Judith; Rudisill, Caroline; Bhattarai, Nawaraj; Gulliford, Martin

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to estimate the impact of deprivation on the occurrence, health outcomes and health care costs of people with multiple morbidity in England. Cohort study in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, using deprivation quintile (IMD2010) at individual postcode level. Incidence and mortality from diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, stroke and colorectal cancer, and prevalence of depression, were used to define multidisease states. Costs of health care use were estimated for each state from a two-part model. Data were analysed for 141,535 men and 141,352 women aged ≥30 years, with 33,862 disease incidence events, and 13,933 deaths. Among incidences of single conditions, 22% were in the most deprived quintile and 19% in the least deprived; dual conditions, most deprived 26%, least deprived 16% and triple conditions, most deprived 29%, least deprived 14%. Deaths in participants without disease were distributed most deprived 22%, least deprived 19%; in participants with single conditions, most deprived 24%, least deprived 18%; dual conditions, most deprived 27%, least deprived 15%, and triple conditions, most deprived 33%, least deprived 17%. The relative rate of depression in most deprived participants with triple conditions, compared with least deprived and no disease, was 2.48 (1.74 to 3.54). Costs of health care use were associated with increasing deprivation and level of morbidity. The higher incidence of disease, associated with deprivation, channels deprived populations into categories of multiple morbidity with a greater prevalence of depression, higher mortality and higher costs. This has implications for the way that resources are allocated in England's National Health Service.

  10. That's Using Your Brain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Dana R.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses new adult learning theories, including those of Roger Sperry (left brain/right brain), Paul McLean (triune brain), and Howard Gardner (multiple intelligences). Relates adult learning theory to training. (JOW)

  11. Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition An unpredictable disease of the central nervous system, multiple sclerosis (MS) can range from relatively benign to somewhat disabling to devastating, as communication between the brain and other parts of the ...

  12. PHIT for Duty, a Personal Health Intervention Tool for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    education , and cognitive behavior change modules for reducing stress, attentional restructuring, improving sleep and reducing alcohol use. Usability...PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder, mobile health, smartphone, self help, iPAD , Android 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...schema for implementing a self-directed interactive CBT/MI intervention and a suite of educational modules on various aspects of alcohol use and risk

  13. Detained adolescent females' multiple mental health and adjustment problem outcomes in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, E; Vermeiren, R R J M; Krabbendam, A A; Beekman, A T F; Doreleijers, T A H; Jansen, L M C

    2013-09-01

    Although prior studies have shown that detained females are marked by significant adverse circumstances, little is known about their adult outcomes. Prospective follow-up study of 184 (80.4% of original sample of 229) detained adolescent females who were reassessed 4.5 (SD=0.6) years later in young adulthood (mean age=20.0, SD=1.4) on mental health and adjustment outcomes. Associations between these outcomes and detained females' behavior problems and offense history were examined. In the total sample, 59.0% had one or more mental health problems at follow-up, whereas 96.2% were facing at least one adjustment problem. Subjects with a personality disorder (PD) reported more adjustment problems compared to subjects without PD. Mental health and adjustment problems in young adulthood were predicted by detained adolescent females' behavior problems and offense history. Detained adolescent females suffered from multiple mental health and adjustment problems in young adulthood. Females who developed PD were most impaired. Results of this study underline the compelling need for continued and gender-specific interventions. The identification of predictors during detention for poor adult outcomes can serve as targets for intervention. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2013 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  14. Research Review: Environmental exposures, neurodevelopment, and child mental health - new paradigms for the study of brain and behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Virginia A; Margolis, Amy E

    2016-07-01

    Environmental exposures play a critical role in the genesis of some child mental health problems. We open with a discussion of children's vulnerability to neurotoxic substances, changes in the distribution of toxic exposures, and cooccurrence of social and physical exposures. We address trends in prevalence of mental health disorders, and approaches to the definition of disorders that are sensitive to the subtle effects of toxic exposures. We suggest broadening outcomes to include dimensional measures of autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and child learning capacity, as well as direct assessment of brain function. We consider the impact of two important exposures on children's mental health: lead and pesticides. We argue that longitudinal research designs may capture the cascading effects of exposures across biological systems and the full-range of neuropsychological endpoints. Neuroimaging is a valuable tool for observing brain maturation under varying environmental conditions. A dimensional approach to measurement may be sensitive to subtle subclinical toxic effects, permitting the development of exposure-related profiles and testing of complex functional relationships between brain and behavior. Questions about the neurotoxic effects of chemicals become more pressing when viewed through the lens of environmental justice. Reduction in the burden of child mental health disorders will require longitudinal study of neurotoxic exposures, incorporating dimensional approaches to outcome assessment, and measures of brain function. Research that seeks to identify links between toxic exposures and mental health outcomes has enormous public health and societal value. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  15. Pupil size signals mental effort deployed during multiple object tracking and predicts brain activity in the dorsal attention network and the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnæs, Dag; Sneve, Markus Handal; Espeseth, Thomas; Endestad, Tor; van de Pavert, Steven Harry Pieter; Laeng, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    Attentional effort relates to the allocation of limited-capacity attentional resources to meet current task demands and involves the activation of top-down attentional systems in the brain. Pupillometry is a sensitive measure of this intensity aspect of top-down attentional control. Studies relate pupillary changes in response to cognitive processing to activity in the locus coeruleus (LC), which is the main hub of the brain's noradrenergic system and it is thought to modulate the operations of the brain's attentional systems. In the present study, participants performed a visual divided attention task known as multiple object tracking (MOT) while their pupil sizes were recorded by use of an infrared eye tracker and then were tested again with the same paradigm while brain activity was recorded using fMRI. We hypothesized that the individual pupil dilations, as an index of individual differences in mental effort, as originally proposed by Kahneman (1973), would be a better predictor of LC activity than the number of tracked objects during MOT. The current results support our hypothesis, since we observed pupil-related activity in the LC. Moreover, the changes in the pupil correlated with activity in the superior colliculus and the right thalamus, as well as cortical activity in the dorsal attention network, which previous studies have shown to be strongly activated during visual tracking of multiple targets. Follow-up pupillometric analyses of the MOT task in the same individuals also revealed that individual differences to cognitive load can be remarkably stable over a lag of several years. To our knowledge this is the first study using pupil dilations as an index of attentional effort in the MOT task and also relating these to functional changes in the brain that directly implicate the LC-NE system in the allocation of processing resources.

  16. Does screening for and intervening with multiple health compromising behaviours and mental health disorders amongst young people attending primary care improve health outcomes? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Marianne J; Kauer, Sylvia D; Ozer, Elizabeth M; Haller, Dagmar M; Sanci, Lena A

    2016-08-04

    Adolescence and young adulthood are important developmental periods. Screening for health compromising behaviours and mental health disorders during routine primary care visits has the potential to assist clinicians to identify areas of concern and provide appropriate interventions. The objective of this systematic review is to investigate whether screening and subsequent interventions for multiple health compromising behaviours and mental health disorders in primary care settings improves the health outcomes of young people. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, literature searches were conducted in Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (Prospero registration number CRD42013005828) using search terms representing four thematic concepts: primary care, young people, screening, and mental health and health compromising behaviour. To be eligible for inclusion, studies had to: include a measure of health outcome; include at least 75 % of participants aged under 25 years; use a screening tool that assessed more than one health domain; and be conducted within a primary care setting. Risk of bias was assessed using the Quality Rating Scale. From 5051 articles identified, nine studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were reviewed: two randomised controlled trials (RCTs), one pilot RCT, two clustered RCTs, one randomised study with multiple intervention groups and no control group, one cluster RCT with two active arms, one longitudinal study and one pre-post study. Seven studies, including two RCTs and one clustered RCT, found positive changes in substance use, diet, sexual health or risky sexual behaviour, alcohol-related risky behaviour, social stress, stress management, helmet use, sleep and exercise. Of only two studies reporting on harms, one reported a negative health outcome of increased alcohol use. There is some evidence that the use of screening and intervention with young people

  17. Multiple Myeloma and Glyphosate Use: A Re-Analysis of US Agricultural Health Study (AHS) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorahan, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A previous publication of 57,311 pesticide applicators enrolled in the US Agricultural Health Study (AHS) produced disparate findings in relation to multiple myeloma risks in the period 1993–2001 and ever-use of glyphosate (32 cases of multiple myeloma in the full dataset of 54,315 applicators without adjustment for other variables: rate ratio (RR) 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5 to 2.4; 22 cases of multiple myeloma in restricted dataset of 40,719 applicators with adjustment for other variables: RR 2.6, 95% CI 0.7 to 9.4). It seemed important to determine which result should be preferred. RRs for exposed and non-exposed subjects were calculated using Poisson regression; subjects with missing data were not excluded from the main analyses. Using the full dataset adjusted for age and gender the analysis produced a RR of 1.12 (95% CI 0.50 to 2.49) for ever-use of glyphosate. Additional adjustment for lifestyle factors and use of ten other pesticides had little effect (RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.52 to 2.94). There were no statistically significant trends for multiple myeloma risks in relation to reported cumulative days (or intensity weighted days) of glyphosate use. The doubling of risk reported previously arose from the use of an unrepresentative restricted dataset and analyses of the full dataset provides no convincing evidence in the AHS for a link between multiple myeloma risk and glyphosate use. PMID:25635915

  18. Self-rated health in women prior to clinical onset of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Harpsøe, Maria C; Simonsen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is preceded by a clinically silent period of up to 10 years. OBJECTIVES: Examine whether such a period should be associated with poor self-rated health (SRH). METHODS: Information on SRH before pregnancy was ascertained among...... 80,848 women participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) 1996-2002. Women were followed for MS from enrolment in DNBC in the 16th week of pregnancy until 31 December 2011. Associations between SRH and MS were evaluated by means of hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs...

  19. Health-related quality of life in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Mohammadi, Nastaran Keshavarz

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study aimed to evaluate aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who live in Tehran and to compare data with evaluations of both the general population and MS patients in other countries Material and methods: One hundred...... and forty patients with MS, yet without severe comorbidity, were selected according to convenience in a cross-sectional study. Data were collected by means of the SF-36 questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Expanded Disability Status Scale of Kurtzke (EDSS) and Mini Mental State Examination...

  20. Health-related quality of life in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Mohammadi, Nastaran Keshavarz

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who live in Tehran and to compare data with evaluations of both the general population and MS patients in other countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One...... hundred and forty patients with MS, yet without severe comorbidity, were selected according to convenience sampling in a cross-sectional study. Data were collected by means of the SF-36 questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The Expanded Disability Status Scale of Kurtzke (EDSS) and Mini...

  1. Use of health services in people with multiple sclerosis with and without depressive symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytterberg, Charlotte; Lundqvist, Sanna; Johansson, Sverker

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To organize tailored healthcare for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), knowledge about patterns in the use of healthcare among subgroups, such as those with depressive symptoms, is essential. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore and compare the use of health services...... with regard to disease severity (Expanded Disability Status Scale). RESULTS: People with EDSS mild and depressive symptoms used more outpatient and inpatient care compared to those with no depressive symptoms. Furthermore, they received more unsalaried informal care as well as intense rehabilitation periods...

  2. Dynamic metabolic response to multiple spreading depolarizations in patients with acute brain injury: an online microdialysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerstein, Delphine; Manning, Andrew; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2010-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) occur spontaneously with high incidence in patients with acute brain injury. They can be detected by subdural electrocorticographic recordings. We here characterize the dynamic metabolic response to these events. A microdialysis catheter was inserted into perilesio...

  3. Abnormal blood-brain barrier permeability in normal appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis investigated by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig Præstekær; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is disrupted in normal appearing white matter in MS patients, when compared to healthy controls and whether it is correlated with MS clinical characteristics.......To investigate whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is disrupted in normal appearing white matter in MS patients, when compared to healthy controls and whether it is correlated with MS clinical characteristics....

  4. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tallner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  5. Smoking and physical activity: examining health behaviors and 15-year mortality among individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Aaron P; Hartoonian, Narineh; Maynard, Charles; Leipertz, Steven L; Haselkorn, Jodie K

    2015-03-01

    To examine 2 modifiable health behaviors-smoking and physical activity-and their relationship to mortality among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Secondary analysis of Large Health Survey. Data were obtained from a linkage of the Veterans Affairs (VA) MS National Data Repository, containing information on service provision to all individuals with MS receiving health services within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; the VA 1999 Large Health Survey, containing information on smoking and physical activity; and the VA Vital Status File. All-cause mortality was examined for the 15-year period from 1999 through 2013. Participants (N=2994) with MS who completed the Large Health Survey containing information on smoking and physical activity. Not applicable. Survival. There were 1500 deaths (50.1%) during the study period. Cox proportional hazard analyses were conducted to examine the association between smoking and physical activity and 15-year mortality. After adjusting for demographic factors, physical functioning, mental health, and comorbid medical conditions, baseline smoking was associated with greater mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.184-1.60). Higher levels of baseline physical activity were associated with lower mortality (activity 1-2 times/wk: HR=.64; 95% CI, .518-.798; activity ≥3 times/wk: HR=.53; 95% CI, .388-.715). Results suggest that modifiable health behaviors represent a promising opportunity for intervention to improve the lives of individuals with MS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallner, Alexander; Waschbisch, Anne; Hentschke, Christian; Pfeifer, Klaus; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-07-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  7. Multiple Social Identities Enhance Health Post-Retirement Because They Are a Basis for Giving Social Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas K Steffens

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the extent to which multiple social identities are associated with enhanced health and well-being in retirement because they provide a basis for giving and receiving social support. Results from a cross-sectional study show that retirees (N = 171 who had multiple social identities following (but not prior to retirement report being (a more satisfied with retirement, (b in better health, and (c more satisfied with life in general. Furthermore, mediation analyses revealed an indirect path from multiple social identities to greater satisfaction with retirement and better health through greater provision, but not receipt, of social support to others. These findings are the first to point to the value of multiple group membership post-retirement as a basis for increased opportunities to give meaningful support to others. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications for the management of multiple identities in the process of significant life transitions such as retirement.

  8. Selecting the most relevant brain regions to discriminate Alzheimer's disease patients from healthy controls using multiple kernel learning: A comparison across functional and structural imaging modalities and atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondina, Jane Maryam; Ferreira, Luiz Kobuti; de Souza Duran, Fabio Luis; Kubo, Rodrigo; Ono, Carla Rachel; Leite, Claudia Costa; Smid, Jerusa; Nitrini, Ricardo; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Busatto, Geraldo F

    2018-01-01

    Machine learning techniques such as support vector machine (SVM) have been applied recently in order to accurately classify individuals with neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on neuroimaging data. However, the multivariate nature of the SVM approach often precludes the identification of the brain regions that contribute most to classification accuracy. Multiple kernel learning (MKL) is a sparse machine learning method that allows the identification of the most relevant sources for the classification. By parcelating the brain into regions of interest (ROI) it is possible to use each ROI as a source to MKL (ROI-MKL). We applied MKL to multimodal neuroimaging data in order to: 1) compare the diagnostic performance of ROI-MKL and whole-brain SVM in discriminating patients with AD from demographically matched healthy controls and 2) identify the most relevant brain regions to the classification. We used two atlases (AAL and Brodmann's) to parcelate the brain into ROIs and applied ROI-MKL to structural (T1) MRI, 18 F-FDG-PET and regional cerebral blood flow SPECT (rCBF-SPECT) data acquired from the same subjects (20 patients with early AD and 18 controls). In