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Sample records for brain glucose homeostasis

  1. Exercise, energy intake, glucose homeostasis, and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Praag, Henriette; Fleshner, Monika; Schwartz, Michael W; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-11-12

    Here we summarize topics covered in an SFN symposium that considered how and why exercise and energy intake affect neuroplasticity and, conversely, how the brain regulates peripheral energy metabolism. This article is not a comprehensive review of the subject, but rather a view of how the authors' findings fit into a broader context. Emerging findings elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms by which exercise and energy intake modify the plasticity of neural circuits in ways that affect brain health. By enhancing neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity and neuronal stress robustness, exercise and intermittent energy restriction/fasting may optimize brain function and forestall metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, brain-centered glucoregulatory and immunomodulating systems that mediate peripheral health benefits of intermittent energetic challenges have recently been described. A better understanding of adaptive neural response pathways activated by energetic challenges will enable the development and optimization of interventions to reduce the burden of disease in our communities.

  2. [Glucose homeostasis in children. I. Regulation of blood glucose].

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    Otto Buczkowska, E; Szirer, G; Jarosz-Chobot, P

    2001-01-01

    The amount of glucose in the circulation depends on its absorption from the intestine, uptake by and release from the liver and uptake by peripheral tissues. Insulin and glucagon together control the metabolities required by peripheral tissues and both are involved in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Insulin is considered to be an anabolic hormone in that it promotes the synthesis of protein, lipid and glycogen. The key target tissues for insulin are liver, muscles and adipose tissue. Glucagon acts largely to increase catabolic processes. Between meals or during fast, the most tightly regulated process is the release of glucose from the liver. During fasting glucose is produced from glycogen and is formed by enzymes on the gluconeogenic pathway. Fetal metabolism is directed to ensure anabolism with formation of glycogen, fat and protein. Glucogen is stored in the liver and serves as the immediate source of new glucose during first few hours after birth. Glucose is the most important substrate for brain metabolism. Due to the large size of neonatal brain in relation to body weight cerebral glucose consumption is particularly high. Postnatal hormonal changes have a central role in regulating glucose mobilization through glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The initial glucagon surge is the key adaptive change which triggers the switch to glucose production. The control of insulin and glucagon secretion is of fundamental importance during first hours after birth. Children have a decreased tolerance to starvation when compared with adults, they are more prone to develop hypoglycaemia after short fasting. The faster rate in the fall of blood glucose and gluconeogenic substrates and rapid rate of ketogenesis are characteristic features of fasting adaptation in children.

  3. Brain iron homeostasis.

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    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  4. Hepatocytes: critical for glucose homeostasis.

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    Klover, Peter J; Mooney, Robert A

    2004-05-01

    Maintaining blood glucose levels within a narrow range is a critical physiological function requiring multiple metabolic pathways and involving several cell types, including a prominent role for hepatocytes. Under hormonal control, hepatocytes can respond to either feeding or fasting conditions by storing or producing glucose as necessary. In the fasting state, the effects of glucagon avoid hypoglycemia by stimulating glucogenesis and glycogenolysis and initiating hepatic glucose release. Postprandially, insulin prevents hyperglycemia, in part, by suppressing hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis and facilitating hepatic glycogen synthesis. Both transcriptional regulation of rate limiting enzymes and modulation of enzyme activity through phosphorylation and allosteric regulation are involved. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common serious metabolic condition in the world, and results from a subnormal response of tissues to insulin (insulin resistance) and a failure of the insulin-secreting beta cells to compensate. In type 2 diabetes, glucose is overproduced by the hepatocyte and is ineffectively metabolized by other organs. Impairments in the insulin signal transduction pathway appear to be critical lesions contributing to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  5. The Impact of Melatonin on Glucose Homeostasis

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    Zeynep Arzu Yeğin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Melatonin is a pineal product mainly charged with the maintenance of antioxidant conditions in human. This study is performed to identify the short-term effect of melatonin on glucose homeostasis in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Melatonin and placebo were given perorally to sixty patients. Blood glucose and insulin levels were measured with constant intervals. Results: No significant correlation was found among the levels of glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR index at any time after melatonin/placebo administration.Conclusions: Prospective studies with long-term use of melatonin are needed to define the exact role of melatonin in glucose homeostasis. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 52-5

  6. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

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    Dotson, Cedrick D; Zhang, Lan; Xu, Hong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Vigues, Stephan; Ott, Sandra H; Elson, Amanda E T; Choi, Hyun Jin; Shaw, Hillary; Egan, Josephine M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Li, Xiaodong; Steinle, Nanette I; Munger, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  7. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

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    Cedrick D Dotson

    Full Text Available TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+ and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  8. Hormones and the Autonomic Nervous System are Involved in Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Modulation of Glucose Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, M.; Buijs, R.M.; Kalsbeek, A.

    2006-01-01

    Glucose is one of the most important energy sources for the body in general, and the brain in particular. It is essential for survival to keep glucose levels within strict boundaries. Acute disturbances of glucose homeostasis are rapidly corrected by hormonal and neuronal mechanisms. Furthermore, ch

  9. The role of biological clock in glucose homeostasis 

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    Piotr Chrościcki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the biological clock is based on a rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes. As a result of their transcripto-translational associations, endogenous rhythms in the synthesis of key proteins of various physiological and metabolic processes are created. The major timekeeping mechanism for these rhythms exists in the central nervous system. The master circadian clock, localized in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, regulates multiple metabolic pathways, while feeding behavior and metabolite availability can in turn regulate the circadian clock. It is also suggested that in the brain there is a food entrainable oscillator (FEO or oscillators, resulting in activation of both food anticipatory activity and hormone secretion that control digestion processes. Moreover, most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks. Maintenance of the glucose homeostasis is particularly important for the proper function of the body, as this sugar is the main source of energy for the brain, retina, erythrocytes and skeletal muscles. Thus, glucose production and utilization are synchronized in time. The hypothalamic excited orexin neurons control energy balance of organism and modulate the glucose production and utilization. Deficiency of orexin action results in narcolepsy and weight gain, whereas glucose and amino acids can affect activity of the orexin cells. Large-scale genetic studies in rodents and humans provide evidence for the involvement of disrupted clock gene expression rhythms in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In general, the current lifestyle of the developed modern societies disturbs the action of biological clock. 

  10. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an importa

  11. Cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis in the brain.

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    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component for neuronal physiology not only during development stage but also in the adult life. Cholesterol metabolism in brain is independent from that in peripheral tissues due to blood-brain barrier. The content of cholesterol in brain must be accurately maintained in order to keep brain function well. Defects in brain cholesterol metabolism has been shown to be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and some cognitive deficits typical of the old age. The brain contains large amount of cholesterol, but the cholesterol metabolism and its complex homeostasis regulation are currently poorly understood. This review will seek to integrate current knowledge about the brain cholesterol metabolism with molecular mechanisms.

  12. nfluence of antidepressants on glucose homeostasis : effects and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derijks, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Depression has shown to be a common morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression in diabetes mellitus patients is frequently treated with antidepressants. It has been postulated that antidepressants may interfere with glucose homeostasis and that the interference of antidepre

  13. Exploring the role of glucagon in glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, Maria Gertrud Jobina van

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to gain further insight into the role of glucagon in glucose homeostasis in healthy volunteers and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, and to explore the novel antisense glucagon receptor antagonist. Chapter 2 showed that the effect of meal replacers containing prote

  14. Microbiota-Produced Succinate Improves Glucose Homeostasis via Intestinal Gluconeogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vadder, Filipe; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zitoun, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary fiber on glucose and energy homeostasis have long been described, focusing mostly on the production of short-chain fatty acids by the gut commensal bacteria. However, bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber also produces large amounts of succinate and, to date......, no study has focused on the role of succinate on host metabolism. Here, we fed mice a fiber-rich diet and found that succinate was the most abundant carboxylic acid in the cecum. Dietary succinate was identified as a substrate for intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN), a process that improves glucose...... homeostasis. Accordingly, dietary succinate improved glucose and insulin tolerance in wild-type mice, but those effects were absent in mice deficient in IGN. Conventional mice colonized with the succinate producer Prevotella copri exhibited metabolic benefits, which could be related to succinate-activated IGN...

  15. Dopaminergic drugs in type 2 diabetes and glucose homeostasis.

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    Lopez Vicchi, Felicitas; Luque, Guillermina Maria; Brie, Belen; Nogueira, Juan Patricio; Garcia Tornadu, Isabel; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2016-07-01

    The importance of dopamine in central nervous system function is well known, but its effects on glucose homeostasis and pancreatic β cell function are beginning to be unraveled. Mutant mice lacking dopamine type 2 receptors (D2R) are glucose intolerant and have abnormal insulin secretion. In humans, administration of neuroleptic drugs, which block dopamine receptors, may cause hyperinsulinemia, increased weight gain and glucose intolerance. Conversely, treatment with the dopamine precursor l-DOPA in patients with Parkinson's disease reduces insulin secretion upon oral glucose tolerance test, and bromocriptine improves glycemic control and glucose tolerance in obese type 2 diabetic patients as well as in non diabetic obese animals and humans. The actions of dopamine on glucose homeostasis and food intake impact both the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Different central actions of the dopamine system may mediate its metabolic effects such as: (i) regulation of hypothalamic noradrenaline output, (ii) participation in appetite control, and (iii) maintenance of the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. On the other hand, dopamine inhibits prolactin, which has metabolic functions; and, at the pancreatic beta cell dopamine D2 receptors inhibit insulin secretion. We review the evidence obtained in animal models and clinical studies that posited dopamine receptors as key elements in glucose homeostasis and ultimately led to the FDA approval of bromocriptine in adults with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolic consequences of treatment with neuroleptics which target the D2R, that should be monitored in psychiatric patients to prevent the development in diabetes, weight gain, and hypertriglyceridemia.

  16. Chronic Sleep Disturbance Impairs Glucose Homeostasis in Rats

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    R. Paulien Barf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown an association between short or disrupted sleep and an increased risk for metabolic disorders. To assess a possible causal relationship, we examined the effects of experimental sleep disturbance on glucose regulation in Wistar rats under controlled laboratory conditions. Three groups of animals were used: a sleep restriction group (RS, a group subjected to moderate sleep disturbance without restriction of sleep time (DS, and a home cage control group. To establish changes in glucose regulation, animals were subjected to intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs before and after 1 or 8 days of sleep restriction or disturbance. Data show that both RS and DS reduce body weight without affecting food intake and also lead to hyperglycemia and decreased insulin levels during an IVGTT. Acute sleep disturbance also caused hyperglycemia during an IVGTT, yet, without affecting the insulin response. In conclusion, both moderate and severe disturbances of sleep markedly affect glucose homeostasis and body weight control.

  17. Hypothalamic vitamin D improves glucose homeostasis and reduces weight

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    Despite clear associations between vitamin D deficiency and obesity and/or type 2 diabetes, a causal relationship is not established. Vitamin D receptors (VDRs) are found within multiple tissues, including the brain. Given the importance of the brain in controlling both glucose levels and body weigh...

  18. Melatonin improves glucose homeostasis in young Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

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    Agil, Ahmad; Rosado, Isaac; Ruiz, Rosario; Figueroa, Adriana; Zen, Nourahouda; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on glucose homeostasis in young male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, an experimental model of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). ZDF rats (n=30) and lean littermates (ZL) (n=30) were used. At 6wk of age, both lean and fatty animals were subdivided into three groups, each composed of ten rats: naive (N), vehicle treated (V), and melatonin treated (M) (10mg/kg/day) for 6wk. Vehicle and melatonin were added to the drinking water. ZDF rats developed DM (fasting hyperglycemia, 460±39.8mg/dL; HbA(1) c 8.3±0.5%) with both insulin resistance (HOMA-IR 9.28±0.9 versus 1.2±0.1 in ZL) and decreased β-cell function (HOMA1-%B) by 75%, compared with ZL rats. Melatonin reduced fasting hyperglycemia by 18.6% (Pmelatonin lowered insulinemia by 15.9% (Pmelatonin decreased hyperleptinemia by 34% (Pmelatonin reduced serum free fatty acid levels by 13.5% (Pmelatonin administration ameliorates glucose homeostasis in young ZDF rats by improving both insulin action and β-cell function. These observations have implications on melatonin's possible use as a new pharmacologic therapy for improving glucose homeostasis and of obesity-related T2DM, in young subjects.

  19. Hormones and the autonomic nervous system are involved in suprachiasmatic nucleus modulation of glucose homeostasis.

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    Ruiter, Marieke; Buijs, Ruud M; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2006-05-01

    Glucose is one of the most important energy sources for the body in general, and the brain in particular. It is essential for survival to keep glucose levels within strict boundaries. Acute disturbances of glucose homeostasis are rapidly corrected by hormonal and neuronal mechanisms. Furthermore, changes in energy expenditure associated with the light-dark cycle induce variations in the plasma glucose concentration that are more gradual. Organisms take advantage of adapting their internal physiology to the predictable daily changes in energy expenditure, because it enables them to anticipate these changes and to prevent unnecessary disturbance of homeostasis. The hypothalamic biological clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), receives light information from the eyes and transmits this information to the rest of the body to synchronize physiology to the environment. Here we review several studies providing evidence for biological clock control of the daily variation in several aspects of glucose metabolism. Although both hormones and the autonomic nervous system can stimulate glucose uptake or production by organs in the periphery, we have shown that the biological clock control of glucose metabolism mostly occurs through the autonomic nervous system. The critical involvement of the biological clock is also indicated by several studies, indicating that disturbance of the biological clock is often associated with metabolic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

  20. Perinatal exercise improves glucose homeostasis in adult offspring.

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    Carter, Lindsay G; Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Wilkerson, Donald C; Tobia, Christine M; Ngo Tenlep, Sara Y; Shridas, Preetha; Garcia-Cazarin, Mary L; Wolff, Gretchen; Andrade, Francisco H; Charnigo, Richard J; Esser, Karyn A; Egan, Josephine M; de Cabo, Rafael; Pearson, Kevin J

    2012-10-15

    Emerging research has shown that subtle factors during pregnancy and gestation can influence long-term health in offspring. In an attempt to be proactive, we set out to explore whether a nonpharmacological intervention, perinatal exercise, might improve offspring health. Female mice were separated into sedentary or exercise cohorts, with the exercise cohort having voluntary access to a running wheel prior to mating and during pregnancy and nursing. Offspring were weaned, and analyses were performed on the mature offspring that did not have access to running wheels during any portion of their lives. Perinatal exercise caused improved glucose disposal following an oral glucose challenge in both female and male adult offspring (P wheels (P nursing can enhance long-term glucose homeostasis in offspring.

  1. Glucose homeostasis in mice is transglutaminase 2 independent.

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    Siiri E Iismaa

    Full Text Available Transglutaminase type 2 (TG2 has been reported to be a candidate gene for maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY because three different mutations that impair TG2 transamidase activity have been found in 3 families with MODY. TG2 null (TG2(-/- mice have been reported to be glucose intolerant and have impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Here we rigorously evaluated the role of TG2 in glucose metabolism using independently generated murine models of genetic TG2 disruption, which show no compensatory enhanced expression of other TGs in pancreatic islets or other tissues. First, we subjected chow- or fat-fed congenic SV129 or C57BL/6 wild type (WT and TG2(-/- littermates, to oral glucose gavage. Blood glucose and serum insulin levels were similar for both genotypes. Pancreatic islets isolated from these animals and analysed in vitro for GSIS and cholinergic potentiation of GSIS, showed no significant difference between genotypes. Results from intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (GTTs and insulin tolerance tests (ITTs were similar for both genotypes. Second, we directly investigated the role of TG2 transamidase activity in insulin secretion using a coisogenic model that expresses a mutant form of TG2 (TG2(R579A, which is constitutively active for transamidase activity. Intraperitoneal GTTs and ITTs revealed no significant differences between WT and TG2(R579A/R579A mice. Given that neither deletion nor constitutive activation of TG2 transamidase activity altered basal responses, or responses to a glucose or insulin challenge, our data indicate that glucose homeostasis in mice is TG2 independent, and question a link between TG2 and diabetes.

  2. Regulation of glucose homeostasis by KSR1 and MARK2.

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    Paula J Klutho

    Full Text Available Protein scaffolds control the intensity and duration of signaling and dictate the specificity of signaling through MAP kinase pathways. KSR1 is a molecular scaffold of the Raf/MEK/ERK MAP kinase cascade that regulates the intensity and duration of ERK activation. Relative to wild-type mice, ksr1⁻/⁻ mice are modestly glucose intolerant, but show a normal response to exogenous insulin. However, ksr1⁻/⁻ mice also demonstrate a three-fold increase in serum insulin levels in response to a glucose challenge, suggesting a role for KSR1 in insulin secretion. The kinase MARK2 is closely related to C-TAK1, a known regulator of KSR1. Mice lacking MARK2 have an increased rate of glucose disposal in response to exogenous insulin, increased glucose tolerance, and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. mark2⁻/⁻ksr1⁻/⁻ (DKO mice were compared to wild type, mark2⁻/⁻, and ksr1⁻/⁻ mice for their ability to regulate glucose homeostasis. Here we show that disruption of KSR1 in mark2⁻/⁻ mice reverses the increased sensitivity to exogenous insulin resulting from MARK2 deletion. DKO mice respond to exogenous insulin similarly to wild type and ksr1⁻/⁻ mice. These data suggest a model whereby MARK2 negatively regulates insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue through inhibition of KSR1. Consistent with this model, we found that MARK2 binds and phosphorylates KSR1 on Ser392. Phosphorylation of Ser392 is a critical regulator of KSR1 stability, subcellular location, and ERK activation. These data reveal an unexpected role for the molecular scaffold KSR1 in insulin-regulated glucose metabolism.

  3. Effect of Ghrelin on Glucose-Insulin Homeostasis: Therapeutic Implications

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    Susana Sangiao-Alvarellos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that displays a strong growth hormone- (GH- releasing activity through the activation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR. The first studies about role of ghrelin were focused on its orexigenic ability, but despite indisputable pharmacological data, the evidence for a physiological role for ghrelin in the control of appetite is much less clear. Mice with targeted deletion of either ghrelin or the GHSR exhibit an essentially normal metabolic phenotype when fed a regular chow diet, suggesting that ghrelin may have a redundant role in the regulation of food intake. RNAs for ghrelin as well as GHSR are expressed in the pancreas of rats and humans and several studies propose that ghrelin could have an important function in glucose homeostasis and insulin release, independent of GH secretion. Low plasma ghrelin levels are associated with elevated fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance, suggesting both physiological and pathophysiological roles for ghrelin. For this reason, at least theoretically, ghrelin and/or its signalling manipulation could be useful for the treatment or prevention of diseases of glucose homeostasis such as type 2 diabetes.

  4. K+ homeostasis in the brain: a new role for glycogenolysis.

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    Mangia, S; Giove, F; Dinuzzo, M

    2013-03-01

    The results of the study of Xu and colleagues in this issue constitute a critical new piece of information on the functional specialization of astrocytes for K(+) homeostasis in the brain. The relationship between astrocytes and potassium has been long recognized in half a century of research. Now this relation appears to have found its metabolic correlate in astrocytic glycogen. Xu et al. showed that glycogen is committed to fuel astrocytic K(+) uptake, as this process is abolished when glycogenolysis is inhibited even in the presence of glucose. They went further by showing that the cellular mechanisms which selectively mobilize glycogen involve the participation of several intracellular signaling cascades. As with all good science, these findings generate a number of fundamental questions that are open for experimental research.

  5. Revisiting "Vegetables" to combat modern epidemic of imbalanced glucose homeostasis.

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    Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Vegetables have been part of human food since prehistoric times and are considered nutritionally necessary and good for health. Vegetables are rich natural resource of biological antioxidants and possess capabilities of maintaining glucose homeostasis. When taken before starch-rich diet, juice also of vegetables such as ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd, chayote and juice of leaves of vegetables such as radish, Indian Dill, ajwain, tropical green amaranth, and bladder dock are reported to arrest significantly the rise in postprandial blood glucose level. Juice of vegetables such as ash gourd, squash gourd, and tropical green amaranth leaves are observed to tone-down sweet-beverages such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose-induced postprandial glycemic excursion. On the other hand, juice of egg-plant and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and palak are reported to augment starch-induced postprandial glycemic excursion; and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and radish supplement to the glucose-induced postprandial glycemia. Vegetables possess multifaceted antihyperglycemic activities such as inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase, inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1β in liver and skeletal muscles, and insulin mimetic and secretagogue activities. Furthermore, they are also reported to influence polyol pathway in favor of reducing development of oxidative stress, and consequently the development of diabetic complications. In the wake of emergence of modern maladaptive diet-induced hyperglycemic epidemic therefore, vegetables may offer cost-effective dietary regimen to control diet-induced glycemic over load and future development of diabetes mellitus. However, for vegetables have been reported to do both, mitigate as well as supplement to the diet-induced postprandial glycemic load, care is required in selection of vegetables when considered as medicament.

  6. Revisiting "Vegetables" to combat modern epidemic of imbalanced glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Tiwari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetables have been part of human food since prehistoric times and are considered nutritionally necessary and good for health. Vegetables are rich natural resource of biological antioxidants and possess capabilities of maintaining glucose homeostasis. When taken before starch-rich diet, juice also of vegetables such as ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd, chayote and juice of leaves of vegetables such as radish, Indian Dill, ajwain, tropical green amaranth, and bladder dock are reported to arrest significantly the rise in postprandial blood glucose level. Juice of vegetables such as ash gourd, squash gourd, and tropical green amaranth leaves are observed to tone-down sweet-beverages such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose-induced postprandial glycemic excursion. On the other hand, juice of egg-plant and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and palak are reported to augment starch-induced postprandial glycemic excursion; and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and radish supplement to the glucose-induced postprandial glycemia. Vegetables possess multifaceted antihyperglycemic activities such as inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase, inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1β in liver and skeletal muscles, and insulin mimetic and secretagogue activities. Furthermore, they are also reported to influence polyol pathway in favor of reducing development of oxidative stress, and consequently the development of diabetic complications. In the wake of emergence of modern maladaptive diet-induced hyperglycemic epidemic therefore, vegetables may offer cost-effective dietary regimen to control diet-induced glycemic over load and future development of diabetes mellitus. However, for vegetables have been reported to do both, mitigate as well as supplement to the diet-induced postprandial glycemic load, care is required in selection of vegetables when considered as medicament.

  7. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and glucose homeostasis in mice and men.

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    Luther, James M; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-09-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are formed from arachidonic acid by the action of P450 epoxygenases (CYP2C and CYP2J). Effects of EETs are limited by hydrolysis by soluble epoxide hydrolase to less active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Studies in rodent models provide compelling evidence that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids exert favorable effects on glucose homeostasis, either by enhancing pancreatic islet cell function or by increasing insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues. Specifically, the tissue expression of soluble epoxide hydrolase appears to be increased in rodent models of obesity and diabetes. Pharmacological inhibition of epoxide hydrolase or deletion of the gene encoding soluble epoxide hydrolase (Ephx2) preserves islet cells in rodent models of type 1 diabetes and enhances insulin sensitivity in models of type 2 diabetes, as does administration of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids or their stable analogues. In humans, circulating concentrations of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids correlate with insulin sensitivity, and a loss-of-function genetic polymorphism in EPHX2 is associated with insulin sensitivity.

  8. Leptin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis, but not adipostasis, in the zebrafish.

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    Michel, Maximilian; Page-McCaw, Patrick S; Chen, Wenbiao; Cone, Roger D

    2016-03-15

    Leptin is the primary adipostatic factor in mammals. Produced largely by adipocytes in proportion to total adipose mass, the hormone informs the brain regarding total energy stored as triglycerides in fat cells. The hormone acts on multiple circuits in the brain to regulate food intake, autonomic outflow, and endocrine function to maintain energy balance. In addition to regulating adipose mass, mammalian leptin also plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and as a gating factor in reproductive competence. Leptin-deficient mice and people exhibit early onset profound hyperphagia and obesity, diabetes, and infertility. Although leptin and the leptin receptor are found in fish, the hormone is not expressed in adipose tissue, but is found in liver and other tissues. Here, we show that adult zebrafish lacking a functional leptin receptor do not exhibit hyperphagia or increased adiposity, and exhibit normal fertility. However, leptin receptor-deficient larvae have increased numbers of β-cells and increased levels of insulin mRNA. Furthermore, larval zebrafish have been shown to exhibit β-cell hyperplasia in response to high fat feeding or peripheral insulin resistance, and we show here that leptin receptor is required for this response. Adult zebrafish also have increased levels of insulin mRNA and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Thus, a role for leptin in the regulation of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis appears to be conserved across vertebrates, whereas its role as an adipostatic factor is likely to be a secondary role acquired during the evolution of mammals.

  9. Sleep duration and sleep quality are associated differently with alterations of glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Hansen, Anne-Louise Smidt; Christensen, Dirk Lund

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims  Studies suggest that inadequate sleep duration and poor sleep quality increase the risk of impaired glucose regulation and diabetes. However, associations with specific markers of glucose homeostasis are less well explained. The objective of this study was to explore possible...... associations of sleep duration and sleep quality with markers of glucose homeostasis and glucose tolerance status in a healthy population-based study sample. Methods  The study comprised 771 participants from the Danish, population-based cross-sectional ‘Health2008’ study. Sleep duration and sleep quality were......), the homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function and glucose tolerance status. Associations of sleep duration and sleep quality with markers of glucose homeostasis and tolerance were analysed by multiple linear and logistic regression. Results  A 1-h increment in sleep duration was associated with a 0.3 mmol...

  10. Effects of celiac superior mesenteric ganglionectomy on glucose homeostasis and hormonal changes during oral glucose tolerance testing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumakura, Atsushi; Shikuma, Junpei; Ogihara, Norikazu; Eiki, Jun-ichi; Kanazawa, Masao; Notoya, Yōko; Kikuchi, Masatoshi; Odawara, Masato

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis in the body. In the prandial state, some of the glucose which is absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract is converted into glycogen and stored in the liver. In contrast, the liver produces glucose by glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis while fasting. Thus, the liver contributes to maintaining blood glucose level within normoglycemic range. Glycogenesis and glycogenolysis are regulated by various mechanisms including hormones, the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems and the hepatic glucose content. In this study, we examined a rat model in which the celiac superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG) was resected. We attempted to elucidate how the celiac sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating glucose homeostasis by assessing the effects of CSMG resection on glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test, and by examining hepatic glycogen content and hepatic glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activity. On the oral glucose tolerance test, CSMG-resected rats demonstrated improved glucose tolerance and significantly increased GP activity compared with sham-operated rats, whereas there were no significant differences in insulin, glucagon or catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the celiac sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating the rate of glycogen consumption through GP activity. In conclusion, the examined rat model showed that the celiac sympathetic nervous system regulates hepatic glucose metabolism in conjunction with vagal nerve innervations and is a critical component in the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis.

  11. Melatonin modulates glucose homeostasis during winter dormancy in a vespertilionid bat, Scotophilus heathi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Raj Kamal; Krishna, Amitabh

    2010-03-01

    The role for melatonin in glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance is not very clear and has recently been an active area of investigation. The present study investigated the role of melatonin in seasonal accumulation of adipose tissue in Scotophilus heathi, with particular reference to its role in glucose homeostasis and development of insulin resistance. The circulating melatonin levels correlated positively (pinsulin resistance condition which improves after winter when most of the fat has been utilized as a metabolic fuel. The high circulating melatonin levels during the period of maximum body fat at the beginning of winter prepare the bats for winter dormancy by modulating the glucose homeostasis through affecting blood glucose levels, muscle and liver glycogen stores, insulin receptor and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT 4) expression. This is also confirmed by in vivo study in which melatonin injection improves the glucose tolerance, increases muscle insulin receptor and GLUT 4 expression, and enhances glucose clearance from the blood. The results of present study further showed that the effect of melatonin injection on the blood glucose levels is determined by the metabolic state of the bats and may protect from decrease in blood glucose level during extreme starvation, however, melatonin when injected during fed state increases glucose clearance from the blood. In summary, the present study suggested that melatonin interferes with the glucose homeostasis through modulating intracellular glucose transport and may protect bats from hypoglycemia during winter dormancy.

  12. The effect of hepatectomy on glucose homeostasis in pig and in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Torsten Leif Bunk; Grunnet, Niels; Rasmussen, Allan

    2002-01-01

    and muscle) to the glucose homeostasis in the anhepatic pig and in man during the anhepatic phase of human liver transplantations. METHODS: Blood glucose and lactate were monitored in the anhepatic phase in 46 patients undergoing liver transplantation. Arterial-venous differences of lactate, glucose...

  13. Lack of glucagon receptor signaling and its implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon action is transduced by a G protein-coupled receptor located in liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart, pancreatic β-cells, and placenta. Genetically modified animal models have provided important clues about the role of glucagon and its receptor (Gcgr) beyond glucose control. The PubMed database was searched for articles published between 1995 and 2014 using the key terms glucagon, glucagon receptor, signaling, and animal models. Lack of Gcgr signaling has been associated with: i) hypoglycemic pregnancies, altered placentation, poor fetal growth, and increased fetal-neonatal death; ii) pancreatic glucagon cell hyperplasia and hyperglucagonemia; iii) altered body composition, energy state, and protection from diet-induced obesity; iv) impaired hepatocyte survival; v) altered glucose, lipid, and hormonal milieu; vi) altered metabolic response to prolonged fasting and exercise; vii) reduced gastric emptying and increased intestinal length; viii) altered retinal function; and ix) prevention of the development of diabetes in insulin-deficient mice. Similar phenotypic findings were observed in the hepatocyte-specific deletion of Gcgr. Glucagon action has been involved in the modulation of sweet taste responsiveness, inotropic and chronotropic effects in the heart, satiety, glomerular filtration rate, secretion of insulin, cortisol, ghrelin, GH, glucagon, and somatostatin, and hypothalamic signaling to suppress hepatic glucose production. Glucagon (α) cells under certain conditions can transdifferentiate into insulin (β) cells. These findings suggest that glucagon signaling plays an important role in multiple organs. Thus, treatment options designed to block Gcgr activation in diabetics may have implications beyond glucose homeostasis.

  14. Cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Juan; Qiang LIU

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component for neuronal physiology not only during development stage but also in the adult life. Cholesterol metabolism in brain is independent from that in peripheral tissues due to blood-brain barrier. The content of cholesterol in brain must be accurately maintained in order to keep brain function well. Defects in brain cholesterol metabolism has been shown to be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD)...

  15. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed.

  16. Metabolomic profiling identifies potential pathways involved in the interaction of iron homeostasis with glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Stechemesser

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that high serum ferritin concentrations are linked to impaired glucose homeostasis in subjects with the MetS. Iron excess is associated to distinct changes in the serum concentrations of phosphatidylcholine subsets. A pathway involving sarcosine and citrulline also may be involved in iron-induced impairment of glucose metabolism.

  17. Upper intestinal lipids trigger a gut-brain-liver axis to regulate glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Penny Y T; Caspi, Liora; Lam, Carol K L; Chari, Madhu; Li, Xiaosong; Light, Peter E; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Ang, Michelle; Schwartz, Gary J; Lam, Tony K T

    2008-04-24

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by food intake and liver glucose production, respectively. The upper intestine has a critical role in nutrient digestion and absorption. However, studies indicate that upper intestinal lipids inhibit food intake as well in rodents and humans by the activation of an intestine-brain axis. In parallel, a brain-liver axis has recently been proposed to detect blood lipids to inhibit glucose production in rodents. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that upper intestinal lipids activate an intestine-brain-liver neural axis to regulate glucose homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that direct administration of lipids into the upper intestine increased upper intestinal long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (LCFA-CoA) levels and suppressed glucose production. Co-infusion of the acyl-CoA synthase inhibitor triacsin C or the anaesthetic tetracaine with duodenal lipids abolished the inhibition of glucose production, indicating that upper intestinal LCFA-CoAs regulate glucose production in the preabsorptive state. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or gut vagal deafferentation interrupts the neural connection between the gut and the brain, and blocks the ability of upper intestinal lipids to inhibit glucose production. Direct administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate ion channel blocker MK-801 into the fourth ventricle or the nucleus of the solitary tract where gut sensory fibres terminate abolished the upper-intestinal-lipid-induced inhibition of glucose production. Finally, hepatic vagotomy negated the inhibitory effects of upper intestinal lipids on glucose production. These findings indicate that upper intestinal lipids activate an intestine-brain-liver neural axis to inhibit glucose production, and thereby reveal a previously unappreciated pathway that regulates glucose homeostasis.

  18. Glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in growth hormone-transgenic mice: a cross-sectional analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Khardori, Romesh; Bartke, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to its stimulatory effects on musculature, bone, and organ development, and its lipolytic effects, growth hormone (GH) opposes insulin effects on glucose metabolism. Chronic GH overexposure is thought to result in insulin insensitivity and decreased blood glucose homeostatic control. Yet, despite the importance of this concept for basic biology, as well as human conditions of GH excess or deficiency, no systematic assessment of the impact of GH overexpression on glucose homeostasi...

  19. Lactate, Glucose and Oxygen Uptake in Human Brain During Recovery from Maximal Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kojiro, I.; Schmalbruch, I.K.; Quistorff, B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake......Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake...

  20. Glucose homeostasis during spontaneous labor in normal human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, P C; Bonin, B; Dizazo, A; Guimond, P; Monier, D; Bourque, J; Chiasson, J L

    1996-01-01

    Using stable isotope, glucose turnover was measured in six normal pregnant women during the various stages of labor; during the latent (A1) and active (A2) phases of cervical dilatation, during fetal expulsion (B), and during placental expulsion (C). These data were compared to measurements made in five postpartum women. Pancreatic hormones and cortisol were also measured. In four other normal women undergoing spontaneous labor, catecholamines and free fatty acids were measured. Plasma glucose increased throughout labor from 4.0 +/- 0.2 (A1) to 5.5 +/- 0.5 mmol/L (C) (P period. Epinephrine and norepinephrine also increased during labor from 218 +/- 132 pmol/L and 1.09 +/- 0.16 nmol/L to 1119 +/- 158 and 3.61 +/- 1.04, respectively. It is concluded that labor is associated with a marked increase in glucose utilization and production. These findings suggest that muscle contraction (uterus and skeletal) independent of insulin is a major regulator of glucose utilization during labor. Furthermore, the increase in hepatic glucose production could be favored by an increase in glucagon, catecholamines, and cortisol.

  1. Common genetic determinants of glucose homeostasis in healthy children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelliny, Clara; Ekelund, Ulf; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate whether the effects of common genetic variants associated with fasting glucose in adults are detectable in healthy children. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in MTNR1B (rs10830963), G6PC2 (rs560887), and GCK (rs4607517...... glucose (0.033 mmol/l [0.01-0.06], P = 0.01). Calculating a genetic predisposition score adding the number of risk alleles of G6PC2, MTNR1B, GCK, and SLC30A8 showed that glucose levels were successively higher in children carrying a greater number of risk alleles (P = 7.1 x 10(-17)), with mean levels of 5...

  2. The effect of metformin on glucose homeostasis during moderate exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merethe; Palsøe, Marie K.; Helge, Jørn Wulff;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the role of metformin on glucose kinetics during moderate exercise. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Before, during, and after a 45-min bout of exercise at 60% VO2max, glucose kinetics were determined by isotope tracer technique in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus...... with metformin treatment (DM2+Met) or without metformin treatment (DM2) and in healthy control subjects (CON) matched for BMI and age. Glucoregulatory hormones and metabolites were measured throughout the study. RESULTS: Plasma glucose concentration was unchanged during exercise in CON but decreased in DM2....... No significant change was found in DM2+Met. Hormones and metabolites showed no differences among the groups except for elevated exercise-induced concentrations of lactate in DM2 (area under the curve [AUC] 31 ± 1% vs. CON) and glucagon in DM2 (AUC 5 ± 1% vs. DM2+Met). Free fatty acid levels were lower in DM2+Met...

  3. Nutrients other than carbohydrates: their effects on glucose homeostasis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Martina; Egert, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Besides carbohydrates, other nutrients, such as dietary protein and amino acids; the supply of fat, vitamin D, and vitamin K; and sodium intake seem to affect glucose homeostasis. Although their effect is less pronounced than that of the amount and composition of carbohydrates, it seems reasonable to consider how nutrient intake habits may be modified to support an improved glucose homeostasis. For instance, taking into account the effect of some nutrients to lower blood glucose concentration on a day-by-day basis might support improvement of glucose homeostasis in the long run. On the other hand, lowering sodium intake too much, as recommended to avoid the development of hypertension, particularly in sodium-sensitive people, might lead to insulin resistance and thereby might risk increasing fasting as well as postprandial blood glucose concentrations. This review summarizes the state of our knowledge of how several nutrients other than carbohydrates, such as protein, fatty acids, vitamin D, vitamin K, magnesium, zinc, chromium, and sodium, affect blood glucose concentrations. Sufficient evidence exists to show that, in prospective studies based on randomized controlled trials, these selected nutrients affect blood glucose regulation. The review describes potential mechanisms leading to the observed effect. As much as is possible from the available data, the extent of the effect, is considered.

  4. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  5. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal;

    1997-01-01

    ). Concentrations of glucagon and growth hormone remained unchanged, whereas glucose, C-peptide and cortisol increased on day 2. Noradrenaline concentrations increased during the stay at altitude, while adrenaline concentrations remained unchanged. In response to insulin infusion, catecholamines increased on day 2...... in counter-regulatory hormones....

  6. BMAL1 and CLOCK, two essential components of the circadian clock, are involved in glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Daniel Rudic

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian timing is generated through a unique series of autoregulatory interactions termed the molecular clock. Behavioral rhythms subject to the molecular clock are well characterized. We demonstrate a role for Bmal1 and Clock in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Inactivation of the known clock components Bmal1 (Mop3 and Clock suppress the diurnal variation in glucose and triglycerides. Gluconeogenesis is abolished by deletion of Bmal1 and is depressed in Clock mutants, but the counterregulatory response of corticosterone and glucagon to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia is retained. Furthermore, a high-fat diet modulates carbohydrate metabolism by amplifying circadian variation in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and mutation of Clock restores the chow-fed phenotype. Bmal1 and Clock, genes that function in the core molecular clock, exert profound control over recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Furthermore, asynchronous dietary cues may modify glucose homeostasis via their interactions with peripheral molecular clocks.

  7. Synergistic Impairment of Glucose Homeostasis in ob/ob Mice Lacking Functional Serotonin 2C Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Jennifer M.; Juneja, Punita; Mackay, Adrienne W.; Graham, James; Havel, Peter J.; Tecott, Laurence H.; Goulding, Evan H.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate how serotonin and leptin interact in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis, we generated a genetic mouse model, the OB2C mouse, which lacks functional serotonin 2C receptors and the adipocyte hormone leptin. The OB2C mice exhibited a dramatic diabetes phenotype, evidenced by a synergistic increase in serum glucose levels and water intake. The severity of the animals’ diabetes phenotype would not have been predicted from the phenotypic characterization of mice...

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1, glucose homeostasis and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Deacon, Carolyn F; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2008-01-01

    Incretins, enhancers of insulin secretion, are essential for glucose tolerance, and a reduction in their function might contribute to poor beta-cell function in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. However, at supraphysiological doses, the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) protects...... as therapies for type-2 diabetes and have recently reached the market. The pathophysiological basis the clinical use of these therapeutics is reviewed here....

  9. Acylhydrazones contribute to serum glucose homeostasis through dual physiological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, Marisa Jádna Silva; Castro, Allisson Jhonatan Gomes; Mascarello, Alessandra; Mendes, Camila Pires; Kappel, Virgínia Dermachi; Stumpf, Taisa Regina; Leal, Paulo Cesar; Nunes, Ricardo José; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2012-01-01

    In this study the in vivo and in vitro antidiabetic effects of four acylhydrazone derivatives were investigated in rats. The secretagogue action, oral glucose tolerance, insulinogenic index and mechanism of action of these acylhydrazones in relation to calcium uptake in pancreatic islets were studied. Also, the insulinomimetic effect on glycemia in diabetic rats was verified. Of the acylhydrazones studied, 1 and 4 were able to increase glucose tolerance in an acute time-course. A powerful secretagogue effect was exhibited by 1 and glibenclamide with an insulinogenic index around 3.9 and 1.3-fold higher than that of the hyperglycemic group, respectively. Moreover, an acute and dose-dependent effect of glibenclamide and 1 on calcium uptake in pancreatic islets was observed. The rapid stimulatory effect of 1 on calcium uptake seems to be mediated, at least in part, by ATP-dependent K+ channels (K+-ATP) since the stimulatory effect of 1 was similar to that observed for glibenclamide but was not potentiated by sulphonylurea. Furthermore, both extracellular and calcium from stocks mediate the signal transduction of stimulatory effect of 1 on calcium uptake which may contribute to insulin secretion. In addition, the insulinomimetic effect of 1 was evidenced through the level of serum glucose lowering in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Also, 1 induced a significant increase in glycogen content in vivo and glucose uptake in soleus muscle in vitro. The results of this study indicate dual physiological targets for the acylhydrazone 1, i.e., pancreatic islets and skeletal muscle, as a result of insulin secretagogue and insulinomimetic action.

  10. Caffeine and glucose homeostasis during rest and exercise in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Dessi P; Riddell, Michael C

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is a substance that has been used in our society for generations, primarily for its effects on the central nervous system that causes wakefulness. Caffeine supplementation has become increasingly more popular as an ergogenic aid for athletes and considerable scientific evidence supports its effectiveness. Because of their potential to alter energy metabolism, the effects of coffee and caffeine on glucose metabolism in diabetes have also been studied both epidemiologically and experimentally. Predominantly targeting the adenosine receptors, caffeine causes alterations in glucose homeostasis by decreasing glucose uptake into skeletal muscle, thereby causing elevations in blood glucose concentration. Caffeine intake has also been proposed to increase symptomatic warning signs of hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and elevate blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Other effects include potential increases in glucose counterregulatory hormones such as epinephrine, which can also decrease peripheral glucose disposal. Despite these established physiological effects, increased coffee intake has been associated with reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes in large-scale epidemiological studies. This review paper highlights the known effects of caffeine on glucose homeostasis and diabetes metabolism during rest and exercise.

  11. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  12. Actions of prolonged ghrelin infusion on gastrointestinal transit and glucose homeostasis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkén, Y; Hellström, P M; Sanger, G J

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin is produced by enteroendocrine cells in the gastric mucosa and stimulates gastric emptying in healthy volunteers and patients with gastroparesis in short-term studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of intravenous ghrelin on gastrointestinal motility and glucose homeostasis...

  13. Lak of influence of glucagon on glucose homeostasis after prolonged exercise in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Richter, Erik; Holst, J J;

    1977-01-01

    The significance of glucagon for post-exercise glucose homeostasis has been studied in rats fasted overnight. Immediately after exhaustive swimming either rabbit-antiglucagon serum or normal rabbit serum was injected by cardiac puncture. Cardiac blood and samples of liver and muscle tissue were...

  14. Glucose homeostasis can be differentially modulated by varying individual components of a western diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Josephine M; Cowan, Samantha P; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Morley, Amy L; Ward, Leigh C; Walker, Karen Z; Cooper, Mark E; Coughlan, Melinda T

    2013-07-01

    Chronic overconsumption of a Western diet has been identified as a major risk factor for diabetes, yet precisely how each individual component contributes to defects in glucose homeostasis independent of consumption of other macronutrients remains unclear. Eight-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to feeding with one of six semi-pure diets: control, processed (high advanced glycation end products/AGE), high protein, high dextrose (glucose polymer), high in saturated fat (plant origin), or high in saturated fat (animal origin). After chronic feeding for 24 weeks, body composition was determined by bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy and glucose homeostasis was assessed. When compared to the control and high AGE diets, excess consumption of the diet high in saturated fat (animal source) increased body weight and adiposity, and decreased insulin sensitivity, as defined by HOMA IR, impaired skeletal muscle insulin signaling and insulin hypersecretion in the context of increased circulating glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1). Compared to the control diet, chronic consumption of the high AGE, protein or dextrose diet increased fasting plasma glucose, decreased fasting plasma insulin and insulin secretion. These diets also reduced circulating GLP-1 concentrations. These data suggest that individual components of a western diet have differential effects in modulating glucose homeostasis and adiposity. These data provide clear evidence of a link between over-consumption of a western diet and the development of diabetes.

  15. Acute elevation of endogenous prolactin does not influence glucose homeostasis in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigas, M; Klimes, I; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1993-01-01

    The diabetogenic effect of prolactin observed in patients with pathological hyperprolactinaemia was verified in healthy subjects. Plasma prolactin elevation was induced by administration of a dopamine antagonist drug domperidone (Motilium 10 mg orally, 9 subjects) and 2 h later the oral glucose tolerance test was performed. The influence of dopamine receptor stimulation on glucose homeostasis was tested by dopamine infusion (0.3 mg in saline or 20% glucose, 1 g/min for 60 min, 11 subjects). After the blockade of dopamine receptors, a significant and prolonged increase of prolactin concentration was found. However, the levels of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide either before or after the glucose load were not different from control ones. The decreased number of insulin receptors (1.97 +/- 0.41 vs 0.51 +/- 0.14 pmol per 2.10(9) red blood cells) was compensated by increased affinity (0.51 +/- 0.17 vs 1.00 +/- 0.22 Ke 10(8) mol.-1 per l]) of insulin receptors. The stimulation of dopamine receptors showed a negligible effect on glucose regulation. It may be suggested that an endogenous increase of prolactin concentration in the physiological range does not participate in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects.

  16. Astrocytes in the nucleus of the solitary tract are activated by low glucose or glucoprivation: evidence for glial involvement in glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Harry McDougal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis is maintained through interplay between central and peripheral control mechanisms which are aimed at storing excess glucose following meals and mobilizing these same stores during periods of fasting. The nucleus of the solitary tract (NST in the dorsal medulla has long been associated with the central detection of glucose availability and the control of glucose homeostasis. Recent evidence has emerged which supports the involvement of astrocytes in glucose homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether NST-astrocytes respond to physiologically relevant decreases in glucose availability, in vitro, as well as to the presence of the glucoprivic compound 2-deoxy-D-Glucose. This report demonstrates that some NST-astrocytes are capable of responding to low glucose or glucoprivation by increasing cytoplasmic calcium; a change that reverses with restoration of normal glucose availability. While some NST-neurons also demonstrate an increase in calcium signaling during low glucose availability, this effect is smaller and somewhat delayed compared to those observed in adjacent astrocytes. TTX did not abolish these hypoglycemia mediated responses of astrocytes, suggesting that NST-astrocytes may be directly sensing low glucose levels as opposed to responding to neuronal detection of hypoglycemia. Thus, chemodetection of low glucose by NST-astrocytes may play an important role in the autonomic regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  17. Somatropin and glucose homeostasis: considerations for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Nørrelund, Helene; Conceicao, Flavia; Møller, Niels; Christiansen, Jens S

    2002-01-01

    More than 60 years ago it was shown, in dogs, that anterior pituitary extracts may cause glucose intolerance and that hypophysectomy was associated with increased insulin sensitivity. Accordingly, active acromegaly is characterized by insulin resistance at the hepatic and muscular level, whereas children with growth hormone (GH) deficiency are insulin hypersensitive and prone to developing fasting hypoglycemia. Somewhat unexpectedly, hypopituitary adults with untreated GH deficiency tend to be insulin resistant, which may be aggravated by somatropin (GH) therapy. The explanation for this apparent paradox has not been fully established. It is, however, likely that high circulating levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are responsible for insulin resistance, both before and after somatropin therapy. In the untreated state, patients have abdominal obesity, which increases circulating FFA levels. Since GH has potent lipolytic effects, somatropin therapy will further increase FFA levels. Theoretically, this GH replacement effect will eventually be compensated for by favorable alterations in body composition, including a reduction of fat mass. Subcutaneous somatropin therapy, however, will cause some degree of hypersomatropinemia in the prandial phase, which will inevitably antagonize the physiologic effects of insulin. At present, the best way to circumvent this inherent problem is to employ evening injections of somatropin and to ensure that the dosage is not too high. In the latter regard, it is important to realize that dosage requirements are lower in adults compared with children, and that the dosage will probably need to be reduced with age in the individual patient.

  18. Brain GLUT4 Knockout Mice Have Impaired Glucose Tolerance, Decreased Insulin Sensitivity, and Impaired Hypoglycemic Counterregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reno, Candace M; Puente, Erwin C; Sheng, Zhenyu; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Bree, Adam J; Routh, Vanessa H; Kahn, Barbara B; Fisher, Simon J

    2017-03-01

    GLUT4 in muscle and adipose tissue is important in maintaining glucose homeostasis. However, the role of insulin-responsive GLUT4 in the central nervous system has not been well characterized. To assess its importance, a selective knockout of brain GLUT4 (BG4KO) was generated by crossing Nestin-Cre mice with GLUT4-floxed mice. BG4KO mice had a 99% reduction in GLUT4 protein expression throughout the brain. Despite normal feeding and fasting glycemia, BG4KO mice were glucose intolerant, demonstrated hepatic insulin resistance, and had reduced glucose uptake in the brain. In response to hypoglycemia, BG4KO mice had impaired glucose sensing, noted by impaired epinephrine and glucagon responses and impaired c-fos activation in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Moreover, in vitro glucose sensing of glucose-inhibitory neurons from the ventromedial hypothalamus was impaired in BG4KO mice. In summary, BG4KO mice are glucose intolerant, insulin resistant, and have impaired glucose sensing, indicating a critical role for brain GLUT4 in sensing and responding to changes in blood glucose.

  19. A potential role for muscle in glucose homeostasis: in vivo kinetic studies in glycogen storage disease type 1a and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huidekoper, H.H.; Visser, G.; Ackermans, M.T.; Sauerwein, H.P.; Wijburg, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    A potential role for muscle in glucose homeostasis was recently suggested based on characterization of extrahepatic and extrarenal glucose-6-phosphatase (glucose-6-phosphatase-beta). To study the role of extrahepatic tissue in glucose homeostasis during fasting glucose kinetics were studied in two p

  20. Central effects of beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radosevich, P.M.; Lacy, D.B.; Brown, L.L.; Williams, P.E.; Abumrad, N.N.

    1989-02-01

    The effects of centrally administered beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog were studied. Intracerebroventricular administration of beta-endorphin (0.2 mg/h) caused a 70% increase in plasma glucose. The mechanism of the hyperglycemia was twofold: there was an early increase in glucose production and a late inhibition of glucose clearance. These changes are explained by marked increases in plasma epinephrine (30-fold) and norepinephrine (6-fold) that occurred during infusion of beta-endorphin. Central administration of beta-endorphin also resulted in increased levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol. In addition there was an increase in plasma insulin but no increase in plasma glucagon. Intravenous administration of beta-endorphin did not alter glucose homeostasis. Intracerebroventricular administration of acetylated beta-endorphin did not perturb glucose kinetics or any of the hormones that changed during infusion of the unacetylated peptide. We conclude that beta-endorphin acts centrally to cause hyperglycemia by stimulating sympathetic outflow and the pituitary-adrenal axis. Acetylation of beta-endorphin abolishes the in vivo activity of the peptide.

  1. Glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in growth hormone-transgenic mice: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Khardori, Romesh; Bartke, Andrzej

    2010-10-01

    In contrast to its stimulatory effects on musculature, bone, and organ development, and its lipolytic effects, growth hormone (GH) opposes insulin effects on glucose metabolism. Chronic GH overexposure is thought to result in insulin insensitivity and decreased blood glucose homeostatic control. Yet, despite the importance of this concept for basic biology, as well as human conditions of GH excess or deficiency, no systematic assessment of the impact of GH over- expression on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity has been conducted. We report that male and female adult GH transgenic mice have enhanced glucose tolerance compared to littermate controls and this effect is not dependent on age or on the particular heterologous GH transgene used. Furthermore, increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, augmented insulin sensitivity, and muted gluconeogenesis were also observed in bovine GH overexpressing mice. These results show that markedly increased systemic GH concentration in GH-transgenic mice exerts unexpected beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis, presumably via a compensatory increase in insulin release. The counterintuitive nature of these results challenges previously held presumptions of the physiology of these mice and other states of GH overexpression or suppression. In addition, they pose intriguing queries about the relationships between GH, endocrine control of metabolism, and aging.

  2. Evaluating the Mechanisms of Improved Glucose Homeostasis after Bariatric Surgery in Ossabaw Miniature Swine

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    Jonathan G. Sham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is the most common bariatric operation; however, the mechanism underlying the profound weight-independent effects on glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Large animal models of naturally occurring insulin resistance (IR, which have been lacking, would provide opportunities to elucidate such mechanisms. Ossabaw miniature swine naturally exhibit many features that may be useful in evaluating the anti diabetic effects of bariatric surgery. Methods. Glucose homeostasis was studied in 53 Ossabaw swine. Thirty-two received an obesogenic diet and were randomized to RYGB, gastrojejunostomy (GJ, gastrojejunostomy with duodenal exclusion (GJD, or Sham operations. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests and standardized meal tolerance tests were performed prior to, 1, 2, and 8 weeks after surgery and at a single time-point for regular diet control pigs. Results. High-calorie-fed Ossabaws weighed more and had greater IR than regular diet controls, though only 70% developed IR. All operations caused weight-loss-independent improvement in IR, though only in pigs with high baseline IR. Only RYGB induced weight loss and decreased IR in the majority of pigs, as well as increasing AUCinsulin/AUCglucose. Conclusions. Similar to humans, Ossabaw swine exhibit both obesity-dependent and obesity-independent IR. RYGB promoted weight loss, IR improvement, and increased AUCinsulin/AUCglucose, compared to the smaller changes following GJ and GJD, suggesting a combination of upper and lower gut mechanisms in improving glucose homeostasis.

  3. Sleep apnea predicts distinct alterations in glucose homeostasis and biomarkers in obese adults with normal and impaired glucose metabolism

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    Hill Nathan R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Notwithstanding previous studies supporting independent associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and prevalence of diabetes, the underlying pathogenesis of impaired glucose regulation in OSA remains unclear. We explored mechanisms linking OSA with prediabetes/diabetes and associated biomarker profiles. We hypothesized that OSA is associated with distinct alterations in glucose homeostasis and biomarker profiles in subjects with normal (NGM and impaired glucose metabolism (IGM. Methods Forty-five severely obese adults (36 women without certain comorbidities/medications underwent anthropometric measurements, polysomnography, and blood tests. We measured fasting serum glucose, insulin, selected cytokines, and calculated homeostasis model assessment estimates of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS and pancreatic beta-cell function (HOMA-B. Results Both increases in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI and the presence of prediabetes/diabetes were associated with reductions in HOMA-IS in the entire cohort even after adjustment for sex, race, age, and BMI (P = 0.003. In subjects with NGM (n = 30, OSA severity was associated with significantly increased HOMA-B (a trend towards decreased HOMA-IS independent of sex and adiposity. OSA-related oxyhemoglobin desaturations correlated with TNF-α (r=-0.76; P = 0.001 in women with NGM and with IL-6 (rho=-0.55; P = 0.035 in women with IGM (n = 15 matched individually for age, adiposity, and AHI. Conclusions OSA is independently associated with altered glucose homeostasis and increased basal beta-cell function in severely obese adults with NGM. The findings suggest that moderate to severe OSA imposes an excessive functional demand on pancreatic beta-cells, which may lead to their exhaustion and impaired secretory capacity over time. The two distinct biomarker profiles linking sleep apnea with NGM and IGM via TNF-α and IL-6 have been discerned in our study to suggest that sleep apnea and particularly

  4. PCAF Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Suppressing the Gluconeogenic Activity of PGC-1α

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    Cheng Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PGC-1α plays a central role in hepatic gluconeogenesis and has been implicated in the onset of type 2 diabetes. Acetylation is an important posttranslational modification for regulating the transcriptional activity of PGC-1α. Here, we show that PCAF is a pivotal acetyltransferase for acetylating PGC-1α in both fasted and diabetic states. PCAF acetylates two lysine residues K328 and K450 in PGC-1α, which subsequently triggers its proteasomal degradation and suppresses its transcriptional activity. Adenoviral-mediated expression of PCAF in the obese mouse liver greatly represses gluconeogenic enzyme activation and glucose production and improves glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Moreover, liver-specific knockdown of PCAF stimulates PGC-1α activity, resulting in an increase in blood glucose and hepatic glucose output. Our results suggest that PCAF might be a potential pharmacological target for developing agents against metabolic disorders associated with hyperglycemia, such as obesity and diabetes.

  5. Dual Effect of Rosuvastatin on Glucose Homeostasis Through Improved Insulin Sensitivity and Reduced Insulin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Vishal A; Mollet, Inês G; Ofori, Jones K; Malm, Helena A; Esguerra, Jonathan L S; Reinbothe, Thomas M; Stenkula, Karin G; Wendt, Anna; Eliasson, Lena; Vikman, Jenny

    2016-08-01

    Statins are beneficial in the treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but these lipid-lowering drugs are associated with increased incidence of new on-set diabetes. The cellular mechanisms behind the development of diabetes by statins are elusive. Here we have treated mice on normal diet (ND) and high fat diet (HFD) with rosuvastatin. Under ND rosuvastatin lowered blood glucose through improved insulin sensitivity and increased glucose uptake in adipose tissue. In vitro rosuvastatin reduced insulin secretion and insulin content in islets. In the beta cell Ca(2+) signaling was impaired and the density of granules at the plasma membrane was increased by rosuvastatin treatment. HFD mice developed insulin resistance and increased insulin secretion prior to administration of rosuvastatin. Treatment with rosuvastatin decreased the compensatory insulin secretion and increased glucose uptake. In conclusion, our data shows dual effects on glucose homeostasis by rosuvastatin where insulin sensitivity is improved, but beta cell function is impaired.

  6. Oxygen glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slice cultures results in alterations in carnitine homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

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    Thomas F Rau

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neuroprotective. Thus, this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which HI alters carnitine metabolism and to begin to elucidate the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine (LCAR supplementation. Utilizing neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures we found that oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD decreased the levels of free carnitines (FC and increased the acylcarnitine (AC: FC ratio. These changes in carnitine homeostasis correlated with decreases in the protein levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT 1 and 2. LCAR supplementation prevented the decrease in CPT1 and CPT2, enhanced both FC and the AC∶FC ratio and increased slice culture metabolic viability, the mitochondrial membrane potential prior to OGD and prevented the subsequent loss of neurons during later stages of reperfusion through a reduction in apoptotic cell death. Finally, we found that LCAR supplementation preserved the structural integrity and synaptic transmission within the hippocampus after OGD. Thus, we conclude that LCAR supplementation preserves the key enzymes responsible for maintaining carnitine homeostasis and preserves both cell viability and synaptic transmission after OGD.

  7. Role of Vitamin D in Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity for Glucose Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Jessica A.; Ambika Ashraf

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D functions are not limited to skeletal health benefits and may extend to preservation of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. This review summarizes the literature related to potential vitamin D influences on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Cross-sectional data provide some evidence that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is inversely associated with insulin resistance, although direct measurements of insulin sensitivity are required for confirmation. Report...

  8. The Mammalian Tribbles Homolog TRIB3, Glucose Homeostasis, and Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Insulin signaling plays a physiological role in traditional insulin target tissues controlling glucose homeostasis as well as in pancreatic β-cells and in the endothelium. Insulin signaling abnormalities may, therefore, be pathogenic for insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, endothelial dysfunction, and eventually, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease. Tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) is a 45-kDa pseudokinase binding to and inhibiting Akt, a key mediator of insulin s...

  9. The Islet Circadian Clock: Entrainment Mechanisms, Function and Role in Glucose Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rakshit, Kuntol; Qian, Jingyi; Colwell, Christopher S; Matveyenko, Aleksey V.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion has long been appreciated as an important feature of metabolic control in humans. Circadian disruption is becoming increasingly prevalent in today’s society and is likely responsible in part for the considerable rise in Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome worldwide. Thus, understanding molecular mechanisms driving the inter-relationship between circadian disruption and T2DM is important in context of disease preventio...

  10. Exenatide improves glucose homeostasis and prolongs survival in a murine model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

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    Arpita Kalla Vyas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing awareness of secondary insulin resistance and alterations in myocardial glucose utilization in congestive heart failure. Whether therapies that directly target these changes would be beneficial is unclear. We previously demonstrated that acute blockade of the insulin responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 precipitates acute decompensated heart failure in mice with advanced dilated cardiomyopathy. Our current objective was to determine whether pharmacologic enhancement of insulin sensitivity and myocardial glucose uptake preserves cardiac function and survival in the setting of primary heart failure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The GLP-1 agonist exenatide was administered twice daily to a murine model of dilated cardiomyopathy (TG9 starting at 56 days of life. TG9 mice develop congestive heart failure and secondary insulin resistance in a highly predictable manner with death by 12 weeks of age. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by measuring glucose tolerance at 8 and 10 weeks and tissue 2-deoxyglucose uptake at 75 days. Exenatide treatment improved glucose tolerance, myocardial GLUT4 expression and 2-deoxyglucose uptake, cardiac contractility, and survival over control vehicle-treated TG9 mice. Phosphorylation of AMP kinase and AKT was also increased in exenatide-treated animals. Total myocardial GLUT1 levels were not different between groups. Exenatide also abrogated the detrimental effect of the GLUT4 antagonist ritonavir on survival in TG9 mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In heart failure secondary insulin resistance is maladaptive and myocardial glucose uptake is suboptimal. An incretin-based therapy, which addresses these changes, appears beneficial.

  11. Brain Glucose Transporter (Glut3) Haploinsufficiency Does Not Impair Mouse Brain Glucose Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Charles A.; Ross, Ian R.; Howell, Mary E. A.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Wood, Thomas G.; Ceci, Jeffrey D.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Mouse brain expresses three principle glucose transporters. Glut1 is an endothelial marker and is the principal glucose transporter of the blood-brain barrier. Glut3 and Glut6 are expressed in glial cells and neural cells. A mouse line with a null allele for Glut3 has been developed. The Glut3−/− genotype is intrauterine lethal by seven days post-coitis, but the heterozygous (Glut3+/−) littermate survives, exhibiting rapid post-natal weight gain, but no seizures or other behavioral aberration...

  12. Leptin Is Required for Glucose Homeostasis after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass in Mice.

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    Mohamad Mokadem

    Full Text Available Leptin, the protein product of the ob gene, increases energy expenditure and reduces food intake, thereby promoting weight reduction. Leptin also regulates glucose homeostasis and hepatic insulin sensitivity via hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons in mice. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB induces weight loss that is substantial and sustained despite reducing plasma leptin levels. In addition, patients who fail to undergo diabetes remission after RYGB are hypoletinemic compared to those who do and to lean controls. We have previously demonstrated that the beneficial effects of RYGB in mice require the melanocortin-4 receptor, a downstream effector of leptin action. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that leptin is required for sustained weight reduction and improved glucose homeostasis observed after RYGB.To investigate this hypothesis, we performed RYGB or sham operations on leptin-deficient ob/ob mice maintained on regular chow. To investigate whether leptin is involved in post-RYGB weight maintenance, we challenged post-surgical mice with high fat diet.RYGB reduced total body weight, fat and lean mass and caused reduction in calorie intake in ob/ob mice. However, it failed to improve glucose tolerance, glucose-stimulated plasma insulin, insulin tolerance, and fasting plasma insulin. High fat diet eliminated the reduction in calorie intake observed after RYGB in ob/ob mice and promoted weight regain, although not to the same extent as in sham-operated mice. We conclude that leptin is required for the effects of RYGB on glucose homeostasis but not body weight or composition in mice. Our data also suggest that leptin may play a role in post-RYGB weight maintenance.

  13. FGF19 action in the brain induces insulin-independent glucose lowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Gregory J; Matsen, Miles E; Bracy, Deanna P; Meek, Thomas H; Nguyen, Hong T; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N; Wasserman, David H; Schwartz, Michael W

    2013-11-01

    Insulin-independent glucose disposal (referred to as glucose effectiveness [GE]) is crucial for glucose homeostasis and, until recently, was thought to be invariable. However, GE is reduced in type 2 diabetes and markedly decreased in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Strategies aimed at increasing GE should therefore be capable of improving glucose tolerance in these animals. The gut-derived hormone FGF19 has previously been shown to exert potent antidiabetic effects in ob/ob mice. In ob/ob mice, we found that systemic FGF19 administration improved glucose tolerance through its action in the brain and that a single, low-dose i.c.v. injection of FGF19 dramatically improved glucose intolerance within 2 hours. Minimal model analysis of glucose and insulin data obtained during a frequently sampled i.v. glucose tolerance test showed that the antidiabetic effect of i.c.v. FGF19 was solely due to increased GE and not to changes of either insulin secretion or insulin sensitivity. The mechanism underlying this effect appears to involve increased metabolism of glucose to lactate. Together, these findings implicate the brain in the antidiabetic action of systemic FGF19 and establish the brain’s capacity to rapidly, potently, and selectively increase insulin-independent glucose disposal.

  14. Contrasting effects of puerarin and daidzin on glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meezan, Elias; Meezan, Elisabeth M; Jones, Kenneth; Moore, Ray; Barnes, Stephen; Prasain, Jeevan K

    2005-11-02

    Puerarin and daidzin are the major isoflavone glucosides found in kudzu dietary supplements. In this study, we demonstrated that puerarin significantly improves glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J-ob/ob mice, an animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, blunting the rise in blood glucose levels after i.p. administration of glucose. In contrast, daidzin, the O-glucoside, had a significant but opposite effect, impairing glucose tolerance as compared to saline-treated controls. When they were administered i.p. with (14)C-glucose to C57BL/6J lean mice, puerarin inhibited glucose uptake into tissues and incorporation into glycogen, while daidzin stimulated glucose uptake, showing an opposite effect to puerarin. Puerarin also antagonized the stimulatory effect of decyl-beta-D-thiomaltoside, an artificial primer of glycogen synthesis, which increases (14)C-glucose uptake and incorporation into glycogen in mouse liver and heart. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry procedure was used to investigate the metabolism and bioavailability of puerarin and daidzin. The blood puerarin concentration-time curve by i.p. and oral administration indicated that puerarin was four times more bioavailable via i.p. injection than via the oral route of administration. This may account for the increased hypoglycemic effect seen in the i.p. glucose tolerance test vs that seen orally. Our results suggest that puerarin is rapidly absorbed from the intestine without metabolism, while daidzin is hydrolyzed to the aglycone daidzein. The opposing effects of puerarin and daidzin on glucose homeostasis may have implications for the activity of dietary supplements that contain both of these isoflavonoids.

  15. Glycogen Supercompensation in the Rat Brain After Acute Hypoglycemia is Independent of Glucose Levels During Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, João M N; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Gruetter, Rolf

    2017-01-12

    Patients with diabetes display a progressive decay in the physiological counter-regulatory response to hypoglycemia, resulting in hypoglycemia unawareness. The mechanism through which the brain adapts to hypoglycemia may involve brain glycogen. We tested the hypothesis that brain glycogen supercompensation following hypoglycemia depends on blood glucose levels during recovery. Conscious rats were submitted to hypoglycemia of 2 mmol/L for 90 min and allowed to recover at different glycemia, controlled by means of i.v. glucose infusion. Brain glycogen concentration was elevated above control levels after 24 h of recovery in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. This glycogen supercompensation was independent of blood glucose levels in the post-hypoglycemia period. In the absence of a preceding hypoglycemia insult, brain glycogen concentrations were unaltered after 24 h under hyperglycemia. In the hypothalamus, which controls peripheral glucose homeostasis, glycogen levels were unaltered. Overall, we conclude that post-hypoglycemia glycogen supercompensation occurs in several brain areas and its magnitude is independent of plasma glucose levels. By supporting brain metabolism during recurrent hypoglycemia periods, glycogen may have a role in the development of hypoglycemia unawareness.

  16. Ghrelin Inhibition Restores Glucose Homeostasis in Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1α (MODY3)-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brial, François; Lussier, Carine R; Belleville, Karine; Sarret, Philippe; Boudreau, François

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF1α) is a transcription factor expressed in tissues of endoderm origin. Mutations in HNF1A are associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young 3 (MODY3). Mice deficient for Hnf1α are hyperglycemic, with their pancreatic β-cells being defective in glucose-sensing insulin secretion. The specific mechanisms involved in this defect are unclear. Gut hormones control glucose homeostasis. Our objective was to explore whether changes in these hormones play a role in glucose homeostasis in the absence of Hnf1α. An increase in ghrelin gene transcript and a decrease in glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) gene transcripts were observed in the gut of Hnf1α-null mice. These changes correlated with an increase of ghrelin and a decrease of GIP-labeled cells. Ghrelin serological levels were significantly induced in Hnf1α-null mice. Paradoxically, GIP levels were also induced in these mice. Treatment of Hnf1α-null mice with a ghrelin antagonist led to a recovery of the diabetic symptoms. We conclude that upregulation of ghrelin in the absence of Hnf1α impairs insulin secretion and can be reversed by pharmacological inhibition of ghrelin/GHS-R interaction. These observations open up on future strategies to counteract ghrelin action in a program that could become beneficial in controlling non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

  17. Heritability of phenotypes associated with glucose homeostasis and adiposity in a rural area of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Geórgia G; Dutra, Míriam Santos; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation between glucose homeostasis and adiposity traits in a population in a rural community in Brazil. The Jequitinhonha Community Family Study cohort consists of subjects aged ≥18 years residing in rural areas in Brazil. The data on the following traits were assembled for 280 individuals (51.7% women): body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, waist and mid-upper arm circumferences, triceps skinfold, conicity index, insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), triglycerides and C-reactive protein. Extended pedigrees were constructed up to the third generation of individuals using the data management software PEDSYS. The heritability and genetic correlations were estimated using a variance component method. The age- and sex-adjusted heritability values estimated for insulin (h(2) = 52%), glucose (h(2) = 51%), HDLc (h(2) = 58%), and waist circumference (WC; h(2) = 49%) were high. Significantly adjusted genetic correlations were observed between insulin paired with each of the following phenotypes; (BMI; ρg = 0.48), WC (ρg = 0.47) and HDLc (ρg = -0.47). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was genetically correlated with BMI (ρg = 0.53) and HDLc (ρg = -0.58). The adjusted genetic correlations between traits were consistently higher compared with the environmental correlations. In conclusion, glucose metabolism and adiposity traits are highly heritable and share common genetic effects with body adiposity traits.

  18. CD14 deficiency impacts glucose homeostasis in mice through altered adrenal tone.

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    James L Young

    Full Text Available The toll-like receptors comprise one of the most conserved components of the innate immune system, signaling the presence of molecules of microbial origin. It has been proposed that signaling through TLR4, which requires CD14 to recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, may generate low-grade inflammation and thereby affect insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. To examine the long-term influence of partial innate immune signaling disruption on glucose homeostasis, we analyzed knockout mice deficient in CD14 backcrossed into the diabetes-prone C57BL6 background at 6 or 12 months of age. CD14-ko mice, fed either normal or high-fat diets, displayed significant glucose intolerance compared to wild type controls. They also displayed elevated norepinephrine urinary excretion and increased adrenal medullary volume, as well as an enhanced norepinephrine secretory response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. These results point out a previously unappreciated crosstalk between innate immune- and sympathoadrenal- systems, which exerts a major long-term effect on glucose homeostasis.

  19. Yuzu extract prevents cognitive decline and impaired glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-infused rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Hwang, Jin Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Park, Sunmin

    2013-07-01

    Our preliminary study revealed that dementia induced by β-amyloid accumulation impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis (unpublished). We therefore evaluated whether long-term oral consumption of yuzu (Citrus junos Tanaka) extract improves cognitive dysfunction and glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-induced rats. Male rats received hippocampal CA1 infusions of β-amyloid (25-35) [plaque forming β-amyloid; Alzheimer disease (AD)] or β-amyloid (35-25) [non-plaque forming β-amyloid; C (non-Alzheimer disease control)] at a rate of 3.6 nmol/d for 14 d. AD rats were divided into 2 dietary groups that received either 3% lyophilized 70% ethanol extracts of yuzu (AD-Y) or 3% dextrin (AD-C) in high-fat diets (43% energy as fat). The AD-C group exhibited greater hippocampal β-amyloid deposition, which was not detected in the C group, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling. Yuzu treatment prevented β-amyloid accumulation, increased tau phosphorylation, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling observed in AD-C rats. Consistent with β-amyloid accumulation, the AD-C rats experienced cognitive dysfunction, which was prevented by yuzu. AD-C rats gained less weight than did C rats due to decreased feed consumption, and yuzu treatment prevented the decrease in feed consumption. Serum glucose concentrations were higher in AD-C than in C rats at 40-120 min after glucose loading during an oral-glucose-tolerance test, but not at 0-40 min. Serum insulin concentrations were highly elevated in AD-C rats but not enough to lower serum glucose to normal concentrations, indicating that rats in the AD-C group had insulin resistance and a borderline diabetic state. Although AD-C rats were profoundly insulin resistant, AD-Y rats exhibited normal first and second phases of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and secretion. In conclusion, yuzu treatment prevented the cognitive dysfunction and impaired energy and glucose homeostasis induced by β-amyloid infusion.

  20. The Contribution of Intestinal Gluconeogenesis to Glucose Homeostasis Is Low in 2-Day-Old Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherbuy, Claire; Vaugelade, Pierre; Labarthe, Simon; Honvo-Houeto, Edith; Darcy-Vrillon, Béatrice; Watford, Malcolm; Duée, Pierre-Henri

    2017-03-01

    -old piglets.Conclusion: Our results indicate that there is a low contribution to glucose homeostasis from intestinal gluconeogenesis in 2-d-old piglets.

  1. Transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways and role of glucose homeostasis during copper imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Natalia; Rivas, Nicole; del Pozo, Talía; Burkhead, Jason; Suazo, Miriam; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for organism health. Dietary changes or pathologies linked to this metal induce changes in intracellular glutathione concentrations. Here, we studied the transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways in Jurkat cell lines, analyzing the effect of change in glucose homeostasis during a physiological and supra-physiological copper exposure. An immortalized line of human T lymphocyte cell line (Jurkat) was exposed to different copper and glucose conditions to mimic concentrations present in human blood. We applied treatments for 6 (acute) and 24 h (sustained) to 2 µM (physiological) or 20 µM (supra-physiological, Wilson disease scenario) of CuSO4 in combination with 25 mg/dL (hypoglycemia), 100 mg/dL (normal) and 200 mg/dL (hyperglycemia, diabetes scenario) of glucose. The results indicate that a physiological concentration of copper exposure does not induce transcriptional changes in the glutathione synthesis pathway after 6 or 24 h. The G6PDH gene (regeneration pathway), however, is induced during a supra-physiological copper condition. This data was correlated with the viability assays, where fluctuation in both glucose conditions (hypo and hyperglycemia scenario) affected Jurkat proliferation when 20 µM of CuSO4 was added to the culture media. Under a copper overload condition, the transcription of a component of glutathione regeneration pathway (G6PDH gene) is activated in cells chronically exposed to a hyperglycemia scenario, indicating that fluctuations in glucose concentration impact the resistance against the metal. Our findings illustrate the importance of glucose homeostasis during copper excess.

  2. Bis-Pyrano Prenyl Isoflavone Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Inhibiting Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 in Hyperglycemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhofen, Delsi; da Luz, Gabrielle; Frederico, Marisa Jádna Silva; Venzke, Dalila; Brich, Mayara; Vigil, Silvana; Fröde, Tania Silvia; Linares, Carlos Eduardo Blanco; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2017-01-01

    Isoflavones widely distributed in plants prevent diabetes. This study investigated the in vivo and in vitro effect of 3',4'-dihydroxy-6″,6″,6″',6″'-tetramethylbis(pyrano[2″,3″:5,6::2″',3″':7,8]isoflavone (bis-pyrano prenyl isoflavone) on glucose homeostasis in hyperglycemic rats. The ethyl acetate fraction from aerial parts of Polygala molluginifolia that contain isoflavones was assayed on glucose tolerance, on in vitro maltase activity and on protein glycation. The isoflavone bis-pyrano prenyl isolated from this fraction was investigated on glucose homeostasis. The in vivo action of the isoflavone exhibits an anti-hyperglycemic effect by improving glucose tolerance, augmenting the liver glycogen, inhibiting maltase activity, and stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and insulin secretion. The in vitro isoflavone inhibits dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity since the glucose tolerance was improved in the presence of the isoflavone as much as sitagliptin, an inhibitor of DPP-4. However, the co-incubation with isoflavone and sitagliptin exhibited an additive anti-hyperglycemic action. The isoflavone increased the GLP-1 faster than the positive hyperglycemic group, which shows that the intestine is a potential target. Thus, to clarify the main site of action in which isoflavone improves glucose balance, the in vitro mechanism of action of this compound was tested in intestine using calcium influx as a trigger for the signal pathways for GLP-1 secretion. The isoflavone stimulates calcium influx in intestine and its mechanism involves voltage-dependent calcium channels, phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and stored calcium contributing for GLP-1 secretion. In conclusion, the isoflavone regulates glycaemia by acting mainly in a serum target, the DPP-4 inhibitor. Furthermore, the long-term effect of isoflavone prevents protein glycation. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 92-103, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Interactive effects of neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate and aspartame on glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collison Kate S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that the effects of certain food additives may be synergistic or additive. Aspartame (ASP and Monosodium Glutamate (MSG are ubiquitous food additives with a common moiety: both contain acidic amino acids which can act as neurotransmitters, interacting with NMDA receptors concentrated in areas of the Central Nervous System regulating energy expenditure and conservation. MSG has been shown to promote a neuroendocrine dysfunction when large quantities are administered to mammals during the neonatal period. ASP is a low-calorie dipeptide sweetener found in a wide variety of diet beverages and foods. However, recent reports suggest that ASP may promote weight gain and hyperglycemia in a zebrafish nutritional model. Methods We investigated the effects of ASP, MSG or a combination of both on glucose and insulin homeostasis, weight change and adiposity, in C57BL/6 J mice chronically exposed to these food additives commencing in-utero, compared to an additive-free diet. Pearson correlation analysis was used to investigate the associations between body characteristics and variables in glucose and insulin homeostasis. Results ASP alone (50 mg/Kgbw/day caused an increase in fasting blood glucose of 1.6-fold, together with reduced insulin sensitivity during an Insulin Tolerance Test (ITT P  Conclusions Aspartame exposure may promote hyperglycemia and insulin intolerance. MSG may interact with aspartame to further impair glucose homeostasis. This is the first study to ascertain the hyperglycemic effects of chronic exposure to a combination of these commonly consumed food additives; however these observations are limited to a C57BL/6 J mouse model. Caution should be applied in extrapolating these findings to other species.

  4. Parameters of glucose metabolism and the aging brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; Altmann-Schneider, Irmhild;

    2015-01-01

    Given the concurrent, escalating epidemic of diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases, two age-related disorders, we aimed to understand the relation between parameters of glucose metabolism and indices of pathology in the aging brain. From the Leiden Longevity Study, 132 participants (mean...... age 66 years) underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to assess glucose tolerance (fasted and area under the curve (AUC) glucose), insulin sensitivity (fasted and AUC insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS)) and insulin secretion (insulinogenic index). 3-T brain...... different parameters of glucose metabolism (impairment of which is characteristic of diabetes mellitus) and brain aging....

  5. p21-Activated protein kinases and their emerging roles in glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-ting Alex; Jin, Tianru

    2014-04-01

    p21-Activated protein kinases (PAKs) are centrally involved in a plethora of cellular processes and functions. Their function as effectors of small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 has been extensively studied during the past two decades, particularly in the realms of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and hence tumorigenesis, as well as cytoskeletal remodeling and related cellular events in health and disease. In recent years, a large number of studies have shed light onto the fundamental role of group I PAKs, most notably PAK1, in metabolic homeostasis. In skeletal muscle, PAK1 was shown to mediate the function of insulin on stimulating GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake, while in pancreatic β-cells, PAK1 participates in insulin granule localization and vesicle release. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PAK1 mediates the cross talk between insulin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways and hence regulates gut proglucagon gene expression and the production of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The utilization of chemical inhibitors of PAK and the characterization of Pak1(-/-) mice enabled us to gain mechanistic insights as well as to assess the overall contribution of PAKs in metabolic homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of PAKs, with an emphasis on the emerging roles of PAK1 in glucose homeostasis.

  6. Reciprocal regulation of insulin and plasma 5'-AMP in glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lin; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Xiao; Zhan, Yibei; Cheng, Rui; Wang, Shiming; Zhang, Jianfa

    2015-03-01

    A previous investigation has demonstrated that plasma 5'-AMP (pAMP) exacerbates and causes hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. However, the crosstalk between pAMP and insulin signaling to regulate glucose homeostasis has not been investigated in depth. In this study, we showed that the blood glucose level was more dependent on the ratio of insulin to pAMP than on the absolute level of these two factors. Administration of 5'-AMP significantly attenuated the insulin-stimulated insulin receptor (IR) autophosphorylation in the liver and muscle tissues, resulting in the inhibition of downstream AKT phosphorylation. A docking analysis indicated that adenosine was a potential inhibitor of IR tyrosine kinase. Moreover, the 5'-AMP treatment elevated the ATP level in the pancreas and in the isolated islets, stimulating insulin secretion and increasing the plasma level of insulin. The insulin administration decreased the 5'-AMP-induced hyper-adenosine level by the up-regulation of adenosine kinase activities. Our results indicate that blood glucose homeostasis is reciprocally regulated by pAMP and insulin.

  7. The activation of hepatic and muscle polyamine catabolism improves glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Taina; Cerrada-Gimenez, Marc; Pirinen, Eija; Hohtola, Esa; Paananen, Jussi; Vuohelainen, Susanna; Tusa, Maija; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Heikkinen, Sami; Virkamäki, Antti; Uimari, Anne; Alhonen, Leena; Laakso, Markku

    2012-02-01

    The mitochondrial biogenesis and energy expenditure regulator, PGC-1α, has been previously reported to be induced in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver of mice overexpressing spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT). The activation of PGC-1α in these mouse lines leads to increased number of mitochondria, improved glucose homeostasis, reduced WAT mass and elevated basal metabolic rate. The constant activation of polyamine catabolism produces a futile cycle that greatly reduces the ATP pools and induces 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which in turn activates PGC-1α in WAT. In this study, we have investigated the effects of activated polyamine catabolism on the glucose and energy metabolisms when targeted to specific tissues. For that we used a mouse line overexpressing SSAT under the endogenous SSAT promoter, an inducible SSAT overexpressing mouse model using the metallothionein I promoter (MT-SSAT), and a mouse model with WAT-specific SSAT overexpression (aP2-SSAT). The results demonstrated that WAT-specific SSAT overexpression was sufficient to increase the number of mitochondria, reduce WAT mass and protect the mice from high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, the improvement in the glucose homeostasis is achieved only when polyamine catabolism is enhanced at the same time in the liver and skeletal muscle. Our results suggest that the tissue-specific targeting of activated polyamine catabolism may reveal new possibilities for the development of drugs boosting mitochondrial metabolism and eventually for treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  8. Roles of dorsomedial hypothalamic cholecystokinin signaling in the controls of meal patterns and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangjing; Yan, Jianqun; Smith, Wanli W; Moran, Timothy H; Bi, Sheng

    2012-01-18

    A role for dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) cholecystokinin (CCK) signaling in feeding control has been proposed. Administration of CCK into the DMH reduces food intake and OLETF rats lacking CCK1 receptors (CCK1R) become hyperphagic and obese. We hypothesized that site specific replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats would attenuate aspects of their feeding deficits. Recombinant vectors of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated expression of CCK1R (AAVCCK1R) were bilaterally delivered into the DMH of OLETF. OLETF rats with AAVCCK1R injections demonstrated a 65% replenishment of Cck1r mRNA expression in the DMH relative to lean LETO control rats. Although this level of replenishment did not significantly affect overall food intake or body weight through 14 weeks following viral injections, meal patterns were partially normalized in OLETF rats receiving AAVCCK1R with a significant decrease in dark cycle meal size and a small but significant decrease in daily food intake in the meal analysis chambers. Importantly, the elevation in blood glucose level of OLETF rats was attenuated by the AAVCCK1R injections (p=0.03), suggesting a role for DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis. In support of this role, administration of CCK into the DMH of intact rats enhanced glucose tolerance, as this occurred through activation of CCK1R but not CCK2R signaling. In conclusion, partial replenishment of CCK1R in the DMH of OLETF rats, although insufficient for altering overall food intake and body weight, normalizes meal pattern changes and reduces blood glucose levels. Our study also shows a novel role of DMH CCK signaling in glucose homeostasis.

  9. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in rats are associated with altered brain glycogen and amino-acid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions; however, scarce information about how these metabolic syndromes influence brain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis exist. The objective of this study was to elucidate how brain glycogen and neurotransmitter homeostasis are affect...

  10. Adipocyte-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deletion increases lipogenesis, adipocyte cell size and is a minor regulator of glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Owen

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, a key negative regulator of leptin and insulin signaling, is positively correlated with adiposity and contributes to insulin resistance. Global PTP1B deletion improves diet-induced obesity and glucose homeostasis via enhanced leptin signaling in the brain and increased insulin signaling in liver and muscle. However, the role of PTP1B in adipocytes is unclear, with studies demonstrating beneficial, detrimental or no effect(s of adipose-PTP1B-deficiency on body mass and insulin resistance. To definitively establish the role of adipocyte-PTP1B in body mass regulation and glucose homeostasis, adipocyte-specific-PTP1B knockout mice (adip-crePTP1B(-/- were generated using the adiponectin-promoter to drive Cre-recombinase expression. Chow-fed adip-crePTP1B(-/- mice display enlarged adipocytes, despite having similar body weight/adiposity and glucose homeostasis compared to controls. High-fat diet (HFD-fed adip-crePTP1B(-/- mice display no differences in body weight/adiposity but exhibit larger adipocytes, increased circulating glucose and leptin levels, reduced leptin sensitivity and increased basal lipogenesis compared to controls. This is associated with decreased insulin receptor (IR and Akt/PKB phosphorylation, increased lipogenic gene expression and increased hypoxia-induced factor-1-alpha (Hif-1α expression. Adipocyte-specific PTP1B deletion does not beneficially manipulate signaling pathways regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism or adipokine secretion in adipocytes. Moreover, PTP1B does not appear to be the major negative regulator of the IR in adipocytes.

  11. Translocator protein (18 kDa) as a pharmacological target in adipocytes to regulate glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-09-01

    As a major regulator in obesity and its associated metabolic complications, the proper functioning of adipocytes is crucial for health maintenance, thus serving as an important target for the development of anti-obese and anti-diabetic therapies. There is increasing evidence that mitochondrial malfunction is a pivotal event in disturbing adipocyte cell homeostasis. Among major mitochondrial structure components, the high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) has shown importance across a broad spectrum of mitochondrial functions. Recent studies demonstrated the presence of TSPO in white adipocyte mitochondria of mice, and administration of TSPO drug ligands to obese mice reduced weight gain and lowered glucose level. Therefore, it is of great interest to assess whether TSPO in adipocytes could serve as a drug target to regulate adipocyte activities with potential influence on weight control and glucose metabolism. Two structurally distinct TSPO drug ligands, PK 11195 and FGIN-1-27, improved the intracellular dynamics of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, such as the production and release of adipokines, glucose uptake, and adipogenesis. TSPO knockdown in either differentiated adipocytes or preadipocytes impaired these functions. Findings from 3T3-L1 cells were related to human primary cells, where TSPO expression was tightly associated with the metabolic state of primary adipocytes and the differentiation of primary preadipocytes. These results suggest that TSPO expression is essential to safeguard healthy adipocyte functions, and that TSPO activation in adipocytes improves their metabolic status in regulating glucose homeostasis. Adipocyte TSPO may serve as a pharmacologic target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

  12. Beneficial effects of banana leaves (Musa x paradisiaca on glucose homeostasis: multiple sites of action

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    Virginia D. Kappel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The acute effect of crude extract, n-butanol and aqueous residual fractions of Musa x paradisiaca L., Musaceae, leaves on glycemia, serum insulin secretion and glycogen content in an in vivo approach was evaluated. In addition, the in vitro effect on disaccharidases activity and albumin glycation was studied. The crude extract and fractions, n-butanol and aqueous residual, reduced glycemia and increased liver glycogen content in hyperglycemic rats, inhibited maltase activity and the formation of advanced glycation end-products in vitro. Also, a significant increase in insulin secretion and muscle glycogen content in hyperglycemic rats was observed with oral administration of the n-butanol fraction. Phytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of rutin in crude extract and fractions of M. x paradisiaca leaves as the major compound. These beneficial effects on the regulation of glucose homeostasis observed for M. x paradisiaca leaves and the presence of rutin as the major compound indicate potential anti-diabetic properties, since previous studies have been reported that rutin can modulate glucose homeostasis.

  13. Homeostasis

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    Anna Negroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs form a physiochemical barrier that separates the intestinal lumen from the host’s internal milieu and is critical for electrolyte passage, nutrient absorption, and interaction with commensal microbiota. Moreover, IECs are strongly involved in the intestinal mucosal inflammatory response as well as in mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Cell death in the intestinal barrier is finely controlled, since alterations may lead to severe disorders, including inflammatory diseases. The emerging picture indicates that intestinal epithelial cell death is strictly related to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. This review is focused on previous reports on different forms of cell death in intestinal epithelium.

  14. Deletion of Rab GAP AS160 modifies glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation in primary skeletal muscles and adipocytes and impairs glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansey, Melissa N; Walker, Natalie N; Hargett, Stefan R; Stevens, Joseph R; Keller, Susanna R

    2012-11-15

    Tight control of glucose uptake in skeletal muscles and adipocytes is crucial to glucose homeostasis and is mediated by regulating glucose transporter GLUT4 subcellular distribution. In cultured cells, Rab GAP AS160 controls GLUT4 intracellular retention and release to the cell surface and consequently regulates glucose uptake into cells. To determine AS160 function in GLUT4 trafficking in primary skeletal muscles and adipocytes and investigate its role in glucose homeostasis, we characterized AS160 knockout (AS160(-/-)) mice. We observed increased and normal basal glucose uptake in isolated AS160(-/-) adipocytes and soleus, respectively, while insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was impaired and GLUT4 expression decreased in both. No such abnormalities were found in isolated AS160(-/-) extensor digitorum longus muscles. In plasma membranes isolated from AS160(-/-) adipose tissue and gastrocnemius/quadriceps, relative GLUT4 levels were increased under basal conditions and remained the same after insulin treatment. Concomitantly, relative levels of cell surface-exposed GLUT4, determined with a glucose transporter photoaffinity label, were increased in AS160(-/-) adipocytes and normal in AS160(-/-) soleus under basal conditions. Insulin augmented cell surface-exposed GLUT4 in both. These observations suggest that AS160 is essential for GLUT4 intracellular retention and regulation of glucose uptake in adipocytes and skeletal muscles in which it is normally expressed. In vivo studies revealed impaired insulin tolerance in the presence of normal (male) and impaired (female) glucose tolerance. Concurrently, insulin-elicited increases in glucose disposal were abolished in all AS160(-/-) skeletal muscles and liver but not in AS160(-/-) adipose tissues. This suggests AS160 as a target for differential manipulation of glucose homeostasis.

  15. The pancreatic beta cell is a key site for mediating the effects of leptin on glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Scott D; Wideman, Rhonda D; McDonald, Christine; Unniappan, Suraj; Huynh, Frank; Asadi, Ali; Speck, Madeleine; Webber, Travis; Chua, Streamson C; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2006-10-01

    The hormone leptin plays a crucial role in maintenance of body weight and glucose homeostasis. This occurs through central and peripheral pathways, including regulation of insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cells. To study this further in mice, we disrupted the signaling domain of the leptin receptor gene in beta cells and hypothalamus. These mice develop obesity, fasting hyperinsulinemia, impaired glucose-stimulated insulin release, and glucose intolerance, similar to leptin receptor null mice. However, whereas complete loss of leptin function causes increased food intake, this tissue-specific attenuation of leptin signaling does not alter food intake or satiety responses to leptin. Moreover, unlike other obese models, these mice have reduced fasting blood glucose. These results indicate that leptin regulation of glucose homeostasis extends beyond insulin sensitivity to influence beta cell function, independent of pathways controlling food intake. These data suggest that defects in this adipoinsular axis could contribute to diabetes associated with obesity.

  16. Sex-Related Differences in the Effects of the Mediterranean Diet on Glucose and Insulin Homeostasis

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    Alexandra Bédard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To document sex differences in the impact of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet on glucose/insulin homeostasis and to verify whether these sex-related effects were associated with changes in nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA. Methods. All foods were provided to 38 men and 32 premenopausal women (24–53 y during 4 weeks. Variables were measured during a 180 min OGTT before and after the MedDiet. Results. A sex-by-time interaction for plasma insulin iAUC was found (men: −17.8%, P=0.02; women: +9.4%, P=0.63; P for sex-by-time interaction = 0.005. A sex-by-time interaction was also observed for insulin sensitivity (Cederholm index, P=0.03, for which only men experienced improvements (men: +8.1%, P=0.047; women: −5.9%, P=0.94. No sex difference was observed for glucose and C-peptide responses. Trends toward a decrease in NEFA AUC (P=0.06 and an increase in NEFA suppression rate (P=0.06 were noted, with no sex difference. Changes in NEFA were not associated with change in insulin sensitivity. Conclusions. Results suggest that the more favorable changes in glucose/insulin homeostasis observed in men compared to women in response to the MedDiet are not explained by sex differences in NEFA response. This clinical trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01293344.

  17. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D'Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2015-05-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a "leaky" RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis.

  18. Effects of sodium benzoate, a widely used food preservative, on glucose homeostasis and metabolic profiles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerz, Belinda S; Vafai, Scott B; Delaney, Nigel F; Clish, Clary B; Deik, Amy A; Pierce, Kerry A; Ludwig, David S; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2015-01-01

    Sodium benzoate is a widely used preservative found in many foods and soft drinks. It is metabolized within mitochondria to produce hippurate, which is then cleared by the kidneys. We previously reported that ingestion of sodium benzoate at the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) dose leads to a robust excursion in the plasma hippurate level [1]. Since previous reports demonstrated adverse effects of benzoate and hippurate on glucose homeostasis in cells and in animal models, we hypothesized that benzoate might represent a widespread and underappreciated diabetogenic dietary exposure in humans. Here, we evaluated whether acute exposure to GRAS levels of sodium benzoate alters insulin and glucose homeostasis through a randomized, controlled, cross-over study of 14 overweight subjects. Serial blood samples were collected following an oral glucose challenge, in the presence or absence of sodium benzoate. Outcome measurements included glucose, insulin, glucagon, as well as temporal mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiles. We did not find a statistically significant effect of an acute oral exposure to sodium benzoate on glucose homeostasis. Of the 146 metabolites targeted, four changed significantly in response to benzoate, including the expected rise in benzoate and hippurate. In addition, anthranilic acid, a tryptophan metabolite, exhibited a robust rise, while acetylglycine dropped. Although our study shows that GRAS doses of benzoate do not have an acute, adverse effect on glucose homeostasis, future studies will be necessary to explore the metabolic impact of chronic benzoate exposure.

  19. TDP-43, an ALS linked protein, regulates fat deposition and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Nancy R; Puttaparthi, Krishna; Dowling, Katherine J; Luther, Christina M; Burns, Dennis K; Davis, Kathryn; Elliott, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    The identification of proteins which determine fat and lean body mass composition is critical to better understanding and treating human obesity. TDP-43 is a well-conserved RNA-binding protein known to regulate alternative splicing and recently implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 knockout mice show early embryonic lethality, post-natal conditional knockout mice show weight loss, fat depletion, and rapid death, suggesting an important role for TDP-43 in regulating energy metabolism. Here we report, that over-expression of TDP-43 in transgenic mice can result in a phenotype characterized by increased fat deposition and adipocyte hypertrophy. In addition, TDP-43 over-expression in skeletal muscle results in increased steady state levels of Tbc1d1, a RAB-GTPase activating protein involved in Glucose 4 transporter (Glut4) translocation. Skeletal muscle fibers isolated from TDP-43 transgenic mice show altered Glut4 translocation in response to insulin and impaired insulin mediated glucose uptake. These results indicate that levels of TDP-43 regulate body fat composition and glucose homeostasis in vivo.

  20. TDP-43, an ALS Linked Protein, Regulates Fat Deposition and Glucose Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Nancy R.; Puttaparthi, Krishna; Dowling, Katherine J.; Luther, Christina M.; Burns, Dennis K.; Davis, Kathryn; Elliott, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of proteins which determine fat and lean body mass composition is critical to better understanding and treating human obesity. TDP-43 is a well-conserved RNA-binding protein known to regulate alternative splicing and recently implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 knockout mice show early embryonic lethality, post-natal conditional knockout mice show weight loss, fat depletion, and rapid death, suggesting an important role for TDP-43 in regulating energy metabolism. Here we report, that over-expression of TDP-43 in transgenic mice can result in a phenotype characterized by increased fat deposition and adipocyte hypertrophy. In addition, TDP-43 over-expression in skeletal muscle results in increased steady state levels of Tbc1d1, a RAB-GTPase activating protein involved in Glucose 4 transporter (Glut4) translocation. Skeletal muscle fibers isolated from TDP-43 transgenic mice show altered Glut4 translocation in response to insulin and impaired insulin mediated glucose uptake. These results indicate that levels of TDP-43 regulate body fat composition and glucose homeostasis in vivo. PMID:23967244

  1. TDP-43, an ALS linked protein, regulates fat deposition and glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R Stallings

    Full Text Available The identification of proteins which determine fat and lean body mass composition is critical to better understanding and treating human obesity. TDP-43 is a well-conserved RNA-binding protein known to regulate alternative splicing and recently implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. While TDP-43 knockout mice show early embryonic lethality, post-natal conditional knockout mice show weight loss, fat depletion, and rapid death, suggesting an important role for TDP-43 in regulating energy metabolism. Here we report, that over-expression of TDP-43 in transgenic mice can result in a phenotype characterized by increased fat deposition and adipocyte hypertrophy. In addition, TDP-43 over-expression in skeletal muscle results in increased steady state levels of Tbc1d1, a RAB-GTPase activating protein involved in Glucose 4 transporter (Glut4 translocation. Skeletal muscle fibers isolated from TDP-43 transgenic mice show altered Glut4 translocation in response to insulin and impaired insulin mediated glucose uptake. These results indicate that levels of TDP-43 regulate body fat composition and glucose homeostasis in vivo.

  2. Cigarette smoking and brain regulation of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eChen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is an addictive behaviour, and is the primary cause of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, and cancer (among other diseases. Cigarette smoke contains thousands of components that may affect caloric intake and energy expenditure, although nicotine is the major addictive substance present, and has the best described actions. Nicotine exposure from cigarette smoke can change brain feeding regulation to reduce appetite via both energy homeostatic and reward mechanisms, causing a negative energy state which is characterized by reduced energy intake and increased energy expenditure that are linked to low body weight. These findings have led to the public perception that smoking is associated with weight loss. However, its effects at reducing abdominal fat mass (a predisposing factor for glucose intolerance and insulin resistance are marginal, and its promotion of lean body mass loss in animal studies suggests a limited potential for treatment in obesity. Smoking during pregnancy puts pressure on the mother’s metabolic system and is a significant contributor to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Smoking is a predictor of future risk for respiratory dysfunction, social behavioral problems, cardiovascular disease, obesity and type-2 diabetes. Catch-up growth is normally observed in children exposed to intrauterine smoke, which has been linked to subsequent childhood obesity. Nicotine can have a profound impact on the developing fetal brain, via its ability to rapidly and fully pass the placenta. In animal studies this has been linked with abnormal hypothalamic gene expression of appetite regulators such as downregulation of NPY and POMC in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Maternal smoking or nicotine replacement leads to unhealthy eating habits (such as junk food addiction and other behavioral disorders in the offspring.

  3. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  4. Revisiting “Vegetables” to combat modern epidemic of imbalanced glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Vegetables have been part of human food since prehistoric times and are considered nutritionally necessary and good for health. Vegetables are rich natural resource of biological antioxidants and possess capabilities of maintaining glucose homeostasis. When taken before starch-rich diet, juice also of vegetables such as ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd, chayote and juice of leaves of vegetables such as radish, Indian Dill, ajwain, tropical green amaranth, and bladder dock are reported to arrest significantly the rise in postprandial blood glucose level. Juice of vegetables such as ash gourd, squash gourd, and tropical green amaranth leaves are observed to tone-down sweet-beverages such as sucrose, fructose, and glucose-induced postprandial glycemic excursion. On the other hand, juice of egg-plant and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and palak are reported to augment starch-induced postprandial glycemic excursion; and juice of leaves of Ceylon spinach, Joyweed, and radish supplement to the glucose-induced postprandial glycemia. Vegetables possess multifaceted antihyperglycemic activities such as inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase, inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1β in liver and skeletal muscles, and insulin mimetic and secretagogue activities. Furthermore, they are also reported to influence polyol pathway in favor of reducing development of oxidative stress, and consequently the development of diabetic complications. In the wake of emergence of modern maladaptive diet-induced hyperglycemic epidemic therefore, vegetables may offer cost-effective dietary regimen to control diet-induced glycemic over load and future development of diabetes mellitus. However, for vegetables have been reported to do both, mitigate as well as supplement to the diet-induced postprandial glycemic load, care is required in selection of vegetables when considered as medicament. PMID:24991093

  5. Sensing the fuels: glucose and lipid signaling in the CNS controlling energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sabine D; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is capable of gathering information on the body's nutritional state and it implements appropriate behavioral and metabolic responses to changes in fuel availability. This feedback signaling of peripheral tissues ensures the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The hypothalamus is a primary site of convergence and integration for these nutrient-related feedback signals, which include central and peripheral neuronal inputs as well as hormonal signals. Increasing evidence indicates that glucose and lipids are detected by specialized fuel-sensing neurons that are integrated in these hypothalamic neuronal circuits. The purpose of this review is to outline the current understanding of fuel-sensing mechanisms in the hypothalamus, to integrate the recent findings in this field, and to address the potential role of dysregulation in these pathways in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. The sum of many parts: potential mechanisms for improvement in glucose homeostasis after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim T; Korner, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has emerged as the most durably effective treatment of type 2 diabetes (DM). However, the mechanisms governing improvement in glucose homeostasis have yet to be fully elucidated. In this review we discuss the various types of surgical interventions and the multitude of factors that potentially mediate the effects on glycemia, such as altered delivery of nutrients to the distal ileum, duodenal exclusion, gut hormone changes, bile acid reabsorption, and amino acid metabolism. Accumulating evidence that some of these changes seem to be independent of weight loss questions the rationale of using body mass index as the major indication for surgery in diabetic patients. Understanding the complex mechanisms and interactions underlying improved glycemic control could lead to novel therapeutic targets and would also allow for greater individualization of therapy and optimization of surgical outcomes.

  7. Short and Long-Term Effects of Baccharis articulata on Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio H. Reginatto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the in vivo effect of the crude extract and n-butanol and aqueous residual fractions of Baccharis articulata (Lam. Pers. on serum glucose levels, insulin secretion and liver and muscle glycogen content, as well as in vitro action on serum intestinal disaccharidase activity and albumin glycation were investigated. Oral administration of the extract and fractions reduced glycemia in hyperglycemic rats. Additionally, the n-butanol fraction, which has high flavonoids content, stimulated insulin secretion, exhibiting an insulinogenic index similar to that of glipizide. Also, the n-butanol fraction treatment significantly increased glycogen content in both liver and muscle tissue. In vitro incubation with the crude extract and n-butanol and aqueous residual fractions inhibited maltase activity and the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. Thus, the results demonstrated that B. articulata exhibits a significant antihyperglycemic and insulin-secretagogue role. These effects on the regulation of glucose homeostasis observed for B. articulata indicate potential anti-diabetic properties.

  8. A low-protein diet combined with low-dose endotoxin leads to changes in glucose homeostasis in weanling rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Ackerley, Cameron; Koulajian, Khajag; Zhang, Ling; van Zutphen, Tim; van Dijk, Theo H.; Xiao, Changting; Giacca, Adria; Lewis, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    Severe malnutrition is a leading cause of global childhood mortality, and infection and hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia are commonly present. The etiology behind the changes in glucose homeostasis is poorly understood. Here, we generated an animal model of severe malnutrition with and without low-grad

  9. A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin improves glucose homeostasis and reduces body weight in diet-induced obese rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigh, M; Henriksen, K; Andreassen, K V

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of acute and chronic administration of a novel oral formulation of salmon calcitonin (sCT) on glycaemic control, glucose homeostasis and body weight regulation in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats-an animal model of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes....

  10. Central serotonergic neurons activate and recruit thermogenic brown and beige fat and regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGlashon, Jacob M; Gorecki, Michelle C; Kozlowski, Amanda E;

    2015-01-01

    diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) was selectively expressed in central 5-HT neurons. Treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) eliminated 5-HT neurons and caused loss of thermoregulation, brown adipose tissue (BAT) steatosis, and a >50% decrease in uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) expression in BAT and inguinal white...... glucose and lipid homeostasis, in part through recruitment and metabolic activation of brown and beige adipocytes....

  11. Utero-placental transfer of alternate energy substrates and glucose homeostasis in the newborn pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thulin, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    In the first experiment, three sows in late gestation were infused with (/sup 14/C)..beta..-hydroxybutyrate to evaluate utero-placental transfer of ketones. ..beta..-Hydroxy-butyrate (BOHB) concentrations were low in both the mother and fetus throughout the experiments (0.0189, 0.0197, 0.0054, and 0.0063 mmole/liter blood for UV, UA, FV, and FA, respectively). Radioactive BOHB was detected in fetal blood within two minutes post-injection. Lipid extracts of liver and adipose tissue exhibited the greatest relative incorporation of (/sup 14/C)..beta..-hydroxybutyrate followed by lung and heart tissues (3540, 3674, 1214, and 528 dpm/g wet weight, respectively). In a second study, five gravid gilts during late gestation were used to determine utero-placental transfer of maternal free fatty acids (FFA). Using similar techniques as Exp. 1, injections were given containing (/sup 14/C) linoleic acid and (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid or (/sup 14/C) octanoic acid. In a third experiment, gravid gilts were fed supplemental energy as starch (C), soybean oil (SO) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) during late gestation to determine the influence on colostrum composition and neonatal pig glucose homeostasis. Energy content of colostrum was increased (P = 0.05 by feeding SO and MCT. After a 36 h fast, mean piglet glucose concentrations were higher (P < 0.05) for MCT pigs. Glucose and creatinine levels showed quadratic effects, while FFA and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) exhibited cubic patterns during the fasting period. Although creatine levels were similar, BUN concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) for MCT progeny.

  12. The Role of Gut–brain Axis in Regulating Glucose Metabolism After Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Asrani, Varsha M; Murphy, Rinki; Cutfield, Richard; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes has become an epidemic in developed and developing countries alike, with an increased demand for new efficacious treatments. A large body of pre-clinical evidence suggests that the gut–brain axis may be exploited as a potential therapeutic target for defective glucose homeostasis. This clinical study aimed to investigate a comprehensive panel of glucoregulatory peptides, released by both the gut and brain, in individuals after acute pancreatitis. Methods: Fasting levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glicentin, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and secretin were studied. Modified Poisson and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Pre-determined concentration ranges were used to categorize each peptide into quartiles. Results: A total of 83 individuals were included, of who 30 (36%) developed abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) after acute pancreatitis. In individuals with AGM, the highest quartile of oxyntomodulin differed most significantly from the lowest quartile with a prevalence ratio (PR; 95% confidence interval) of 0.50 (0.21, 1.20; P=0.005); of glicentin with a PR of 0.26 (0.13, 0.54; Pcholecystokinin, ghrelin, and secretin were not significantly associated with AGM. Conclusions: Fasting circulating oxyntomodulin, glicentin, and VIP levels are significantly decreased in patients with defective glucose homeostasis after acute pancreatitis. Oxyntomodulin appears to be a promising therapeutic target for future clinical studies on diabetes associated with diseases of the exocrine pancreas. PMID:28055028

  13. Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, M; Alex, Manju; Mathews, Varghese V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-05-28

    Aspartame is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners globally. Data concerning acute neurotoxicity of aspartame is controversial, and knowledge on its chronic effect is limited. In the current study, we investigated the chronic effects of aspartame on ionic homeostasis and regional monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. Our results showed that aspartame at high dose caused a disturbance in ionic homeostasis and induced apoptosis in the brain. We also investigated the effects of aspartame on brain regional monoamine synthesis, and the results revealed that there was a significant decrease of dopamine in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex and of serotonin in corpus striatum. Moreover, aspartame treatment significantly alters the tyrosine hydroxylase activity and amino acids levels in the brain. Our data suggest that chronic use of aspartame may affect electrolyte homeostasis and monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis dose dependently, and this might have a possible effect on cognitive functions.

  14. Molecules implicated in glucose homeostasis are differentially expressed in the trachea of lean and obese Zucker rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Merigo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the processes mediated by the (T1R2/T1R3 glucose/sugar receptor of gustatory cells in the tongue, and hormones like leptin and ghrelin contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Altered plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin are associated with obesity both in humans and rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the ultrastructure of the mucosa, and the expression of molecules implicated in the regulation of glucose homeostasis (GLUT2, SGLT1, T1R3, ghrelin and its receptor in the trachea of an animal model of obesity (Zucker rats. We found that the tracheal epithelium of obese animals was characterized by the presence of poorly differentiated cells. Ciliated and secretory cells were the cell lineages with greatest loss of differentiation. Severe epithelial alterations were associated with marked deposit of extracellular matrix in the lamina propria. The expression pattern of GLUT2 and SGLT1 glucose transporters was similar in the trachea of both the Zucker rat genotypes, whereas that of T1R3 was reduced in ciliated cells of obese rats. A different immunolocalization for ghrelin was also found in the trachea of obese rats. In conclusion, the tracheal morphological alterations in obese animals seem to compromise the expression of molecules involved in the homeostasis of glucose.

  15. Activin B regulates islet composition and islet mass but not whole body glucose homeostasis or insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, Lara; Brown, Melissa; Ungerleider, Nathan; Muse, Meghan; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the phenotype of the activin-like kinase-7 (ALK7)-null mouse, activins A and B have been proposed to play distinct roles in regulating pancreatic islet function and glucose homeostasis, with activin A acting to enhance islet function and insulin release while activin B antagonizes these actions. We therefore hypothesized that islets from activin B-null (BBKO) mice would have enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, we hypothesized that this enhanced islet function would translate into increased whole body glucose tolerance. We tested these hypotheses by analyzing glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion, and islet function in BBKO mice. No differences were observed in fasting glucose or insulin levels, glucose tolerance, or insulin sensitivity compared with weight-matched young or older males. Similarly, there were no significant differences in insulin secretion comparing islets from WT or BBKO males at either age. However, BBKO islets were more sensitive to activin A, myostatin (MSTN), and follistatin (FST) treatments, so that activin A and FST inhibited and MSTN enhanced glucose stimulated insulin secretion. While mean islet area and the distribution of islet areas were not different between the genotypes, islet mass, islet number, and the proportion of α-cells/islet were significantly reduced in BBKO islets. These results indicate that activin B does not antagonize activin A to influence whole body glucose homeostasis or β-cell function but does influence islet mass and proportion of α-cells/islet. Therefore, loss of activin B signaling alone does not account for the ALK7-null phenotype, but activin B may have important roles in modulating islet mass, islet number, and the cellular composition of islets. PMID:22739106

  16. Glial Hsp70 Protects K+ Homeostasis in the Drosophila Brain during Repetitive Anoxic Depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gary A. B.; Xiao, Chengfeng; Krill, Jennifer L.; Seroude, Laurent; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2011-01-01

    Neural tissue is particularly vulnerable to metabolic stress and loss of ion homeostasis. Repetitive stress generally leads to more permanent dysfunction but the mechanisms underlying this progression are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of energetic compromise in Drosophila by targeting the Na+/K+-ATPase. Acute ouabain treatment of intact flies resulted in subsequent repetitive comas that led to death and were associated with transient loss of K+ homeostasis in the brain. Heat shock pre-conditioned flies were resistant to ouabain treatment. To control the timing of repeated loss of ion homeostasis we subjected flies to repetitive anoxia while recording extracellular [K+] in the brain. We show that targeted expression of the chaperone protein Hsp70 in glial cells delays a permanent loss of ion homeostasis associated with repetitive anoxic stress and suggest that this is a useful model for investigating molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection. PMID:22174942

  17. Glial Hsp70 protects K+ homeostasis in the Drosophila brain during repetitive anoxic depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A B Armstrong

    Full Text Available Neural tissue is particularly vulnerable to metabolic stress and loss of ion homeostasis. Repetitive stress generally leads to more permanent dysfunction but the mechanisms underlying this progression are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of energetic compromise in Drosophila by targeting the Na(+/K(+-ATPase. Acute ouabain treatment of intact flies resulted in subsequent repetitive comas that led to death and were associated with transient loss of K(+ homeostasis in the brain. Heat shock pre-conditioned flies were resistant to ouabain treatment. To control the timing of repeated loss of ion homeostasis we subjected flies to repetitive anoxia while recording extracellular [K(+] in the brain. We show that targeted expression of the chaperone protein Hsp70 in glial cells delays a permanent loss of ion homeostasis associated with repetitive anoxic stress and suggest that this is a useful model for investigating molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection.

  18. The short-chain fatty acid receptor, FFA2, contributes to gestational glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Miles; Priyadarshini, Medha; Gibbons, Sean M; Angueira, Anthony R; Brodsky, Michael; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gilbert, Jack A; Lowe, William L; Layden, Brian T

    2015-11-15

    The structure of the human gastrointestinal microbiota can change during pregnancy, which may influence gestational metabolism; however, a mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we observed that in wild-type (WT) mice the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased during pregnancy. Along with these changes, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are mainly produced through gut microbiota fermentation, significantly changed in both the cecum and peripheral blood throughout gestation in these mice. SCFAs are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as free fatty acid receptor-2 (FFA2), and we have previously demonstrated that the fatty acid receptor-2 gene (Ffar2) expression is higher in pancreatic islets during pregnancy. Using female Ffar2-/- mice, we explored the physiological relevance of signaling through this GPCR and found that Ffar2-deficient female mice developed fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in the setting of impaired insulin secretion compared with WT mice during, but not before, pregnancy. Insulin tolerance tests were similar in Ffar2-/- and WT mice before and during pregnancy. Next, we examined the role of FFA2 in gestational β-cell mass, observing that Ffar2-/- mice had diminished gestational expansion of β-cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, mouse genotype had no significant impact on the composition of the gut microbiome, but did affect the observed SCFA profiles, suggesting a functional difference in the microbiota. Together, these results suggest a potential link between increased Ffar2 expression in islets and the alteration of circulating SCFA levels, possibly explaining how changes in the gut microbiome contribute to gestational glucose homeostasis.

  19. Impact of streptozotocin on altering normal glucose homeostasis during insulin testing in diabetic rats compared to normoglycemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinna NA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nidal A Qinna,1 Adnan A Badwan2 1Department of Pharmacology and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of Petra, 2Research and Innovation Centre, The Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Co. Plc. (JPM, Amman, Jordan Abstract: Streptozotocin (STZ is currently the most used diabetogenic agent in testing insulin and new antidiabetic drugs in animals. Due to the toxic and disruptive nature of STZ on organs, apart from pancreas, involved in preserving the body’s normal glucose homeostasis, this study aims to reassess the action of STZ in inducing different glucose response states in diabetic rats while testing insulin. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats induced with STZ were classified according to their initial blood glucose levels into stages. The effect of randomizing rats in such a manner was investigated for the severity of interrupting normal liver, pancreas, and kidney functions. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of subcutaneously injected insulin in diabetic and nondiabetic rats were compared. Interruption of glucose homeostasis by STZ was challenged by single and repeated administrations of injected insulin and oral glucose to diabetic rats. In diabetic rats with high glucose (451–750 mg/dL, noticeable changes were seen in the liver and kidney functions compared to rats with lower basal glucose levels. Increased serum levels of recombinant human insulin were clearly indicated by a significant increase in the calculated maximum serum concentration and area under the concentration–time curve. Reversion of serum glucose levels to normal levels pre- and postinsulin and oral glucose administrations to STZ diabetic rats were found to be variable. In conclusion, diabetic animals were more responsive to insulin than nondiabetic animals. STZ was capable of inducing different levels of normal glucose homeostasis disruption in rats. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of insulin were

  20. Astrocytic Insulin Signaling Couples Brain Glucose Uptake with Nutrient Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Quarta, Carmelo; Varela, Luis; Gao, Yuanqing; Gruber, Tim; Legutko, Beata; Jastroch, Martin; Johansson, Pia; Ninkovic, Jovica; Yi, Chun-Xia; Le Thuc, Ophelia; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Cai, Weikang; Meyer, Carola W; Pfluger, Paul T; Fernandez, Ana M; Luquet, Serge; Woods, Stephen C; Torres-Alemán, Ignacio; Kahn, C Ronald; Götz, Magdalena; Horvath, Tamas L; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2016-08-11

    We report that astrocytic insulin signaling co-regulates hypothalamic glucose sensing and systemic glucose metabolism. Postnatal ablation of insulin receptors (IRs) in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells affects hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, mitochondrial function, and circuit connectivity. Accordingly, astrocytic IR ablation reduces glucose-induced activation of hypothalamic pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) neurons and impairs physiological responses to changes in glucose availability. Hypothalamus-specific knockout of astrocytic IRs, as well as postnatal ablation by targeting glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST)-expressing cells, replicates such alterations. A normal response to altering directly CNS glucose levels in mice lacking astrocytic IRs indicates a role in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This was confirmed in vivo in GFAP-IR KO mice by using positron emission tomography and glucose monitoring in cerebral spinal fluid. We conclude that insulin signaling in hypothalamic astrocytes co-controls CNS glucose sensing and systemic glucose metabolism via regulation of glucose uptake across the BBB.

  1. Involvement of SIK3 in glucose and lipid homeostasis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Uebi

    Full Text Available Salt-inducible kinase 3 (SIK3, an AMP-activated protein kinase-related kinase, is induced in the murine liver after the consumption of a diet rich in fat, sucrose, and cholesterol. To examine whether SIK3 can modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver, we analyzed phenotypes of SIK3-deficent mice. Sik3(-/- mice have a malnourished the phenotype (i.e., lipodystrophy, hypolipidemia, hypoglycemia, and hyper-insulin sensitivity accompanied by cholestasis and cholelithiasis. The hypoglycemic and hyper-insulin-sensitive phenotypes may be due to reduced energy storage, which is represented by the low expression levels of mRNA for components of the fatty acid synthesis pathways in the liver. The biliary disorders in Sik3(-/- mice are associated with the dysregulation of gene expression programs that respond to nutritional stresses and are probably regulated by nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid plays a role in cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis, wheras ALDH1a which produces retinoic acid, is expressed at low levels in Sik3(-/- mice. Lipid metabolism disorders in Sik3(-/- mice are ameliorated by the treatment with 9-cis-retinoic acid. In conclusion, SIK3 is a novel energy regulator that modulates cholesterol and bile acid metabolism by coupling with retinoid metabolism, and may alter the size of energy storage in mice.

  2. Iron overload alters glucose homeostasis, causes liver steatosis, and increases serum triacylglycerols in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maísa; Silva, Marcelo E; de Paula, Heberth; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of iron overload with a hyperlipidemic diet on the histologic feature of hepatic tissue, the lipid and glycemic serum profiles, and the markers of oxidative damage and stress in a rat model. Twenty-four male Fischer rats, purchased from Experimental Nutrition Laboratory, Federal University of Ouro Preto, were assigned to 4 equal groups, 2 were fed a standard cholesterol-free diet (group C or control and CI or control with iron) containing 8.0% soybean oil and 2 were fed a hyperlipidemic diet (group H or hyperlipidemic and HI or hyperlipidemic with iron) containing 1.0% cholesterol and 25.0% soybean oil. A total of 50 mg of iron was administered to rats in groups CI and HI in 5 equal doses (1 every 3 weeks for a 16-week period) by intraperitoneal injections of 0.1 mL of iron dextran solution (100 g Fe(2+)/L; Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The other rats in groups C and H were treated in a similar manner but with sterile saline (0.1 mL). Irrespective of the diet, iron excess enhanced serum triacylglycerols (P .05) were observed in paraoxonase activities or in serum levels of free or total sulfhydryl radicals, malondialdehyde, or total antioxidants. The findings suggest that iron excess in the rat probably modifies lipid metabolism and, as a consequence, alters glucose homeostasis and increases the level of serum triacylglycerols but not of cholesterol.

  3. Melatonin improves glucose homeostasis and endothelial vascular function in high-fat diet-fed insulin-resistant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Claudio; Dessen, Pierre; Mathieu, Caroline; Monney, Anita; Bloch, Jonathan; Nicod, Pascal; Scherrer, Urs; Duplain, Hervé

    2009-12-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance represent a problem of utmost clinical significance worldwide. Insulin-resistant states are characterized by the inability of insulin to induce proper signal transduction leading to defective glucose uptake in skeletal muscle tissue and impaired insulin-induced vasodilation. In various pathophysiological models, melatonin interacts with crucial molecules of the insulin signaling pathway, but its effects on glucose homeostasis are not known. In a diet-induced mouse model of insulin resistance and normal chow-fed control mice, we sought to assess the effects of an 8-wk oral treatment with melatonin on insulin and glucose tolerance and to understand underlying mechanisms. In high-fat diet-fed mice, but not in normal chow-fed control mice, melatonin significantly improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, as evidenced by a higher rate of glucose infusion to maintain euglycemia during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies and an attenuated hyperglycemic response to an ip glucose challenge. Regarding underlying mechanisms, we found that melatonin restored insulin-induced vasodilation to skeletal muscle, a major site of glucose utilization. This was due, at least in part, to the improvement of insulin signal transduction in the vasculature, as evidenced by increased insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and endoethelial nitric oxide synthase in aortas harvested from melatonin-treated high-fat diet-fed mice. In contrast, melatonin had no effect on the ability of insulin to promote glucose uptake in skeletal muscle tissue in vitro. These data demonstrate for the first time that in a diet-induced rodent model of insulin resistance, melatonin improves glucose homeostasis by restoring the vascular action of insulin.

  4. Characterization of cerebral glucose dynamics in vivo with a four-state conformational model of transport at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, João M N; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-05-01

    Determination of brain glucose transport kinetics in vivo at steady-state typically does not allow distinguishing apparent maximum transport rate (T(max)) from cerebral consumption rate. Using a four-state conformational model of glucose transport, we show that simultaneous dynamic measurement of brain and plasma glucose concentrations provide enough information for independent and reliable determination of the two rates. In addition, although dynamic glucose homeostasis can be described with a reversible Michaelis-Menten model, which is implicit to the large iso-inhibition constant (K(ii)) relative to physiological brain glucose content, we found that the apparent affinity constant (K(t)) was better determined with the four-state conformational model of glucose transport than with any of the other models tested. Furthermore, we confirmed the utility of the present method to determine glucose transport and consumption by analysing the modulation of both glucose transport and consumption by anaesthesia conditions that modify cerebral activity. In particular, deep thiopental anaesthesia caused a significant reduction of both T(max) and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose consumption. In conclusion, dynamic measurement of brain glucose in vivo in function of plasma glucose allows robust determination of both glucose uptake and consumption kinetics.

  5. Changes in Glucose Homeostasis after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery for Obesity at Day Three, Two Months, and One Year after Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkén, Y; Hellström, P M; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2011-01-01

    Context: Endocrine effects of gastric bypass (GBP) surgery for obesity on glucose homeostasis are not fully understood. Main Objective: The main objective of the study was to assess the changes in plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), leptin, somatostatin, glucose...

  6. Dietary fructose aggravates the pathobiology of traumatic brain injury by influencing energy homeostasis and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rahul; Noble, Emily; Vergnes, Laurent; Ying, Zhe; Reue, Karen; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Fructose consumption has been on the rise for the last two decades and is starting to be recognized as being responsible for metabolic diseases. Metabolic disorders pose a particular threat for brain conditions characterized by energy dysfunction, such as traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury patients experience sudden abnormalities in the control of brain metabolism and cognitive function, which may worsen the prospect of brain plasticity and function. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we report that fructose consumption disrupts hippocampal energy homeostasis as evidenced by a decline in functional mitochondria bioenergetics (oxygen consumption rate and cytochrome C oxidase activity) and an aggravation of the effects of traumatic brain injury on molecular systems engaged in cell energy homeostasis (sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha) and synaptic plasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding, synaptophysin signaling). Fructose also worsened the effects of traumatic brain injury on spatial memory, which disruption was associated with a decrease in hippocampal insulin receptor signaling. Additionally, fructose consumption and traumatic brain injury promoted plasma membrane lipid peroxidation, measured by elevated protein and phenotypic expression of 4-hydroxynonenal. These data imply that high fructose consumption exacerbates the pathology of brain trauma by further disrupting energy metabolism and brain plasticity, highlighting the impact of diet on the resilience to neurological disorders.

  7. Impact of low dose prenatal ethanol exposure on glucose homeostasis in Sprague-Dawley rats aged up to eight months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Probyn

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to alcohol prenatally has a myriad of detrimental effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. It is unknown whether chronic low-moderate exposure of alcohol prenatally has similar and lasting effects on the adult offspring's health. Using our recently developed Sprague-Dawley rat model of 6% chronic prenatal ethanol exposure, this study aimed to determine if this modest level of exposure adversely affects glucose homeostasis in male and female offspring aged up to eight months. Plasma glucose concentrations were measured in late fetal and postnatal life. The pancreas of 30 day old offspring was analysed for β-cell mass. Glucose handling and insulin action was measured at four months using an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and insulin challenge, respectively. Body composition and metabolic gene expression were measured at eight months. Despite normoglycaemia in ethanol consuming dams, ethanol-exposed fetuses were hypoglycaemic at embryonic day 20. Ethanol-exposed offspring were normoglycaemic and normoinsulinaemic under basal fasting conditions and had normal pancreatic β-cell mass at postnatal day 30. However, during a glucose tolerance test, male ethanol-exposed offspring were hyperinsulinaemic with increased first phase insulin secretion. Female ethanol-exposed offspring displayed enhanced glucose clearance during an insulin challenge. Body composition and hepatic, muscle and adipose tissue metabolic gene expression levels at eight months were not altered by prenatal ethanol exposure. Low-moderate chronic prenatal ethanol exposure has subtle, sex specific effects on glucose homeostasis in the young adult rat. As aging is associated with glucose dysregulation, further studies will clarify the long lasting effects of prenatal ethanol exposure.

  8. Effect of curcumin supplementation on blood glucose, plasma insulin, and glucose homeostasis related enzyme activities in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kwon-Il; Choi, Myung-Sook; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Yeo, Jiyoung; Jeon, Seon-Min; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of curcumin on insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice and their age-matched lean non-diabetic db/+ mice. Both db/+ and db/db mice were fed with or without curcumin (0.02%, wt/wt) for 6 wks. Curcumin significantly lowered blood glucose and HbA 1c levels, and it suppressed body weight loss in db/db mice. Curcumin improved homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and glucose tolerance, and elevated the plasma insulin level in db/db mice. Hepatic glucokinase activity was significantly higher in the curcumin-supplemented db/db group than in the db/db group, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activities were significantly lower. In db/db mice, curcumin significantly lowered the hepatic activities of fatty acid synthase, beta-oxidation, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme reductase, and acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase. Curcumin significantly lowered plasma free fatty acid, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations and increased the hepatic glycogen and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase in db/db mice. Curcumin normalized erythrocyte and hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, gluthathione peroxidase) in db/db mice that resulted in a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation. However, curcumin showed no effect on the blood glucose, plasma insulin, and glucose regulating enzyme activities in db/+ mice. These results suggest that curcumin seemed to be a potential glucose-lowering agent and antioxidant in type 2 diabetic db/db mice, but had no affect in non-diabetic db/+ mice.

  9. Effects of MDMA on blood glucose levels and brain glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Montenegro, M.L.; Vaquero, J.J.; Garcia-Barreno, P.; Desco, M. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Laboratorio de Imagen, Medicina Experimental, Madrid (Spain); Arango, C. [Hospital General Gregorio Maranon, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Madrid (Spain); Ricaurte, G. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    This study was designed to assess changes in glucose metabolism in rats administered single or repeated doses of MDMA. Two different experiments were performed: (1) A single-dose study with four groups receiving 20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg, saline or heat, and (2) a repeated-dose study with two groups receiving three doses, at intervals of 2 h, of 5 mg/kg or saline. Rats were imaged using a dedicated small-animal PET scanner 1 h after single-dose administration or 7 days after repeated doses. Glucose metabolism was measured in 12 cerebral regions of interest. Rectal temperature and blood glucose were monitored. Peak body temperature was reached 1 h after MDMA administration. Blood glucose levels decreased significantly after MDMA administration. In the single-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism showed hyperactivation in cerebellum and hypo-activation in the hippocampus, amygdala and auditory cortex. In the repeated-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism did not show any significant change at day 7. These results are the first to indicate that MDMA has the potential to produce significant hypoglycaemia. In addition, they show that MDMA alters glucose metabolism in components of the motor, limbic and somatosensory systems acutely but not on a long-term basis. (orig.)

  10. Decreased glucose transporter 1 gene expression and glucose uptake in fetal brain exposed to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Pullen, G.L.; Srivenugopal, K.S.; Yuan Xiaohua; Snyder, A.K. (Veterans Affairs Medical Center, North Chicago, IL (United States) Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Using pregnant rats fed equicaloric liquid diets (AF, ad libitum-fed controls; PF, pair-fed controls; EF, ethanol-fed), the authors have previously shown that maternal alcoholism produces a specific and significant decrease of glucose in the fetal brain, which is accompanied by growth retardation. To further define the mechanisms of ethanol-induced perturbations in fetal fuel supply, they have examined (I) the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) by dissociated brain cells from fetal rats that were exposed to ethanol in utero and (II) the steady-state levels of the glucose transporter-1 (GT-1) mRNA. A 9% decrease in brain weight and a 54.8% reduction in 2-DG uptake into brain cells were found in offspring of EF mothers compared to the AF group. Brain weight correlated with the rate of 2-DG uptake. Northern blot analysis showed a 50% reduction of GT-1 mRNA in EF brain relative to that in the AF and PF groups. They conclude that glucose transport into the brain is an important parameter altered by maternal ethanol ingestion.

  11. Microglia development follows a stepwise program to regulate brain homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Winter, Deborah R; Giladi, Amir; Vargas Aguilar, Stephanie; Spinrad, Amit; Sarrazin, Sandrine; Ben-Yehuda, Hila; David, Eyal; Zelada González, Fabiola; Perrin, Pierre; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Gury, Meital; Lara-Astaiso, David; Thaiss, Christoph A; Cohen, Merav; Bahar Halpern, Keren; Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Lorenzo-Vivas, Erika; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Elinav, Eran; Sieweke, Michael H; Schwartz, Michal; Amit, Ido

    2016-08-19

    Microglia, the resident myeloid cells of the central nervous system, play important roles in life-long brain maintenance and in pathology. Despite their importance, their regulatory dynamics during brain development have not been fully elucidated. Using genome-wide chromatin and expression profiling coupled with single-cell transcriptomic analysis throughout development, we found that microglia undergo three temporal stages of development in synchrony with the brain--early, pre-, and adult microglia--which are under distinct regulatory circuits. Knockout of the gene encoding the adult microglia transcription factor MAFB and environmental perturbations, such as those affecting the microbiome or prenatal immune activation, led to disruption of developmental genes and immune response pathways. Together, our work identifies a stepwise microglia developmental program integrating immune response pathways that may be associated with several neurodevelopmental disorders.

  12. Fisetin improves glucose homeostasis through the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzymes in hepatic tissues of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasath, Gopalan Sriram; Pillai, Subramanian Iyyam; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2014-10-05

    Liver plays a vital role in blood glucose homeostasis. Recent studies have provided considerable evidence that hepatic glucose production (HGP) plays an important role in the development of fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. From this perspective, diminution of HGP has certainly been considered for the treatment of diabetes. In the present study, we have analyzed the modulatory effects of fisetin, a flavonoid of strawberries, on the expression of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in STZ induced experimental diabetic rats. The physiological criterions such as food and fluid intake were regularly monitored. The levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, hemoglobin and glycosylated hemoglobin were analyzed. The mRNA and protein expression levels of gluconeogenic genes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) were determined by immunoblot as well as PCR analysis. Diabetic group of rats showed significant increase in food and water intake when compared with control group of rats. Upon oral administration of fisetin as well as gliclazide to diabetic group of rats, the levels were found to be decreased. Oral administration of fisetin (10 mg/kg body weight) to diabetic rats for 30 days established a significant decline in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels and a significant increase in plasma insulin level. The mRNA and protein expression levels of gluconeogenic genes, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), were decreased in liver tissues upon treatment with fisetin. The results of the present study suggest that fisetin improves glucose homeostasis by direct inhibition of gluconeogenesis in liver.

  13. Mucosal maltase-glucoamylase plays a crucial role in starch digestion and prandial glucose homeostasis of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Buford L; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Robayo-Torres, Claudia C; Ao, Zihua; Hamaker, Bruce R; Butte, Nancy F; Marini, Juan; Jahoor, Farook; Sterchi, Erwin E

    2009-04-01

    Starch is the major source of food glucose and its digestion requires small intestinal alpha-glucosidic activities provided by the 2 soluble amylases and 4 enzymes bound to the mucosal surface of enterocytes. Two of these mucosal activities are associated with sucrase-isomaltase complex, while another 2 are named maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) in mice. Because the role of Mgam in alpha-glucogenic digestion of starch is not well understood, the Mgam gene was ablated in mice to determine its role in the digestion of diets with a high content of normal corn starch (CS) and resulting glucose homeostasis. Four days of unrestricted ingestion of CS increased intestinal alpha-glucosidic activities in wild-type (WT) mice but did not affect the activities of Mgam-null mice. The blood glucose responses to CS ingestion did not differ between null and WT mice; however, insulinemic responses elicited in WT mice by CS consumption were undetectable in null mice. Studies of the metabolic route followed by glucose derived from intestinal digestion of (13)C-labeled and amylase-predigested algal starch performed by gastric infusion showed that, in null mice, the capacity for starch digestion and its contribution to blood glucose was reduced by 40% compared with WT mice. The reduced alpha-glucogenesis of null mice was most probably compensated for by increased hepatic gluconeogenesis, maintaining prandial glucose concentration and total flux at levels comparable to those of WT mice. In conclusion, mucosal alpha-glucogenic activity of Mgam plays a crucial role in the regulation of prandial glucose homeostasis.

  14. Period2 gene mutant mice show compromised insulin-mediated endothelial nitric oxide release and altered glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Miguel Carvas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Period2 (Per2 is an important component of the circadian clock. Mutation of this gene is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and altered glucose metabolism. The aim of this study is to further characterize whole body glucose homeostasis and endothelial NO production in response to insulin in the mPer2Brdm1 mice. We show that mPer2Brdm1 mice exhibit compromised insulin receptor activation and Akt signaling in various tissues including liver, fat, heart, and aortas with a tissue-specific heterogeneous diurnal pattern, and decreased insulin-stimulated endothelial NO release in the aortas in both active and inactive phases of the animals. As compared to wild type mice, the mPer2Brdm1 mice reveal hyperinsulinemia, hypoglycemia with lower fasting hepatic glycogen content and glycogen synthase level, no difference in glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. The mPer2Brdm1 mice do not show increased predisposition to obesity either on normal chow or high fat diet compared to wild type controls. Thus, mice with Per2 gene mutation show altered glucose homeostasis and compromised insulin-stimulated endothelial NO release, independently of obesity.

  15. The Alzheimer's Disease-Related Glucose Metabolic Brain Pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Strijkert, Fijanne; Renken, Remco J.; Izaks, Gerbrand J.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; Segbers, Marcel; Roerdink, Jos B. T. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging of the brain can be used to assist in the differential diagnosis of dementia. Group differences in glucose uptake between patients with dementia and controls are well-known. However, a multivariate analysis technique called scaled subprofile model

  16. Vitamin transport and homeostasis in mammalian brain: focus on Vitamins B and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Reynold; Johanson, Conrad E

    2007-10-01

    With the application of genetic and molecular biology techniques, there has been substantial progress in understanding how vitamins are transferred across the mammalian blood-brain barrier and choroid plexus into brain and CSF and how vitamin homeostasis in brain is achieved. In most cases (with the exception of the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter for biotin, pantothenic acid, and lipoic acid), the vitamins are transported by separate carriers through the blood-brain barrier or choroid plexus. Then the vitamins are accumulated by brain cells by separate, specialized systems. This review focuses on six vitamins (B(1), B(3), B(6), pantothenic acid, biotin, and E) and the newer genetic information including relevant 'knockdown' or 'knockout' models in mice and humans. The overall objective is to integrate this newer information with previous physiological and biochemical observations to achieve a better understanding of vitamin transport and homeostasis in brain. This is especially important in view of the newly described non-cofactor vitamin roles in brain (e.g. of B(1), B(3), B(6), and E) and the potential roles of vitamins in the therapy of brain disorders.

  17. A low-protein diet combined with low-dose endotoxin leads to changes in glucose homeostasis in weanling rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandsma, Robert H J; Ackerley, Cameron; Koulajian, Khajag; Zhang, Ling; van Zutphen, Tim; van Dijk, Theo H; Xiao, Changting; Giacca, Adria; Lewis, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Severe malnutrition is a leading cause of global childhood mortality, and infection and hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia are commonly present. The etiology behind the changes in glucose homeostasis is poorly understood. Here, we generated an animal model of severe malnutrition with and without low-grade inflammation to investigate the effects on glucose homeostasis. Immediately after weaning, rats were fed diets containing 5 [low-protein diet (LP)] or 20% protein [control diet (CTRL)], with or without repeated low-dose intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 2 mg/kg), to mimic inflammation resulting from infections. After 4 wk on the diets, hyperglycemic clamps or euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were performed with infusion of [U-(13)C6]glucose and [2-(13)C]glycerol to assess insulin secretion, action, and hepatic glucose metabolism. In separate studies, pancreatic islets were isolated for further analyses of insulin secretion and islet morphometry. Glucose clearance was reduced significantly by LP feeding alone (16%) and by LP feeding with LPS administration (43.8%) compared with control during the hyperglycemic clamps. This was associated with a strongly reduced insulin secretion in LP-fed rats in vivo as well as ex vivo in islets but signficantly enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity. Gluconeogenesis rates were unaffected by LP feeding, but glycogenolysis was higher after LP feeding. A protein-deficient diet in young rats leads to a susceptibility to low-dose endotoxin-induced impairment in glucose clearance with a decrease in the islet insulin secretory pathway. A protein-deficient diet is associated with enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity but impaired insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glycogenolysis.

  18. Cholesterol homeostasis failure in the brain: implications for synaptic dysfunction and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segatto, Marco; Leboffe, Loris; Trapani, Laura; Pallottini, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the most important molecules in cell physiology because of its involvement in several biological processes: for instance, it determines both physical and biochemical properties of cell membranes and proteins. Disruption to cholesterol homeostasis leads to coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Strong evidence suggests that cholesterol also has a crucial role in the brain as various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson diseases are associated with disruptions to cholesterol homeostasis. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the role cholesterol plays at synaptic junctions and the pathological consequences caused by disruptions in the homeostatic maintenance of this compound.

  19. Ketones and brain development: Implications for correcting deteriorating brain glucose metabolism during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Scott

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain energy metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized mainly by temporo-parietal glucose hypometabolism. This pattern has been widely viewed as a consequence of the disease, i.e. deteriorating neuronal function leading to lower demand for glucose. This review will address deteriorating glucose metabolism as a problem specific to glucose and one that precedes AD. Hence, ketones and medium chain fatty acids (MCFA could be an alternative source of energy for the aging brain that could compensate for low brain glucose uptake. MCFA in the form of dietary medium chain triglycerides (MCT have a long history in clinical nutrition and are widely regarded as safe by government regulatory agencies. The importance of ketones in meeting the high energy and anabolic requirements of the infant brain suggest they may be able to contribute in the same way in the aging brain. Clinical studies suggest that ketogenesis from MCT may be able to bypass the increasing risk of insufficient glucose uptake or metabolism in the aging brain sufficiently to have positive effects on cognition.

  20. The sodium glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitor empagliflozin preserves β-cell mass and restores glucose homeostasis in the male zucker diabetic fatty rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Jelsing, Jacob; Hansen, Carl Frederik; Hansen, Gitte; Vrang, Niels; Mark, Michael; Klein, Thomas; Mayoux, Eric

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by impaired β-cell function associated with progressive reduction of insulin secretion and β-cell mass. Evidently, there is an unmet need for treatments with greater sustainability in β-cell protection and antidiabetic efficacy. Through an insulin and β cell-independent mechanism, empagliflozin, a specific sodium glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor, may potentially provide longer efficacy. This study compared the antidiabetic durability of empagliflozin treatment (10 mg/kg p.o.) against glibenclamide (3 mg/kg p.o.) and liraglutide (0.2 mg/kg s.c.) on deficient glucose homeostasis and β-cell function in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Empagliflozin and liraglutide led to marked improvements in fed glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels, as well as impeding a progressive decline in insulin levels. In contrast, glibenclamide was ineffective. Whereas the effects of liraglutide were less pronounced at week 8 of treatment compared with week 4, those of empagliflozin remained stable throughout the study period. Similarly, empagliflozin improved glucose tolerance and preserved insulin secretion after both 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. These effects were reflected by less reduction in β-cell mass with empagliflozin or liraglutide at week 4, whereas only empagliflozin showed β-cell sparing effects also at week 8. Although this study cannot be used to dissociate the absolute antidiabetic efficacy among the different mechanisms of drug action, the study demonstrates that empagliflozin exerts a more sustained improvement of glucose homeostasis and β-cell protection in the ZDF rat. In comparison with other type 2 diabetic treatments, SGLT-2 inhibitors may through insulin-independent pathways thus enhance durability of β-cell protection and antidiabetic efficacy.

  1. Combined Heart Rate- and Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity Energy Expenditure and Associations With Glucose Homeostasis Markers in a Population at High Risk of Developing Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Louise Smidt; Carstensen, Bendix; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2013-01-01

    energy expenditure (PAEE) with detailed measures of glucose homeostasis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In 1,531 men and women, with low to high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, we measured 7 days of PAEE using a combined accelerometry and heart rate monitor (ActiHeart). Measures and indices of glucose...... homeostasis were derived from a 3-point oral glucose tolerance test in addition to measures of long-term glycemia (glycated hemoglobin A1c and advanced glycation end products). Associations of PAEE with glucose homeostasis markers were examined using linear regression models. RESULTS: Median age (IQR) was 66.......05). CONCLUSIONS: Even in an elderly population with low levels of PA, we found higher objectively measured PAEE levels to be associated with a more beneficial glucose metabolic profile. Although our findings are cross-sectional, they indicate that even without high-intensity exercise, increasing the overall level...

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate reduces calcium accumulation in rat brain endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cells expend large amounts of energy sequestering calcium (Ca2+, while loss of Ca2+ compartmentalization leads to cell damage or death. Upon cell entry, glucose is converted to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P, a parent substrate to several metabolic major pathways, including glycolysis. In several tissues, G6P alters the ability of the endoplasmic reticulum to sequester Ca2+. This led to the hypothesis that G6P regulates Ca2+ accumulation by acting as an endogenous ligand for sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA. Whole brain ER microsomes were pooled from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using radio-isotopic assays, 45Ca2+ accumulation was quantified following incubation with increasing amounts of G6P, in the presence or absence of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA inhibitor. To qualitatively assess SERCA activity, the simultaneous release of inorganic phosphate (Pi coupled with Ca2+ accumulation was quantified. Addition of G6P significantly and decreased Ca2+ accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion (1-10 mM. The reduction in Ca2+ accumulation was not significantly different that seen with addition of thapsigargin. Addition of glucose-1-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, or other glucose metabolic pathway intermediates, had no effect on Ca2+ accumulation. Further, the release of Pi was markedly decreased, indicating G6P-mediated SERCA inhibition as the responsible mechanism for reduced Ca2+ uptake. Simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and G6P did decrease inorganic phosphate in comparison to either treatment alone, which suggests that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, G6P may be a novel, endogenous regulator of SERCA activity. Additionally, pathological conditions observed during disease states that disrupt glucose homeostasis, may be attributable to Ca2+ dystasis caused by altered G6P regulation of SERCA activity

  3. A glucose fuel cell for implantable brain-machine interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin I Rapoport

    Full Text Available We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3.4 μW cm(-2 steady-state power and up to 180 μW cm(-2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, employing semiconductor fabrication techniques, and is therefore well suited for manufacture together with integrated circuits on a single silicon wafer. Thus, it can help enable implantable microelectronic systems with long-lifetime power sources that harvest energy from their surrounds. The fuel reactions are mediated by robust, solid state catalysts. Glucose is oxidized at the nanostructured surface of an activated platinum anode. Oxygen is reduced to water at the surface of a self-assembled network of single-walled carbon nanotubes, embedded in a Nafion film that forms the cathode and is exposed to the biological environment. The catalytic electrodes are separated by a Nafion membrane. The availability of fuel cell reactants, oxygen and glucose, only as a mixture in the physiologic environment, has traditionally posed a design challenge: Net current production requires oxidation and reduction to occur separately and selectively at the anode and cathode, respectively, to prevent electrochemical short circuits. Our fuel cell is configured in a half-open geometry that shields the anode while exposing the cathode, resulting in an oxygen gradient that strongly favors oxygen reduction at the cathode. Glucose reaches the shielded anode by diffusing through the nanotube mesh, which does not catalyze glucose oxidation, and the Nafion layers, which are permeable to small neutral and cationic species. We demonstrate computationally that the natural recirculation of cerebrospinal fluid around the human brain theoretically permits glucose energy harvesting at a rate on the order of at least 1 mW with no adverse physiologic effects. Low-power brain-machine interfaces can thus potentially benefit from having their implanted units

  4. Human monoclonal antibodies against glucagon receptor improve glucose homeostasis by suppression of hepatic glucose output in diet-induced obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook-Dong Kim

    Full Text Available AIM: Glucagon is an essential regulator of hepatic glucose production (HGP, which provides an alternative therapeutic target for managing type 2 diabetes with glucagon antagonists. We studied the effect of a novel human monoclonal antibody against glucagon receptor (GCGR, NPB112, on glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. METHODS: The glucose-lowering efficacy and safety of NPB112 were investigated in DIO mice with human GCGR for 11 weeks, and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study was conducted to measure HGP. RESULTS: Single intraperitoneal injection of NPB112 with 5 mg/kg effectively decreased blood glucose levels in DIO mice for 5 days. A significant reduction in blood glucose was observed in DIO mice treated with NPB112 at a dose ≥5 mg/kg for 6 weeks, and its glucose-lowering effect was dose-dependent. Long-term administration of NPB112 also caused a mild 29% elevation in glucagon level, which was returned to the normal range after discontinuation of treatment. The clamp study showed that DIO mice injected with NPB112 at 5 mg/kg were more insulin sensitive than control mice, indicating amelioration of insulin resistance by treatment with NPB112. DIO mice treated with NPB112 showed a significant improvement in the ability of insulin to suppress HGP, showing a 33% suppression (from 8.3 mg/kg/min to 5.6 mg/kg/min compared to the 2% suppression (from 9.8 mg/kg/min to 9.6 mg/kg/min in control mice. In addition, no hypoglycemia or adverse effect was observed during the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A novel human monoclonal GCGR antibody, NPB112, effectively lowered the glucose level in diabetic animal models with mild and reversible hyperglucagonemia. Suppression of excess HGP with NPB112 may be a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  5. The Action of Antidiabetic Plants of the Canadian James Bay Cree Traditional Pharmacopeia on Key Enzymes of Hepatic Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Nachar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase and glycogen synthase (GS activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK, Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines.

  6. The Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glucose Homeostasis and the Expression of Genes Related to Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jablonska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of selenium supplementation on the expression of genes associated with glucose metabolism in humans, in order to explain the unclear relationship between selenium and the risk of diabetes. For gene expression analysis we used archival samples of cDNA from 76 non-diabetic subjects supplemented with selenium in the previous study. The supplementation period was six weeks and the daily dose of selenium was 200 µg (as selenium yeast. Blood for mRNA isolation was collected at four time points: before supplementation, after two and four weeks of supplementation, and after four weeks of washout. The analysis included 15 genes encoding selected proteins involved in insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. In addition, HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose were measured at three and four time points, respectively. Selenium supplementation was associated with a significantly decreased level of HbA1c but not fasting plasma glucose (FPG and significant down-regulation of seven genes: INSR, ADIPOR1, LDHA, PDHA, PDHB, MYC, and HIF1AN. These results suggest that selenium may affect glycemic control at different levels of regulation, linked to insulin signaling, glycolysis, and pyruvate metabolism. Further research is needed to investigate mechanisms of such transcriptional regulation and its potential implication in direct metabolic effects.

  7. The Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glucose Homeostasis and the Expression of Genes Related to Glucose Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Ewa; Reszka, Edyta; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Wieczorek, Edyta; Krol, Magdalena B.; Raimondi, Sara; Socha, Katarzyna; Borawska, Maria H.; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of selenium supplementation on the expression of genes associated with glucose metabolism in humans, in order to explain the unclear relationship between selenium and the risk of diabetes. For gene expression analysis we used archival samples of cDNA from 76 non-diabetic subjects supplemented with selenium in the previous study. The supplementation period was six weeks and the daily dose of selenium was 200 µg (as selenium yeast). Blood for mRNA isolation was collected at four time points: before supplementation, after two and four weeks of supplementation, and after four weeks of washout. The analysis included 15 genes encoding selected proteins involved in insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. In addition, HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose were measured at three and four time points, respectively. Selenium supplementation was associated with a significantly decreased level of HbA1c but not fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and significant down-regulation of seven genes: INSR, ADIPOR1, LDHA, PDHA, PDHB, MYC, and HIF1AN. These results suggest that selenium may affect glycemic control at different levels of regulation, linked to insulin signaling, glycolysis, and pyruvate metabolism. Further research is needed to investigate mechanisms of such transcriptional regulation and its potential implication in direct metabolic effects. PMID:27983572

  8. The cAMP-HMGA1-RBP4 system: a novel biochemical pathway for modulating glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foti Daniela

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that mice lacking the high mobility group A1 gene (Hmga1-knockout mice developed a type 2-like diabetic phenotype, in which cell-surface insulin receptors were dramatically reduced (below 10% of those in the controls in the major targets of insulin action, and glucose intolerance was associated with increased peripheral insulin sensitivity. This particular phenotype supports the existence of compensatory mechanisms of insulin resistance that promote glucose uptake and disposal in peripheral tissues by either insulin-dependent or insulin-independent mechanisms. We explored the role of these mechanisms in the regulation of glucose homeostasis by studying the Hmga1-knockout mouse model. Also, the hypothesis that increased insulin sensitivity in Hmga1-deficient mice could be related to the deficit of an insulin resistance factor is discussed. Results We first show that HMGA1 is needed for basal and cAMP-induced retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4 gene and protein expression in living cells of both human and mouse origin. Then, by employing the Hmga1-knockout mouse model, we provide evidence for the identification of a novel biochemical pathway involving HMGA1 and the RBP4, whose activation by the cAMP-signaling pathway may play an essential role for maintaining glucose metabolism homeostasis in vivo, in certain adverse metabolic conditions in which insulin action is precluded. In comparative studies of normal and mutant mice, glucagon administration caused a considerable upregulation of HMGA1 and RBP4 expression both at the mRNA and protein level in wild-type animals. Conversely, in Hmga1-knockout mice, basal and glucagon-mediated expression of RBP4 was severely attenuated and correlated inversely with increased Glut4 mRNA and protein abundance in skeletal muscle and fat, in which the activation state of the protein kinase Akt, an important downstream mediator of the metabolic effects of insulin on Glut4

  9. Zinc Status Affects Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen B. Fung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Up to 20% of adult patients with Thalassemia major (Thal live with diabetes, while 30% may be zinc deficient. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between zinc status, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in Thal patients. Charts from thirty subjects (16 male, 27.8 ± 9.1 years with Thal were reviewed. Patients with low serum zinc had significantly lower fasting insulin, insulinogenic and oral disposition indexes (all p < 0.05 and elevated glucose response curve, following a standard 75 g oral load of glucose compared to those with normal serum zinc after controlling for baseline (group × time interaction p = 0.048. Longitudinal data in five patients with a decline in serum zinc over a two year follow up period (−19.0 ± 9.6 μg/dL, showed consistent increases in fasting glucose (3.6 ± 3.2 mg/dL and insulin to glucose ratios at 120 min post glucose dose (p = 0.05. Taken together, these data suggest that the frequently present zinc deficiency in Thal patients is associated with decreased insulin secretion and reduced glucose disposal. Future zinc trials will require modeling of oral glucose tolerance test data and not simply measurement of static indices in order to understand the complexities of pancreatic function in the Thal patient.

  10. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga

    2010-01-01

    Levels of circulating glucose are tightly regulated. To identify new loci influencing glycemic traits, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide association studies informative for fasting glucose, fasting insulin and indices of beta-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in u...

  11. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Dupuis (Josée); C. Langenberg (Claudia); I. Prokopenko (Inga); R. Saxena (Richa); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A.U. Jackson (Anne); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); A.L. Gloyn (Anna); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); R. Mägi (Reedik); A.P. Morris (Andrew); J.C. Randall (Joshua); T. Johnson (Toby); P. Elliott (Paul); D. Rybin (Denis); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); P. Henneman (Peter); H. Grallert (Harald); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J. JanHottenga (Jouke); C.S. Franklin (Christopher); P. Navarro (Pau); K. Song (Kijoung); A. Goel (Anuj); J.R.B. Perry (John); J.M. Egan (Josephine); T. Lajunen (Taina); N. Grarup (Niels); T. Sparsø (Thomas); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); M. Li (Man); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); P. Shrader (Peter); C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); M. Kumari (Meena); L. Qi (Lu); N. Timpson (Nicholas); C. Gieger (Christian); C. Zabena (Carina); G. Rocheleau (Ghislain); E. Ingelsson (Erik); P. An (Ping); J.R. O´Connell; J. Luan; S.A. McCarroll (Steven); F. Payne (Felicity); R.M. Roccasecca; F. Pattou (François); P. Sethupathy (Praveen); K.G. Ardlie (Kristin); Y. Ariyurek (Yavuz); B. Balkau (Beverley); P. Barter (Phil); J.P. Beilby (John); Y. Ben-Shlomo; R. Benediktsson (Rafn); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); M. Bochud (Murielle); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); K. Borch-Johnsen; Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); E. Brunner (Eric); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); Y. der IdaChen (Yii); P.S. Chines (Peter); R. Clarke; L.J. McOin (Lachlan); M.N. Cooper (Matthew); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); G. Crawford (Gabe); L. Crisponi (Laura); I.N.M. Day (Ian); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); J. Delplanque (Jerome); C. Dina (Christian); M.R. Erdos (Michael); A.C. Fedson (Annette); A. Fischer-Rosinsky (Antje); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C.S. Fox (Caroline); R.R. Frants (Rune); M. GraziaFranzosi (Maria); P. Galan (Pilar); M. Goodarzi (Mark); J. Graessler (Jürgen); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); R. Gwilliam (Rhian); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); S. Hadjadj (Samy); G. Hallmans (Göran); N. Hammond (Naomi); X. Han (Xijing); A.-L. Hartikainen (Anna-Liisa); N. Hassanali (Neelam); C. Hayward (Caroline); S.C. Heath (Simon); S. Hercberg (Serge); C. Herder (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); D.R. Hillman (David); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hofman (Albert); J. Hui (Jennie); J. Hung (Judy); B. Isomaa (Bo); T. Jørgensen (Torben); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kaakinen (Marika); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); Y. AnteroKesaniemi; M. Kivimaki (Mika); B. Knight (Beatrice); S. Koskinen (Seppo); P. Kovacs (Peter); K.O. Kyvik (Kirsten Ohm); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); O.L. Bacquer (Olivier); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); R. Mahley (Robert); M. Mangino (Massimo); A.K. Manning (Alisa); M. TeresaMartínez-Larrad (María); J.B. McAteer (Jarred); L.J. McCulloch (Laura); R. McPherson (Ruth); C. Meisinger (Christa); D. Melzer (David); D. Meyre (David); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); M.A. Morken (Mario); S. Mukherjee (Sutapa); S. Naitza (Silvia); N. Narisu (Narisu); M.J. Neville (Matthew); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Orrù (Marco); R. Pakyz (Ruth); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); G. Paolisso (Giuseppe); C. Pattaro (Cristian); D. Pearson (Daniel); J. Peden (John); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); M. Perola (Markus); A.F.H. Pfeiffer (Andreas); I. Pichler (Irene); O. Polasek (Ozren); D. Posthuma (Danielle); S.C. Potter (Simon); A. Pouta (Anneli); M.A. Province (Mike); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); K. Rice (Kenneth); S. Ripatti (Samuli); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); M. Roden (Michael); O. Rolandsson (Olov); A. Sandbaek (Annelli); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); S. Sanna (Serena); A.A. Sayer; P. Scheet (Paul); L.J. Scott (Laura); U. Seedorf (Udo); S.J. Sharp (Stephen); B.M. Shields (Beverley); G. Sigursson (Gunnar); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A. Silveira (Angela); L. Simpson (Laila); A. Singleton (Andrew); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); U. Sovio (Ulla); A.J. Swift (Amy); H. Syddall (Holly); A.-C. Syvänen (Ann-Christine); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); B. Thorand (Barbara); J. Tichet (Jean); A. Tönjes (Anke); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.A.P. Willems van Dijk (Ko); M.V. Hoek; D. Varma (Dhiraj); S. Visvikis-Siest (Sophie); V. Vitart (Veronique); N. Vogelzangs (Nicole); G. Waeber (Gérard); P.J. Wagner (Peter); A. Walley (Andrew); G. BragiWalters; K.L. Ward (Kim); H. Watkins (Hugh); M.N. Weedon (Michael); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.W. GYarnell (John); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); D. Zelenika (Diana); B. Zethelius (Björn); G. Zhai (Guangju); J.H. Zhao; M.C. Zillikens (Carola); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); P. Meneton (Pierre); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); D.M. Nathan (David); G.H. Williams (Gordon); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); K. Silander (Kaisa); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); P. Schwarz (Peter); J. Spranger (Jürgen); F. Karpe (Fredrik); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); G.V. Dedoussis (George); M. Serrano-Ríos (Manuel); L. Lind (Lars); C. Palmer (Cameron); F.B. Hu (Frank); P.W. Franks (Paul); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); M. Marmot (Michael); W.H. Linda Kao; J.S. Pankow (James); M.J. Sampson (Michael); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); T. Hansen (Torben); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T. Illig (Thomas); I. Rudan (Igor); A.F. Wright (Alan); M. Stumvoll (Michael); H. Campbell (Harry); J.F. Wilson (James); R.N. Bergman (Richard); T.A. Buchanan (Thomas); F.S. Collins (Francis); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); T.T. Valle (Timo); D. Altshuler (David); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); D.S. Siscovick (David); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); T.D. Spector (Timothy); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A. Kong (Augustine); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A. Cao (Antonio); A. Scuteri (Angelo); D. Schlessinger (David); M. Uda (Manuela); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); D. Waterworth (Dawn); P. Vollenweider (Peter); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); V. Mooser (Vincent); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); N.J. Wareham (Nick); R. Sladek (Rob); P. Froguel (Philippe); J.B. Meigs (James); L. Groop (Leif); R.M. Watanabe (Richard); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); J.C. Florez (Jose); I. Barroso (Inês)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLevels of circulating glucose are tightly regulated. To identify new loci influencing glycemic traits, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide association studies informative for fasting glucose, fasting insulin and indices of beta-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid homeostasis, brain aging and Alzheimer's disease: Can we reconcile the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphael; Castellano, Christian A; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    A crossroads has been reached on research into docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the one hand, several prospective observational studies now clearly indicate a protective effect of higher fish and DHA intake against risk of AD. On the other hand, once AD is clinically evident, supplementation trials demonstrate essentially no benefit of DHA in AD. Despite apparently low DHA intake in AD, brain DHA levels are frequently the same as in controls, suggesting that low DHA intake results in low plasma DHA but does not necessarily reduce brain DHA in humans. Animal models involving dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency to deplete brain DHA may therefore not be appropriate in AD research. Studies in the healthy elderly suggest that DHA homeostasis changes during aging. Tracer methodology now permits estimation of DHA half-life in the human brain and whole body. Apolipoprotein E alleles have an important impact not only on AD but also on DHA homeostasis in humans. We therefore encourage further development of innovative approaches to the study of DHA metabolism and its role in human brain function. A better understanding of DHA metabolism in humans will hopefully help explain how higher habitual DHA intake protects against the risk of deteriorating cognition during aging and may eventually give rise to a breakthrough in the treatment of AD.

  13. Short-chain fructooligosaccharides do not alter glucose homeostasis but improve the lipid profile in obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Soares da Silva-Morita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of short-chain fructooligosaccharides (scFOS feeding on body weight, fat accumulation, glucose homeostasis and lipid profile in cafeteria (CAF obese rats. Male Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: control group (CTL, n = 10, which received a chow diet and water and CAF (n = 20, which received the cafeteria diet, standard chow and soda. After 30 weeks of diet, 10 animals of CAF group received scFOS in the diet (50 g kg-1 of diet over a period of 50 days, forming the CAF FOS group. Were evaluated the body weight, fat pad as well as, quantity of feces, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance (IR and serum lipids levels. Animals submitted to the CAF diet displayed obesity, hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and IR. The scFOS feeding   not altered obesity, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and IR. CAF rats also presented hypertriglyceridemia and lower levels of HDL-cholesterol. The CAF FOS animals had reduced serum triglycerides (TG and increased HDL-cholesterol. Thus, the use of scFOS in the diet can be considered as a hypolipidemic agent in the obese state.

  14. A whole-body model for glycogen regulation reveals a critical role for substrate cycling in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely, and sometimes rapid, metabolic adaptation to changes in food supply is critical for survival as an organism moves from the fasted to the fed state, and vice versa. These transitions necessitate major metabolic changes to maintain energy homeostasis as the source of blood glucose moves away from ingested carbohydrates, through hepatic glycogen stores, towards gluconeogenesis. The integration of hepatic glycogen regulation with extra-hepatic energetics is a key aspect of these adaptive mechanisms. Here we use computational modeling to explore hepatic glycogen regulation under fed and fasting conditions in the context of a whole-body model. The model was validated against previous experimental results concerning glycogen phosphorylase a (active and glycogen synthase a dynamics. The model qualitatively reproduced physiological changes that occur during transition from the fed to the fasted state. Analysis of the model reveals a critical role for the inhibition of glycogen synthase phosphatase by glycogen phosphorylase a. This negative regulation leads to high levels of glycogen synthase activity during fasting conditions, which in turn increases substrate (futile cycling, priming the system for a rapid response once an external source of glucose is restored. This work demonstrates that a mechanistic understanding of the design principles used by metabolic control circuits to maintain homeostasis can benefit from the incorporation of mathematical descriptions of these networks into "whole-body" contextual models that mimic in vivo conditions.

  15. Priority in selenium homeostasis involves regulation of SepSecS transcription in the chicken brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Long Li

    Full Text Available O-phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS is critical for the biosynthesis and transformation of selenocysteine (Sec and plays an important role in the biological function of Se through the regulation of selenoprotein synthesis. Selenium (Se and Selenoprotein play a pivotal role in brain function. However, how intake of the micronutrient Se affects gene expression and how genetic factors influence Se metabolism in the brain is unknown. To investigate the regulation of SepSecS transcription induced by Se in the chicken brain, we determined the Se content of brain tissue, SepSecS gene expression levels and mRNA stability in the chicken brain and primary cultured chicken embryos neurons receiving Se supplements. These results showed that Se content in the brain remains remarkably stable during Se supplementation. A significant increase in SepSecS mRNA levels was observed in all of the brain tissues of chickens fed diets containing 1-5 mg/kg sodium selenite. Most strikingly, significant changes in SepSecS mRNA levels were not observed in neurons treated with Se. However, Se altered the SepSecS mRNA half-life in cells. These data suggest that Se could regulate SepSecS mRNA stability in the avian brain and that SepSecS plays an important role in Se homeostasis regulation.

  16. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  17. Effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene, on the somatotropic axis and insulin-glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksik, A M; Duong, T; Pliester, N; Asma, G; Popp-Snijders, C; Lips, P

    2001-06-01

    Raloxifene is the first selective estrogen receptor modulator registered for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In addition to direct effects on bone cells, estrogen and raloxifene may act indirectly via changes in hormonal homeostasis. However, the menopause-related decrease in serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and the increase in insulin or glucose are not always reversed by estrogen replacement. Especially orally administered estrogen was reported to decrease serum IGF-I levels. Understanding the effects of estrogens and raloxifene on the GH-IGF axis and insulin-glucose homeostasis are important because of their link to bone metabolism and cardiovascular health. We investigated the effects of raloxifene on the GH-IGF-I axis and insulin-glucose homeostasis in a cross-sectional study in the third year of the Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation trial, a double blind, placebo-controlled, prospective study in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (T-score of -2.5 or less or at least two moderate vertebral fractures). Patients with diabetes mellitus were excluded from this additional study. A fasting blood sample was obtained (0 h), and women received an sc injection of 0.05 mg recombinant human GH (Humatrope)/kg BW. The second blood sample was obtained 24 h later (24 h). GH, IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), insulin, and glucose were measured. Group characteristics were tested by nonparametric ANOVA. The dose-response to raloxifene was tested by linear regression models, with age and body mass as covariates. Seven women were taking placebo, 16 were taking raloxifene (60 mg/day), and 9 were taking raloxifene (120 mg/day). Patients from the 60 mg raloxifene group were the oldest (mean +/- SD, 64.4 +/- 4.2 vs. 69.3 +/- 6.9 and 63.3 +/- 5.9 yr for placebo, 60 mg/day raloxifene, and 120 mg/day raloxifene, respectively; P = 0.05). Compared with placebo users, patients taking raloxifene had higher body mass index (24.7 +/- 1

  18. Differential role of SH2-B and APS in regulating energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghua; Ren, Decheng; Iseki, Masanori; Takaki, Satoshi; Rui, Liangyou

    2006-05-01

    SH2-B and APS, two members of a pleckstrin homology and SH2 domain-containing adaptor family, promote both insulin and leptin signaling in a similar fashion in cultured cells. In addition, APS mediates insulin-stimulated activation of the c-Cbl/CAP/TC10 pathway in cultured adipocytes. Here we characterized genetically modified mice lacking SH2-B, APS, or both to determine the physiological roles of these two proteins in animals. Disruption of the SH2-B gene resulted in obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose intolerance. Conversely, deletion of the APS gene did not alter adiposity, energy balance, and glucose metabolism. Energy intake, energy expenditure, fat content, body weight, and plasma insulin, leptin, glucose, and lipid levels were similar between APS(-/-) and WT littermates fed either normal chow or a high-fat diet. Moreover, deletion of APS failed to alter insulin and glucose tolerance. APS(-/-)/SH2-B(-/-) double knockout mice also developed energy imbalance, obesity, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and glucose intolerance; however, plasma leptin and insulin levels were significantly lower in APS(-/-)/SH2-B(-/-) than in SH2-B(-/-) mice. These results suggest that SH2-B, but not APS, is a key positive regulator of energy and glucose metabolism in mice.

  19. Cocoa-rich diet ameliorates hepatic insulin resistance by modulating insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Martín, María Ángeles; Escrivá, Fernando; Álvarez, Carmen; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2015-07-01

    Insulin resistance is the primary characteristic of type 2 diabetes and results from insulin signaling defects. Cocoa has been shown to exert anti-diabetic effects by lowering glucose levels. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this preventive activity and whether cocoa exerts potential beneficial effects on the insulin signaling pathway in the liver remain largely unknown. Thus, in this study, the potential anti-diabetic properties of cocoa on glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling were evaluated in type 2 diabetic Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats were fed a control or cocoa-rich diet (10%), and Zucker lean animals received the control diet. ZDF rats supplemented with cocoa (ZDF-Co) showed a significant decrease in body weight gain, glucose and insulin levels, as well as an improved glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Cocoa-rich diet further ameliorated the hepatic insulin resistance by abolishing the increased serine-phosphorylated levels of the insulin receptor substrate 1 and preventing the inactivation of the glycogen synthase kinase 3/glycogen synthase pathway in the liver of cocoa-fed ZDF rats. The anti-hyperglycemic effect of cocoa appeared to be at least mediated through the decreased levels of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and increased values of glucokinase and glucose transporter 2 in the liver of ZDF-Co rats. Moreover, cocoa-rich diet suppressed c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 activation caused by insulin resistance. These findings suggest that cocoa has the potential to alleviate both hyperglycemia and hepatic insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic ZDF rats.

  20. Life stage dependent responses to the lampricide, 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), provide insight into glucose homeostasis and metabolism in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Matthew; Birceanu, Oana; Clifford, Alexander M; McClelland, Grant B; Wang, Yuxiang S; Wilkie, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    The primary method of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control in the Great Lakes is the treatment of streams and rivers with the pesticide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), which targets larval sea lamprey. However, less is known about the effects of TFM on other stages of the sea lamprey's complex life cycle. The goal of this study was to determine how TFM affected internal energy stores, metabolites, and ion balance in larval, juvenile (parasitic) and adult sea lamprey. The larvae were more tolerant to TFM than the adults, with a 2-fold higher 12h TFM LC50 and a 1.5-fold higher LC99.9. Acute (3h) exposure of the larvae, parasites and adults to their respective 12h TFM LC99.9 led to marked reductions in glycogen and phosphocreatine in the adult brain, with lesser or no effect in the larvae and parasites. Increased lactate in the brain, at less than the expected stoichiometry, suggested that it was exported to the blood. Kidney glycogen declined after TFM exposure, suggesting that this organ plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. TFM-induced disturbances to ion balance were minimal. In conclusion, TFM perturbs energy metabolism in all major stages of the sea lamprey life cycle in a similar fashion, but the adults appear to be the most sensitive. Thus, the adult stage could be a viable and effective target for TFM treatment, particularly when used in combination with other existing and emerging strategies of sea lamprey control.

  1. Identifiability and online estimation of diagnostic parameters with in the glucose insulin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Claudia; Ament, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    Today, diagnostic decisions about pre-diabetes or diabetes are made using static threshold rules for the measured plasma glucose. In order to develop an alternative diagnostic approach, dynamic models as the Minimal Model may be deployed. We present a novel method to analyze the identifiability of model parameters based on the interpretation of the empirical observability Gramian. This allows a unifying view of both, the observability of the system's states (with dynamics) and the identifiability of the system's parameters (without dynamics). We give an iterative algorithm, in order to find an optimized set of states and parameters to be estimated. For this set, estimation results using an Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) are presented. Two parameters are of special interest for diagnostic purposes: the glucose effectiveness S(G) characterizes the ability of plasma glucose clearance, and the insulin sensitivity S(I) quantifies the impact from the plasma insulin to the interstitial insulin subsystem. Applying the identifiability analysis to the trajectories of the insulin glucose system during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) shows the following result: (1) if only plasma glucose G(t) is measured, plasma insulin I(t) and S(G) can be estimated, but not S(I). (2) If plasma insulin I(t) is captured additionally, identifiability is improved significantly such that up to four model parameters can be estimated including S(I). (3) The situation of the first case can be improved, if a controlled external dosage of insulin is applied. Then, parameters of the insulin subsystem can be identified approximately from measurement of plasma glucose G(t) only.

  2. Rapid, transient drop in brain glucose after intravenous phloretin or 3-0-methyl-D-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldendorf, W H; Crane, P D; Lawner, P M; Braun, L D

    1983-01-01

    Rats were injected intravenously with either phloretin (100 mg/kg) or 3-0-methyl glucose (2 g/kg) to reduce the carrier-mediated flux of glucose into brain. Plasma glucose and brain free glucose (BFG), lactate, and glycogen were measured over a 16 min time course. Injection of these substances caused a rapid drop in BFG to 60% of control at one minute and a minimum (50% of control values) at 4 min., followed by a gradual rise to control levels at 16 min. While plasma glucose fell, and then increased after injection, brain lactate and glycogen content was unaffected. Repeated injections of phloretin eventually caused a drop in brain glycogen; but with either competitor, BFG never fell below 50% of normal values. The i.v. injection of the glucose analog, 3-0-methyl glucose (the less toxic of the two drugs) is proposed as a possible means of cutting off the potentially hazardous supply of blood glucose to the postischemic brain.

  3. Thioredoxin interacting protein is a potential regulator of glucose and energy homeostasis in endogenous Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Sahraoui, Afaf; Scholz, Hanne; Bøyum, Hege; Evang, Johan Arild; Godang, Kristin; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have described bone as an endocrine organ regulating glucose metabolism, with insulin signaling regulating osteocalcin secretion and osteocalcin regulating β cell function. We have previously demonstrated increased bone expression of TXNIP in patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS), and we hypothesized that TXNIP could contribute to the dysregulated glucose metabolism in CS. We studied 33 CS patients and 29 matched controls, with bone biopsies from nine patients, before and after surgical treatment. In vitro, the effect of silencing TXNIP (siTXNIP) in osteoblasts, including its effect on human islet cells, was examined. Our major findings were: (i) The high mRNA levels of TXNIP in bone from CS patients were significantly associated with high levels of glucose and insulin, increased insulin resistance, and decreased insulin sensitivity in these patients. (ii) Silencing TXNIP in osteoblasts enhanced their OC response to insulin and glucose and down-regulated interleukin (IL)-8 levels in these cells. (iii) Conditional media from siTXNIP-treated osteoblasts promoted insulin content and anti-inflammatory responses in human islet cells. We recently demonstrated that the thioredoxin/TXNIP axis may mediate some detrimental effects of glucocorticoid excess on bone tissue in CS. Here we show that alterations in this axis also may affect glucose metabolism in these patients.

  4. Thioredoxin interacting protein is a potential regulator of glucose and energy homeostasis in endogenous Cushing's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tove Lekva

    Full Text Available Recent studies have described bone as an endocrine organ regulating glucose metabolism, with insulin signaling regulating osteocalcin secretion and osteocalcin regulating β cell function. We have previously demonstrated increased bone expression of TXNIP in patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS, and we hypothesized that TXNIP could contribute to the dysregulated glucose metabolism in CS. We studied 33 CS patients and 29 matched controls, with bone biopsies from nine patients, before and after surgical treatment. In vitro, the effect of silencing TXNIP (siTXNIP in osteoblasts, including its effect on human islet cells, was examined. Our major findings were: (i The high mRNA levels of TXNIP in bone from CS patients were significantly associated with high levels of glucose and insulin, increased insulin resistance, and decreased insulin sensitivity in these patients. (ii Silencing TXNIP in osteoblasts enhanced their OC response to insulin and glucose and down-regulated interleukin (IL-8 levels in these cells. (iii Conditional media from siTXNIP-treated osteoblasts promoted insulin content and anti-inflammatory responses in human islet cells. We recently demonstrated that the thioredoxin/TXNIP axis may mediate some detrimental effects of glucocorticoid excess on bone tissue in CS. Here we show that alterations in this axis also may affect glucose metabolism in these patients.

  5. Versatility of the complement system in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and brain homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Franca; De Blasio, Daiana; Zangari, Rosalia; Zanier, Elisa R; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier (BBB) damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain) and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury). This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement cascade.

  6. VERSATILITY OF THE COMPLEMENT SYSTEM IN NEUROINFLAMMATION, NEURODEGENERATION AND BRAIN HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca eOrsini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury. This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement

  7. Glucose is necessary to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis during synaptic activity in cultured glutamatergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2006-01-01

    including vesicular release. The incorporation of 13C label into intracellular lactate, alanine, succinate, glutamate, and aspartate was determined by mass spectrometry. The metabolism of [U-13C]lactate under non-depolarizing conditions was high compared with that of [U-13C]glucose; however, it decreased...... and efflux of glutamate was examined using preloaded D-[3H]aspartate as a glutamate tracer and DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate to inhibit glutamate transporters. The results suggest that glucose is essential to prevent depolarization-induced reversal of the transporter (efflux), whereas vesicular release...

  8. Effect of simvastatin on the expression of farnesoid X receptor in diabetic animal models of altered glucose homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lulu; Huang Xianping; Hu Su; Ma Xiaoli; Wang Shaolian; Pang Shuguang

    2014-01-01

    Background Statin therapy has affected glucose homoeostasis of type 2 diabetes patients,which could be related with bile acids metabolism.Whether bile acid metabolism and the expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR),liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (Srebp)-1c is regulated by hyperglycemia,or whether simvastatin therapy led to higher glucose is related with down-regulated expression of FXR in diabetic rats remained unclear.Methods Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups:normal control rats,insulin resistance rats,diabetic model rats,and the late simvastatin induced diabetic rats.Normal control rats were fed with standard diet,others were fed with high-fat diet.Diabetic model rats were induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ).The late simvastatin induced diabetic rats started simvastatin administration after STZ induced diabetic model rats.Characteristics of fasting blood glucose (FPG),lipid files and total bile acids (TBAs) were measured and the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed after overnight fasting at the eighth weekend.RNA and protein levels of FXR,LXR-α and Srebp-1c were tested by Western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results The insulin resistance rats showed higher glucose,lipid files and lower expression of FXR compared with normal control rats (P >0.05).The diabetic model rats showed significantly higher glucose,lipid files,TBA and lower expression of FXR compared with insulin resistance rats (P <0.05).The late simvastatin induced diabetic rats displayed higher glucose and TBA and lower expression of FXR compared with diabetic model rats (P <0.05).Conclusions Changes in bile acid homeostasis,including the alterations of bile acid levels and bile acid receptors,are either a cause or a consequence of the metabolic disturbances observed during diabetic models.Statin therapy induced hyperglycemia may be

  9. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during carbohydrate ingestion suggest that glucose may regulate HT signaling but are potentially confoun...

  10. Central insulin and leptin-mediated autonomic control of glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largely as a result of rising obesity rates, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is escalating rapidly. Type 2 diabetes results from multi-organ dysfunctional glucose metabolism. Recent publications have highlighted hypothalamic insulin- and adipokine-sensing as a major determinant of peripheral glucos...

  11. Effect of Rebaudioside A, a diterpenoid on glucose homeostasis in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Vengatash babu, Kaliyappan; Ramachandran, Vinayagam

    2012-09-01

    Rebaudioside A (Reb A), a major constituent of Stevia rebaudiana, was recently proposed as an insulinotropic agent. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of Reb A on the activities of hepatic enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in adult male Albino Wistar rats, weighing 180-200 g, by a single intraperitoneal injection at a dose of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight). Diabetic rats showed significant (P<0.05) increase in the levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin and significant (P<0.05) decrease in the levels of plasma insulin and hemoglobin. Activities of gluconeogenic enzymes such as glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were significantly (P<0.05) increased while hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in the liver along with glycogen. Oral treatment with Reb A to diabetic rats significantly (P<0.05) decreased blood glucose and reversed these hepatic carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes in a significant manner. Histopathology changes of pancreas confirmed the protective effects of Reb A in diabetic rats. Thus, the results show that Reb A possesses an antihyperglycemic activity and provide evidence for its traditional usage in the control of diabetes.

  12. Lupanine Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Influencing KATP Channels and Insulin Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Wiedemann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The glucose-lowering effects of lupin seeds involve the combined action of several components. The present study investigates the influence of one of the main quinolizidine alkaloids, lupanine, on pancreatic beta cells and in an animal model of type-2 diabetes mellitus. In vitro studies were performed with insulin-secreting INS-1E cells or islets of C57BL/6 mice. In the in vivo experiments, hyperglycemia was induced in rats by injecting streptozotocin (65 mg/kg body weight. In the presence of 15 mmol/L glucose, insulin secretion was significantly elevated by 0.5 mmol/L lupanine, whereas the alkaloid did not stimulate insulin release with lower glucose concentrations. In islets treated with l-arginine, the potentiating effect of lupanine already occurred at 8 mmol/L glucose. Lupanine increased the expression of the Ins-1 gene. The potentiating effect on secretion was correlated to membrane depolarization and an increase in the frequency of Ca2+ action potentials. Determination of the current through ATP-dependent K+ channels (KATP channels revealed that lupanine directly inhibited the channel. The effect was dose-dependent but, even with a high lupanine concentration of 1 mmol/L or after a prolonged exposure time (12 h, the KATP channel block was incomplete. Oral administration of lupanine did not induce hypoglycemia. By contrast, lupanine improved glycemic control in response to an oral glucose tolerance test in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. In summary, lupanine acts as a positive modulator of insulin release obviously without a risk for hypoglycemic episodes.

  13. The Proton-Activated Receptor GPR4 Modulates Glucose Homeostasis by Increasing Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Giudici

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proton-activated G protein-coupled receptor GPR4 is expressed in many tissues including white adipose tissue. GPR4 is activated by extracellular protons in the physiological pH range (i.e. pH 7.7 - 6.8 and is coupled to the production of cAMP. Methods: We examined mice lacking GPR4 and examined glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in young and aged mice as well as in mice fed with a high fat diet. Expression profiles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in white adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle was assessed. Results: Here we show that mice lacking GPR4 have an improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and increased insulin sensitivity. Insulin levels were comparable but leptin levels were increased in GPR4 KO mice. Gpr4-/- showed altered expression of PPARα, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, and TGF-1β in skeletal muscle, white adipose tissue, and liver. High fat diet abolished the differences in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity between Gpr4+/+ and Gpr4-/- mice. In contrast, in aged mice (12 months old, the positive effect of GPR4 deficiency on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity was maintained. Liver and adipose tissue showed no major differences in the mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory factors between aged mice of both genotypes. Conclusion: Thus, GPR4 deficiency improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The effect may involve an altered balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in insulin target tissues.

  14. Glucose homeostasis in the intensive care: the end of a cycle

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade there has been extensive literature and debate about blood glucose control in adults and children undergoing intensive care. The concept of tight glycaemic management began in adults and subsequently trickled down to paediatric patients. Hyperglycaemia is known to correlate with the degree of organ failure and death. The central question is whether hyperglycaemia is simply a marker of illness severity or a contributory factor in the patient’s illness. This is of fundamental importance in that it determines whether one should intervene or defer insulin treatment. The other issue is whether treatment with insulin is beneficial or harmful in this ICU setting. Possible explanations for the adverse effects of high glucose include pro-inflammatory responses. It was postulated that lethal perfusion injury to vital organs could be reduced by the prevention of hyperglycaemia with insulin. It was clear that randomised trials were needed to determine the best course of action.

  15. Combined effect of terbutaline and betamethasone on glucose homeostasis in preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, K; Ou, C N; Cotton, D B

    1993-01-01

    The short- and long-term effects of simultaneous administration of terbutaline and betamethasone were investigated in 8 gravidas treated for preterm labor. Their plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, C-peptide, lactate and potassium were compared to a control group receiving intravenous magnesium sulfate and betamethasone. The patients on terbutaline therapy had a marked hyperglycemia at 11 h which remained elevated for 48 h. There was a simultaneous rise in plasma insulin and C-peptide, and a fall in plasma glucagon. Lactate levels were markedly elevated. Only 1 of the 8 patients had an abnormal glucose tolerance test at 1 week of therapy. The metabolic changes of control patients were minimal in comparison and there was no lacticacidemia. This suggests that glucocorticoids potentiate the hyperglycemic response of terbutaline.

  16. Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Baar, Emma L; Syed, Faizan A.; Cummings, Nicole E.; Brar, Harpreet K.; Pumper, Cassidy P.; Kimple, Michelle E.; Lamming, Dudley W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA‐approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age‐related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long‐term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age‐related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are larg...

  17. Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Neuman, Joshua C; Baar, Emma L; Syed, Faizan A; Cummings, Nicole E; Brar, Harpreet K; Pumper, Cassidy P; Kimple, Michelle E; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age-related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long-term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are largely mediated by the inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), which is acutely sensitive to rapamycin, many of the negative side effects are mediated by the inhibition of a second mTOR-containing complex, mTORC2, which is much less sensitive to rapamycin. We hypothesized that different rapamycin dosing schedules or the use of FDA-approved rapamycin analogs with different pharmacokinetics might expand the therapeutic window of rapamycin by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Here, we identified an intermittent rapamycin dosing schedule with minimal effects on glucose tolerance, and we find that this schedule has a reduced impact on pyruvate tolerance, fasting glucose and insulin levels, beta cell function, and the immune system compared to daily rapamycin treatment. Further, we find that the FDA-approved rapamycin analogs everolimus and temsirolimus efficiently inhibit mTORC1 while having a reduced impact on glucose and pyruvate tolerance. Our results suggest that many of the negative side effects of rapamycin treatment can be mitigated through intermittent dosing or the use of rapamycin analogs.

  18. Maintenance of Glucose Homeostasis Through Acetylation of the Metabolic Transcriptional Coactivator PGC1-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Ceddia, R.B., William, W.N., Jr., Lima, F.B., Flandin, P., Curi, R., and Giacobino, J.P. (2000). Leptin stimulates uncoupling protein-2 mRNAnc...intake, energy expenditure and physical activity. Since the hypothalamus controls food intake in fed and fasted condi- tions through leptin , insulin...glucose synthesis in the liver and kidney . The coordinated initiation and subsequent maintenance of this remarkable change in fuel utilization is a highly

  19. Soluble CLEC2 Extracellular Domain Improves Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating Liver Kupffer Cell Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinle Wu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The polarization of tissue resident macrophages toward the alternatively activated, anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype is believed to positively impact obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that the soluble form of the extracellular domain (ECD of C-type lectin-like receptor 2, CLEC2, regulates Kupffer cell polarization in the liver and improves glucose and lipid parameters in diabetic animal models. Over-expression of Fc-CLEC2(ECD in mice via in vivo gene delivery, or injection of recombinant Fc-CLEC2(ECD protein, results in a reduction of blood glucose and liver triglyceride levels and improves glucose tolerance. Furthermore, Fc-CLEC2(ECD treatment improves cytokine profiles and increases both the M2 macrophage population and the genes involved in the oxidation of lipid metabolism in the liver. These data reveal a previously unidentified role for CLEC2 as a regulator of macrophage polarity, and establish CLEC2 as a promising therapeutic target for treatment of diabetes and liver disease.

  20. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Jackson, Anne U; Wheeler, Eleanor; Glazer, Nicole L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mägi, Reedik; Morris, Andrew P; Randall, Joshua; Johnson, Toby; Elliott, Paul; Rybin, Denis; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Henneman, Peter; Grallert, Harald; Dehghan, Abbas; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Franklin, Christopher S; Navarro, Pau; Song, Kijoung; Goel, Anuj; Perry, John R B; Egan, Josephine M; Lajunen, Taina; Grarup, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas; Doney, Alex; Voight, Benjamin F; Stringham, Heather M; Li, Man; Kanoni, Stavroula; Shrader, Peter; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Kumari, Meena; Qi, Lu; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gieger, Christian; Zabena, Carina; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Ingelsson, Erik; An, Ping; O’Connell, Jeffrey; Luan, Jian'an; Elliott, Amanda; McCarroll, Steven A; Payne, Felicity; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Pattou, François; Sethupathy, Praveen; Ardlie, Kristin; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Balkau, Beverley; Barter, Philip; Beilby, John P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan J M; Cooper, Matthew N; Cornelis, Marilyn; Crawford, Gabe; Crisponi, Laura; Day, Ian N M; de Geus, Eco; Delplanque, Jerome; Dina, Christian; Erdos, Michael R; Fedson, Annette C; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Frants, Rune; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Galan, Pilar; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Grundy, Scott; Gwilliam, Rhian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hadjadj, Samy; Hallmans, Göran; Hammond, Naomi; Han, Xijing; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon C; Hercberg, Serge; Herder, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hillman, David R; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joe; Isomaa, Bo; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Knight, Beatrice; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Lecoeur, Cécile; Li, Yun; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mahley, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Manning, Alisa K; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; McAteer, Jarred B; McCulloch, Laura J; McPherson, Ruth; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morken, Mario A; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Naitza, Silvia; Narisu, Narisu; Neville, Matthew J; Oostra, Ben A; Orrù, Marco; Pakyz, Ruth; Palmer, Colin N A; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Pattaro, Cristian; Pearson, Daniel; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Pichler, Irene; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Potter, Simon C; Pouta, Anneli; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, Nigel W; Rice, Kenneth; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sandhu, Manjinder; Sanna, Serena; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scheet, Paul; Scott, Laura J; Seedorf, Udo; Sharp, Stephen J; Shields, Beverley; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Erik J G; Silveira, Angela; Simpson, Laila; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Nicholas L; Sovio, Ulla; Swift, Amy; Syddall, Holly; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uitterlinden, André G; van Dijk, Ko Willems; van Hoek, Mandy; Varma, Dhiraj; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Waeber, Gérard; Wagner, Peter J; Walley, Andrew; Walters, G Bragi; Ward, Kim L; Watkins, Hugh; Weedon, Michael N; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Yarnell, John W G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zelenika, Diana; Zethelius, Björn; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zillikens, M Carola; Borecki, Ingrid B; Loos, Ruth J F; Meneton, Pierre; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Nathan, David M; Williams, Gordon H; Hattersley, Andrew T; Silander, Kaisa; Salomaa, Veikko; Smith, George Davey; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Spranger, Joachim; Karpe, Fredrik; Shuldiner, Alan R; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Morris, Andrew D; Lind, Lars; Palmer, Lyle J; Hu, Frank B.; Franks, Paul W; Ebrahim, Shah; Marmot, Michael; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Sampson, Michael J; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Wichmann, H Erich; Illig, Thomas; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Stumvoll, Michael; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Hamsten, Anders; Bergman, Richard N; Buchanan, Thomas A; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Altshuler, David; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David S; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret; Deloukas, Panos; Spector, Timothy D; Frayling, Timothy M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Cao, Antonio; Scuteri, Angelo; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Waterworth, Dawn M; Vollenweider, Peter; Peltonen, Leena; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Wareham, Nicholas J; Sladek, Robert; Froguel, Philippe; Watanabe, Richard M; Meigs, James B; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Florez, Jose C; Barroso, Inês

    2010-01-01

    Circulating glucose levels are tightly regulated. To identify novel glycemic loci, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide associations studies informative for fasting glucose (FG), fasting insulin (FI) and indices of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 non-diabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with FG/HOMA-B and two associated with FI/HOMA-IR. These include nine new FG loci (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and FAM148B) and one influencing FI/HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB/TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify T2D risk loci, as well as loci that elevate FG modestly, but do not cause overt diabetes. PMID:20081858

  1. The nexus of vitamin homeostasis and DNA synthesis and modification in mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Reynold; Johanson, Conrad E

    2014-01-10

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the implications of the 2009 discovery of the sixth deoxyribonucleoside (dN) [5-hydroxymethyldeoxycytidine (hmdC)] in DNA which is the most abundant in neurons. The concurrent discovery of the three ten-eleven translocation enzymes (TET) which not only synthesize but also oxidize hmdC in DNA, prior to glycosylase removal and base excision repair, helps explain many heretofore unexplained phenomena in brain including: 1) the high concentration of ascorbic acid (AA) in neurons since AA is a cofactor for the TET enzymes, 2) the requirement for reduced folates and the dN synthetic enzymes in brain, 3) continued DNA synthesis in non-dividing neurons to repair the dynamic formation/removal of hmdC, and 4) the heretofore unexplained mechanism to remove 5-methyldeoxycytidine, the fifth nucleoside, from DNA. In these processes, we also describe the important role of choroid plexus and CSF in supporting vitamin homeostasis in brain: especially for AA and folates, for hmdC synthesis and removal, and methylated deoxycytidine (mdC) removal from DNA in brain. The nexus linking AA and folates to methylation, hydroxymethylation, and demethylation of DNA is pivotal to understanding not only brain development but also the subsequent function.

  2. Homocysteine homeostasis and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase expression in the brain of hibernating bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijian Zhang

    Full Text Available Elevated homocysteine is an important risk factor that increases cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease morbidity. In mammals, B vitamin supplementation can reduce homocysteine levels. Whether, and how, hibernating mammals, that essentially stop ingesting B vitamins, maintain homocysteine metabolism and avoid cerebrovascular impacts and neurodegeneration remain unclear. Here, we compare homocysteine levels in the brains of torpid bats, active bats and rats to identify the molecules involved in homocysteine homeostasis. We found that homocysteine does not elevate in torpid brains, despite declining vitamin B levels. At low levels of vitamin B6 and B12, we found no change in total expression level of the two main enzymes involved in homocysteine metabolism (methionine synthase and cystathionine β-synthase, but a 1.85-fold increase in the expression of the coenzyme-independent betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT. BHMT expression was observed in the amygdala of basal ganglia and the cerebral cortex where BHMT levels were clearly elevated during torpor. This is the first report of BHMT protein expression in the brain and suggests that BHMT modulates homocysteine in the brains of hibernating bats. BHMT may have a neuroprotective role in the brains of hibernating mammals and further research on this system could expand our biomedical understanding of certain cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease processes.

  3. Bone morphogenetic proteins in inflammation, glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grgurevic, Lovorka; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schulz, Tim J;

    2016-01-01

    Bore morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily, a group of secreted proteins that regulate embryonic development. This review summarizes the effects of BMPs on physiological processes not exclusively linked to the musculoskeletal system....... Specifically, we focus on the involvement of BMPs in inflammatory disorders, e.g. fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, anchylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, we discuss the role of BMPs in the context of vascular disorders, and explore the role of these signalling proteins in iron...... homeostasis (anaemia, hemochromatosis) and oxidative damage. The second and third parts of this review focus on BMPs in the development of metabolic pathologies such as type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The pancreatic beta cells are the sole source of the hormone insulin and BMPs have recently been...

  4. The salutary effects of DHA dietary supplementation on cognition, neuroplasticity, and membrane homeostasis after brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aiguo; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2011-10-01

    The pathology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by the decreased capacity of neurons to metabolize energy and sustain synaptic function, likely resulting in cognitive and emotional disorders. Based on the broad nature of the pathology, we have assessed the potential of the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to counteract the effects of concussive injury on important aspects of neuronal function and cognition. Fluid percussion injury (FPI) or sham injury was performed, and rats were then maintained on a diet high in DHA (1.2% DHA) for 12 days. We found that DHA supplementation, which elevates brain DHA content, normalized levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin I (Syn-1), cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB), and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), and improved learning ability in FPI rats. It is known that BDNF facilitates synaptic transmission and learning ability by modulating Syn-I, CREB, and CaMKII signaling. The DHA diet also counteracted the FPI-reduced manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Sir2 (a NAD+-dependent deacetylase). Given the involvement of SOD and Sir2 in promoting metabolic homeostasis, DHA may help the injured brain by providing resistance to oxidative stress. Furthermore, DHA normalized levels of calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) and syntaxin-3, which may help preserve membrane homeostasis and function after FPI. The overall results emphasize the potential of dietary DHA to counteract broad and fundamental aspects of TBI pathology that may translate into preserved cognitive capacity.

  5. Mitochondrial ferritin in the regulation of brain iron homeostasis and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofen eGao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt is a novel iron-storage protein in mitochondria. Evidences have shown that FtMt is structurally and functionally similar to the cytosolic H-chain ferritin. It protects mitochondria from iron-induced oxidative damage presumably through sequestration of potentially harmful excess free iron. It also participates in the regulation of iron distribution between cytosol and mitochondrial contents. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed H-ferritin, FtMt is mainly expressed in testis and brain, which suggests its tissue-related roles. FtMt is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, as its increased expression has been observed in Alzheimer’s disease, restless legs syndrome and Friedreich’s ataxia. Studies from our laboratory showed that in Alzheimer’s disease, FtMt overexpression attenuated the β-amyloid induced neurotoxicity, which on the other hand increased significantly when FtMt expression was knocked down. It is also found that, by maintaining mitochondrial iron homeostasis, FtMt could prevent 6-hydroxydopamine induced dopaminergic cell damage in Parkinson’s disease. These recent findings on FtMt regarding its functions in regulation of brain iron homeostasis and its protective role in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases are summarized and reviewed.

  6. Effects of a disrupted blood-brain barrier on cholesterol homeostasis in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Ahmed A; Genové, Guillem; Li, Tian; Lütjohann, Dieter; Olin, Maria; Mast, Natalia; Pikuleva, Irina A; Crick, Peter; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William; Betsholtz, Christer; Björkhem, Ingemar

    2014-08-22

    The presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for cholesterol metabolism in the brain, preventing uptake of lipoprotein-bound cholesterol from the circulation. The metabolic consequences of a leaking BBB for cholesterol metabolism have not been studied previously. Here we used a pericyte-deficient mouse model, Pdgfb(ret/ret), shown to have increased permeability of the BBB to a range of low-molecular mass and high-molecular mass tracers. There was a significant accumulation of plant sterols in the brains of the Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. By dietary treatment with 0.3% deuterium-labeled cholesterol, we could demonstrate a significant flux of cholesterol from the circulation into the brains of the mutant mice roughly corresponding to about half of the measured turnover of cholesterol in the brain. We expected the cholesterol flux into the brain to cause a down-regulation of cholesterol synthesis. Instead, cholesterol synthesis was increased by about 60%. The levels of 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC) were significantly reduced in the brains of the pericyte-deficient mice but increased in the circulation. After treatment with 1% cholesterol in diet, the difference in cholesterol synthesis between mutants and controls disappeared. The findings are consistent with increased leakage of 24S-OHC from the brain into the circulation in the pericyte-deficient mice. This oxysterol is an efficient suppressor of cholesterol synthesis, and the results are consistent with a regulatory role of 24S-OHC in the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a defective BBB may lead to increased flux of a lipophilic compound out from the brain. The relevance of the findings for the human situation is discussed.

  7. Astragalus polysaccharide reduces hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and restores glucose homeostasis in a diabetic KKAy mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-qing MAO; Yong WU; Ke WU; Ming LIU; Jing-fang ZHANG; Feng ZOU; Jing-ping OU-YANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To examine the potential effects of Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in vivo and in vitro and its link with hypoglycemia activity, thus establishing the mechanism underlying the hypogly- cemic action of APS. Methods: The obese and type 2 diabetic KKAy mouse model, which is the yellow offspring of the KK mice expressed Ay2 gene (700 mg·kg-12-d-12, 8 weeks) and a high glucose-induced HepG2 cell model (200 μg/mL, 24 h) were treated with APS. The oral glucose tolerance test was measured to reflex insulin sensitivity with the calculated homeostasis model assessment (HOMA- IR) index. XBP1 (Xho1 site-binding protein 1) transcription and splicing, an indica- tor of ER stress, was analyzed by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. The expression and activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), an insulin signaling protein, was measured by Western blotting. Results: APS can alleviate ER stress in cul- tured cells in vivo. The hyperglycemia status, systemic insulin sensitivity, fatty liver disease, and insulin action in the liver of diabetic mice were partly normalized or improved in response to APSadministration. Conclusion: Our results indicate that APS enables insulin-sensitizing and hypoglycemic activity at least in part by enhancing the adaptive capacity of the ER, which can further promote insulin signal transduction. Thus, APS has promising application in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Munc18b Increases Insulin Granule Fusion, Restoring Deficient Insulin Secretion in Type-2 Diabetes Human and Goto-Kakizaki Rat Islets with Improvement in Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairan Qin

    2017-02-01

    Infusion of Ad-Munc18b into GK rat pancreas led to sustained improvement in glucose homeostasis. However, Munc18b overexpression in normal islets increased only newcomer SG fusion. Therefore, Munc18b could potentially be deployed in human T2D to rescue the deficient GSIS.

  9. Glucose homeostasis and metabolic adaptation in the pregnant and lactating sheep are affected by the level of nutrition previously provided during her late fetal life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Sanne Munch; Nielsen, Mette Benedicte Olaf; Blache, D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether undernutrition (UN) during late fetal life can programme the subsequent adult life adaptation of glucose homeostasis and metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. Twenty-four primiparous experimental ewes were used. Twelve had been exposed to a prenatal NORM level...

  10. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Haissaguerre, Magalie; Ruz-Maldonado, Inmaculada; Lhamyani, Said; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tabarin, Antoine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight), which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases.

  11. Alteration of brain insulin and leptin signaling promotes energy homeostasis impairment and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taouis Mohammed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS controls vital functions, by efficiently coordinating peripheral and central cascades of signals and networks in a coordinated manner. Historically, the brain was considered to be an insulin-insensitive tissue. But, new findings demonstrating that insulin is present in different regions of themammalian brain, in particular the hypothalamus and the hippocampus. Insulin acts through specific receptors and dialogues with numerous peptides, neurotransmitters and adipokines such as leptin. The cross-talk between leptin and insulin signaling pathways at the hypothalamic level is clearly involved in the control of energy homeostasis. Both hormones are anorexigenic through their action on hypothalamic arcuate nucleus by inducing the expression of anorexigenic neuropetides such as POMC (pro-opiomelanocortin, the precursor of aMSH and reducing the expression of orexigenic neuropeptide such as NPY (Neuropeptide Y. Central defect of insulin and leptin signaling predispose to obesity (leptin-resistant state and type-2 diabetes (insulin resistant state. Obesity and type-2 diabetes are associated to deep alterations in energy homeostasis control but also to other alterations of CNS functions as the predisposition to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by distinct hallmarks within the brain. Postmortem observation of AD brains showed the presence of parenchymal plaques due to the accumulation of the amyloid beta (AB peptide and neurofibrillary tangles. These accumulations result from the hyperphosphorylation of tau (a mictrotubule-interacting protein. Both insulin and leptin have been described to modulate tau phosphorylation and therefore in leptin and insulin resistant states may contribute to AD. The concentrations of leptin and insulin cerebrospinal fluid are decreased type2 diabetes and obese patients. In addition, the concentration of insulin in the

  12. Role of myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK in glucose homeostasis and muscle insulin action.

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    Esther Llagostera

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1 is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-unstranslated region of the DMPK gene, which encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. One of the common clinical features of DM1 patients is insulin resistance, which has been associated with a pathogenic effect of the repeat expansions. Here we show that DMPK itself is a positive modulator of insulin action. DMPK-deficient (dmpk-/- mice exhibit impaired insulin signaling in muscle tissues but not in adipocytes and liver, tissues in which DMPK is not expressed. Dmpk-/- mice display metabolic derangements such as abnormal glucose tolerance, reduced glucose uptake and impaired insulin-dependent GLUT4 trafficking in muscle. Using DMPK mutants, we show that DMPK is required for a correct intracellular trafficking of insulin and IGF-1 receptors, providing a mechanism to explain the molecular and metabolic phenotype of dmpk-/- mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that reduced DMPK expression may directly influence the onset of insulin-resistance in DM1 patients and point to dmpk as a new candidate gene for susceptibility to type 2-diabetes.

  13. Role of FGF19 induced FGFR4 activation in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2009-12-09

    FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 form a unique subfamily of fibroblast growth factors. Because they contain intra-molecular disulfide bonds and show reduced affinity toward heparan sulfate located in the extracellular space, it is thought that, in contrast to other FGFs, they function as endocrine hormones. FGF23 and its co-receptor alphaKlotho are involved in the control of aging, but it is not known if the same holds true for FGF19, which can also signal through alphaKlotho. However, considerable evidence supports a role for FGF19 in controlling various aspects of metabolism. We have recently fully characterized FGF19/FGFR/co-factor interactions and signaling, and in the current manuscript discuss the contribution of the FGF19/FGFR4 axis to bile acid and glucose regulation.

  14. Plasma metabolomic profiles reflective of glucose homeostasis in non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic obese African-American women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Fiehn

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance progressing to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is marked by a broad perturbation of macronutrient intermediary metabolism. Understanding the biochemical networks that underlie metabolic homeostasis and how they associate with insulin action will help unravel diabetes etiology and should foster discovery of new biomarkers of disease risk and severity. We examined differences in plasma concentrations of >350 metabolites in fasted obese T2DM vs. obese non-diabetic African-American women, and utilized principal components analysis to identify 158 metabolite components that strongly correlated with fasting HbA1c over a broad range of the latter (r = -0.631; p<0.0001. In addition to many unidentified small molecules, specific metabolites that were increased significantly in T2DM subjects included certain amino acids and their derivatives (i.e., leucine, 2-ketoisocaproate, valine, cystine, histidine, 2-hydroxybutanoate, long-chain fatty acids, and carbohydrate derivatives. Leucine and valine concentrations rose with increasing HbA1c, and significantly correlated with plasma acetylcarnitine concentrations. It is hypothesized that this reflects a close link between abnormalities in glucose homeostasis, amino acid catabolism, and efficiency of fuel combustion in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. It is speculated that a mechanism for potential TCA cycle inefficiency concurrent with insulin resistance is "anaplerotic stress" emanating from reduced amino acid-derived carbon flux to TCA cycle intermediates, which if coupled to perturbation in cataplerosis would lead to net reduction in TCA cycle capacity relative to fuel delivery.

  15. Effects of 2 Months Aerobic Exercis on Glucose Homeostasis Index and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rashidlamir

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cause of many metabolic diseases is a progressive increase in fasting insulin levels that is generally associated with inflammatory status. In such conditions, circulating resistin hormonal levels and CRP levels also increase. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of 2 months aerobic training on insulin resistance and inflammatory markers. Methods: In the study, 30 middle aged healthy men volunteered (Age=38.56±4.77, BMI=25.14±2.16 to participate and based on their body fat percentage were assigned in two equal groups. Experimental group was asked to perform 2 months of aerobic exercise, 4 sessions a week with 60-80% maximum heart rate, while the control group was sedentary during the same period. Blood samples were collected 48 hours before the first session and 48 hours after the last session under similar conditions. Results: Plasma insulin (p≤0.001 and glucose (p≤0.001 levels decreased and consequently insulin resistance index also decreased (p≤0.001 in the experimental group as compared to controls. Also, resistin concentrations increased (p≤0.001, while CRP concentrations decreased (p≤0.001, respectively in the experimental group. Conclusion: In general, it can be concluded that regular aerobic exercise due to improved insulin resistance and plasma levels of two inflammatory markers (CRP and the resistin reduces risk factors of metabolic disease and atherosclerosis and can be used as an effective strategy to prevent such diseases.

  16. Neuronal Rap1 Regulates Energy Balance, Glucose Homeostasis, and Leptin Actions

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    Kentaro Kaneko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contributes to obesity and metabolic disease; however, the underlying neurobiological pathways remain to be fully established. Here, we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is expressed in multiple hypothalamic nuclei that control whole-body metabolism and is activated in high-fat diet (HFD-induced obesity. Genetic ablation of CNS Rap1 protects mice from dietary obesity, glucose imbalance, and insulin resistance in the periphery and from HFD-induced neuropathological changes in the hypothalamus, including diminished cellular leptin sensitivity and increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of CNS Rap1 signaling normalizes hypothalamic ER stress and inflammation, improves cellular leptin sensitivity, and reduces body weight in mice with dietary obesity. We also demonstrate that Rap1 mediates leptin resistance via interplay with ER stress. Thus, neuronal Rap1 critically regulates leptin sensitivity and mediates HFD-induced obesity and hypothalamic pathology and may represent a potential therapeutic target for obesity treatment.

  17. Calbindin-D9k Ablation Disrupt Glucose/Pancreatic Insulin Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Changhwan; Lee, Dongoh; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Yang, Hyun; An, Beum-Soo

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that cellular Ca2+ signals activate hormone secretion. In pancreatic β cells, which produce insulin, Ca2+ signals have been known to contribute to insulin secretion. Prior to this study, we confirmed that insulin-secreting β cells express CaBP-9k, and assumed that CaBP-9k play a role in β cell insulin synthesis or secretion. Using CaBP-9k knock out (KO) mice, we demonstrated that ablation of CaBP-9k causes reducing insulin secretion and increasing serum glucose. To compare the role of CaBP-9k with pathophysiological conditions, we exposed wild-type and CaBP-9k KO mice to hypoxic conditions for 10 days. Hypoxia induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, increasing both insulin signaling and insulin resistance. By exposing hypoxia, CaBP-9k KO mice showed an increased level of ER stress marker protein relative to wild type mice. Without hypoxic conditions, CaBP-9K ablation regulates calcium channels and causes ER stress in a CaBP-9K specific manner. Ablation of CaBP-9k also showed decreased levels of sulfonylurea receptor1 (SUR1) and inward-rectifier potassium ion channel 6.2 (Kir6.2), which are insulin secretion marker genes. Overall, the results of the present study demonstrated that CaBP-9k regulates synthesis of insulin and is part of the insulin-secreting calcium signaling. PMID:27736926

  18. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  19. Regulation of calpain activity in rat brain with altered Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averna, Monica; Stifanese, Roberto; De Tullio, Roberta; Passalacqua, Mario; Defranchi, Enrico; Salamino, Franca; Melloni, Edon; Pontremoli, Sandro

    2007-01-26

    Activation of calpain occurs as an early event in correlation with an increase in [Ca2+]i induced in rat brain upon treatment with a high salt diet for a prolonged period of time. The resulting sequential events have been monitored in the brain of normal and hypertensive rats of the Milan strain, diverging for a constitutive alteration in the level of [Ca2+]i found to be present in nerve cells of hypertensive animals. After 2 weeks of treatment, the levels of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase and of native calpastatin are profoundly decreased. These degradative processes, more pronounced in the brain of hypertensive rats, are progressively and efficiently compensated in the brain of both rat strains by different incoming mechanisms. Along with calpastatin degradation, 15-kDa still-active inhibitory fragments are accumulated, capable of efficiently replacing the loss of native inhibitor molecules. A partial return to a more efficient control of Ca2+ homeostasis occurs in parallel, assured by an early increase in the expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of calpastatin, both producing, after 12 weeks of a high salt (sodium) diet, the restoration of almost original levels of the Ca2+ pump and of significant amounts of native inhibitor molecules. Thus, conservative calpastatin fragmentation, associated with an increased expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of the calpain natural inhibitor, has been demonstrated to occur in vivo in rat brain. This represents a sequential adaptive response capable of overcoming the effects of calpain activation induced by a moderate long term elevation of [Ca2+]i.

  20. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Is Related to Protein Signaling Involved in Glucose Homeostasis in a Tissue-Specific Manner

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    Lewan Parker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has been suggested to play a role in glucose metabolism. However, previous findings are contradictory and mechanistic pathways remain unclear. We examined the relationship between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD, insulin sensitivity, and insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Seventeen healthy adults (Body mass index: 26 ± 4; Age: 30 ± 12 years underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and resting skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies. In this cohort, the plasma 25(OHD concentration was not associated with insulin sensitivity (r = 0.19, p = 0.56. However, higher plasma 25(OHD concentrations correlated with lower phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 αSer21 and βSer9 in skeletal muscle (r = −0.66, p = 0.015 and r = −0.53, p = 0.06, respectively and higher GSK-3 αSer21 and βSer9 phosphorylation in adipose tissue (r = 0.82, p < 0.01 and r = 0.62, p = 0.042, respectively. Furthermore, higher plasma 25(OHD concentrations were associated with greater phosphorylation of both protein kinase-B (AktSer473 (r = 0.78, p < 0.001 and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1Ser312 (r = 0.71, p = 0.01 in adipose tissue. No associations were found between plasma 25(OHD concentration and IRS-1Tyr612 phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The divergent findings between muscle and adipose tissue with regard to the association between 25(OHD and insulin signaling proteins may suggest a tissue-specific interaction with varying effects on glucose homeostasis. Further research is required to elucidate the physiological relevance of 25(OHD in each tissue.

  1. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  2. Effect of Maternal Factors and Fetomaternal Glucose Homeostasis on Birth Weight and Postnatal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbörü Aşkan, Öykü; Bozaykut, Abdülkadir; Sezer, Rabia Gönül; Güran, Tülay; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: It is important to identify the possible risk factors for the occurrence of large for gestational age (LGA) in newborns and to determine the effect of birth weight and metabolic parameters on subsequent growth. We aimed to determine the effects of maternal weight, weight gain during pregnancy, maternal hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), C-peptide and insulin as well as cord C-peptide and insulin levels on birth weight and postnatal growth during the first two years of life. Methods: Healthy, non-diabetic mothers and term singleton newborns were included in this prospective case-control cohort study. Fasting maternal glucose, HbA1c, C-peptide and insulin levels were studied. Cord blood was analyzed for C-peptide and insulin. At birth, newborns were divided into two groups according to birth size: LGA and appropriate for GA (AGA). Infants were followed at six-month intervals for two years and their length and weight were recorded. Results: Forty LGA and 43 AGA infants were included in the study. Birth weight standard deviation score (SDS) was positively correlated with maternal body mass index (BMI) before delivery (r=0.2, p=0.04) and with weight gain during pregnancy (r=0.2, p=0.04). In multivariate analyses, the strongest association with macrosomia was a maternal C-peptide level >3.85 ng/mL (OR=20). Although the LGA group showed decreased growth by the 6-month of follow-up, the differences between the LGA and AGA groups in weight and length SDS persisted over the 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion: The control of maternal BMI and prevention of overt weight gain during pregnancy may prevent excessive birth weight. The effect of the in utero metabolic environment on the weight and length SDS of infants born LGA persists until at least two years of age. PMID:26831549

  3. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  4. The Hijacking of Cellular Signaling and the Diabetes Epidemic: Mechanisms of Environmental Disruption of Insulin Action and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Sargis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The burgeoning epidemic of metabolic disease causes significant societal and individual morbidity and threatens the stability of health care systems around the globe. Efforts to understand the factors that contribute to metabolic derangements are critical for reversing these troubling trends. While excess caloric consumption and physical inactivity superimposed on a susceptible genetic background are central drivers of this crisis, these factors alone fail to fully account for the magnitude and rapidity with which metabolic diseases have increased in prevalence worldwide. Recent epidemiological evidence implicates endocrine disrupting chemicals in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. These compounds represent a diverse array of chemicals to which humans are exposed via multiple routes in adulthood and during development. Furthermore, a growing ensemble of animal- and cell-based studies provides preclinical evidence supporting the hypothesis that environmental contaminants contribute to the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Herein are reviewed studies linking specific endocrine disruptors to impairments in glucose homeostasis as well as tying these compounds to disturbances in insulin secretion and impairments in insulin signal transduction. While the data remains somewhat incomplete, the current body of evidence supports the hypothesis that our chemically polluted environment may play a contributing role in the current metabolic crisis.

  5. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman’s rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region) with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1). Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding. PMID:27171423

  6. Role of the P-Type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B in brain copper homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telianidis, Jonathon; Hung, Ya Hui; Materia, Stephanie; Fontaine, Sharon La

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades there have been significant advances in our understanding of copper homeostasis and the pathological consequences of copper dysregulation. Cumulative evidence is revealing a complex regulatory network of proteins and pathways that maintain copper homeostasis. The recognition of copper dysregulation as a key pathological feature in prominent neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and prion diseases has led to increased research focus on the mechanisms controlling copper homeostasis in the brain. The copper-transporting P-type ATPases (copper-ATPases), ATP7A and ATP7B, are critical components of the copper regulatory network. Our understanding of the biochemistry and cell biology of these complex proteins has grown significantly since their discovery in 1993. They are large polytopic transmembrane proteins with six copper-binding motifs within the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, eight transmembrane domains, and highly conserved catalytic domains. These proteins catalyze ATP-dependent copper transport across cell membranes for the metallation of many essential cuproenzymes, as well as for the removal of excess cellular copper to prevent copper toxicity. A key functional aspect of these copper transporters is their copper-responsive trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the cell periphery. ATP7A- and ATP7B-deficiency, due to genetic mutation, underlie the inherited copper transport disorders, Menkes and Wilson diseases, respectively. Their importance in maintaining brain copper homeostasis is underscored by the severe neuropathological deficits in these disorders. Herein we will review and update our current knowledge of these copper transporters in the brain and the central nervous system, their distribution and regulation, their role in normal brain copper homeostasis, and how their absence or dysfunction contributes to disturbances in copper homeostasis and neurodegeneration.

  7. Role of the P-Type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B in brain copper homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon eTelianidis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades there have been significant advances in our understanding of copper homeostasis and the pathological consequences of copper dysregulation. Cumulative evidence is revealing a complex regulatory network of proteins and pathways that maintain copper homeostasis. The recognition of copper dysregulation as a key pathological feature in prominent neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases has led to increased research focus on the mechanisms controlling copper homeostasis in the brain. The copper-transporting P-Type ATPases (copper-ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, are critical components of the copper regulatory network. Our understanding of the biochemistry and cell biology of these complex proteins has grown significantly since their discovery in 1993. They are large polytopic transmembrane proteins with six copper-binding motifs within the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, eight transmembrane domains and highly conserved catalytic domains. These proteins catalyze ATP-dependent copper transport across cell membranes for the metallation of many essential cuproenzymes, as well as for the removal of excess cellular copper to prevent copper toxicity. A key functional aspect of these copper transporters is their copper-responsive trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the cell periphery. ATP7A- and ATP7B-deficiency, due to genetic mutation, underlie the inherited copper transport disorders, Menkes and Wilson diseases, respectively. Their importance in maintaining brain copper homeostasis is underscored by the severe neuropathological deficits in these disorders. Herein we will review and update our current knowledge of these copper transporters in the brain and the central nervous system, their distribution and regulation, their role in normal brain copper homeostasis and how their absence or dysfunction contributes to disturbances in copper homeostasis and neurodegeneration.

  8. Drosophila Vps13 Is Required for Protein Homeostasis in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Jan J.; Lahaye, Liza L.; Kanon, Bart; van der Zwaag, Marianne; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio; Freire, Raimundo; van IJzendoorn, Sven C.; Grzeschik, Nicola A.; Sibon, Ody C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Chorea-Acanthocytosis is a rare, neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of locomotor and cognitive function. It is caused by loss of function mutations in the Vacuolar Protein Sorting 13A (VPS13A) gene, which is conserved from yeast to human. The consequences of VPS13A dysfunction in the nervous system are still largely unspecified. In order to study the consequences of VPS13A protein dysfunction in the ageing central nervous system we characterized a Drosophila melanogaster Vps13 mutant line. The Drosophila Vps13 gene encoded a protein of similar size as human VPS13A. Our data suggest that Vps13 is a peripheral membrane protein located to endosomal membranes and enriched in the fly head. Vps13 mutant flies showed a shortened life span and age associated neurodegeneration. Vps13 mutant flies were sensitive to proteotoxic stress and accumulated ubiquitylated proteins. Levels of Ref(2)P, the Drosophila orthologue of p62, were increased and protein aggregates accumulated in the central nervous system. Overexpression of the human Vps13A protein in the mutant flies partly rescued apparent phenotypes. This suggests a functional conservation of human VPS13A and Drosophila Vps13. Our results demonstrate that Vps13 is essential to maintain protein homeostasis in the larval and adult Drosophila brain. Drosophila Vps13 mutants are suitable to investigate the function of Vps13 in the brain, to identify genetic enhancers and suppressors and to screen for potential therapeutic targets for Chorea-Acanthocytosis. PMID:28107480

  9. Glutathione in Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Biology and Pathobiology: Implications for Brain Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrity of the vascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is central to cerebrovascular homeostasis. Given the function of the BBB as a physical and metabolic barrier that buffers the systemic environment, oxidative damage to the endothelial monolayer will have significant deleterious impact on the metabolic, immunological, and neurological functions of the brain. Glutathione (GSH is a ubiquitous major thiol within mammalian cells that plays important roles in antioxidant defense, oxidation-reduction reactions in metabolic pathways, and redox signaling. The existence of distinct GSH pools within the subcellular organelles supports an elegant mode for independent redox regulation of metabolic processes, including those that control cell fate. GSH-dependent homeostatic control of neurovascular function is relatively unexplored. Significantly, GSH regulation of two aspects of endothelial function is paramount to barrier preservation, namely, GSH protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury and GSH control of postdamage cell proliferation in endothelial repair and/or wound healing. This paper highlights our current insights and hypotheses into the role of GSH in cerebral microvascular biology and pathobiology with special focus on endothelial GSH and vascular integrity, oxidative disruption of endothelial barrier function, GSH regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, and the pathological implications of GSH disruption in oxidative stress-associated neurovascular disorders, such as diabetes and stroke.

  10. Hemispherical dominance of glucose metabolic rate in the brain of the 'normal' ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Spyrou, NM

    2004-01-01

    In the 'normal' ageing brain a decrease in the cerebral metabolic rate has been determined across many brain regions. This study determines whether age differences would affect metabolic rates in regions and different hemispheres of the brain. The regional metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) was exa

  11. Zinc transporter ZIP14 functions in hepatic zinc, iron and glucose homeostasis during the innate immune response (endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolunay Beker Aydemir

    altered in the Zip14(-/- mice and their phenotype shows defects in glucose homeostasis.

  12. Association between dopamine D4 receptor polymorphism and age related changes in brain glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora D Volkow

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with reductions in brain glucose metabolism in some cortical and subcortical regions, but the rate of decrease varies significantly between individuals, likely reflecting genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. Here we test the hypothesis that the variant of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4 gene (VNTR in exon 3, which has been associated with novelty seeking and sensitivity to environmental stimuli (negative and positive including the beneficial effects of physical activity on longevity, influence the effects of aging on the human brain. We used positron emission tomography (PET and [(18F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18FDG to measure brain glucose metabolism (marker of brain function under baseline conditions (no stimulation in 82 healthy individuals (age range 22-55 years. We determined their DRD4 genotype and found an interaction with age: individuals who did not carry the 7-repeat allele (7R-, n = 53 had a significant (p<0.0001 negative association between age and relative glucose metabolism (normalized to whole brain glucose metabolism in frontal (r = -0.52, temporal (r = -0.51 and striatal regions (r = -0.47, p<0.001; such that older individuals had lower metabolism than younger ones. In contrast, for carriers of the 7R allele (7R+ n = 29, these correlations with age were not significant and they only showed a positive association with cerebellar glucose metabolism (r = +0.55; p = 0.002. Regression slopes of regional brain glucose metabolism with age differed significantly between the 7R+ and 7R- groups in cerebellum, inferior temporal cortex and striatum. These results provide evidence that the DRD4 genotype might modulate the associations between regional brain glucose metabolism and age and that the carriers of the 7R allele appear to be less sensitive to the effects of age on brain glucose metabolism.

  13. Disturbed intestinal nitrogen homeostasis in a mouse model of high-fat diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Thi Thu Huong; Hindlet, Patrick; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Kapel, Nathalie; Neveux, Nathalie; Mignon, Virginie; Deloménie, Claudine; Farinotti, Robert; Fève, Bruno; Buyse, Marion

    2014-03-01

    The oligopeptide transporter peptide cotransporter-1 Slc15a1 (PEPT1) plays a major role in the regulation of nitrogen supply, since it is responsible for 70% of the dietary nitrogen absorption. Previous studies demonstrated that PEPT1 expression and function in jejunum are reduced in diabetes and obesity, suggesting a nitrogen malabsorption from the diet. Surprisingly, we reported here a decrease in gut nitrogen excretion in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice and further investigated the mechanisms that could explain this apparent contradiction. Upon HFD, mice exhibited an increased concentration of free amino acids (AAs) in the portal vein (60%) along with a selective increase in the expression of two AA transporters (Slc6a20a, Slc36a1), pointing to a specific and adaptive absorption of some AAs. A delayed transit time (+40%) and an increased intestinal permeability (+80%) also contribute to the increase in nitrogen absorption. Besides, HFD mice exhibited a 2.2-fold decrease in fecal DNA resulting from a reduction in nitrogen catabolism from cell desquamation and/or in the intestinal microbiota. Indeed, major quantitative (2.5-fold reduction) and qualitative alterations of intestinal microbiota were observed in feces of HFD mice. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that both increased AA transporters, intestinal permeability and transit time, and changes in gut microbiota are involved in the increased circulating AA levels. Modifications in nitrogen homeostasis provide a new insight in HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance; however, whether these modifications are beneficial or detrimental for the HFD-associated metabolic complications remains an open issue.

  14. A role for adipose tissue de novo lipogenesis in glucose homeostasis during catch-up growth: a Randle cycle favoring fat storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Helena; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Summermatter, Serge; Sarafian, Delphine; Miles-Chan, Jennifer; Arsenijevic, Denis; Zani, Fabio; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Seydoux, Josiane; Solinas, Giovanni; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Dulloo, Abdul G

    2013-02-01

    Catch-up growth, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, is characterized by hyperinsulinemia and accelerated body fat recovery. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding that exhibits catch-up fat, we previously reported that during refeeding on a low-fat diet, glucose tolerance is normal but insulin-dependent glucose utilization is decreased in skeletal muscle and increased in adipose tissue, where de novo lipogenic capacity is concomitantly enhanced. Here we report that isocaloric refeeding on a high-fat (HF) diet blunts the enhanced in vivo insulin-dependent glucose utilization for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) in adipose tissue. These are shown to be early events of catch-up growth that are independent of hyperphagia and precede the development of overt adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation, or defective insulin signaling. These results suggest a role for enhanced DNL as a glucose sink in regulating glycemia during catch-up growth, which is blunted by exposure to an HF diet, thereby contributing, together with skeletal muscle insulin resistance, to the development of glucose intolerance. Our findings are presented as an extension of the Randle cycle hypothesis, whereby the suppression of DNL constitutes a mechanism by which dietary lipids antagonize glucose utilization for storage as triglycerides in adipose tissue, thereby impairing glucose homeostasis during catch-up growth.

  15. Pancreatic alpha-cell dysfunction contributes to the disruption of glucose homeostasis and compensatory insulin hypersecretion in glucocorticoid-treated rats.

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    Alex Rafacho

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid (GC-based therapies can cause insulin resistance (IR, glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia and, occasionally, overt diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms behind these metabolic disorders could improve the management of glucose homeostasis in patients undergoing GC treatment. For this purpose, adult rats were treated with a daily injection of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p. (DEX or saline as a control for 5 consecutive days. The DEX rats developed IR, augmented glycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperglucagonemia. Treatment of the DEX rats with a glucagon receptor antagonist normalized their blood glucose level. The characteristic inhibitory effect of glucose on glucagon secretion was impaired in the islets of the DEX rats, while no direct effects were found on α-cells in islets that were incubated with DEX in vitro. A higher proportion of docked secretory granules was found in the DEX α-cells as well as a trend towards increased α-cell mass. Additionally, insulin secretion in the presence of glucagon was augmented in the islets of the DEX rats, which was most likely due to their higher glucagon receptor content. We also found that the enzyme 11βHSD-1, which participates in GC metabolism, contributed to the insulin hypersecretion in the DEX rats under basal glucose conditions. Altogether, we showed that GC treatment induces hyperglucagonemia, which contributes to an imbalance in glucose homeostasis and compensatory β-cell hypersecretion. This hyperglucagonemia may result from altered α-cell function and, likely, α-cell mass. Additionally, blockage of the glucagon receptor seems to be effective in preventing the elevation in blood glucose levels induced by GC administration.

  16. Metabolism of [U-13C]glucose in Human Brain Tumors In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Elizabeth A.; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bachoo, Robert M.; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Raisanen, Jack; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Jindal, Ashish; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Choi, Changho; Madden, Christopher; Mathews, Dana; Pascual, Juan M.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) and brain metastases demonstrate avid uptake of 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) by positron emission tomography (PET) and display perturbations of intracellular metabolite pools by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). These observations suggest that metabolic reprogramming contributes to brain tumor growth in vivo. The Warburg effect, excess metabolism of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen, is a hallmark of cancer cells in culture. FDG-positive tumors are assumed to metabolize glucose in a similar manner, with high rates of lactate formation compared to mitochondrial glucose oxidation, but few studies have specifically examined the metabolic fates of glucose in vivo. In particular, the capacity of human brain malignancies to oxidize glucose in the tricarboxylic acid cycle is unknown. Here we studied the metabolism of human brain tumors in situ. [U-13C]glucose was infused during surgical resection, and tumor samples were subsequently subjected to 13C NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of tumor metabolites revealed lactate production, as expected. We also determined that pyruvate dehydrogenase, turnover of the TCA cycle, anaplerosis and de novo glutamine and glycine synthesis contributed significantly to the ultimate disposition of glucose carbon. Surprisingly, less than 50% of the acetyl-CoA pool was derived from blood-borne glucose, suggesting that additional substrates contribute to tumor bioenergetics. This study illustrates a convenient approach that capitalizes on the high information content of 13C NMR spectroscopy and enables the analysis of intermediary metabolism in diverse malignancies growing in their native microenvironment. PMID:22419606

  17. Persistent resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose uptake ratio by brain activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Hasselbalch, S G; Hagemann, L P;

    1995-01-01

    fraction of the activation-induced excess glucose uptake. These data confirm earlier reports that brain activation can induce resetting of the cerebral oxygen/glucose consumption ratio, and indicate that the resetting persists for a long period after cerebral activation has been terminated and physiologic...

  18. High glucose, glucose fluctuation and carbonyl stress enhance brain microvascular endothelial barrier dysfunction: Implications for diabetic cerebral microvasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that in normal glucose (5 mM, methylglyoxal (MG, a model of carbonyl stress induced brain microvascular endothelial cell (IHEC dysfunction that was associated with occludin glycation and prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC. Herein, we investigated the impact of high glucose and low GSH, conditions that mimicked the diabetic state, on MG-induced IHEC dysfunction. MG-induced loss of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER was potentiated in IHECs cultured for 7 or 12 days in 25 mM glucose (hyperglycemia; moreover, barrier function remained disrupted 6 h after cell transfer to normal glucose media (acute glycemic fluctuation. Notably, basal occludin glycation was elevated under these glycemic states. TEER loss was exaggerated by inhibition of glutathione (GSH synthesis and abrogated by NAC, which corresponded to GSH decreases and increases, respectively. Significantly, glyoxalase II activity was attenuated in hyperglycemic cells. Moreover, hyperglycemia and GSH inhibition increased MG accumulation, consistent with a compromised capacity for MG elimination. α-Oxoaldehydes (MG plus glyoxal levels were elevated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat plasma. Immunohistochemistry revealed a prevalence of MG-positive, but fewer occludin-positive microvessels in the diabetic brain in vivo, and Western analysis confirmed an increase in MG–occludin adducts. These results provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and acute glucose fluctuation promote MG–occludin formation and exacerbate brain microvascular endothelial dysfunction. Low occludin expression and high glycated-occludin contents in diabetic brain in vivo are factors that would contribute to the dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature during diabetes.

  19. Exposure to low level of arsenic and lead in drinking water from Antofagasta city induces gender differences in glucose homeostasis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Javier; Roman, Domingo; Cifuentes, Fredi

    2012-08-01

    Populations chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water often have increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the glucose homeostasis of male and female rats exposed to low levels of heavy metals in drinking water. Treated groups were Sprague-Dawley male and female rats exposed to drinking water from Antofagasta city, with total arsenic of 30 ppb and lead of 53 ppb for 3 months; control groups were exposed to purified water by reverse osmosis. The two treated groups in both males and females showed arsenic and lead in the hair of rats. The δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase was used as a sensitive biomarker of arsenic toxicity and lead. The activity of δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase was reduced only in treated male rats, compared to the control group. Treated males showed a significantly sustained increase in blood glucose and plasma insulin levels during oral glucose tolerance test compared to control group. The oral glucose tolerance test and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance demonstrated that male rats were insulin resistant, and females remained sensitive to insulin after treatment. The total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol increased in treated male rats vs. the control, and triglyceride increased in treated female rats vs. the control. The activity of intestinal Na+/glucose cotransporter in male rats increased compared to female rats, suggesting a significant increase in intestinal glucose absorption. The findings indicate that exposure to low levels of arsenic and lead in drinking water could cause gender differences in insulin resistance.

  20. Influence of blood glucose on the expression of glucose transporter proteins 1 and 3 in the brain of diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Wei-kai; FU Chun-li; ZHANG Wen-wen; CHEN Li; XIAN Yu-xin; ZHANG Li; LAI Hong; HOU Xin-guo; XU Yu-xin; YU Ting; XU Fu-yu; SONG Jun

    2007-01-01

    Background The delivery of glucose from the blood to the brain involves its passage across the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is mediated by the facilitative glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT1), and then across the neural cell membranes, which is mediated by GLUT3. This study aimed to evaluate the dynamic influence of hyperglycemia on the expression of these GLUTs by measuring their expression in the brain at different blood glucose levels in a rat model of diabetes. This might help to determine the proper blood glucose threshold level in the treatment of diabetic apoplexy.Methods Diabetes mellitus was induced with streptozotocin (STZ) in 30 rats. The rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: diabetic group without blood glucose control (group DM1), diabetic rats treated with low dose insulin (group DM2),and diabetic rats treated with high dose insulin (group DM3). The mRNA and protein levels of GLUT1 and GLUT3 were assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively.Results Compared with normal control rats, the GLUT1 mRNA was reduced by 46.08%, 29.80%, 19.22% (P<0.01) in DM1, DM2, and DM3 group, respectively; and the GLUT3 mRNA was reduced by 75.00%, 46.75%, and 17.89% (P<0.01)in DM1, DM2, and DM3 group, respectively. The abundance of GLUT1 and GLUT3 proteins had negative correlation with the blood glucose level (P<0.01). The density of microvessels in the brain of diabetic rats did not change significantly compared with normal rats.Conclusions Chronic hyperglycemia downregulates GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in the rat brain, which is not due to the decrease of the density of microvessels. The downregulation of GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression might be the adaptive reaction of the body to prevent excessive glucose entering the cell that may lead to cell damage.

  1. Effect of mild hypothermia on glucose metabolism and glycerol of brain tissue in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiong; LI Ai-lin; ZHI Da-shi; HUANG Hui-ling

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of mild hypothermia on glucose metabolism and glycerol of brain tissue in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI) using clinical microdialysis.Methods: Thirty-one patients with STBI ( GCS ≤8) were randomly divided into hypothermic group (Group A) and control group (Group B). Microdialysis catheters were inserted into the cerebral cortex of perilesional and normal brain tissue. All samples were analyzed using CMA microdialysis analyzer.Results: In comparison with the control group, lactate/glucose ratio ( L/G) , lactate/pyruvate ratio ( L/P) and glycerol (Gly) in perilensional tissue were significantly decreased; L/P in normal brain tissue was significantly decreased. In control group, L/G, L/P and Gly in perilensional tissue were higher than that in normal brain tissue. In the hypothermic group, L/P in perilensional tissue was higher than that in relative normal brain.Conclusions: Mild hypothermia protects brain tissues by decreasing L/G, L/P and Gly in perilensional tissue and L/P in "normal brain" tissues. The energy crisis and membrane phospholipid degradation in perilensional tissue are easier to happen after traumatic brain injury, and mild hypothermia protects brain better in perilensional tissue than in normal brain tissue.

  2. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  3. Avian sleep homeostasis: convergent evolution of complex brains, cognition and sleep functions in mammals and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattenborg, Niels C; Martinez-Gonzalez, Dolores; Lesku, John A

    2009-03-01

    Birds are the only taxonomic group other than mammals that exhibit high-amplitude slow-waves in the electroencephalogram (EEG) during sleep. This defining feature of slow-wave sleep (SWS) apparently evolved independently in mammals and birds, as reptiles do not exhibit similar EEG activity during sleep. In mammals, the level of slow-wave activity (SWA) (low-frequency spectral power density) during SWS increases and decreases as a function of prior time spent awake and asleep, respectively, and therefore reflects homeostatically regulated sleep processes potentially tied to the function of SWS. Although birds also exhibit SWS, previous sleep deprivation studies in birds did not detect a compensatory increase in SWS-related SWA during recovery, as observed in similarly sleep-deprived mammals. This suggested that, unlike mammalian SWS, avian SWS is not homeostatically regulated, and therefore might serve a different function. However, we recently demonstrated that SWA during SWS increases in pigeons following short-term sleep deprivation. Herein we summarize research on avian sleep homeostasis, and cast our evidence for this phenomenon within the context of theories for the function of SWS in mammals. We propose that the convergent evolution of homeostatically regulated SWS in mammals and birds was directly linked to the convergent evolution of large, heavily interconnected brains capable of performing complex cognitive processes in each group. Specifically, as has been proposed for mammals, the interconnectivity that forms the basis of complex cognition in birds may also instantiate slow, synchronous network oscillations during SWS that in turn maintain interconnectivity and cognition at an optimal level.

  4. Glucose metabolism and astrocyte-neuron interactions in the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is essentially the sole fuel for the adult brain and the mapping of its metabolism has been extensive in the adult but not in the neonatal brain, which is believed to rely mainly on ketone bodies for energy supply. However, glucose is absolutely indispensable for normal development and recent studies have shed light on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and metabolic interactions between astrocytes and neurons in the 7-day-old rat brain. Appropriately (13)C labeled glucose was used to distinguish between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway during development. Experiments using (13)C labeled acetate provided insight into the GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle between astrocytes and neurons. It could be shown that in the neonatal brain the part of this cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating efficiently while, in contrast, little glutamate is shuttled from neurons to astrocytes. This lack of glutamate for glutamine synthesis is compensated for by anaplerosis via increased pyruvate carboxylation relative to that in the adult brain. Furthermore, compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritized to the pentose phosphate pathway than glycolysis and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The reported developmental differences in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis may determine the ability of the brain at various ages to resist excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia.

  5. An aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (turmeric) rhizomes stimulates insulin release and mimics insulin action on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohankumar, Sureshkumar; McFarlane, James R

    2011-03-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has been used widely as a spice, particularly in Asian countries. It is also used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine as an antiinflammatory and antimicrobial agent and for numerous other curative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an aqueous extract of Curcuma longa (AEC) on tissues involved in glucose homeostasis. The extract was prepared by soaking 100 g of ground turmeric in 1 L of water, which was filtered and stored at -20°C prior to use. Pancreas and muscle tissues of adult mice were cultured in DMEM with 5 or 12 mmol/L glucose and varying doses of extract. The AEC stimulated insulin secretion from mouse pancreatic tissues under both basal and hyperglycaemic conditions, although the maximum effect was only 68% of that of tolbutamide. The AEC induced stepwise stimulation of glucose uptake from abdominal muscle tissues in the presence and absence of insulin, and the combination of AEC and insulin significantly potentiated the glucose uptake into abdominal muscle tissue. However, this effect was attenuated by wortmannin, suggesting that AEC possibly acts via the insulin-mediated glucose uptake pathway. In summary, water soluble compounds of turmeric exhibit insulin releasing and mimicking actions within in vitro tissue culture conditions.

  6. Consumption of added sugars from liquid but not solid sources predicts impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance among youth at risk of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiawei; Light, Kelly; Henderson, Mélanie; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Mathieu, Marie-Eve; Paradis, Gilles; Gray-Donald, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about longitudinal associations between added sugar consumption (solid and liquid sources) and glucose-insulin homeostasis among youth. Caucasian children (8-10 y) with at least one obese biological parent were recruited in the QUébec Adipose and Lifestyle InvesTigation in Youth (QUALITY) cohort (n = 630) and followed-up 2 y later (n = 564). Added sugars were assessed by 3 24-h dietary recalls at baseline. Two-year changes were examined in multivariate linear regression models, adjusting for baseline level, age, sex, Tanner stage, energy intake, fat mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and physical activity (7 d accelerometer). Added sugar intake in either liquid or solid sources was not related to changes in adiposity measures (fat mass, body mass index, or waist circumference). However, a higher consumption (10 g/d) of added sugars from liquid sources was associated with 0.04 mmol/L higher fasting glucose, 2.3 pmol/L higher fasting insulin, 0.1 unit higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and 0.4 unit lower Matsuda-insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda-ISI) in all participants (P sugars from solid sources. Overweight/obese children at baseline had greater increases in adiposity indicators, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR and decreases in Matsuda-ISI during those 2 y than normal-weight children. Consumption of added sugars from liquid or solid sources was not associated with changes in adiposity, but liquid added sugars were a risk factor for the development of impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance over 2 y among youth at risk of obesity.

  7. Relationship between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperament factor of personality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Eun Ju; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Temperament factor of personality has been considered to have correlation with activity in a specific central monoaminergic system. In an attempt to explore neuronal substrate of biogenetic personality traits, we examined the relationship between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperament factor of personality. Twenty right-handed healthy subjects (age, 24{+-}4 yr: 10 females and 10 males) were studied with FDG PET. Their temperaments were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), which consisted of four temperament factors (harm avoidance (HA), novelty seeking (NS), reward dependence (RD), persistency) and three personality factors. The relationship between regional glucose metabolism and each temperament score was tested using SPM99 (P < 0.005, uncorrected). NS score was negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the frontal areas, insula, and superior temporal gyrus mainly in the right hemisphere. Positive correlation between NS score and glucose metabolism was observed in the left superior temporal gyrus. HA score showed negative correlation with glucose metabolism in the middle and orbitofrontal gyri as well as in the parahippocampal gyrus. RD score was positively correlated with glucose metabolism in the left middle frontal gyrus and negative correlated in the posterior cingulate gyrus and caudate nucleus. We identified the relationship between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperamental personality trait. Each temperament factor had a relation with functions of specific brain areas. These results help understand biological background of personality and specific feedback circuits associated with each temperament factor.

  8. Acute Alcohol Intoxication Decreases Glucose Metabolism but Increases Acetate Uptake in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Muench, Lisa; Shea, Colleen; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wong, Christopher; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol intoxication results in marked reductions in brain glucose metabolism, which we hypothesized reflect not just its GABAergic enhancing effects but also metabolism of acetate as an alternative brain energy source. To test this hypothesis we separately assessed the effects of alcohol intoxication on brain glucose and acetate metabolism using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We found that alcohol intoxication significantly decreased whole brain glucose metabolism (measured with FDG) with the largest decrements in cerebellum and occipital cortex and the smallest in thalamus. In contrast, alcohol intoxication caused a significant increase in [1-11C]acetate brain uptake (measured as standard uptake value, SUV), with the largest increases occurring in cerebellum and the smallest in thalamus. In heavy alcohol drinkers [1-11C]acetate brain uptake during alcohol challenge trended to be higher than in occasional drinkers (p <0.06) and the increases in [1-11C]acetate uptake in cerebellum with alcohol were positively associated with the reported amount of alcohol consumed (r=0.66, p<0.01). Our findings corroborate a reduction of brain glucose metabolism during intoxication and document an increase in brain acetate uptake. The opposite changes observed between regional brain metabolic decrements and regional increases in [1-11C]acetate uptake support the hypothesis that during alcohol intoxication the brain may rely on acetate as an alternative brain energy source and provides preliminary evidence that heavy alcohol exposures may facilitate the use of acetate as an energy substrate. These findings raise the question of the potential therapeutic benefits that increasing plasma acetate concentration (ie ketogenic diets) may have in alcoholics undergoing alcohol detoxification. PMID:22947541

  9. BI 885578, a Novel IGF1R/INSR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor with Pharmacokinetic Properties That Dissociate Antitumor Efficacy and Perturbation of Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael P; Apgar, Joshua; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Hofmann, Marco H; Kessler, Dirk; Quant, Jens; Savchenko, Alexander; Schaaf, Otmar; Treu, Matthias; Tye, Heather; Zahn, Stephan K; Zoephel, Andreas; Haaksma, Eric; Adolf, Günther R; Kraut, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of the IGF1R, INSRA, and INSRB receptor tyrosine kinases represents an attractive approach of pharmacologic intervention in cancer, owing to the roles of the IGF1R and INSRA in promoting cell proliferation and survival. However, the central role of the INSRB isoform in glucose homeostasis suggests that prolonged inhibition of this kinase could result in metabolic toxicity. We describe here the profile of the novel compound BI 885578, a potent and selective ATP-competitive IGF1R/INSR tyrosine kinase inhibitor distinguished by rapid intestinal absorption and a short in vivo half-life as a result of rapid metabolic clearance. BI 885578, administered daily per os, displayed an acceptable tolerability profile in mice at doses that significantly reduced the growth of xenografted human GEO and CL-14 colon carcinoma tumors. We found that treatment with BI 885578 is accompanied by increases in circulating glucose and insulin levels, which in turn leads to compensatory hyperphosphorylation of muscle INSRs and subsequent normalization of blood glucose within a few hours. In contrast, the normalization of IGF1R and INSR phosphorylation in GEO tumors occurs at a much slower rate. In accordance with this, BI 885578 led to a prolonged inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in GEO tumors. We propose that the remarkable therapeutic window observed for BI 885578 is achieved by virtue of the distinctive pharmacokinetic properties of the compound, capitalizing on the physiologic mechanisms of glucose homeostasis and differential levels of IGF1R and INSR expression in tumors and normal tissues.

  10. Changes in Plasma Levels of N-Arachidonoyl Ethanolamine and N-Palmitoylethanolamine following Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Females with Impaired Glucose Homeostasis

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    Akhila Mallipedhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We examined endocannabinoids (ECs in relation to bariatric surgery and the association between plasma ECs and markers of insulin resistance. Methods. A study of 20 participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, and C-peptide were recorded preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively with plasma ECs (AEA, 2-AG and endocannabinoid-related lipids (PEA, OEA. Results. Gender-specific analysis showed differences in AEA, OEA, and PEA preoperatively with reductions in AEA and PEA in females postoperatively. Preoperatively, AEA was correlated with 2-hour glucose (r=0.55, P=0.01, HOMA-IR (r=0.61, P=0.009, and HOMA %S (r=-0.71, P=0.002. OEA was correlated with weight (r=0.49, P=0.03, waist circumference (r=0.52, P=0.02, fasting insulin (r=0.49, P=0.04, and HOMA-IR (r=0.48, P=0.05. PEA was correlated with fasting insulin (r=0.49, P=0.04. 2-AG had a negative correlation with fasting glucose (r=-0.59, P=0.04. Conclusion. Gender differences exist in circulating ECs in obese subjects. Females show changes in AEA and PEA after bariatric surgery. Specific correlations exist between different ECs and markers of obesity and insulin and glucose homeostasis.

  11. Analysis of the protein network of cholesterol homeostasis in different brain regions: an age and sex dependent perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segatto, Marco; Di Giovanni, Annalaura; Marino, Maria; Pallottini, Valentina

    2013-07-01

    Although a great knowledge about the patho-physiological roles of cholesterol metabolism perturbation in several organs has been reached, scarce information is available on the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain where this lipid is involved in the maintenance of several of neuronal processes. Currently, no study is available in literature dealing how and if sex and age may modulate the major proteins involved in the regulatory network of cholesterol levels in different brain regions. Here, we investigated the behavior of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) in adult (3-month-old) and aged (12-month-old) male and female rats. The analyses were performed in four different brain regions: cortex, brain stem, hippocampus, and cerebellum which represent brain areas characterized by different neuronal cell types, metabolism, cytoarchitecture and white matter composition. The results show that in hippocampus HMGR is lower (30%) in adult female rats than in age-matched males. Differences in LDLr expression are also observable in old females with respect to age-matched males: the protein levels increase (40%) in hippocampus and decrease (20%) in cortex, displaying different mechanisms of regulation. The mechanism underlying the observed modifications are ascribable to Insig-1 and SREBP-1 modulation. The obtained data demonstrate that age- and sex-related differences in cholesterol homeostasis maintenance exist among brain regions, such as the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, important for learning, memory and affection. Some of these differences could be at the root of marked gender disparities observed in clinical disease incidence, manifestation, and prognosis.

  12. Brain pyruvate recycling and peripheral metabolism: an NMR analysis ex vivo of acetate and glucose metabolism in the rat.

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    Serres, Sébastien; Bezancon, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Merle, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of pyruvate recycling in the rat brain was studied in either pentobarbital anesthetized animals or awake animals receiving a light analgesic dose of morphine, which were infused with either [1-13C]glucose + acetate or glucose + [2-13C]acetate for various periods of time. Metabolite enrichments in the brain, blood and the liver were determined from NMR analyses of tissue extracts. They indicated that: (i) Pyruvate recycling was revealed in the brain of both the anesthetized and awake animals, as well as from lactate and alanine enrichments as from glutamate isotopomer composition, but only after infusion of glucose + [2-13C]acetate. (ii) Brain glucose was labelled from [2-13C]acetate at the same level in anaesthetized and awake rats (approximately 4%). Comparing its enrichment with that of blood and liver glucose indicated that brain glucose labelling resulted from hepatic gluconeogenesis. (iii) Analysing glucose 13C-13C coupling in the brain, blood and the liver confirmed that brain glucose could be labelled in the liver through the activities of both pyruvate recycling and gluconeogenesis. (iv) The rate of appearance and the amount of brain glutamate C4-C5 coupling, a marker of pyruvate recycling when starting from [2-13C]acetate, were lower than those of brain glucose labelling from hepatic metabolism. (v) The evaluation of the contributions of glucose and acetate to glutamate metabolism revealed that more than 60% of brain glutamate was synthesized from glucose whereas only 7% was from acetate and that glutamate C4-C5 coupling was mainly due to the metabolism of glucose labelled through hepatic gluconeogenesis. All these results indicate that, under the present conditions, the pyruvate recycling observed through the labelling of brain metabolites mainly originates from peripheral metabolism.

  13. Effects of Saturated Fat, Polyunsaturated Fat, Monounsaturated Fat, and Carbohydrate on Glucose-Insulin Homeostasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomised Controlled Feeding Trials.

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    Fumiaki Imamura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of major dietary macronutrients on glucose-insulin homeostasis remain controversial and may vary by the clinical measures examined. We aimed to assess how saturated fat (SFA, monounsaturated fat (MUFA, polyunsaturated fat (PUFA, and carbohydrate affect key metrics of glucose-insulin homeostasis.We systematically searched multiple databases (PubMed, EMBASE, OVID, BIOSIS, Web-of-Knowledge, CAB, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, SIGLE, Faculty1000 for randomised controlled feeding trials published by 26 Nov 2015 that tested effects of macronutrient intake on blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion in adults aged ≥18 years. We excluded trials with non-isocaloric comparisons and trials providing dietary advice or supplements rather than meals. Studies were reviewed and data extracted independently in duplicate. Among 6,124 abstracts, 102 trials, including 239 diet arms and 4,220 adults, met eligibility requirements. Using multiple-treatment meta-regression, we estimated dose-response effects of isocaloric replacements between SFA, MUFA, PUFA, and carbohydrate, adjusted for protein, trans fat, and dietary fibre. Replacing 5% energy from carbohydrate with SFA had no significant effect on fasting glucose (+0.02 mmol/L, 95% CI = -0.01, +0.04; n trials = 99, but lowered fasting insulin (-1.1 pmol/L; -1.7, -0.5; n = 90. Replacing carbohydrate with MUFA lowered HbA1c (-0.09%; -0.12, -0.05; n = 23, 2 h post-challenge insulin (-20.3 pmol/L; -32.2, -8.4; n = 11, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (-2.4%; -4.6, -0.3; n = 30. Replacing carbohydrate with PUFA significantly lowered HbA1c (-0.11%; -0.17, -0.05 and fasting insulin (-1.6 pmol/L; -2.8, -0.4. Replacing SFA with PUFA significantly lowered glucose, HbA1c, C-peptide, and HOMA. Based on gold-standard acute insulin response in ten trials, PUFA significantly improved insulin secretion capacity (+0.5 pmol/L/min; 0.2, 0.8 whether replacing

  14. Mice deficient in GEM GTPase show abnormal glucose homeostasis due to defects in beta-cell calcium handling.

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    Jenny E Gunton

    Full Text Available AIMS AND HYPOTHESIS: Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from beta-cells is a tightly regulated process that requires calcium flux to trigger exocytosis of insulin-containing vesicles. Regulation of calcium handling in beta-cells remains incompletely understood. Gem, a member of the RGK (Rad/Gem/Kir family regulates calcium channel handling in other cell types, and Gem over-expression inhibits insulin release in insulin-secreting Min6 cells. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Gem in insulin secretion. We hypothesised that Gem may regulate insulin secretion and thus affect glucose tolerance in vivo. METHODS: Gem-deficient mice were generated and their metabolic phenotype characterised by in vivo testing of glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and insulin secretion. Calcium flux was measured in isolated islets. RESULTS: Gem-deficient mice were glucose intolerant and had impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Furthermore, the islets of Gem-deficient mice exhibited decreased free calcium responses to glucose and the calcium oscillations seen upon glucose stimulation were smaller in amplitude and had a reduced frequency. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that Gem plays an important role in normal beta-cell function by regulation of calcium signalling.

  15. Magnesium enhances exercise performance via increasing glucose availability in the blood, muscle, and brain during exercise.

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    Hsuan-Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Glucose mobilization and utilization in the periphery and central nervous system are important during exercise and are responsible for exercise efficacy. Magnesium (Mg is involved in energy production and plays a role in exercise performance. This study aimed to explore the effects of Mg on the dynamic changes in glucose and lactate levels in the muscle, blood and brain of exercising rats using a combination of auto-blood sampling and microdialysis. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 90 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min before treadmill exercise (20 m/min for 60 min. Our results indicated that the muscle, blood, and brain glucose levels immediately increased during exercise, and then gradually decreased to near basal levels in the recovery periods of both groups. These glucose levels were significantly enhanced to approximately two-fold (P<0.05 in the Mg group. Lactate levels in the muscle, blood, and brain rapidly and significantly increased in both groups during exercise, and brain lactate levels in the Mg group further elevated (P<0.05 than those in the control group during exercise. Lactate levels significantly decreased after exercise in both groups. In conclusion, Mg enhanced glucose availability in the peripheral and central systems, and increased lactate clearance in the muscle during exercise.

  16. Role of glucose and ketone bodies in the metabolic control of experimental brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, T N; Sanderson, T M; El-Abbadi, M M; McGowan, R; Mukherjee, P

    2003-10-06

    Brain tumours lack metabolic versatility and are dependent largely on glucose for energy. This contrasts with normal brain tissue that can derive energy from both glucose and ketone bodies. We examined for the first time the potential efficacy of dietary therapies that reduce plasma glucose and elevate ketone bodies in the CT-2A syngeneic malignant mouse astrocytoma. C57BL/6J mice were fed either a standard diet unrestricted (SD-UR), a ketogenic diet unrestricted (KD-UR), the SD restricted to 40% (SD-R), or the KD restricted to 40% of the control standard diet (KD-R). Body weights, tumour weights, plasma glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured 13 days after tumour implantation. CT-2A growth was rapid in both the SD-UR and KD-UR groups, but was significantly reduced in both the SD-R and KD-R groups by about 80%. The results indicate that plasma glucose predicts CT-2A growth and that growth is dependent more on the amount than on the origin of dietary calories. Also, restriction of either diet significantly reduced the plasma levels of IGF-1, a biomarker for angiogenesis and tumour progression. Owing to a dependence on plasma glucose, IGF-1 was also predictive of CT-2A growth. Ketone bodies are proposed to reduce stromal inflammatory activities, while providing normal brain cells with a nonglycolytic high-energy substrate. Our results in a mouse astrocytoma suggest that malignant brain tumours are potentially manageable with dietary therapies that reduce glucose and elevate ketone bodies.

  17. A palatable hyperlipidic diet causes obesity and affects brain glucose metabolism in rats

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    Motoyama Caio SM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that either the continuous intake of a palatable hyperlipidic diet (H or the alternation of chow (C and an H diet (CH regimen induced obesity in rats. Here, we investigated whether the time of the start and duration of these feeding regimens are relevant and whether they affect brain glucose metabolism. Methods Male Wistar rats received C, H, or CH diets during various periods of their life spans: days 30-60, days 30-90, or days 60-90. Experiments were performed the 60th or the 90th day of life. Rats were killed by decapitation. The glucose, insulin, leptin plasma concentration, and lipid content of the carcasses were determined. The brain was sliced and incubated with or without insulin for the analysis of glucose uptake, oxidation, and the conversion of [1-14C]-glucose to lipids. Results The relative carcass lipid content increased in all of the H and CH groups, and the H30-60 and H30-90 groups had the highest levels. Groups H30-60, H30-90, CH30-60, and CH30-90 exhibited a higher serum glucose level. Serum leptin increased in all H groups and in the CH60-90 and CH30-90 groups. Serum insulin was elevated in the H30-60, H60-90, CH60-90, CH30-90 groups. Basal brain glucose consumption and hypothalamic insulin receptor density were lower only in the CH30-60 group. The rate of brain lipogenesis was increased in the H30-90 and CH30-90 groups. Conclusion These findings indicate that both H and CH diet regimens increased body adiposity independent treatment and the age at which treatment was started, whereas these diets caused hyperglycemia and affected brain metabolism when started at an early age.

  18. Glucose homeostasis and metabolic adaptation in the pregnant and lactating sheep are affected by the level of nutrition previously provided during her late fetal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, S M; Nielsen, M O; Blache, D; Ingvartsen, K L

    2008-05-01

    This study investigated whether undernutrition (UN) during late fetal life can programme the subsequent adult life adaptation of glucose homeostasis and metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. Twenty-four primiparous experimental ewes were used. Twelve had been exposed to a prenatal NORM level of nutrition (maternal diet approximately 15 MJME/d) and 12 to a LOW level of nutrition (maternal diet approximately 7 MJME/d) during the last 6 weeks pre-partum. The experimental ewes were subjected to two intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IGTT) in late gestation (one prior to (G-IGTT) and one by the end of a feed restriction period (RG-IGTT)), and a third around peak lactation (L-IGTT). LOW had lower basal insulin concentrations during lactation, and significantly decreased absolute insulin secretion during the L-IGTT in spite of similar glucose tolerance, indicating increased insulin sensitivity in LOW during lactation. There was no effect of prenatal UN on glucose tolerance during G-IGTT, however, during RG-IGTT LOW was more glucose intolerant and apparently more insulin resistant compared to NORM. In conclusion, UN during late fetal life in sheep impairs subsequent pancreatic insulin secretory capacity during adult life, and reduces plasticity of down-regulation of insulin secretion in response to a metabolic challenge. Furthermore, prenatal UN appears to programme mechanisms, which in young adult females can shift the insulin hypersensitivity observed during early lactation into an insulin resistance observed during late gestation and feed restriction. Early postnatal UN caused by lowered milk intake in early postnatal life may have contributed to these phenomena.

  19. (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL: a GLP-1 agonist that improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and β-cell function in high-fat-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Rachael; Porter, David W; Flatt, Peter R; Gault, Victor A

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the biological properties of a novel GLP-1 peptide, (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL, engineered with an Ala(8)→Val(8) substitution and additional incorporation of a C(16) fatty acid moiety at Lys(26) via a glutamic acid linker. GLP-1 underwent 75 % degradation by DPP-IV over 8 h, whereas (Val(8))GLP-1 and (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL remained intact. All GLP-1 peptides significantly stimulated insulin secretion at 5.6 mM (1.3- to 4.9-fold, pGLP-1-Glu-PAL was significantly more potent at stimulating insulin secretion (1.2- to 1.3-fold, pGLP-1 peptides significantly lowered plasma glucose concentrations (41-66 % decrease, pGLP-1-Glu-PAL eliciting protracted glucose-lowering actions (32-59 % decrease, pGLP-1-Glu-PAL in high-fat-fed mice for 21 days had no effect on bodyweight or food intake, but significantly lowered non-fasting plasma glucose (43-46 % decrease, pGLP-1-Glu-PAL markedly decreased glycemic excursion following intraperitoneal glucose (32-48 % decrease, pGLP-1-Glu-PAL therapy. Treatment with (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL resulted in a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells (1.3-fold, pGLP-1-Glu-PAL is a long-acting GLP-1 peptide that significantly improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion in high-fat-fed mice.

  20. Meta-analysis investigating associations between healthy diet and fasting glucose and insulin levels and modification by loci associated with glucose homeostasis in data from 15 cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whether loci that influence fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) levels, as identified by genome-wide association studies, modify associations of diet with FG or FI is unknown. We utilized data from 15 US and European cohort studies comprising 51,289 persons without diabetes to test whether...

  1. The effect of long-term taurine supplementation and fructose feeding on glucose and lipid homeostasis in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lea Hüche; Orstrup, Laura Kofoed Hvidsten; Hansen, Svend Høime; Grunnet, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig

    2013-01-01

    The nonprotein amino acid taurine has been shown to counteract the negative effects of a high-fructose diet in rats with regard to insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Here we examined the long-term (26 weeks) effects of oral taurine supplementation (2% in the drinking water) in fructose-fed Wistar rats.The combination of fructose and taurine caused a significant increase in fasting glucose compared to the control diet without changing hepatic phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels. The combination of fructose and taurine also improved glucose tolerance compared to control. Neither a high-fructose diet nor taurine supplementation induced significant changes in body weight, body fat or total calorie intake, fasting insulin levels, HOMA-IR, or insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle.Fructose alone caused a decrease in liver triglyceride content, with taurine supplementation preventing this. There was no effect of long-term fructose diet and/or taurine supplementation on plasma triglycerides, plasma nonesterified fatty acids, as well as plasma HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol.In conclusion, the study suggests that long-term taurine supplementation improves glucose tolerance and normalize hepatic triglyceride content following long-term fructose feeding. However, as the combination of taurine and fructose also increased fasting glucose levels, the beneficial effect of taurine supplementation towards amelioration of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance may be questionable.

  2. Soy Leaf Extract Containing Kaempferol Glycosides and Pheophorbides Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Enhancing Pancreatic β-Cell Function and Suppressing Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Ji, Hyeon-Seon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Ha; Park, Ho-Yong; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyung; Yun, Bong-Sik; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2015-08-19

    This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of an ethanol extract of soy leaves (ESL) in db/db mice. Control groups (db/+ and db/db) were fed a normal diet (ND), whereas the db/db-ESL group was fed ND with 1% ESL for 8 weeks. Dietary ESL improved glucose tolerance and lowered plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride levels. The pancreatic insulin content of the db/db-ESL group was significantly greater than that of the db/db group. ESL supplementation altered pancreatic IRS1, IRS2, Pdx1, Ngn3, Pax4, Ins1, Ins2, and FoxO1 expression. Furthermore, ESL suppressed lipid accumulation and increased glucokinase activity in the liver. ESL primarily contained kaempferol glycosides and pheophorbides. Kaempferol, an aglycone of kaempferol glycosides, improved β-cell proliferation through IRS2-related FoxO1 signaling, whereas pheophorbide a, a product of chlorophyll breakdown, improved insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation through IRS1-related signaling with protein kinase A in MIN6 cells. ESL effectively regulates glucose homeostasis by enhancing IRS-mediated β-cell insulin signaling and suppressing SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipid accumulation in db/db mice.

  3. Targeted deletion of growth hormone (GH) receptor in macrophage reveals novel osteopontin-mediated effects of GH on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunxia; Kumar, P Anil; Sun, Jinhong; Aggarwal, Anjali; Fan, Yong; Sperling, Mark A; Lumeng, Carey N; Menon, Ram K

    2013-05-31

    We investigated GH action on macrophage (MΦ) by creating a MΦ-specific GH receptor-null mouse model (MacGHR KO). On a normal diet (10% fat), MacGHR KO and littermate controls exhibited similar growth profiles and glucose excursions on intraperitoneal glucose (ipGTT) and insulin tolerance (ITT) tests. However, when challenged with high fat diet (HFD, 45% fat) for 18 weeks, MacGHR KO mice exhibited impaired ipGTT and ITT compared with controls. In MacGHR KO, adipose-tissue (AT) MΦ abundance was increased with skewing toward M1 polarization. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1β, TNF-α, IL6, and osteopontin (OPN)) were increased in MacGHR KO AT stromal vascular fraction (SVF). In MacGHR KO AT, crown-like-structures were increased with decreased insulin-dependent Akt phosphorylation. The abundance of phosphorylated NF-κB and of OPN was increased in SVF and bone-marrow-derived MΦ in MacGHR KO. GH, acting via an NF-κB site in the distal OPN promoter, inhibited the OPN promoter. Thus in diet-induced obesity (DIO), lack of GH action on the MΦ exerts an unexpected deleterious effect on glucose homeostasis by accentuating AT inflammation and NF-κB-dependent activation of OPN expression. These novel results in mice support the possibility that administration of GH could have salutary effects on DIO-associated chronic inflammation and insulin resistance in humans.

  4. Age-and diet-dependent requirement of DJ-1 for glucose homeostasis in mice with implications for human type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepak Jain; Ruchi Jain; Daniel Eberhard; Jan Eglinger; Marco Bugliani; Lorenzo Piemonti; Piero Marchetti; Eckhard Lammert

    2012-01-01

    Elderly patients often suffer from multiple age-related diseases.Here we show that the expression of DJ-1,an antioxidant protein with reduced expression in the central nervous system of patients with Parkinson's disease,is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).In contrast,under non-diabetic conditions,DJ-1 expression increases in mouse and human islets during aging.In mouse islets,we show that DJ-1 prevents an increase in reactive oxygen species levels as the mice age.This antioxidant function preserves mitochondrial integrity and physiology,prerequisites for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.Accordingly,DJ-1-deficient mice develop glucose intolerance and reduced β cell area as they age or gain weight.Our data suggest that DJ-1 is more generally involved in age-and lifestyle-related human diseases and show for the first time that DJ-1 plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and might serve as a novel drug target for T2DM.

  5. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha is a key factor related to depression and physiological homeostasis in the mouse brain.

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    Kyosuke Yamanishi

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a common psychiatric disorder that involves marked disabilities in global functioning, anorexia, and severe medical comorbidities. MDD is associated with not only psychological and sociocultural problems, but also pervasive physical dysfunctions such as metabolic, neurobiological and immunological abnormalities. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors have yet to be determined in detail. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and dysregulation of physiological homeostasis, including immunological function as well as lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity in the brain. We generated depression-like behavior in mice using chronic mild stress (CMS as a model of depression. We compared the gene expression profiles in the prefrontal cortex (PFC of CMS and control mice using microarrays. We subsequently categorized genes using two web-based bioinformatics applications: Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and The Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We then confirmed significant group-differences by analyzing mRNA and protein expression levels not only in the PFC, but also in the thalamus and hippocampus. These web tools revealed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (Hnf4a may exert direct effects on various genes specifically associated with amine synthesis, such as genes involved in serotonin metabolism and related immunological functions. Moreover, these genes may influence lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity. We also confirmed the significant effects of Hnf4a on both mRNA and protein expression levels in the brain. These results suggest that Hnf4a may have a critical influence on physiological homeostasis under depressive states, and may be associated with the mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and the dysregulation of

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, impaired glucose metabolism, and bipolar disorder course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Santos, Camila M; Rizzo, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in bipolar disorder (BD). However, current evidence is limited and results have been highly heterogeneous. This study aimed to assess the moderating effect of impaired glucose metabolism...

  7. Effects of intravenous glucose on Dopaminergic function in the human brain in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haltia, Lauri T.; Rinne, Juha O.; Merisaari, Harri; Maguire, Ralph P.; Savontaus, Eriika; Helin, Semi; Nagren, Kjell; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2007-01-01

    Dopamine is known to regulate food intake by modulating food reward via the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of high energy input (i.v. glucose) on striatal and thalamic dopamine release in overweight and lean individuals. We hypothesized that

  8. Effect of intracarotid injection of iopamidol on local cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avella, D; Cicciarello, R; Albiero, F; Piscitelli, G; Fiori, M G; Mesiti, M; Princi, P; d'Aquino, S

    1989-01-01

    We assessed, by means of the [14C]-2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography method, the effect of intracarotid injection of a nonionic, low-osmolar contrast medium (iopamidol) on local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat brain. Contrast medium was injected at 20 degrees C and at 37 degrees C, and the relative changes in local cerebral glucose utilization were measured. At 20 degrees C the viscosity of the contrast agent was about twice that of the same solution at 37 degrees C, and resulted in a statistically significant increase in local cerebral glucose utilization in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the side of intracarotid infusion. Saline control studies showed that the metabolic change was not related to either the solution temperature or the osmolality. These findings suggest that increased viscosity of a contrast medium may contribute to its neurotoxic effects during cerebral angiography, hence emphasizing the importance of preheating contrast material to avoid adverse reactions.

  9. Assessment of regional glucose metabolism in aging brain and dementia with positron-emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Ferris, S.; Christman, D.; Fowler, J.; MacGregor, R.; Farkas, T.; Greenberg, J.; Dann, R.; Wolf, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper explores the alterations in regional glucose metabolism that occur in elderly subjects and those with senile dementia compared to normal young volunteers. Results showed a tendency for the frontal regions to have a lower metabolic rate in patients with dementia although this did not reach the level of significance when compared to the elderly control subjects. The changes in glucose metabolism were symmetrical in both the left and right hemispheres. There was a lack of correlation between the mean cortical metabolic rates for glucose and the global mental function in the patients with senile dementia. This is at variance with most of the regional cerebral blood flow data that has been collected. This may be partly related to the use of substrates other than glucose by the brain in elderly and demented subjects. (PSB)

  10. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    secretion was reduced by 37% in betaGlud1(-/-). Furthermore, isolated islets with either constitutive or acute adenovirus-mediated knock-out of GDH showed a 49 and 38% reduction in glucose-induced insulin release, respectively. Adenovirus-mediated re-expression of GDH in betaGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored...

  11. The effect of long-term taurine supplementation and fructose feeding on glucose and lipid homeostasis in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Hüche; Orstrup, Laura Kofoed Hvidsten; Hansen, Svend Høime;

    2013-01-01

    preventing this. There was no effect of long-term fructose diet and/or taurine supplementation on plasma triglycerides, plasma nonesterified fatty acids, as well as plasma HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol.In conclusion, the study suggests that long-term taurine supplementation improves glucose tolerance...

  12. Differential incretin effects of GIP and GLP-1 on gastric emptying, appetite, and insulin-glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edholm, T; Degerblad, M; Grybäck, P

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are major incretins with important effects on glucoregulatory functions. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of GIP and GLP-1 on gastric emptying and appetite after a mixed meal, and effects on ins...

  13. Glucose-coated gold nanoparticles transfer across human brain endothelium and enter astrocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Gromnicova

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of many therapeutic agents into the brain. Various nanocarriers have been developed to help agents to cross this barrier, but they all have limitations, with regard to tissue-selectivity and their ability to cross the endothelium. This study investigated the potential for 4 nm coated gold nanoparticles to act as selective carriers across human brain endothelium and subsequently to enter astrocytes. The transfer rate of glucose-coated gold nanoparticles across primary human brain endothelium was at least three times faster than across non-brain endothelia. Movement of these nanoparticles occurred across the apical and basal plasma membranes via the cytosol with relatively little vesicular or paracellular migration; antibiotics that interfere with vesicular transport did not block migration. The transfer rate was also dependent on the surface coating of the nanoparticle and incubation temperature. Using a novel 3-dimensional co-culture system, which includes primary human astrocytes and a brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, we demonstrated that the glucose-coated nanoparticles traverse the endothelium, move through the extracellular matrix and localize in astrocytes. The movement of the nanoparticles through the matrix was >10 µm/hour and they appeared in the nuclei of the astrocytes in considerable numbers. These nanoparticles have the correct properties for efficient and selective carriers of therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier.

  14. Methylphenidate decreased the amount of glucose needed by the brain to perform a cognitive task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora D Volkow

    Full Text Available The use of stimulants (methylphenidate and amphetamine as cognitive enhancers by the general public is increasing and is controversial. It is still unclear how they work or why they improve performance in some individuals but impair it in others. To test the hypothesis that stimulants enhance signal to noise ratio of neuronal activity and thereby reduce cerebral activity by increasing efficiency, we measured the effects of methylphenidate on brain glucose utilization in healthy adults. We measured brain glucose metabolism (using Positron Emission Tomography and 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose in 23 healthy adults who were tested at baseline and while performing an accuracy-controlled cognitive task (numerical calculations given with and without methylphenidate (20 mg, oral. Sixteen subjects underwent a fourth scan with methylphenidate but without cognitive stimulation. Compared to placebo methylphenidate significantly reduced the amount of glucose utilized by the brain when performing the cognitive task but methylphenidate did not affect brain metabolism when given without cognitive stimulation. Whole brain metabolism when the cognitive task was given with placebo increased 21% whereas with methylphenidate it increased 11% (50% less. This reflected both a decrease in magnitude of activation and in the regions activated by the task. Methylphenidate's reduction of the metabolic increases in regions from the default network (implicated in mind-wandering was associated with improvement in performance only in subjects who activated these regions when the cognitive task was given with placebo. These results corroborate prior findings that stimulant medications reduced the magnitude of regional activation to a task and in addition document a "focusing" of the activation. This effect may be beneficial when neuronal resources are diverted (i.e., mind-wandering or impaired (i.e., attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but it could be detrimental when

  15. Sulfite disrupts brain mitochondrial energy homeostasis and induces mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening via thiol group modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grings, Mateus; Moura, Alana P; Amaral, Alexandre U; Parmeggiani, Belisa; Gasparotto, Juciano; Moreira, José C F; Gelain, Daniel P; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir; Leipnitz, Guilhian

    2014-09-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is biochemically characterized by the accumulation of sulfite, thiosulfate and S-sulfocysteine in tissues and biological fluids of the affected patients. The main clinical symptoms include severe neurological dysfunction and brain abnormalities, whose pathophysiology is still unknown. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of sulfite and thiosulfate on mitochondrial homeostasis in rat brain mitochondria. It was verified that sulfite per se, but not thiosulfate, decreased state 3, CCCP-stimulated state and respiratory control ratio in mitochondria respiring with glutamate plus malate. In line with this, we found that sulfite inhibited the activities of glutamate and malate (MDH) dehydrogenases. In addition, sulfite decreased the activity of a commercial solution of MDH, that was prevented by antioxidants and dithiothreitol. Sulfite also induced mitochondrial swelling and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) retention capacity, NAD(P)H pool and cytochrome c immunocontent when Ca(2+) was present in the medium. These alterations were prevented by ruthenium red, cyclosporine A (CsA) and ADP, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in these effects. We further observed that N-ethylmaleimide prevented the sulfite-elicited swelling and that sulfite decreased free thiol group content in brain mitochondria. These findings indicate that sulfite acts directly on MPT pore containing thiol groups. Finally, we verified that sulfite reduced cell viability in cerebral cortex slices and that this effect was prevented by CsA. Therefore, it may be presumed that disturbance of mitochondrial energy homeostasis and MPT induced by sulfite could be involved in the neuronal damage characteristic of SO deficiency.

  16. Plasma antioxidants and brain glucose metabolism in elderly subjects with cognitive complaints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picco, Agnese; Ferrara, Michela; Arnaldi, Dario; Brugnolo, Andrea; Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa and IRCCS San Martino-IST, Clinical Neurology, Department of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), Largo P. Daneo, 3, 16132, Genoa (Italy); Polidori, M.C. [University of Cologne, Institute of Geriatrics, Cologne (Germany); Cecchetti, Roberta; Baglioni, Mauro; Bastiani, Patrizia; Mecocci, Patrizia [University of Perugia, Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Perugia (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia; Bossert, Irene [University of Genoa and IRCCS San Martino-IST, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Health Science (DISSAL), Genoa (Italy); Fiorucci, Giuliana; Dottorini, Massimo Eugenio [Nuclear Medicine, S. M. della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The role of oxidative stress is increasingly recognized in cognitive disorders of the elderly, notably Alzheimer's disease (AD). In these subjects brain{sup 18}F-FDG PET is regarded as a reliable biomarker of neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that oxidative stress could play a role in impairing brain glucose utilization in elderly subjects with increasing severity of cognitive disturbance. The study group comprised 85 subjects with cognitive disturbance of increasing degrees of severity including 23 subjects with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), 28 patients with mild cognitive impairment and 34 patients with mild AD. In all subjects brain FDG PET was performed and plasma activities of extracellular superoxide dismutase (eSOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured. Voxel-based analysis (SPM8) was used to compare FDG PET between groups and to evaluate correlations between plasma antioxidants and glucose metabolism in the whole group of subjects, correcting for age and Mini-Mental State Examination score. Brain glucose metabolism progressively decreased in the bilateral posterior temporoparietal and cingulate cortices across the three groups, from SCI to mild AD. eSOD activity was positively correlated with glucose metabolism in a large area of the left temporal lobe including the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri and the fusiform gyrus. These results suggest a role of oxidative stress in the impairment of glucose utilization in the left temporal lobe structures in elderly patients with cognitive abnormalities, including AD and conditions predisposing to AD. Further studies exploring the oxidative stress-energy metabolism axis are considered worthwhile in larger groups of these patients in order to identify pivotal pathophysiological mechanisms and innovative therapeutic opportunities. (orig.)

  17. Preliminary Study of Brain Glucose Metabolism Changes in Patients with Lung Cancer of Different Histological Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ling Li; Chang Fu; Ang Xuan; Da-Peng Shi; Yong-Ju Gao; Jie Zhang; Jun-Ling Xu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Cerebral glucose metabolism changes are always observed in patients suffering from malignant tumors.This preliminary study aimed to investigate the brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types.Methods:One hundred and twenty patients with primary untreated lung cancer,who visited People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University from February 2012 to July 2013,were divided into three groups based on histological types confirmed by biopsy or surgical pathology,which included adenocarcinoma (52 cases),squamous cell carcinoma (43 cases),and small-cell carcinoma (25 cases).The whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (1 8F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of these cases was retrospectively studied.The brain PET data of three groups were analyzed individually using statistical parametric maps (SPM) software,with 50 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls for comparison.Results:The brain resting glucose metabolism in all three lung cancer groups showed regional cerebral metabolic reduction.The hypo-metabolic cerebral regions were mainly distributed at the left superior and middle frontal,bilateral superior and middle temporal and inferior and middle temporal gyrus.Besides,the hypo-metabolic regions were also found in the right inferior parietal lobule and hippocampus in the small-cell carcinoma group.The area of the total hypo-metabolic cerebral regions in the small-cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 3255) was larger than those in the adenocarcinoma group (total voxel value 1217) and squamous cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 1292).Conclusions:The brain resting glucose metabolism in patients with lung cancer shows regional cerebral metabolic reduction and the brain hypo-metabolic changes are related to the histological types of lung cancer.

  18. Homeostasis of Microglia in the Adult Brain: Review of Novel Microglia Depletion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Ari; Ginhoux, Florent; Greter, Melanie; Bruttger, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Microglia are brain macrophages that emerge from early erythro-myeloid precursors in the embryonic yolk sac and migrate to the brain mesenchyme before the blood brain barrier is formed. They seed the brain, and proliferate until they have formed a grid-like distribution in the central nervous system that is maintained throughout lifespan. The mechanisms through which these embryonic-derived cells contribute to microglia homoeostasis at steady state and upon inflammation are still not entirely clear. Here we review recent studies that provided insight into the contribution of embryonically-derived microglia and of adult 'microglia-like' cells derived from monocytes during inflammation. We examine different microglia depletion models, and discuss the origin of their rapid repopulation after depletion and outline important areas of future research.

  19. The effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement on blood glucose homeostasis in adult non-diabetic patients with GH deficiency: real-life data from the NordiNet(®) International Outcome Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Matthias M; Biller, Beverly Mk; Pedersen, Birgitte Tønnes;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of 4 years' GH replacement on glucose homeostasis and evaluate factors affecting glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c ) in adults with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: NordiNet(®) International Outcome Study, a non-interventional study, monitors long-term effectiveness and ...

  20. The role of GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits in AgRP and POMC neurons on body weight and glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Üner

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in AgRP neurons play a critical role in central control of body weight homeostasis and blood glucose balance via mechanisms that likely involve regulation of AgRP neuronal survival and structure, and modulation of hypothalamic leptin action.

  1. Mucosal Maltase-Glucoamylase Plays a Crucial Role in Starch Digestion and Prandial Glucose Homeostasis of Mice1–3

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Starch is the major source of food glucose and its digestion requires small intestinal α-glucosidic activities provided by the 2 soluble amylases and 4 enzymes bound to the mucosal surface of enterocytes. Two of these mucosal activities are associated with sucrase-isomaltase complex, while another 2 are named maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) in mice. Because the role of Mgam in α-glucogenic digestion of starch is not well understood, the Mgam gene was ablated in mice to determine its role in the d...

  2. In vivo measurements of brain glucose transport using the reversible Michaelis-Menten model and simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow changes during hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, I Y; Lee, S P; Kim, S G; Gruetter, R

    2001-06-01

    Glucose is the major substrate that sustains normal brain function. When the brain glucose concentration approaches zero, glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier becomes rate limiting for metabolism during, for example, increased metabolic activity and hypoglycemia. Steady-state brain glucose concentrations in alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats were measured noninvasively as a function of plasma glucose. The relation between brain and plasma glucose was linear at 4.5 to 30 mmol/L plasma glucose, which is consistent with the reversible Michaelis-Menten model. When the model was fitted to the brain glucose measurements, the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, Kt, was 3.3 +/- 1.0 mmol/L, and the ratio of the maximal transport rate relative to CMRglc, Tmax/CMRglc, was 2.7 +/- 0.1. This Kt is comparable to the authors' previous human data, suggesting that glucose transport kinetics in humans and rats are similar. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was simultaneously assessed and constant above 2 mmol/L plasma glucose at 73 +/- 6 mL 100 g(-1) min(-1). Extrapolation of the reversible Michaelis-Menten model to hypoglycemia correctly predicted the plasma glucose concentration (2.1 +/- 0.6 mmol/L) at which brain glucose concentrations approached zero. At this point, CBF increased sharply by 57% +/- 22%, suggesting that brain glucose concentration is the signal that triggers defense mechanisms aimed at improving glucose delivery to the brain during hypoglycemia.

  3. Effects of the Soluble Fiber Complex PolyGlycopleX on Glucose Homeostasis and Body Weight in Young Zucker Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Gary James; Koetzner, Lee; Wicks, Joan; Gahler, Roland J; Lyon, Michael R; Reimer, Raylene A; Wood, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Dietary fiber can reduce insulin resistance, body weight, and hyperlipidemia depending on fiber type, water solubility, and viscosity. PolyGlycopleX(®) (PGX(®)) is a natural, novel water soluble, non-starch polysaccharide complex that with water forms a highly viscous gel compared to other naturally occurring dietary fiber. We determined the effect of dietary PGX(®) vs. cellulose and inulin on the early development of insulin resistance, body weight, hyperlipidemia, and glycemia-induced tissue damage in young Zucker diabetic rats (ZDFs) in fasted and non-fasted states. ZDFs (5 weeks old) were fed a diet containing 5% (wgt/wgt) cellulose, inulin, or PGX(®) for 8 weeks. Body weight, lipids, insulin, and glucose levels were determined throughout the study and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used to measure insulin sensitivity throughout the study in fasted animals. At study termination, insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT) and kidney, liver, and pancreatic histopathology were determined. Body weight and food intake were significantly reduced by PGX(®) vs. inulin and cellulose. Serum insulin in fasted and non-fasted states was significantly reduced by PGX(®) as was non-fasted blood glucose. Insulin resistance, measured as a HOMA score, was significantly reduced by PGX(®) in weeks 5 through 8 as well as terminal OGTT scores in fed and fasted states. Serum total cholesterol was also significantly reduced by PGX(®). PGX(®) significantly reduced histological kidney and hepatic damage in addition to reduced hepatic steatosis and cholestasis. A greater mass of pancreatic β-cells was found in the PGX(®) group. PGX(®) therefore may be a useful dietary additive in the control of the development of the early development of the metabolic syndrome.

  4. Effects of the Soluble Fiber Complex PolyGlycopleX® on Glucose Homeostasis and Body Weight in Young Zucker Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland J. Gahler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fiber can reduce insulin resistance, body weight and hyperlipidemia depending on fiber type, water solubility and viscosity. PolyGlycopleX® (PGX® is a natural, novel water soluble, non-starch polysaccharide complex that with water forms a highly viscous gel compared to other naturally-occurring dietary fiber. We determined the effect of dietary PGX® vs cellulose and inulin on the early development of insulin resistance, body weight, hyperlipidemia, and glycemia-induced tissue damage in young Zucker diabetic rats (ZDFs in fasted and nonfasted states. ZDFs (5 weeks old were fed a diet containing 5% (wt/wt cellulose, inulin, or PGX® for 8 weeks. Body weight, lipids, insulin and glucose levels were determined throughout the study and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA was used to measure insulin sensitivity throughout the study in fasted animals. At study termination, insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT and kidney, liver, and pancreatic histopathology were determined. Body weight and food intake were significantly reduced by PGX® vs inulin and cellulose. Serum insulin in fasted and non-fasted states was significantly reduced by PGX® as was non-fasted blood glucose. Insulin resistance, measured as a HOMA score, was significantly reduced by PGX® in weeks 5 through 8 as well as terminal OGTT scores in fed and fasted states. Serum total cholesterol was also significantly reduced by PGX®. PGX® significantly reduced histological kidney and hepatic damage in addition to reduced hepatic steatosis and cholestasis. A greater mass of pancreatic -cells was found in the PGX® group. PGX® therefore may be a useful dietary additive in the control of the development of the early development of the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Brain Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging of Sleep Homeostasis and Restoration in Drug Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George H. Trksak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous reports have documented a high occurrence of sleep difficulties in drug-dependent populations, prompting researchers to characterize sleep profiles and physiology in drug abusing populations. This mini-review examines studies indicating that drug-dependent populations exhibit alterations in sleep homeostatic and restoration processes in response to sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation is a principal sleep research tool that results in marked physiological challenge, which provides a means to examine sleep homeostatic processes in response to extended wakefulness. A report from our laboratory demonstrated that following recovery sleep from sleep deprivation, brain high-energy phosphates particularly beta–nucleoside triphosphate (beta-NTP are markedly increased as measured with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. A more recent study examined the effects of sleep deprivation in opiate-dependent methadone-maintained (MM subjects. The study demonstrated increases in brain beta-NTP following recovery sleep. Interestingly, these increases were of a markedly greater magnitude in MM subjects compared to control subjects. A similar study examined sleep deprivation in cocaine-dependent subjects demonstrating that cocaine-dependent subjects exhibit greater increases in brain beta-NTP following recovery sleep when compared to control subjects. The studies suggest that sleep deprivation in both MM subjects and cocaine-dependent subjects is characterized by greater changes in brain ATP levels than control subjects. Greater enhancements in brain ATP following recovery sleep may reflect a greater disruption to or impact of sleep deprivation in drug dependent subjects, whereby sleep restoration processes may be unable to properly regulate brain ATP and maintain brain high-energy equilibrium. These studies support the notion of a greater susceptibility to sleep loss in drug dependent populations. Additional sleep studies in drug abusing

  6. Brain glucose metabolism in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia and their asymptomatic relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Studentsova, Yana; Margus, Brad; Crawford, Thomas O

    2014-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia is a recessive genetic disorder (ATM is the mutated gene) of childhood with severe motor impairments and whereas homozygotes manifest the disorder, heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Structural brain imaging and post-mortem studies in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia have reported cerebellar atrophy; but abnormalities of motor control characteristic of extrapyramidal dysfunction suggest impairment of broader motor networks. Here, we investigated possible dysfunction in other brain areas in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia and tested for brain changes in asymptomatic relatives to assess if heterozygocity affects brain function. We used positron emission tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (quantified as µmol/100 g/min), which serves as a marker of brain function, in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia, 19 non-affected adult relatives (12 siblings, seven parents) and 29 age-matched healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping and region of interest analyses were used to compare individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia, asymptomatic relatives, and unrelated controls. We found that participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had lower metabolism in cerebellar hemispheres (14%, P brain stimulation. Our finding of decreased metabolism in vermis and hippocampus of asymptomatic relatives suggests that heterozygocity influences the function of these brain regions.

  7. The role of DNA base excision repair in brain homeostasis and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Morevati, Marya; Croteau, Deborah;

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification and spontaneous loss of nucleotide bases from DNA are estimated to occur at the rate of thousands per human cell per day. DNA base excision repair (BER) is a critical mechanism for repairing such lesions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Defective expression or function...... of proteins required for BER or proteins that regulate BER have been consistently associated with neurological dysfunction and disease in humans. Recent studies suggest that DNA lesions in the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments and the cellular response to those lesions have a profound effect on cellular...... energy homeostasis, mitochondrial function and cellular bioenergetics, with especially strong influence on neurological function. Further studies in this area could lead to novel approaches to prevent and treat human neurodegenerative disease....

  8. Impaired glucose tolerance in midlife and longitudinal changes in brain function during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thambisetty, Madhav; Beason-Held, Lori L; An, Yang; Kraut, Michael; Metter, Jeffrey; Egan, Josephine; Ferrucci, Luigi; O'Brien, Richard; Resnick, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in midlife subsequently show regionally specific longitudinal changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) relative to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Sixty-four cognitively normal participants in the neuroimaging substudy of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent serial (15)O-water positron emission tomography scans (age at first scan, 69.6 ± 7.5 years) and oral glucose tolerance tests 12 years earlier (age at first oral glucose tolerance test, 57.2 ± 11.1 years). Using voxel-based analysis, we compared changes in rCBF over an 8-year period between 15 participants with IGT in midlife and 49 with NGT. Significant differences were observed in longitudinal change in rCBF between the IGT and NGT groups. The predominant pattern was greater rCBF decline in the IGT group in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices. Some brain regions in the frontal and temporal cortices also showed greater longitudinal increments in rCBF in the IGT group. Our findings suggest that IGT in midlife is associated with subsequent longitudinal changes in brain function during aging even in cognitively normal older individuals.

  9. Effects of macronutrient composition and cyclooxygenase-inhibition on diet-induced obesity, low grade inflammation and glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjære, Even

    Background: Obesity and its related metabolic complications are an increasing problem worldwide. A high fat diet in combination with sucrose has been shown to induce obesity and development of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rodents. C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diets with sucrose......- or protein based background, and supplemented with either corn- or fish oil. These experiments were conducted to determine whether macronutrient composition and type of dietary fat can modulate diet-induced obesity, and associated metabolic consequences. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs...... is escalating, and in view of the increased consumption of obesogenic diets with high levels of dietary carbohydrates and fat, the metabolic consequences of cyclooxygenase-inhibition warrants investigation. Results: High fat/high sucrose diets increased obesity development and expression of macrophage...

  10. Regulation of neural development and adult brain homeostasis in the zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridaen, J.T.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    During vertebrate neural development, many genes and pathways are involved in order to properly pattern and maintain regional brain identities. This thesis documents the roles and pathways they are involved in of several genes that were identified from forward and reverse genetic screens in the zebr

  11. Correlation of glucose metabolism in brain cells and brain morphological changes with clinical typing in children with cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongxiang Zhai; Huixian Qiao; Jiqing Liu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It is widely known that fluorino-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography(18F-FDG PET)is commonly used to evaluate and diagnose epilepsy;however,whether it is beneficial to understand functional metabolism of bra in cells so as to reflect injured site and degree of brain cells or not should be studied further.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the correlation between glucose metabolism and clinical typling as well as the conelation between active function of brain cells and degree of brain injury among children with cerbral palsy with 18F-FDG PET and MRI and compare the results of them.DESIGN:Case analysis.SETTING:Department of Pediatrics,People's Hospital of Guangdong Province.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 31 children with cerebral palsy were selected from Out-patient Clinic and In-patient Department of People's Hospital of Guangdong Province from July 2001 to August 2004.Based on clinical criteria of cerebral palsy,patients were classified into spasm(n=10),gradual movement(n=4),mixed type(n =13)and ataxia(n=4).There were 18 boys and 13 girls aged from 10 months to 4 years.All of them were met the diagnostic criteria of cerebral palsy and all parents of them were told the facts.Exclusion cdteria:Patients who had cerebral palsy caused by genetic metabolism disease were excluded.METHODS:①All children accepted MRI examination after hospitalization with Philips Acs NT 15T superconductling magnetic resonance scanner.②All children were fasted for 4 hours.And then,PET image of brain was collected based on T+EID type.If obvious hypermetabolism or hypometabolism region successively occurred on two layers, the image was regarded as abnormality. ③Different correlations of various abnormal greups of MRI and vadous types of cerebral palsy with PET image were compared and analyzed with Erusal-Willas rank sum test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①Results of 18F-FDG PET;②Results of MRI examination;③Correlation of variously abnormal groups of MRI and various types of cerebral

  12. Versatility of the complement system in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and brain homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Orsini, Franca; De Blasio, Daiana; Zangari, Rosalia; Zanier, Elisa R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circul...

  13. Classic and novel stem cell niches in brain homeostasis and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruihe; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2015-12-02

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) critical for the continued production of new neurons and glia are sequestered in distinct areas of the brain called stem cell niches. Until recently, only two forebrain sites, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus, have been recognized adult stem cell niches (Alvarez-Buylla and Lim, 2004; Doetsch et al., 1999a, 1999b; Doetsch, 2003a, 2003b; Lie et al., 2004; Ming and Song, 2005). Nonetheless, the last decade has been witness to a growing literature suggesting that in fact the adult brain contains stem cell niches along the entire extent of the ventricular system. These niches are capable of widespread neurogenesis and gliogenesis, particularly after injury (Barnabé-Heider et al., 2010; Carlén et al., 2009; Decimo et al., 2012; Lin et al., 2015; Lindvall and Kokaia, 2008; Robins et al., 2013) or other inductive stimuli (Bennett et al., 2009; Cunningham et al., 2012; Decimo et al., 2011; Kokoeva et al., 2007, 2005; Lee et al., 2012a, 2012b; Migaud et al., 2010; Pencea et al., 2001b; Sanin et al., 2013; Suh et al., 2007; Sundholm-Peters et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2005; Zhang et al., 2007). This review focuses on the role of these novel and classic brain niches in maintaining adult neurogenesis and gliogenesis in response to normal physiological and injury-related pathological cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  14. Steady-state brain glucose transport kinetics re-evaluated with a four-state conformational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M N Duarte

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose supply from blood to brain occurs through facilitative transporter proteins. A near linear relation between brain and plasma glucose has been experimentally determined and described by a reversible model of enzyme kinetics. A conformational four-state exchange model accounting for trans-acceleration and asymmetry of the carrier was included in a recently developed multi-compartmental model of glucose transport. Based on this model, we demonstrate that brain glucose (Gbrain as function of plasma glucose (Gplasma can be described by a single analytical equation namely comprising three kinetic compartments: blood, endothelial cells and brain. Transport was described by four parameters: apparent half saturation constant Kt, apparent maximum rate constant Tmax, glucose consumption rate CMRglc, and the iso-inhibition constant Kii that suggests Gbrain as inhibitor of the isomerisation of the unloaded carrier. Previous published data, where Gbrain was quantified as a function of plasma glucose by either biochemical methods or NMR spectroscopy, were used to determine the aforementioned kinetic parameters. Glucose transport was characterized by Kt ranging from 1.5 to 3.5 mM, Tmax/CMRglc from 4.6 to 5.6, and Kii from 51 to 149 mM. It was noteworthy that Kt was on the order of a few mM, as previously determined from the reversible model. The conformational four-state exchange model of glucose transport into the brain includes both efflux and transport inhibition by Gbrain, predicting that Gbrain eventually approaches a maximum concentration. However, since Kii largely exceeds Gplasma, iso-inhibition is unlikely to be of substantial importance for plasma glucose below 25 mM. As a consequence, the reversible model can account for most experimental observations under euglycaemia and moderate cases of hypo- and hyperglycaemia.

  15. Roles of astrocytic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and glycogenolysis for K(+) homeostasis in mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Leif; Gerkau, Niklas J; Xu, Junnan; Durry, Simone; Song, Dan; Rose, Christine R; Peng, Liang

    2015-07-01

    Neuronal excitation increases extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)]o) in vivo and in incubated brain tissue by stimulation of postsynaptic glutamatergic receptors and by channel-mediated K(+) release during action potentials. Convincing evidence exists that subsequent cellular K(+) reuptake occurs by active transport, normally mediated by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. This enzyme is expressed both in neurons and in astrocytes but is stimulated by elevated [K(+)]o only in astrocytes. This might lead to an initial K(+) uptake in astrocytes, followed by Kir4.1-mediated release and neuronal reuptake. In cell culture experiments, K(+)-stimulated glycogenolysis is essential for operation of the astrocytic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase resulting from the requirement for glycogenolysis in a pathway leading to uptake of Na(+) for costimulation of its intracellular sodium-binding site. The astrocytic but not the neuronal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is additionally stimulated by isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic agonist, but only at nonelevated [K(+)]o. This effect is also glycogenolysis dependent and might play a role during poststimulatory undershoots. Attempts to replicate dependence on glycogenolysis for K(+) reuptake in glutamate-stimulated brain slices showed similar [K(+)]o recovery half-lives in the absence and presence of the glycogenolysis inhibitor 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol. The undershoot was decreased, but to the same extent as an unexpected reduction of peak [K(+)]o increase. A potential explanation for this difference from the cell culture experiments is that astrocytic glutamate uptake might supply the cells with sufficient Na(+). Inhibition of action potential generation by tetrodotoxin caused only a marginal, nonsignificant decrease in stimulated [K(+)]o in brain slices, hindering the evaluation if K(+) reaccumulation after action potential propagation requires glycogenolysis in this preparation.

  16. Minireview: Toward the establishment of a link between melatonin and glucose homeostasis: association of melatonin MT2 receptor variants with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitri, Angeliki; Renault, Nicolas; Clement, Nathalie; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2013-08-01

    The existence of interindividual variations in G protein-coupled receptor sequences has been recognized early on. Recent advances in large-scale exon sequencing techniques are expected to dramatically increase the number of variants identified in G protein-coupled receptors, giving rise to new challenges regarding their functional characterization. The current minireview will illustrate these challenges based on the MTNR1B gene, which encodes the melatonin MT2 receptor, for which exon sequencing revealed 40 rare nonsynonymous variants in the general population and in type 2 diabetes (T2D) cohorts. Functional characterization of these MT2 mutants revealed 14 mutants with loss of Gi protein activation that associate with increased risk of T2D development. This repertoire of disease-associated mutants is a rich source for structure-activity studies and will help to define the still poorly understood role of melatonin in glucose homeostasis and T2D development in humans. Defining the functional defects in carriers of rare MT2 mutations will help to provide personalized therapies to these patients in the future.

  17. GLUT-4, tumour necrosis factor, essential fatty acids and daf-genes and their role in glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, U N

    1999-04-01

    GLUT-4 receptor, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their metabolites and daf-genes seem to play an important and essential role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, and in the pathobiology of obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Daf-genes encode for proteins which are 35% identical to the human insulin receptor, a transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) type signal and can also enhance the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD). On the other hand, EFAs and their metabolites can increase the cell membrane fluidity and thus, enhance the expression of GLUT-4 and insulin receptors. In addition, EFAs can suppress TNF-alpha production and secretion and thus, are capable of reversing insulin resistance. Melatonin has anti-oxidant actions similar to daf-16, TGF-beta and SOD. Hence, it is likely that there is a close interaction between GLUT-4, TNF-alpha, EFAs, daf-genes, melatonin and leptin that may have relevance to the development of insulin resistance, obesity, NIDDM, complications due to NIDDM, longevity and ageing.

  18. Maternal flaxseed oil intake during lactation changes body fat, inflammatory markers and glucose homeostasis in the adult progeny: role of gender dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda, Deysla Sabino; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Carvalho, Janaíne Cavalcanti; Reis, Adelina Martha Dos; Soares, Patricia Novaes; Lisboa, Patricia Cristina; Figueiredo, Mariana Sarto

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated maternal flaxseed oil intake during lactation on body composition, lipid profile, glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue inflammation in male and female progeny at adulthood. Lactating rats were divided into the following: control 7% soybean oil (C), hyper 19% soybean oil (HS) and hyper 17% flaxseed oil+2% soybean oil (HF). Weaned pups received a standard diet. Offspring were killed in PN180. Male HF presented higher visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and triacylglycerol, and female HF showed insulin resistance. Both male and female HF had hyperleptinemia, and only male HF had hyperprolactinemia. In VAT, male HF presented lower PPAR-γ expressions and higher TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-10 expressions; in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), they presented lower PPAR-γ and TNF-α expressions. Female HF presented higher leptin, as well as lower adiponectin, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β expressions in VAT and lower TNF-α in SAT. Flaxseed oil during lactation leads to gender-specific effects with more adiposity and dyslipidemia in male and insulin resistance in female. Higher prolactin and inflammatory cytokines in male could play a role in these gender differences. We suggest that the use of flaxseed oil during lactation increases metabolic syndrome risk in the adult progeny.

  19. Regional changes in glucose metabolism during brain development from the age of 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, P; Wikler, D; Damhaut, P; Szliwowski, H B; Goldman, S

    1998-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) studies of 42 subjects ages 6 to 38 years were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping to identify age-related changes in regional distribution of glucose metabolism adjusted for global activity. Whereas adults were normal volunteers, children had idiopathic epilepsy. We studied polynomial expansions of age to identify nonlinear effects and found that adjusted glucose metabolism varied very significantly in the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex and to a lesser degree in the basal ganglia, the mesencephalon, and the insular, posterior cingulate, frontal, and postcentral cortices. Regression plots slowed that the best fit was not linear: adjusted glucose metabolism increased mainly before the age of 25 years and then remained relatively stable. Effects persisted when anti-epileptic drug intake and sleep during the FDG uptake were considered as confounding covariates. To determine if the metabolic changes observed were not due to the epileptic condition of the children, PET data obtained in adults with temporal lobe epilepsy were compared with those in our group of normal adult subjects, resulting in the absence of mapping in the age-related regions. This study suggests that brain maturation from the age of 6 years gives rise to a relative increase of synaptic activities in the thalamus, possibly as a consequence of improved corticothalamic connections. Increased metabolic activity in the anterior cingulate cortex is probably related to these thalamic changes and suggests that the limbic system is involved in the processes of brain maturation.

  20. Reduction in the in vitro expression of Brain-Pancreas Relative Protein by oxygen and glucose-deprivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Yan-Hua; Liu, Ai-Hua; Pan, Yan; Westenbroek, Christel; Ter Horst, Gert J.; Yu, He-Ming; Li, Xue-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Brain-Pancreas Relative Protein (BPRP) is a novel protein found in our laboratory. In previous study we observed a significant reduction in BPRP in ischemic brain of rat. Here we undertook this study to explore the possible mediating mechanism by which oxygen and glucose-deprivation culture (OGD), a

  1. Effects of glucose, insulin, and supernatant from pancreatic beta-cells on brain-pancreas relative protein in rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Yan-Hua; Westenbroek, Christel; Tie, Lu; Liu, Ai-Hua; Yu, He-Ming; Ter Horst, Gert J.; Li, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiang-yi

    2006-01-01

    Brain-pancreas relative protein (BPRP) is a novel protein that mainly expresses in brain and pancreas. In our previous study, we found that various stressors significantly decreased the expression of BPRP in pancreas in vivo, accompanied by changes in insulin and glucose levels, and that expression

  2. Fatigue is a brain-derived emotion that regulates the exercise behavior to ensure the protection of whole body homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy David Noakes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An influential book written by A. Mosso in the late 19th century proposed that fatigue that at first sight might appear an imperfection of our body, is on the contrary one of its most marvellous perfections. The fatigue increasing more rapidly than the amount of work done saves us from the injury which lesser sensibility would involve for the organism so that muscular fatigue also is at bottom an exhaustion of the nervous system.It has taken more than a century to confirm Mosso’s idea that both the brain and the muscles alter their function during exercise and that fatigue is predominantly an emotion, part of a complex regulation, the goal of which is to protect the body from harm. Mosso’s ideas were supplanted in the English literature by those of A.V. Hill who believed that fatigue was the result of biochemical changes in the exercising limb muscles - peripheral fatigue - to which the central nervous system makes no contribution. The past decade has witnessed the growing realization that this brainless model cannot explain exercise performance. This article traces the evolution of our modern understanding of how the CNS regulates exercise specifically to insure that each exercise bout terminates whilst homeostasis is retained in all bodily systems. The brain uses the symptoms of fatigue as key regulators to insure that the exercise is completed before harm develops. These sensations of fatigue are unique to each individual and are illusionary since their generation is largely independent of the real biological state of the athlete at the time they develop. The model predicts that attempts to understand fatigue and to explain superior human athletic performance purely on the basis of the body’s known physiological and metabolic responses to exercise must fail since subconscious and conscious mental decisions made by winners and losers, in both training and competition, are the ultimate determinants of both fatigue and athletic performance.

  3. Regrowing the adult brain: NF-κB controls functional circuit formation and tissue homeostasis in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Imielski

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders.

  4. Subchronic effects of inhaled ambient particulate matter on glucose homeostasis and target organ damage in a type 1 diabetic rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yuan-Horng [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Charles, Chou C.-K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jyh-Seng [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tung, Chun-Liang [Department of Pathology, Ditmanson Medical Foundation Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Li, Ya-Ru; Lo, Kai [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen, E-mail: tcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported associations between particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular effects, and diabetes mellitus (DM) patients might be susceptible to these effects. The chief chronic injuries resulting from DM are small vascular injuries (micro-vascular complications) or large blood vessel injuries (macro-vascular complications). However, toxicological data regarding the effects of PM on DM-related cardiovascular complications is limited. Our objective was to investigate whether subchronic PM exposure alters glucose homeostasis and causes cardiovascular complications in a type 1 DM rat model. We constructed a real world PM{sub 2.5} exposure system, the Taipei Air Pollution Exposure System for Health Effects (TAPES), to continuously deliver non-concentrated PM for subchronic exposure. A type 1 DM rat model was induced using streptozotocin. Between December 22, 2009 and April 9, 2010, DM rats were exposed to PM or to filtered air (FA) using TAPES in Taipei, Taiwan, 24 h/day, 7 days/week, for a total of 16 weeks. The average concentrations (mean [SD]) of PM{sub 2.5} in the exposure and control chambers of the TAPES were 13.30 [8.65] and 0.13 [0.05] μg/m{sup 3}, respectively. Glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was significantly elevated after exposure to PM compared with exposure to FA (mean [SD], 7.7% [3.1%] vs. 4.7% [1.0%], P < 0.05). Interleukin 6 and fibrinogen levels were significantly increased after PM exposure. PM caused focal myocarditis, aortic medial thickness, advanced glomerulosclerosis, and accentuation of tubular damage of the kidney (tubular damage index: 1.76 [0.77] vs. 1.15 [0.36], P < 0.001). PM exposure might induce the macro- and micro-vascular complications in DM through chronic hyperglycemia and systemic inflammation. - Highlights: • The study demonstrated cardiovascular and renal effects of PM in a rat model of DM. • TAPES is a continuous, real world, long-term PM exposure system. • HbA1c, a marker of glycemic

  5. Parameters of glucose metabolism and the aging brain: a magnetization transfer imaging study of brain macro- and micro-structure in older adults without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; Altmann-Schneider, Irmhild; Jansen, Steffy W; van Buchem, Mark A; Slagboom, P Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-08-01

    Given the concurrent, escalating epidemic of diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases, two age-related disorders, we aimed to understand the relation between parameters of glucose metabolism and indices of pathology in the aging brain. From the Leiden Longevity Study, 132 participants (mean age 66 years) underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to assess glucose tolerance (fasted and area under the curve (AUC) glucose), insulin sensitivity (fasted and AUC insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS)) and insulin secretion (insulinogenic index). 3-T brain MRI was used to detect macro-structural damage (atrophy, white matter hyper-intensities, infarcts and/or micro-bleeds) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) to detect loss of micro-structural homogeneity that remains otherwise invisible on conventional MRI. Macro-structurally, higher fasted glucose was significantly associated with white matter atrophy (P = 0.028). Micro-structurally, decreased magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) peak height in gray matter was associated with higher fasted insulin (P = 0.010), AUCinsulin (P = 0.001), insulinogenic index (P = 0.008) and lower HOMA-IS index (P brain parenchymal homogeneity. These findings offer some insight into the association between different parameters of glucose metabolism (impairment of which is characteristic of diabetes mellitus) and brain aging.

  6. The 78-kD Glucose-Regulated Protein Regulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Homeostasis and Distal Epithelial Cell Survival during Lung Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodby, Per; Li, Changgong; Liu, Yixin; Wang, Hongjun; Marconett, Crystal N; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Minoo, Parviz; Lee, Amy S; Zhou, Beiyun

    2016-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease of prematurity, has been linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To investigate a causal role for ER stress in BPD pathogenesis, we generated conditional knockout (KO) mice (cGrp78(f/f)) with lung epithelial cell-specific KO of Grp78, a gene encoding the ER chaperone 78-kD glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a master regulator of ER homeostasis and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Lung epithelial-specific Grp78 KO disrupted lung morphogenesis, causing developmental arrest, increased alveolar epithelial type II cell apoptosis, and decreased surfactant protein and type I cell marker expression in perinatal lungs. cGrp78(f/f) pups died immediately after birth, likely owing to respiratory distress. Importantly, Grp78 KO triggered UPR activation with marked induction of the proapoptotic transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP). Increased expression of genes involved in oxidative stress and cell death and decreased expression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes suggest a role for oxidative stress in alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis. Increased Smad3 phosphorylation and expression of transforming growth factor-β/Smad3 targets Cdkn1a (encoding p21) and Gadd45a suggest that interactions among the apoptotic arm of the UPR, oxidative stress, and transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathways contribute to Grp78 KO-induced AEC apoptosis and developmental arrest. Chemical chaperone Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced UPR activation and apoptosis in cGrp78(f/f) lungs cultured ex vivo, confirming a role for ER stress in observed AEC abnormalities. These results demonstrate a key role for GRP78 in AEC survival and gene expression during lung development through modulation of ER stress, and suggest the UPR as a potential therapeutic target in BPD.

  7. Sleep disturbances and glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Scheurink, Anton J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, induced by either lifestyle, shift work or sleeping disorders, have become more prevalent in our 24/7 Western society. Sleep disturbances are associated with impaired health including metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The question remains whether there is a

  8. Voxel-based statistical analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wook Kim; Hyoung Seop Kim; Young-Sil An; Sang Hee Im

    2010-01-01

    Background Permanent vegetative state is defined as the impaired level of consciousness longer than 12 months after traumatic causes and 3 months after non-traumatic causes of brain injury. Although many studies assessed the cerebral metabolism in patients with acute and persistent vegetative state after brain injury, few studies investigated the cerebral metabolism in patients with permanent vegetative state. In this study, we performed the voxel-based analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism and investigated the relationship between regional cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of impaired consciousness in patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury.Methods We compared the regional cerebral glucose metabolism as demonstrated by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography from 12 patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury with those from 12 control subjects. Additionally, covariance analysis was performed to identify regions where decreased changes in regional cerebral glucose metabolism significantly correlated with a decrease of level of consciousness measured by JFK-coma recovery scare. Statistical analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping.Results Compared with controls, patients with permanent vegetative state demonstrated decreased cerebral glucose metabolism in the left precuneus, both posterior cingulate cortices, the left superior parietal lobule (Pcorrected <0.001), and increased cerebral glucose metabolism in the both cerebellum and the right supramarginal cortices (Pcorrected <0.001). In the covariance analysis, a decrease in the level of consciousness was significantly correlated with decreased cerebral glucose metabolism in the both posterior cingulate cortices (Puncorrected <0.005).Conclusion Our findings suggest that the posteromedial parietal cortex, which are part of neural network for consciousness, may be relevant structure for pathophysiological mechanism

  9. Role of the P-Type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B in brain copper homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathon eTelianidis; Ya Hui eHung; Stephanie eMateria; Sharon eLa Fontaine

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades there have been significant advances in our understanding of copper homeostasis and the pathological consequences of copper dysregulation. Cumulative evidence is revealing a complex regulatory network of proteins and pathways that maintain copper homeostasis. The recognition of copper dysregulation as a key pathological feature in prominent neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and prion diseases has led to increased research focus on the mech...

  10. Aqueous extract of tamarind seeds selectively increases glucose transporter-2, glucose transporter-4, and islets' intracellular calcium levels and stimulates β-cell proliferation resulting in improved glucose homeostasis in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Sushant Shivdas; Srinivasan, B P

    2012-08-01

    Tamarindus indica Linn. has been in use for a long time in Asian food and traditional medicine for different diseases including diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been fully understood. In view of the multidimensional activity of tamarind seeds due to their having high levels of polyphenols and flavonoids, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of aqueous tamarind seed extract (TSE) might increase glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP) 1c messenger RNA (mRNA) in the liver. Daily oral administration of TSE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced (90 mg/kg intraperitoneally) type 2 diabetic male Wistar rats at different doses (120 and 240 mg/kg body weight) for 4 weeks showed positive correlation with intracellular calcium and insulin release in isolated islets of Langerhans. Tamarind seed extract supplementation significantly improved the GLUT-2 protein and SREBP-1c mRNA expression in the liver and GLUT-4 protein and mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. The elevated levels of serum nitric oxide (NO), glycosylated hemoglobin level (hemoglobin (A1c)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) decreased after TSE administration. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that TSE abrogated STZ-induced apoptosis and increased β-cell neogenesis, indicating its effect on islets and β-cell mass. In conclusion, it was found that the antidiabetic effect of TSE on STZ-induced diabetes resulted from complex mechanisms of β-cell neogenesis, calcium handling, GLUT-2, GLUT-4, and SREBP-1c. These findings show the scope for formulating a new herbal drug for diabetes therapy.

  11. Influence of diabetes surgery on a gut-brain-liver axis regulating food intake and internal glucose production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mithieux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the brain, especially the hypothalamus, can modulate both insulin secretion and hepatic glucose fluxes, via the modulation of the sympathetic system (promoting glycogen breakdown and the parasympathetic system (stimulating glycogen deposition. Central insulin signalling or hypothalamic long-chain fatty acid oxidation can also control insulin's suppression of endogenous glucose production. Interestingly, intestinal gluconeogenesis can initiate a portal glucose signal, transmitted to the hypothalamus via the gastrointestinal nervous system. This signal may modulate the sensation of hunger and satiety and insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose fluxes as well. The rapid improvements of glucose control taking place after gastric bypass surgery in obese diabetics has long been mysterious. Actually, the specificity of gastric bypass in obese diabetic mice relates to major changes in the sensations of hunger and to rapid improvement in insulin sensitivity of endogenous glucose production. We have shown that an induction of intestinal gluconeogenesis plays a major role in these phenomena. In addition, the restoration of the secretion of glucagon like peptide 1 and consequently of insulin plays a key additional role to improve postprandial glucose tolerance. Therefore, a synergy between incretin effects and intestinal gluconeogenesis might be a key feature explaining the rapid improvement of glucose control in obese diabetics after bypass surgery.

  12. Influence of diabetes surgery on a gut-brain-liver axis regulating food intake and internal glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithieux, G

    2013-03-01

    It has long been known that the brain, especially the hypothalamus, can modulate both insulin secretion and hepatic glucose fluxes, via the modulation of the sympathetic system (promoting glycogen breakdown) and the parasympathetic system (stimulating glycogen deposition). Central insulin signalling or hypothalamic long-chain fatty acid oxidation can also control insulin's suppression of endogenous glucose production. Interestingly, intestinal gluconeogenesis can initiate a portal glucose signal, transmitted to the hypothalamus via the gastrointestinal nervous system. This signal may modulate the sensation of hunger and satiety and insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose fluxes as well. The rapid improvements of glucose control taking place after gastric bypass surgery in obese diabetics has long been mysterious. Actually, the specificity of gastric bypass in obese diabetic mice relates to major changes in the sensations of hunger and to rapid improvement in insulin sensitivity of endogenous glucose production. We have shown that an induction of intestinal gluconeogenesis plays a major role in these phenomena. In addition, the restoration of the secretion of glucagon like peptide 1 and consequently of insulin plays a key additional role to improve postprandial glucose tolerance. Therefore, a synergy between incretin effects and intestinal gluconeogenesis might be a key feature explaining the rapid improvement of glucose control in obese diabetics after bypass surgery.

  13. Neuroendocrinology: Electromagnetogenetic Control over Feeding and Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruud, Johan; Brüning, Jens C

    2016-06-06

    Cutting-edge experiments show a new means to control the activity of specifically genetically targeted neurons in the hypothalamus using electromagnetic force. At the flip of a switch, the system bidirectionally regulates feeding behavior and glucose homeostasis, demonstrating wireless control over deep brain regions and their strong influence over energy balance.

  14. Monitoring arterio-venous differences of glucose and lactate in the anesthetized rat with or without brain damage with ultrafiltration and biosensor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegsma-Vogt, G; Venema, K; Postema, F; Korf, J

    2001-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of arterio-venous glucose and lactate differences may serve as a diagnostic tool to assess normal brain function and brain pathology. We describe a method and some results obtained with arterio-venous measurements of glucose and lactate in the blood of the halothane-anesthetize

  15. A Systems Approach Implicates a Brain Mitochondrial Oxidative Homeostasis Co-expression Network in Genetic Vulnerability to Alcohol Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Nicole A. R.; Denmark, DeAunne L.; Kozell, Laura B.; Buck, Kari J.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors significantly affect vulnerability to alcohol dependence (alcoholism). We previously identified quantitative trait loci on distal mouse chromosome 1 with large effects on predisposition to alcohol physiological dependence and associated withdrawal following both chronic and acute alcohol exposure in mice (Alcdp1 and Alcw1, respectively). We fine-mapped these loci to a 1.1–1.7 Mb interval syntenic with human 1q23.2-23.3. Alcw1/Alcdp1 interval genes show remarkable genetic variation among mice derived from the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains, the two most widely studied genetic animal models for alcohol-related traits. Here, we report the creation of a novel recombinant Alcw1/Alcdp1 congenic model (R2) in which the Alcw1/Alcdp1 interval from a donor C57BL/6J strain is introgressed onto a uniform, inbred DBA/2J genetic background. As expected, R2 mice demonstrate significantly less severe alcohol withdrawal compared to wild-type littermates. Additionally, comparing R2 and background strain animals, as well as reciprocal congenic (R8) and appropriate background strain animals, we assessed Alcw1/Alcdp1 dependent brain gene expression using microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. To our knowledge this includes the first Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis using reciprocal congenic models. Importantly, this allows detection of co-expression patterns limited to one or common to both genetic backgrounds with high or low predisposition to alcohol withdrawal severity. The gene expression patterns (modules) in common contain genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, building upon human and animal model studies that implicate involvement of oxidative phosphorylation in alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Finally, we demonstrate that administration of N-acetylcysteine, an FDA-approved antioxidant, significantly reduces symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (convulsions) in mice, thus validating a phenotypic role for this network. Taken together, these studies

  16. The optimal dosage and window of opportunity to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis following traumatic brain injury using the uncoupler FCCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Jignesh D; Pauly, James R; Sullivan, Patrick G

    2009-08-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a rapid and extensive necrosis at the primary site of injury that appears to be driven in part by significant mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is based on the hypothesis that TBI-induced, aberrant glutamate release increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling/overload ultimately leading to mitochondrial damage. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrates that mitochondrial uncoupling during the acute phases of TBI-induced excitotoxicity can reduce mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (cycling), ROS production and mitochondrial damage resulting in neuroprotection and improved behavioral outcome. The current study was designed to determine the optimal dosage and therapeutic window of opportunity for the potent mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP following moderate TBI. For this study, we used young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g); either sham-operated or moderately (1.5 mm) injured using the controlled cortical impactor (CCI) model of TBI. In the first set of studies animals were injected with either vehicle (100% DMSO) or different concentrations of FCCP (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg in 100% DMSO) intraperitoneally at 5 min post-injury; tested behaviorally at 10 days and cortical sparing assessed at 18 days post-injury. The results demonstrate that of all the dosages tested, 2.5 mg/kg rendered the maximum improvement in behavioral outcomes and tissue spared. Using this optimal dose (2.5 mg/kg) and time point for intervention (5 min post-injury), we assessed mitochondrial bioenergetics and mitochondrial structural integrity 24 h post-injury. Furthermore, using this dosage we assessed mitochondrial bioenergetics and Ca(2+) loading at 3 and 6 h post-injury to further verify our target mechanism and establish these assessments as a valid endpoint to use as a means to determine the therapeutic window of FCCP. To begin to address the window of opportunity for maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis, the optimal dose of FCCP

  17. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; van Osch, Matthias J.; Roerdink, Jos B. T. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfu

  18. Analysis of tumor metabolism reveals mitochondrial glucose oxidation in genetically diverse, human glioblastomas in the mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Yang, Chendong; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Cho, Steve; Baek, Hyeonman; Yang, Xiao-Li; Rajagopalan, Kartik N.; Maddie, Melissa; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Zhao, Zhenze; Cai, Ling; Good, Levi; Tu, Benjamin P.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Matés, José M.; Pascual, Juan M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer cell lines, but little is known about the fate of glucose and other nutrients in tumors growing in their native microenvironment. To study tumor metabolism in vivo, we used an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM). We infused 13C-labeled nutrients into mice bearing three independent GBM lines, each with a distinct set of mutations. All three lines displayed glycolysis, as expected for aggressive tumors. They also displayed unexpected metabolic complexity, oxidizing glucose via pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle, and using glucose to supply anaplerosis and other biosynthetic activities. Comparing the tumors to surrounding brain revealed obvious metabolic differences, notably the accumulation of a large glutamine pool within the tumors. Many of these same activities were conserved in cells cultured ex vivo from the tumors. Thus GBM cells utilize mitochondrial glucose oxidation during aggressive tumor growth in vivo. PMID:22682223

  19. Functional imaging of focal brain activation in conscious rats: impact of [(14)C]glucose metabolite spreading and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Nancy F; Ball, Kelly K; Dienel, Gerald A

    2007-11-15

    Labeled glucose and its analogs are widely used in imaging and metabolic studies of brain function, astrocyte-neuron interactions, and neurotransmission. Metabolite shuttling among astrocytes and neurons is essential for cell-cell transfer of neurotransmitter precursors and supply and elimination of energy metabolites, but dispersion and release of labeled compounds from activated tissue would reduce signal registration in metabolic labeling studies, causing underestimation of focal functional activation. Processes and pathways involved in metabolite trafficking and release were therefore assessed in the auditory pathway of conscious rats. Unilateral monotonic stimulation increased glucose utilization (CMR(glc)) in tonotopic bands in the activated inferior colliculus by 35-85% compared with contralateral tissue when assayed with [(14)C]deoxyglucose (DG), whereas only 20-30% increases were registered with [1- or 6-(14)C]glucose. Tonotopic bands were not evident with [1-(14)C]glucose unless assayed during halothane anesthesia or pretreatment with probenecid but were detectable with [6-(14)C]glucose. Extracellular lactate levels transiently doubled during acoustic stimulation, so metabolite spreading was assessed by microinfusion of [(14)C]tracers into the inferior colliculus. The volume of tissue labeled by [1-(14)C]glucose exceeded that by [(14)C]DG by 3.2- and 1.4-fold during rest and acoustic activation, respectively. During activation, the tissue volume labeled by U-(14)C-labeled glutamine and lactate rose, whereas that by glucose fell 50% and that by DG was unchanged. Dispersion of [1-(14)C]glucose and its metabolites during rest was also reduced 50% by preinfusion of gap junction blockers. To summarize, during brain activation focal CMR(glc) is underestimated with labeled glucose because of decarboxylation reactions, spreading within tissue and via the astrocyte syncytium, and release from activated tissue. These findings help explain the fall in CMR(O2)/CMR

  20. The Oral Iron Chelator, Deferasirox, Reverses the Age-Dependent Alterations in Iron and Amyloid-β Homeostasis in Rat Brain: Implications in the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Anand, Shruti; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2016-01-01

    The altered metabolism of iron impacts the brain function in multiple deleterious ways during normal aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease. We have shown in this study that chelatable iron accumulates in the aged rat brain along with overexpression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin, accompanied by significant alterations in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide homeostasis in the aging brain, such as an increased production of the amyloid-β protein precursor, a decreased level of neprilysin, and increased accumulation of Aβ42. When aged rats are given daily the iron chelator, deferasirox, over a period of more than 4 months starting from the 18th month, the age-related accumulation of iron and overexpression of TfR1 and ferritin in the brain are significantly prevented. More interestingly, the chelator treatment also considerably reverses the altered Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain implying a significant role of iron in the latter phenomenon. Further, other results indicate that iron accumulation results in oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB in the aged rat brain, which are also reversed by the deferasirox treatment. The analysis of the results together suggests that iron accumulation and oxidative stress interact at multiple levels that include transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to bring about changes in the expression levels of TfR1 and ferritin and also alterations in Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging rat brain. The efficacy of deferasirox in preventing age-related changes in iron and Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain, as shown here, has obvious therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Glucose-induced inhibition of the appetitive brain response to visual food cues in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vugt, Dean A; Krzemien, Alicja; Alsaadi, Hanin; Frank, Tamar C; Reid, Robert L

    2014-04-16

    We postulate that insulin regulation of food intake is compromised when insulin resistance is present. In order to investigate the effect of insulin sensitivity on appetitive brain responses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in a group of women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in which insulin sensitivity ranged from normal to resistant. Subjects (n=19) were imaged while viewing pictures of high calorie (HC) foods and low calorie (LC) foods after ingesting either 75 g glucose or an equivalent volume of water. The insulin sensitive group showed reduced blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in response to food pictures following glucose ingestion in numerous corticolimbic brain regions, whereas the insulin resistant group did not. There was a significant interaction between insulin sensitivity (sensitive vs resistant) and condition (water vs glucose). The largest clusters identified included the left insula, bilateral limbic/parahippocampal gyrus/culmen/midbrain, bilateral limbic lobe/precuneus, and left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal for HC and LC stimuli combined, the left parahippocampal gyrus/fusiform/pulvinar/midbrain for HC pictures, and the left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal and middle/inferior frontal gyrus/orbitofrontal cortex for LC pictures. Furthermore, BOLD signal in the anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and parietal cortex during a glucose challenge correlated negatively with insulin sensitivity. We conclude the PCOS women with insulin resistance have an impaired brain response to a glucose challenge. The inability of postprandial hyperinsulinemia to inhibit brain responsiveness to food cues in insulin resistant subjects may lead to greater non-homeostatic eating.

  2. Effects of diabetes on brain metabolism - is brain glycogen a significant player?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S.

    2015-01-01

    Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose to the br......Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose...... to the brain may be affected and have important impacts on brain metabolism and neurotransmission. This also implies that brain glycogen may serve an essential role in the diabetic state to sustain appropriate brain function. There are two main types of diabetes; type 1 and type 2 diabetes and both types may...... be associated with brain impairments e.g. cognitive decline and dementia. It is however, not clear how these impairments on brain function are linked to alterations in brain energy and neurotransmitter metabolism. In this review, we will illuminate how rodent diabetes models have contributed to a better...

  3. Evidence that the major metabolites accumulating in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency disturb mitochondrial energy homeostasis in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Ferreira, Gustavo da Costa; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Zanatta, Angela; Klamt, Fábio; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-11-03

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is an inherited metabolic disorder of fatty acid oxidation in which the affected patients predominantly present high levels of octanoic (OA) and decanoic (DA) acids and their glycine and carnitine by-products in tissues and body fluids. It is clinically characterized by episodic encephalopathic crises with coma and seizures, as well as by progressive neurological involvement, whose pathophysiology is poorly known. In the present work, we investigated the in vitro effects of OA and DA on various parameters of energy homeostasis in mitochondrial preparations from brain of young rats. We found that OA and DA markedly increased state 4 respiration and diminished state 3 respiration as well as the respiratory control ratio, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the matrix NAD(P)H levels. In addition, DA-elicited increase in oxygen consumption in state 4 respiration was partially prevented by atractyloside, indicating the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocator. OA and DA also reduced ADP/O ratio, CCCP-stimulated respiration and the activities of respiratory chain complexes. The data indicate that the major accumulating fatty acids in MCADD act as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and as metabolic inhibitors. Furthermore, DA, but not OA, provoked a marked mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release from mitochondria, reflecting a permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Taken together, these data suggest that OA and DA impair brain mitochondrial energy homeostasis that could underlie at least in part the neuropathology of MCADD.

  4. The expression of dominant negative TCF7L2 in pancreatic beta cells during the embryonic stage causes impaired glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijuan Shao

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Our observations support a cell autonomous role for TCF7L2 in pancreatic β-cells suggested by most, though not all, investigations. βTCFDN is a novel model for further exploring the role of TCF7L2 in β-cell genesis and metabolic homeostasis.

  5. Brain glucose utilization in systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric symptoms: a controlled positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, A. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Weiner, S.M. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Peter, H.H. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Mueller-Brand, J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Goetze, M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Moser, E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Gutfleisch, J. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Hoegerle, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Juengling, F.D. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Nitzsche, E.U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    In contrast to morphological imaging [such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography], functional imaging may be of advantage in the detection of brain abnormalities in cases of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, we studied 13 patients (aged 40{+-}14 years, 11 female, 2 male) with neuropsychiatric SLE who met four of the American Rheumatism Association criteria for the classification of SLE. Ten clinically and neurologically healthy volunteers served as controls (aged 40{+-}12 years, 5 female, 5 male). Both groups were investigated using fluorine-18-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography (PET) and cranial MRI. The normal controls and 11 of the 13 patients showed normal MRI scans. However, PET scan was abnormal in all 13 SLE patients. Significant group-to-group differences in the glucose metabolic index (GMI=region of interest uptake/global uptake at the level of the basal ganglia and thalamus) were found in the parieto-occipital region on both sides: the GMI of the parieto-occipital region on the right side was 0.922{+-}0.045 in patients and 1.066{+-}0.081 in controls (P<0.0001, Mann Whitney U test), while on the left side it was 0.892{+-}0.060 in patients and 1.034{+-}0.051 in controls (P=0.0002). Parieto-occipital hypometabolism is a conspicuous finding in mainly MRI-negative neuropsychiatric SLE. As the parieto-occipital region is located at the boundary of blood supply of all three major arteries, it could be the most vulnerable zone of the cerebrum and may be affected at an early stage of the cerebrovascular disease. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Brain glucose metabolism and neuropsychological test in patients with mild cognitive impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹秋云; 江开达; 张明园; 刘永昌; 肖世富; 左传涛; 黄红芳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the features of regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc) in patients with mild cognitive impairment(MCI) by positron emission-tomography and its relationship with neuropsychological test.Methods Positron emission tomography, mini-mental state examination and Wechsler memory scale were applied in 10 patients with MCI and 10 healthy volunteers as the control group.Results Scores of mini-mental state examination and Wechsler memory scale in MCI patients were lower than those in the control group (P<0.01). rCMRglc of the left orbital gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus and right putamen was lower in the MCI group than in the control group (P<0.05). Correlation analysis in the MCI group indicated that rCMRglc of many brain regions such as the orbital gyrus, putamen, left hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, left amygdaloid body, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and medial occipitotemporal gyrus in MCI patients, were correlated negatively with age; while the rCMRglc of many parts of the brain such as the left putamen, temporal lobe, anterior cingulate gyrus, left insular lobe, amygdaloid body, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus and medial occipitotemporal gyrus were correlated positively with mini-mental state examination; and rCMRglc of the left putamen, temporal lobe, left insular lobe, precentral gyrus and postcentral gyrus were correlated positively with Wechsler memory scale. The right putamen, the right inferior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and left postcentral gyrus were correlated positively with the length of education. However, only rCMRglc of the left amygdaloid body were correlated positively with gender. Conclusion The rCMRglc was lower in the orbital gyrus and putamen of MCI patients. Their rCMRglc were correlated with their cognitive impairment severity, age, length of education and sex.

  7. Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

  8. Design, synthesis and preliminary bio-evaluation of glucose-cholesterol derivatives as ligands for brain targeting liposomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lei; Wei Fan; Xian Kun Li; Shan Wang; Li Hai; Yong Wu

    2011-01-01

    A series of glucose-cholesterol derivatives 8a-8e as ligands for brain targeting liposomes were synthesized. The preparation of compound 6 involved temporary protection of glucose with chlorotrimethylsilicane and hexamethyldisilazane followed by selectively hydrolyzed. The known cholesteryl tosylate 1 were coupled to ethylene glycols to afford alcohol 2a-2e. Substitution and deprotection of alcohol 2a-2e furnished the acids 4a-4e, which was condensed with compound 6 to get compounds 7a-7e, and then was deprotected in tetrahydrofuran with TEA to obtain the title compounds. As a model drug, tegafur was entrapped by liposomes coupled with 8b, and preliminary in vivo evaluation shown 8b could enhance the ability of liposomes delivering tegafur across the blood brain barrier.

  9. Cytosolic NADPH homeostasis in glucose-starved procyclic Trypanosoma brucei relies on malic enzyme and the pentose phosphate pathway fed by gluconeogenic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmann, Stefan; Morand, Pauline; Ebikeme, Charles; Gales, Lara; Biran, Marc; Hubert, Jane; Brennand, Ana; Mazet, Muriel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Michels, Paul A M; Portais, Jean-Charles; Boshart, Michael; Bringaud, Frédéric

    2013-06-21

    All living organisms depend on NADPH production to feed essential biosyntheses and for oxidative stress defense. Protozoan parasites such as the sleeping sickness pathogen Trypanosoma brucei adapt to different host environments, carbon sources, and oxidative stresses during their infectious life cycle. The procyclic stage develops in the midgut of the tsetse insect vector, where they rely on proline as carbon source, although they prefer glucose when grown in rich media. Here, we investigate the flexible and carbon source-dependent use of NADPH synthesis pathways in the cytosol of the procyclic stage. The T. brucei genome encodes two cytosolic NADPH-producing pathways, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and the NADP-dependent malic enzyme (MEc). Reverse genetic blocking of those pathways and a specific inhibitor (dehydroepiandrosterone) of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase together established redundancy with respect to H2O2 stress management and parasite growth. Blocking both pathways resulted in ∼10-fold increase of susceptibility to H2O2 stress and cell death. Unexpectedly, the same pathway redundancy was observed in glucose-rich and glucose-depleted conditions, suggesting that gluconeogenesis can feed the PPP to provide NADPH. This was confirmed by (i) a lethal phenotype of RNAi-mediated depletion of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) in the glucose-depleted Δmec/Δmec null background, (ii) an ∼10-fold increase of susceptibility to H2O2 stress observed for the Δmec/Δmec/(RNAi)PGI double mutant when compared with the single mutants, and (iii) the (13)C enrichment of glycolytic and PPP intermediates from cells incubated with [U-(13)C]proline, in the absence of glucose. Gluconeogenesis-supported NADPH supply may also be important for nucleotide and glycoconjugate syntheses in the insect host.

  10. Comparison of the effect of multiple short-duration with single long-duration exercise sessions on glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, L; Dahl-Petersen, I; Haugaard, Steen B

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated and compared the effects on glycaemic control of two different exercise protocols in elderly men with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Eighteen patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus carried out home-based bicycle training for 5 weeks. Patients were randomly assigned...... glucose OGTT (p = 0.04) and plasma glucose concentration areas under the curve at 120 min (p exercise groups...... increased similarly in both exercise groups. A possible explanation is that the energy expenditure associated with multiple short daily sessions may be greater than that in a single daily session. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov...

  11. Endocannabinoids and energy homeostasis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristino, Luigia; Becker, Thorsten; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a widespread intercellular signaling system that plays a critical role in energy homeostasis, meant as the precise matching of caloric intake with energy expenditure which normally keeps body weight stable over time. Complex interactions between environmental and neurohormonal systems directly contribute to the balance of energy homeostasis. This review highlights established and more recent data on the brain circuits in which the ECS plays an important regulatory role, with focus on the hypothalamus, a region where numerous interacting systems regulating feeding, satiety, stress, and other motivational states coexist. Although not meant as an exhaustive review of the field, this article will discuss how endocannabinoid tone, in addition to reinforcing reward circuitries and modulating food intake and the salience of food, controls lipid and glucose metabolism in several peripheral organs, particularly the liver and adipose tissue. Direct actions in the skeletal muscle and pancreas are also emerging and are briefly discussed. This review provides new perspectives into endocannabinoid control of the neurochemical causes and consequences of energy homeostasis imbalance, a knowledge that might lead to new potential treatments for obesity and related morbidities.

  12. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  13. At the centennial of Michaelis and Menten, competing Michaelis-Menten steps explain effect of GLP-1 on blood-brain transfer and metabolism of glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Gejl; Rungby, Jørgen; Brock, Birgitte;

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent insulinotropic incretin hormone with pancreatic and extrapancreatic effects. Studies reveal significant effects in regions of brain tissue that regulate appetite and satiety. The effects cause that mimetics of GLP-1 serves as treatment of type 2 diabete...... and in vivo, as in pancreas. The apparent neuroprotective potential of GLP-1, indirectly acting through changes of cerebral blood flow, glucose metabolism or brain glucose concentration, or all of these, is worthy of close attention....

  14. Role of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in the regulation of energy homeostasis in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Pedersen, Maria; Krabbe, Karen S

    2009-01-01

    identifies BDNF as a player not only in central metabolism, but also in regulating energy metabolism in peripheral organs. Low levels of BDNF are found in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. In addition, BDNF levels are low in obesity...... and independently so in patients with type 2 diabetes. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is expressed in non-neurogenic tissues, including skeletal muscle, and exercise increases BDNF levels not only in the brain and in plasma, but in skeletal muscle as well. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein...... diabetes may explain the clustering of these diseases. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is likely to mediate some of the beneficial effects of exercise with regard to protection against dementia and type 2 diabetes....

  15. Diazepam and Jacobson's progressive relaxation show similar attenuating short-term effects on stress-related brain glucose consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifarré, P; Simó, M; Gispert, J-D; Plaza, P; Fernández, A; Pujol, J

    2015-02-01

    A non-pharmacological method to reduce anxiety is "progressive relaxation" (PR). The aim of the method is to reduce mental stress and associated mental processes by means of progressive suppression of muscle tension. The study was addressed to evaluate changes in brain glucose metabolism induced by PR in patients under a stressing state generated by a diagnostic medical intervention. The effect of PR was compared to a dose of sublingual diazepam, with the prediction that both interventions would be associated with a reduction in brain metabolism. Eighty-four oncological patients were assessed with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. Maps of brain glucose distribution from 28 patients receiving PR were compared with maps from 28 patients receiving sublingual diazepam and with 28 patients with no treatment intervention. Compared to reference control subjects, the PR and diazepam groups showed a statistically significant, bilateral and generalized cortical hypometabolism. Regions showing the most prominent changes were the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. No significant differences were identified in the direct comparison between relaxation technique and sublingual diazepam. Our findings suggest that relaxation induced by a physical/psychological procedure can be as effective as a reference anxiolytic in reducing brain activity during a stressful state.

  16. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan and High Stability Fucoxanthin on Glucose Homeostasis, Lipid Metabolism, and Liver Function in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ting Victor Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF and fucoxanthin (Fx in terms of antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective activities were investigated in a mouse model of type II diabetes. The intake of LMF, Fx, and LMF + Fx lowered the blood sugar and fasting blood sugar levels, and increased serum adiponectin levels. The significant decrease in urinary sugar was only observed in LMF + Fx supplementation. LMF and Fx had ameliorating effects on the hepatic tissue of db/db mice by increasing hepatic glycogen and antioxidative enzymes, and LMF was more effective than Fx at improving hepatic glucose metabolism. As for glucose and lipid metabolism in the adipose tissue, the expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, glucose transporter (GLUT, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, and uncoupling protein (UCP-1 mRNAs in the adipose tissue of diabetic mice was significantly upregulated by Fx and LMF + Fx, and levels of inflammatory adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6, were significantly modulated only by LMF + Fx supplementation. The efficacy of LMF + Fx supplementation on the decrease in urinary sugar and on glucose and lipid metabolism in the white adipose tissue of db/db mice was better than that of Fx or LMF alone, indicating the occurrence of a synergistic effect of LMF and Fx.

  17. The role of insulin-like growth factor-I and its binding proteins in glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpathak, Swapnil N; Gunter, Marc J; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Ho, Gloria Y F; Kaplan, Robert C; Muzumdar, Radhika; Rohan, Thomas E; Strickler, Howard D

    2009-01-01

    This review addresses the possible role of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-axis in normal glucose homoeostasis and in the etiopathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. IGF-I, a peptide hormone, shares amino acid sequence homology with insulin and has insulin-like activity; most notably, the promotion of glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. Type 2 diabetes as well as pre-diabetic states, including impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance, are associated cross-sectionally with altered circulating levels of IGF-I and its binding proteins (IGFBPs). Administration of recombinant human IGF-I has been reported to improve insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals as well as in patients with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Further, IGF-I may have beneficial effects on systemic inflammation, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and on pancreatic beta-cell mass and function. There is considerable inter-individual heterogeneity in endogenous levels of IGF-I and its binding proteins; however, the relationship between these variations and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes has not been extensively investigated. Large prospective studies are required to evaluate this association.

  18. Betulinic acid and 1,25(OH)₂ vitamin D₃ share intracellular signal transduction in glucose homeostasis in soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Allisson Jhonatan Gomes; Frederico, Marisa Jádna Silva; Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Bretanha, Lizandra Czermainski; Tavares, Luciana de Carvalho; Buss, Ziliani da Silva; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; de Souza, Ariane Zamoner Pacheco; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2014-03-01

    The effect of betulinic acid on glycemia and its mechanism of action compared with 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 in rat muscle were investigated. Betulinic acid improved glycemia, induced insulin secretion and increased the glycogen content and glucose uptake in muscle tissue. Additionally, the integrity of both PI3K and the cytoskeleton is necessary for the stimulatory action of betulinic acid in glucose uptake. The genomic effect was apparent, since cycloheximide and PD98059 nullified the stimulatory effect of betulinic acid on glucose uptake. Therefore, although this compound did not modify the DNA transcription, the protein translation was significantly improved. Also, betulinic acid increased the GLUT4 immunocontent and its translocation was corroborated by GLUT4 localization at the plasma membrane (after 180 min). On the other hand, the effect of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 on glucose uptake is not mediated by PI3K and microtubule activity. In contrast, the nuclear activity of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 is necessary to trigger glucose uptake. In addition, the increased DNA transcription and GLUT4 immunocontent provide evidence of a mechanism by which 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 contributes to glycemia. In conclusion, betulinic acid acts as an insulin secretagogue and insulinomimetic agent via PI3K, MAPK and mRNA translation and partially shares the genomic pathway with 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 to upregulate the GLUT4. In summary, betulinic acid regulates glycemia through classical insulin signaling by stimulating GLUT4 synthesis and translocation. In addition, it does not cause hypercalcemia, which is highly significant from the drug discovery perspective.

  19. ONLINE MONITORING OF EXTRACELLULAR BRAIN GLUCOSE USING MICRODIALYSIS AND A NADPH-LINKED ENZYMATIC ASSAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERKUIL, JHF; KORF, J

    1991-01-01

    A method to monitor extracellular glucose in freely moving rats, based on intracerebral microdialysis coupled to an enzyme reactor is described. The dialysate is continuously mixed with a solution containing the enzymes hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and the fluorescence of NADPH

  20. Glucose metabolism via the pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and Krebs cycle in an orthotopic mouse model of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Malloy, Craig R; Bachoo, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using orthotopic mouse models of human glioblastoma (GBM) and renal cell carcinoma metastatic to brain, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-(13) C(2) ]glucose. The [3-(13) C]lactate/[2,3-(13) C(2) ]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and brain metastasis and their respective surrounding brains (GBM, 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033, respectively (p = 1); metastasis: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than the PPP flux in these tumors, and that the PPP flux into the lactate pool is similar in both tumors. Remarkably, (13) C-(13) C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumor types, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal cell carcinoma, in contrast with GBM, (13) C multiplets of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. In addition, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient's primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a renal cell carcinoma tissue microarray of the same histology, suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell autonomous in at least a subset of renal cell carcinomas. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (13) C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  1. Glucose Metabolism via the Pentose Phosphate Pathway, Glycolysis and Krebs Cycle in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B.; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM) and a brain metastatic renal tumor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) histology, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-13C2]glucose. The [3-13C]lactate/[2,3-13C2]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and renal tumor and their respective surrounding brains (GBM: 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033 (p=1); CCRCC: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than PPP flux in these tumors, and that PPP flux into the lactate pool was similar in both tissues. Remarkably, 13C-13C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumors, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal tumor, in contrast to GBM and surrounding brain, 13C multiplets of GABA differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. Additionally, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient’s primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a CCRCC tissue microarray suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell-autonomous in at least a subset of renal tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate that 13C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22383401

  2. At the centennial of Michaelis and Menten, competing Michaelis-Menten steps explain effect of GLP-1 on blood-brain transfer and metabolism of glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gejl, Michael; Rungby, Jørgen; Brock, Birgitte; Gjedde, Albert

    2014-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent insulinotropic incretin hormone with both pancreatic and extrapancreatic effects. Studies of GLP-1 reveal significant effects in regions of brain tissue that regulate appetite and satiety. GLP-1 mimetics are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 interacts with peripheral functions in which the autonomic nervous system plays an important role, and emerging pre-clinical findings indicate a potential neuroprotective role of the peptide, for example in models of stroke and in neurodegenerative disorders. A century ago, Leonor Michaelis and Maud Menten described the steady-state enzyme kinetics that still apply to the multiple receptors, transporters and enzymes that define the biochemical reactions of the brain, including the glucose-dependent impact of GLP-1 on blood-brain glucose transfer and metabolism. This MiniReview examines the potential of GLP-1 as a molecule of interest for the understanding of brain energy metabolism and with reference to the impact on brain metabolism related to appetite and satiety regulation, stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. These effects can be understood only by reference to the original formulation of the Michaelis-Menten equation as applied to a chain of kinetically controlled steps. Indeed, the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on blood-brain glucose transfer and brain metabolism of glucose depend on the glucose concentration and relative affinities of the steps both in vitro and in vivo, as in the pancreas.

  3. Metabolically distinct weight loss by 10,12 CLA and caloric restriction highlight the importance of subcutaneous white adipose tissue for glucose homeostasis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shari; Goodspeed, Leela; Wietecha, Tomasz; Houston, Barbara; Omer, Mohamed; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Subramanian, Savitha; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Morton, Gregory J.; Chait, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Background Widely used as a weight loss supplement, trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (10,12 CLA) promotes fat loss in obese mice and humans, but has also been associated with insulin resistance. Objective We therefore sought to directly compare weight loss by 10,12 CLA versus caloric restriction (CR, 15–25%), an acceptable healthy method of weight loss, to determine how 10,12 CLA-mediated weight loss fails to improve glucose metabolism. Methods Obese mice with characteristics of human metabolic syndrome were either supplemented with 10,12 CLA or subjected to CR to promote weight loss. Metabolic endpoints such as energy expenditure, glucose and insulin tolerance testing, and trunk fat distribution were measured. Results By design, 10,12 CLA and CR caused equivalent weight loss, with greater fat loss by 10,12 CLA accompanied by increased energy expenditure, reduced respiratory quotient, increased fat oxidation, accumulation of alternatively activated macrophages, and browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). Moreover, 10,12 CLA-supplemented mice better defended their body temperature against a cold challenge. However, 10,12 CLA concurrently induced the detrimental loss of subcutaneous WAT without reducing visceral WAT, promoted reduced plasma and WAT adipokine levels, worsened hepatic steatosis, and failed to improve glucose metabolism. Obese mice undergoing CR were protected from subcutaneous-specific fat loss, had improved hepatic steatosis, and subsequently showed the expected improvements in WAT adipokines, glucose metabolism and WAT inflammation. Conclusions These results suggest that 10,12 CLA mediates the preferential loss of subcutaneous fat that likely contributes to hepatic steatosis and maintained insulin resistance, despite significant weight loss and WAT browning in mice. Collectively, we have shown that weight loss due to 10,12 CLA supplementation or CR results in dramatically different metabolic phenotypes, with the latter

  4. The renin-angiotensin system: a target of and contributor to dyslipidemias, altered glucose homeostasis, and hypertension of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Kelly; Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Cassis, Lisa A

    2012-03-15

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension. Obesity has emerged as a primary contributor to essential hypertension in the United States and clusters with other metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol) defined within the metabolic syndrome. In addition to hypertension, RAS blockade may also serve as an effective treatment strategy to control impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and dyslipidemias in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or specific cholesterol metabolites have been demonstrated to activate components required for the synthesis [angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)], degradation (ACE2), or responsiveness (angiotensin II type 1 receptors, Mas receptors) to angiotensin peptides in cell types (e.g., pancreatic islet cells, adipocytes, macrophages) that mediate specific disorders of the metabolic syndrome. An activated local RAS in these cell types may contribute to dysregulated function by promoting oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. This review will discuss data demonstrating the regulation of components of the RAS by cholesterol and its metabolites, glucose, and/or insulin in cell types implicated in disorders of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss data supporting a role for an activated local RAS in dyslipidemias and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance and the development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome. Identification of an activated RAS as a common thread contributing to several disorders of the metabolic syndrome makes the use of angiotensin receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors an intriguing and novel option for multisymptom treatment.

  5. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver.

  6. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

  7. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazalviel, Laurent; Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Vallée, Nicolas; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Besnard, Stéphane; Abraini, Jacques H

    2016-01-01

    Normobaric oxygen (NBO) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA) = 0.1 MPa) and HBO (pO2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa) through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support) of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA.

  8. Cerebral glucose metabolism in long-term survivors of childhood primary brain tumors treated with surgery and radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Krabbe, Katja; Leffers, Anne M.;

    2003-01-01

    Delayed structural cerebral sequelae has been reported following cranial radiation therapy (CRT) to children with primary brain tumors, but little is known about potential functional changes. Twenty-four patients were included, diagnosed and treated at a median age of 11 years, and examined after...... that there is a general reduction in rCMRglc in long-term recurrence free survivors of childhood primary brain tumors treated with CRT in high doses (44-56 Gy)......Delayed structural cerebral sequelae has been reported following cranial radiation therapy (CRT) to children with primary brain tumors, but little is known about potential functional changes. Twenty-four patients were included, diagnosed and treated at a median age of 11 years, and examined after...... a median recurrence free survival of 16 years by MRI and Positron Emission Tomography using the glucose analog 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG). Three patients were not analyzed further due to diffuse cerebral atrophy, which might be related to previous hydrocephalus. Twenty-one patients were...

  9. The brain acid-base homeostasis and serotonin: A perspective on the use of carbon dioxide as human and rodent experimental model of panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, N K; van den Hove, D L A; Esquivel, G; De Cort, K; Goossens, L; Strackx, E; Buchanan, G F; Steinbusch, H W M; Lesch, K P; Schruers, K R J

    2015-06-01

    Panic attacks (PAs), the core feature of panic disorder, represent a common phenomenon in the general adult population and are associated with a considerable decrease in quality of life and high health care costs. To date, the underlying pathophysiology of PAs is not well understood. A unique feature of PAs is that they represent a rare example of a psychopathological phenomenon that can be reliably modeled in the laboratory in panic disorder patients and healthy volunteers. The most effective techniques to experimentally trigger PAs are those that acutely disturb the acid-base homeostasis in the brain: inhalation of carbon dioxide (CO2), hyperventilation, and lactate infusion. This review particularly focuses on the use of CO2 inhalation in humans and rodents as an experimental model of panic. Besides highlighting the different methodological approaches, the cardio-respiratory and the endocrine responses to CO2 inhalation are summarized. In addition, the relationships between CO2 level, changes in brain pH, the serotonergic system, and adaptive physiological and behavioral responses to CO2 exposure are presented. We aim to present an integrated psychological and neurobiological perspective. Remaining gaps in the literature and future perspectives are discussed.

  10. Combination of the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor empagliflozin with orlistat or sibutramine further improves the body-weight reduction and glucose homeostasis of obese rats fed a cafeteria diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers SP

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Vickers,1 Sharon C Cheetham,1 Katie R Headland,1 Keith Dickinson,1 Rolf Grempler,2 Eric Mayoux,2 Michael Mark,2 Thomas Klein2 1RenaSci, BioCity Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma, Biberach an der Riss, Germany Abstract: The present study assessed the potential of the sodium glucose-linked transporter (SGLT-2 inhibitor empagliflozin to decrease body weight when administered alone or in combination with the clinically effective weight-loss agents orlistat and sibutramine in obese rats fed a cafeteria diet. Female Wistar rats were exposed to a cafeteria diet to induce obesity. Empagliflozin was dosed once daily (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg for 28 days. Combination studies were subsequently performed using a submaximal empagliflozin dose (10 mg/kg with either sibutramine or orlistat. Body weight, food, and water intake were recorded daily. The effect of drug treatment on glucose tolerance, relevant plasma parameters, and carcass composition was determined. Empagliflozin dose-dependently reduced body weight, plasma leptin, and body fat though increased urinary glucose excretion. The combination of empagliflozin and orlistat significantly reduced body weight compared to animals treated with either drug alone, and significantly improved glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, and leptin compared to vehicle-treated controls. The effect of sibutramine to improve glycemic control in an oral glucose-tolerance test was also significantly increased, with empagliflozin and combination treatment leading to a reduction in carcass fat greater than that observed with either drug alone. These data demonstrate that empagliflozin reduces body weight in cafeteria-fed obese rats. In combination studies, empagliflozin further improved the body-weight or body-fat loss of animals in comparison to orlistat or sibutramine alone. Such studies may indicate improved strategies for the treatment of obese patients with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Keywords

  11. Effect of type and amount of dietary carbohydrate on biomarkers of glucose homeostasis and C reactive protein in overweight or obese adults: results from the OmniCarb trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Miller, Edgar R; Selvin, Elizabeth; Carey, Vincent J; Appel, Lawrence J; Christenson, Robert H; Sacks, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The glycemic index (GI) of dietary carbohydrate is thought to affect glucose homeostasis. Recently, the Effect of Amount and Type of Dietary Carbohydrates on Risk for Cardiovascular Heart Disease and Diabetes Study (OmniCarb) trial reported that a low-GI diet did not improve insulin sensitivity. We conducted this ancillary study of the OmniCarb trial to determine the effects of GI and carbohydrate content on glucose homeostasis and inflammation. Research design and methods OmniCarb was a randomized cross-over feeding study conducted in overweight or obese adults without diabetes (N=163). Participants were fed each of 4 diets for 5 weeks with 2-week washout periods. Weight was held constant. Diets were: high GI (GI≥65) with high carbohydrate (58% kcal), low GI (GI≤45) with low carbohydrate (40% kcal), low GI with high carbohydrate, and high GI with low carbohydrate. We measured glycated albumin (GA), fructosamine, and high sensitivity C reactive protein (CRP) at baseline and following each dietary period. These biomarkers were compared within-person between diets. Results The study population was 52% female and 50% black. Mean age was 53 (SD, 11) years; mean body mass index was 32 (SD 6) kg/m2. Reducing GI had no effect on GA or fructosamine, but increased fasting glucose in the setting of a high-carbohydrate diet (+2.2 mg/dL; p=0.02). Reducing carbohydrate content decreased GA in the setting of a high-GI diet (−0.2%; p=0.03) and decreased fructosamine in the setting of a low-GI diet (−4 µmol/L; p=0.003). Reducing carbohydrate while simultaneously increasing GI significantly reduced both GA (−0.2%; p=0.04) and fructosamine (−4 µmol/L; p=0.009). Neither reducing GI nor amount of carbohydrate affected insulin or CRP. Conclusions Reducing carbohydrate, regardless of high or low GI, decreased GA and fructosamine. This suggests that reducing carbohydrate content, rather than GI, is a better strategy for lowering glycemia in adults at risk

  12. Alcohol Decreases Baseline Brain Glucose Metabolism More in Heavy Drinkers Than Controls But Has No Effect on Stimulation-Induced Metabolic Increases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S.; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-01-01

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-18FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal. PMID:25698759

  13. Temporal control of glucocorticoid neurodynamics and its relevance for brain homeostasis, neuropathology and glucocorticoid-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Russell, Georgina M; Zarros, Apostolos; Lightman, Stafford L

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids mediate plethora of actions throughout the human body. Within the brain, they modulate aspects of immune system and neuroinflammatory processes, interfere with cellular metabolism and viability, interact with systems of neurotransmission and regulate neural rhythms. The influence of glucocorticoids on memory and emotional behaviour is well known and there is increasing evidence for their involvement in many neuropsychiatric pathologies. These effects, which at times can be in opposing directions, depend not only on the concentration of glucocorticoids but also the duration of their presence, the temporal relationship between their fluctuations, the co-influence of other stimuli, and the overall state of brain activity. Moreover, they are region- and cell type-specific. The molecular basis of such diversity of effects lies on the orchestration of the spatiotemporal interplay between glucocorticoid- and mineralocorticoid receptors, and is achieved through complex dynamics, mainly mediated via the circadian and ultradian pattern of glucocorticoid secretion. More sophisticated methodologies are therefore required to better approach the study of these hormones and improve the effectiveness of glucocorticoid-based therapeutics.

  14. Standardized chungkookjang, short-term fermented soybeans with Bacillus lichemiformis, improves glucose homeostasis as much as traditionally made chungkookjang in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Kim, Da Sol; Daily, James W; Jeong, Do Youn; Kwon, Dae Young; Park, Sunmin

    2013-01-01

    As the traditional homemade chungkookjang is replaced by standardized chungkookjang fermented by inoculating Bacillus spp., it is desirable to maintain the anti-diabetic efficacy of the most potent traditional varieties. Preliminary in vitro research suggested that anti-diabetic efficacy can be achieved by using B. lichemiformis as a starter and fermenting for 48 h. Experimental type 2 diabetic male rats induced by partial pancreatectomy and high fat diets were administered either control diet, 10% cooked soybeans, 10% traditional chungkookjang with potent anti-diabetic efficacy, or standardized chungkookjang fermented with B. lichemiformis for 48 h. Rats were fed their respective diets for 8 weeks after surgery. Cooked soybeans as well as both chungkookjangs partially restored fasting serum glucose concentrations, but only the chungkoojangs increased fasting insulin levels. That trend was also seen in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during hyperglycemic clamp and was explained by the greater β-cell mass and BrdU incorporation indicating increased proliferation of β-cells. The euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp indicated that all soy products improved insulin sensitivity. Phosphorylation of Akt and AMPK in the liver increased in an ascending order of the control, cooked soybeans, traditional chungkookjang and standardized chungkookjang while PEPCK expression was lowered in a descending order of the control, cooked soybeans, traditional chungkookjang and standardized chungkookjang. These results indicate that standardized chungkookjang is most effective for improving hepatic insulin signaling. In conclusion, chungkookjang fermented with B. lichemiformis retains the anti-diabetic properties of the most efficacious traditional chungkookjang and it may be even more effective for improving insulin function than traditionally prepared chungkookjang.

  15. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  16. Blood constituents trigger brain swelling, tissue death, and reduction of glucose metabolism early after acute subdural hematoma in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechli, Heidi; Behzad, Melika; Schreckenberger, Matthias; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Heimann, Axel; Kempski, Oliver; Alessandri, Beat

    2010-03-01

    Outcome from acute subdural hematoma is often worse than would be expected from the pure increase of intracranial volume by bleeding. The aim was to test whether volume-independent pathomechanisms aggravate damage by comparing the effects of blood infusion with those of an inert fluid, paraffin oil, on intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), local cerebral blood flow (CBF), edema formation, glucose metabolism ([18F]-deoxyglucose, MicroPET ), and histological outcome. Rats were injured by subdural infusion of 300 muL venous blood or paraffin. ICP, CPP, and CBF changes, assessed during the first 30 mins after injury, were not different between the injury groups at most time points (n=8 per group). Already at 2 h after injury, blood caused a significantly more pronounced decrease in glucose metabolism in the injured cortex when compared with paraffin (P<0.001, n=5 per group). Ipsilateral brain edema did not differ between groups at 2 h, but was significantly more pronounced in the blood-treated groups at 24 and 48 h after injury (n=8 per group). These changes caused a 56.2% larger lesion after blood when compared with paraffin (48.1+/-23.0 versus 21.1+/-11.8 mm(3); P<0.02). Blood constituent-triggered pathomechanisms aggravate the immediate effects due to ICP, CPP, and CBF during hemorrhage and lead to early reduction of glucose metabolism followed by more severe edema and histological damage.

  17. 2-Deoxyglucose incorporation into rat brain glycogen during measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization by the 2-deoxyglucose method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, T.; Kaufman, E.E.; Sokoloff, L.

    1984-10-01

    The incorporation of 14C into glycogen in rat brain has been measured under the same conditions that exist during the measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization by the autoradiographic 2-(14C)deoxyglucose method. The results demonstrate that approximately 2% of the total 14C in brain 45 min after the pulse of 2-(14C)deoxyglucose is contained in the glycogen portion, and, in fact, incorporated into alpha-1-4 and alpha-1-6 deoxyglucosyl linkages. When the brain is removed by dissection, as is routinely done in the course of the procedure of the 2-(14C)deoxyglucose method to preserve the structure of the brain for autoradiography, the portion of total brain 14C contained in glycogen falls to less than 1%, presumably because of postmortem glycogenolysis which restores much of the label to deoxyglucose-phosphates. In any case, the incorporation of the 14C into glycogen is of no consequence to the validity of the autoradiographic deoxyglucose method, not because of its small magnitude, but because 2-(14C)deoxyglucose is incorporated into glycogen via (14C)deoxyglucose-6-phosphate, and the label in glycogen represents, therefore, an additional ''trapped'' product of deoxyglucose phosphorylation by hexokinase. With the autoradiographic 2-(14C)deoxyglucose method, in which only total 14C concentration in the brain tissue is measured by quantitative autoradiography, it is essential that all the labeled products derived directly or indirectly from (14C)deoxyglucose phosphorylation by hexokinase be retained in the tissue; their chemical identity is of no significance.

  18. Comments on "Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Mental Retardation and Down Syndrome."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerman, Lee; Schultz, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between mental retardation and brain size is discussed. Research suggests that a common path for many otherwise idiopathic mild retardation cases (genetic or environmental) could be small brain size, indicating reduced information processing capacity. Suggestions are made for further research on neuron number. (SLD)

  19. A combination of physical activity and computerized brain training improves verbal memory and increases cerebral glucose metabolism in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, T; Verdile, G; Sohrabi, H; Campbell, A; Putland, E; Cheetham, C; Dhaliwal, S; Weinborn, M; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Martins, R N

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise interventions and cognitive training programs have individually been reported to improve cognition in the healthy elderly population; however, the clinical significance of using a combined approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated whether physical activity (PA), computerized cognitive training and/or a combination of both could improve cognition. In this nonrandomized study, 224 healthy community-dwelling older adults (60–85 years) were assigned to 16 weeks home-based PA (n=64), computerized cognitive stimulation (n=62), a combination of both (combined, n=51) or a control group (n=47). Cognition was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test and the CogState computerized battery at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks post intervention. Physical fitness assessments were performed at all time points. A subset (total n=45) of participants underwent [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans at 16 weeks (post-intervention). One hundred and ninety-one participants completed the study and the data of 172 participants were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control group, the combined group showed improved verbal episodic memory and significantly higher brain glucose metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex after controlling for age, sex, premorbid IQ, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status and history of head injury. The higher cerebral glucose metabolism in this brain region was positively associated with improved verbal memory seen in the combined group only. Our study provides evidence that a specific combination of physical and mental exercises for 16 weeks can improve cognition and increase cerebral glucose metabolism in cognitively intact healthy older adults. PMID:25463973

  20. Effect of blueberries and insulin on glucose induced neurotoxicity in brain cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Literature had shown that disruption in glucose metabolism seen in metabolic syndrome maybe responsible for neuronal cell-death. Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation (INF) triggered by the impaired metabolic process are considered to be the primary factors for the toxic neuronal atmos...

  1. Brain interstitial fluid glutamine homeostasis is controlled by blood-brain barrier SLC7A5/LAT1 amino acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgodilina, Elena; Imobersteg, Stefan; Laczko, Endre; Welt, Tobias; Verrey, Francois; Makrides, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    L-glutamine (Gln) is the most abundant amino acid in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid and a precursor for the main central nervous system excitatory (L-glutamate) and inhibitory (γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) neurotransmitters. Concentrations of Gln and 13 other brain interstitial fluid amino acids were measured in awake, freely moving mice by hippocampal microdialysis using an extrapolation to zero flow rate method. Interstitial fluid levels for all amino acids including Gln were ∼5-10 times lower than in cerebrospinal fluid. Although the large increase in plasma Gln by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of (15)N2-labeled Gln (hGln) did not increase total interstitial fluid Gln, low levels of hGln were detected in microdialysis samples. Competitive inhibition of system A (SLC38A1&2; SNAT1&2) or system L (SLC7A5&8; LAT1&2) transporters in brain by perfusion with α-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid (MeAIB) or 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) respectively, was tested. The data showed a significantly greater increase in interstitial fluid Gln upon BCH than MeAIB treatment. Furthermore, brain BCH perfusion also strongly increased the influx of hGln into interstitial fluid following IP injection consistent with transstimulation of LAT1-mediated transendothelial transport. Taken together, the data support the independent homeostatic regulation of amino acids in interstitial fluid vs. cerebrospinal fluid and the role of the blood-brain barrier expressed SLC7A5/LAT1 as a key interstitial fluid gatekeeper.

  2. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha mediates protection of DL-3-n-butylphthalide in brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihong Yang; Ling Li; Ruxun Huang; Zhong Pei; Songjie Liao; Jinsheng Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can significantly alleviate oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells at least partly associated with its enhancement on oxygen glucose deprivation -induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression. In this study, we hypothesized that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can protect against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury of newborn rat brain microvascular endothelial cells by means of upregulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression. MTT assay and Hoechst staining results showed that DL-3-n-butylphthalide protected brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot and immunofluorescent staining results further confirmed that the protective effect was related to upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α. Real-time RT-PCR reaction results showed that DL-3-n-butylphthalide reduced apoptosis by inhibiting downregulation of pro-apoptotic gene caspase-3 mRNA expression and upregulation of apoptosis-executive protease bcl-2 mRNA expression; however, DL-3-n-butylphthalide had no protective effects on brain microvascular endothelial cells after knockdown of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by small interfering RNA. These findings suggest that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can protect brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury by upregulating bcl-2 expression and downregulating caspase-3 expression though hypoxia inducible factor-1α pathway.

  3. The novel GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 improves glucose homeostasis and increases β-cell mass without affecting islet number in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Louise S; Almholt, Dorthe L C; Neerup, Trine S R; Vrang, Niels; Jelsing, Jacob; Fosgerau, Keld

    2014-08-01

    Antidiabetic treatments aiming to preserve or even to increase β-cell mass are currently gaining increased interest. Here we investigated the effect of chronic treatment with the novel glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 (HGEGTFTSDLSKQMEEEAVRLFIEWLKN-8Ado-8Ado-YGWLDF-NH2) on glycemic control, β-cell mass and proliferation, and islet number. Male db/db mice were treated with ZP3022, liraglutide, or vehicle for 2, 4, or 8 weeks, with terminal assessment of hemoglobin A1c, basal blood glucose, and plasma insulin concentrations. Pancreata were removed for immunohistochemical staining and stereological quantification of β-cell mass, islet numbers, proliferation, and apoptosis. Treatment with ZP3022 or liraglutide led to a significant improvement in glycemic control. ZP3022 treatment resulted in a sustained increase in β-cell mass after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, whereas the effect of liraglutide was transient. The expansion in β-cell mass observed in the ZP3022-treated mice appeared to be driven by increased β-cell proliferation in existing islets rather than by formation of new islets, as mean islet mass increased but the number of islets remained constant. Our data demonstrate that the GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 causes a sustained improvement in glycemic control accompanied by an increase in β-cell mass, increased proliferation, and increased mean islet mass. The results highlight that the GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist increases β-cell mass more than liraglutide and that dual agonists could potentially be developed into a new class of antidiabetic treatments.

  4. Alzheimer's disease therapeutics targeted to the control of amyloid precursor protein translation: maintenance of brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Rogers, Jack T

    2014-04-15

    The neurotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ), a major cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is enhanced by iron, as found in the amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. By contrast, the long-known neuroprotective activity of APP is evident after α-secretase cleavage of the precursor to release sAPPα, and depends on the iron export actions of APP itself. The latter underlie its neurotrophic and protective effects in facilitating the homeostatic actions of ferroportin mediated-iron export. Thus APP-dependent iron export may alleviate oxidative stress by minimizing labile iron thus protecting neurons from iron overload during stroke and hemorrhage. Consistent with this, altered phosphorylation of iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) and its signaling processes play a critical role in modulating APP translation via the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of its transcript. The APP 5'UTR region encodes a functional iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop that represents a potential target for modulating APP production. Targeted regulation of APP gene expression via the modulation of 5'UTR sequence function represents a novel approach for the potential treatment of AD since altering APP translation can be used to improve both the protective brain iron balance and provide anti-amyloid efficacy. Approved drugs including paroxetine and desferrioxamine and several novel compounds have been identified that suppress abnormal metal-promoted Aβ accumulation with a subset of these acting via APP 5'UTR-dependent mechanisms to modulate APP translation and cleavage to generate the non-toxic sAPPα.

  5. Design of a sup 13 C (1H) RF probe for monitoring the in vivo metabolism of (1- sup 13 C)glucose in primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, B.E.; Sacks, W.; Bigler, R.E.; Hennessy, M.J.; Sacks, S.; Fleischer, A.; Zanzonico, P.B. (Intermagnetics General Corporation, Guilderland, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The design of an RF probe suitable for obtaining proton-decoupled {sup 13}C spectra from a subhuman primate brain is described. Two orthogonal saddle coils, one tuned to the resonant frequency of {sup 13}C and the other to the resonant frequency of 1H, were used to monitor the in vivo metabolism of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose in rhesus monkey brain at 2.1 T. Difference spectra showed the appearance of {sup 13}C-enriched glutamate and glutamine 30 to 40 min after a bolus injection of (1-{sup 13}C)glucose.

  6. Depressed glucose consumption at reperfusion following brain ischemia does not correlate with mitochondrial dysfunction and development of infarction: an in vivo positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Abraham; Rojas, Santiago; Pareto, Deborah; Santalucia, Tomàs; Millán, Olga; Abasolo, Ibane; Gómez, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi; Gispert, Joan D; Falcon, Carles; Bargalló, Núria; Planas, Anna M

    2009-05-01

    Glucose consumption is severely depressed in the ischemic core, whereas it is maintained or even increased in penumbral regions during ischemia. Conversely, glucose utilization is severely reduced early after reperfusion in spite that glucose and oxygen are available. Experimental studies suggest that glucose hypometabolism might be an early predictor of brain infarction. However, the relationship between early glucose hypometabolism with later development of infarction remains to be further studied in the same subjects. Here, glucose consumption was assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion. Perfusion was evaluated by PET with (13)NH(3) during and after 2-hour (h) middle cerebral artery occlusion, and (18)F-FDG was given after 2h of reperfusion. Brain infarction was evaluated at 24h. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was examined ex vivo using a biochemical method. Cortical (18)F-FDG uptake was reduced by 45% and 25% in the ischemic core and periphery, respectively. However, substantial alteration of mitochondrial respiration was not apparent until 24h, suggesting that mitochondria retained the ability to consume oxygen early after reperfusion. These results show reduced glucose use at early reperfusion in regions that will later develop infarction and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent regions. Depressed glucose metabolism in the ischemic core might be attributable to reduced metabolic requirement due to irreversible cellular injury. However, reduced glucose metabolism in peripheral regions suggests either an impairment of glycolysis or reduced glucose demand. Thus, our study supports that glycolytic depression early after reperfusion is not always related to subsequent development of infarction.

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate Reduces Calcium Accumulation in Rat Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    low millimolar range. Most Ca2+ is sequestered within organelles , including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, mitochondria , and nucleus (Carafoli...G6P and thapsigargin caused generalized reduction in Ca2+ accumulation in remarkably similar patterns with no apparent gray matter regional...with glucose-6-phosphate (10 mM) or thapsigargin (1 µM), revealed very similar pattern of generalized reduction in 45Ca2+ accumulation in gray and

  8. Immunocytochemical analysis of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT-1) in typical, brain invasive, atypical and anaplastic meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Nes, Johannes A P; Griewank, Klaus G; Schmid, Kurt-Werner; Grabellus, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) is one of the major isoforms of the family of glucose transporter proteins that facilitates the import of glucose in human cells to fuel anaerobic metabolism. The present study was meant to determine the extent of the anaerobic/hypoxic state of the intratumoral microenvironment by staining for GLUT-1 in intracranial non-embolized typical (WHO grade I; n = 40), brain invasive and atypical (each WHO grade II; n = 38) and anaplastic meningiomas (WHO grade III, n = 6). In addition, GLUT-1 staining levels were compared with the various histological criteria used for diagnosing WHO grade II and III meningiomas, namely, brain invasion, increased mitotic activity and atypical cytoarchitectural change, defined by the presence of at least three out of hypercellularity, sheet-like growth, prominent nucleoli, small cell change and "spontaneous" necrosis. The level of tumor hypoxia was assessed by converting the extent and intensity of the stainings by multiplication in an immunoreactive score (IRS) and statistically evaluated. The results were as follows. (1) While GLUT-1 expression was found to be mainly weak in WHO grade I meningiomas (IRS = 1-4) and to be consistently strong in WHO grade III meningiomas (IRS = 6-12), in WHO grade II meningiomas GLUT-1 expression was variable (IRS = 1-9). (2) Histologically typical, but brain invasive meningiomas (WHO grade II) showed no or similarly low levels of GLUT-1 expression as observed in WHO grade I meningiomas (IRS = 0-4). (3) GLUT-1 expression was observed in the form of a patchy, multifocal staining reaction in 76% of stained WHO grade I-III meningiomas, while diffuse staining (in 11%) and combined multifocal and areas of diffuse staining (in 13%) were only detected in WHO grades II and III meningiomas, except for uniform staining in angiomatous WHO grade I meningioma. (4) "Spontaneous" necrosis and small cell change typically occurred away from the intratumoral capillary

  9. Profiling the dynamics of abscisic acid and ABA-glucose ester after using the glucosyltransferase UGT71C5 to mediate abscisic acid homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Mei Xiong; Zhen Liu; Han Chen; Jin-Tao Xue; Yi Yang; Cong Chen; Li-Ming Ye

    2014-01-01

    The HPLC-MS/MS method was developed to profile the dynamics of abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA-glucose ester (ABA-GE) after cloning glycosyltransferase enzyme family gene AtUGT71C5 into Arabidopsis thaliana. By constructing over-expression lines (OE) and down-expression lines (DN), we acquired mutant strains to analyze the function of AtUGT71C5. The multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) was used for quantitative determination in negative mode. The transition was m/z 263.1-153.0 for ABA ([M-H]þ), m/z 425.1-263.0 for ABA-GE ([M-H]þ), and m/z 321.0-152.0 for chloramphe-nicol. The linear range was 0.8684-217.1 ng/mL for ABA and 0.3920-196.0 ng/mL for ABA-GE. The accuracy was 88.0-109.0% for ABA and 86.6-113.0% for ABA-GE; the inter-day and intra-day precisions were less than 5.4%for ABA and 8.9%for ABA-GE, respectively. This method is simple and sensitive enough for determination of ABA and ABA-GE in A. thaliana leaves. All the evidence confirmed the speculation that AtUGT71C5 can mediate abscisic acid homeostasis.

  10. Correlation of brain cell glucose metabolism and patient's condition in children with epileptic encephalopathy An assessment using fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongxiang Zhai; Yuxiong Guo; Yuxin Zhang; Zhihong Chen; Jian Ding; Juan Gui; Ying Hao

    2011-01-01

    We examined a total of 16 children with epileptic encephalopathy using fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission computed tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography.Children with infantile spasms showed significant mental retardation, severely abnormal electroencephalogram recordings, and bilateral diffuse cerebral cortex hypometabolism with 18F-FDG PET imaging.MRI in these cases showed brain atrophy, multi-micropolygyria, macrogyria, and porencephalia.In cases with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, 18F-FDG PET showed bilateral diffuse glucose hypometabolism, while MRI showed cortical atrophy, heterotopic gray matter and tuberous sclerosis.MRI in cases with myoclonic encephalopathy demonstrated bilateral frontal and temporal cortical and white matter atrophy and 18F-FDG PET imaging showed bilateral frontal lobe atrophy with reduced bilateral frontal cortex, occipital cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellar glucose uptake.In children who could not be clearly classified, MRI demonstrated cerebral cortical atrophy and 18F-FDG PET exhibited multifocal glucose hypometabolism.Overall, this study demonstrated that the degree of brain metabolic abnormality was consistent with clinical seizure severity.In addition, 18F-FDG PET imaging after treatment was consistent with clinical outcomes.These findings indicate that 18F-FDG PET can be used to assess the severity of brain injury and prognosis in children with epileptic encephalopathy.

  11. Neuroprotection afforded by diazepam against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Frosini, Maria

    2007-04-30

    The aim of the present investigation was to assess neuroprotection exerted by diazepam (0.1-25 microM) in rat cortical brain slices subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation. Neuronal injury and neuroprotection were assessed by measuring the release of glutamate and lactate dehydrogenase and tissue water content. Results demonstrate that diazepam exerted neuroprotective effects according to a "U-shaped", hormetic-like, concentration-response curve, with an efficacy window of 0.5-5 microM concentration. Flumazenil (20 microM) fully antagonised neuroprotection afforded by 5 microM diazepam. In conclusion, the hormetic response of diazepam should be taken into consideration when designing experiments aimed at assessing diazepam neuroprotection against ischemia/reoxygenation injury.

  12. S100b Counteracts Neurodegeneration of Rat Cholinergic Neurons in Brain Slices after Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Serbinek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a severe chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by beta-amyloid plaques, tau pathology, cerebrovascular damage, inflammation, reactive gliosis, and cell death of cholinergic neurons. The aim of the present study is to test whether the glia-derived molecule S100b can counteract neurodegeneration of cholinergic neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in organotypic brain slices of basal nucleus of Meynert. Our data showed that 3 days of OGD induced a marked decrease of cholinergic neurons (60% of control, which could be counteracted by 50 μg/mL recombinant S100b. The effect was dose and time dependent. Application of nerve growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 was less protective. C-fos-like immunoreactivity was enhanced 3 hours after OGD indicating metabolic stress. We conclude that S100b is a potent neuroprotective factor for cholinergic neurons during ischemic events.

  13. Riluzole protects Huntington disease patients from brain glucose hypometabolism and grey matter volume loss and increases production of neurotrophins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squitieri, Ferdinando; Orobello, Sara; Cannella, Milena; Martino, Tiziana [IRCCS Neuromed, Neurogenetics Unit and Centre for Rare Disease, Pozzilli (Italy); Romanelli, Pantaleo [IRCCS Neuromed, Department of Neurosurgery, Pozzilli (Italy); Giovacchini, Giampiero; Ciarmiello, Andrea [S. Andrea Hospital, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, La Spezia (Italy); Frati, Luigi [University ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Mansi, Luigi [Second University of Naples, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    Huntington disease (HD) mutation increases gain-of-toxic functions contributing to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. Riluzole interferes with glutamatergic neurotransmission, thereby reducing excitotoxicity, enhancing neurite formation in damaged motoneurons and increasing serum concentrations of BDNF, a brain cortex neurotrophin protecting striatal neurons from degeneration. We investigated metabolic and volumetric differences in distinct brain areas between 11 riluzole-treated and 12 placebo-treated patients by MRI and {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) PET scanning, according to fully automated protocols. We also investigated the influence of riluzole on peripheral growth factor blood levels. Placebo-treated patients showed significantly greater proportional volume loss of grey matter and decrease in metabolic FDG uptake than patients treated with riluzole in all cortical areas (p<0.05). The decreased rate of metabolic FDG uptake correlated with worsening clinical scores in placebo-treated patients, compared to those who were treated with riluzole. The progressive decrease in metabolic FDG uptake observed in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex correlated linearly with the severity of motor scores calculated by Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS-I) in placebo-treated patients. Similarly, the rate of metabolic changes in the frontal and temporal areas of the brain cortex correlated linearly with worsening behavioural scores calculated by UHDRS-III in the placebo-treated patients. Finally, BDNF and transforming growth factor beta-1 serum levels were significantly higher in patients treated with riluzole. The linear correlation between decreased metabolic FDG uptake and worsening clinical scores in the placebo-treated patients suggests that FDG-PET may be a valuable procedure to assess brain markers of HD. (orig.)

  14. Transient oxygen-glucose deprivation sensitizes brain capillary endothelial cells to rtPA at 4h of reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Mélanie; Mysiorek, Caroline; Pétrault, Olivier; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Aijjou, Rachid; Uzbekov, Rustem; Bérézowski, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Thrombolysis treatment of acute ischemic stroke is limited by the pro-edematous and hemorrhagic effects exerted by reperfusion, which disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) capillary endothelium in the infarct core. Most studies of the ischemic BBB overlook the complexity of the penumbral area, where the affected brain cells are still viable following deprivation. Our present objective was to examine in vitro the kinetic impact of reoxygenation on the integrity of ischemic BBB cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation. Through the use of a co-culture of brain capillary endothelial cells and glial cells, we first showed that the transendothelial permeability increase induced by deprivation can occur with both preserved cell viability and interendothelial tight junction network. The subtle and heterogeneous alteration of the tight junctions was observable only through electron microscopy. A complete permeability recovery was then found after reoxygenation, when Vimentin and Actin networks were reordered. However, still sparse ultrastructural alterations of tight junctions suggested an acquired vulnerability. Endothelial cells were then exposed to recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA) to define a temporal profile for the toxic effect of this thrombolytic on transendothelial permeability. Interestingly, the reoxygenated BBB broke down with aggravated tight junction disruption when exposed to rtPA only at 4h after reoxygenation. Moreover, this breakdown was enhanced by 50% when ischemic glial cells were present during the first hours of reoxygenation. Our results suggest that post-stroke reoxygenation enables retrieval of the barrier function of brain capillary endothelium when in a non-necrotic environment, but may sensitize it to rtPA at the 4-hour time point, when both endothelial breakdown mechanisms and glial secretions could be identified and targeted in a therapeutical perspective.

  15. In vivo evaluation of amyloid deposition and brain glucose metabolism of 5XFAD mice using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Santiago; Herance, José Raúl; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Abad, Sergio; Torrent, Elia; Jiménez, Xavier; Pareto, Deborah; Perpiña, Unai; Sarroca, Sara; Rodríguez, Elisenda; Ortega-Aznar, Arantxa; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2013-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used extensively to evaluate the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in vivo. Radiotracers directed toward the amyloid deposition such as [(18)F]-FDDNP (2-(1-{6-[(2-[F]Fluoroethyl)(methyl)amino]-2-naphthyl}ethylidene)malononitrile) and [(11)C]-PIB (Pittsburg compound B) have shown exceptional value in animal models and AD patients. Previously, the glucose analogue [(18)F]-FDG (2-[(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose) allowed researchers and clinicians to evaluate the brain glucose consumption and proved its utility for the early diagnosis and the monitoring of the progression of AD. Animal models of AD are based on the transgenic expression of different human mutant genes linked to familial AD. The novel transgenic 5XFAD mouse containing 5 mutated genes in its genome has been proposed as an AD model with rapid and massive cerebral amyloid deposition. PET studies performed with animal-dedicated scanners indicate that PET with amyloid-targeted radiotracers can detect the pathological amyloid deposition in transgenic mice and rats. However, in other studies no differences were found between transgenic mice and their wild type littermates. We sought to investigate in 5XFAD mice if the radiotracers [(11)C]-PIB, and [(18)F]-Florbetapir could quantify the amyloid deposition in vivo and if [(18)F]-FDG could do so with regard to glucose consumption. We found that 5XFAD animals presented higher cerebral binding of [(18)F]-Florbetapir, [(11)C]-PIB, and [(18)F]-FDG. These results support the use of amyloid PET radiotracers for the evaluation of AD animal models. Probably, the increased uptake observed with [(18)F]-FDG is a consequence of glial activation that occurs in 5XFAD mice.

  16. Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Function in the Brain as Revealed by the Cerebral Metabolism of (1-(13)C)-Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Laura; Rial, Eduardo; Cerdan, Sebastian; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate transporter Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12 is critically involved in brain aspartate synthesis, and AGC1 deficiency results in a drastic fall of brain aspartate levels in humans and mice. It has recently been described that the uncoupling protein UCP2 transports four carbon metabolites including aspartate. Since UCP2 is expressed in several brain cell types and AGC1 is mainly neuronal, we set to test whether UCP2 could be a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in the brain glial compartment. The study of the cerebral metabolism of (1-(13)C)-glucose in vivo in wild type and UCP2-knockout mice showed no differences in C3 or C2 labeling of aspartate, suggesting that UCP2 does not function as a mitochondrial aspartate carrier in brain. However, surprisingly, a clear decrease (of about 30-35 %) in the fractional enrichment of glutamate, glutamine and GABA was observed in the brains of UCP2-KO mice which was not associated with differences in either glucose or lactate enrichments. The results suggest that the dilution in the labeling of glutamate and its downstream metabolites could originate from the uptake of an unlabeled substrate that could not leave the matrix via UCP2 becoming trapped in the matrix. Understanding the nature of the unlabeled substrate and its precursor(s) as alternative substrates to glucose is of interest in the context of neurological diseases associated with UCP2.

  17. Role of serotonin and/or norepinephrine in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachmerhiwala, Rashida; Bhide, Nirmal; Straiko, Megan; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2010-10-10

    The acute administration of MDMA has been shown to promote glycogenolysis and increase the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum. In the present study the role of serotonergic and/or noradrenergic mechanisms in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis was assessed. The relationship of these responses to the hyperthermia produced by MDMA also was examined. The administration of MDMA (10mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a significant and sustained increase of 65-100% in the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum, as well as in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and a 35% decrease in brain glycogen content. Peripheral blood glucose was modestly increased by 32% after MDMA treatment. Treatment of rats with fluoxetine (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose in the striatum but had no effect on MDMA-induced glycogenolysis or hyperthermia. Treatment with prazosin (1mg/kg, i.p.) did not alter the glucose or glycogen responses to MDMA but completely suppressed MDMA-induced hyperthermia. Finally, propranolol (3mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis but did not alter MDMA-induced hyperthermia. The present results suggest that MDMA increases extracellular glucose in multiple brain regions, and that this response involves both serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. Furthermore, beta-adrenergic and alpha-adrenergic receptors appear to contribute to MDMA-induced glycogenolysis and hyperthermia, respectively. Finally, hyperthermia, glycogenolysis and elevated extracellular glucose appear to be independent, unrelated responses to acute MDMA administration.

  18. Regulation of Brain Glucose Metabolic Patterns by Protein Phosphorlyation and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    Suppl3 (2006) SI49-55. 64 15 Hoffmann, P.C., Toon, R., Kleinman, J. and Heller , A., The association of lesion- induced reductions in brain monoamines with...Lipska, B.K., Deep-Soboslay, A, Weickert, C.S., Hyde, TM., Martin, e.E., Herman , M.M. and Kleinman, IE., Critical factors in gene expression in

  19. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Fusco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1 is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1, two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression and results in impaired cell proliferation. CREB-deficient NSCs expanded poorly in vitro and did not respond to glucose availability. Elevated glucose also promoted Sirt-1-dependent repression of the Hes-1 promoter. Conversely, in low glucose, CREB replaced Sirt-1 on the chromatin associated with the Hes-1 promoter enhancing Hes-1 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, the glucose-regulated antagonism between CREB and Sirt-1 for Hes-1 transcription participates in the metabolic regulation of neurogenesis.

  20. Blood-brain barrier transport of drugs for the treatment of brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2009-06-01

    The central nervous system is a sanctuary protected by barriers that regulate brain homeostasis and control the transport of endogenous compounds into the brain. The blood-brain barrier, formed by endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells allowing entry only to amino acids, glucose and hormones needed for normal brain cell function and metabolism. This very tight regulation of brain cell access is essential for the survival of neurons which do not have a significant capacity to regenerate, but also prevents therapeutic compounds, small and large, from reaching the brain. As a result, various strategies are being developed to enhance access of drugs to the brain parenchyma at therapeutically meaningful concentrations to effectively manage disease.

  1. Glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway after human traumatic brain injury: microdialysis studies using 1,2-(13)C2 glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Carpenter, Keri L H; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J; Mason, Andrew; Gallagher, Clare N; Helmy, Adel; Murphy, Michael P; Menon, David K; Carpenter, T Adrian; Pickard, John D; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Increased 'anaerobic' glucose metabolism is observed after traumatic brain injury (TBI) attributed to increased glycolysis. An alternative route is the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), which generates putatively protective and reparative molecules. To compare pathways we employed microdialysis to perfuse 1,2-(13)C2 glucose into the brains of 15 TBI patients and macroscopically normal brain in six patients undergoing surgery for benign tumors, and to simultaneously collect products for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. (13)C enrichment for glycolytic 2,3-(13)C2 lactate was the median 5.4% (interquartile range (IQR) 4.6-7.5%) in TBI brain and 4.2% (2.4-4.4%) in 'normal' brain (P<0.01). The ratio of PPP-derived 3-(13)C lactate to glycolytic 2,3-(13)C2 lactate was median 4.9% (3.6-8.2%) in TBI brain and 6.7% (6.3-8.9%) in 'normal' brain. An inverse relationship was seen for PPP-glycolytic lactate ratio versus PbtO2 (r=-0.5, P=0.04) in TBI brain. Thus, glycolytic lactate production was significantly greater in TBI than 'normal' brain. Several TBI patients exhibited PPP-lactate elevation above the 'normal' range. There was proportionally greater PPP-derived lactate production with decreasing PbtO2. The study raises questions about the roles of the PPP and glycolysis after TBI, and whether they can be manipulated to achieve a better outcome. This study is the first direct comparison of glycolysis and PPP in human brain.

  2. Brain glucose metabolic changes associated with chronic spontaneous Pain due to brachial plexus avulsion:a preliminary positron emission tomography study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fu-yong; TAO Wei; CHENG Xin; WANG Hong-yan; HU Yong-sheng; ZHANG Xiao-hua; LI Yong-jie

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous brain imaging studies suggested that the brain activity underlying the perception of chronic pain maV differ from that underlying acute pain.To investigate the brain regions involved in chronic spontaneous pain due to brachial plexus avulsion(BPA),fluorine-18fluorodeoxygIucose (19F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning was applied to determine the glucose metabolic changes in patients with pain due to BPA.Methods Six right-handed patients with chronic spontaneous pain due to left-BPA and twelve right-handed age-and sex-matched healthy control subjects participated in the 18F-FDG PET study.The patients were rated by visual analog scale (VAS) during scanning and Hamilton depression scale and Hamilton anxiety scale after scanning.Statistical parametric mapping 2 (SPM2) was applied for data analysis.Results Compared with healthy subjects,the patients had significant glucose metabolism decreases in the right thalamus and S I(P<0.001,uncorrected),and significant glucose metabolism increases in the right orbitofrontaI cortex (OFC) (BA11),left rostral insula cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal codex (DLPFC) (BA10/46) (P<0.001,uncorrected).Conclusion These findings suggest that the brain areas involved in emotion.aRention and internal modulation of pain may be related to the chronic spontaneous pain due to BPA.

  3. Glucose Metabolic Changes in the Brain and Muscles of Patients with Nonspecific Neck Pain Treated by Spinal Manipulation Therapy: A [18F]FDG PET Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akie Inami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in brain and muscle glucose metabolism that are not yet known, using positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG PET. Methods. Twenty-one male volunteers were recruited for the present study. [18F]FDG PET scanning was performed twice on each subject: once after the spinal manipulation therapy (SMT intervention (treatment condition and once after resting (control condition. We performed the SMT intervention using an adjustment device. Glucose metabolism of the brain and skeletal muscles was measured and compared between the two conditions. In addition, we measured salivary amylase level as an index of autonomic nervous system (ANS activity, as well as muscle tension and subjective pain intensity in each subject. Results. Changes in brain activity after SMT included activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellar vermis, and somatosensory association cortex and deactivation of the prefrontal cortex and temporal sites. Glucose uptake in skeletal muscles showed a trend toward decreased metabolism after SMT, although the difference was not significant. Other measurements indicated relaxation of cervical muscle tension, decrease in salivary amylase level (suppression of sympathetic nerve activity, and pain relief after SMT. Conclusion. Brain processing after SMT may lead to physiological relaxation via a decrease in sympathetic nerve activity.

  4. Furin mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor upregulation in cultured rat astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Junjian; Deng, Min

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and the role of furin in BDNF maturation in reactive astrocytes from rats exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Furin, a proprotein convertase, is upregulated and cleaves certain substrates during hypoxia in cancer cells. In addition, during hypoxia in the central nervous system, astrocytes become reactive and release BDNF to protect neurons. Maturation of BDNF in astrocytes requires furin-mediated endoproteolytic processing of the precursor protein pro-BDNF to BDNF. To expand our knowledge about the role of furin in BDNF maturation in astrocytes, these cells were exposed to OGD, and expression of furin and BDNF was detected by Western blot analysis. Changes in BDNF expression were observed when furin activity was inhibited by furin prosegment. We found that protein expression of BDNF and furin was upregulated, and this upregulation correlated with OGD stimulation. Furin inhibition reduced BDNF maturation and secretion. These results indicate that furin mediates the upregulation of BDNF in reactive astrocytes exposed to OGD and that furin may impact the biological effect of reactive astrocytes.

  5. Comparing brain amyloid deposition, glucose metabolism, and atrophy in mild cognitive impairment with and without a family history of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Lisa; Andrews, Randolph D; Matthews, Dawn C

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the degree of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition, glucose metabolism, and grey matter volume (GMV) reductions in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients overall and as a function of their parental history of dementia. Ten MCI with maternal history (MH), 8 with paternal history (PH), and 24 with negative family history (NH) received 11C-PiB and 18F-FDG PET and T1-MRI as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Statistical parametric mapping, voxel based morphometry, and Z-score mapping were used to compare biomarkers across MCI groups, and relative to 12 normal controls. MCI had higher PiB retention, hypometabolism, and GMV reductions in Alzheimer-vulnerable regions compared to controls. Biomarker abnormalities were more pronounced in MCI with MH than those with PH and NH. After partial volume correction of PET, Aβ load exceeded hypometabolism and atrophy with regard to the number of regions affected and magnitude of impairment in those regions. Hypometabolism exceeded atrophy in all MCI groups and exceeded Aβ load in medial temporal and posterior cingulate regions of MCI MH. While all three biomarkers were abnormal in MCI compared to controls, Aβ deposition was the most prominent abnormality, with MCI MH having the greatest degree of co-occurring hypometabolism.

  6. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per eSodersten

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem and hypothalamic orexigenic/anorexigenic networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have shown that while a hypothalamic orexigen excites eating when food is abundant, it inhibits eating and stimulates foraging when food is in short supply. As the physical price of food approaches zero, eating and body weight increase without constraints. Conversely, in anorexia nervosa body weight is homeostatically regulated, the high level of physical activity in anorexia is displaced hoarding for food that keeps body weight constantly low. A treatment based on this point of view, providing patients with computerized mealtime support to re-establish normal eating behavior, has brought 75% of patients with eating disorders into remission, reduced the rate of relapse to 10%, and eliminated mortality.

  7. Osteocalcin as a hormone regulating glucose metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients with osteoporosis and diabetesis rapidly increasing all over the world. Bone is recentlyrecognized as an endocrine organ. Accumulatingevidence has shown that osteocalcin, which is specificallyexpressed in osteoblasts and secreted into the circulation,regulates glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulinexpression in pancreas and adiponectin expression inadipocytes, resulting in improving glucose intolerance.On the other hand, insulin and adiponectin stimulateosteocalcin expression in osteoblasts, suggesting thatpositive feedforward loops exist among bone, pancreas,and adipose tissue. In addition, recent studies haveshown that osteocalcin enhances insulin sensitivity andthe differentiation in muscle, while secreted factors frommuscle, myokines, regulate bone metabolism. Thesefindings suggest that bone metabolism and glucosemetabolism are associated with each other through theaction of osteocalcin. In this review, I describe the roleof osteocalcin in the interaction among bone, pancreas,brain, adipose tissue, and muscle.

  8. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 in cultured brain slices after oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Cui; Weijuan Han; Lijun Yang; Yanzhong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expressed in oligodendrocytes may trigger the repair of neuronal myelin impairment, and play a crucial role in myelin repair. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor, is of great significance in premature infants with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. There is little evidence of direct regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α on oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. In this study, brain slices of Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Then, slices were transfected with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α or oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. The expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 were significantly up-regulated in rat brains prior to transfection, as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Eight hours after transfection of slices with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression was upregulated, and reached a peak 24 hours after transfection. Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 transfection induced no significant differences in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α levels in rat brain tissues with oxygen-glucose deprivation. These experimental findings indicate that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α can regulate oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression in hypoxic brain tissue, thus repairing the neural impairment.

  9. A Fall in Plasma Free Fatty Acid (FFA) Level Activates the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Independent of Plasma Glucose: Evidence for Brain Sensing of Circulating FFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Taek; Oh, Ki-Sook; Kang, Insug

    2012-01-01

    The brain responds to a fall in blood glucose by activating neuroendocrine mechanisms for its restoration. It is unclear whether the brain also responds to a fall in plasma free fatty acids (FFA) to activate mechanisms for its restoration. We examined whether lowering plasma FFA increases plasma corticosterone or catecholamine levels and, if so, whether the brain is involved in these responses. Plasma FFA levels were lowered in rats with three independent antilipolytic agents: nicotinic acid (NA), insulin, and the A1 adenosine receptor agonist SDZ WAG 994 with plasma glucose clamped at basal levels. Lowering plasma FFA with these agents all increased plasma corticosterone, but not catecholamine, within 1 h, accompanied by increases in plasma ACTH. These increases in ACTH or corticosterone were abolished when falls in plasma FFA were prevented by Intralipid during NA or insulin infusion. In addition, the NA-induced increases in plasma ACTH were completely prevented by administration of SSR149415, an arginine vasopressin receptor antagonist, demonstrating that the hypothalamus is involved in these responses. Taken together, the present data suggest that the brain may sense a fall in plasma FFA levels and activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to increase plasma ACTH and corticosterone, which would help restore FFA levels. Thus, the brain may be involved in the sensing and control of circulating FFA levels. PMID:22669895

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy or hydroxycobalamin attenuates surges in brain interstitial lactate and glucose; and hyperbaric oxygen improves respiratory status in cyanide-intoxicated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, P; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Hyldegaard, O

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide (CN) intoxication inhibits cellular oxidative metabolism and may result in brain damage. Hydroxycobalamin (OHCob) is one among other antidotes that may be used following intoxication with CN. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is recommended when supportive measures or antidotes fail. However, the ...... this beneficial effect. In conclusion, CN intoxication in anesthetized rats produces specific uncoupling of cerebral oxidative metabolism resulting in interstitial lactate and glucose surges that may be ameliorated by treatment with either hydroxycobalamin or HBO2....

  11. Study of effect of oxygen/glucose-deprived culture on the brain-pancreas relative protein in PC12 cells and the mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-huaLIN; LuTIE; Ai-huaLIU; Xue-junLI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of oxygen/glucose-deprived (OGD)culture on the expression of a novel protein, brain-pancreas relative protein (BPRP), and the possible regulating mechanism in vitro. BPRP was a key protein found in our previous study of cerebral ischemia. METHODS: PC12 cells was selected and exposed to the Eagle's solution containing 1 mmol/L Na2S2O4 for

  12. Age- and Sex-Associated Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Normal Healthy Subjects: Statistical Parametric Mapping Analysis of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Brain Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, Yong-Ki (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea); Medical Research Institute, Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea)). e-mail: growthkim@daum.net/growthkim@pusan.ac.kr)

    2009-12-15

    Background: The age- and sex-associated changes of brain development are unclear and controversial. Several previous studies showed conflicting results of a specific pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism or no differences of cerebral glucose metabolism in association with normal aging process and sex. Purpose: To investigate the effects of age and sex on changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) brain positron emission tomography (PET) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight healthy subjects (32 males, mean age 46.6+-18.2 years; 46 females, mean age 40.6+-19.8 years) underwent F-18 FDG brain PET. Using SPM, age- and sex-associated changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were investigated. Results: In males, a negative correlation existed in several gray matter areas, including the right temporopolar (Brodmann area [BA] 38), right orbitofrontal (BA 47), left orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 10), left dorsolateral frontal gyrus (BA 8), and left insula (BA 13) areas. A positive relationship existed in the left claustrum and left thalamus. In females, negative changes existed in the left caudate body, left temporopolar area (BA 38), right orbitofrontal gyri (BA 47 and BA 10), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46). A positive association was demonstrated in the left subthalamic nucleus and the left superior frontal gyrus. In white matter, an age-associated decrease in FDG uptake in males was shown in the left insula, and increased FDG uptake was found in the left corpus callosum. The female group had an age-associated negative correlation of FDG uptake only in the right corpus callosum. Conclusion: Using SPM, we found not only similar areas of brain, but also sex-specific cerebral areas of age-associated changes of FDG uptake

  13. EFFECTS OF THE SODIUM-CHANNEL BLOCKER TETRODOTOXIN (TTX) ON CELLULAR ION HOMEOSTASIS IN RAT-BRAIN SUBJECTED TO COMPLETE ISCHEMIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    XIE, YX; DENGLER, K; ZACHARIAS, E; WILFFERT, B; TEGTMEIER, F

    1994-01-01

    Anoxic depolarization (AD) and failure of the cellular ion homeostasis are suggested to play a key role in ischemia-induced neuronal death. Recent studies show that the blockade of Na+ influx significantly improved the neuronal outcome. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 10 mu M te

  14. The selfish brain: Competition for energy resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes have become the major health problems in many industrialized countries. Here, I present the unconventional concept that a healthy organism maintains its systemic homeostasis by a "competent brain-pull", i.e., the brain's ability to properly demand glucose from the body, and that the underlying cause of obesity is "incompetent brain-pull." I describe the energy fluxes from the environment, through the body, toward the brain as the final consumer in a "supply chain" model. There is data-based support for the hypothesis, which states that under conditions of food abundance incompetent brain-pull will lead to build ups in the supply chain culminating in obesity and type 2 diabetes. There is also support for the related hypothesis, which states that under conditions of food deprivation, a competent brain-pull mechanism is indispensable for the continuation of the brain's high energy level. To experimentally determine how the competent brain-pull functions to demand for cerebral energy, healthy young men undergoing psychosocial stress were studied. It was found that the brain under stressful conditions demands for energy from the body by using a brain-pull mechanism, which is referred to as "cerebral insulin suppression" and in so doing it can satisfy its excessive needs during stress. This article gives an overview about the recent work on the "Selfish Brain" theory dealing with the maintenance of the cerebral and peripheral energy homeostasis.

  15. Voxel-based statistical analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism in the rat cortical deafness model by 3D reconstruction of brain from autoradiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Kwang Suk [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 28 Yungun-Dong, Chongno-Ku, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea); Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Chong Sun; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Dong Soo; Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 28 Yungun-Dong, Chongno-Ku, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-06-01

    Animal models of cortical deafness are essential for investigation of the cerebral glucose metabolism in congenital or prelingual deafness. Autoradiographic imaging is mainly used to assess the cerebral glucose metabolism in rodents. In this study, procedures for the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis of autoradiographic data were established to enable investigations of the within-modal and cross-modal plasticity through entire areas of the brain of sensory-deprived animals without lumping together heterogeneous subregions within each brain structure into a large region of interest. Thirteen 2-[1-{sup 14}C]-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiographic images were acquired from six deaf and seven age-matched normal rats (age 6-10 weeks). The deafness was induced by surgical ablation. For the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis, brain slices were extracted semiautomatically from the autoradiographic images, which contained the coronal sections of the brain, and were stacked into 3D volume data. Using principal axes matching and mutual information maximization algorithms, the adjacent coronal sections were co-registered using a rigid body transformation, and all sections were realigned to the first section. A study-specific template was composed and the realigned images were spatially normalized onto the template. Following count normalization, voxel-wise t tests were performed to reveal the areas with significant differences in cerebral glucose metabolism between the deaf and the control rats. Continuous and clear edges were detected in each image after registration between the coronal sections, and the internal and external landmarks extracted from the spatially normalized images were well matched, demonstrating the reliability of the spatial processing procedures. Voxel-wise t tests showed that the glucose metabolism in the bilateral auditory cortices of the deaf rats was significantly (P<0.001) lower than that in the controls. There was no significantly reduced metabolism in

  16. Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Ameliorates Mild Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Cognitive and Sensorimotor Deficits and Neuroinflammation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu-Wen; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Kai-Yun; Wu, John Chung-Che; Hoffer, Barry J.; Greig, Nigel H.; Li, Yazhou; Lai, Jing-Huei; Chang, Cheng-Fu; Lin, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yu-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a major public health issue, representing 75–90% of all cases of TBI. In clinical settings, mTBI, which is defined as a Glascow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13–15, can lead to various physical, cognitive, emotional, and psychological-related symptoms. To date, there are no pharmaceutical-based therapies to manage the development of the pathological deficits associated with mTBI. In this study, the neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin similar to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), was investigated after its steady-state subcutaneous administration, focusing on behavior after mTBI in an in vivo animal model. The mTBI rat model was generated by a mild controlled cortical impact (mCCI) and used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of GIP. We used the Morris water maze and novel object recognition tests, which are tasks for spatial and recognition memory, respectively, to identify the putative therapeutic effects of GIP on cognitive function. Further, beam walking and the adhesive removal tests were used to evaluate locomotor activity and somatosensory functions in rats with and without GIP administration after mCCI lesion. Lastly, we used immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and Western blot analyses to evaluate the inflammatory markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), and bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X (BMX) in animals with mTBI. GIP was well tolerated and ameliorated mTBI-induced memory impairments, poor balance, and sensorimotor deficits after initiation in the post-injury period. In addition, GIP mitigated mTBI-induced neuroinflammatory changes on GFAP, APP, and BMX protein levels. These findings suggest GIP has significant benefits in managing mTBI-related symptoms and represents a novel strategy for mTBI treatment. PMID:26972789

  17. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos; V; Rizos; Moses; S; Elisaf

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro-and macrovascular disease.Moreover,increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance.As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical.However,the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism.Indeed,angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis.Calcium channel blockers(CCBs)have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism.However,some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis.On the other hand,diuretics andβ-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism.Of note,carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of theβ-blockers class,being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis.The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may,to an extent,compromise their cardiovascular protective role.As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment,especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes.

  18. Comparison of intensive insulin therapy versus conventional glucose control in traumatic brain injury patients on parenteral nutrition: A pilot randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Neda Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parenteral nutrition (PN is a valuable life saving intervention, which can improve the nutritional status of hospitalized malnourished patients. PN is associated with complications including hyperglycemia. This study was conducted to compare two methods of blood glucose control in traumatic brain injury patients on PN. Materials and Methods: A randomized, open-label, controlled trial with blinded end point assessment was designed. Traumatic brain injury patients (GCS = 4-9 on PN, without diabetes, pancreatitis, liver disease, kidney complication, were participated. Patients were randomly assigned to receive continuous insulin infusion to maintain glucose levels between 4.4 mmol/l (80 mg/dl and 6.6 mmol/l (120 mg/dl (n = 13 or conventional treatment (n = 13. Patients in the conventional group were not received insulin unless glucose levels were greater than 10 mmol/l (>180 mg/dl. These methods were done to maintain normoglycemia in ICU. The primary outcome was hypo/hyperglycemic episodes. Other factors such as C-reactive protein, blood electrolytes, liver function tests, lipid profile and mid-arm circumference were compared. Results: Mean glucose concentration were significantly lower in IIT group (118 ± 28 mg/dl vs conventional group (210 ± 31 mg/dl (P < 0.01. No hypoglycemic episode occurred in two groups. Triglyceride (P = 0.02 and C-reactive protein (P = 0.001 was decreased in the IIT group, significantly. There were also significant differences in the electrolytes, with magnesium and phosphorus being lower in the IIT group (P = 0.05. Conclusion: In this pilot study, blood glucose level, CRP and TG were lower in IIT group. Further data collection is warranted to reach definitive conclusions.

  19. Cerebral glucose metabolism in long-term survivors of childhood primary brain tumors treated with surgery and radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Krabbe, Katja; Leffers, Anne M.

    2003-01-01

    a median recurrence free survival of 16 years by MRI and Positron Emission Tomography using the glucose analog 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG). Three patients were not analyzed further due to diffuse cerebral atrophy, which might be related to previous hydrocephalus. Twenty-one patients were...

  20. Alterations in blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations during deep brain stimulation in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene eDiepenbroek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc is an effective therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD and is currently under investigation as a treatment for eating disorders. DBS of this area is associated with altered food intake and pharmacological treatment of OCD is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Therefore we examined if DBS of the NAc-shell (sNAc influences glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to DBS, or sham stimulation, for a period of one hour. To assess the effects of stimulation on blood glucose and glucoregulatory hormones, blood samples were drawn before, during and after stimulation. Subsequently, all animals were used for quantitative assessment of Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA using computerized image analysis. DBS of the sNAc rapidly increased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucose while sham stimulation and DBS outside the sNAc were ineffective. In addition, the increase in glucose was dependent on DBS intensity. In contrast, the DBS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentrations was independent of intensity and region, indicating that the observed DBS-induced metabolic changes were not due to corticosterone release. Stimulation of the sNAc with 200 μA increased Fos immunoreactivity in the LHA compared to sham or 100 μA stimulated animals. These data show that DBS of the sNAc alters glucose metabolism in a region- and intensity dependent manner in association with neuronal activation in the LHA. Moreover, these data illustrate the need to monitor changes in glucose metabolism during DBS-treatment of OCD patients.

  1. Changes in brain glucose use and extracellular ions associated with kainic acid-induced seizures: (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose and intracranial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastain, J.E Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of kainic acid (KA) on brain glucose use with coadministration of diazepam, and the effect of KA on brain extracellular (K/sup +/), Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/) was investigated in rats by means of (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and intracranial microdialysis, respectively. Also, the impact of intracranial microdialysis on brain regional metabolic function was studied. Co-treatment with KA and diazepam attenuated KA-induced 3 hr increases and prevented 48 hr decreases in glucose use within all structures measured, particularly the piriform cortex and amygdala. Hippocampal CA/sub 3/, CA/sub 4/, and CA/sub 1/-ventral were least affected by diazepam. The results suggest that diazepam suppresses KA seizure spread from its focus, proposed to be CA/sub 3/. KA-induced ions changes were studied by intracranial microdialysis. Dialysis fibers were implanted within the hippocampus or piriform cortex and perfused 24 hr later. Samples, collected before and after KA, were analyzed for (K/sup +/), (Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/). KA caused an early and prolonged increase in extracellular (K/sup +/) and a negligible decrease in (Ca/sup 2 +/) within the hippocampus. In the piriform cortex, both (K/sup +/) and (Na/sup +/) increase during a period of early seizure signs. The results indicate that ion homostatic control of ion levels is better maintained during parenteral KA-induced seizures than when the brain is activated locally or during ischemia/hypoxia. The effect of intracranial microdialysis was studied by means of 2-DG in control state and KA-induced seizure state. The results indicate that intracranial microdialysis alters brain metabolic function during KA-induced seizures, but not in the control state. At 3 hr post KA, seizure metabolic activity was enhanced within the piriform cortex, and attenuated within the hippocampus.

  2. Ghrelin Facilitates GLUT2-, SGLT1- and SGLT2-mediated Intestinal Glucose Transport in Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Ramesh, Naresh; Delgado, María Jesús; Valenciano, Ana Isabel; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is an important biological process that involves a variety of regulatory mechanisms. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin, a multifunctional gut-brain hormone, modulates intestinal glucose transport in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Three intestinal glucose transporters, the facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and the sodium/glucose co-transporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2), were studied. Immunostaining of intestinal sections found colocalization of ghrelin and GLUT2 and SGLT2 in mucosal cells. Some cells containing GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 coexpressed the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Intraperitoneal glucose administration led to a significant increase in serum ghrelin levels, as well as an upregulation of intestinal preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyltransferase and ghs-r1 expression. In vivo and in vitro ghrelin treatment caused a concentration- and time-dependent modulation (mainly stimulatory) of GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2. These effects were abolished by the GHS-R1a antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, suggesting that ghrelin actions on glucose transporters are mediated by GHS-R1a via the PLC/PKC signaling pathway. Finally, ghrelin stimulated the translocation of GLUT2 into the plasma membrane of goldfish primary intestinal cells. Overall, data reported here indicate an important role for ghrelin in the modulation of glucoregulatory machinery and glucose homeostasis in fish. PMID:28338019

  3. Oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation as an in vitro ischemia-reperfusion injury model for studying blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Himakarnika; Anasooya Shaji, Chinchusha; Davis, Matthew L; Tharakan, Binu

    2015-05-07

    Ischemia-Reperfusion (IR) injury is known to contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic strokes. Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents account for 80% of all strokes. A common cause of IR injury is the rapid inflow of fluids following an acute/chronic occlusion of blood, nutrients, oxygen to the tissue triggering the formation of free radicals. Ischemic stroke is followed by blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and vasogenic brain edema. Structurally, tight junctions (TJs) between the endothelial cells play an important role in maintaining the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). IR injury is an early secondary injury leading to a non-specific, inflammatory response. Oxidative and metabolic stress following inflammation triggers secondary brain damage including BBB permeability and disruption of tight junction (TJ) integrity. Our protocol presents an in vitro example of oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD-R) on rat brain endothelial cell TJ integrity and stress fiber formation. Currently, several experimental in vivo models are used to study the effects of IR injury; however they have several limitations, such as the technical challenges in performing surgeries, gene dependent molecular influences and difficulty in studying mechanistic relationships. However, in vitro models may aid in overcoming many of those limitations. The presented protocol can be used to study the various molecular mechanisms and mechanistic relationships to provide potential therapeutic strategies. However, the results of in vitro studies may differ from standard in vivo studies and should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Stretch and/or oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in an in vitro traumatic brain injury (TBI model induces calcium alteration and inflammatory cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellaine eSalvador

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, made up of endothelial cells of capillaries in the brain, maintains the microenvironment of the central nervous system. During ischemia and traumatic brain injury (TBI, cellular disruption leading to mechanical insult results to the BBB being compromised. Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD is the most commonly used in vitro model for ischemia. On the other hand, stretch injury is currently being used to model TBI in vitro. In this paper, the two methods are used alone or in combination, to assess their effects on cerebrovascular endothelial cells cEND in the presence or absence of astrocytic factors. Applying severe stretch and/or OGD to cEND cells in our experiments resulted to cell swelling and distortion. Damage to the cells induced release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH and nitric oxide (NO into the cell culture medium. In addition, mRNA expression of inflammatory markers interleukin (IL-6, IL-1α, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α also increased. These events could lead to the opening of calcium ion channels resulting to excitotoxicity. This could be demonstrated by increased calcium level in OGD-subjected cEND cells incubated with astrocyte-conditioned medium. Furthermore, reduction of cell membrane integrity decreased tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin expression. In addition, permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer increased. Also, since cell damage requires an increased uptake of glucose, expression of glucose transporter glut1 was found to increase at the mRNA level after OGD. Overall, the effects of OGD on cEND cells appear to be more prominent than that of stretch with regards to TJ proteins, NO, glut1 expression and calcium level. Astrocytes potentiate these effects on calcium level in cEND cells. Combining both methods to model TBI in vitro shows a promising improvement to currently available models.

  5. Stretch and/or oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) in an in vitro traumatic brain injury (TBI) model induces calcium alteration and inflammatory cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Ellaine; Burek, Malgorzata; Förster, Carola Y

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), made up of endothelial cells of capillaries in the brain, maintains the microenvironment of the central nervous system. During ischemia and traumatic brain injury (TBI), cellular disruption leading to mechanical insult results to the BBB being compromised. Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) is the most commonly used in vitro model for ischemia. On the other hand, stretch injury is currently being used to model TBI in vitro. In this paper, the two methods are used alone or in combination, to assess their effects on cerebrovascular endothelial cells cEND in the presence or absence of astrocytic factors. Applying severe stretch and/or OGD to cEND cells in our experiments resulted to cell swelling and distortion. Damage to the cells induced release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH) and nitric oxide (NO) into the cell culture medium. In addition, mRNA expression of inflammatory markers interleukin (I L)-6, IL-1α, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α also increased. These events could lead to the opening of calcium ion channels resulting to excitotoxicity. This could be demonstrated by increased calcium level in OGD-subjected cEND cells incubated with astrocyte-conditioned medium. Furthermore, reduction of cell membrane integrity decreased tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin expression. In addition, permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer increased. Also, since cell damage requires an increased uptake of glucose, expression of glucose transporter glut1 was found to increase at the mRNA level after OGD. Overall, the effects of OGD on cEND cells appear to be more prominent than that of stretch with regards to TJ proteins, NO, glut1 expression, and calcium level. Astrocytes potentiate these effects on calcium level in cEND cells. Combining both methods to model TBI in vitro shows a promising improvement to currently available models.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus.

  7. Comparison of Glutamate Turnover in Nerve Terminals and Brain Tissue During [1,6-(13)C2]Glucose Metabolism in Anesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anant B; Lai, James C K; Chowdhury, Golam I M; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2017-01-01

    The (13)C turnover of neurotransmitter amino acids (glutamate, GABA and aspartate) were determined from extracts of forebrain nerve terminals and brain homogenate, and fronto-parietal cortex from anesthetized rats undergoing timed infusions of [1,6-(13)C2]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate. Nerve terminal (13)C fractional labeling of glutamate and aspartate was lower than those in whole cortical tissue at all times measured (up to 120 min), suggesting either the presence of a constant dilution flux from an unlabeled substrate or an unlabeled (effectively non-communicating on the measurement timescale) glutamate pool in the nerve terminals. Half times of (13)C labeling from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, as estimated by least squares exponential fitting to the time course data, were longer for nerve terminals (GluC4, 21.8 min; GABAC2 21.0 min) compared to cortical tissue (GluC4, 12.4 min; GABAC2, 14.5 min), except for AspC3, which was similar (26.5 vs. 27.0 min). The slower turnover of glutamate in the nerve terminals (but not GABA) compared to the cortex may reflect selective effects of anesthesia on activity-dependent glucose use, which might be more pronounced in the terminals. The (13)C labeling ratio for glutamate-C4 from [2-(13)C]acetate over that of (13)C-glucose was twice as large in nerve terminals compared to cortex, suggesting that astroglial glutamine under the (13)C glucose infusion was the likely source of much of the nerve terminal dilution. The net replenishment of most of the nerve terminal amino acid pools occurs directly via trafficking of astroglial glutamine.

  8. Impaired fasting blood glucose is associated to cognitive impairment and cerebral atrophy in middle-aged non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelti, Fathia; Dhenain, Marc; Terrien, Jérémy; Picq, Jean-Luc; Hardy, Isabelle; Champeval, Delphine; Perret, Martine; Schenker, Esther; Epelbaum, Jacques; Aujard, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations. In the grey mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus, spatial memory deficits have been associated with age and cerebral atrophy but the origin of these alterations have not been clearly identified. Herein, we showed that, on 28 female grey mouse lemurs (age range 2.4-6.1 years-old), age correlated with impaired fasting blood glucose (rs=0.37) but not with impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance. In middle-aged animals (4.1-6.1 years-old), fasting blood glucose was inversely and closely linked with spatial memory performance (rs=0.56) and hippocampus (rs=−0.62) or septum (rs=−0.55) volumes. These findings corroborate observations in humans and further support the grey mouse lemur as a natural model to unravel mechanisms which link impaired glucose homeostasis, brain atrophy and cognitive processes. PMID:28039490

  9. Glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of anticonvulsants: effect of methyl ethyl ketone in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Akifumi [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: yamaaki@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Momosaki, Sotaro; Hosoi, Rie [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Abe, Kohji [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Developmental Research Laboratories, Shionogi and Co., Ltd., Toyonaka, Osaka, 561-0825 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masatoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Johnan, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Enhancement of glucose utilization in the brain has been well known during acute seizure in various kinds of animal model of epilepsy. This enhancement of glucose utilization might be related to neural damage in these animal models. Recently, we found that methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) had both anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects in lithium-pilocapine (Li-pilo) status epilepticus (SE) rat. In this article, we measured the uptake of [{sup 14}C]2-deoxyglucose ([{sup 14}C]DG) in the Li-pilo SE and Li-pilo SE with MEK rat brain in order to assess whether the glucose utilization was a useful biomarker for the detection of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds. Significant increase of [{sup 14}C]DG uptake (45 min after the injection) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus during acute seizure induced by Li-pilo were observed. On the other hand, the initial uptake of [{sup 14}C]DG (1 min after the injection) in the Li-pilo SE rats was not different from the control rats. Therefore, the enhancement of glucose metabolism during acute seizure was due to the facilitation of the rate of phosphorylation process of [{sup 14}C]DG in the brain. Pretreatment with MEK (8 mmol/kg) completely abolished the enhancement of glucose utilization in the Li-pilo SE rats. The present results indicated that glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure might be a useful biomarker for the evaluation of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds.

  10. Novel bio-spectroscopic imaging reveals disturbed protein homeostasis and thiol redox with protein aggregation prior to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron death induced by global brain ischemia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Mark J; Smith, Shari E; Caine, Sally; Nichol, Helen; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2015-12-01

    Global brain ischemia resulting from cardiac arrest and cardiac surgery can lead to permanent brain damage and mental impairment. A clinical hallmark of global brain ischemia is delayed neurodegeneration, particularly within the CA1 subsector of the hippocampus. Unfortunately, the biochemical mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, hindering optimization of current therapies (i.e., therapeutic hypothermia) or development of new therapies. A major limitation to elucidating the mechanisms that contribute to neurodegeneration and understanding how these are influenced by potential therapies is the inability to relate biochemical markers to alterations in the morphology of individual neurons. Although immunocytochemistry allows imaging of numerous biochemical markers at the sub-cellular level, it is not a direct chemical imaging technique and requires successful "tagging" of the desired analyte. Consequently, important biochemical parameters, particularly those that manifest from oxidative damage to biological molecules, such as aggregated protein levels, have been notoriously difficult to image at the cellular or sub-cellular level. It has been hypothesized that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during ischemia and reperfusion facilitate protein aggregation, impairing neuronal protein homeostasis (i.e., decreasing protein synthesis) that in turn promotes neurodegeneration. Despite indirect evidence for this theory, direct measurements of morphology and ROS induced biochemical damage, such as increased protein aggregates and decreased protein synthesis, within the same neuron is lacking, due to the unavailability of a suitable imaging method. Our experimental approach has incorporated routine histology with novel wide-field synchrotron radiation Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) of the same neurons, ex vivo within brain tissue sections. The results demonstrate for the first time that increased protein aggregation and decreased levels of total protein

  11. 胃旁路手术调节胰岛素抵抗机制的研究%Mechanism of glucose homeostasis regulation by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晨宇; 徐瑞; 朱弘宇; 朱耀明

    2016-01-01

    目的 研究Roux-en-Y胃旁路手术(RYGB)对高脂饮食诱导的肥胖小鼠(DIO)胰岛素抵抗的调节机制.方法 将C57BL/6、H-2b小鼠随机分为胃旁路术组、假手术组和对照组.记录各组小鼠术后脂肪沉积及胰岛素敏感性;生化法检测血浆与脂肪组织细胞因子含量;荧光报告分析法检测荧光素活性;Western blot法检测组织核因子(NF)-κB及c-Jun氨基末端激酶(JNK)/c-Jun表达量;流式细胞仪检测组织巨噬细胞以及T细胞亚型.结果RYGB能有效改善小鼠的肥胖及胰岛素抵抗.与对照组DIO小鼠比较,RYGB小鼠的血浆胰岛素[(4.1±1.1)μg/L]及瘦素量均相应减少;此外RYGB能稳定白脂肪以及肝脏中的脂联素水平,单核细胞趋化因子-1(MCP-1)及白细胞介素(IL)-6表达也显著降低;RYGB能抑制高脂饮食(HFD)引起的白脂肪及肝脏组织中特异性的NF-κB及JNK/c-Jun信号通路激活;RYGB还能抑制肝脏和白脂肪中巨噬细胞M1亚群产生,促进M2亚群分化,调节CD4+及CD8+T细胞的浸润,增加调节性T细胞比例.结论DIO小鼠模型中,RYGB改善肥胖和胰岛素抵抗与早期炎症调节反应相关.%Objective We tested early immunological events of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass(RYGB),an effective approach for the improvement of glucose homeostasis,using the high-fat diet-induced obese(DIO)mouse model.Methods RYGB was performed with DIO mice that were divided into the following groups:RYGB,pair-feeding with sham surgery(SHAM-PF),and control(untreated DIO mice).We analyzed adiposity,insulin sensitivity,plasma and tissue cytokines and adipokines,tissue nuclear factor(NF)-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase(JNK)/c-Jun activation and tissue macrophage and T cell subsets.Results We found that RYGB resulted in sustained improvement of adiposity and insulin sensitivity.Plasma insulin and leptin levels were increased in untreated DIO mice and reduced in RYGB mice[(4.1±1.1)μg/L].RYGB maintained plasma adiponectin levels and inhibited

  12. Regulation of high glucose-induced apoptosis of brain pericytes by mitochondrial CA VA: A specific target for prevention of diabetic cerebrovascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Tulin O; Sheibani, Nader; Shah, Gul N

    2017-04-01

    Events responsible for cerebrovascular disease in diabetes are not fully understood. Pericyte loss is an early event that leads to endothelial cell death, microaneurysms, and cognitive impairment. A biochemical mechanism underlying pericyte loss is rapid respiration (oxidative metabolism of glucose). This escalation in respiration results from free influx of glucose into insulin-insensitive tissues in the face of high glucose levels in the blood. Rapid respiration generates superoxide, the precursor to all reactive oxygen species (ROS), and results in pericyte death. Respiration is regulated by carbonic anhydrases (CAs) VA and VB, the two isozymes expressed in mitochondria, and their pharmacologic inhibition with topiramate reduces respiration, ROS, and pericyte death. Topiramate inhibits both isozymes; therefore, in the earlier studies, their individual roles were not discerned. In a recent genetic study, we showed that mitochondrial CA VA plays a significant role in regulation of reactive oxygen species and pericyte death. The role of CA VB was not addressed. In this report, genetic knockdown and overexpression studies confirm that mitochondrial CA VA regulates respiration in pericytes, whereas mitochondrial CA VB does not contribute significantly. Identification of mitochondrial CA VA as a sole regulator of respiration provides a specific target to develop new drugs with fewer side effects that may be better tolerated and can protect the brain from diabetic injury. Since similar events occur in the capillary beds of other insulin-insensitive tissues such as the eye and kidney, these drugs may also slow the onset and progression of diabetic disease in these tissues.

  13. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ježek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic β cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in β cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic β cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic β cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic β cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release.

  14. Modeling the ischemic blood-brain barrier; the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on endothelial cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Berndt, Philipp;

    Introduction - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical, transport and metabolic barrier which plays a key role in preventing uncontrolled exchanges between blood and brain, ensuring an optimal environment for neurons activity. This extent interface is created by the endothelial cells forming ...

  15. Hierarchical clustering of Alzheimer and "normal" brains using elemental concentrations and glucose metabolism determined by PIXE, INAA and PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Spyrou, NM; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL

    2001-01-01

    Brain tissue samples, obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Brain Bank, Institute of Psychiatry, London, were taken from both left and right hemispheres of three regions of the cerebrum, namely the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes for both Alzheimer and 'normal' subjects. Trace element concentrat

  16. The protective role of isorhamnetin on human brain microvascular endothelial cells from cytotoxicity induced by methylglyoxal and oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Chen, Zhigang; Yan, Min; He, Ping; Chen, Zhong; Dai, Haibin

    2016-02-01

    As the first target of stroke, cerebral endothelial cells play a key role in brain vascular repair and maintenance, and their function is impeded in diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive dicarbonyl produced during glucose metabolism, accumulates in diabetic patients. MGO and MGO-induced advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) could ameliorate stroke-induced brain vascular damage, closely related with ECs dysfunction. Using MGO plus oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to mimic diabetic stroke, we reported the protective effect of isorhamnetin on OGD-induced cytotoxicity after MGO treatment on primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and explored the underlying mechanisms. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly enhanced 3-h OGD-induced HBMEC toxic effect, which was inhibited by pretreatment of isorhamnetin (100 μmol/L). Moreover, the protective effect of isorhamnetin is multiple function dependent, which includes anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptosis effects. Besides its well-known inhibition on the mitochondria-dependent or intrinsic apoptotic pathway, isorhamnetin also reduced activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, as characterized by the decreased expression and activity of caspase 3 and caspase 8. Furthermore, pretreatment with isorhamnetin specifically inhibited FAS/FASL expression and suppressed nuclear factor-kappa B nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results indicated that isorhamnetin protected against OGD-induced cytotoxicity after MGO treatment in cultured HBMEC due to its multiple protective effects and could inhibit Fas-mediated extrinsic apoptosis. Therefore, isorhamnetin is a promising reagent for the treatment of hyperglycemia and ischemia-induced cerebral vascular degeneration. A proposed model of the potential protective mechanism of isorhamnetin, a metabolite of quercetin, on methylglyoxal (MGO) treatment plus oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) exposure-induced cytotoxicity in cultured human

  17. Brain regions involved in voluntary movements as revealed by radioisotopic mapping of CBF or CMR-glucose changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Ingvar, D H

    1990-01-01

    Mapping of cortical and subcortical grey matter active during voluntary movements by means of measurements of local increases of CBF or CMR-Glucose is reviewed. Most of the studies concern observations in man during hand movements using the intracarotid Xenon-133 injection technique, an approach...

  18. In utero fuel homeostasis: Lessons for a clinician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N Suman Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetus exists in a complex, dynamic, and yet intriguing symbiosis with its mother as far as fuel metabolism is concerned. Though the dependence on maternal fuel is nearly complete to cater for its high requirement, the fetus is capable of some metabolism of its own. The first half of gestation is a period of maternal anabolism and storage whereas the second half results in exponential fetal growth where maternal stores are mobilized. Glucose is the primary substrate for energy production in the fetus though capable of utilizing alternate sources like lactate, ketoacids, amino acids, fatty acids, and glycogen as fuel under special circumstances. Key transporters like glucose transporters (GLUT are responsible for preferential transfers, which are in turn regulated by complex interaction of maternal and fetal hormones. Amino acids are preferentially utilized for growth and essential fatty acids for development of brain and retina. Insulin, insulin like growth factors, glucagon, catecholamines, and letpin are the hormones implicated in this fascinating process. Hormonal regulation of metabolic substrate utilization and anabolism in the fetus is secondary to the supply of nutrient substrates. The knowledge of fuel homeostasis is crucial for a clinician caring for pregnant women and neonates to manage disorders of metabolism (diabetes, growth (intrauterine growth restriction, and transitional adaptation (hypoglycemia.

  19. Elements for Success in Managing Type 2 Diabetes With SGLT-2 Inhibitors: Role of the Kidney in Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for SGLT-2 Inhibition in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eden M

    2017-02-01

    The focus on the kidney as a therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has led to the development of the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, of which 3 are available in the United States. This article addresses the implications for SGLT-2 inhibition in the treatment of T2DM.

  20. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir O Murovets

    Full Text Available The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+ inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-. Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain.

  1. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer’s Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Yuan; Men, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Hua; Lei, Jian-Feng; Zuo, Fu-Xing; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhu, Zhao-Hui; Bao, Xin-Jie; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr). Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD). By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD). Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer’s cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals. PMID:27763550

  2. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer’s Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1 transgenic (Tg mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr. Morris water maze (MWM was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD. By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD. Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer’s cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  3. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer's Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using (18)F-FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Yuan; Men, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Hua; Lei, Jian-Feng; Zuo, Fu-Xing; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhu, Zhao-Hui; Bao, Xin-Jie; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using (18)F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr). Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD). By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD). Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer's cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  4. Requirement of glycogenolysis for uptake of increased extracellular K+ in astrocytes: potential implications for K+ homeostasis and glycogen usage in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junnan; Song, Dan; Xue, Zhanxia; Gu, Li; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2013-03-01

    The importance of astrocytic K(+) uptake for extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](e)) clearance during neuronal stimulation or pathophysiological conditions is increasingly acknowledged. It occurs by preferential stimulation of the astrocytic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, which has higher K(m) and V(max) values than its neuronal counterpart, at more highly increased [K(+)](e) with additional support of the cotransporter NKCC1. Triggered by a recent DiNuzzo et al. paper, we used administration of the glycogenolysis inhibitor DAB to primary cultures of mouse astrocytes to determine whether K(+) uptake required K(+)-stimulated glycogenolysis. KCl was increased by either 5 mM (stimulating only the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) or 10 mM (stimulating both transporters) in glucose-containing saline media prepared to become iso-osmotic after the addition. DAB completely inhibited both uptakes, the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase-mediated by preventing Na(+) uptake for stimulation of its intracellular Na(+)-activated site, and the NKCC1-mediated uptake by inhibition of depolarization- and L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) uptake. Drugs inhibiting the signaling pathways involved in either of these processes also abolished K(+) uptake. Assuming similar in vivo characteristics, partly supported by literature data, K(+)-stimulated astrocytic K(+) uptake must discontinue after normalization of extracellular K(+). This will allow Kir1.4-mediated release and reuptake by the less powerful neuronal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase.

  5. HCdc14A is involved in cell cycle regulation of human brain vascular endothelial cells following injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingjing; Zhou, Houguang; Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Hu, Renming; Dong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle processes play a vital role in vascular endothelial proliferation and dysfunction. Cell division cycle protein 14 (Cdc14) is an important cell cycle regulatory phosphatase. Previous studies in budding yeast demonstrated that Cdc14 could trigger the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), which are required for mitotic exit and cytokinesis. However, the exact function of human Cdc14 (hCdc14) in cell cycle regulation during vascular diseases is yet to be elucidated. There are two HCdc14 homologs: hCdc14A and hCdc14B. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of hCdc14A in high glucose-, free fatty acids (FFAs)-, and hypoxia-induced injury in cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs). Data revealed that high glucose, FFA, and hypoxia down-regulated hCdc14A expression remarkably, and also affected the expression of other cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclin B, cyclin D, cyclin E, and p53. Furthermore, the combined addition of the three stimuli largely blocked cell cycle progression, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. We also determined that hCdc14A was localized mainly to centrosomes during interphase and spindles during mitosis using confocal microscopy, and that it could affect the expression of other cycle-related proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of hCdc14A accelerated cell cycle progression, enhanced cell proliferation, and promoted neoplastic transformation, whereas the knockdown of hCdc14A using small interfering RNA produced the opposite effects. Therefore, these findings provide novel evidence that hCdc14A might be involved in cell cycle regulation in cultured HBVECs during high glucose-, FFA-, and hypoxia-induced injury.

  6. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K. Teune, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients.

  7. 锌转运体8在胰岛功能和血糖稳态中的作用%The Role of Zinc Transporter 8 in Islet Function and Glucose Homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱莉

    2011-01-01

    ZnT8( SLC30A8 )is a newly discovered islet-specific zinc transporter that controls zinc efflux into the extracellular matrix and intracellular vesicles to reduce the concentration of zinc in the cytoplasm.The polymorphism of the SLC30A8 gene is associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. ZnT8 deletion decreased fasting and glucose - stimulated insulin secretion, however the blood glucose levels were not significantly changed in mice. In summary, SLC30A8 gene deletion is accompanied by a modest impairment in insulin secretion without major alterations in glucose metabolism.%锌转运体8(ZnT8)是新近发现的特异性高表达于胰岛的锌转运体,主要功能是参与锌在细胞内的区室化以及锌的外排,从而降低胞质内锌的浓度.同时,SLC30A8多态性影响2型糖尿病的易患性,与2型糖尿病的发病机制有关.虽然ZnT8全身剔除的小鼠空腹及葡萄糖刺激后胰岛素均减少,但血糖浓度无明显改变,表明了ZnT8的缺乏影响胰岛功能,而对全身血糖代谢的影响比较局限.

  8. Effects of High-Intensity Interval Exercise versus Moderate Continuous Exercise on Glucose Homeostasis and Hormone Response in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Using Novel Ultra-Long-Acting Insulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othmar Moser

    Full Text Available We investigated blood glucose (BG and hormone response to aerobic high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE and moderate continuous exercise (CON matched for mean load and duration in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Seven trained male subjects with T1DM performed a maximal incremental exercise test and HIIE and CON at 3 different mean intensities below (A and above (B the first lactate turn point and below the second lactate turn point (C on a cycle ergometer. Subjects were adjusted to ultra-long-acting insulin Degludec (Tresiba/ Novo Nordisk, Denmark. Before exercise, standardized meals were administered, and short-acting insulin dose was reduced by 25% (A, 50% (B, and 75% (C dependent on mean exercise intensity. During exercise, BG, adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, cortisol, glucagon, and insulin-like growth factor-1, blood lactate, heart rate, and gas exchange variables were measured. For 24 h after exercise, interstitial glucose was measured by continuous glucose monitoring system.BG decrease during HIIE was significantly smaller for B (p = 0.024 and tended to be smaller for A and C compared to CON. No differences were found for post-exercise interstitial glucose, acute hormone response, and carbohydrate utilization between HIIE and CON for A, B, and C. In HIIE, blood lactate for A (p = 0.006 and B (p = 0.004 and respiratory exchange ratio for A (p = 0.003 and B (p = 0.003 were significantly higher compared to CON but not for C.Hypoglycemia did not occur during or after HIIE and CON when using ultra-long-acting insulin and applying our methodological approach for exercise prescription. HIIE led to a smaller BG decrease compared to CON, although both exercises modes were matched for mean load and duration, even despite markedly higher peak workloads applied in HIIE. Therefore, HIIE and CON could be safely performed in T1DM.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02075567 http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02075567.

  9. The Selfish Brain: Stress and Eating Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim ePeters

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain occupies a special hierarchical position in human energy metabolism. If cerebral homeostasis is threatened, the brain behaves in a "selfish" manner by competing for energy resources with the body. Here we present a logistic approach, which is based on the principles of supply and demand known from economics. In this "cerebral supply chain" model, the brain constitutes the final consumer. In order to illustrate the operating mode of the cerebral supply chain, we take experimental data which allow to assess the supply, demand and need of the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress. The experimental results show that the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress actively demands energy from the body, in order to cover its increased energy needs. The data demonstrate that the stressed brain uses a mechanism referred to as "cerebral insulin suppression" to limit glucose fluxes into peripheral tissue (muscle, fat and to enhance cerebral glucose supply. Furthermore psychosocial stress elicits a marked increase in eating behavior in the post-stress phase. Subjects ingested more carbohydrates without any preference for sweet ingredients. These experimentally observed changes of cerebral demand, supply and need are integrated into a logistic framework describing the supply chain of the selfish brain.

  10. The selfish brain: stress and eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Achim; Kubera, Britta; Hubold, Christian; Langemann, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The brain occupies a special hierarchical position in human energy metabolism. If cerebral homeostasis is threatened, the brain behaves in a "selfish" manner by competing for energy resources with the body. Here we present a logistic approach, which is based on the principles of supply and demand known from economics. In this "cerebral supply chain" model, the brain constitutes the final consumer. In order to illustrate the operating mode of the cerebral supply chain, we take experimental data which allow assessing the supply, demand and need of the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress. The experimental results show that the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress actively demands energy from the body, in order to cover its increased energy needs. The data demonstrate that the stressed brain uses a mechanism referred to as "cerebral insulin suppression" to limit glucose fluxes into peripheral tissue (muscle, fat) and to enhance cerebral glucose supply. Furthermore psychosocial stress elicits a marked increase in eating behavior in the post-stress phase. Subjects ingested more carbohydrates without any preference for sweet ingredients. These experimentally observed changes of cerebral demand, supply and need are integrated into a logistic framework describing the supply chain of the selfish brain.

  11. [Pharmacological assessment of ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution for cerebrospinal surgery based on glucose incorporation activity in primary cultures of rat brain cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Masuhiro; Doi, Kazuhisa; Naito, Shinsaku

    2010-01-01

    ARTCEREB irrigation and perfusion solution (Artcereb) is typically used as an artificial fluid for applications inside the skull and spinal cavity. This in vitro study was conducted to assess the effects of Artcereb in cultures of rat fetal brain cells. Cell function following exposure to Artcereb was evaluated by measuring (3)H-deoxy-D-glucose incorporation activity. Cell function was significantly reduced in primary cultures of rat fetal brain cells at 0 h and 24 h after 1-h or 3-h exposure to normal saline as compared with Artcereb. Cell function was also significantly reduced at 24 h after 3-h exposure to lactated Ringer's solution as compared with Artcereb. Furthermore, cell function was significantly reduced at 24 h after 3-h exposure to a modified Artcereb formulation lacking either HCO(3)(-) or Mg(2+) as compared with Artcereb, while cell function was unaffected at 24 h after exposure to lactated Ringer's solution with HCO(3)(-) or normal saline with HCO(3)(-) as compared with Artcereb. These findings suggest the importance of the presence of HCO(3)(-) and Mg(2+) in the formulation of Artcereb.

  12. Brain glucose metabolism is associated with hormone level in Cushing's disease: A voxel-based study using FDG-PET

    OpenAIRE

    Shuai Liu; Yinyan Wang; Kaibin Xu; Fan Ping; Renzhi Wang; Fang Li; Xin Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids can exert a neurotoxic effect in patients, possibly manifesting as molecular imaging alterations in patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between brain metabolism and elevated hormone level using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. We retrospectively enrolled 92 consecutive patients with confirmed diagnosis of Cushing's disease. A voxel-based analysis was performed to investigate the...

  13. Microbiome–Gut–Brain Axis: A Pathway for Improving Brainstem Serotonin Homeostasis and Successful Autoresuscitation in SIDS—A Novel Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Vijayakumar; Praveen, Shama

    2017-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) continues to be a major public health issue. Following its major decline since the “Back to Sleep” campaign, the incidence of SIDS has plateaued, with an annual incidence of about 1,500 SIDS-related deaths in the United States and thousands more throughout the world. The etiology of SIDS, the major cause of postneonatal mortality in the western world, is still poorly understood. Although sleeping in prone position is a major risk factor, SIDS continues to occur even in the supine sleeping position. The triple-risk model of Filiano and Kinney emphasizes the interaction between a susceptible infant during a critical developmental period and stressor/s in the pathogenesis of SIDS. Recent evidence ranges from dysregulated autonomic control to findings of altered neurochemistry, especially the serotonergic system that plays an important role in brainstem cardiorespiratory/thermoregulatory centers. Brainstem serotonin (5-HT) and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2) levels have been shown to be lower in SIDS, supporting the evidence that defects in the medullary serotonergic system play a significant role in SIDS. Pathogenic bacteria and their enterotoxins have been associated with SIDS, although no direct evidence has been established. We present a new hypothesis that the infant’s gut microbiome, and/or its metabolites, by its direct effects on the gut enterochromaffin cells, stimulates the afferent gut vagal endings by releasing serotonin (paracrine effect), optimizing autoresuscitation by modulating brainstem 5-HT levels through the microbiome–gut–brain axis, thus playing a significant role in SIDS during the critical period of gut flora development and vulnerability to SIDS. The shared similarities between various risk factors for SIDS and their relationship with the infant gut microbiome support our hypothesis. Comprehensive gut-microbiome studies are required to test our hypothesis. PMID:28111624

  14. How the cerebral serotonin homeostasis predicts environmental changes: a model to explain seasonal changes of brain 5-HTT as intermediate phenotype of the 5-HTTLPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Kalbitzer, Urs; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Cumming, Paul; Heinz, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    Molecular imaging studies with positron emission tomography have revealed that the availability of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) in the human brain fluctuates over the course of the year. This effect is most pronounced in carriers of the short allele of the 5-HTT promoter region (5-HTTLPR), which has in several previous studies been linked to an increased risk to develop mood disorders. We argue that long-lasting fluctuations in the cerebral serotonin transmission, which is regulated via the 5-HTT, are responsible for mediating responses to environmental changes based on an assessment of the expected "safety" of the environment; this response is obtained in part through serotonergic modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We posit that the intermediate phenotype of the s-allele may properly be understood as mediating a trade-off, wherein increased responsiveness of cerebral serotonin transmission to seasonal and other forms of environmental change imparts greater behavioral flexibility, at the expense of increased vulnerability to stress. This model may explain the somewhat higher prevalence of the s-allele in some human populations dwelling at geographic latitudes with pronounced seasonal climatic changes, while this hypothesis does not rule out that genetic drift plays an additional or even exclusive role. We argue that s-allele manifests as an intermediate phenotype in terms of an increased responsiveness of the 5-HTT expression to number of daylight hours, which may serve as a stable surrogate marker of other environmental factors, such as availability of food and safety of the environment in populations that live closer to the geographic poles.

  15. Comparing amyloid-β deposition, neuroinflammation, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial complex I activity in brain: a PET study in aged monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Hideo; Nishiyama, Shingo; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Kanazawa, Masakatsu; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Harada, Norihiro [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Central Research Laboratory, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to compare amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition, translocator protein (TSPO) activity, regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc), and mitochondrial complex I (MC-I) activity in the brain of aged monkeys. PET scans with {sup 11}C-PIB (Aβ), {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF (MC-I), {sup 11}C-DPA-713 (TSPO), and {sup 18}F-FDG (rCMRglc) were performed in aged monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in the conscious state and under isoflurane anaesthesia. {sup 11}C-PIB binding to Aβ and {sup 11}C-DPA-713 binding to TSPO were evaluated in terms of standard uptake values (SUV). The total volume of distribution (V{sub T}) of {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF and rCMRglc with {sup 18}F-FDG were calculated using arterial blood sampling. Isoflurane did not affect MC-I activity measured in terms of {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF uptake in living brain. There was a significant negative correlation between {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF binding (V{sub T}) and {sup 11}C-PIB uptake (SUVR), and there was a significant positive correlation between {sup 11}C-DPA-713 uptake (SUV) and {sup 11}C-PIB uptake. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between rCMRglc ratio and {sup 11}C-PIB uptake. {sup 18}F-BCPP-EF could be a potential PET probe for quantitative imaging of impaired MC-I activity that is correlated with Aβ deposition in the living brain. (orig.)

  16. Oxygen-glucose deprivation increases the enzymatic activity and the microvesicle-mediated release of ectonucleotidases in the cells composing the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Stefania; Colombo, Laura; Magni, Giulia; Viganò, Francesca; Boccazzi, Marta; Deli, Mária A; Sperlágh, Beáta; Abbracchio, Maria P; Kittel, Agnes

    2011-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), the dynamic interface between the nervous tissue and the blood, is composed by endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their receptors (the purinergic system) constitute a widely diffused signaling system involved in many pathophysiological processes. However, the role of this system in controlling BBB functions is still largely unknown. By using cultures of these three cell types grown separately and a BBB in vitro model consisting of triple co-cultures, we studied for the first time the expression and distribution of the ecto-enzymes nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases, the enzymes which hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides) under control and ischemic (oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro; OGD) conditions. NTPDase1 was detected in all three cell types, whereas NTPDase2 was expressed by astrocytes and pericytes and, to a lesser extent, by endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were extremely susceptible to cell death when OGD was applied to mimic in vitro the cytotoxicity induced by ischemia, whereas astrocytes and pericytes were more resistant. A semi-quantitative assay highlighted markedly increased e-ATPase activity following exposure to OGD in all three cell types, either when grown separately or when co-cultured together to resemble the composition of the BBB. Moreover, electron microscopy analysis showed that both endothelial cells and astrocytes shed microvesicles containing NTPDases from their membrane, which may suggest a novel mechanism to increase the breakdown of ATP released to toxic levels by damaged BBB cells. We hypothesize that this phenomenon could have a protective and/or modulatory effect for brain parenchymal cells. This in vitro model is therefore useful to study the role of extracellular nucleotides in modulating BBB responses to ischemic events, and to develop new effective purinergic-based approaches for brain ischemia.

  17. The gut-brain axis: a major glucoregulatory player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcelin, R

    2010-10-01

    Glucose homeostasis corresponds to the overall physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms which tightly maintain the glycaemia between ∼4.5 and ∼6 mM. The resulting blood glucose concentration is the consequence of a balance between the mechanisms that ensure the entry and the output of glucose in the blood. A dynamic balance needs hence to be perfectly achieved in order to maintain a physiological glycaemic concentration. Specialized cells from the intestine continuously detect changes in glucose concentration and send signals to peripheral tissues and the brain through the vagus nerve. The molecular mechanisms involved in glucose detection have not been perfectly defined but could resemble those from the insulin-secreting beta cells. The brain then integrates the enteric and circulating endocrine signals to generate a new signal towards peripheral tissues such as the pancreas, liver, muscles, and blood vessels. This metabolic reflex is called anticipatory since it allows the peripheral tissues to prepare for the adequate handling of nutrients. Diabetes is associated with an impaired anticipatory reflex, which hampers the proper detection of nutrients and leads to hyperglycaemic episodes. Recently, GLP-1-based therapies have demonstrated the improvement of glucose detection and their efficacy on glycaemic control. Although not yet fully demonstrated, GLP-1-based therapies regulate glucose sensors, which leads to the glycaemic improvement. Certainly other molecular targets could be identified to further generate new therapeutic strategies.

  18. Effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity, glucose homeostasis and plasma amino acid concentrations in the most TCDD-susceptible and the most TCDD-resistant rat strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viluksela, M.; Pohjanvirta, R.; Tuomisto, J.T.; Tuomisto, J. (National Public Health Inst., Laboratory of Toxicology, Kuopio (Finland)); Unkila, M. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)); Stahl, B.U.; Rozman, K.K. (Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States) Section of Environmental Toxicology, GSF-Institut fuer Toxikologie, Neuherberg (Germany))

    1999-08-01

    Reduced gluconeogenesis due to decreased activity of key gluconeogenic enzymes in liver, together with feed refusal, has been suggested to play an important role in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced lethality in rats. This study was carried out to further analyse the toxicological significance of reduced gluconeogenesis by comparing dose-responses and time-courses of effects of TCDD on the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in liver, liver glycogen concentration as well as plasma concentrations of glucose and amino acids in both genders of TCDD-sensitive Long-Evans (L-E) rats and TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar (H/W) rats. A dose-dependent decrease in PEPCK activity was observed in H/W rats, but in L-E rats the activity was not decreased. However, TCDD impaired the strong increase in liver PEPCK activity observed in pair-fed controls of the L-E strain. Liver glycogen concentrations were severely decreased in L-E rats and moderately in H/W rats. This effect seems to be secondary to reduced feed intake, since a similar decrease was seen in pair-fed controls. Decreases in plasma glucose concentrations were also more profound in L-E rats than in H/W rats, but pair-fed controls were generally less affected. Circulating concentrations of amino acids were markedly increased in TCDD-treated L-E rats, which is likely to reflect increased mobilization of amino acids and their decreased metabolism in liver. Reduction of liver PEPCK activity cannot account for the sensitivity difference of these two strains of rats in terms of mortality. Nevertheless, the response of both strains of TCDD-treated rats regarding gluconeogenesis is different from that seen in pair-fed controls and suggesting that impairment of this pathway contributes to the development of the wasting syndrome. (orig.) With 7 figs., 2 tabs., 47 refs.

  19. Ecrg4 expression and its product augurin in the choroid plexus: impact on fetal brain development, cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis and neuroprogenitor cell response to CNS injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Ana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The content and composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is determined in large part by the choroid plexus (CP and specifically, a specialized epithelial cell (CPe layer that responds to, synthesizes, and transports peptide hormones into and out of CSF. Together with ventricular ependymal cells, these CPe relay homeostatic signals throughout the central nervous system (CNS and regulate CSF hydrodynamics. One new candidate signal is augurin, a newly recognized 14 kDa protein that is encoded by esophageal cancer related gene-4 (Ecrg4, a putative tumor suppressor gene whose presence and function in normal tissues remains unexplored and enigmatic. The aim of this study was to explore whether Ecrg4 and its product augurin, can be implicated in CNS development and the response to CNS injury. Methods Ecrg4 gene expression in CNS and peripheral tissues was studied by in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR. Augurin, the protein encoded by Ecrg4, was detected by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The biological consequence of augurin over-expression was studied in a cortical stab model of rat CNS injury by intra-cerebro-ventricular injection of an adenovirus vector containing the Ecrg4 cDNA. The biological consequences of reduced augurin expression were evaluated by characterizing the CNS phenotype caused by Ecrg4 gene knockdown in developing zebrafish embryos. Results Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that, the CP is a major source of Ecrg4 in the CNS and that Ecrg4 mRNA is predominantly localized to choroid plexus epithelial (CPe, ventricular and central canal cells of the spinal cord. After a stab injury into the brain however, both augurin staining and Ecrg4 gene expression decreased precipitously. If the loss of augurin was circumvented by over-expressing Ecrg4 in vivo, BrdU incorporation by cells in the subependymal zone decreased. Inversely, gene knockdown of Ecrg4 in developing

  20. Phosphate homeostasis and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghat, P; Sodi, R; Swaminathan, R

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies of inherited disorders of phosphate metabolism have shed new light on the understanding of phosphate metabolism. Phosphate has important functions in the body and several mechanisms have evolved to regulate phosphate balance including vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and phosphatonins such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). Disorders of phosphate homeostasis leading to hypo- and hyperphosphataemia are common and have clinical and biochemical consequences. Notably, recent studies have linked hyperphosphataemia with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This review outlines the recent advances in the understanding of phosphate homeostasis and describes the causes, investigation and management of hypo- and hyperphosphataemia.

  1. Brain glucose metabolism in the early and specific diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. FDG-PET studies in MCI and AD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, Lisa [University of Florence, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, Nuclear Medicine Unit (Italy); University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL400, Department of Psychiatry New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The demographics of aging suggest a great need for the early diagnosis of dementia and the development of preventive strategies. Neuropathology and structural MRI studies have pointed to the medial temporal lobe (MTL) as the brain region earliest affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD). MRI findings provide strong evidence that in mild cognitive impairments (MCI), AD-related volume losses can be reproducibly detected in the hippocampus, the entorhinal cortex (EC) and, to a lesser extent, the parahippocampal gyrus; they also indicate that lateral temporal lobe changes are becoming increasingly useful in predicting the transition to dementia. Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging has revealed glucose metabolic reductions in the parieto-temporal, frontal and posterior cingulate cortices to be the hallmark of AD. Overall, the pattern of cortical metabolic changes has been useful for the prediction of future AD as well as in distinguishing AD from other neurodegenerative diseases. FDG-PET on average achieves 90% sensitivity in identifying AD, although specificity in differentiating AD from other dementias is lower. Moreover, recent MRI-guided FDG-PET studies have shown that MTL hypometabolism is the most specific and sensitive measure for the identification of MCI, while the utility of cortical deficits is controversial. This review highlights cross-sectional, prediction and longitudinal FDG-PET studies and attempts to put into perspective the value of FDG-PET in diagnosing AD-like changes, particularly at an early stage, and in providing diagnostic specificity. The examination of MTL structures, which has so far been exclusive to MRI protocols, is then examined as a possible strategy to improve diagnostic specificity. All told, there is considerable promise that early and specific diagnosis is feasible through a combination of imaging modalities. (orig.)

  2. Scaling of brain metabolism with a fixed energy budget per neuron: implications for neuronal activity, plasticity and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2011-03-01

    It is usually considered that larger brains have larger neurons, which consume more energy individually, and are therefore accompanied by a larger number of glial cells per neuron. These notions, however, have never been tested. Based on glucose and oxygen metabolic rates in awake animals and their recently determined numbers of neurons, here I show that, contrary to the expected, the estimated glucose use per neuron is remarkably constant, varying only by 40% across the six species of rodents and primates (including humans). The estimated average glucose use per neuron does not correlate with neuronal density in any structure. This suggests that the energy budget of the whole brain per neuron is fixed across species and brain sizes, such that total glucose use by the brain as a whole, by the cerebral cortex and also by the cerebellum alone are linear functions of the number of neurons in the structures across the species (although the average glucose consumption per neuron is at least 10× higher in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum). These results indicate that the apparently remarkable use in humans of 20% of the whole body energy budget by a brain that represents only 2% of body mass is explained simply by its large number of neurons. Because synaptic activity is considered the major determinant of metabolic cost, a conserved energy budget per neuron has several profound implications for synaptic homeostasis and the regulation of firing rates, synaptic plasticity, brain imaging, pathologies, and for brain scaling in evolution.

  3. FDG-PET changes in brain glucose metabolism from normal cognition to pathologically verified Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, Lisa [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL 400, New York, NY (United States); Mistur, Rachel; Switalski, Remigiusz; Glodzik, Lidia; Li, Yi; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; De Santi, Susan; Reisberg, Barry [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Tsui, Wai Hon; De Leon, Mony J. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Wisniewski, Thomas [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We report the first clinicopathological series of longitudinal FDG-PET scans in post-mortem (PM) verified cognitively normal elderly (NL) followed to the onset of Alzheimer's-type dementia (DAT), and in patients with mild DAT with progressive cognitive deterioration. Four NL subjects and three patients with mild DAT received longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and dynamic FDG-PET examinations with arterial input functions. NL subjects were followed for 13 {+-} 5 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 7 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 6 {+-} 3 years after the last FDG-PET. Two NL declined to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and two developed probable DAT before death. DAT patients were followed for 9 {+-} 3 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 3 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 7 {+-} 1 years after the last FDG-PET. Two DAT patients progressed to moderate-to-severe dementia and one developed vascular dementia. The two NL subjects who declined to DAT received a PM diagnosis of definite AD. Their FDG-PET scans indicated a progression of deficits in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) from the hippocampus to the parietotemporal and posterior cingulate cortices. One DAT patient showed AD with diffuse Lewy body disease (LBD) at PM, and her last in vivo PET was indicative of possible LBD for the presence of occipital as well as parietotemporal hypometabolism. Progressive CMRglc reductions on FDG-PET occur years in advance of clinical DAT symptoms in patients with pathologically verified disease. The FDG-PET profiles in life were consistent with the PM diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Effects of taurine supplementation and swimming, associated or not, on obesity and glucose homeostasis in mice = Efeito da suplementação com taurina e da natação, associadas ou não, sobre a obesidade e homeostase glicêmica em camundongos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Cheng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Studies show that physical exercise (PE is associated with a reduced fat accumulation and increased insulin sensitivity, and taurine (TAU improves glucose homeostasis in lean rodents. The aim in this work was evaluate the effects of supplementing TAU and practice of PE, associated or not, on obesity and glucose homeostasis on obese MSG-mice. Neonate male Swiss mice received injections of monosodium glutamate (MSG group or saline (CON group. From the 30th to the 90th day of life, one group of animals received TAU in drinking water (MSG TAU group, another was subjected to PE (MSG PE group and a third group underwent both procedures (MSG PE TAU group. Mice treated with MSG become obese, hypertriglyceridemic, glucose intolerant and insulin resistant. The supplementation with TAU and the PE, isolated or associated, reduced the triglycerides (38%, glucose intolerance (around 30% and KITT (79% in MSG-obese animals, but did not influence the accumulation of fat. Interestingly, the combination of both strategies significantly reduced the insulin resistance, compared to animals subjected to isolated strategies. In conclusion, the supplementation with TAU and PE, isolated or associated, did not influence the accumulation of fat in MSG-obese mice, however, reduce the triglycerides and insulin resistance. O exercício físico (EF está associado à redução do acúmulo de gordura e aumento na sensibilidade à insulina e a taurina (TAU melhora a homeostase glicêmica em roedores magros. Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos da suplementação com TAU e do EF, associados ou não, sobre a obesidade e a homeostase glicêmica em camundongos obesos-MSG. Camundongos Swiss machos neonatos receberam injeções de glutamato monossódico (grupo MSG ou salina (grupo CON. Do 30º ao 90º dia de vida, um grupo de animais MSG recebeu TAU na água de beber (MSG TAU; outro foi submetido ao EF (MSG EX e um terceiro grupo foi submetido aos dois procedimentos (MSG EX TAU

  5. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  6. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilio Corrado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR 1. Adrenoceptor (AR activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine-, β2(terbutaline-, α1(phenylephrine- and α2(clonidine-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P -/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies in neonates.

  7. α-Melanocyte stimulating hormone promotes muscle glucose uptake via melanocortin 5 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. Enriori

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: These data describe a novel endocrine circuit that modulates glucose homeostasis by pituitary α-MSH, which increases muscle glucose uptake and thermogenesis through the activation of a MC5R-PKA-pathway, which is disrupted in obesity.

  8. TSLP and Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shino Hanabuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In an immune system, dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs as well as powerful sensors of danger signals. When DCs receive signals from infection and tissue stress, they immediately activate and instruct the initiation of appropriate immune responses to T cells. However, it has remained unclear how the tissue microenvironment in a steady state shapes the function of DCs. Recent many works on thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that has the strong ability to activate DCs, provide evidence that TSLP mediates crosstalk between epithelial cells and DCs, involving in DC-mediated immune homeostasis. Here, we review recent progress made on how TSLP expressed within the thymus and peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues regulates DC-mediated T-cell development in the thymus and T-cell homeostasis in the periphery.

  9. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  10. Suppression of BDNF-induced expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cortical cultures by oxygen-glucose deprivation: a model system to study ischemic mechanisms in the perinatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, Ayalla; Roberts, Jodie

    2002-04-15

    The aim of this study was to establish a culture system that can serve as a model to study hypoxic-ischemic mechanisms regulating the functional expression of NPY neurons in the perinatal brain. Using an aggregate culture system derived from the rat fetal cortex, we defined the effects of oxygen and glucose deprivation on NPY expression, using BDNF-induced production of NPY as a functional criterion. NPY neurons exhibited a differential susceptibility to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Although the neurons could withstand oxygen deprivation for 16 hr, they were dramatically damaged by 8 hr of glucose deprivation and by 1-4 hr of deprivation of both oxygen and glucose (N+Glu-). One-hour exposure to N+Glu- led to a transient inhibition ( approximately 50%) of NPY production manifesting within 24 hr and recovering by 5 days thereafter, a 2-hr exposure to N+Glu- led to a sustained inhibition (50-75%) manifesting 1-5 days thereafter, and a 4-hr exposure to N+Glu- led to a total irreversible suppression of BDNF-induced production of NPY manifesting within 24 hr and lasting 8 days after re-supply of oxygen and glucose. Moreover, 1-hr exposure to N+Glu- led to a substantial and 4-hr exposure led to a total disappearance of immunostaining for MAP-2 and NPY but not for GFAP; indicating that neurons are the primary cell-type damaged by oxygen-glucose deprivation. Analysis of cell viability (LDH, MTT) indicated that progressive changes in cell integrity take place during the 4-hr exposure to N+Glu- followed by massive cell death 24 hr thereafter. Thus, we defined a culture system that can serve as a model to study mechanisms by which ischemic insult leads to suppression and eventually death of NPY neurons. Importantly, changes in NPY neurons can be integrated into the overall scheme of ischemic injury in the perinatal brain.

  11. Salvianolic acid B improves the disruption of high glucose-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cells via the ROS/HIF-1α/VEGF and miR-200b/VEGF signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Chao; You, Fu-Li; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Xiang-Nan; Wang, Yan-Feng

    2016-09-06

    The study investigated the roles and mechanisms of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on permeability of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMECs) exposed to high glucose. The results demonstrated that Sal B greatly up-regulated the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and decreased the permeability of RBMECs compared with the control group. And the increase of reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein induced by high glucose were antagonized by Sal B. In addition, a great decrease of microRNA-200b (miR-200b) was observed in the RBMECs under high-glucose condition, which was significantly increased by Sal B pretreatment. And overexpression of miR-200b markedly attenuated the RBMECs permeability and inhibited the expression of VEGF protein by targeting with 3'-UTR of its mRNA. This led to the conclusion that Sal B-mediated improvement of blood-brain barrier dysfunction induced by high-glucose is related to the ROS/HIF-1α/VEGF and miR-200b/VEGF signaling pathways.

  12. G-CSF Protects Human Brain Vascular Endothelial Cells Injury Induced by High Glucose, Free Fatty Acids and Hypoxia through MAPK and Akt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Jingchun; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Dong, Qiang; Hu, Renming

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to play a neuroprotective role in ischemic stroke by mobilizing bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), promoting angiogenesis, and inhibiting apoptosis. Impairments in mobilization and function of the BM-derived EPCs have previously been reported in animal and human studies of diabetes where there is both reduction in the levels of the BM-derived EPCs and its ability to promote angiogenesis. This is hypothesized to account for the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications such as stroke. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of G-CSF on diabetes-associated cerebral vascular defect. We observed that pretreatment of the cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs) with G-CSF largely prevented cell death induced by the combination stimulus with high glucose, free fatty acids (FFA) and hypoxia by increasing cell viability, decreasing apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. Cell ultrastructure measured by transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that G-CSF treatment nicely reduced combination stimulus-induced cell apoptosis. The results from fluorescent probe Fluo-3/AM showed that G-CSF greatly suppressed the levels of intracellular calcium ions under combination stimulus. We also found that G-CSF enhanced the expression of cell cycle proteins such as human cell division cycle protein 14A (hCdc14A), cyclinB and cyclinE, inhibited p53 activity, and facilitated cell cycle progression following combination stimulus. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt, and deactivation of c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 were proved to be required for the pro-survival effects of G-CSF on HBVECs exposed to combination stimulus. Overall, G-CSF is capable of alleviating HBVECs injury triggered by the combination administration with high glucose, FFA and hypoxia involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt signaling

  13. Effect of latent asymptomatic toxoplasmosis on glucose metabolism in brain of mice%弓形虫慢性感染对小鼠脑内葡萄糖代谢影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周永华; 黄洪波; 陶永辉; 俞惠新; 许永良; 张英; 高琪

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of latent asymptomatic Toxoplasma gondii infection on glucose metabolism in brain of mice. Methods Twenty mice were randomly divided into two groups: a Toxoplasma infected group and normal control group. The mice in the Toxoplasma infected group were inoculated with 0.3 ml of brain suspension in saline containing ten Toxoplasma gondii tissue cysts, avirulent Toxoplasma gondii Prugniaud (PRU, a Type II strain). The mice in the control group received 0.3 ml of saline orally. Six monthes after the infection, the glucose metabolism changes in the mouse brain were evaluated by Mi-croPET, then all the mice were sacrificed and the brain tissues were observed histopathologically. Results Compared with the normal controls, the infected mice demonstrated profound and widespread brain pathology, and MicroPET indicated a significant glucose metabolism reduction in the brain of asymptomatic Toxoplasma gondii infected mice. Conclusion Chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection maybe results in the glucose metabolism reduction in the brain of mice.%目的 探讨弓形虫慢性感染对小鼠脑内葡萄糖代谢的影响.方法 将30只SPF级ICR小鼠随机分成弓形虫感染组和正常对照组,感染组每只小鼠口服感染弓形虫PRU株包囊悬液0.3 ml(含包囊10个),对照组口服0.3 ml生理盐水.小鼠感染弓形虫6个月后,应用MicroPET扫描脑内葡萄糖代谢,结束后解剖小鼠进行脑组织病理学观察.结果 与正常对照组小鼠相比,弓形虫慢性感染6个月后,“无症状”的感染小鼠脑内葡萄糖代谢均显著下降,脑组织中可见大小不一、数量不等的包囊,脑膜下有大量淋巴细胞浸润、血管充血、小血管淋巴细胞袖管形成.结论 弓形虫慢性感染可造成宿主脑内葡萄糖代谢下降,神经元变性或细胞丢失.

  14. New perspectives on corpora amylacea in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augé, Elisabet; Cabezón, Itsaso; Pelegrí, Carme; Vilaplana, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Corpora amylacea are structures of unknown origin and function that appear with age in human brains and are profuse in selected brain areas in several neurodegenerative conditions. They are constituted of glucose polymers and may contain waste elements derived from different cell types. As we previously found on particular polyglucosan bodies in mouse brain, we report here that corpora amylacea present some neo-epitopes that can be recognized by natural antibodies, a certain kind of antibodies that are involved in tissue homeostasis. We hypothesize that corpora amylacea, and probably some other polyglucosan bodies, are waste containers in which deleterious or residual products are isolated to be later eliminated through the action of the innate immune system. In any case, the presence of neo-epitopes on these structures and the existence of natural antibodies directed against them could become a new focal point for the study of both age-related and degenerative brain processes. PMID:28155917

  15. Transcranial electrical stimulation accelerates human sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Reato

    Full Text Available The sleeping brain exhibits characteristic slow-wave activity which decays over the course of the night. This decay is thought to result from homeostatic synaptic downscaling. Transcranial electrical stimulation can entrain slow-wave oscillations (SWO in the human electro-encephalogram (EEG. A computational model of the underlying mechanism predicts that firing rates are predominantly increased during stimulation. Assuming that synaptic homeostasis is driven by average firing rates, we expected an acceleration of synaptic downscaling during stimulation, which is compensated by a reduced drive after stimulation. We show that 25 minutes of transcranial electrical stimulation, as predicted, reduced the decay of SWO in the remainder of the night. Anatomically accurate simulations of the field intensities on human cortex precisely matched the effect size in different EEG electrodes. Together these results suggest a mechanistic link between electrical stimulation and accelerated synaptic homeostasis in human sleep.

  16. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-07

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  17. High “Normal” Blood Glucose Is Associated with Decreased Brain Volume and Cognitive Performance in the 60s: The PATH through Life Study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Type 2 diabetes is associated with cerebral atrophy, cognitive impairment and dementia. We recently showed higher glucose levels in the normal range not to be free of adverse effects and to be associated with greater hippocampal and amygdalar atrophy in older community-dwelling individuals free of diabetes. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine whether blood glucose levels in the normal range (

  18. Brain glucagon-like peptide–1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide–1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state. PMID:16322793

  19. Brain glucagon-like peptide-1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J; Kahn, C Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state.

  20. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wulp, Mariëtte Y M; Verkade, Henkjan J; Groen, Albert K

    2013-04-10

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-coding RNA's. The last two decades insight into underlying mechanisms has increased vastly but there are still a lot of unknowns, particularly regarding intracellular cholesterol transport. After decades of concentration on the liver, in recent years the intestine has come into focus as an important control point in cholesterol homeostasis. This review will discuss current knowledge of cholesterol physiology, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and new (possible) therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  1. Pain emotion and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2011-05-01

    Pain has always been considered as part of a defensive strategy, whose specific role is to signal an immediate, active danger. This definition partially fits acute pain, but certainly not chronic pain, that is maintained also in the absence of an active noxa or danger and that nowadays is considered a disease by itself. Moreover, acute pain is not only an automatic alerting system, but its severity and characteristics can change depending on the surrounding environment. The affective, emotional components of pain have been and are the object of extensive attention and research by psychologists, philosophers, physiologists and also pharmacologists. Pain itself can be considered to share the same genesis as emotions and as a specific emotion in contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of each unique subject. Interestingly, this role of pain reaches its maximal development in the human; some even argue that it is specific for the human primate.

  2. Bayesian model discrimination for glucose-insulin homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Brooks, Stephen P.; Højbjerre, Malene

    the reformulation of existing deterministic models as stochastic state space models which properly accounts for both measurement and process variability. The analysis is further enhanced by Bayesian model discrimination techniques and model averaged parameter estimation which fully accounts for model as well...

  3. Change in hexose distribution volume and fractional utilization of ( sup 18 F)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose in brain during acute hypoglycemia in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, E.T.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.; Given, B.D.; Polonsky, K.S. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) to study the effects of mild hypoglycemia on cerebral glucose uptake and metabolism. Nine healthy men were studied under basal saline-infusion conditions, and during euglycemic and hypoglycemic clamp studies. Insulin was infused at the same rate (1 mU.kg-1.min-1) in both clamp studies. In euglycemic clamp studies, glucose was infused at a rate sufficient to maintain the basal plasma glucose concentration, whereas in hypoglycemic clamp studies, the glucose infusion rate was reduced to maintain the plasma glucose at 3.1 mM. Each study lasted 3 h and included a 30-min baseline period and a subsequent 150-min period in which insulin or glucose was administered. Blood samples for measurement of insulin, glucose, cortisol, growth hormone, and glucagon were obtained at 20- to 30-min intervals. A bolus injection of 5-10 mCi (18F)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (2-DFG) was administered 120 min after initiation of the study, and plasma radioactivity and dynamic PET scans were obtained at frequent intervals for the remaining 40-60 min of the study. Cerebral regions of interest were defined, and concentrations of radioactivity were calculated and used in the three-compartment model of 2-DFG distribution described by Sokoloff. Glucose levels were similar during saline-infusion (4.9 +/- 0.1 mM) and euglycemic clamp (4.8 +/- 0.1 mM) studies, whereas the desired degree of mild hypoglycemia was achieved during the hypoglycemic clamp study (3.1 +/- 0.1 mM, P less than 0.05). The insulin level during saline infusion was 41 +/- 7 pM.

  4. In Alzheimer’s Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke; Møller, Arne; Hansen, Søren B.; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Schacht, Anna; Møller, Niels; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [11C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [18F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.01; 0.064). In contrast, the GLP-1 analog treatment caused a numerical but insignificant increase of CMRglc after 6 months. Cognitive scores did not change. We conclude that the GLP-1 analog treatment prevented the decline of CMRglc that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution. We draw no firm conclusions from the Aβ load or cognition measures, for which the study was underpowered. PMID:27252647

  5. Role of serotonin and/or norepinephrine in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis in the rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pachmerhiwala, Rashida; Bhide, Nirmal; Straiko, Megan; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    The acute administration of MDMA has been shown to promote glycogenolysis and increase the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum. In the present study the role of serotonergic and/or noradrenergic mechanisms in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis was assessed. The relationship of these responses to the hyperthermia produced by MDMA also was examined. The administration of MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a significant and sustained increase ...

  6. The Kidney's role in glucose balance following partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C E; Koshibu, K; DeCambre, M; Gerich, J E; Bessey, P Q; Krusch, D A

    1998-10-01

    It has long been believed that the liver is the major contributor to glucose balance during fasting and stressful situations. Recently, investigators have implicated the kidney as having a significant contribution to systemic glucose appearance. We studied the relative contributions of the kidney and liver to glucose homeostasis in fasted nonoperated, sham-operated, and 70% hepatectomized rats. Systemic glucose appearance, renal glucose release and uptake, and hepatic glucose release were determined by glucose balance and isotopic dilution techniques. Systemic glucose appearance remained unchanged following hepatectomy. There was a significant output of glucose by the kidney in all groups, accounting for >50% of total glucose appearance. Despite the kidney's appreciable contribution to circulating glucose in the postabsorptive state, renal glucose release was not increased in the hepatectomized rats compared to controls. Total glucose appearance was maintained following hepatectomy by an increase in hepatic glucogenesis. There was a significant increase in the rate of hepatic glucose release from resected rats when normalized to gram of remaining liver (P < 0.001). Despite the substantial amount of renal glucose output in the postabsorptive state, preservation of glucose balance following 70% hepatectomy is accomplished by adaptation in hepatic glucose output.

  7. The rate of intestinal glucose absorption is correlated with plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide concentrations in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachters-Hagedoorn, Renate E.; Priebe, Marion G.; Heimweg, Janneke A. J.; Heiner, A. Marius; Englyst, Klaus N.; Holst, Jens. J.; Stellaard, Frans; Vonk, Roel J.

    2006-01-01

    Glucagon-like pepticle-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) both play a role in the control of glucose homeostasis, and GIP is implicated in the regulation of energy storage. The capacity of carbohydrates to induce secretion of these incretin hormones could be one of the

  8. of Energy Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences exist in the complex regulation of energy homeostasis that utilizes central and peripheral systems. It is widely accepted that sex steroids, especially estrogens, are important physiological and pathological components in this sex-specific regulation. Estrogens exert their biological functions via estrogen receptors (ERs. ERα, a classic nuclear receptor, contributes to metabolic regulation and sexual behavior more than other ER subtypes. Physiological and molecular studies have identified multiple ERα-rich nuclei in the hypothalamus of the central nervous system (CNS as sites of actions that mediate effects of estrogens. Much of our understanding of ERα regulation has been obtained using transgenic models such as ERα global or nuclei-specific knockout mice. A fundamental question concerning how ERα is regulated in wild-type animals, including humans, in response to alterations in steroid hormone levels, due to experimental manipulation (i.e., castration and hormone replacement or physiological stages (i.e., puberty, pregnancy, and menopause, lacks consistent answers. This review discusses how different sex hormones affect ERα expression in the hypothalamus. This information will contribute to the knowledge of estrogen action in the CNS, further our understanding of discrepancies in correlation of altered sex hormone levels with metabolic disturbances when comparing both sexes, and improve health issues in postmenopausal women.

  9. 脑损伤患者空腹血糖水平变化及其与脑损伤程度的关系分析%Analysis of fasting blood glucose level changes in patients with brain trauma and its correlations with the extent of brain trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋海蓉; 颜幼玲; 毛蓓

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析空腹血糖水平变化在脑损伤患者中的临床意义及其与脑损伤程度的关系,为判断患者的预后、指导临床治疗提供理论依据。方法选取本院2009年6月至2011年6月收治的213例脑损伤患者,按照其脑损伤程度分为轻、中、重度脑损伤组,比较三组患者空腹血糖水平差异,同时分析患者预后与空腹血糖水平的相关性。结果 T1~T3时段重度脑损伤组患者空腹血糖水平显著高于中、轻度脑损伤组,中度脑损伤组患者空腹血糖水平亦显著高于轻度脑损伤组(P<0.05);轻度脑损伤组患者T2时即见空腹血糖水平降低,中、重度脑损伤组患者T2时空腹血糖水平上升,T3时空腹血糖水平降低。三组患者均获得有效随访,平均随访时间为(11.7±0.5)个月。随访中可见,预后良好65例,预后较差103例,死亡45例。死亡组患者T1~T3时段空腹血糖水平均显著高于预后较差组及预后良好组,预后较差组患者空腹血糖水平亦显著高于预后良好组(P<0.05);预后良好组患者T2时空腹血糖水平降至正常值,预后较差及死亡患者T3时空腹血糖水平出现降低趋势,但未降至正常水平。以空腹血糖水平为自变量,格拉斯哥昏迷评分(GCS)为因变量,Spearman's相关分析提示y=-0.74x+17.305,空腹血糖水平与GCS评分呈负相关,即血糖增高程度与脑损伤程度呈高度正相关(r=0.74,P<0.01)。结论脑损伤患者受伤后出现明显的空腹血糖升高反应,而空腹血糖升高程度与患者的脑损伤程度呈正相关,在今后的治疗中,应密切监测脑损伤患者的空腹血糖水平,及时调整治疗策略,防止神经系统后遗症的发生,保证患者的生活及生存质量。%Objective To analyze the clinical signiifcance of fasting blood glucose level changes in patients with brain trauma and its correlations with

  10. Metabolism of (1-(13)C) glucose and (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetate in the neuronal and glial compartments of the adult rat brain as detected by [(13)C, (2)H] NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, F; Cruz, F; García-Martín, M L; García-Espinosa, M A; Cerdán, S

    2000-01-01

    Ex vivo ¿(13)C, (2)H¿ NMR spectroscopy allowed to estimate the relative sizes of neuronal and glial glutamate pools and the relative contributions of (1-(13)C) glucose and (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetate to the neuronal and glial tricarboxylic acid cycles of the adult rat brain. Rats were infused during 60 min in the right jugular vein with solutions containing (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetate and (1-(13)C) glucose or (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetate only. At the end of the infusion the brains were frozen in situ and perchloric acid extracts were prepared and analyzed by high resolution (13)C NMR spectroscopy (90.5 MHz). The relative sizes of the neuronal and glial glutamate pools and the contributions of acetyl-CoA molecules derived from (2-(13)C, (2)H(3)) acetate or (1-(13)C) glucose entering the tricarboxylic acid cycles of both compartments, could be determined by the analysis of (2)H-(13)C multiplets and (2)H induced isotopic shifts observed in the C4 carbon resonances of glutamate and glutamine. During the infusions with (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetate and (1-(13)C) glucose, the glial glutamate pool contributed 9% of total cerebral glutamate being derived from (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetyl-CoA (4%), (2-(13)C) acetyl-CoA (3%) and recycled (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H) acetyl-CoA (2%). The neuronal glutamate pool accounted for 91% of the total cerebral glutamate being mainly originated from (2-(13)C) acetyl-CoA (86%) and (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H) acetyl-CoA (5%). During the infusions of (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetate only, the glial glutamate pool contributed 73% of the cerebral glutamate, being derived from (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H(3)) acetyl-CoA (36%), (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H) acetyl-CoA (27%) and (2-(13)C) acetyl-CoA (10%). The neuronal pool contributed 27% of cerebral glutamate being formed from (2-(13)C) acetyl-CoA (11%) and recycled (2-(13)C, 2-(2)H) acetyl-CoA (16%). These results illustrate the potential of ¿(13)C, (2)H¿ NMR spectroscopy as a novel approach to investigate substrate selection and

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 decreases intracerebral glucose content by activating hexokinase and changing glucose clearance during hyperglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Egefjord, Lærke; Lerche, Susanne;

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia with the resulting increase of glucose concentrations in the brain impair the outcome of ischemic stroke, and may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reports indicate that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) may be neuroprotective in models of AD...... in the actions of GLUT1 and glucose metabolism: GLP-1 ensures less fluctuation of brain glucose levels in response to alterations in plasma glucose, which may prove to be neuroprotective during hyperglycemia....

  12. Regulation of energy homeostasis by GPR41