WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain emerging mechanisms

  1. Mechanical Containment in Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Carcoba Rubio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The restraint is a therapeutic measure aimed at blocking partial or widespread in most of the body of a patient to try to ensure the safety of himself or others. In most cases it forces to act against their will, and in a common context of urgency; in such a way that its use applies a therapeutic plan without the consent of the patient and is temporally deprived of freedom of movement. A literature review of the issue has been performed consulting surveillance systems and protocols developed at hospitals in several spanish cities. Also the current legal regulations on health matters relating to the subject are checked.After the analysis of data and evidence, is created a protocol of restraint in emergency and the various functions of the components of the team, to address the situation with greater efficiency and safe as possible.

  2. [Brain and sleep mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahama, Kunio

    2006-11-01

    It is now accepted that sleep is induced by biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and/or sleep promoting substances, which influence ventrolateral preoptic (VLPO) neurons. The VLPO neurons affects more caudally situated posterior hypothalamic ones containing orexine and/or histamine, reciprocally. When these neurons inhibit lower brainstem aminergic ones, sleep is induced. REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep can be induced mainly by brainstem cholinergic neurons, when aminergic ones are completely inhibited. During this stage, tonic activities and phasic Ponto-Geniculate-Occipital (PGO) ones originated within brainstem cholinergic neurons activate irregularly many parts of the brain such as the cerebral cortex and limbic system to produce dream-like activity. Muscle atonia is also observed during REM sleep. This atonia is caused by neurons in the pontine reticular inhibitory area (PIA), which is normally inhibited by aminergic inputs. The PIA affects medullary neurons of the paramedian and/or magnocelullar nuclei to regulate motoneurons in the ventral horn. Therefore. muscle atonia is produced when these PPT cells are active during REM sleep. In addition, based upon many recent data, sleep is not a passive state but rather an active state, during which recuperation of neuronal system is promoted and information processing is executed. PMID:17432188

  3. Local inhibitory plasticity tunes macroscopic brain dynamics and allows the emergence of functional brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellyer, Peter J; Jachs, Barbara; Clopath, Claudia; Leech, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rich, spontaneous brain activity has been observed across a range of different temporal and spatial scales. These dynamics are thought to be important for efficient neural functioning. A range of experimental evidence suggests that these neural dynamics are maintained across a variety of different cognitive states, in response to alterations of the environment and to changes in brain configuration (e.g., across individuals, development and in many neurological disorders). This suggests that the brain has evolved mechanisms to maintain rich dynamics across a broad range of situations. Several mechanisms based around homeostatic plasticity have been proposed to explain how these dynamics emerge from networks of neurons at the microscopic scale. Here we explore how a homeostatic mechanism may operate at the macroscopic scale: in particular, focusing on how it interacts with the underlying structural network topology and how it gives rise to well-described functional connectivity networks. We use a simple mean-field model of the brain, constrained by empirical white matter structural connectivity where each region of the brain is simulated using a pool of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We show, as with the microscopic work, that homeostatic plasticity regulates network activity and allows for the emergence of rich, spontaneous dynamics across a range of brain configurations, which otherwise show a very limited range of dynamic regimes. In addition, the simulated functional connectivity of the homeostatic model better resembles empirical functional connectivity network. To accomplish this, we show how the inhibitory weights adapt over time to capture important graph theoretic properties of the underlying structural network. Therefore, this work presents suggests how inhibitory homeostatic mechanisms facilitate stable macroscopic dynamics to emerge in the brain, aiding the formation of functional connectivity networks. PMID:26348562

  4. The scalable mammalian brain: Emergent distributions of glia and neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.M. Jehee; J.M.J. Murre

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that two characteristic properties of mammalian brains emerge when scaling-up modular, cortical structures. Firstly, the glia-to-neuron ratio is not constant across brains of different sizes: large mammalian brains have more glia per neuron than smaller brains. Our anal

  5. Emerging applications of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayur; Naik, Vikas; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation surgery is an established treatment modality for a variety of medical refractory movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremors and dystonia. Following the success of DBS in these movement disorders with a high rate of safety and efficacy, there is a resurgence of interest in the utility of this modality in other medical refractory disorders. Consequently, neuromodulation has been explored for a variety of refractory conditions such as neuropsychiatric disorders (major depressive disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, addictions), eating disorders including obesity, traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), dementias and chronic pain. This review provides an overview of the emerging applications of DBS in these disorders, including summary of the published literature. We have highlighted the pathophysiology and likely aberrant neural circuits involved in these refractory disorders. Current and possible surgical targets for neurosurgical intervention related to these disorders have also been discussed. Furthermore, recent advances such as closed loop systems; responsive neurostimulation systems and optogenetics techniques have been addressed. PMID:26788743

  6. Possible Brain Mechanisms of Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-06-01

    Creativity is the new discovery, understanding, development and expression of orderly and meaningful relationships. Creativity has three major stages: preparation, the development (nature and nurture) of critical knowledge and skills; innovation, the development of a creative solution; and creative production. Successful preparation requires a basic level of general intelligence and domain specific knowledge and skills and highly creative people may have anatomic alterations of specific neocortical regions. Innovation requires disengagement and divergent thinking primarily mediated by frontal networks. Creative people are often risk-takers and novelty seekers, behaviors that activate their ventral striatal reward system. Innovation also requires associative and convergent thinking, activities that are dependent on the integration of highly distributed networks. People are often most creative when they are in mental states associated with reduced levels of brain norepinephrine, which may enhance the communication between distributed networks. We, however, need to learn more about the brain mechanisms of creativity. PMID:27001974

  7. Brain mechanisms of flavor learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eYamamoto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Once the flavor of the ingested food (conditioned stimulus, CS is associated with a preferable (e.g., good taste or nutritive satisfaction or aversive (e.g., malaise with displeasure signal (unconditioned stimulus, US, animals react to its subsequent exposure by increasing or decreasing ingestion to the food. These two types of association learning (preference learning vs. aversion learning are known as classical conditioned reactions which are basic learning and memory phenomena, leading selection of food and proper food intake. Since the perception of flavor is generated by interaction of taste and odor during food intake, taste and/or odor are mainly associated with bodily signals in the flavor learning. After briefly reviewing flavor learning in general, brain mechanisms of conditioned taste aversion is described in more detail. The CS-US association leading to long-term potentiation in the amygdala, especially in its basolateral nucleus, is the basis of establishment of conditioned taste aversion. The novelty of the CS detected by the cortical gustatory area may be supportive in CS-US association. After the association, CS input is conveyed through the amygdala to different brain regions including the hippocampus for contextual fear formation, to the supramammilary and thalamic paraventricular nuclei for stressful anxiety or memory dependent fearful or stressful emotion, to the reward system to induce aversive expression to the CS, or hedonic shift from positive to negative, and to the CS-responsive neurons in the gustatory system to enhance the responsiveness to facilitate to detect the harmful stimulus.

  8. Manganese: Brain Species and Mechanisms of Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Neth, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Manganism is a Parkinson-related disease, which can arise by accumulation of the essential trace element manganese (Mn) in the brain by overexposure. Versatile Mn-species and imbalances of trace elements in serum and brain tissue of Mn-exposed rats were analyzed by methods of metallomics. Additionally, non-targeted metabolomics of brain tissue served for analysis of the multilateral mechanisms, which can lead to the neuronal injury. Finally, results from metallomics were correlated to the fin...

  9. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2016-01-01

    Barrier mechanisms in the brain are important for its normal functioning and development. Stability of the brain's internal environment, particularly with respect to its ionic composition, is a prerequisite for the fundamental basis of its function, namely transmission of nerve impulses. In addit...... addition, such studies, if applied to brain pathologies such as stroke, trauma, or multiple sclerosis, will aid in defining the contribution of brain barrier pathology to these conditions, either causative or secondary....

  10. [Mild brain injuries in emergency medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Niskakangas, Tero; Ohman, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostics and correct classification of mild brain injuries is challenging. Problems caused by insufficient documentation at the acute phase become more obvious in situations in which legal insurance issues are to be considered. A small proportion of patients with mild brain injury suffer from prolonged symptoms. Medical recording and classification of the brain injury at the initial phase should therefore be carried out in a structured manner. The review deals with the diagnostic problems of mild brain injuries and presents a treatment protocol for adult patients at the acute phase, aiming at avoiding prolonged problems. PMID:22238915

  11. Collaboration mechanism of intercity emergency rescue ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yiping; Zhao Lindu

    2009-01-01

    With the development of metropolitan regions and the appearance of urban agglomerations,cities have been more closely related.For the restricted emergency rescue resource in a single city,it has become more and more imminent for the demand of the intercity collaborative resistance to major accident,so as to improve the protection capacity of urban security.In order to find an effective intercity emergency rescue collaborative system,this paper introduces the concept and analysis method of ecosystem theory into intercity emergency rescue.Based on theanalysis of the formation-process of emergency rescue individual,population and community,a three-level intercity emergency rescue collaborative system is constructed according to the characteristics of dynamics and structure of intercity emergency rescue ecosystem,then the collaboration mechanism of information,resource and process in the intercity emergency rescue ecosystem is also studied in this paper,so as to offer available strategy and method for the ecosystem theory applied to intercity emergency rescue.Through the studies of intercity emergency rescue eco,system,it illuminates that the proposed emergency system can not only cope with the major accident more timely and effectively,but also integrate the intercity information resources and emergency rescue resource and process optimi,zation.

  12. Respiratory mechanics in brain injury: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Katsiari, Maria; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Daganou, Maria; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G.; Rovina, Nikoletta

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that lung injury occurs shortly after brain damage. The responsible mechanisms involve neurogenic pulmonary edema, inflammation, the harmful action of neurotransmitters, or autonomic system dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation, an essential component of life support in brain-damaged patients (BD), may be an additional traumatic factor to the already injured or susceptible to injury lungs of these patients thus worsening lung injury, in case ...

  13. Melanoma Brain Metastasis: Mechanisms, Models, and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, David A; Silvis, Mark R; Cho, Joseph H; Holmen, Sheri L

    2016-01-01

    The development of brain metastases in patients with advanced stage melanoma is common, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their development are poorly understood. Melanoma brain metastases cause significant morbidity and mortality and confer a poor prognosis; traditional therapies including whole brain radiation, stereotactic radiotherapy, or chemotherapy yield only modest increases in overall survival (OS) for these patients. While recently approved therapies have significantly improved OS in melanoma patients, only a small number of studies have investigated their efficacy in patients with brain metastases. Preliminary data suggest that some responses have been observed in intracranial lesions, which has sparked new clinical trials designed to evaluate the efficacy in melanoma patients with brain metastases. Simultaneously, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of melanoma cell dissemination to the brain have revealed novel and potentially therapeutic targets. In this review, we provide an overview of newly discovered mechanisms of melanoma spread to the brain, discuss preclinical models that are being used to further our understanding of this deadly disease and provide an update of the current clinical trials for melanoma patients with brain metastases. PMID:27598148

  14. Emergency treatment options for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Exo, J; Smith, C.; Smith, R.; Bell, MJ

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading killer of children and is a major public health problem around the world. Using general principles of neurocritical care, various treatment strategies have been developed to attempt to restore homeostasis to the brain and allow brain healing, including mechanical factors, cerebrospinal fluid diversion, hyperventilation, hyperosmolar therapies, barbiturates and hypothermia. Careful application of these therapies, normally in a step-wise fashion as intracrani...

  15. Brain mechanisms underlying human communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs L Noordzij

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Human communication has been described as involving the coding-decoding of a conventional symbol system, which could be supported by parts of the human motor system (i.e. the “mirror neurons system”. However, this view does not explain how these conventions could develop in the first place. Here we target the neglected but crucial issue of how people organize their non-verbal behavior to communicate a given intention without pre-established conventions. We have measured behavioral and brain responses in pairs of subjects during communicative exchanges occurring in a real, interactive, on-line social context. In two fMRI studies, we found robust evidence that planning new communicative actions (by a sender and recognizing the communicative intention of the same actions (by a receiver relied on spatially overlapping portions of their brains (the right posterior superior temporal sulcus. The response of this region was lateralized to the right hemisphere, modulated by the ambiguity in meaning of the communicative acts, but not by their sensorimotor complexity. These results indicate that the sender of a communicative signal uses his own intention recognition system to make a prediction of the intention recognition performed by the receiver. This finding supports the notion that our communicative abilities are distinct from both sensorimotor processes and language abilities.

  16. Uncovering the mechanism(s) of deep brain stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Gang; Yu Chao; Lin Ling; Lu, Stephen C-Y [Inspiring Technical Laboratory, College of Precision Instruments and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2005-01-01

    Deep brain stimulators, often called 'pacemakers for the brain', are implantable devices which continuously deliver impulse stimulation to specific targeted nuclei of deep brain structure, namely deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most effective clinical technique for the treatment of several medically refractory movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia). In addition, new clinical applications of DBS for other neurologic and psychiatric disorders (e.g., epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder) have been put forward. Although DBS has been effective in the treatment of movement disorders and is rapidly being explored for the treatment of other neurologic disorders, the scientific understanding of its mechanisms of action remains unclear and continues to be debated in the scientific community. Optimization of DBS technology for present and future therapeutic applications will depend on identification of the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action. The goal of this review is to address our present knowledge of the effects of high-frequency stimulation within the central nervous system and comment on the functional implications of this knowledge for uncovering the mechanism(s) of DBS.

  17. Uncovering the mechanism(s) of deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Li; Chao, Yu; Ling, Lin; C-Y Lu, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Deep brain stimulators, often called `pacemakers for the brain', are implantable devices which continuously deliver impulse stimulation to specific targeted nuclei of deep brain structure, namely deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most effective clinical technique for the treatment of several medically refractory movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia). In addition, new clinical applications of DBS for other neurologic and psychiatric disorders (e.g., epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder) have been put forward. Although DBS has been effective in the treatment of movement disorders and is rapidly being explored for the treatment of other neurologic disorders, the scientific understanding of its mechanisms of action remains unclear and continues to be debated in the scientific community. Optimization of DBS technology for present and future therapeutic applications will depend on identification of the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action. The goal of this review is to address our present knowledge of the effects of high-frequency stimulation within the central nervous system and comment on the functional implications of this knowledge for uncovering the mechanism(s) of DBS.

  18. Uncovering the mechanism(s) of deep brain stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep brain stimulators, often called 'pacemakers for the brain', are implantable devices which continuously deliver impulse stimulation to specific targeted nuclei of deep brain structure, namely deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most effective clinical technique for the treatment of several medically refractory movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia). In addition, new clinical applications of DBS for other neurologic and psychiatric disorders (e.g., epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder) have been put forward. Although DBS has been effective in the treatment of movement disorders and is rapidly being explored for the treatment of other neurologic disorders, the scientific understanding of its mechanisms of action remains unclear and continues to be debated in the scientific community. Optimization of DBS technology for present and future therapeutic applications will depend on identification of the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action. The goal of this review is to address our present knowledge of the effects of high-frequency stimulation within the central nervous system and comment on the functional implications of this knowledge for uncovering the mechanism(s) of DBS

  19. Hydrogels for brain repair after stroke: an emerging treatment option.

    OpenAIRE

    Nih, LR; Carmichael, ST; Segura, T

    2016-01-01

    Stroke disability is the only major disease without an effective treatment. The substantial clinical burden of stroke in disabled survivors and the lack of a medical therapy that promotes recovery provide an opportunity to explore the use of biomaterials to promote brain repair after stroke. Hydrogels can be injected as a liquid and solidify in situ to form a gelatinous solid with similar mechanical properties to the brain. These biomaterials have been recently explored to generate pro-repair...

  20. Mechanism of action of levonorgestrel emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenborn, Chris; Peck, Rebecca; Severs, Walter B

    2015-02-01

    There has been much debate regarding levonorgestrel emergency contraception's (LNG-EC's) method of action since 1999 when the Food and Drug Administration first approved its use. Proponents of LNG-EC have argued that they have moral certitude that LNG-EC works via a non-abortifacient mechanism of action, and claim that all the major scientific and medical data consistently support this hypothesis. However, newer medical data serve to undermine the consistency of the non-abortifacient hypothesis and instead support the hypothesis that preovulatory administration of LNG-EC has significant potential to work via abortion. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room protocols. In the future, technology such as the use of early pregnancy factor may have the potential to quantify how frequently preovulatory LNG-EC works via abortion. Lay Summary: How Plan B (levonorgestrel emergency contraception) works has been vigorously debated ever since the Food and Drug Administration approved it in 1999. Many doctors and researchers claim that it has either no-or at most-an extremely small chance of working via abortion. However, the latest scientific and medical evidence now demonstrates that levonorgestrel emergency contraception theoretically works via abortion quite often. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room rape protocols. PMID:25698840

  1. Mechanism of action of levonorgestrel emergency contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlenborn, Chris; Peck, Rebecca; Severs, Walter B.

    2015-01-01

    There has been much debate regarding levonorgestrel emergency contraception's (LNG-EC's) method of action since 1999 when the Food and Drug Administration first approved its use. Proponents of LNG-EC have argued that they have moral certitude that LNG-EC works via a non-abortifacient mechanism of action, and claim that all the major scientific and medical data consistently support this hypothesis. However, newer medical data serve to undermine the consistency of the non-abortifacient hypothes...

  2. Emergent mechanics, quantum and un-quantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, John P.

    2013-10-01

    There is great interest in quantum mechanics as an "emergent" phenomenon. The program holds that nonobvious patterns and laws can emerge from complicated physical systems operating by more fundamental rules. We find a new approach where quantum mechanics itself should be viewed as an information management tool not derived from physics nor depending on physics. The main accomplishment of quantum-style theory comes in expanding the notion of probability. We construct a map from macroscopic information as data" to quantum probability. The map allows a hidden variable description for quantum states, and efficient use of the helpful tools of quantum mechanics in unlimited circumstances. Quantum dynamics via the time-dependent Shroedinger equation or operator methods actually represents a restricted class of classical Hamiltonian or Lagrangian dynamics, albeit with different numbers of degrees of freedom. We show that under wide circumstances such dynamics emerges from structureless dynamical systems. The uses of the quantum information management tools are illustrated by numerical experiments and practical applications

  3. Recovery after Brain Injury: Mechanisms and Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randolph J. Nudo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The past 20 years have represented an important period in the development of principles underlying neuroplasticity, especially as they apply to recovery from neurological injury. It is now generally accepted that acquired brain injuries, such as occur in stroke or trauma, initiate a cascade of regenerative events that last for at least several weeks, if not months. Many investigators have pointed out striking parallels between post-injury plasticity and the molecular and cellular events that take place during normal brain development. As evidence for the principles and mechanisms underlying post-injury neuroplasticity has been gleaned from both animal models and human populations, novel approaches to therapeutic intervention have been proposed. One important theme has persisted as the sophistication of clinicians and scientists in their knowledge of neuroplasticity mechanisms has grown: Behavioral experience is the most potent modulator of brain plasticity. While there is substantial evidence for this principle in normal, healthy brains, the injured brain is particularly malleable. Based on the quantity and quality of motor experience, the brain can be reshaped after injury in either adaptive or maladaptive ways. This paper reviews selected studies that have demonstrated the neurophysiological and neuroanatomical changes that are triggered by motor experience, by injury, and the interaction of these processes. In addition, recent studies using new and elegant techniques are providing novel perspectives on the events that take place in the injured brain, providing a real-time window into post-injury plasticity. These new approaches are likely to accelerate the pace of basic research, and provide a wealth of opportunities to translate basic principles into therapeutic methodologies.

  4. Bohmian mechanics and the emergence of classicality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohmian mechanics is endowed with an ontological package that supposedly allows to solve the main interpretational problems of quantum mechanics. We are concerned in this work by the emergence of classicality from the quantum mechanical substrate. We will argue that although being superficially attractive, the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation does not shed new light on the quantum-to-classical transition. This is due to nature of the dynamical law of Bohmian mechanics by which the particles follow the streamlines of the probability flow. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories can be highly non-classical even when the wavefunction propagates along classical trajectories, as happens in semiclassical systems. In order to account for classical dynamics, Bohmian mechanics needs non-spreading and non-interfering wave packets: this is achieved for practical purposes by having recourse to decoherence and dense measurements. However one then faces the usual fundamental problems associated with the meaning of reduced density matrices. Moreover the specific assets of the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation - in particular the existence of point-like particles pursuing well-defined trajectories - would play no role in accounting for the emergence of classical dynamics.

  5. Bohmian mechanics and the emergence of classicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, A.

    2009-06-01

    Bohmian mechanics is endowed with an ontological package that supposedly allows to solve the main interpretational problems of quantum mechanics. We are concerned in this work by the emergence of classicality from the quantum mechanical substrate. We will argue that although being superficially attractive, the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation does not shed new light on the quantum-to-classical transition. This is due to nature of the dynamical law of Bohmian mechanics by which the particles follow the streamlines of the probability flow. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories can be highly non-classical even when the wavefunction propagates along classical trajectories, as happens in semiclassical systems. In order to account for classical dynamics, Bohmian mechanics needs non-spreading and non-interfering wave packets: this is achieved for practical purposes by having recourse to decoherence and dense measurements. However one then faces the usual fundamental problems associated with the meaning of reduced density matrices. Moreover the specific assets of the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation - in particular the existence of point-like particles pursuing well-defined trajectories - would play no role in accounting for the emergence of classical dynamics.

  6. The neuroprotective mechanism of brain ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-qian LIU; Rui SHENG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2009-01-01

    Brain ischemia is one of the most common causes of death and the leading cause of adult disability in the world. Brain ischemic pre- conditioning (BIP) refers to a transient, sublethal ischemia which results in tolerance to later, otherwise lethal, cerebral ischemia. Many attempts have been made to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotection offered by ischemic preconditioning. Many studies have shown that neuroprotective mechanisms may involve a series of molecular regulatory pathways including activation of the N-methyI-D-aspartate (NMDA) and adenosine receptors; activation of intracellular signaling pathways such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) and other protein kinases; upregulation of Bcl-2 and heat shock proteins (HSPs); and activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagic-lysosomal pathway. A better understanding of the processes that lead to cell death after stroke as well as of the endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms by which BIP protects against brain ischemic insults could help to develop new therapeutic strategies for this devastating neurological disease. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the neuroprotective mechanisms of BIP and to discuss the possibility of mimicking ischemic preconditioning as a new strategy for preventive treatment of ischemia.

  7. Respiratory mechanics in brain injury: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Katsiari, Maria; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Daganou, Maria; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G; Rovina, Nikoletta

    2016-02-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that lung injury occurs shortly after brain damage. The responsible mechanisms involve neurogenic pulmonary edema, inflammation, the harmful action of neurotransmitters, or autonomic system dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation, an essential component of life support in brain-damaged patients (BD), may be an additional traumatic factor to the already injured or susceptible to injury lungs of these patients thus worsening lung injury, in case that non lung protective ventilator settings are applied. Measurement of respiratory mechanics in BD patients, as well as assessment of their evolution during mechanical ventilation, may lead to preclinical lung injury detection early enough, allowing thus the selection of the appropriate ventilator settings to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury. The aim of this review is to explore the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in BD patients along with the underlying mechanisms, and to translate the evidence of animal and clinical studies into therapeutic implications regarding the mechanical ventilation of these critically ill patients. PMID:26855895

  8. Imaging brain mechanisms in chronic visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Emeran A; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity, and connectivity, as well as in gray and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data-driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25789437

  9. Progesterone signaling mechanisms in brain and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ShailaMani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormone, progesterone, modulates neuroendocrine functions in the central nervous system resulting in alterations in physiology and behavior. These neuronal effects are mediated primarily by intracellular progestin receptors in the steroid-sensitive neurons, resulting in transcription-dependent genomic actions (classical mechanism. In addition to progesterone, intracellular progestin receptors can also be activated in a “ligand-independent” manner by neurotransmitters, peptide growth factors, cyclic nucleotides and neurosteroids. Recent studies indicate that rapid, non-classical progesterone actions involving cytoplasmic kinase signaling and/or extranuclear progestin receptors can result in both transcription-independent and transcription-dependent actions. Cross-talk between extranuclear and classical intracellular signaling pathways promotes progesterone-dependent behavior in mammals. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which progesterone-initiated signaling mechanisms converge with progestin receptors in the brain to modulate reproductive behavior in female rodents.

  10. MONETARY POLICY TRANSMISSION MECHANISM IN EMERGING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea ROŞOIU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The transmission channels of monetary policy are used by central banks to accomplish the main objective of price stability in the context of sustainable economic growth. The importance of interest rate and exchange rate channels for the emerging countries Romania, Poland, Czech Republic and Hungary is analyzed by using Bayesian VAR approach with Diffuse priors over 1998Q1-2012Q3. Main result of the empirical study is that both channels are effective for the monetary policy transmission mechanism in Hungary and Czech Republic. In Romania and Poland they do not exhibit puzzles, but the impact of the macroeconomic variables is not very significant and shows very high volatility. In the context of monetary integration, exchange rate channel will become irrelevant when these countries adopt Euro currency. This change will lead instead to a powerful interest rate channel.

  11. Academic Emergency Medicine Physicians’ Knowledge of Mechanical Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcox, Susan R.; Tania D. Strout; Jeffrey I. Schneider; Mitchell, Patricia M.; Smith, Jessica; Lutfy-Clayton, Lucienne; Marcolini, Evie G.; Aydin, Ani; Seigel, Todd A.; Jeremy B. Richards

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Although emergency physicians frequently intubate patients, management of mechanical ventilation has not been emphasized in emergency medicine (EM) education or clinical practice. The objective of this study was to quantify EM attendings’ education, experience, and knowledge regarding mechanical ventilation in the emergency department. Methods: We developed a survey of academic EM attendings’ educational experiences with ventilators and a knowledge assessme...

  12. Academic Emergency Medicine Physicians’ Knowledge of Mechanical Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcox, Susan R.; Tania D. Strout; Jeffrey I. Schneider; Mitchell, Patricia M.; Jessica Smith; Lucienne Lutfy-Clayton; Marcolini, Evie G.; Ani Aydin; Seigel, Todd A.; Jeremy B. Richards

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Although emergency physicians frequently intubate patients, management of mechanical ventilation has not been emphasized in emergency medicine (EM) education or clinical practice. The objective of this study was to quantify EM attendings’ education, experience, and knowledge regarding mechanical ventilation in the emergency department. Methods: We developed a survey of academic EM attendings’ educational experiences with ventilators and a knowledge assessment tool with nine ...

  13. Brain angiogenesis: Mechanism and Therapeutic Intervention in Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Woo-Young; Lee, Ho-Young

    2009-01-01

    Formation of new blood vessels is required for growth and metastasis of all solid tumors. New blood vessels are established in tumors mainly through angiogenesis. Brain tumors in particular are highly angiogenic. Therefore, interventions designed to prevent angiogenesis may be effective at controlling brain tumors. Indeed, many recent findings from preclinical and clinical studies of antiangiogenic therapy for brain tumors showed that it is a promising approach to managing this deadly disease...

  14. P300 brain computer interface: current challenges and emerging trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Fazel-Rezai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI enables communication without movement based on brain signals measured with electroencephalography (EEG. BCIs usually rely on one of three types of signals: the P300 and other components of the event-related potential (ERP, steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP, or event related desynchronization (ERD. Although P300 BCIs were introduced over twenty years ago, the past few years have seen a strong increase in P300 BCI research. This closed-loop BCI approach relies on the P300 and other components of the event-related potential (ERP, based on an oddball paradigm presented to the subject. In this paper, we overview the current status of P300 BCI technology, and then discuss new directions: paradigms for eliciting P300s; signal processing methods; applications; and hybrid BCIs. We conclude that P300 BCIs are quite promising, as several emerging directions have not yet been fully explored and could lead to improvements in bit rate, reliability, usability, and flexibility.

  15. Synaptic Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekwas, Andrzej; Somayaji, Mahadevabharath R; Gupta, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    Blast wave-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common injuries to military personnel. Brain tissue compression/tension due to blast-induced cranial deformations and shear waves due to head rotation may generate diffuse micro-damage to neuro-axonal structures and trigger a cascade of neurobiological events culminating in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. Although diffuse axonal injury is regarded as a signature wound of mild TBI (mTBI), blast loads may also cause synaptic injury wherein neuronal synapses are stretched and sheared. This synaptic injury may result in temporary disconnect of the neural circuitry and transient loss in neuronal communication. We hypothesize that mTBI symptoms such as loss of consciousness or dizziness, which start immediately after the insult, could be attributed to synaptic injury. Although empirical evidence is beginning to emerge; the detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic injury are still elusive. Coordinated in vitro-in vivo experiments and mathematical modeling studies can shed light into the synaptic injury mechanisms and their role in the potentiation of mTBI symptoms. PMID:26834697

  16. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer, which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each...

  17. Brain enabled mechanized speech synthesizer using Brain Mobile Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R.Raajan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Communication is easily evoked when the necessity to carry out the thoughts and vision arises. As the communication technology developed it cultivated the threats of information security, on the otherhand physically challenged people have no possibility to communicate freely hence the urge for development in the field of communication is necessary in present scenario. Aim of this work is to propose a system that improves the present communication system. Here we had put forward the concept of Brain Mobile Interface (BMI from the basis of Brain Computer Interface (BCI. BMI serves as a device to translate human thoughts about speech without the need of physical movement. Wireless EEG headsets are used to acquire the speech signals directly from the brain and after signal processing it is given to the mobile which consist of inbuilt speller application. With the help of speller application the message to be conveyed is acquired as text which is then converted into speech by means of text to speech converter.

  18. Emergence of classical theories from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hajicek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Three problems stand in the way of deriving classical theories from quantum mechanics: those of realist interpretation, of classical properties and of quantum measurement. Recently, we have identified some tacit assumptions that lie at the roots of these problems. Thus, a realist interpretation is hindered by the assumption that the only properties of quantum systems are values of observables. If one simply postulates the properties to be objective that are uniquely defined by preparation then all difficulties disappear. As for classical properties, the wrong assumption is that there are arbitrarily sharp classical trajectories. It turns out that fuzzy classical trajectories can be obtained from quantum mechanics by taking the limit of high entropy. Finally, standard quantum mechanics implies that any registration on a quantum system is disturbed by all quantum systems of the same kind existing somewhere in the universe. If one works out systematically how quantum mechanics must be corrected so that there is ...

  19. Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Microenvironment and Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Wen Zang; Xiao-Dong Gu; Jian-Bin Xiang; Zong-You Chen

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract malignancies in the world. Owing to the newer and more effective systemic therapies, the life of colorectal cancer patients can be remarkably prolonged, and the incidence of brain metastases is increasing. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Here we review the tumor microenvironment and metastasis associated molecules in brain metastases from colorectal cancer. A furthe...

  20. Emergence of classical theories from quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three problems stand in the way of deriving classical theories from quantum mechanics: those of realist interpretation, of classical properties and of quantum measurement. Recently, we have identified some tacit assumptions that lie at the roots of these problems. Thus, a realist interpretation is hindered by the assumption that the only properties of quantum systems are values of observables. If one simply postulates the properties to be objective that are uniquely defined by preparation then all difficulties disappear. As for classical properties, the wrong assumption is that there are arbitrarily sharp classical trajectories. It turns out that fuzzy classical trajectories can be obtained from quantum mechanics by taking the limit of high entropy. Finally, standard quantum mechanics implies that any registration on a quantum system is disturbed by all quantum systems of the same kind existing somewhere in the universe. If one works out systematically how quantum mechanics must be corrected so that there is no such disturbance, one finds a new interpretation of von Neumann's 'first kind of dynamics', and so a new way to a solution of the quantum measurement problem. The present paper gives a very short review of this work.

  1. Emergence of classical theories from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájíček, P.

    2012-05-01

    Three problems stand in the way of deriving classical theories from quantum mechanics: those of realist interpretation, of classical properties and of quantum measurement. Recently, we have identified some tacit assumptions that lie at the roots of these problems. Thus, a realist interpretation is hindered by the assumption that the only properties of quantum systems are values of observables. If one simply postulates the properties to be objective that are uniquely defined by preparation then all difficulties disappear. As for classical properties, the wrong assumption is that there are arbitrarily sharp classical trajectories. It turns out that fuzzy classical trajectories can be obtained from quantum mechanics by taking the limit of high entropy. Finally, standard quantum mechanics implies that any registration on a quantum system is disturbed by all quantum systems of the same kind existing somewhere in the universe. If one works out systematically how quantum mechanics must be corrected so that there is no such disturbance, one finds a new interpretation of von Neumann's "first kind of dynamics", and so a new way to a solution of the quantum measurement problem. The present paper gives a very short review of this work.

  2. Operational Mechanism and Evaluation System for Emergency Logistics Risks

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Cheng; Lei Yu

    2010-01-01

    Lots of risks existed in the operating process of emergency logistics especially when natural disasters happened. Both operating mechanism and evaluation system research on Emergency Logistics Risks (ELR) are the basis of effective recognizing, preventing and responding to risks, so it’s of great theoretical and practical significance to study the formation and influence mechanism and to establish an evaluating index system for ELR. Firstly, some foundation research about ELR was carried out,...

  3. Emergence Of Consciousness And Qualia From A Complex Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Jakob

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Qualia are private conscious experiences of which the associated feelings can be reported to other people. Whether qualia are amenable to scientific exploration has often been questioned, which is challenged by the present article. The following arguments are given: 1. the configuration of the brain changes continuously and irreversibly, because of genetic and environmental influences and interhuman communication; 2. qualia and consciousness are processes, rather than states; 3. private feelings, including those associated with qualia, should be positioned in the context of a personal brain as being developed during life; 4. consciousness and qualia should be understood in the context of general system theory, thus concluding that isolated, in vitro, properties of neurons and other brain constituents might marginally contribute to the understanding of higher brain functions, mind or qualia; 5. current in vivo approaches have too little resolution power - in terms of space and time - to delineate individual and subjective brain processes.

  4. Brain mechanisms of hallucinogens and entactogens

    OpenAIRE

    Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on recent brain imaging and behavioral studies of sensory gating functions, which assess similarities between the effects of classic hallucinogens (eg, psilocybin), dissociative anesthetics (eg, ketamine), and entactogens (eg, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) in humans. Serotonergic hallucinogens and psychotomimetic anesthetics produce overlapping psychotic syndromes associated with a marked activation of the prefrontal cortex (hyperfrontality) and other overlappi...

  5. "Brain sex differentiation" in teleosts: Emerging concepts with potential biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Mamta, Sajwan-Khatri; Raghuveer, Kavarthapu; Swapna, Immani; Murugananthkumar, Raju

    2015-09-01

    "Brain sex differentiation" in teleosts is a contentious topic of research as most of the earlier reports tend to suggest that gonadal sex differentiation drives brain sex differentiation. However, identification of sex-specific marker genes in the developing brain of teleosts signifies brain-gonadal interaction during early sexual development in lower vertebrates. In this context, the influence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-gonadotropin (GTH) axis on gonadal sex differentiation, if any requires in depth analysis. Presence of seabream (sb) GnRH immunoreactivity (ir-) in the brain of XY Nile tilapia was found as early as 5days post hatch (dph) followed by qualitative reduction in the preoptic area-hypothalamus region. In contrast, in the XX female brain a steady ir- of sbGnRH was evident from 15dph. Earlier studies using sea bass already implied the importance of hypothalamic gonadotropic axis completion during sex differentiation period. Such biphasic pattern of localization was also seen in pituitary GTHs using heterologous antisera in tilapia. However, more recent analysis in the same species could not detect any sexually dimorphic pattern using homologous antisera for pituitary GTHs. Detailed studies on the development of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal axis in teleosts focusing on hypothalamic monoamines (MA) and MA-related enzymes demonstrated sex-specific differential expression of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) in the early stages of developing male and female brains of tilapia and catfish. The changes in Tph expression was in agreement with the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxytryptophan in the preoptic area-hypothalamus. Considering the stimulatory influence of 5-HT on GnRH and GTH release, it is possible to propose a network association between these correlates during early development, which may bring about brain sex dimorphism in males. A recent study from our laboratory during female brain sex development demonstrated high expression of

  6. Towards the Self-constructive Brain: emergence of adaptive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Corbacho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behavior is mainly the result of adaptive brains. We go a step beyond and claim that the brain does not only adapt to its surrounding reality but rather, it builds itself up to constructs its own reality. That is, rather than just trying to passively understand its environment, the brain is the architect of its own reality in an active process where its internal models of the external world frame how its new interactions with the environment are assimilated. These internal models rep...

  7. Brain-to-Brain coupling: A mechanism for creating and sharing a social world

    OpenAIRE

    Hasson, Uri; Asif A Ghazanfar; GALANTUCCI, BRUNO; Garrod, Simon; Keysers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Cognition materializes in an interpersonal space. The emergence of complex behaviors requires the coordination of actions among individuals according to a shared set of rules. Despite the central role of other individuals in shaping our minds, most cognitive studies focus on processes that occur within a single individual. We call for a shift from a single-brain to a multi-brain frame of reference. We argue that in many cases the neural processes in one brain are coupled to the neural process...

  8. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of brain-body associations in ruptured brain aneurysms: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W. Y. Lo

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This systematic review synthesizes the most current evidence of underlying mechanisms of brain related associations with body systems in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Results gained from these studies are clinically useful and shed light on how ruptured brain aneurysms affect the cardiopulmonary system. Subsequent neuro-cardio-endocrine responses then interact with other body systems as part of the secondary responses to primary injury.

  9. Vocal emotion of humanoid robots: a study from brain mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youhui; Hu, Xiaohua; Dai, Weihui; Zhou, Jie; Kuo, Taitzong

    2014-01-01

    Driven by rapid ongoing advances in humanoid robot, increasing attention has been shifted into the issue of emotion intelligence of AI robots to facilitate the communication between man-machines and human beings, especially for the vocal emotion in interactive system of future humanoid robots. This paper explored the brain mechanism of vocal emotion by studying previous researches and developed an experiment to observe the brain response by fMRI, to analyze vocal emotion of human beings. Findings in this paper provided a new approach to design and evaluate the vocal emotion of humanoid robots based on brain mechanism of human beings. PMID:24587712

  10. NF-κB and epigenetic mechanisms as integrative regulators of brain resilience to anoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnico, Ilenia; Branca, Caterina; Lanzillotta, Annamaria; Porrini, Vanessa; Benarese, Marina; Spano, Pier Franco; Pizzi, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Brain cells display an amazing ability to respond to several different types of environmental stimuli and integrate this response physiologically. Some of these responses can outlive the original stimulus by days, weeks or even longer. Long-lasting changes in both physiological and pathological conditions occurring in response to external stimuli are almost always mediated by changes in gene expression. To effect these changes, cells have developed an impressive repertoire of signaling systems designed to modulate the activity of numerous transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms affecting the chromatin structure. Since its initial characterization in the nervous system, NF-κB has shown to respond to multiple signals and elicit pleiotropic activities suggesting that it may play a pivotal role in integration of different types of information within the brain. Ample evidence demonstrates that NF-κB factors are engaged in and necessary for neuronal development and synaptic plasticity, but they also regulate brain response to environmental noxae. By focusing on the complexity of NF-κB transcriptional activity in neuronal cell death, it emerged that the composition of NF-κB active dimers finely tunes the neuronal vulnerability to brain ischemia. Even though we are only beginning to understand the contribution of distinct NF-κB family members to the regulation of gene transcription in the brain, an additional level of regulation of NF-κB activity has emerged as operated by the epigenetic mechanisms modulating histone acetylation. We will discuss NF-κB and epigenetic mechanisms as integrative regulators of brain resilience to anoxic stress and useful drug targets for restoration of brain function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration. PMID:22575713

  11. Imaging Brain Mechanisms in Chronic Visceral Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Emeran A.; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified ab...

  12. Emergence Of Consciousness And Qualia From A Complex Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Qualia are private conscious experiences of which the associated feelings can be reported to other people. Whether qualia are amenable to scientific exploration has often been questioned, which is challenged by the present article. The following arguments are given: 1. the configuration of the brain changes continuously and irreversibly, because of genetic and environmental influences and interhuman communication; 2. qualia and consciousness are processes, rather than states; 3. private feelings, including those associated with qualia, should be positioned in the context of a personal brain as being developed during life; 4. consciousness and qualia should be understood in the context of general system theory, thus concluding that isolated, in vitro, properties of neurons and other brain constituents might marginally contribute to the understanding of higher brain functions, mind or qualia; 5. current in vivo approaches have too little resolution power - in terms of space and time - to delineate individual and subjective brain processes. When subtle personalized properties of the nervous system can be assessed in vivo or in vitro, qualia can scientifically be investigated. We discuss some approaches to overcome these barriers. PMID:26444360

  13. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  14. Development of brain mechanisms for processing affective touch

    OpenAIRE

    Malin eBjornsdotter; Ilanit eGordon; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Håkan eOlausson; Martha eKaiser

    2014-01-01

    Affective tactile stimulation plays a key role in the maturation of neural circuits, but the development of brain mechanisms processing touch is poorly understood. We therefore used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain responses to soft brush stroking of both glabrous (palm) and hairy (forearm) skin in healthy children (5-13 years), adolescents (14-17 years), and adults (25-35 years). Adult-defined regions-of-interests in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), secondary...

  15. Academic Emergency Medicine Physicians’ Knowledge of Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Wilcox

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although emergency physicians frequently intubate patients, management of mechanical ventilation has not been emphasized in emergency medicine (EM education or clinical practice. The objective of this study was to quantify EM attendings’ education, experience, and knowledge regarding mechanical ventilation in the emergency department. Methods: We developed a survey of academic EM attendings’ educational experiences with ventilators and a knowledge assessment tool with nine clinical questions. EM attendings at key teaching hospitals for seven EM residency training programs in the northeastern United States were invited to participate in this survey study. We performed correlation and regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between attendings’ scores on the assessment instrument and their training, education, and comfort with ventilation. Results: Of 394 EM attendings surveyed, 211 responded (53.6%. Of respondents, 74.5% reported receiving three or fewer hours of ventilation-related education from EM sources over the past year and 98 (46% reported receiving between 0-1 hour of education. The overall correct response rate for the assessment tool was 73.4%, with a standard deviation of 19.9. The factors associated with a higher score were completion of an EM residency, prior emphasis on mechanical ventilation during one’s own residency, working in a setting where an emergency physician bears primary responsibility for ventilator management, and level of comfort with managing ventilated patients. Physicians’ comfort was associated with the frequency of ventilator changes and EM management of ventilation, as well as hours of education. Conclusion: EM attendings report caring for mechanically ventilated patients frequently, but most receive fewer than three educational hours a year on mechanical ventilation, and nearly half receive 0-1 hour. Physicians’ performance on an assessment tool for mechanical ventilation is

  16. Speculations on the emergence of self-awareness in big-brained organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues that self-awareness is a learned behavior that emerges in organisms whose brains have a sufficiently integrated, complex ability for associative learning and memory. Continual sensory input of information related to the organism causes the organism's brain to learn the physical characteristics of the organism, in the sense that neural pathways are produced that are reinforced by, and therefore recognize, various features associated with the organism. This results in the form...

  17. Brain alterations and clinical symptoms of dementia in diabetes: Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes affects cognitive function and increases the incidence of dementia. However, the mechanisms by which diabetes modifies cognitive function still remains unclear. Morphologically, diabetes is associated with neuronal loss in the frontal and temporal lobes including the hippocampus, and aberrant functional connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and medial frontal/temporal gyrus. Clinically, diabetic patients show decreased executive function, information processing, planning, visuospatial construction, and visual memory. Therefore, in comparison with the characteristics of AD brain structure and cognition, diabetes seems to affect cognitive function through not only simple AD pathological feature-dependent mechanisms, but also independent mechanisms. As an Abeta/tau-independent mechanism, diabetes compromises cerebrovascular function, increases subcortical infarction and might alter the blood brain barrier (BBB. Diabetes also affects glucose metabolism, insulin signaling and mitochondrial function in the brain. Diabetes also modifies metabolism of Abeta and tau and causes Abeta/tau-dependent pathological changes. Moreover, there is evidence that suggests an interaction between Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms. Therefore, diabetes modifies cognitive function through Abeta/tau-dependent and independent mechanisms. Interaction between these two mechanisms forms a vicious cycle.

  18. On the Ricci flow and emergent quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Isidro, J M; de Cordoba, P Fernandez

    2009-01-01

    The Ricci flow equation of a conformally flat Riemannian metric on a closed 2-dimensional configuration space is analysed. It turns out to be equivalent to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a point particle subject to a potential function that is proportional to the Ricci scalar curvature of configuration space. This allows one to obtain Schroedinger quantum mechanics from Perelman's action functional: the quantum-mechanical wavefunction is the exponential of $i$ times the conformal factor of the metric on configuration space. We explore links with the recently discussed emergent quantum mechanics.

  19. The emerging quantum the physics behind quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Pena, Luis de la; Valdes-Hernandez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This monograph presents the latest findings from a long-term research project intended to identify the physics behind Quantum Mechanics. A fundamental theory for quantum mechanics is constructed from first physical principles, revealing quantization as an emergent phenomenon arising from a deeper stochastic process. As such, it offers the vibrant community working on the foundations of quantum mechanics an alternative contribution open to discussion. The book starts with a critical summary of the main conceptual problems that still beset quantum mechanics.  The basic consideration is then introduced that any material system is an open system in permanent contact with the random zero-point radiation field, with which it may reach a state of equilibrium. Working from this basis, a comprehensive and self-consistent theoretical framework is then developed. The pillars of the quantum-mechanical formalism are derived, as well as the radiative corrections of nonrelativistic QED, while revealing the underlying physi...

  20. Blood-brain barrier shuttle peptides: an emerging paradigm for brain delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller-Salvia, Benjamí; Sánchez-Navarro, Macarena; Giralt, Ernest; Teixidó, Meritxell

    2016-08-22

    Brain delivery is one of the major challenges in drug development because of the high number of patients suffering from neural diseases and the low efficiency of the treatments available. Although the blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents most drugs from reaching their targets, molecular vectors - known as BBB shuttles - offer great promise to safely overcome this formidable obstacle. In recent years, peptide shuttles have received growing attention because of their lower cost, reduced immunogenicity, and higher chemical versatility than traditional Trojan horse antibodies and other proteins. PMID:27188322

  1. Corticonic models of brain mechanisms underlying cognition and intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    The concern of this review is brain theory or more specifically, in its first part, a model of the cerebral cortex and the way it: (a) interacts with subcortical regions like the thalamus and the hippocampus to provide higher-level-brain functions that underlie cognition and intelligence, (b) handles and represents dynamical sensory patterns imposed by a constantly changing environment, (c) copes with the enormous number of such patterns encountered in a lifetime by means of dynamic memory that offers an immense number of stimulus-specific attractors for input patterns (stimuli) to select from, (d) selects an attractor through a process of “conjugation” of the input pattern with the dynamics of the thalamo-cortical loop, (e) distinguishes between redundant (structured) and non-redundant (random) inputs that are void of information, (f) can do categorical perception when there is access to vast associative memory laid out in the association cortex with the help of the hippocampus, and (g) makes use of “computation” at the edge of chaos and information driven annealing to achieve all this. Other features and implications of the concepts presented for the design of computational algorithms and machines with brain-like intelligence are also discussed. The material and results presented suggest, that a Parametrically Coupled Logistic Map network (PCLMN) is a minimal model of the thalamo-cortical complex and that marrying such a network to a suitable associative memory with re-entry or feedback forms a useful, albeit, abstract model of a cortical module of the brain that could facilitate building a simple artificial brain. In the second part of the review, the results of numerical simulations and drawn conclusions in the first part are linked to the most directly relevant works and views of other workers. What emerges is a picture of brain dynamics on the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales that gives a glimpse of the nature of the long sought after brain code

  2. Emerging Molecular Targets for Brain Repair after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Jerzy; Slevin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The field of neuroprotection generated consistent preclinical findings of mechanisms of cell death but these failed to be translated into clinics. The approaches that combine the modulation of the inhibitory environment together with the promotion of intrinsic axonal outgrowth needs further work before combined therapeutic strategies will be transferable to clinic trials. It is likely that only when some answers have been found to these issues will our therapeutic efforts meet our expectations. Stroke is a clinically heterogeneous disease and combinatorial treatments require much greater work in pharmacological and toxicological testing. Advances in genetics and results of the Whole Human Genome Project (HGP) provided new unknown information in relation to stroke. Genetic factors are not the only determinants of responses to some diseases. It was recognized early on that “epigenetic” factors were major players in the aetiology and progression of many diseases like stroke. The major players are microRNAs that represent the best-characterized subclass of noncoding RNAs. Epigenetic mechanisms convert environmental conditions and physiological stresses into long-term changes in gene expression and translation. Epigenetics in stroke are in their infancy but offer great promise for better understanding of stroke pathology and the potential viability of new strategies for its treatment. PMID:23365789

  3. Emerging Molecular Targets for Brain Repair after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Krupinski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of neuroprotection generated consistent preclinical findings of mechanisms of cell death but these failed to be translated into clinics. The approaches that combine the modulation of the inhibitory environment together with the promotion of intrinsic axonal outgrowth needs further work before combined therapeutic strategies will be transferable to clinic trials. It is likely that only when some answers have been found to these issues will our therapeutic efforts meet our expectations. Stroke is a clinically heterogeneous disease and combinatorial treatments require much greater work in pharmacological and toxicological testing. Advances in genetics and results of the Whole Human Genome Project (HGP provided new unknown information in relation to stroke. Genetic factors are not the only determinants of responses to some diseases. It was recognized early on that “epigenetic” factors were major players in the aetiology and progression of many diseases like stroke. The major players are microRNAs that represent the best-characterized subclass of noncoding RNAs. Epigenetic mechanisms convert environmental conditions and physiological stresses into long-term changes in gene expression and translation. Epigenetics in stroke are in their infancy but offer great promise for better understanding of stroke pathology and the potential viability of new strategies for its treatment.

  4. Stress and the social brain: behavioural effects and neurobiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandi, Carmen; Haller, József

    2015-05-01

    Stress often affects our social lives. When undergoing high-level or persistent stress, individuals frequently retract from social interactions and become irritable and hostile. Predisposition to antisocial behaviours - including social detachment and violence - is also modulated by early life adversity; however, the effects of early life stress depend on the timing of exposure and genetic factors. Research in animals and humans has revealed some of the structural, functional and molecular changes in the brain that underlie the effects of stress on social behaviour. Findings in this emerging field will have implications both for the clinic and for society. PMID:25891510

  5. Mechanical ventilation in emergency departments: Non invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. Where is the answer?

    OpenAIRE

    Esquinas Rodriguez Antonio M; Cosentini Roberto; Papadakos Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The Emergency Department length of stay for patients requiring mechanical ventilation paper in this issue is very illustrative of many variables that still confound the way we treat patients that may not require endotracheal intubation (ETI) but may benefit from non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) [1].

  6. Development of brain mechanisms for processing affective touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin eBjornsdotter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Affective tactile stimulation plays a key role in the maturation of neural circuits, but the development of brain mechanisms processing touch is poorly understood. We therefore used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to study brain responses to soft brush stroking of both glabrous (palm and hairy (forearm skin in healthy children (5-13 years, adolescents (14-17 years and adults (25-35 years. Adult-defined regions-of-interests in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, secondary somatosensory cortex (SII, insular cortex and right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS were significantly and similarly activated in all age groups. Whole-brain analyses revealed that responses in the ipsilateral SII were positively correlated with age in both genders, and that responses in bilateral regions near the pSTS correlated significantly and strongly with age in females but not in males. These results suggest that brain mechanisms associated with both sensory-discriminative and affective-motivational aspects of touch are largely established in school-aged children, and that there is a general continuing maturation of SII and a female-specific increase in pSTS sensitivity with age. Our work establishes a groundwork for future comparative studies of tactile processing in developmental disorders characterized by disrupted social perception such as autism.

  7. Iodine Deficiency and the Brain: Effects and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Kahla; Ruffman, Ted; Fitzgerald, Penelope; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-12-01

    Iodine is an essential micronutrient needed in human diets. As iodine is an integral component of thyroid hormone, it mediates the effects of thyroid hormone on brain development. Iodine deficiency is the most prevalent and preventable cause of mental impairment in the world. The exact mechanism through which iodine influences the brain is unclear, but is generally thought to begin with genetic expression. Many brain structures and systems appear to be affected with iodine deficiency, including areas such as the hippocampus, microstructures such as myelin, and neurotransmitters. The clearest evidence comes from the studies examining cognition in the cases of iodine deprivation or interventions involving iodine supplementation. Nevertheless, there are many inconsistencies and gaps in the literature of iodine deficiency, especially over the lifespan. This paper summarizes the literature on this topic, suggests a causal mechanism for iodine's effect on the brain, and indicates areas for the future research (e.g., using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional MRI to examine how iodine supplementation facilitates cognitive functioning). PMID:25880137

  8. Operational Mechanism and Evaluation System for Emergency Logistics Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lots of risks existed in the operating process of emergency logistics especially when natural disasters happened. Both operating mechanism and evaluation system research on Emergency Logistics Risks (ELR are the basis of effective recognizing, preventing and responding to risks, so it’s of great theoretical and practical significance to study the formation and influence mechanism and to establish an evaluating index system for ELR. Firstly, some foundation research about ELR was carried out, including definition, characteristics and classification of ELR. The formation and influence mechanism of ELR were discussed. The research of questionnaire survey offered an objective support for theoretical mechanism and index system establishment. Then, the evaluating index system for ELR was established. This system was a multi-level index system, and mainly evaluated by the decision-making risk, dispatching and commanding risk, organizing and coordinating risk, executing and controlling risk, resources supporting risk and their sub index. The establishment principles and significance of the index system were discussed. Then, the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation and Delphi method were used to confirm the index weight and value. Finally, a case analysis on ELR of Yushu earthquake was conducted to demonstrate the evaluating index system and to evaluate the actual risk level.

  9. Adenosine, ketogenic diet and epilepsy: the emerging therapeutic relationship between metabolism and brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masino, S A; Kawamura, M; Wasser, C D; Wasser, C A; Pomeroy, L T; Ruskin, D N

    2009-09-01

    For many years the neuromodulator adenosine has been recognized as an endogenous anticonvulsant molecule and termed a "retaliatory metabolite." As the core molecule of ATP, adenosine forms a unique link between cell energy and neuronal excitability. In parallel, a ketogenic (high-fat, low-carbohydrate) diet is a metabolic therapy that influences neuronal activity significantly, and ketogenic diets have been used successfully to treat medically-refractory epilepsy, particularly in children, for decades. To date the key neural mechanisms underlying the success of dietary therapy are unclear, hindering development of analogous pharmacological solutions. Similarly, adenosine receptor-based therapies for epilepsy and myriad other disorders remain elusive. In this review we explore the physiological regulation of adenosine as an anticonvulsant strategy and suggest a critical role for adenosine in the success of ketogenic diet therapy for epilepsy. While the current focus is on the regulation of adenosine, ketogenic metabolism and epilepsy, the therapeutic implications extend to acute and chronic neurological disorders as diverse as brain injury, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, autism and hyperdopaminergic disorders. Emerging evidence for broad clinical relevance of the metabolic regulation of adenosine will be discussed. PMID:20190967

  10. Quantum Mechanics, Pattern Recognition, and the Mammalian Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapline, George

    2008-10-01

    Although the usual way of representing Markov processes is time asymmetric, there is a way of describing Markov processes, due to Schrodinger, which is time symmetric. This observation provides a link between quantum mechanics and the layered Bayesian networks that are often used in automated pattern recognition systems. In particular, there is a striking formal similarity between quantum mechanics and a particular type of Bayesian network, the Helmholtz machine, which provides a plausible model for how the mammalian brain recognizes important environmental situations. One interesting aspect of this relationship is that the "wake-sleep" algorithm for training a Helmholtz machine is very similar to the problem of finding the potential for the multi-channel Schrodinger equation. As a practical application of this insight it may be possible to use inverse scattering techniques to study the relationship between human brain wave patterns, pattern recognition, and learning. We also comment on whether there is a relationship between quantum measurements and consciousness.

  11. Inhibitory Antibodies Targeting Emerging Viruses: Advancements and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham

    2016-07-01

    From Ebola virus outbreaks in Western Africa to the introduction of chikungunya and Zika viruses in the Americas, new and neglected viruses continue to emerge and spread around the world. Due to a lack of existing vaccines or specific therapeutics, little other than supportive care and attempts to interrupt transmission can be provided during initial outbreaks. This has prompted a shift in vaccine design and development to identify novel epitopes and mechanisms of protection that may offer a broader range of protection against groups or whole families of viruses. Receptor-binding domains and other motifs within viral envelope proteins represent one excellent opportunity to target communal epitopes shared by related viruses. Similarly, for viruses where envelope participates in driving viral egress from infected cells, shared epitopes need to be identified to guide the development of broadly protective antibodies and vaccines. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of broadly protective humoral responses for emerging viruses. PMID:27226280

  12. Brain. Conscious and Unconscious Mechanisms of Cognition, Emotions, and Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Ilin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conscious and unconscious brain mechanisms, including cognition, emotions and language are considered in this review. The fundamental mechanisms of cognition include interactions between bottom-up and top-down signals. The modeling of these interactions since the 1960s is briefly reviewed, analyzing the ubiquitous difficulty: incomputable combinatorial complexity (CC. Fundamental reasons for CC are related to the Gödel’s difficulties of logic, a most fundamental mathematical result of the 20th century. Many scientists still “believed” in logic because, as the review discusses, logic is related to consciousness; non-logical processes in the brain are unconscious. CC difficulty is overcome in the brain by processes “from vague-unconscious to crisp-conscious” (representations, plans, models, concepts. These processes are modeled by dynamic logic, evolving from vague and unconscious representations toward crisp and conscious thoughts. We discuss experimental proofs and relate dynamic logic to simulators of the perceptual symbol system. “From vague to crisp” explains interactions between cognition and language. Language is mostly conscious, whereas cognition is only rarely so; this clarifies much about the mind that might seem mysterious. All of the above involve emotions of a special kind, aesthetic emotions related to knowledge and to cognitive dissonances. Cognition-language-emotional mechanisms operate throughout the hierarchy of the mind and create all higher mental abilities. The review discusses cognitive functions of the beautiful, sublime, music.

  13. Brain. Conscious and unconscious mechanisms of cognition, emotions, and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid; Ilin, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Conscious and unconscious brain mechanisms, including cognition, emotions and language are considered in this review. The fundamental mechanisms of cognition include interactions between bottom-up and top-down signals. The modeling of these interactions since the 1960s is briefly reviewed, analyzing the ubiquitous difficulty: incomputable combinatorial complexity (CC). Fundamental reasons for CC are related to the Gödel's difficulties of logic, a most fundamental mathematical result of the 20th century. Many scientists still "believed" in logic because, as the review discusses, logic is related to consciousness; non-logical processes in the brain are unconscious. CC difficulty is overcome in the brain by processes "from vague-unconscious to crisp-conscious" (representations, plans, models, concepts). These processes are modeled by dynamic logic, evolving from vague and unconscious representations toward crisp and conscious thoughts. We discuss experimental proofs and relate dynamic logic to simulators of the perceptual symbol system. "From vague to crisp" explains interactions between cognition and language. Language is mostly conscious, whereas cognition is only rarely so; this clarifies much about the mind that might seem mysterious. All of the above involve emotions of a special kind, aesthetic emotions related to knowledge and to cognitive dissonances. Cognition-language-emotional mechanisms operate throughout the hierarchy of the mind and create all higher mental abilities. The review discusses cognitive functions of the beautiful, sublime, music. PMID:24961270

  14. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574316

  15. Autonomous control for mechanically stable navigation of microscale implants in brain tissue to record neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sindhu; Kumar, Swathy Sampath; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2016-08-01

    Emerging neural prosthetics require precise positional tuning and stable interfaces with single neurons for optimal function over a lifetime. In this study, we report an autonomous control to precisely navigate microscale electrodes in soft, viscoelastic brain tissue without visual feedback. The autonomous control optimizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single neuronal recordings in viscoelastic brain tissue while maintaining quasi-static mechanical stress conditions to improve stability of the implant-tissue interface. Force-displacement curves from microelectrodes in in vivo rodent experiments are used to estimate viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Using a combination of computational models and experiments, we determined an optimal movement for the microelectrodes with bidirectional displacements of 3:2 ratio between forward and backward displacements and a inter-movement interval of 40 s for minimizing mechanical stress in the surrounding brain tissue. A regulator with the above optimal bidirectional motion for the microelectrodes in in vivo experiments resulted in significant reduction in the number of microelectrode movements (0.23 movements/min) and longer periods of stable SNR (53 % of the time) compared to a regulator using a conventional linear, unidirectional microelectrode movement (with 1.48 movements/min and stable SNR 23 % of the time). PMID:27457752

  16. Simultaneous emergence of curved spacetime and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    De, S S

    2014-01-01

    It is shown in this paper that the geometrically structureless spacetime manifold is converted instantaneously to a curved one, the Riemannian or may be a Finslerian spacetime with an associated Riemannian spacetime, on the appearance of quantum Weyl spinors dependent only on time in that background flat manifold and having the sympleic property in the abstract space of spinors. The scenario depicts simultaneous emergence of the gravity in accord with general relativity and quantum mechanics.The emergent gravity leads to the generalized uncertainty principle, which in turn, ushers in discrete space time. The emerged space time is specified here as to be Finslerian and the field equation in that space time has been obtained from the classical one due to the arising quantized space and time. From this field equation we find the quantum field equation for highly massive (of the Planck order) spinors in the associated Riemannian space of the Finsler space, which is in fact, the background FRW space time of the un...

  17. The mechanism of the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although multiple overstretched DNA states were identified in experiments, the mechanism of the emergence of distinct states is still unclear. Molecular dynamics simulation is an ideal tool to clarify the mechanism, but the force loading rates in stretching achieved by conventional all-atom DNA models are much faster, which essentially affect overstretching states. We employed a modified coarse-grained DNA model with an unprecedented low loading rate in simulations to study the overstretching transitions of end-opened double-stranded DNA. We observed two-strand peeling off for DNA with low stability and the S-DNA with high stability under tension. By introducing a melting-forbidden model which prevents base-pair breaking, we still observed the overstretching transition induced by the formation of S-DNA due to the change of dihedral angle. Hence, we confirmed that the competition between the two strain-softening manners, i.e., base-pair breaking and dihedral angle variation, results in the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states

  18. The mechanism of the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan, E-mail: zysun@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Lu, Zhong-Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2016-01-14

    Although multiple overstretched DNA states were identified in experiments, the mechanism of the emergence of distinct states is still unclear. Molecular dynamics simulation is an ideal tool to clarify the mechanism, but the force loading rates in stretching achieved by conventional all-atom DNA models are much faster, which essentially affect overstretching states. We employed a modified coarse-grained DNA model with an unprecedented low loading rate in simulations to study the overstretching transitions of end-opened double-stranded DNA. We observed two-strand peeling off for DNA with low stability and the S-DNA with high stability under tension. By introducing a melting-forbidden model which prevents base-pair breaking, we still observed the overstretching transition induced by the formation of S-DNA due to the change of dihedral angle. Hence, we confirmed that the competition between the two strain-softening manners, i.e., base-pair breaking and dihedral angle variation, results in the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states.

  19. PREFACE: EmQM13: Emergent Quantum Mechanics 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    These proceedings comprise the invited lectures of the second international symposium on Emergent Quantum Mechanics (EmQM13), which was held at the premises of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, Austria, 3-6 October 2013. The symposium was held at the ''Theatersaal'' of the Academy of Sciences, and was devoted to the open exploration of emergent quantum mechanics, a possible ''deeper level theory'' that interconnects three fields of knowledge: emergence, the quantum, and information. Could there appear a revised image of physical reality from recognizing new links between emergence, the quantum, and information? Could a novel synthesis pave the way towards a 21st century, ''superclassical'' physics? The symposium provided a forum for discussing (i) important obstacles which need to be overcome as well as (ii) promising developments and research opportunities on the way towards emergent quantum mechanics. Contributions were invited that presented current advances in both standard as well as unconventional approaches to quantum mechanics. The EmQM13 symposium was co-organized by Gerhard Grössing (Austrian Institute for Nonlinear Studies (AINS), Vienna), and by Jan Walleczek (Fetzer Franklin Fund, USA, and Phenoscience Laboratories, Berlin). After a very successful first conference on the same topic in 2011, the new partnership between AINS and the Fetzer Franklin Fund in producing the EmQM13 symposium was able to further expand interest in the promise of emergent quantum mechanics. The symposium consisted of two parts, an opening evening addressing the general public, and the scientific program of the conference proper. The opening evening took place at the Great Ceremonial Hall (Grosser Festsaal) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and it presented talks and a panel discussion on ''The Future of Quantum Mechanics'' with three distinguished speakers: Stephen Adler (Princeton), Gerard 't Hooft (Utrecht) and Masanao Ozawa (Nagoya). The articles contained in

  20. Orosensory self-stimulation by sucrose involves brain dopaminergic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, L H

    1989-01-01

    The most convincing body of evidence supporting a role for brain dopaminergic mechanisms in sweet taste reward has been obtained using the sham-feeding rat. In rats prepared with a chronic gastric fistula and tested with the cannula open, intake is a direct function of the palatability of the solution offered as well as of the state of food deprivation. Because essentially none of the ingested fluid passes on to the intestine, negative postingestive feedback is eliminated. Thus, the relative orosensory/hedonic potency of the food determines and sustains the rate of sham intake; long periods of food deprivation are not required. In this way, the sham feeding of sweet solutions may be considered a form of oral self-stimulation behavior and afford a preparation through which the neurochemical and neuranatomical substrates of sweet taste reward may be identified. The results obtained in the series of experiments summarized in this paper clearly indicate that central D-1 and D-2 receptor mechanisms are critical for the orosensory self-stimulation by sucrose in the rat. In conclusion, I suggest that such investigations of the roles of brain dopaminergic mechanisms in the sucrose sham-feeding rat preparation may further our understanding of normal and aberrant attractions to sweet fluids in humans (see Cabanac, Drewnowski, and Halmi, this volume), as an innate, positive affective response of human neonates to sucrose and the sustained positive hedonic ratings for glucose when tasted but not when consumed have demonstrated. PMID:2699194

  1. Chaotic desynchronization as the therapeutic mechanism of deep brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J Wilson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available High frequency deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (DBS relieves many of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in humans and animal models. Although the treatment has seen widespread use, its therapeutic mechanism remains paradoxical. The subthalamic nucleus is excitatory, so its stimulation at rates higher than its normal firing rate should worsen the disease by increasing subthalamic excitation of the globus pallidus. The therapeutic effectiveness of DBS is also frequency and intensity sensitive, and the stimulation must be periodic; aperiodic stimulation at the same mean rate is ineffective. These requirements are not adequately explained by existing models, whether based on firing rate changes or on reduced bursting. Here we report modeling studies suggesting that high frequency periodic excitation of the subthalamic nucleus may act by desynchronizing the firing of neurons in the globus pallidus, rather than by changing the firing rate or pattern of individual cells. Globus pallidus neurons are normally desynchronized, but their activity becomes correlated in Parkinson's disease. Periodic stimulation may induce chaotic desynchronization by interacting with the intrinsic oscillatory mechanism of globus pallidus neurons. Our modeling results suggest a mechanism of action of deep brain stimulation and a pathophysiology of Parkinsonism in which synchrony, rather than firing rate, is the critical pathological feature.

  2. Emerging targets for addiction neuropharmacology: From mechanisms to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaldi, Massimo; Cannella, Nazzareno; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Drug abuse represents a considerable burden of disease and has enormous economic impacts on societies. Over the years, few medications have been developed for clinical use. Their utilization is endowed with several limitations, including partial efficacy or significant side effects. On the other hand, the successful advancement of these compounds provides an important proof of concept for the feasibility of drug development programs in addiction. In recent years, a wealth of information has been generated on the psychological mechanisms, genetic or epigenetic predisposing factors, and neurobiological adaptations induced by drug consumption that interact with each other to contribute to disease progression. It is now clear that addiction develops through phases, from initial recreational use to excessive consumption and compulsive drug seeking, with a shift from positive to negative reinforcement driving motivated behaviors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms has opened new vistas in drug development programs. Researchers' attention has been shifted from investigation of classical targets associated with reward to biological substrates responsible for negative reinforcement, impulse loss of control, and maladaptive mechanisms resulting from protracted drug use. From this research, several new biological targets for the development of innovative therapies have started to emerge. This chapter offers an overview of targets currently under scrutiny for the development of new medications for addiction. This work is not exhaustive but rather it provides a few examples of how this research has advanced in recent years by virtue of studies carried out in our laboratory. PMID:26822362

  3. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Rae Walker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  5. Cognitive information processing and learning mechanisms of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majovski, L V; Jacques, S

    1982-05-01

    The view that the two cerebral hemispheres of the human brain are characterized by different cognitive processing modes that handle information received in various forms is commonly accepted by neurobehavioral scientists and neuropsychologists. Selected neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, neurochemical, biochemical, and neuropsychological data that bear on a cognitive information-processing model of the brain are presented. Processes involved in memory functions are discussed in regard to the nature of thought and the characteristics of mental life, e.g., internalization of thought, perception, arousal, attention, cognitive development, problem solving, the development of cognitive encoding, and selective recall. We present a position that argues for the brain as being flexible vs. fixed in its characteristics and limitations, drawing from various theories and viewpoints. We also present a review of selected mechanisms believed to be involved in brain-behavior processes, e.g., learning, cognition, pain, emotion, reward, cognitive development, and memory formation. A major theme addressed in terms of human information processing is that cognitive functioning, in a variety of instances, comprises subsets of more general processes, e.g., selective recall, cueing that is capable of addressing schemas, notions of inhibition and disinhibition, and the modulation of excitatory properties of certain neural transmitter substances. Questions such as "how is information stored in memory in the first place?" and "how do elements of motivation (i.e., goal orientation) get connected and then send their messages to appropriate inbound behaviors?" are addressed from the point of view that learning, although not understood completely, is somehow involved. Another unresolved question of theoretical and practical significance that we address is "how does learning result in neural connections?" Such questions are discussed in light of their implications for human memory, thought

  6. A brain mechanism for facilitation of insight by positive affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karuna; Kounios, John; Parrish, Todd B; Jung-Beeman, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Previous research has shown that people solve insight or creative problems better when in a positive mood (assessed or induced), although the precise mechanisms and neural substrates of this facilitation remain unclear. We assessed mood and personality variables in 79 participants before they attempted to solve problems that can be solved by either an insight or an analytic strategy. Participants higher in positive mood solved more problems, and specifically more with insight, compared with participants lower in positive mood. fMRI was performed on 27 of the participants while they solved problems. Positive mood (and to a lesser extent and in the opposite direction, anxiety) was associated with changes in brain activity during a preparatory interval preceding each solved problem; modulation of preparatory activity in several areas biased people to solve either with insight or analytically. Analyses examined whether (a) positive mood modulated activity in brain areas showing responsivity during preparation; (b) positive mood modulated activity in areas showing stronger activity for insight than noninsight trials either during preparation or solution; and (c) insight effects occurred in areas that showed mood-related effects during preparation. Across three analyses, the ACC showed sensitivity to both mood and insight, demonstrating that positive mood alters preparatory activity in ACC, biasing participants to engage in processing conducive to insight solving. This result suggests that positive mood enhances insight, at least in part, by modulating attention and cognitive control mechanisms via ACC, perhaps enhancing sensitivity to detect non-prepotent solution candidates. PMID:18578603

  7. 16S ribosomal RNA methylation: emerging resistance mechanism against aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Yohei; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2007-07-01

    Methylation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance against aminoglycosides among gram-negative pathogens belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae and glucose-nonfermentative microbes, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species. This event is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases, which share modest similarity to those produced by aminoglycoside-producing actinomycetes. Their presence confers a high level of resistance to all parenterally administered aminoglycosides that are currently in clinical use. The responsible genes are mostly located on transposons within transferable plasmids, which provides them with the potential to spread horizontally and may in part explain the already worldwide distribution of this novel resistance mechanism. Some of these organisms have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases or metallo-beta-lactamases, contributing to their multidrug-resistant phenotypes. A 2-tiered approach, consisting of disk diffusion tests followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction, is recommended for detection of 16S rRNA methylase-mediated resistance. PMID:17554708

  8. Alcohol Withdrawal and Brain Injuries: Beyond Classical Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna E. Jung

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Unmanaged sudden withdrawal from the excessive consumption of alcohol (ethanol adversely alters neuronal integrity in vulnerable brain regions such as the cerebellum, hippocampus, or cortex. In addition to well known hyperexcitatory neurotransmissions, ethanol withdrawal (EW provokes the intense generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the activation of stress-responding protein kinases, which are the focus of this review article. EW also inflicts mitochondrial membranes/membrane potential, perturbs redox balance, and suppresses mitochondrial enzymes, all of which impair a fundamental function of mitochondria. Moreover, EW acts as an age-provoking stressor. The vulnerable age to EW stress is not necessarily the oldest age and varies depending upon the target molecule of EW. A major female sex steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2, interferes with the EW-induced alteration of oxidative signaling pathways and thereby protects neurons, mitochondria, and behaviors. The current review attempts to provide integrated information at the levels of oxidative signaling mechanisms by which EW provokes brain injuries and E2 protects against it. Unmanaged sudden withdrawal from the excessive consumption of alcohol (ethanol adversely alters neuronal integrity in vulnerable brain regions such as the cerebellum, hippocampus, or cortex. In addition to well known hyperexcitatory neurotransmissions, ethanol withdrawal (EW provokes the intense generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the activation of stress-responding protein kinases, which are the focus of this review article. EW also inflicts mitochondrial membranes/membrane potential, perturbs redox balance, and suppresses mitochondrial enzymes, all of which impair a fundamental function of mitochondria. Moreover, EW acts as an age-provoking stressor. The vulnerable age to EW stress is not necessarily the oldest age and varies depending upon the target molecule of EW. A major female sex steroid, 17

  9. Emergence of Quantum Mechanics from a Sub-Quantum Statistical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    A research program within the scope of theories on "Emergent Quantum Mechanics" is presented, which has gained some momentum in recent years. Via the modeling of a quantum system as a non-equilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy from the zero-point vacuum, the quantum is considered as an emergent system. We implement a specific "bouncer-walker" model in the context of an assumed sub-quantum statistical physics, in analogy to the results of experiments by Couder and Fort on a classical wave-particle duality. We can thus give an explanation of various quantum mechanical features and results on the basis of a "21st century classical physics", such as the appearance of Planck's constant, the Schrödinger equation, etc. An essential result is given by the proof that averaged particle trajectories' behaviors correspond to a specific type of anomalous diffusion termed "ballistic" diffusion on a sub-quantum level...

  10. Pictures as a neurological tool: lessons from enhanced and emergent artistry in brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, G D

    2012-06-01

    Pictures created spontaneously by patients with brain disease often display impaired or diminished artistry, reflecting the patient's cerebral damage. This article explores the opposite: those pictures created in the face of brain disease that show enhanced or enduring artistry, and those that emerge for the first time in artistically naïve patients. After comments on background issues relating to the patient and the viewer, the paintings and drawings are considered in relation to the heterogeneous conditions in which this artistic creativity is seen. These conditions include various dementias-most notably frontotemporal lobar dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease, autism and related disorders and psychiatric disease, epilepsy, migraine and trauma. In the discussion, it is argued that evidence of underlying brain dysfunction revealed by these pictures often rests on the abnormal context in which the pictures are created, or on changes in artistry demonstrated by a sequence of pictures. In the former, the compulsive element and sensory and emotional accompaniments are often important features; in the latter, evolving changes are evident, and have included depiction of increasing menace in portrayal of faces. The occurrence of synaesthesia, and its relation to creativity, are briefly discussed in respect of two unusual patients, followed by considering the role of the anterior and frontal lobes, mesolimbic connections and the right hemisphere. In at least some patients, impaired inhibition leading to paradoxical functional facilitation, with compensatory changes particularly in the right posterior hemisphere, is likely to be pivotal in enabling unusual artistry to emerge; preservation of language, however, is not a prerequisite. Many patients studied have been artists, and it appears possible that some of those with an artistic predisposition may be more likely to experience pathologically obsessive creativity. The discussion concludes that occasionally pictures

  11. Emergence of quantum mechanics from a sub-quantum statistical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, Gerhard

    2014-07-01

    A research program within the scope of theories on "Emergent Quantum Mechanics" is presented, which has gained some momentum in recent years. Via the modeling of a quantum system as a non-equilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy from the zero-point vacuum, the quantum is considered as an emergent system. We implement a specific "bouncer-walker" model in the context of an assumed sub-quantum statistical physics, in analogy to the results of experiments by Couder and Fort on a classical wave-particle duality. We can thus give an explanation of various quantum mechanical features and results on the basis of a "21st century classical physics", such as the appearance of Planck's constant, the Schrödinger equation, etc. An essential result is given by the proof that averaged particle trajectories' behaviors correspond to a specific type of anomalous diffusion termed "ballistic" diffusion on a sub-quantum level. It is further demonstrated both analytically and with the aid of computer simulations that our model provides explanations for various quantum effects such as double-slit or n-slit interference. We show the averaged trajectories emerging from our model to be identical to Bohmian trajectories, albeit without the need to invoke complex wavefunctions or any other quantum mechanical tool. Finally, the model provides new insights into the origins of entanglement, and, in particular, into the phenomenon of a "systemic" non-locality.

  12. Developmental modes and developmental mechanisms can channel brain evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine J Charvet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Anseriform birds (ducks and geese as well as parrots and songbirds have evolved a disproportionately enlarged telencephalon compared with many other birds. However, parrots and songbirds differ from anseriform birds in their mode of development. Whereas ducks and geese are precocial (e.g., hatchlings feed on their own, parrots and songbirds are altricial (e.g., hatchlings are fed by their parents. We here consider how developmental modes may limit and facilitate specific changes in the mechanisms of brain development. We suggest that altriciality facilitates the evolution of telencephalic expansion by delaying telencephalic neurogenesis. We further hypothesize that delays in telencephalic neurogenesis generate delays in telencephalic maturation, which in turn foster neural adaptations that facilitate learning. Specifically, we propose that delaying telencephalic neurogenesis was a prerequisite for the evolution of neural circuits that allow parrots and songbirds to produce learned vocalizations. Overall, we argue that developmental modes have influenced how some lineages of birds increased the size of their telencephalon and that this, in turn, has influenced subsequent changes in brain circuits and behavior.

  13. Boundaries as Mechanisms for Learning in Emergency Exercises with Students from Emergency Service Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Annika

    2016-01-01

    To prepare emergency response organisations for collaborative work in unpredictable and dynamic situations, various types of exercises are widely used. Still, our knowledge of collaboration exercises with emergency response students is limited. This study aimed to contribute to this field by exploring boundaries that emerged between collaborating…

  14. Androgen modulation of social decision making mechanisms in the brain: an integrative and embodied perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui F Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Apart from their role in reproduction androgens also respond to social challenges and this response has been seen as a way to regulate the expression of behaviour according to the perceived social environment (Challenge hypothesis, Wingfield et al. 1990. This hypothesis implies that social decision-making mechanisms localized in the central nervous system (CNS are open to the influence of peripheral hormones that ultimately are under the control of the CNS through the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore, two puzzling questions emerge at two different levels of biological analysis: (1 Why does the brain, which perceives the social environment and regulates androgen production in the gonad, need feedback information from the gonad to adjust its social decision-making processes? (2 How does the brain regulate gonadal androgen responses to social challenges and how do these feedback into the brain? In this paper, we will address these two questions using the integrative approach proposed by Niko Tinbergen, who proposed that a full understanding of behaviour requires its analysis at both proximate (physiology, ontogeny and ultimate (ecology, evolution levels.

  15. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  16. A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating b...

  17. How does our brain constitute defense mechanisms? First-person neuroscience and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg; Bermpohl, Felix; Schoeneich, Frank; Boeker, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Current progress in the cognitive and affective neurosciences is constantly influencing the development of psychoanalytic theory and practice. However, despite the emerging dialogue between neuroscience and psychoanalysis, the neuronal processes underlying psychoanalytic constructs such as defense mechanisms remain unclear. One of the main problems in investigating the psychodynamic-neuronal relationship consists in systematically linking the individual contents of first-person subjective experience to third-person observation of neuronal states. We therefore introduced an appropriate methodological strategy, 'first-person neuroscience', which aims at developing methods for systematically linking first- and third-person data. The utility of first-person neuroscience can be demonstrated by the example of the defense mechanism of sensorimotor regression as paradigmatically observed in catatonia. Combined psychodynamic and imaging studies suggest that sensorimotor regression might be associated with dysfunction in the neural network including the orbitofrontal, the medial prefrontal and the premotor cortices. In general sensorimotor regression and other defense mechanisms are psychoanalytic constructs that are hypothesized to be complex emotional-cognitive constellations. In this paper we suggest that specific functional mechanisms which integrate neuronal activity across several brain regions (i.e. neuronal integration) are the physiological substrates of defense mechanisms. We conclude that first-person neuroscience could be an appropriate methodological strategy for opening the door to a better understanding of the neuronal processes of defense mechanisms and their modulation in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. PMID:17426413

  18. Emergent Semiclassical Time in Quantum Gravity. I. Mechanical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, E

    2006-01-01

    Strategies intended to resolve the problem of time in quantum gravity by means of emergent or hidden timefunctions are considered in the arena of relational particle toy models. In situations with `heavy' and `light' degrees of freedom, two notions of emergent semiclassical WKB time emerge; these are furthermore equivalent to two notions of emergent classical `Leibniz--Mach--Barbour' time. I futhermore study the semiclassical approach, in a geometric phase formalism, extended to include linear constraints, and with particular care to make explicit those approximations and assumptions used. I propose a new iterative scheme for this in the cosmologically-motivated case with one heavy degree of freedom. I find that the usual semiclassical quantum cosmology emergence of time comes hand in hand with the emergence of other qualitatively significant terms, including back-reactions on the heavy subsystem and second time derivatives. I illustrate my analysis by taking it further for relational particle models with lin...

  19. Research on Group Decision-Making Mechanism of Internet Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kefan; Chen, Gang; Qian, Wu; Shi, Zhao

    With the development of information technology, internet has become a popular term and internet emergency has an intensive influence on people's life. This article offers a short history of internet emergency management. It discusses the definition, characteristics, and factor of internet emergency management. A group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency is presented based on the discussion. The authors establish a so-called Rough Set Scenario Flow Graphs (RSSFG) of group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency management and make an empirical analysis based on the RSSFG approach. The experimental results confirm that this approach is effective in internet emergency decision-making.

  20. Common resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shawniqua T; Conte, Mary M; Goldfine, Andrew M; Noirhomme, Quentin; Gosseries, Olivia; Thonnard, Marie; Beattie, Bradley; Hersh, Jennifer; Katz, Douglas I; Victor, Jonathan D; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known zolpidem responses we identify a distinctive pattern of EEG dynamics that suggests a mechanistic model. In the absence of zolpidem, all subjects show a strong low frequency oscillatory peak ∼6–10 Hz in the EEG power spectrum most prominent over frontocentral regions and with high coherence (∼0.7–0.8) within and between hemispheres. Zolpidem administration sharply reduces EEG power and coherence at these low frequencies. The ∼6–10 Hz activity is proposed to arise from intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal neurons that are passively entrained across the cortex by locally-generated spontaneous activity. Activation by zolpidem is proposed to arise from a combination of initial direct drug effects on cortical, striatal, and thalamic populations and further activation of underactive brain regions induced by restoration of cognitively-mediated behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01157.001 PMID:24252875

  1. Mechanism of brain damaging by rapid evacuation decompression of epidural hematoma explored with dynamic brain SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the value of dynamic brain SPECT imaging in clarifying the major mechanism of obstinate brain edema following evacuation of epidural hematoma. Methods: The dynamic brain SPECT imaging was performed on New Zealand rabbit model of epidural hematoma. The changes of their intracellular [Ca2+], and brain tissue water content were measured, and the correlation between them was analyzed. Results: It is showed that the severe hypoperfusion occurred on compressing parietal lobe for 30 min and hyper-reperfusion occurred 10 min after decompression on dynamic brain SPECT imaging and on its time-radioactivity curve. [Ca2+] increased remarkably after being pressed. There was a short-term decreasing following decompression and then increased gradually reaching the peak at 24 h. The correlation between [Ca2+] and brain tissue water content was with magnificent value (r=0.469, P<0.01). Conclusions: These findings indicate there exists severe reperfusion injury, which is the major mechanism of obstinate brain edema after evacuation of epidural hematoma. The dynamic brain SPECT imaging can show the image evidence of reperfusion clearly and non-invasively. (authors)

  2. Characterization of multiciliated ependymal cells that emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Takashi; Sawada, Masato; Takase, Hiroshi; Nakai, Chiemi; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Kaneko, Naoko; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-10-15

    In mammals, ventricular walls of the developing brain maintain a neurogenic niche, in which radial glial cells act as neural stem cells (NSCs) and generate new neurons in the embryo. In the adult brain, the neurogenic niche is maintained in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral wall of lateral ventricles and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the neonatal V-SVZ, radial glial cells transform into astrocytic postnatal NSCs and multiciliated ependymal cells. On the other hand, in zebrafish, radial glial cells continue to cover the surface of the adult telencephalic ventricle and maintain a higher neurogenic potential in the adult brain. However, the cell composition of the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain has not been investigated. Here we show that multiciliated ependymal cells emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish telencephalon. These multiciliated cells appear predominantly in the dorsal part of the ventral telencephalic ventricular zone, which also contains clusters of migrating new neurons. Scanning electron microscopy and live imaging analyses indicated that these multiple cilia beat coordinately and generate constant fluid flow within the ventral telencephalic ventricle. Analysis of the cell composition by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the neurogenic niche in the aged zebrafish contains different types of cells, with ultrastructures similar to those of ependymal cells, transit-amplifying cells, and migrating new neurons in postnatal mice. These data suggest that the transformation capacity of radial glial cells is conserved but that its timing is different between fish and mice. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2982-2992, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991819

  3. Effect of Mechanical Damage on to Emergence Rate and Emergence Force of Some Wild Sunflower (Helianthus L. Spp.) Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    DAĞÜSTÜ, Nazan; Özer, Seda

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the possible use of wild sunflower species (Helianthus spp.) with cultural varieties at classical breeding studies and to overcome the seed dormancy and germination problems encountered at germination stage in seed, the effect of mechanical damage to the seed on to emergence rate and emergence force was determined. The study was conducted at Uludağ University, Agricultural Faculty, Field Crops Department, Plant Tissue Culture Laboratory and green house in 2014. Seeds of wild su...

  4. A Scalable Communication Mechanism in Service Emergence Based on Bio-network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hong-bin; DING Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    A scalable communication mechanism is proposed for service emergence based on bio-network. Service emergence is a novel model inspired by the characteristics of emergence and self-evolution in biological neuroendocrine and ininlune system,emergent conununication means a group conununication of mobile bio-entities. A series of protocol and algorithm are presented within frequently bioentities migration and failure,it includes distribution and parailelization of message propagation method,a token-ring protocol that considerably improves the performance of emergence,and failure detection mechanisms.Experiment results show the desired capability via the proposed solution.

  5. Neural mechanisms of face perception, their emergence over development, and their breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrmann, Marlene; Scherf, K Suzanne; Avidan, Galia

    2016-07-01

    Face perception is probably the most developed visual perceptual skill in humans, most likely as a result of its unique evolutionary and social significance. Much recent research has converged to identify a host of relevant psychological mechanisms that support face recognition. In parallel, there has been substantial progress in uncovering the neural mechanisms that mediate rapid and accurate face perception, with specific emphasis on a broadly distributed neural circuit, comprised of multiple nodes whose joint activity supports face perception. This article focuses specifically on the neural underpinnings of face recognition, and reviews recent structural and functional imaging studies that elucidate the neural basis of this ability. In addition, the article covers some of the recent investigations that characterize the emergence of the neural basis of face recognition over the course of development, and explores the relationship between these changes and increasing behavioural competence. This paper also describes studies that characterize the nature of the breakdown of face recognition in individuals who are impaired in face recognition, either as a result of brain damage acquired at some point or as a result of the failure to master face recognition over the course of development. Finally, information regarding similarities between the neural circuits for face perception in humans and in nonhuman primates is briefly covered, as is the contribution of subcortical regions to face perception. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:247-263. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1388 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27196333

  6. Theory of brain function, quantum mechanics and superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Nanopoulos, Dimitri V

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments/efforts to understand aspects of the brain function at the {\\em sub-neural} level are discussed. MicroTubules (MTs) participate in a wide variety of dynamical processes in the cell especially in bioinformation processes such as learning and memory, by possessing a well-known binary error-correcting code with 64 words. In fact, MTs and DNA/RNA are unique cell structures that possess a code system. It seems that the MTs' code system is strongly related to a kind of ``Mental Code" in the following sense. The MTs' periodic paracrystalline structure make them able to support a superposition of coherent quantum states, as it has been recently conjectured by Hameroff and Penrose, representing an external or mental order, for sufficient time needed for efficient quantum computing. Then the quantum superposition collapses spontaneously/dynamically through a new, string-derived mechanism for collapse proposed recently by Ellis, Mavromatos, and myself. At the moment of collapse, organized quantum exo...

  7. Experimental and numerical study on the mechanical behavior of rat brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M; Yousefi, H; Haghi, A Motevalli; Sadati, Sja

    2014-02-01

    Brain tissue is a very soft tissue in which the mechanical properties depend on the loading direction. While few studies have characterized these biomechanical properties, it is worth knowing that accurate characterization of the mechanical properties of brain tissue at different loading directions is a key asset for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. In this study, the hyperelastic mechanical properties of rat brain tissue were measured experimentally and computationally. Prepared cylindrical samples were excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by a tensile testing machine. The effects of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue were measured by applying load on both longitudinal and circumferential directions. The general prediction ability of the proposed hyperelastic model was verified using finite element (FE) simulations of brain tissue tension experiments. The uniaxial experimental results compared well with those predicted by the FE models. The results revealed the influence of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue. The Ogden hyperelastic material model was suitably represented by the non-linear behavior of the brain tissue, which can be used in future biomechanical simulations. The hyperelastic properties of brain tissue provided here have interest to the medical research community as there are several applications where accurate characterization of these properties are crucial for an accurate outcome, such as neurosurgery, robotic surgery, haptic device design or car manufacturing to evaluate possible trauma due to an impact. PMID:24519528

  8. Nitric Oxide Inactivation Mechanisms in the Brain: Role in Bioenergetics and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M. Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades nitric oxide (•NO has emerged as a critical physiological signaling molecule in mammalian tissues, notably in the brain. •NO may modify the activity of regulatory proteins via direct reaction with the heme moiety, or indirectly, via S-nitrosylation of thiol groups or nitration of tyrosine residues. However, a conceptual understanding of how •NO bioactivity is carried out in biological systems is hampered by the lack of knowledge on its dynamics in vivo. Key questions still lacking concrete and definitive answers include those related with quantitative issues of its concentration dynamics and diffusion, summarized in the how much, how long, and how far trilogy. For instance, a major problem is the lack of knowledge of what constitutes a physiological •NO concentration and what constitutes a pathological one and how is •NO concentration regulated. The ambient •NO concentration reflects the balance between the rate of synthesis and the rate of breakdown. Much has been learnt about the mechanism of •NO synthesis, but the inactivation pathways of •NO has been almost completely ignored. We have recently addressed these issues in vivo on basis of microelectrode technology that allows a fine-tuned spatial and temporal measurement •NO concentration dynamics in the brain.

  9. Emerging roles of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers in epilepsy and developmental brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hanshu; Carney, Karen E; Falgoust, Lindsay; Pan, Jullie W; Sun, Dandan; Zhang, Zhongling

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common central nervous system (CNS) disease characterized by recurrent transient neurological events occurring due to abnormally excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. The CNS is affected by systemic acid-base disorders, and epileptic seizures are sensitive indicators of underlying imbalances in cellular pH regulation. Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) are a family of membrane transporter proteins actively involved in regulating intracellular and organellar pH by extruding H(+) in exchange for Na(+) influx. Altering NHE function significantly influences neuronal excitability and plays a role in epilepsy. This review gives an overview of pH regulatory mechanisms in the brain with a special focus on the NHE family and the relationship between epilepsy and dysfunction of NHE isoforms. We first discuss how cells translocate acids and bases across the membrane and establish pH homeostasis as a result of the concerted effort of enzymes and ion transporters. We focus on the specific roles of the NHE family by detailing how the loss of NHE1 in two NHE mutant mice results in enhanced neuronal excitability in these animals. Furthermore, we highlight new findings on the link between mutations of NHE6 and NHE9 and developmental brain disorders including epilepsy, autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These studies demonstrate the importance of NHE proteins in maintaining H(+) homeostasis and their intricate roles in the regulation of neuronal function. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying NHE1, 6, and 9 dysfunctions in epilepsy formation may advance the development of new epilepsy treatment strategies. PMID:26965387

  10. Brain mechanisms of acoustic communication in humans and nonhuman primates: an evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Hermann; Hage, Steffen R; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Any account of "what is special about the human brain" (Passingham 2008) must specify the neural basis of our unique ability to produce speech and delineate how these remarkable motor capabilities could have emerged in our hominin ancestors. Clinical data suggest that the basal ganglia provide a platform for the integration of primate-general mechanisms of acoustic communication with the faculty of articulate speech in humans. Furthermore, neurobiological and paleoanthropological data point at a two-stage model of the phylogenetic evolution of this crucial prerequisite of spoken language: (i) monosynaptic refinement of the projections of motor cortex to the brainstem nuclei that steer laryngeal muscles, presumably, as part of a "phylogenetic trend" associated with increasing brain size during hominin evolution; (ii) subsequent vocal-laryngeal elaboration of cortico-basal ganglia circuitries, driven by human-specific FOXP2 mutations.;>This concept implies vocal continuity of spoken language evolution at the motor level, elucidating the deep entrenchment of articulate speech into a "nonverbal matrix" (Ingold 1994), which is not accounted for by gestural-origin theories. Moreover, it provides a solution to the question for the adaptive value of the "first word" (Bickerton 2009) since even the earliest and most simple verbal utterances must have increased the versatility of vocal displays afforded by the preceding elaboration of monosynaptic corticobulbar tracts, giving rise to enhanced social cooperation and prestige. At the ontogenetic level, the proposed model assumes age-dependent interactions between the basal ganglia and their cortical targets, similar to vocal learning in some songbirds. In this view, the emergence of articulate speech builds on the "renaissance" of an ancient organizational principle and, hence, may represent an example of "evolutionary tinkering" (Jacob 1977). PMID:24827156

  11. The mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation and ideas for the future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used as a treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor for over twenty years, and is a promising treatment for depression and epilepsy. However, the exact mechanisms of action of DBS are still uncertain, although different theories have emerged. This review summarizes the current understanding in this field. Different modalities used to investigate DBS such as electrophysiological, imaging and biochemical studies have revealed different mechanisms of DBS. The mechanisms may also be different depending on the structure targeted, the disease condition or the animal model employed. DBS may inhibit the target neuronal networks but activate the efferent axons. It may suppress pathological rhythms or impose new rhythms associated with beneficial effects, and involves neuronal networks with widespread connections. Different neurotransmitter systems such as dopamine and GABA upregulation are involved in the effects of DBS. There are also technical advances to prolong the battery life and specific targeting based on new electrode designs with multiple contacts which have the ability to steer the current toward a specific direction. There is ongoing work in closed loop or adaptive DBS using neural oscillations to provide the feedback signals. These oscillations need to be better characterized in a wide variety of clinical settings in future studies. Individualization of DBS parameters based on neural oscillations may optimize the clinical benefits of DBS. PMID:26296674

  12. Emerging Security Mechanisms for Medical Cyber Physical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Ovunc; Soyata, Tolga; Aktas, Mehmet K

    2016-01-01

    The following decade will witness a surge in remote health-monitoring systems that are based on body-worn monitoring devices. These Medical Cyber Physical Systems (MCPS) will be capable of transmitting the acquired data to a private or public cloud for storage and processing. Machine learning algorithms running in the cloud and processing this data can provide decision support to healthcare professionals. There is no doubt that the security and privacy of the medical data is one of the most important concerns in designing an MCPS. In this paper, we depict the general architecture of an MCPS consisting of four layers: data acquisition, data aggregation, cloud processing, and action. Due to the differences in hardware and communication capabilities of each layer, different encryption schemes must be used to guarantee data privacy within that layer. We survey conventional and emerging encryption schemes based on their ability to provide secure storage, data sharing, and secure computation. Our detailed experimental evaluation of each scheme shows that while the emerging encryption schemes enable exciting new features such as secure sharing and secure computation, they introduce several orders-of-magnitude computational and storage overhead. We conclude our paper by outlining future research directions to improve the usability of the emerging encryption schemes in an MCPS. PMID:26812732

  13. Fracture mechanics of concrete: Will applications start to emerge?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mier, J.G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture mechanics of concrete has developed into an active field of research in the past decades. It promises a rational solution technique to structural problems in reinforced concrete in the limit state. Numerical tools have been developed on the basis of fracture mechanics theories. The question

  14. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  15. Mechanisms of abnormal brain development leading to transsexualism (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kurilo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overview of national and world literature on sexual autoidentification is analyzed. Prenatal brain development abnormalities leading to transsexualism are discussed. Results of own cytogenetic analysis, ооgenesis and spermatоgenesis examination are reported.

  16. Mechanisms of abnormal brain development leading to transsexualism (review)

    OpenAIRE

    L. F. Kurilo; S. Sh. Khayat; S. Yu. Kalinchenko; B. Yu. Slonimskiy; T. M. Sorokina

    2014-01-01

    Overview of national and world literature on sexual autoidentification is analyzed. Prenatal brain development abnormalities leading to transsexualism are discussed. Results of own cytogenetic analysis, ооgenesis and spermatоgenesis examination are reported.

  17. Mechanisms that determine the internal environment of the developing brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liddelow, Shane A; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Ek, C Joakim;

    2013-01-01

    studies. Results reveal that most genes associated with intercellular junctions are expressed at similar levels at both ages. In total, 32 molecules known to be associated with brain barrier interfaces were identified. Nine claudins showed unaltered expression, while two claudins (6 and 8) were expressed...... addition, a large number of previously unidentified ion channel and transporter genes were identified for the first time in plexus epithelium. These results, in addition to data obtained from electron microscopical and physiological permeability experiments in immature brains, indicate that exchange...... between blood and CSF is mainly transcellular, as well-formed tight junctions restrict movement of small water-soluble molecules from early in development. These data strongly indicate the brain develops within a well-protected internal environment and the exchange between the blood, brain and CSF is...

  18. Effects of physician-based emergency medical service dispatch in severe traumatic brain injury on prehospital run time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franschman, G.; Verburg, N.; Brens-Heldens, V.; Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Naalt, J. van der; Peerdeman, S.M.; Valk, J.P.M. van der; Hoogerwerf, N.; Greuters, S.; Schober, P.; Vos, P.E.; Christiaans, H.M.; Boer, C.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prehospital care by physician-based helicopter emergency medical services (P-HEMS) may prolong total prehospital run time. This has raised an issue of debate about the benefits of these services in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We therefore investigated the effects of P-HEMS dispatch o

  19. Effects of physician-based emergency medical service dispatch in severe traumatic brain injury on prehospital run time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franschman, G.; Verburg, N.; Brens-Heldens, V.; Andriessen, T. M. J. C.; Van der Naalt, J.; Peerdeman, S. M.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Greuters, S.; Schober, P.; Vos, P. E.; Christiaans, H. M. T.; Boer, C.; Valk, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Prehospital care by physician-based helicopter emergency medical services (P-HEMS) may prolong total prehospital run time. This has raised an issue of debate about the benefits of these services in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We therefore investigated the effects of P-HEMS dispatch o

  20. Mechanisms and functions of brain and behavioural asymmetries

    OpenAIRE

    Tommasi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    For almost a century the field of brain and behavioural asymmetries has been dominated by studies on humans, resting on the evidence that the anatomical structures underlying language functions are asymmetrical, and that human handedness is lateralized at the population level. Today, there is not only evidence of population-level lateralization of brain and behaviour across a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species, but also a growing consensus that the comparative analysis of the envi...

  1. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, L.W.; Prickaerts, J.; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Y. Temel

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and v...

  2. Minimally Complex Exchange Mechanisms: Emergence of Prices, Markets, and Money

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep Dubey; Siddhartha Sahi; Martin Shubik

    2014-01-01

    We consider abstract exchange mechanisms wherein individuals submit "diversified" offers in m commodities, which are then redistributed to them. Our first result is that if the mechanism satisfies certain natural conditions embodying "fairness" and "convenience" then it admits unique prices, in the sense of consistent exchange-rates across commodity pairs ij that equalize the valuation of offers and returns for each individual. We next define certain integers tau_{ij}, pi_{ij}, and k_{i} whic...

  3. The fetal brain sparing response to hypoxia: physiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Dino A

    2016-03-01

    How the fetus withstands an environment of reduced oxygenation during life in the womb has been a vibrant area of research since this field was introduced by Joseph Barcroft, a century ago. Studies spanning five decades have since used the chronically instrumented fetal sheep preparation to investigate the fetal compensatory responses to hypoxia. This defence is contingent on the fetal cardiovascular system, which in late gestation adopts strategies to decrease oxygen consumption and redistribute the cardiac output away from peripheral vascular beds and towards essential circulations, such as those perfusing the brain. The introduction of simultaneous measurement of blood flow in the fetal carotid and femoral circulations by ultrasonic transducers has permitted investigation of the dynamics of the fetal brain sparing response for the first time. Now we know that major components of fetal brain sparing during acute hypoxia are triggered exclusively by a carotid chemoreflex and that they are modified by endocrine agents and the recently discovered vascular oxidant tone. The latter is determined by the interaction between nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. The fetal brain sparing response matures as the fetus approaches term, in association with the prepartum increase in fetal plasma cortisol, and treatment of the preterm fetus with clinically relevant doses of synthetic steroids mimics this maturation. Despite intense interest into how the fetal brain sparing response may be affected by adverse intrauterine conditions, this area of research has been comparatively scant, but it is likely to take centre stage in the near future. PMID:26496004

  4. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic Acid and dihydrokainic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen Honoré;

    2015-01-01

    tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion...... low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug...

  5. Many worlds and the emergence of probability in quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Van Wesep, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The interpretation of the squared norm as probability and the apparent stochastic nature of observation in quantum mechanics are derived from the strong law of large numbers and the algebraic properties of infinite sequences of simultaneous quantum observables. It is argued that this result validates the many-worlds view of quantum reality.

  6. Role of brain CT scan in the diagnosis of patients with minor head injury in trauma emergency center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mousavi Jafarabad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a large burden of hospital admissions is related to minor head trauma and its related imaging studies. One of the challenging issues for emergency physicians is brain computed tomography scan. Sensible use of computed tomography studies could minimize unnecessary radiation exposure and resource use. On the other hand, it can result in delayed or missed early treatment of intracranial injury. The aim of this review is to evaluate and summarize the costs and benefits of using diagnostic measurements in minor head trauma with particular focus on computed tomography scan and the advances and limitations of available guidelines. We studied different issues related to the current approach to minor head trauma in emergency departments. Altogether, it seems using brain computed tomography scan in the setting of emergency is a cost-effective method for the selected patients with minor head injury. However, concerning considerable costs of caring for patients with head injury and high sensitivity of brain computed tomography in terms of minor head injury, it seems reasonable to use brain computed tomography scan for a wider range of patients with minor head injury.

  7. Fluid Mechanics of the Vascular Basement Membrane in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Hui, Jonathan; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter; Carare, Roxana; McLeod, Kenneth; Schaffer, David

    2013-11-01

    Beta-amyloid is a normal product of brain metabolic function and is found within the interstitial fluid of the brain. Failure of the clearance of beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. The vascular basement membrane (VBM) within the walls of cerebral arteries surrounds the spirally arranged smooth muscle cells and represents an essential pathway for removal of beta-amyloid from the brain. This process fails with the stiffening of arterial walls associated with aging. In this study we hypothesize that the deformation of the VBM associated with arterial pulsations drives the interstitial fluid to drain in the direction opposite of the arterial blood flow. This hypothesis is theoretically investigated by modeling the VBM as a thin, coaxial, fluid-filled porous medium surrounding a periodically deforming cylindrical tube. Flow and boundary conditions required to achieve such a backward clearance are derived through a control volume analysis of mass, momentum, and energy.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells: Emerging mechanisms of immunomodulation and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Justin; D; Glenn; Katharine; A; Whartenby

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) are a pleiotropic population of cells that are self-renewing and capable of differentiating into canonical cells of the mesenchyme, including adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. They employ multi-faceted approaches to maintain bone marrow niche homeostasis and promote wound healing during injury. Biomedical research has long sought to exploit their pleiotropic properties as a basis for cell therapy for a variety of diseases and to facilitate hematopoietic stem cell establishment and stromal reconstruction in bone marrow transplantation. Early results demonstrated their usage as safe, and there was little host response to these cells. The discovery of their immunosuppressive functions ushered in a new interest in MSCs as a promising therapeutic tool to suppress inflammation and down-regulate pathogenic immune responses in graft-versus-host and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, autoimmune diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. MSCs produce a large number of soluble and membrane-bound factors, some of which inhibit immune responses. However, the full range of MSC-mediated immune-modulation remains incompletely understood, as emerging reports also reveal that MSCs can adopt an immunogenic phenotype, stimulate immune cells, and yield seemingly contradictory results in experimental animal models of inflammatory disease. The present review describes the large body of literature that has been accumulated on the fascinating biology of MSCs and their complex effects on immune responses.

  9. The emerging threat of superwarfarins: history, detection, mechanisms, and countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Akpa, Belinda S; Ayee, Manuela A; Boullerne, Anne I; Braun, David; Brodsky, Sergey V; Gidalevitz, David; Hauck, Zane; Kalinin, Sergey; Kowal, Kathy; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Lis, Kinga; Marangoni, Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W; Rubinstein, Israel; van Breemen, Richard; Ware, Kyle; Weinberg, Guy

    2016-06-01

    Superwarfarins were developed following the emergence of warfarin resistance in rodents. Compared to warfarin, superwarfarins have much longer half-lives and stronger affinity to vitamin K epoxide reductase and therefore can cause death in warfarin-resistant rodents. By the mid-1970s, the superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum were the most widely used rodenticides throughout the world. Unfortunately, increased use was accompanied by a rise in accidental poisonings, reaching >16,000 per year in the United States. Risk of exposure has become a concern since large quantities, up to hundreds of kilograms of rodent bait, are applied by aerial dispersion over regions with rodent infestations. Reports of intentional use of superwarfarins in civilian and military scenarios raise the specter of larger incidents or mass casualties. Unlike warfarin overdose, for which 1-2 days of treatment with vitamin K is effective, treatment of superwarfarin poisoning with vitamin K is limited by extremely high cost and can require daily treatment for a year or longer. Furthermore, superwarfarins have actions that are independent of their anticoagulant effects, including both vitamin K-dependent and -independent effects, which are not mitigated by vitamin K therapy. In this review, we summarize superwarfarin development, biology and pathophysiology, their threat as weapons, and possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:27244102

  10. Evolving the Language Ready Brain and the Social Mechanisms that Support Language

    OpenAIRE

    Arbib, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    We first review the Mirror-System Hypothesis on the evolution of the language-ready brain, stressing the important role of imitation and protosign in providing the scaffolding for protospeech. We then assess the role of social interaction and non-specific knowledge of language in the emergence of new sign languages in deaf communities (focusing on Nicaraguan Sign Language).

  11. Multisensory brain mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Blanke, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has linked bodily self-consciousness to the processing and integration of multisensory bodily signals in temporoparietal, premotor, posterior parietal and extrastriate cortices. Studies in which subjects receive ambiguous multisensory information about the location and appearance of their own body have shown that these brain areas reflect the conscious experience of identifying with the body (self-identification (also known as body-ownership)), the experience of where 'I' am i...

  12. BRAIN MECHANISMS FOR REPRESENTING WHAT ANOTHER PERSON SEES

    OpenAIRE

    Heyda, Ratha D.; Green, Steven R.; Vander Wyk, Brent C.; James P Morris; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a naturalistic joint attention scenario to evaluate two, alternative hypotheses concerning the social brain. The first, Content Specific Attribution hypothesis, was that core regions previously identified as being involved in social cognition also participate in representing the contents of another mind. The second, Dual Role hypothesis, was that extrastriate, category-specific visual regions respond to a visible stimulus of a specific ...

  13. Mechanisms of gender-linked ischemic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mingyue; Dziennis, Suzan; Hurn, Patricia D.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2009-01-01

    Biological sex is an important determinant of stroke risk and outcome. Women are protected from cerebrovascular disease relative to men, an observation commonly attributed to the protective effect of female sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone. However, sex differences in brain injury persist well beyond the menopause and can be found in the pediatric population, suggesting that the effects of reproductive steroids may not completely explain sexual dimorphism in stroke. We review recent ad...

  14. The mechanical activation of mTOR signaling: an emerging role for late endosome/lysosomal targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Brittany L; Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-02-01

    It is well recognized that mechanical signals play a critical role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass is essential for mobility, disease prevention and quality of life. Furthermore, over the last 15 years it has become established that signaling through a protein kinase called the mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for mechanically-induced changes in protein synthesis and muscle mass, however, the mechanism(s) via which mechanical stimuli regulate mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nonetheless, advancements are being made, and an emerging body of evidence suggests that the late endosome/lysosomal (LEL) system might play a key role in this process. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize this body of evidence. Specifically, we will first explain why the Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are considered to be direct activators of mTOR signaling. We will then describe the process of endocytosis and its involvement in the formation of LEL structures, as well as the evidence which indicates that mTOR and its direct activators (Rheb and PA) are all enriched at the LEL. Finally, we will summarize the evidence that has implicated the LEL in the regulation of mTOR by various growth regulatory inputs such as amino acids, growth factors and mechanical stimuli. PMID:24162376

  15. A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Amy; 10.1016/j.mehy.2008.08.015

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. ...

  16. Pre-hospital severe traumatic brain injury – comparison of outcome in paramedic versus physician staffed emergency medical services

    OpenAIRE

    Pakkanen, Toni; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti; Huhtala, Heini; Silfvast, Tom; Virta, Janne; Randell, Tarja; Yli-Hankala, Arvi

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and permanent disability. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel are often the first healthcare providers attending patients with TBI. The level of available care varies, which may have an impact on the patient’s outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate mortality and neurological outcome of TBI patients in two regions with differently structured EMS systems. Methods A 6-year period (2005 – 2010) observatio...

  17. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder: effects upon cells and circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Sarah K; Eckhardt, Christine A; Sheth, Sameer A; Eskandar, Emad N

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a safe, effective, and reversible treatment for a number of movement disorders. This has prompted investigation of its use for other applications including psychiatric disorders. In recent years, DBS has been introduced for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), which is characterized by recurrent unwanted thoughts or ideas (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors or mental acts performed in order to relieve these obsessions (compulsions). Abnormal activity in cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), ventral striatum, and mediodorsal (MD) thalamus has been implicated in OCD. To this end a number of DBS targets including the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC), ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS), ventral caudate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus (STN), and nucleus accumbens (NAc) have been investigated for the treatment of OCD. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in movement disorders, the mechanism of DBS is not fully understood, especially as it relates to psychiatric disorders. While initially thought to create a functional lesion akin to ablative procedures, it is increasingly clear that DBS may induce clinical benefit through activation of axonal fibers spanning the CSTC circuits, alteration of oscillatory activity within this network, and/or release of critical neurotransmitters. In this article we review how the use of DBS for OCD informs our understanding of both the mechanisms of DBS and the circuitry of OCD. We review the literature on DBS for OCD and discuss potential mechanisms of action at the neuronal level as well as the broader circuit level. PMID:22712007

  18. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder: effects upon cells and circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kathleen Bourne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS has emerged as a safe, effective, and reversible treatment for a number of movement disorders. This has prompted investigation of its use for other applications including psychiatric disorders. In recent years, DBS has been introduced for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, which is characterized by recurrent unwanted thoughts or ideas (obsessions and repetitive behaviors or mental acts performed in order to relieve these obsessions (compulsions. Abnormal activity in cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC circuits including the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and mediodorsal thalamus has been implicated in OCD. To this end a number of DBS targets including the anterior limb of the internal capsule, ventral capsule/ventral striatum, ventral caudate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and the inferior thalamic peduncle have been investigated for the treatment of OCD. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in movement disorders, the mechanism of DBS is not fully understood, especially as it relates to psychiatric disorders. While initially thought to create a functional lesion akin to ablative procedures, it is increasingly clear that DBS may induce clinical benefit through activation of axonal fibers spanning the CSTC circuits, alteration of oscillatory activity within this network, and/or release of critical neurotransmitters. In this article we review how the use of DBS for OCD informs our understanding of both the mechanisms of DBS and the circuitry of OCD. We review the literature on DBS for OCD and discuss potential mechanisms of action at the neuronal level as well as the broader circuit level.

  19. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  20. Defective counterregulation and hypoglycemia unawareness in diabetes: Mechanisms and emerging treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Reno, Candace M.; Litvin, Marina; Clark, Amy L.; Fisher, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    For people with diabetes, hypoglycemia remains the limiting factor in achieving glycemic control. This article reviews recent advances in how the brain senses and responds to hypoglycemia. Novel mechanisms by which people with insulin treated diabetes develop hypoglycemia unawareness and impaired counterregulatory responses are outlined. Prevention strategies for reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia are discussed

  1. Common resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shawniqua; Conte, Mary; Goldfine, Andrew; Noirhomme, Quentin; Gosseries, Olivia; Thonnard, Marie; Beattie, Bradley; Hersh, Jennifer; Katz, Douglas; Victor, Jonathan; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest Some individuals who experience severe brain damage are left with disorders of consciousness. While they can appear to be awake, these individuals lack awareness of their surroundings and cannot respond to events going on around them. Few treatments are available, but a minority of patients show striking improvements in speech, alertness and movement in response to the sleeping pill zolpidem. Although the idea of a sleeping pill increasing consciousness is paradoxical, it is poss...

  2. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-30

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts, with debilitating, costly, and long-lasting effects. Although mechanisms by which head impacts cause TBI have been well-researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient skull flexure to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even without a head impact. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for injury diagnosis and armor design.

  3. Propagation of damage in brain tissue: coupling the mechanics of oedema and oxygen delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Georgina E; Vella, Dominic; Waters, Sarah L; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Brain tissue swelling, or oedema, is a dangerous consequence of traumatic brain injury and stroke. In particular, a locally swollen region can cause the injury to propagate further through the brain: swelling causes mechanical compression of the vasculature in the surrounding tissue and so can cut off that tissue's oxygen supply. We use a triphasic mathematical model to investigate this propagation, and couple tissue mechanics with oxygen delivery. Starting from a fully coupled, finite elasticity, model, we show that simplifications can be made that allow us to express the volume of the propagating region of damage analytically in terms of key parameters. Our results show that performing a craniectomy, to alleviate pressure in the brain and allow the tissue to swell outwards, reduces the propagation of damage; this finding agrees with experimental observations. PMID:25822263

  4. Brain-to-brain coupling : a mechanism for creating and sharing a social world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasson, Uri; Ghazanfar, Asif A.; Galantucci, Bruno; Garrod, Simon; Keysers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Cognition materializes in an interpersonal space. The emergence of complex behaviors requires the coordination of actions among individuals according to a shared set of rules. Despite the central role of other individuals in shaping one's mind, most cognitive studies focus on processes that occur wi

  5. Is the World Local or Nonlocal? Towards an Emergent Quantum Mechanics in the 21st Century

    CERN Document Server

    Walleczek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    What defines an emergent quantum mechanics (EmQM)? Can new insight be advanced into the nature of quantum nonlocality by seeking new links between quantum and emergent phenomena as described by self-organization, complexity, or emergence theory? Could the development of a future EmQM lead to a unified, relational image of the cosmos? One key motivation for adopting the concept of emergence in relation to quantum theory concerns the persistent failure in standard physics to unify the two pillars in the foundations of physics: quantum theory and general relativity theory (GRT). The total contradiction in the foundational, metaphysical assumptions that define orthodox quantum theory versus GRT might render inter-theoretic unification impossible. On the one hand, indeterminism and non-causality define orthodox quantum mechanics, and, on the other hand, GRT is governed by causality and determinism. How could these two metaphysically-contradictory theories ever be reconciled? The present work argues that metaphysic...

  6. Mechanisms of Brain Aging Regulation by Insulin: Implications for Neurodegeneration in Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, Artur F.; Rieder, Carlos M.; Rizzi, Liara; Chaves, Márcia; Roriz-Cruz, Matheus

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and IGF seem to be important players in modulating brain aging. Neurons share more similarities with islet cells than any other human cell type. Insulin and insulin receptors are diffusely found in the brain, especially so in the hippocampus. Caloric restriction decreases insulin resistance, and it is the only proven mechanism to expand lifespan. Conversely, insulin resistance increases with age, obesity, and sedentarism, all of which have been shown to be risk factors for late-onset ...

  7. Multisensory brain mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Olaf

    2012-08-01

    Recent research has linked bodily self-consciousness to the processing and integration of multisensory bodily signals in temporoparietal, premotor, posterior parietal and extrastriate cortices. Studies in which subjects receive ambiguous multisensory information about the location and appearance of their own body have shown that these brain areas reflect the conscious experience of identifying with the body (self-identification (also known as body-ownership)), the experience of where 'I' am in space (self-location) and the experience of the position from where 'I' perceive the world (first-person perspective). Along with phenomena of altered states of self-consciousness in neurological patients and electrophysiological data from non-human primates, these findings may form the basis for a neurobiological model of bodily self-consciousness. PMID:22805909

  8. Brain Mechanisms for Making, Breaking, and Changing Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Daniel S.

    Individuals differ widely, and the same person varies over time, in their tendency to seek maximum information versus their tendency to follow the simplest heuristics. Neuroimaging studies suggest which brain regions might mediate the balance between knowledge maximization and heuristic simplification. The amygdala is more activated in individuals who use primitive heuristics, whereas two areas of the frontal lobes are more activated in individuals with a strong knowledge drive: one area involved in detecting risk or conflict, and another involved in choosing task-appropriate responses. Both of these motivations have engineering uses. There is benefit to understanding a situation at a high enough level to respond in a flexible manner when the context is complex and time allows detailed consideration. Yet simplifying heuristics can yield benefits when the context is routine or when time is limited.

  9. Unraveling the fundamental molecular mechanisms of morphological and cognitive defects in the irradiated brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyde, Joris; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2007-02-01

    Prenatal radiation exposure may have serious consequences for normal brain development. Results of epidemiological studies clearly pointed towards an increased risk of mental retardation in children of the surviving women of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombing when in utero exposure had occurred between weeks 8 and 15 of pregnancy or, at a lower extend between weeks 15 and 25. The high sensitivity of the developing brain, in comparison to the adult brain is related to its higher number of non-differentiated, dividing neural precursor cells. Exposure of the developing brain to ionizing radiation can lead to three main outcomes in the developing brain, depending on the radiation dose and the elapsed period after irradiation. A first event occurs early after irradiation and triggers disturbances in cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and cell death. A second event involves the generation of morphological abnormalities in the developing brain, if the radiation dose is sufficient. A third event involves cognitive dysfunctions that are a direct consequence from a disturbance in regional brain formation. The latter results from exposure to low doses and is usually only observed in the later period of development. In order to understand the mechanisms of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunctions, it is important to track back the underlying changes in specific molecular pathways. In this review, we present the possible relationships within and between molecular pathways potentially involved in cognitive dysfunctions induced by ionizing radiation in the developing brain. PMID:17188364

  10. Temperament and Attention as Core Mechanisms in the Early Emergence of Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Taber-Thomas, Bradley; Auday, Eran; Morales, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is a pervasive, impairing, and early appearing form of psychopathology. Even when anxiety remits, children remain at a two- to threefold increased risk for the later emergence of a mood disorder. Therefore, it is imperative to identify and examine underlying mechanisms that may shape early emerging patterns of behavior that are associated with anxiety. One of the strongest and first visible risk factors is childhood temperament. In particular, children who are behaviorally inhibited o...

  11. Radiology of Fractures in Intoxicated Emergency Department Patients: Locations, Mechanisms, Presentation, and Initial Interpretation Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    MORITA, Yuka; Nozaki, Taiki; Starkey, Jay; Okajima, Yuka; Ohde, Sachiko; Matsusako, Masaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of alcohol intoxication to time-to-presentation following injury, fracture type, mechanism of injury leading to fracture, and initial diagnostic radiology interpretation performance of emergency physicians versus diagnostic radiologists in patients who present to the emergency department (ED) and are subsequently diagnosed with fracture. Medical records of 1286 patients who presented to the ED and were diagnosed with fract...

  12. Management of critically ill patients receiving noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Louise RoseLawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation frequently present to emergency departments, and may remain for prolonged periods due to constrained critical care services. Emergency clinicians often do not receive the same education on management of mechanical ventilation or have similar exposure to these patients as do their critical care colleagues. The aim of this review wa...

  13. Management of critically ill patients receiving noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation frequently present to emergency departments, and may remain for prolonged periods due to constrained critical care services. Emergency clinicians often do not receive the same education on management of mechanical ventilation or have similar exposure to these patients as do their critical care colleagues. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence on management of patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation in the ...

  14. [Water and electrolytes disorders after brain injury: mechanism and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audibert, G; Hoche, J; Baumann, A; Mertes, P-M

    2012-06-01

    Electrolyte disturbances are frequent after brain injuries, especially dysnatremia and dyskalemia. In neurological patients, usual clinical signs of hyponatremia are frequently confounded with clinical signs of the underlying disease. Natremia absolute value is less important than speed of onset of the trouble. Most often, hyponatremia is associated with hypotonicity and intracellular hyperhydration, which may exacerbate a cerebral edema. Distinction between inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) and cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) may be difficult and is mainly based on assessment of patient's volemia, SIADH being associated with normal or hypervolemia and CSWS with hypovolemia. After subarachnoid haemorrhage, the most common disorder is CSWS. In this case, fluid restriction is strictly prohibited. Treatment of CSWS needs to compensate for the natriuresis and may justify the use of mineralocorticoid. It is important to avoid excessively rapid correction of hypernatremia, with a maximal speed of correction of 0.5 m mol/l/h. Serum sodium monitoring should be mandatory for the first ten postoperative days after pituitary adenoma surgery. Therapeutic barbiturate may be responsible for life threatening dyskalemia. PMID:22683162

  15. Reconsolidation of human memory: brain mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Nader, Karim; Pruessner, Jens C

    2014-08-15

    The processes of memory formation and storage are complex and highly dynamic. Once memories are consolidated, they are not necessarily fixed but can be changed long after storage. In particular, seemingly stable memories may re-enter an unstable state when they are retrieved, from which they must be re-stabilized during a process known as reconsolidation. During reconsolidation, memories are susceptible to modifications again, thus providing an opportunity to update seemingly stable memories. While initial demonstrations of memory reconsolidation came mainly from animal studies, evidence for reconsolidation in humans is now accumulating as well. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of human memory reconsolidation. After a summary of findings on the reconsolidation of human fear and episodic memory, we focus particularly on recent neuroimaging data that provide first insights into how reconsolidation processes are implemented in the human brain. Finally, we discuss the implications of memory modifications during reconsolidation for the treatment of mental disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and drug addiction. PMID:24755493

  16. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder: effects upon cells and circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Bourne, Sarah K.; Eckhardt, Christine A.; Sheth, Sameer A.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a safe, effective, and reversible treatment for a number of movement disorders. This has prompted investigation of its use for other applications including psychiatric disorders. In recent years, DBS has been introduced for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), which is characterized by recurrent unwanted thoughts or ideas (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors or mental acts performed in order to relieve these obsessions (compulsions...

  17. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder: effects upon cells and circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Kathleen Bourne; Christine Ann Eckhardt; Sheth, Sameer A.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a safe, effective, and reversible treatment for a number of movement disorders. This has prompted investigation of its use for other applications including psychiatric disorders. In recent years, DBS has been introduced for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), which is characterized by recurrent unwanted thoughts or ideas (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors or mental acts performed in order to relieve these obsessions (compulsions...

  18. The Affective Brain : Novel insights into the biological mechanisms of motivation and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Affective neuroscience is a new emerging doctrine in the brain sciences, which studies the neurobiological correlates of motivation and emotion. The research reported in this thesis starts with discussing empirical studies on the lateralized involvement of the prefrontal cortex in affective processing. Next, the involvement of the parietal cortex, the cerebellum and their functional connectivity to the prefrontal cortex in affective processing will be examined. In addition, it will be argued ...

  19. Mechanism Interpretation of the Biological Brain Cooling and Its Inspiration on Bionic Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xue; Jing Liu

    2011-01-01

    The brain is one of the most important organs in a biological body which can only work in a relatively stable temperature range. However, many environmental factors in biosphere would cause cerebral temperature fluctuations. To sustain and regulate the brain temperature, many mechanisms of biological brain cooling have been evolved, including Selective Brain Cooling (SBC), cooling through surface water evaporation, respiration, behavior response and using special anatomical appendages. This article is dedicated to present a summarization and systematic interpretation on brain cooling strategies developed in animals by classifying and comparatively analyzing each typical biological brain cooling mechanism from the perspective of bio-heat transfer. Meanwhile, inspirations from such cooling in nature were proposed for developing advanced bionic engineering technologies especially with two focuses on therapeutic hypothermia and computer chip cooling areas. It is expected that many innovations can be achieved along this way to find out new cooling methodologies for a wide variety of industrial applications which will be highly efficient, energy saving, flexible or even intelligent.

  20. PHILOSOPHY OF MIND; THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL CONTRIBUTION TO THE EMERGING VISION OF MIND-BRAIN INTERACTION.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Ruiz Santos

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion of mind-brain interactions from an emergentism point of view of the Philosophy of Mind, using some of the naturalized theories. Some proposed bridges between mind and brain based on experimental naturalization are neuro-psychoanalysis, mirror neurons, and psychosomatics, among others. Naturalization can be achieved by earching for the link between psychological and biological processes. This biological-based approach can be developed avoiding mp...

  1. A functional architecture of the human brain: Emerging insights from the science of emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Lindquist, Kristen A; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2012-01-01

    The ‘faculty psychology’ approach to the mind, which attempts to explain mental function in terms of categories that reflect modular ‘faculties’, such as emotions, cognitions, and perceptions, has dominated research into the mind and its physical correlates. In this paper, we argue that brain organization does not respect the commonsense categories belonging to the faculty psychology approach. We review recent research from the science of emotion demonstrating that the human brain contains br...

  2. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.05.025

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting warfighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wave may result in brain injury have been proposed - a thoracic mechanism, head acceleration and direct cranial transmission. These mechanisms need not be mutually exclusive. In this study, likely regions of interest for the first two mechanisms based on blast characteristics (positive pulse duration and peak effective overpressure) are developed using available data from blast experiments and related studies, including behind-armor blunt trauma and ballistic pressure wave studies. These related studies are appropriate to in...

  3. How neurons make meaning: brain mechanisms for embodied and abstract-symbolic semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2013-09-01

    How brain structures and neuronal circuits mechanistically underpin symbolic meaning has recently been elucidated by neuroimaging, neuropsychological, and neurocomputational research. Modality-specific 'embodied' mechanisms anchored in sensorimotor systems appear to be relevant, as are 'disembodied' mechanisms in multimodal areas. In this paper, four semantic mechanisms are proposed and spelt out at the level of neuronal circuits: referential semantics, which establishes links between symbols and the objects and actions they are used to speak about; combinatorial semantics, which enables the learning of symbolic meaning from context; emotional-affective semantics, which establishes links between signs and internal states of the body; and abstraction mechanisms for generalizing over a range of instances of semantic meaning. Referential, combinatorial, emotional-affective, and abstract semantics are complementary mechanisms, each necessary for processing meaning in mind and brain. PMID:23932069

  4. The auditory and non-auditory brain areas involved in tinnitus. An emergent property of multiple parallel overlapping subnetworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound source. It is characterized by sensory components such as the perceived loudness, the lateralization, the tinnitus type (pure tone, noise-like) and associated emotional components, such as distress and mood changes. Source localization of quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) data demonstrate the involvement of auditory brain areas as well as several non-auditory brain areas such as the anterior cingulate cortex (dorsal and subgenual), auditory cortex (primary and secondary), dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, supplementary motor area, orbitofrontal cortex (including the inferior frontal gyrus), parahippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus, in different aspects of tinnitus. Explaining these non-auditory brain areas as constituents of separable subnetworks, each reflecting a specific aspect of the tinnitus percept increases the explanatory power of the non-auditory brain areas involvement in tinnitus. Thus, the unified percept of tinnitus can be considered an emergent property of multiple parallel dynamically changing and partially overlapping subnetworks, each with a specific spontaneous oscillatory pattern and functional connectivity signature. PMID:22586375

  5. The auditory and non-auditory brain areas involved in tinnitus. An emergent property of multiple parallel overlapping subnetworks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Vanneste

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound source. It is characterized by sensory components such as the perceived loudness, the lateralization, the tinnitus type (pure tone, noise-like and associated emotional components, such as distress and mood changes. Source localization of qEEG data demonstrate the involvement of auditory brain areas as well as several non-auditory brain areas such as the anterior cingulate cortex (dorsal and subgenual, auditory cortex (primary and secondary, dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, supplementary motor area, orbitofrontal cortex (including the inferior frontal gyrus, parahippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus, in different aspects of tinnitus. Explaining these non-auditory brain areas as constituents of separable subnetworks, each reflecting a specific aspect of the tinnitus percept increases the explanatory power of the non-auditory brain areas involvement in tinnitus. Thus the unified percept of tinnitus can be considered an emergent property of multiple parallel dynamically changing and partially overlapping subnetworks, each with a specific spontaneous oscillatory pattern and functional connectivity signature.

  6. Brain mechanisms underlying sensation-seeking in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Norbury, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensation-seeking is a personality trait concerned with motivation for intense and unusual sensory experiences, that has been identified as risk factor for a variety of psychopathologies with high social cost; in particular gambling and substance addictions. It has previously proved difficult to tease out neural mechanisms underlying sensation-seeking in humans, due to a lack of cognitive-behavioural paradigms probing sensation-seeking-like behaviour in the lab. The first aim of this thesis w...

  7. Brain Mechanisms Supporting Modulation of Pain by Mindfulness Meditation

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidan, F.; Martucci, K.T.; Kraft, R.A.; Gordon, N. S.; McHaffie, J.G.; Coghill, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    The subjective experience of one’s environment is constructed by interactions among sensory, cognitive, and affective processes. For centuries, meditation has been thought to influence such processes by enabling a non-evaluative representation of sensory events. To better understand how meditation influences the sensory experience, we employed arterial spin labeling (ASL) functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural mechanisms by which mindfulness meditation influences pain in h...

  8. Is the World Local or Nonlocal? Towards an Emergent Quantum Mechanics in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walleczek, Jan; Grössing, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    What defines an emergent quantum mechanics (EmQM)? Can new insight be advanced into the nature of quantum nonlocality by seeking new links between quantum and emergent phenomena as described by self-organization, complexity, or emergence theory? Could the development of a future EmQM lead to a unified, relational image of the cosmos? One key motivation for adopting the concept of emergence in relation to quantum theory concerns the persistent failure in standard physics to unify the two pillars in the foundations of physics: quantum theory and general relativity theory (GRT). The total contradiction in the foundational, metaphysical assumptions that define orthodox quantum theory versus GRT might render inter-theoretic unification impossible. On the one hand, indeterminism and non-causality define orthodox quantum mechanics, and, on the other hand, GRT is governed by causality and determinism. How could these two metaphysically-contradictory theories ever be reconciled? The present work argues that metaphysical contradiction necessarily implies physical contradiction. The contradictions are essentially responsible also for the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. A common foundation may be needed for overcoming the contradictions between the two foundational theories. The concept of emergence, and the development of an EmQM, might help advance a common foundation - physical and metaphysical - as required for successfull inter-theory unification.

  9. Knowing When to Stop: The Brain Mechanisms of Chasing Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell-Meiklejohn, Daniel; Woolrich, Mark; Passingham, Dick;

    2008-01-01

    adult participants decided to chase losses or decided to quit gambling to prevent further losses.ResultsChasing losses was associated with increased activity in cortical areas linked to incentive-motivation and an expectation of reward. By contrast, quitting was associated with decreased activity in......-chasing behavior in pathological gambling might involve a failure to appropriately balance activity within neural systems coding conflicting motivational states. Similar mechanisms might underlie the loss-of-control over appetitive behaviors in other impulse control disorders....

  10. Set up national emergency-response mechanism to scientifically cope with natural disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The establishment of a national emergency management mechanism will enable China to promptly respond to and scientifically cope with natural disasters. This is a lesson we draw from the 2008 winter storms," notes a panel of the CAS Academic Divisions, China's top advisory body in science and technology in a recent proposal forwarded to State policy-makers.

  11. Cognitive Interventions in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases: Emerging Mechanisms and Role of Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, Prashanthi; Fields, Julie; Peter, Jessica; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review There has been recent debate about the lack of compelling scientific evidence on the efficacy of cognitive interventions. The goal of this paper is to review the current state of cognitive interventions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD), present emerging mechanisms, and discuss the role of imaging in designing effective intervention strategies. Recent findings Cognitive interventions appear to be promising in AD and PD. Though feasibility has been shown in mild cognitive impairment, early AD, mild to moderate PD; studies to investigate long term efficacy and mechanisms underlying these interventions are still needed. Summary There is a need to conduct scientifically rigorous studies to validate the efficacy of cognitive intervention trials. Future studies will greatly benefit from including longitudinal imaging in their study design. Imaging can be used to demonstrate the efficacy and mechanisms by measuring brain changes over the intervention period. Imaging can also be used to determine biological and disease-related factors that may influence the treatment response i.e. the effect modifiers. Consideration of effect modifiers will allow us to measure the treatment response in biomarkers and cognition with greater sensitivity and also aid in designing trials that will lead to better patient outcomes. PMID:27213773

  12. Emotional attention for erotic stimuli: Cognitive and brain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennwald, Vanessa; Pool, Eva; Brosch, Tobias; Delplanque, Sylvain; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Sander, David

    2016-06-01

    It has long been posited that among emotional stimuli, only negative threatening information modulates early shifts of attention. However, in the last few decades there has been an increase in research showing that attention is also involuntarily oriented toward positive rewarding stimuli such as babies, food, and erotic information. Because reproduction-related stimuli have some of the largest effects among positive stimuli on emotional attention, the present work reviews recent literature and proposes that the cognitive and cerebral mechanisms underlying the involuntarily attentional orientation toward threat-related information are also sensitive to erotic information. More specifically, the recent research suggests that both types of information involuntarily orient attention due to their concern relevance and that the amygdala plays an important role in detecting concern-relevant stimuli, thereby enhancing perceptual processing and influencing emotional attentional processes. PMID:26179894

  13. Atypical Brain Mechanisms of Prediction According to Uncertainty in Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thillay, Alix; Lemaire, Mathieu; Roux, Sylvie; Houy-Durand, Emmanuelle; Barthélémy, Catherine; Knight, Robert T; Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to change is often reported in autism and may arise from an inability to predict events in uncertain contexts. Using EEG recorded in 12 adults with autism and age-matched controls performing a visual target detection task, we characterized the influence of a certain context (targets preceded by a predictive sequence of three distinct stimuli) or an uncertain context (random targets) on behavior and electrophysiological markers of predictive processing. During an uncertain context, adults with autism were faster than controls to detect targets. They also had an enhancement in CNV amplitude preceding all random stimuli-indexing enhanced preparatory mechanisms, and an earlier N2 to targets-reflecting faster information processing-compared to controls. During a certain context, both controls and adults with autism presented an increase in P3 amplitude to predictive stimuli-indexing information encoding of the predictive sequence, an enhancement in CNV amplitude preceding predictable targets-corresponding to the deployment of preparatory mechanisms, and an earlier P3 to predictable targets-reflecting efficient prediction building and implementation. These results suggest an efficient extraction of predictive information to generate predictions in both controls and adults with autism during a certain context. However, adults with autism displayed a failure to decrease mu power during motor preparation accompanied by a reduced benefit in reaction times to predictable targets. The data reveal that patients with autism over-anticipate stimuli occurring in an uncertain context, in accord with their sense of being overwhelmed by incoming information. These results suggest that adults with autism cannot flexibly modulate cortical activity according to changing levels of uncertainty. PMID:27458337

  14. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A New Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, William C; Blackman, Eric G

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become the signature injury of current military conflicts. The debilitating effects of TBI on society are long-lasting and costly. Although the mechanisms by which impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. Various mechanisms, including impacts caused by the blast, have been investigated, but blast-induced deformation of the skull has been neglected. Through the use of hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient flexure of the skull to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even if no impact occurs. This mechanism has implications for the diagnosis of TBI in soldiers and the design of protective equipment such as helmets.

  15. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in traumatic brain injury: an emerging therapeutic target?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hui-jie; JIANG Rong-cai; LIU Li; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause ofmortality and morbidity in the world. Recent clinical investigations and basic researches suggest that strategies to improve angiogenesis following TBI may provide promising opportunities to improve clinical outcomes and brain functional recovery. More and more evidences show that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which have been identified in the peripheral blood, may play an important role in the pathologic and physiological angiogenesis in adults. Moreover, impressive data demonstrate that EPCs are mobilized from bone marrow to blood circulation in response to traumatic or inflammatory stimulations.In this review, we discussed the role of EPCs in the repair of brain injury and the possible therapeutic implication for functional recovery of TBl in the future.

  16. Action and Language Mechanisms in the Brain: Data, Models and Neuroinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Arbib, Michael A.; Bonaiuto, James J.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Kemmerer, David; MacWhinney, Brian; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Oztop, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    We assess the challenges of studying action and language mechanisms in the brain, both singly and in relation to each other to provide a novel perspective on neuroinformatics, integrating the development of databases for encoding – separately or together – neurocomputational models and empirical data that serve systems and cognitive neuroscience.

  17. Action and Language Mechanisms in the Brain: Data, Models and Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbib, Michael A.; Bonaiuto, James J.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina;

    2014-01-01

    We assess the challenges of studying action and language mechanisms in the brain, both singly and in relation to each other to provide a novel perspective on neuroinformatics, integrating the development of databases for encoding - separately or together - neurocomputational models and empirical...

  18. Action and language mechanisms in the brain: data, models and neuroinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A; Bonaiuto, James J; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Kemmerer, David; MacWhinney, Brian; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Oztop, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    We assess the challenges of studying action and language mechanisms in the brain, both singly and in relation to each other to provide a novel perspective on neuroinformatics, integrating the development of databases for encoding – separately or together – neurocomputational models and empirical data that serve systems and cognitive neuroscience. PMID:24234916

  19. Mindfulness meditation-related pain relief: Evidence for unique brain mechanisms in the regulation of pain

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidan, F.; Grant, J.A.; Brown, C. A.; McHaffie, J.G.; Coghill, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    The cognitive modulation of pain is influenced by a number of factors ranging from attention, beliefs, conditioning, expectations, mood, and the regulation of emotional responses to noxious sensory events. Recently, mindfulness meditation has been found attenuate pain through some of these mechanisms including enhanced cognitive and emotional control, as well as altering the contextual evaluation of sensory events. This review discusses the brain mechanisms involved in mindfulness meditation-...

  20. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting warfighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wav...

  1. Encoding of mechanical nociception differs in the adult and infant brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Verriotis, Madeleine; Williams, Gemma; Lee, Amy; Meek, Judith; Olhede, Sofia; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Newborn human infants display robust pain behaviour and specific cortical activity following noxious skin stimulation, but it is not known whether brain processing of nociceptive information differs in infants and adults. Imaging studies have emphasised the overlap between infant and adult brain connectome architecture, but electrophysiological analysis of infant brain nociceptive networks can provide further understanding of the functional postnatal development of pain perception. Here we hypothesise that the human infant brain encodes noxious information with different neuronal patterns compared to adults. To test this we compared EEG responses to the same time-locked noxious skin lance in infants aged 0-19 days (n = 18, clinically required) and adults aged 23-48 years (n = 21). Time-frequency analysis revealed that while some features of adult nociceptive network activity are present in infants at longer latencies, including beta-gamma oscillations, infants display a distinct, long latency, noxious evoked 18-fold energy increase in the fast delta band (2-4 Hz) that is absent in adults. The differences in activity between infants and adults have a widespread topographic distribution across the brain. These data support our hypothesis and indicate important postnatal changes in the encoding of mechanical pain in the human brain. PMID:27345331

  2. The Third Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: A Review of Emerging Issues and Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    P. Justin eRossi; Aysegul eGunduz; Jack eJudy; Linda eWilson; Andre eMachado; James J Giordano; W. Jeff eElias; Alterman, Ron L.; Rossi, Marvin A.; Butson, Christopher L.; Fox, Michael D.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Nader ePouratian; Swann, Nicole C.; Coralie ede Hemptinne

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. Significant innovations of the past year are emphasized; these advances were presented at the 3rd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank. The Think Tank’s contributors represent a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers, and ...

  3. Windows on the brain: the emerging role of atlases and databases in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, David C.; VanEssen, D. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Brain atlases and associated databases have great potential as gateways for navigating, accessing, and visualizing a wide range of neuroscientific data. Recent progress towards realizing this potential includes the establishment of probabilistic atlases, surface-based atlases and associated databases, combined with improvements in visualization capabilities and internet access.

  4. Infants' Emerging Sensitivity to Emotional Body Expressions: Insights from Asymmetrical Frontal Brain Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missana, Manuela; Grossmann, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive responding to others' emotional body expressions is an essential social skill in humans. Using event-related brain potentials, it has recently been shown that the ability to discriminate between emotional body expressions develops between 4 and 8 months of age. However, it is not clear whether the perception of emotional body…

  5. Emergence of cognitive deficits after mild traumatic brain injury due to hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, David J; Furones, Concepcion; Atkins, Coleen M; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2015-01-01

    Mild elevations in core temperature can occur in individuals involved in strenuous activities that are risky for potentially sustaining a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion. Recently, we have discovered that mild elevations in brain temperature can significantly aggravate the histopathological consequences of mTBI. However, whether this exacerbation of brain pathology translates into behavioral deficits is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the behavioral consequences of elevating brain temperature to mildly hyperthermic levels prior to mTBI. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats underwent mild fluid-percussion brain injury or sham surgery while normothermic (37 °C) or hyperthermic (39 °C) and were allowed to recover for 7 days. Animals were then assessed for cognition using the water maze and cue and contextual fear conditioning. We found that mTBI alone at normothermia had no effect on long-term cognitive measures whereas mTBI animals that were hyperthermic for 15 min prior to and for 4h after brain injury were significantly impaired on long-term retention for both the water maze and fear conditioning. In contrast, hyperthermic mTBI animals cooled within 15 min to normothermia demonstrated no significant long-term cognitive deficits. Mild TBI irrespective of temperature manipulations resulted in significant short-term working memory deficits. Cortical atrophy and contusions were detected in all mTBI treatment groups and contusion volume was significantly less in hyperthermic mTBI animals that were cooled as compared to hyperthermic mTBI animals that remained hyperthermic. These results indicate that brain temperature is an important variable for mTBI outcome and that mildly elevated temperatures at the time of injury result in persistent cognitive deficits. Importantly, cooling to normothermia after mTBI prevents the development of long-term cognitive deficits caused by hyperthermia. Reducing temperature to normothermic levels soon after mTBI represents

  6. Brain-Gut Interactions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mechanisms of Anorexia in Animal Models of Experimental Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weingarten, Harvey P

    1996-01-01

    Physiological processes within the bowel are influenced constantly by signals from other organs, primarily the brain. The mechanisms by which inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract results in anorexia are unknown. Understanding how the inflammation-related signals in the periphery are communicated to the central nervous system and activate cytokine production in the brain remains an enormous challenge. Elucidation of these gut-brain communication mechanisms is essential to the development...

  7. Transport and regulation mechanism of the colloidal gold liposomes in the brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lipeng; CHANG Yanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Blood-brain barrier is the key barrier of brain in the innate immune. It can prevent the harmful substances from the blood into the brain. In order to keep the brain in a relatively stable environment and maintain the normal function of the nervous system, it can also pump harmful substances or excess substances outside the brain selectively. Among them, brain microvascular endothelial cell tissue is a key part in the blood-brain barrier's function. The number of the patients with central nervous system ( CNS) diseases increased year by year. The therapeutic drug is usually inhibited by the blood-brain barrier and is difficult to work. Therefore, how to modify the drug and to make it easier to cross the blood brain barrier is the key point to cure CNS. At present, more than 95% research focus only on how nano drugs can enter the cell, the way and efficiency to enter the cell and the research of effect of nano drug etc. For the process of drug carrier in endocytosis, intracellular transport and release and regulation of research are rarely reported. Clathrin and P-glycoprotein are related protein in endo-cytosis and exocytosis with nano drug. Clathrin is located on the plasma membrane. It participates in endocytosis of some nutrients, and maybe the entry into the cell of some drugs. P-glycoprotein is located in the membrane of cer-ebral capillary endothelial cells. It can efflux drugs relying on ATP. Although there is a certain understanding of the cell in the inner swallow and efflux. But the process of the liposome drug is not clear. To solve the above prob-lems, using colloidal gold liposome nano materials to trace liposome's transport and regulation mechanism in brain microvascular endothelial cells, and study endocytosis, release, distribution and regulation mechanism of nano lipo-somes in brain microvascular. The solution of this problem can guide to construct reasonable drug carrier, and look forward to clarifing the molecular basis and mechanism of

  8. Skull flexure from blast waves: a mechanism for brain injury with implications for helmet design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-14

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts. The debilitating effects of TBI are long-lasting and costly. Although the mechanisms by which impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. Various possibilities have been investigated, but blast-induced deformation of the skull has been neglected. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that nonlethal blasts can induce sufficient flexure of the skull to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even if no impact occurs. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for the diagnosis of soldiers and the design of protective equipment such as helmets.

  9. Emerging role of functional brain MRI in low-grade glioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friismose, Ancuta; Traise, Peter; Markovic, Ljubo;

    Learning objectives 1. To describe the use of functional MRI (fMRI) in cranial surgery planning for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGG). 2. To show the increasing importance of fMRI in the clinical setting. Background LGG include brain tumors classified by the World Health Organization as grade I...... and II. LGG typically affect younger, otherwise healthy individuals. Whereas previously the preferred management strategy of LGG was one of watchful expectation, there is now evidence supporting radical surgery as a means of preventing malignant transformation and ensuring precise tumor grading. FMRI...... can be used to map eloquent cortex areas, thus minimizing postoperative deficits and improving surgical performance. Findings and procedure details Patients diagnosed with low-grade gliomas located in eloquent brain areas undergo fMRI prior to surgery. The exams are performed on a 3T MR system...

  10. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    R, Namas; A, Ghuma; L, Hermus; R, Zamora; DO Okonkwo; TR, Billiar; Y, Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and rege...

  11. Emerging role of brain metastases in the prognosis of breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hambrecht A; Jandial R; Neman J

    2011-01-01

    Amanda Hambrecht1,2, Rahul Jandial2, Josh Neman21Department of Biology, University of Southern California; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope National Cancer Center, CA, USAAbstract: Cancer starts with one rogue cell. Through mutations and genomic alterations, the cell acquires specific and stem cell-like characteristics necessary for invasion of a distant organ and ultimately metastasis. Metastatic brain cancer is a particularly formidable disease because o...

  12. ‘Your Brain on Art’: Emergent cortical dynamics during aesthetic experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Kontson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The brain response to conceptual art was studied with mobile electroencephalography (EEG to examine the neural basis of aesthetic experiences. In contrast to most studies of perceptual phenomena, participants were moving and thinking freely as they viewed the exhibit The Boundary of Life is Quietly Crossed by Dario Robleto at the Menil Collection-Houston. The brain activity of over 400 subjects was recorded using dry-electrode and one reference gel-based EEG systems over a period of 3 months. Here, we report initial findings based on the reference system. EEG segments corresponding to each art piece were grouped into one of three classes (complex, moderate, and baseline based on analysis of a digital image of each piece. Time, frequency, and wavelet features extracted from EEG were used to classify patterns associated with viewing art, and ranked based on their relevance for classification. The maximum classification accuracy was 55% (chance = 33% with delta and gamma features the most relevant for classification. Functional analysis revealed a significant increase in connection strength in localized brain networks while subjects viewed the most aesthetically pleasing art compared to viewing a blank wall. The direction of signal flow showed early recruitment of broad posterior areas followed by focal anterior activation. Significant differences in the strength of connections were also observed across age and gender. This work provides evidence that EEG, deployed on freely behaving subjects, can detect selective signal flow in neural networks, identify significant differences between subject groups, and report with greater-than-chance accuracy the complexity of a subject’s visual percept of aesthetically pleasing art. Our approach, which allows acquisition of neural activity ‘in action and context’, could lead to understanding of how the brain integrates sensory input and its ongoing internal state to produce the phenomenon which we term

  13. Neurotransmitter mechanisms of the action of the antihistamine dimebon on the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To discover the possible mechanism of the stimulating effect of dimebon on the CNS, the action of the drug was studied on catecholamine concentrations and turnover and activity of forms of monoamine oxidase (MAO), differing in the substrate metabolized, in brain structures involved in the regulation of the emotional state and in the regulation of motor activity in rats. 3H-serotonin creatinine-sulfate, 3H-dopamine hydrochloride, and 14C- benzylamine hydrochloride were used as substrates. The results show that dimebon can inhibit MAO activity in the basal ganglia and other brain structures both in vitro and in vivo, and can cause changes in DA and NA metabolism and in functional activity of catecholaminergic neuronal structures of the brain

  14. Drug-Induced Apoptosis: Mechanism by which Alcohol and Many Other Drugs Can Disrupt Brain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Olney

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Maternal ingestion of alcohol during pregnancy can cause a disability syndrome termed Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD, which may include craniofacial malformations, structural pathology in the brain, and a variety of long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances. There is compelling evidence that exposure to alcohol during early embryogenesis (4th week of gestation can cause excessive death of cell populations that are essential for normal development of the face and brain. While this can explain craniofacial malformations and certain structural brain anomalies that sometimes accompany FASD, in many cases these features are absent, and the FASD syndrome manifests primarily as neurobehavioral disorders. It is not clear from the literature how alcohol causes these latter manifestations. In this review we will describe a growing body of evidence documenting that alcohol triggers widespread apoptotic death of neurons and oligodendroglia (OLs in the developing brain when administered to animals, including non-human primates, during a period equivalent to the human third trimester of gestation. This cell death reaction is associated with brain changes, including overall or regional reductions in brain mass, and long-term neurobehavioral disturbances. We will also review evidence that many drugs used in pediatric and obstetric medicine, including general anesthetics (GAs and anti-epileptics (AEDs, mimic alcohol in triggering widespread apoptotic death of neurons and OLs in the third trimester-equivalent animal brain, and that human children exposed to GAs during early infancy, or to AEDs during the third trimester of gestation, have a significantly increased incidence of FASD-like neurobehavioral disturbances. These findings provide evidence that exposure of the developing human brain to GAs in early infancy, or to alcohol or AEDs in late gestation, can cause FASD-like neurodevelopmental disability syndromes. We propose that the mechanism by which

  15. Emergence and resilience of cooperation in the spatial Prisoner's Dilemma via a reward mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Raul; Cuesta, Jose A; Sanchez, Angel

    2007-01-01

    We study the problem of the emergence of cooperation in the spatial Prisoner's Dilemma. The pioneering work by Nowak and May showed that large initial populations of cooperators can survive and sustain cooperation in a square lattice with imitate-the-best evolutionary dynamics. We revisit this problem in a cost-benefit formulation suitable for a number of biological applications. We show that if a fixed-amount reward is established for cooperators to share, a single cooperator can invade a population of defectors and form structures that are resilient to re-invasion even if the reward mechanism is turned off. We discuss analytically the case of the invasion by a single cooperator and present agent-based simulations for small initial fractions of cooperators. Large cooperation levels, in the sustainability range, are found. In the conclusions we discuss possible applications of this model as well as its connections with other mechanisms proposed to promote the emergence of cooperation.

  16. Acute decrease in alkaline phosphatase after brain injury: A potential mechanism for tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Peethambaran; Oguntayo, Samuel; Albert, Stephen Van; Gist, Irene; Wang, Ying; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Long, Joseph B

    2015-11-16

    Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated Tau (pTau) protein, which is essential for the preservation of neuronal microtubule assemblies and for protection against trauma-induced tauopathy and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), is primarily achieved in brain by tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). Paired helical filaments (PHFs) and Tau isolated from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients' brains have been shown to form microtubule assemblies with tubulin only after treatment with TNAP or protein phosphatase-2A, 2B and -1, suggesting that Tau protein in the PHFs of neurons in AD brain is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents microtubule assembly. Using blast or weight drop models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats, we observed pTau accumulation in the brain as early as 6h post-injury and further accumulation which varied regionally by 24h post-injury. The pTau accumulation was accompanied by reduced TNAP expression and activity in these brain regions and a significantly decreased plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity after the weight drop. These results reveal that both blast- and impact acceleration-induced head injuries cause an acute decrease in the level/activity of TNAP in the brain, which potentially contributes to trauma-induced accumulation of pTau and the resultant tauopathy. The regional changes in the level/activity of TNAP or accumulation of pTau after these injuries did not correlate with the accumulation of amyloid precursor protein, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying tauopathy in TBI might be distinct from that associated with AD. PMID:26483321

  17. Mechanisms underlying brain monitoring during anesthesia: limitations, possible improvements, and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Currently, anesthesiologists use clinical parameters to directly measure the depth of anesthesia (DoA). This clinical standard of monitoring is often combined with brain monitoring for better assessment of the hypnotic component of anesthesia. Brain monitoring devices provide indices allowing for an immediate assessment of the impact of anesthetics on consciousness. However, questions remain regarding the mechanisms underpinning these indices of hypnosis. By briefly describing current knowledge of the brain's electrical activity during general anesthesia, as well as the operating principles of DoA monitors, the aim of this work is to simplify our understanding of the mathematical processes that allow for translation of complex patterns of brain electrical activity into dimensionless indices. This is a challenging task because mathematical concepts appear remote from clinical practice. Moreover, most DoA algorithms are proprietary algorithms and the difficulty of exploring the inner workings of mathematical models represents an obstacle to accurate simplification. The limitations of current DoA monitors - and the possibility for improvement - as well as perspectives on brain monitoring derived from recent research on corticocortical connectivity and communication are also discussed. PMID:27066200

  18. Hungary; Stand-By Arrangement: Interim Review Under the Emergency Financing Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the Stand-By Arrangement for Hungary under the Emergency Financing Mechanism. Economic indicators confirm that the downturn envisaged in the program is already under way. The new bank support law is important, as it provides Hungarian banks with access to capital enhancement and borrowing guarantee facilities. The gradual reductions in the policy interest rate have been appropriate. Looking ahead, continued implementation of policies in line with the program is essential...

  19. The radical-pair mechanism as a paradigm for the emerging science of quantum biology

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2015-01-01

    The radical-pair mechanism was introduced in the 1960's to explain anomalously large EPR and NMR signals in chemical reactions of organic molecules. It has evolved to the cornerstone of spin chemistry, the study of the effect electron and nuclear spins have on chemical reactions, with the avian magnetic compass mechanism and the photosynthetic reaction center dynamics being prominent biophysical manifestations of such effects. In recent years the radical-pair mechanism was shown to be an ideal biological system where the conceptual tools of quantum information science can be fruitfully applied. We will here review recent work making the case that the radical-pair mechanism is indeed a major driving force of the emerging field of quantum biology.

  20. A model to investigate the mechanisms underlying the emergence and development of independent sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kathleen M; Zhang, Jing; Walley, Philip R; Rhoads, Jeffrey F; Haddad, Jeffrey M; Claxton, Laura J

    2015-07-01

    When infants first begin to sit independently, they are highly unstable and unable to maintain upright sitting posture for more than a few seconds. Over the course of 3 months, the sitting ability of infants drastically improves. To investigate the mechanisms controlling the development of sitting posture, a single-degree-of-freedom inverted pendulum model was developed. Passive muscle properties were modeled with a stiffness and damping term, while active neurological control was modeled with a time-delayed proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. The findings of the simulations suggest that infants primarily utilize passive muscle stiffness to remain upright when they first begin to sit. This passive control mechanism allows the infant to remain upright so that active feedback control mechanisms can develop. The emergence of active control mechanisms allows infants to integrate sensory information into their movements so that they can exhibit more adaptive sitting. PMID:25442426

  1. Fetal functional imaging portrays heterogeneous development of emerging human brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Jakab

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The functional connectivity architecture of the adult human brain enables complex cognitive processes, and exhibits a remarkably complex structure shared across individuals. We are only beginning to understand its heterogeneous structure, ranging from a strongly hierarchical organization in sensorimotor areas to widely distributed networks in areas such as the parieto-frontal cortex. Our study relied on the functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 32 fetuses with no detectable morphological abnormalities. After adapting functional magnetic resonance acquisition, motion correction and nuisance signal reduction procedures of resting-state functional data analysis to fetuses, we extracted neural activity information for major cortical and subcortical structures. Resting fMRI networks were observed for increasing regional functional connectivity from 21st – 38th gestational weeks (GW with a network-based statistical inference approach. The overall connectivity network, short range and interhemispheric connections showed sigmoid expansion curve peaking at the 26-29. GW. In contrast, long-range connections exhibited linear increase with no periods of peaking development. Region-specific increase of functional signal synchrony followed a sequence of occipital (peak: 24.8 GW, temporal (peak: 26 GW, frontal (peak: 26.4 GW and parietal expansion (peak: 27.5 GW. We successfully adapted functional neuroimaging and image post-processing approaches to correlate macroscopical scale activations in the fetal brain with gestational age. This in vivo study reflects the fact that the mid-fetal period hosts events that cause the architecture of the brain circuitry to mature, which presumably manifests in increasing strength of intra- and interhemispheric functional macroconnectivity.

  2. The Third Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: A Review of Emerging Issues and Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Justin eRossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. Significant innovations of the past year are emphasized; these advances were presented at the 3rd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank. The Think Tank’s contributors represent a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers, and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including policy and advocacy considerations for the future of DBS, connectomic approaches to DBS targeting, developments in electrophysiology and related strides toward responsive DBS systems, and recent developments in sensor and device technologies.

  3. Spatial and functional architecture of the mammalian brain stem respiratory network: a hierarchy of three oscillatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J C; Abdala, A P L; Koizumi, H; Rybak, I A; Paton, J F R

    2007-12-01

    Mammalian central pattern generators (CPGs) producing rhythmic movements exhibit extremely robust and flexible behavior. Network architectures that enable these features are not well understood. Here we studied organization of the brain stem respiratory CPG. By sequential rostral to caudal transections through the pontine-medullary respiratory network within an in situ perfused rat brain stem-spinal cord preparation, we showed that network dynamics reorganized and new rhythmogenic mechanisms emerged. The normal three-phase respiratory rhythm transformed to a two-phase and then to a one-phase rhythm as the network was reduced. Expression of the three-phase rhythm required the presence of the pons, generation of the two-phase rhythm depended on the integrity of Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes and interactions between them, and the one-phase rhythm was generated within the pre-Bötzinger complex. Transformation from the three-phase to a two-phase pattern also occurred in intact preparations when chloride-mediated synaptic inhibition was reduced. In contrast to the three-phase and two-phase rhythms, the one-phase rhythm was abolished by blockade of persistent sodium current (I(NaP)). A model of the respiratory network was developed to reproduce and explain these observations. The model incorporated interacting populations of respiratory neurons within spatially organized brain stem compartments. Our simulations reproduced the respiratory patterns recorded from intact and sequentially reduced preparations. Our results suggest that the three-phase and two-phase rhythms involve inhibitory network interactions, whereas the one-phase rhythm depends on I(NaP). We conclude that the respiratory network has rhythmogenic capabilities at multiple levels of network organization, allowing expression of motor patterns specific for various physiological and pathophysiological respiratory behaviors. PMID:17913982

  4. Pulsations with reflected boundary waves: a hydrodynamic reverse transport mechanism for perivascular drainage in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma, M; Schaffer, J D; Carare, R O; Chiarot, P R; Huang, P

    2016-08-01

    Beta-amyloid accumulation within arterial walls in cerebral amyloid angiopathy is associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanism of beta-amyloid clearance along peri-arterial pathways in the brain is not well understood. In this study, we investigate a transport mechanism in the arterial basement membrane consisting of forward-propagating waves and their reflections. The arterial basement membrane is modeled as a periodically deforming annulus filled with an incompressible single-phase Newtonian fluid. A reverse flow, which has been suggested in literature as a beta-amyloid clearance pathway, can be induced by the motion of reflected boundary waves along the annular walls. The wave amplitude and the volume of the annular region govern the flow magnitude and may have important implications for an aging brain. Magnitudes of transport obtained from control volume analysis and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are presented. PMID:26729476

  5. Management of critically ill patients receiving noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Louise RoseLawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation frequently present to emergency departments, and may remain for prolonged periods due to constrained critical care services. Emergency clinicians often do not receive the same education on management of mechanical ventilation or have similar exposure to these patients as do their critical care colleagues. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence on management of patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation in the emergency department including indications, clinical applications, monitoring priorities, and potential complications. Noninvasive ventilation is recommended for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Less evidence supports its use in asthma and other causes of acute respiratory failure. Use of noninvasive ventilation in the prehospital setting is relatively new, and some evidence suggests benefit. Monitoring priorities for noninvasive ventilation include response to treatment, respiratory and hemodynamic stability, noninvasive ventilation tolerance, detection of noninvasive ventilation failure, and identification of air leaks around the interface. Application of injurious ventilation increases patient morbidity and mortality. Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes based on determination of predicted body weight and control of plateau pressure has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and some evidence exists to suggest this strategy should be used in patients without lung injury. Monitoring of the invasively ventilated patient should focus on assessing response to mechanical ventilation and other interventions, and avoiding complications, such as ventilator-associated pneumonia. Several key aspects of management of noninvasive

  6. Shaping the aging brain: Role of auditory input patterns in the emergence of auditory cortical impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brishna Soraya Kamal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Age-related impairments in the primary auditory cortex (A1 include poor tuning selectivity, neural desynchronization and degraded responses to low-probability sounds. These changes have been largely attributed to reduced inhibition in the aged brain, and are thought to contribute to substantial hearing impairment in both humans and animals. Since many of these changes can be partially reversed with auditory training, it has been speculated that they might not be purely degenerative, but might rather represent negative plastic adjustments to noisy or distorted auditory signals reaching the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of exposing young adult rats to 8 weeks of low-grade broadband noise on several aspects of A1 function and structure. We then characterized the same A1 elements in aging rats for comparison. We found that the impact of noise exposure on A1 tuning selectivity, temporal processing of auditory signal and responses to oddball tones was almost indistinguishable from the effect of natural aging. Moreover, noise exposure resulted in a reduction in the population of parvalbumin inhibitory interneurons and cortical myelin as previously documented in the aged group. Most of these changes reversed after returning the rats to a quiet environment. These results support the hypothesis that age-related changes in A1 have a strong activity-dependent component and indicate that the presence or absence of clear auditory input patterns might be a key factor in sustaining adult A1 function.

  7. Selective Sensation Based Brain-Computer Interface via Mechanical Vibrotactile Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Yao; Jianjun Meng; Dingguo Zhang; Xinjun Sheng; Xiangyang Zhu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, mechanical vibrotactile stimulation was applied to subjects' left and right wrist skins with equal intensity, and a selective sensation perception task was performed to achieve two types of selections similar to motor imagery Brain-Computer Interface. The proposed system was based on event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS), which had a correlation with processing of afferent inflow in human somatosensory system, and attentional effect which modulated the ERD/ER...

  8. THE EFFECTS OF AN INCENTIVE MECHANISM ON BRAIN DRAIN IN THE HOTEL INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Danni

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies the effects of incentive mechanism on brain drain in hotel industry. As for the reason why this topic is chosen, it is regarding to the author's previous working experiences in the hotel industry. After the training practice in several different hotels, it is notable that Chinese hotel industry is confronted with a severe problem of high employee turnover. While the normal human resource turnover rate should remain between 5% and 10%, the average figure for the hotel staff...

  9. How long-term mindfulness meditation practice affects the brain mechanisms of attention?

    OpenAIRE

    Roininen, Minna

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, the beneficial effects of meditation and mindfulness have been broadly researched. Because attention plays a key role in mindfulness, it has been assumed that long-term practice of mindfulness meditation also has an impact on attention on neurophysiological level.In the current study, we explored how the long-term practice of mindfulness meditation affects the brain mechanisms of attention. We compared two groups, long-term meditation practisers and medita...

  10. PREFACE: DICE 2008 - From Quantum Mechanics through Complexity to Spacetime: the role of emergent dynamical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2009-07-01

    Pasquini, which - with its beautiful surroundings, overlooking a piece of Tuscany's coast, and with splendid weather throughout - was conducive to the success of the meeting. The 5-day program was grouped according to the following topics: Quantum Physics and Some Important Questions it Raises Emergent Dynamics, from Quantum to Brain and Beyond Exploring Quantum Mechanics Atomistic Theories of Spacetime Quantum-Entanglement/Gravity/Cosmology A Public Roundtable Discussion formed an integral part of the program under the theme ``Dialoghi sulla complessita' - dall' atomo all' Universo'' and with the participation of physicists and philosophers: F T Arecchi (Firenze), L Fronzoni (Pisa), A M Iacono (Pisa), F Luccio (Pisa) and G Vitiello (Salerno, coordinator). This event drew a large audience, who participated in the lively discussions until late in the evening. The workshop has been organized by L Diósi (Budapest), H-T Elze (Pisa, chair), L Fronzoni (Pisa), J Halliwell (London) and G Vitiello (Salerno), with great help from our conference secretaries M Pesce-Rollins (Siena) and L Baldini (Pisa) and from our students F Caravelli and E Di Nardo, both from Pisa. Several institutions and sponsors generously supported the workshop and their representatives and, in particular, the citizens of Rosignano/Castiglioncello are deeply thanked for the help and kind hospitality: Comune di Rosignano A Nenci (Sindaco di Rosignano), S Scarpellini (Segreteria sindaco), D Del Seppia (Assessore allo Sviluppo Economico del Comune di Rosignano), A Franchi (Assessore al turismo del Comune di Rosignano/Presidente dell' associazione Armunia), A Corsini (Ufficio economato del Comune di Rosignano). REA Rosignano Energia Ambiente s.p.a. F Ghelardini (Presidente della REA), A Cecchini (Ufficio - Responsabile stampa della REA). Solvay Chimica Italia s.a. Dott S Piccoli (Responsabile Relazioni Esterne, Solvay Rosignano), G Becherucci (Comunicazione e Relazioni Esterne). Associazione Armunia M Paganelli

  11. Mechanical and Biological Interactions of Implants with the Brain and Their Impact on Implant Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanov, Dimiter; Delbeke, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses have already a long history and yet the cochlear implant remains the only success story about a longterm sensory function restoration. On the other hand, neural implants for deep brain stimulation are gaining acceptance for variety of disorders including Parkinsons disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is anticipated that the progress in the field has been hampered by a combination of technological and biological factors, such as the limited understanding of the longterm behavior of implants, unreliability of devices, biocompatibility of the implants among others. While the field's understanding of the cell biology of interactions at the biotic-abiotic interface has improved, relatively little attention has been paid on the mechanical factors (stress, strain), and hence on the geometry that can modulate it. This focused review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of mechanical interaction between the implants and the brain. The review gives an overview of the factors by which the implants interact acutely and chronically with the tissue: blood-brain barrier (BBB) breach, vascular damage, micromotions, diffusion etc. We propose some design constraints to be considered in future studies. Aspects of the chronic cell-implant interaction will be discussed in view of the chronic local inflammation and the ways of modulating it. PMID:26903786

  12. Ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography of physiological brain activity - Glymphatic pulsation mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Wang, Xindi; Korhonen, Vesa; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Autio, Joonas; LeVan, Pierre; Keilholz, Shella; Zang, Yu-Feng; Hennig, Jürgen; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-06-01

    The theory on the glymphatic convection mechanism of cerebrospinal fluid holds that cardiac pulsations in part pump cerebrospinal fluid from the peri-arterial spaces through the extracellular tissue into the peri-venous spaces facilitated by aquaporin water channels. Since cardiac pulses cannot be the sole mechanism of glymphatic propulsion, we searched for additional cerebrospinal fluid pulsations in the human brain with ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography. We detected three types of physiological mechanisms affecting cerebral cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: cardiac, respiratory, and very low frequency pulsations. The cardiac pulsations induce a negative magnetic resonance encephalography signal change in peri-arterial regions that extends centrifugally and covers the brain in ≈1 Hz cycles. The respiratory ≈0.3 Hz pulsations are centripetal periodical pulses that occur dominantly in peri-venous areas. The third type of pulsation was very low frequency (VLF 0.001-0.023 Hz) and low frequency (LF 0.023-0.73 Hz) waves that both propagate with unique spatiotemporal patterns. Our findings using critically sampled magnetic resonance encephalography open a new view into cerebral fluid dynamics. Since glymphatic system failure may precede protein accumulations in diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia, this methodological advance offers a novel approach to image brain fluid dynamics that potentially can enable early detection and intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26690495

  13. Role of MicroRNAs in innate neuroprotection mechanisms due to preconditioning of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Jimenez-Mateos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insults to the brain that are sub-threshold for damage activate endogenous protective pathways, which can temporarily protect the brain against a subsequent harmful episode. This mechanism has been named as tolerance and its protective effects have been shown in experimental models of ischemia and epilepsy. The preconditioning-stimulus can be a short period of ischemia or mild seizures induced by low doses of convulsant drugs.Gene-array profiling has shown that both ischemic and epileptic tolerance feature large-scale gene down-regulation but the mechanism are unknown. MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs of ~20-22 nucleotides length which regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level via mRNA degradation or inhibition of protein translation. MicroRNAs have been shown to be regulated after non-harmful and harmful stimuli in the brain and to contribute to neuroprotective mechanisms. This review focuses on the role of microRNAs in the development of tolerance following ischemic or epileptic preconditioning.

  14. Why direct effects of predation complicate the social brain hypothesis: And how incorporation of explicit proximate behavioral mechanisms might help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bijl, Wouter; Kolm, Niclas

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of studies have found that large brains may help animals survive by avoiding predation. These studies provide an alternative explanation for existing correlative evidence for one of the dominant hypotheses regarding the evolution of brain size in animals, the social brain hypothesis (SBH). The SBH proposes that social complexity is a major evolutionary driver of large brains. However, if predation both directly selects for large brains and higher levels of sociality, correlations between sociality and brain size may be spurious. We argue that tests of the SBH should take direct effects of predation into account, either by explicitly including them in comparative analyses or by pin-pointing the brain-behavior-fitness pathway through which the SBH operates. Existing data and theory on social behavior can then be used to identify precise candidate mechanisms and formulate new testable predictions. PMID:27174816

  15. Emergency CT brain: preliminary interpretation with a tablet device: image quality and diagnostic performance of the Apple iPad.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Laughlin, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Tablet devices have recently been used in radiological image interpretation because they have a display resolution comparable to desktop LCD monitors. We identified a need to examine tablet display performance prior to their use in preliminary interpretation of radiological images. We compared the spatial and contrast resolution of a commercially available tablet display with a diagnostic grade 2 megapixel monochrome LCD using a contrast detail phantom. We also recorded reporting discrepancies, using the ACR RADPEER system, between preliminary interpretation of 100 emergency CT brain examinations on the tablet display and formal review on a diagnostic LCD. The iPad display performed inferiorly to the diagnostic monochrome display without the ability to zoom. When the software zoom function was enabled on the tablet device, comparable contrast detail phantom scores of 163 vs 165 points were achieved. No reporting discrepancies were encountered during the interpretation of 43 normal examinations and five cases of acute intracranial hemorrhage. There were seven RADPEER2 (understandable) misses when using the iPad display and 12 with the diagnostic LCD. Use of software zoom in the tablet device improved its contrast detail phantom score. The tablet allowed satisfactory identification of acute CT brain findings, but additional research will be required to examine the cause of "understandable" reporting discrepancies that occur when using tablet devices.

  16. The emergence of grammar in a language-ready brain. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Arbib makes the interesting proposal [3, §1.6] that the first Homo sapiens could have been "language-ready", without possessing the kind of rich lexicon, grammar and compositional semantics that we see in the world's languages today. This early language readiness would have consisted of a set of "protolanguage" abilities, which he enumerates (1-7 in §1.6), supported by brain mechanisms unique to humans. The transition to full "language" (properties 8-11 in §1.6 and §3) would have required no changes in the genome, he argues, but could have resulted from cultural evolution plus some measure of Baldwinian evolution favoring offspring with greater linguistic skill. The full picture is set out in [1].

  17. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN. PMID:25826110

  18. [The status of adaptive-compensatory mechanisms after the brain concussion in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Iu I; Seliverstova, G A; Kalashnikova, T P

    1999-01-01

    80 children of preschool age were observed after concussion of the brain. In follow-up from 6 months 3 years clinical-anamnestic and neuropsychologic methods were used. The functions of autonomic nervous system were evaluated according to the results of estimation of initial autonomic tonus, autonomic reactivity, autonomic maintenance of the activity and the data of cardiointervalography. The state of nonspecific systems of the brain was studied with day time polygraphic research with a visual EEG evaluation, construction of histogramms by Fora method, estimation of speed and order of the fading of the components of a rough response. Psychovegetative stress was the ground for neurologic disorders in posttraumatic period. The disorders of adaptive regulation were manifested in exhausting of ergotropic systems with compensatory overstrain of trophotropic mechanisms, resulted in predominance of inhibiting influences with an inadequate response of synchronization on EEG during functional loads. Severity of clinical manifestations and disorders of adaptive regulation were more pronounced in children 1-3 year-old and with hypoxic-traumatic damages of the brain in anamnesis. Disintegration of cerebral activity correlated with the remote period. In the first 6-12 months after the concussion of the brain changes of vegetative reactivity prevailed, after 18 months the alterations in vegetative maintenance progressed. PMID:10205838

  19. Mechanical Characterization of Brain Tissue in Compression at Dynamic Strain Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.01.022

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when local mechanical load exceeds certain tolerance levels for brain tissue. Extensive research has been done previously for brain matter experiencing compression at quasistatic loading; however, limited data is available to model TBI under dynamic impact conditions. In this research, an experimental setup was developed to perform unconfined compression tests and stress relaxation tests at strain rates < 90/s. The brain tissue showed a stiffer response with increasing strain rates, showing that hyperelastic models are not adequate. Specifically, the compressive nominal stress at 30% strain was 8.83 +/- 1.94, 12.8 +/- 3.10 and 16.0 +/- 1.41 kPa (mean +/- SD) at strain rates of 30, 60 and 90/s, respectively. Relaxation tests were also conducted at 10%-50% strain with the average rise time of 10 ms, which can be used to derive time dependent parameters. Numerical simulations were performed using one-term Ogden model with initial shear modulus mu_0 = 6.06 +/- 1.44, 9.44 +/-...

  20. Intracellular delivery mechanism and brain delivery kinetics of biodegradable cationic bovine serum albumin-conjugated polymersomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Z

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhiqing Pang,1,2 Huile Gao,1,2 Jun Chen,1,2 Shun Shen,1,2 Bo Zhang,3 Jinfeng Ren,1,2 Liangran Guo,1,2 Yong Qian,1,2 Xinguo Jiang,1,2 Heng Mei31Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, 2Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education and PLA, Fudan University, Shanghai, 3Institute of Hematology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: A novel brain drug delivery system using cationic bovine serum albumin (CBSA-conjugated biodegradable polymersomes (CBSA-PO was prepared, and its intracellular delivery mechanism and brain delivery kinetics were evaluated.Methods and results: Biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol-poly(ε -caprolactone (PEG-PCL was used to prepare the polymersomes, and thiolated CBSA was conjugated with the surface of the polymersome. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering showed that the CBSA-PO had a round and vesicle-like shape, with a mean diameter of around 100 nm. Coupling of CBSA with polymersomes was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Uptake of CBSA-PO by bEnd.3 cells was significantly higher than that of unconjugated polymersomes, but was inhibited by low temperature, free CBSA, and poly-L-lysine, indicating that endocytosis was energy-driven and absorptive-mediated. Cell viability assays confirmed the good safety profile of biodegradable CBSA-PO. Pharmacokinetic results demonstrated that the polymersomes had long circulation times, and CBSA conjugation on the polymersomes significantly increased the blood–brain barrier permeability surface area product by 3.6-fold and the percentage of injected dose per gram brain (% ID/g brain by 2.1-fold. Capillary depletion experiments showed that CBSA-PO was distributed into the brain parenchyma in a time-dependent manner, with few polymersomes detected, indicating that conjugation of polymersomes with CBSA significantly improved their

  1. [Mechanism of "treating heart and brain with same methods" based on data science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Tang, Shi-huan; Lu, Peng; Yang, Hong-jun

    2015-11-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory of "treating heart and brain diseases with same methods (Nao Xin Tong Zhi: NXTZ)" has great significance to the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It has been proven effective by a great deal of clinical researches. However, the underlying mechanism for this theory is still unclear. To provide insights into the potential mechanism of "NXTZ", this study attempts to deeply investigate the mechanism from two representative cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebral apoplexy. First, various data resources were integrated to obtain different types of biomedical entities including drugs, targets, pathways and diseases. Then, three different approaches including text mining, biological network and enrichment analysis were utilized to recognize the potential common features between CHD and cerebral apoplexy, and the corresponding functions of drugs which could treat both diseases, thus unveiling the mechanism of NXTZ. PMID:27071272

  2. Shaping and reshaping the aesthetic brain: Emerging perspectives on the neurobiology of embodied aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Louise P; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cross, Emily S

    2016-03-01

    Less than two decades after its inception, the burgeoning field of neuroaesthetics continues to grow in interest and momentum. Despite the biological and social importance of the human body and the attention people pay to its appearance in daily life, only recently has neuroaesthetic inquiry turned its attention to questions concerning the aesthetic appraisal of the human body. We review evidence illustrating that the complexity of aesthetic experience is reflected by dynamic interplay between brain systems involved in reward, perceptual and motor processing, with a focus on aesthetic perception involving the human body. We then evaluate work demonstrating how these systems are modulated by beholders' expertise or familiarity. Finally, we discuss seminal studies revealing the plasticity of behavioural and neural responses to beauty after perceptual and motor training. This research highlights the rich potential for neuroaesthetic inquiry to extend beyond its typical realm of the fine arts to address important questions regarding the relationship between embodiment, aesthetics and performing arts. We conclude by considering some of the criticisms and limitations of neuroaesthetics, and highlight several outstanding issues for future inquiry. PMID:26698020

  3. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI. Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherentlydetrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partiallypropagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP’s.DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and nonhumanprimates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS andTBI in the near future.

  4. Emergent Structural Mechanisms for High-Density Collective Motion Inspired by Human Crowds

    CERN Document Server

    Bottinelli, Arianna; Silverberg, Jesse L

    2016-01-01

    Collective motion of large human crowds often depends on their density. In extreme cases like heavy metal concerts and Black Friday sales events, motion is dominated by physical interactions instead of conventional social norms. Here, we study an active matter model inspired by situations when large groups of people gather at a point of common interest. Our analysis takes an approach developed for jammed granular media and identifies Goldstone modes, soft spots, and stochastic resonance as structurally-driven mechanisms for potentially dangerous emergent collective motion.

  5. Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: mechanisms of brain tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Qiang; Song, Jun-Ying; Jia, Ya-Quan; Zhang, Yun-Ke

    2016-03-01

    Buyanghuanwu decoction has been shown to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, rats were intragastrically given Buyanghuanwu decoction, 15 mL/kg, for 3 days. A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In rats administered Buyanghuanwu decoction, infarct volume was reduced, serum vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin αvβ3 levels were increased, and brain tissue vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression levels were increased compared with untreated animals. These effects of Buyanghuanwu decoction were partially suppressed by an angiogenesis inhibitor (administered through the lateral ventricle for 7 consecutive days). These data suggest that Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis, improves cerebral circulation, and enhances brain tissue repair after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27127482

  6. Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury:mechanisms of brain tissue repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-qiang Zhang; Jun-ying Song; Ya-quan Jia; Yun-ke Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Buyanghuanwu decoction has been shown to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, rats were intragastrically givenBuyanghuanwu decoction, 15 mL/kg, for 3 days. A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reper-fusion injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In rats administeredBuyanghuanwu decoction, infarct volume was reduced, serum vascular endothelial growth factor and integrinαvβ3 levels were increased, and brain tissue vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression levels were increased compared with untreated animals. These effects ofBuyanghuanwu decoction were partially suppressed by an angiogenesis inhibitor (administered through the lateral ventricle for 7 consecutive days). These data suggest thatBuyanghuanwu de-coction promotes angiogenesis, improves cerebral circulation, and enhances brain tissue repair after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  7. Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: mechanisms of brain tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-qiang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Buyanghuanwu decoction has been shown to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, rats were intragastrically given Buyanghuanwu decoction, 15 mL/kg, for 3 days. A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In rats administered Buyanghuanwu decoction, infarct volume was reduced, serum vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin αvβ3 levels were increased, and brain tissue vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression levels were increased compared with untreated animals. These effects of Buyanghuanwu decoction were partially suppressed by an angiogenesis inhibitor (administered through the lateral ventricle for 7 consecutive days. These data suggest that Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis, improves cerebral circulation, and enhances brain tissue repair after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of appetite and obesity: a role for brain AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Urisarri, Adela; Couce, María L; López, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Feeding behaviour and energy storage are both crucial aspects of survival. Thus, it is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating these basic processes. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been revealed as one of the key molecules modulating energy homoeostasis. Indeed, AMPK appears to be essential for translating nutritional and energy requirements into generation of an adequate neuronal response, particularly in two areas of the brain, the hypothalamus and the hindbrain. Failure of this physiological response can lead to energy imbalance, ultimately with extreme consequences, such as leanness or obesity. Here, we will review the data that put brain AMPK in the spotlight as a regulator of appetite. PMID:27555613

  9. Quantum conformal mechanics emerging from unitary representations of SL(2 , R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    The quantum mechanics of one degree of freedom exhibiting the exact conformal SL(2 , R) symmetry is presented. The starting point is the classification of the unitary irreducible representations of the SL(2 , R) group (or, to some extent, its universal covering). The coordinate representation is defined as the basis diagonalizing the special conformal generator K ˆ . As a particular case one obtains the AFF (de Alfaro et al., 1976) system with positive coupling constant. It is shown that for the negative coupling the conformal quantum mechanics in AFF form can be immersed into well-defined quantum theory with global action of SL(2 , R) as a symmetry group. It is indicated how the resulting theory emerges from the canonical/geometric quantization of the Hamiltonian dynamics on the relevant coadjoint orbits.

  10. Equilibration, thermalisation, and the emergence of statistical mechanics in closed quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolin, Christian; Eisert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We review selected advances in the theoretical understanding of complex quantum many-body systems with regard to emergent notions of quantum statistical mechanics. We cover topics such as equilibration and thermalisation in pure state statistical mechanics, the eigenstate thermalisation hypothesis, the equivalence of ensembles, non-equilibration dynamics following global and local quenches as well as ramps. We also address initial state independence, absence of thermalisation, and many-body localisation. We elucidate the role played by key concepts for these phenomena, such as Lieb-Robinson bounds, entanglement growth, typicality arguments, quantum maximum entropy principles and the generalised Gibbs ensembles, and quantum (non-)integrability. We put emphasis on rigorous approaches and present the most important results in a unified language.

  11. Mechanisms and regulation of iron trafficking across the capillary endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kosman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transcellular trafficking of iron from the blood into the brain interstitium depends on iron uptake proteins in the apical membrane of brain microvascular capillary endothelial cells and efflux proteins at the basolateral, abluminal membrane. In this review, we discuss the three mechanisms by which these cells take-up iron from the blood and the sole mechanism by which they efflux this iron into the abluminal space. We then focus on the regulation of this efflux pathway by exocrine factors that are released from neighboring astrocytes. Also discussed are the cytokines secreted by capillary cells that regulate the expression of these glial cell signals. Among the interstitial factors that regulate iron efflux into the brain is the amyloid precursor protein. The role of this amyliodogenic species in brain iron metabolism is discussed. Last, we speculate on the potential relationship between iron transport at the blood-brain barrier and neurological disorders associated with iron mismanagement.

  12. Brain Alterations and Clinical Symptoms of Dementia in Diabetes: Aβ/Tau-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    NaoyukiSato

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes affects cognitive function and increases the incidence of dementia. However, the mechanisms by which diabetes modifies cognitive function still remains unclear. Morphologically, diabetes is associated with neuronal loss in the frontal and temporal lobes including the hippocampus, and aberrant functional connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and medial frontal/temporal gyrus. Clinically, diabetic patients show decreased executive function, info...

  13. On the semiclassical limit of emergent quantum mechanics, as a classical thermodynamics of irreversible processes in the linear regime

    OpenAIRE

    PEREA CÓRDOBA, MILTÓN HENRY

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Motivated by the conceptual problems concerning the quantisation of gravity, the Dutch theoretical physicist G. 't Hooft (1999 Nobel prize in physics) put forward the notion that quantum mechanics must be the emergent theory of some underlying, deterministic theory. This proposal usually goes by the name quantum mechanics as an emergent phenomenon. This research line, initiated by 't Hooft in the late 1990's, has been the subject of intense research over the last 15 years,...

  14. On the physics of the emergence of sensorimotor control in the absence of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Koichiro

    2015-12-01

    The evolutionary origin of sensorimotor control requires a sort of physical durability, other than Galilean inertia being accessible in third-person description in the present tense. One candidate to address this need is the 'class property' of a material body's durability remaining invariant during the exchange of component elements. Using grammatical tense as a descriptive attribute, this durability is accessible only in the frequent update of the present perfect tense in the present progressive tense at the 'now' of the present moment. In this view, the update of the perfect tense is equated with the onset and occurrence of on/off switching behavior of physical origin underlying the phenomena of sensorimotor control. Notably, the physical update of the perfect tense is specific only to the 'now and here' that is central in the tradition of phenomenology. The phenomena upholding thermodynamics, when taken apart from its theory, are decisive in facilitating the onset of sensorimotor control. Instrumental to the emergence of both life in general and sensorimotor control in particular may be the occurrence of a 'physical and chemical affinity' of the material bodies of whatever type. Such will let the constant exchange of component elements be feasible, so that the class identity equipped with the capacity for measurement is made available within the phenomenon. Material bodies constantly exchanging such component elements would make the material world open to biology by allowing each element to experience the organizational whole from within. The internal observer responsible for the origins of life may do double duty of letting itself be durable on the material basis while observing the conditions making it durable on the linguistic ground. The origins of life appear to us a material phenomenon when they are approached with use of our linguistic tools that can get rid of the strict stipulation of an abstract nature applied to the description of dynamical laws in

  15. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie eCastillo-Melendez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the research, clinical and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form terratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs, or umbilical cord blood (UCB stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  16. Mechanisms of 5-azacytidine (5AzC)-induced toxicity in the rat foetal brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Katayama, Kei-Ichi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Doi, Kunio

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms of 5-azacytidine (5AzC)-induced toxicity in the rat foetal brain were investigated. 5AzC (10 mg/kg) was injected into pregnant rats on day 13 of gestation and the protein and mRNA expressions of p53 and its transcriptional target genes, p21, bax, cyclin G1, fas, and gadd45, were examined in the foetal brain. The number of p53-positive cells peaked at 9 h after treatment (HAT) and those of apoptotic cells and p21-positive cells peaked at 12 HAT. The expressions of p21, bax, cyclin G1, and fas mRNAs were significantly elevated from 9 to 12 HAT. From the experiments using 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), as compared with controls, the migration of neuroepithelial cells significantly delayed and BrdU-positive signals were observed in many apoptotic cells from 9 to 24 HAT in the 5AzC-group. In addition, the number of S phase cells significantly decreased at 12 HAT. The present results indicate that 5AzC induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest probably at G1 phase in the rat foetal brain and they might be mediated by p53 in response to DNA damage. PMID:12383193

  17. Analysis of trophic responses in lesioned brain: focus on basic fibroblast growth factor mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadi G.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The actions of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, particularly the basic form (bFGF, have been described in a large number of cells and include mitogenicity, angiogenicity and wound repair. The present review discusses the presence of the bFGF protein and messenger RNA as well as the presence of the FGF receptor messenger RNA in the rodent brain by means of semiquantitative radioactive in situ hybridization in combination with immunohistochemistry. Chemical and mechanical injuries to the brain trigger a reduction in neurotransmitter synthesis and neuronal death which are accompanied by astroglial reaction. The altered synthesis of bFGF following brain lesions or stimulation was analyzed. Lesions of the central nervous system trigger bFGF gene expression by neurons and/or activated astrocytes, depending on the type of lesion and time post-manipulation. The changes in bFGF messenger RNA are frequently accompanied by a subsequent increase of bFGF immunoreactivity in astrocytes in the lesioned pathway. The reactive astrocytes and injured neurons synthesize increased amount of bFGF, which may act as a paracrine/autocrine factor, protecting neurons from death and also stimulating neuronal plasticity and tissue repair

  18. Brain IGF-1 receptors control mammalian growth and lifespan through a neuroendocrine mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Kappeler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations that decrease insulin-like growth factor (IGF and growth hormone signaling limit body size and prolong lifespan in mice. In vertebrates, these somatotropic hormones are controlled by the neuroendocrine brain. Hormone-like regulations discovered in nematodes and flies suggest that IGF signals in the nervous system can determine lifespan, but it is unknown whether this applies to higher organisms. Using conditional mutagenesis in the mouse, we show that brain IGF receptors (IGF-1R efficiently regulate somatotropic development. Partial inactivation of IGF-1R in the embryonic brain selectively inhibited GH and IGF-I pathways after birth. This caused growth retardation, smaller adult size, and metabolic alterations, and led to delayed mortality and longer mean lifespan. Thus, early changes in neuroendocrine development can durably modify the life trajectory in mammals. The underlying mechanism appears to be an adaptive plasticity of somatotropic functions allowing individuals to decelerate growth and preserve resources, and thereby improve fitness in challenging environments. Our results also suggest that tonic somatotropic signaling entails the risk of shortened lifespan.

  19. Brain Mechanisms for Processing Affective (and Nonaffective) Touch Are Atypical in Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Martha D; Yang, Daniel Y-J; Voos, Avery C; Bennett, Randi H; Gordon, Ilanit; Pretzsch, Charlotte; Beam, Danielle; Keifer, Cara; Eilbott, Jeffrey; McGlone, Francis; Pelphrey, Kevin A

    2016-06-01

    C-tactile (CT) afferents encode caress-like touch that supports social-emotional development, and stimulation of the CT system engages the insula and cortical circuitry involved in social-emotional processing. Very few neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural mechanisms of touch processing in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who often exhibit atypical responses to touch. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we evaluated the hypothesis that children and adolescents with ASD would exhibit atypical brain responses to CT-targeted touch. Children and adolescents with ASD, relative to typically developing (TD) participants, exhibited reduced activity in response to CT-targeted (arm) versus non-CT-targeted (palm) touch in a network of brain regions known to be involved in social-emotional information processing including bilateral insula and insular operculum, the right posterior superior temporal sulcus, bilateral temporoparietal junction extending into the inferior parietal lobule, right fusiform gyrus, right amygdala, and bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex including the inferior frontal and precentral gyri, suggesting atypical social brain hypoactivation. Individuals with ASD (vs. TD) showed an enhanced response to non-CT-targeted versus CT-targeted touch in the primary somatosensory cortex, suggesting atypical sensory cortical hyper-reactivity. PMID:26048952

  20. Observation of direction-dependent mechanical properties in the human brain with multi-excitation MR elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Aaron T; Van Houten, Elijah E W; McGarry, Matthew D J; Paulsen, Keith D; Holtrop, Joseph L; Sutton, Bradley P; Georgiadis, John G; Johnson, Curtis L

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has shown promise in noninvasively capturing changes in mechanical properties of the human brain caused by neurodegenerative conditions. MRE involves vibrating the brain to generate shear waves, imaging those waves with MRI, and solving an inverse problem to determine mechanical properties. Despite the known anisotropic nature of brain tissue, the inverse problem in brain MRE is based on an isotropic mechanical model. In this study, distinct wave patterns are generated in the brain through the use of multiple excitation directions in order to characterize the potential impact of anisotropic tissue mechanics on isotropic inversion methods. Isotropic inversions of two unique displacement fields result in mechanical property maps that vary locally in areas of highly aligned white matter. Investigation of the corpus callosum, corona radiata, and superior longitudinal fasciculus, three highly ordered white matter tracts, revealed differences in estimated properties between excitations of up to 33%. Using diffusion tensor imaging to identify dominant fiber orientation of bundles, relationships between estimated isotropic properties and shear asymmetry are revealed. This study has implications for future isotropic and anisotropic MRE studies of white matter tracts in the human brain. PMID:27032311

  1. 面向突发事件的应急财政保障机制研究%Security Mechanism of Emergency Finance for Emergencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亘; 李向阳; 孙钦莹

    2014-01-01

    Various types of emergencies occur frequently in our country. Under the control of government, emergency finance department protects public property and interests, thus the emergency fiscal has the extremely important status and plays a significant role in the emergency management. According to the existing problems in our country, it is necessary to strengthen emergency management and supervision during the preparatory phase, response phase and recovery phase. On this basis, the security mechanism of emergency finance is set up, including the financial mechanism of warning and preventing, the financial mechanism of emergency disposal, the financial mechanism of restoration and reconstruction, operating mechanism and supervision mechanism, in order to save people’ awareness and preventive measures.%各类型的突发事件在我国时有发生,应急财政在政府的调控下,维护公众的财产和利益,由此可见应急财政在应急管理中具有极其重要的地位和作用。针对我国应急财政现存的问题,必须强化应急资金在灾前、灾中、灾后的管理与监督,并根据突发事件应急管理的三个阶段(准备阶段、响应阶段、恢复阶段)分别构建预警防范财政保障机制、应急处置财政保障机制、恢复重建财政保障机制,以及贯穿应急管理全过程的应急财政运行机制与应急财政监督机制,形成整体的应急财政保障机制,提醒政府与人民如何提高自救意识与防范措施。

  2. Prediction of brain target site concentrations on the basis of CSF PK : impact of mechanisms of blood-to-brain transport and within brain distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Westerhout, Joost

    2014-01-01

    In the development of drugs for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the prediction of human CNS drug action is a big challenge. Direct measurement of brain extracellular fluid (brainECF) concentrations is highly restricted in human. Therefore, unbound drug concentrations in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used as a surrogate for human brainECF concentrations. Due to qualitative and quantitative differences in processes that govern the pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs in...

  3. Hydrogen bond networks determine emergent mechanical and thermodynamic properties across a protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallakyan Sargis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gram-negative bacteria use periplasmic-binding proteins (bPBP to transport nutrients through the periplasm. Despite immense diversity within the recognized substrates, all members of the family share a common fold that includes two domains that are separated by a conserved hinge. The hinge allows the protein to cycle between open (apo and closed (ligated conformations. Conformational changes within the proteins depend on a complex interplay of mechanical and thermodynamic response, which is manifested as an increase in thermal stability and decrease of flexibility upon ligand binding. Results We use a distance constraint model (DCM to quantify the give and take between thermodynamic stability and mechanical flexibility across the bPBP family. Quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR are readily evaluated because the DCM links mechanical and thermodynamic properties. We have previously demonstrated that QSFR is moderately conserved across a mesophilic/thermophilic RNase H pair, whereas the observed variance indicated that different enthalpy-entropy mechanisms allow similar mechanical response at their respective melting temperatures. Our predictions of heat capacity and free energy show marked diversity across the bPBP family. While backbone flexibility metrics are mostly conserved, cooperativity correlation (long-range couplings also demonstrate considerable amount of variation. Upon ligand removal, heat capacity, melting point, and mechanical rigidity are, as expected, lowered. Nevertheless, significant differences are found in molecular cooperativity correlations that can be explained by the detailed nature of the hydrogen bond network. Conclusion Non-trivial mechanical and thermodynamic variation across the family is explained by differences within the underlying H-bond networks. The mechanism is simple; variation within the H-bond networks result in altered mechanical linkage properties that directly affect

  4. Emergence of modular structure in a large-scale brain network with interactions between dynamics and connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis Jan Stam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A network of 32 or 64 connected neural masses, each representing a large population of interacting excitatory and inhibitory neurons and generating an EEG / MEG like output signal, was used to demonstrate how an interaction between dynamics and connectivity might explain the emergence of complex network features, in particular modularity. Network evolution was modeled by two processes: (i synchronization dependent plasticity (SDP and (ii growth dependent plasticity (GDP. In the case of SDP, connections between neural masses were strengthened when they were strongly synchronized, and were weakened when they were not. GDP was modeled as a homeostatic process with random, distance dependent outgrowth of new connections between neural masses. GDP alone resulted in stable networks with distance dependent connection strengths, typical small-world features, but no degree correlations and only weak modularity. SDP applied to random networks induced clustering, but no clear modules. Stronger modularity evolved only through an interaction of SDP and GDP, with the number and size of the modules depending on the relative strength of both processes, as well as on the size of the network. Lesioning part of the network, after a stable state was achieved, resulted in a temporary disruption of the network structure. The model gives a possible scenario to explain how modularity can arise in developing brain networks, and makes predictions about the time course of network changes during development and following acute lesions.

  5. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cosimo Quattrocchi

    Full Text Available The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease.Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition.Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12 and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42 and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79.Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration.This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest.Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281.

  6. Evidence of an emerging levee failure mechanism causing disastrous floods in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Albertson, John D.

    2015-10-01

    A levee failure occurred along the Secchia River, Northern Italy, on 19 January 2014, resulting in flood damage in excess of $500 million. In response to this failure, immediate surveillance of other levees in the region led to the identification of a second breach developing on the neighboring Panaro River, where rapid mitigation efforts were successful in averting a full levee failure. The paired breach events that occurred along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers provided an excellent window on an emerging levee failure mechanism. In the Secchia River, by combining the information content of photographs taken from helicopters in the early stage of breach development and 10 cm resolution aerial photographs taken in 2010 and 2012, animal burrows were found to exist in the precise levee location where the breach originated. In the Panaro River, internal erosion was observed to occur at a location where a crested porcupine den was known to exist and this erosion led to the collapse of the levee top. This paper uses detailed numerical modeling of rainfall, river flow, and variably saturated flow in the levee to explore the hydraulic and geotechnical mechanisms that were triggered along the Secchia and Panaro Rivers by activities of burrowing animals leading to levee failures. As habitats become more fragmented and constrained along river corridors, it is possible that this failure mechanism could become more prevalent and, therefore, will demand greater attention in both the design and maintenance of earthen hydraulic structures as well as in wildlife management.

  7. Neurophysiological Evidence of Compensatory Brain Mechanisms in Early-Stage Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Góngora, Mariana; Escartín, Antonio; Martínez-Horta, Saul; Fernández-Bobadilla, Ramón; Querol, Luis; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miquel Àngel; Riba, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system disorder characterized by white matter inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Although cognitive dysfunction is a common manifestation, it may go unnoticed in recently-diagnosed patients. Prior studies suggest MS patients develop compensatory mechanisms potentially involving enhanced performance monitoring. Here we assessed the performance monitoring system in early-stage MS patients using the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related brain potential (ERP) observed following behavioral errors. Twenty-seven early-stage MS patients and 31 controls were neuropsychologically assessed. Electroencephalography recordings were obtained while participants performed: a) a stop task and b) an auditory oddball task. Behavior and ERP measures were assessed. No differences in performance were found between groups in most neuropsychological tests or in behavior or ERP components in the auditory oddball task. However, the amplitude of the ERN associated with stop errors in the stop task was significantly higher in patients. ERN amplitude correlated positively with scores on the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score, and negatively with the time since last relapse. Patients showed higher neuronal recruitment in tasks involving performance monitoring. Results suggest the development of compensatory brain mechanisms in early-stage MS and reflect the sensitivity of the ERN to detect these changes. PMID:26322632

  8. Brain mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational audiovisual stimuli on psychophysiological responses during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigliassi, Marcelo; Silva, Vinícius B; Karageorghis, Costas I; Bird, Jonathan M; Santos, Priscila C; Altimari, Leandro R

    2016-05-01

    Motivational audiovisual stimuli such as music and video have been widely used in the realm of exercise and sport as a means by which to increase situational motivation and enhance performance. The present study addressed the mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational stimuli on psychophysiological responses and exercise performance. Twenty-two participants completed fatiguing isometric handgrip-squeezing tasks under two experimental conditions (motivational audiovisual condition and neutral audiovisual condition) and a control condition. Electrical activity in the brain and working muscles was analyzed by use of electroencephalography and electromyography, respectively. Participants were asked to squeeze the dynamometer maximally for 30s. A single-item motivation scale was administered after each squeeze. Results indicated that task performance and situational motivational were superior under the influence of motivational stimuli when compared to the other two conditions (~20% and ~25%, respectively). The motivational stimulus downregulated the predominance of low-frequency waves (theta) in the right frontal regions of the cortex (F8), and upregulated high-frequency waves (beta) in the central areas (C3 and C4). It is suggested that motivational sensory cues serve to readjust electrical activity in the brain; a mechanism by which the detrimental effects of fatigue on the efferent control of working muscles is ameliorated. PMID:26948160

  9. Inflammation triggers emergency granulopoiesis through a density-dependent feedback mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek W Cain

    Full Text Available Normally, neutrophil pools are maintained by homeostatic mechanisms that require the transcription factor C/EBPα. Inflammation, however, induces neutrophilia through a distinct pathway of "emergency" granulopoiesis that is dependent on C/EBPβ. Here, we show in mice that alum triggers emergency granulopoiesis through the IL-1RI-dependent induction of G-CSF. G-CSF/G-CSF-R neutralization impairs proliferative responses of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC to alum, but also abrogates the acute mobilization of BM neutrophils, raising the possibility that HSPC responses to inflammation are an indirect result of the exhaustion of BM neutrophil stores. The induction of neutropenia, via depletion with Gr-1 mAb or myeloid-specific ablation of Mcl-1, elicits G-CSF via an IL-1RI-independent pathway, stimulating granulopoietic responses indistinguishable from those induced by adjuvant. Notably, C/EBPβ, thought to be necessary for enhanced generative capacity of BM, is dispensable for increased proliferation of HSPC to alum or neutropenia, but plays a role in terminal neutrophil differentiation during granulopoietic recovery. We conclude that alum elicits a transient increase in G-CSF production via IL-1RI for the mobilization of BM neutrophils, but density-dependent feedback sustains G-CSF for accelerated granulopoiesis.

  10. Prediction of brain target site concentrations on the basis of CSF PK : impact of mechanisms of blood-to-brain transport and within brain distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the development of drugs for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the prediction of human CNS drug action is a big challenge. Direct measurement of brain extracellular fluid (brainECF) concentrations is highly restricted in human. Therefore, unbound drug concentrations in huma

  11. PREFACE: EmerQuM 11: Emergent Quantum Mechanics 2011 (Heinz von Foerster Congress)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, Gerhard

    2012-05-01

    These proceedings comprise the plenary lectures and poster contributions of the 'Heinz von Foerster Conference 2011' on Emergent Quantum Mechanics (EmerQuM11), which was held at the University of Vienna, 11-13 November 2011. With the 5th International Heinz von Foerster Conference convened at the occasion of von Foerster's 100th birthday, the organizers opted for a twin conference to take place at the Large and Small Ceremonial Halls of the University's main building, respectively. The overall topic was chosen as 'Self-Organization and Emergence', a topic to which von Foerster was an early contributor. While the first conference ('Self-Organization and Emergence in Nature and Society') addressed a more general audience, the second one ('Emergent Quantum Mechanics') was intended as a specialist meeting with a contemporary topic that could both serve as an illustration of von Foerster's intellectual heritage and, more generally, point towards future directions in physics. We thus intended to bring together many of those physicists who are interested in or are working on attempts to understand quantum mechanics as emerging from a suitable classical (or, more generally, deeper level) physics. EmerQuM11 was organized by the Austrian Institute for Nonlinear Studies (AINS), with essential support from the Wiener Institute for Social Science Documentation and Methodology (WISDOM), the Department of Contemporary History at the University of Vienna, and the Heinz von Foerster-Gesellschaft. There were a number of individuals who contributed to the smooth course of our meeting and whom I would like to sincerely thank: Christian Bischof, Thomas Elze, Marianne Ertl, Gertrud Hafner, Werner Korn, Angelika Krawanja, Florian Krug and his team, Sonja Lang, Albert Müller, Ilse Müller, Irene Müller, Karl Müller, Armin Reautschnig, Marion Schirrmacher, Anton Staudinger, Roman Zlabinger, and, last but not least, my AINS colleagues Siegfried Fussy, Herbert Schwabl and Johannes Mesa

  12. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    (DMT1) is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin......Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is...... strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead...

  13. Infusion of Emerging Technologies and New Teaching Methods into the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum at the City College of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delale, Feridun; Liaw, Benjamin M.; Jiji, Latif M.; Voiculescu, Ioana; Yu, Honghui

    2011-01-01

    From October 2003 to April 2008 a systemic reform of the Mechanical Engineering program at The City College of New York was undertaken with the goal of incorporating emerging technologies (such as nanotechnology, biotechnology, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), intelligent systems) and new teaching methodologies (such as project based…

  14. Transient hypoxia stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in brain subcortex by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adaptive mechanisms that protect brain metabolism during and after hypoxia, for instance, during hypoxic preconditioning, are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that acute transient hypoxia stimulates NO synthase (NOS)-activated mechanisms of m...

  15. Early self-reproduction, the emergence of division mechanisms in protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtas, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Synthetic Biology approaches are proposing model systems and providing experimental evidences that life can arise as spontaneous chemical self-assembly process where the ability to reproduce itself is an essential feature of the living system. The appearance of early cells has required an amphiphilic membrane compartment to confine molecular information against diffusion, and the ability to self-replicate the boundary layer and the genetic information. The initial spontaneous self-replication mechanisms based on thermodynamic instability would have evolved in a prebiotic and later biological catalysis. Early studies demonstrate that fatty acids spontaneously assemble into bilayer membranes, building vesicles able to grow by incorporation of free lipid molecules and divide. Early replication mechanisms may have seen inorganic molecules playing a role as the first catalysts. The emergence of a short ribozyme or short catalytic peptide may have initiated the first prebiotic membrane lipid synthesis required for vesicle growth. The evolution of early catalysts towards the simplest translation machine to deliver proteins from RNA sequences was likely to give early birth to one single enzyme controlling protocell membrane division. The cell replication process assisted by complex enzymes for lipid synthesis is the result of evolved pathways in early cells. Evolution from organic molecules to protocells and early cells, thus from chemistry to biology, may have occurred in and out of the boundary layer. Here we review recent experimental work describing membrane and vesicle division mechanisms based on chemico-physical spontaneous processes, inorganic early catalysis and enzyme based mechanisms controlling early protocell division and finally the feedback from minimal genome studies. PMID:23232904

  16. Interactions between connected half-sarcomeres produce emergent mechanical behavior in a mathematical model of muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth S Campbell

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Most reductionist theories of muscle attribute a fiber's mechanical properties to the scaled behavior of a single half-sarcomere. Mathematical models of this type can explain many of the known mechanical properties of muscle but have to incorporate a passive mechanical component that becomes approximately 300% stiffer in activating conditions to reproduce the force response elicited by stretching a fast mammalian muscle fiber. The available experimental data suggests that titin filaments, which are the mostly likely source of the passive component, become at most approximately 30% stiffer in saturating Ca2+ solutions. The work described in this manuscript used computer modeling to test an alternative systems theory that attributes the stretch response of a mammalian fiber to the composite behavior of a collection of half-sarcomeres. The principal finding was that the stretch response of a chemically permeabilized rabbit psoas fiber could be reproduced with a framework consisting of 300 half-sarcomeres arranged in 6 parallel myofibrils without requiring titin filaments to stiffen in activating solutions. Ablation of inter-myofibrillar links in the computer simulations lowered isometric force values and lowered energy absorption during a stretch. This computed behavior mimics effects previously observed in experiments using muscles from desmin-deficient mice in which the connections between Z-disks in adjacent myofibrils are presumably compromised. The current simulations suggest that muscle fibers exhibit emergent properties that reflect interactions between half-sarcomeres and are not properties of a single half-sarcomere in isolation. It is therefore likely that full quantitative understanding of a fiber's mechanical properties requires detailed analysis of a complete fiber system and cannot be achieved by focusing solely on the properties of a single half-sarcomere.

  17. A Tentative Mechanism of Solubilization of Neuropathy Target Esterase from Chicken Embryo Brain by Phospholipase A2

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Seifert

    2008-01-01

    The neuropathy target esterase is a membrane-bound enzyme linked to organophosphate-induced distal neuropathy. Here we report a tentative mechanism of its solubilization from chicken embryo brains by using phospholipase A2. The enzyme was released from brain membranes after degradation of their structural phospholipids initiated by phospholipase A2. L-α-lysophosphatidylcholine, tested as a representative product of phospholipid hydrolysis, was identified as a new efficient detergent for solub...

  18. Spatial and Functional Architecture of the Mammalian Brain Stem Respiratory Network: A Hierarchy of Three Oscillatory Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J C; Abdala, A. P. L.; Koizumi, H.; Rybak, I. A.; Paton, J. F. R.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian central pattern generators (CPGs) producing rhythmic movements exhibit extremely robust and flexible behavior. Network architectures that enable these features are not well understood. Here we studied organization of the brain stem respiratory CPG. By sequential rostral to caudal transections through the pontine-medullary respiratory network within an in situ perfused rat brain stem–spinal cord preparation, we showed that network dynamics reorganized and new rhythmogenic mechanisms ...

  19. A Tentative Mechanism of Solubilization of Neuropathy Target Esterase from Chicken Embryo Brain by Phospholipase A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Seifert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuropathy target esterase is a membrane-bound enzyme linked to organophosphate-induced distal neuropathy. Here we report a tentative mechanism of its solubilization from chicken embryo brains by using phospholipase A2. The enzyme was released from brain membranes after degradation of their structural phospholipids initiated by phospholipase A2. L-α-lysophosphatidylcholine, tested as a representative product of phospholipid hydrolysis, was identified as a new efficient detergent for solubilization of the neuropathy target esterase.

  20. The role of alpha-band brain oscillations as a sensory suppression mechanism during selective attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AdamC.Snyder

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has amassed from both animal intracranial recordings and human electrophysiology that neural oscillatory mechanisms play a critical role in a number of cognitive functions such as learning, memory, feature binding and sensory gating. The wide availability of high-density electrical and magnetic recordings (64-256 channels over the past two decades has allowed for renewed efforts in the characterization and localization of these rhythms. A variety of cognitive effects that are associated with specific brain oscillations have been reported, which range in spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics depending on the context. Our laboratory has focused on investigating the role of alpha-band oscillatory activity (8-14 Hz as a potential attentional suppression mechanism, and this particular oscillatory attention mechanism will be the focus of the current review. We discuss findings in the context of intersensory selective attention as well as intrasensory spatial and feature-based attention in the visual, auditory, and tactile domains. The weight of evidence suggests that alpha-band oscillations can be actively invoked within cortical regions across multiple sensory systems, particularly when these regions are involved in processing irrelevant or distracting information. That is, a central role for alpha seems to be as an attentional suppression mechanism when objects or features need to be specifically ignored or selected against.

  1. Mechanical circulatory assist devices: a primer for critical care and emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ayan; Larson, Joel S; Kashani, Kianoush B; Libricz, Stacy L; Patel, Bhavesh M; Guru, Pramod K; Alwardt, Cory M; Pajaro, Octavio; Farmer, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory assist devices are now commonly used in the treatment of severe heart failure as bridges to cardiac transplant, as destination therapy for patients who are not transplant candidates, and as bridges to recovery and "decision-making". These devices, which can be used to support the left or right ventricles or both, restore circulation to the tissues, thereby improving organ function. Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are the most common support devices. To care for patients with these devices, health care providers in emergency departments (EDs) and intensive care units (ICUs) need to understand the physiology of the devices, the vocabulary of mechanical support, the types of complications patients may have, diagnostic techniques, and decision-making regarding treatment. Patients with LVADs who come to the ED or are admitted to the ICU usually have nonspecific clinical symptoms, most commonly shortness of breath, hypotension, anemia, chest pain, syncope, hemoptysis, gastrointestinal bleeding, jaundice, fever, oliguria and hematuria, altered mental status, headache, seizure, and back pain. Other patients are seen for cardiac arrest, psychiatric issues, sequelae of noncardiac surgery, and trauma. Although most patients have LVADs, some may have biventricular support devices or total artificial hearts. Involving a team of cardiac surgeons, perfusion experts, and heart-failure physicians, as well as ED and ICU physicians and nurses, is critical for managing treatment for these patients and for successful outcomes. This review is designed for critical care providers who may be the first to see these patients in the ED or ICU. PMID:27342573

  2. Mechanism of Action of Ulipristal Acetate for Emergency Contraception: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Elena; Farris, Manuela; Bastianelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Ulipristal acetate (UPA) is now recommended as first choice hormonal emergency contraception (EC), due to its higher efficacy and similar safety compared to Levonorgestrel - EC. Even though all trials demonstrated that the first mechanism of action is inhibition of ovulation, some authors still postulate that a post fertilization effect is also possible, raising the alert on medication and fostering the ethical debate. A Medline database search was performed in order to find recent articles related to UPA's effects on ovulation, on fallopian tube and on endometrium. We also analyzed the effects on sperm function and pregnancy. All studies conclude that UPA is effective in inhibition of ovulation even when administered shortly before LH peak. The effects on fallopian tube are unclear: according to some authors UPA inhibits ciliar beat through an agonistic effect on progesterone receptors, according to others it antagonizes the progesterone-induced ciliar beat decrease. Concerning the action on endometrium and on embryo implantation most of the studies concluded that low dose UPA used for EC has no significant effect on the decrease of endometrial thickness and on embryo's attachment, but these results are still matter of debate. Finally recent evidence suggests that UPA modulates human sperm functions while it has no effect on established pregnancy. To date the majority of the evidence concurs in excluding a post-fertilization effect of UPA, even though more studies are needed to clarify its mechanism of action. PMID:26793107

  3. Mechanism of action of ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eRosato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYUlipristal acetate (UPA is now recommended as first choice hormonal Emergency Contraception (EC, due to its higher efficacy and similar safety compared to Levonogestrel - EC. Even though all trials demonstrated that the first mechanism of action is inhibition of ovulation, some authors still postulate that a post fertilization effect is also possible, raising the alert on medication and fostering the ethical debate.A Medline database search was performed in order to find recent articles related to UPA’s effects on ovulation, on fallopian tube and on endometrium. We also analyzed the effects on sperm function and pregnancy. All studies conclude that UPA is effective in inhibition of ovulation even when administered shortly before LH peak. The effects on fallopian tube are unclear: according to some authors UPA inhibits ciliar beat through an agonistic effect on progesterone receptors, according to others it antagonizes the progesterone-induced ciliar beat decrease. Concerning the action on endometrium and on embryo implantation most of the studies concluded that low dose UPA used for EC has no significant effect on the decrease of endometrial thickness and on embryo’s attachment, but these results are still matter of debate. Finally recent evidence suggests that UPA modulates human sperm functions while it has no effect on established pregnancy. To date the majority of the evidence concur in excluding a post-fertilization effect of UPA, even though more studies are needed to clarify its mechanism of action.

  4. The complexity of biomechanics causing primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury: a review of potential mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy eCourtney

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary blast induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs which isolate a single injury mechanism.

  5. Investigation of the mechanisms of neuroprotection mediated by Ro5-4864 in brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palzur, Eilam; Sharon, Aviram; Shehadeh, Mona; Soustiel, Jean Francois

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence has established the involvement of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) in the process of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and subsequent apoptosis through modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Recent studies have shown that treatment with Ro5-4864, a TSPO ligand, resulted in a neuroprotective effect in traumatic brain injury. Yet, the nature of this effect remained uncertain as mature neurons are considered to be lacking the TSPO protein. In order to investigate the mechanism of Ro5-4864-mediated neuroprotection, the neuro-inflammatory and neurosteroid response to cortical injury was tested in sham-operated, vehicle, cyclosporine A (CsA) and Ro5-4864-treated rats. As anticipated, the levels of interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α, as well as the astrocyte and microglia cellular density in the injured area were all decreased by CsA in comparison with the vehicle group. By contrast, no visible effect could be observed in Ro5-4864-treated animals. None of the groups showed any significant difference with any other in respect with the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Double immunofluorescence staining with NeuN and TSPO confirmed the absence of TSPO in native neurons though showed clear evidence of co-localization of TSPO in the cytoplasm of NeuN-stained injured neurons. Altogether, this study shows that the neuronal protection mediated by Ro5-4864 in brain injury cannot be solely attributed to an indirect effect of the ligand on glial TSPO but may also represent the consequence of the modulation of upregulated TSPO in injured neurons. This observation may be of importance for future pharmacological research in neurotrauma. PMID:27223627

  6. Is there a better commitment mechanism than cross-listings for emerging-economy firms? Evidence from Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan Siegel

    2009-01-01

    The last decade of work in corporate governance has shown that weak legal institutions at the country level hinder firms in emerging economies from accessing finance and technology affordably. To attract outside resources, these firms must often use external commitments for repayment. Research suggests that a common commitment mechanism is to borrow US securities laws, which involves listing the emerging economy firm's shares on a US exchange. This paper uses a quasi-natural experiment from M...

  7. A thermal window for yawning in humans: yawning as a brain cooling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massen, Jorg J M; Dusch, Kim; Eldakar, Omar Tonsi; Gallup, Andrew C

    2014-05-10

    The thermoregulatory theory of yawning posits that yawns function to cool the brain in part due to counter-current heat exchange with the deep inhalation of ambient air. Consequently, yawning should be constrained to an optimal thermal zone or range of temperature, i.e., a thermal window, in which we should expect a lower frequency at extreme temperatures. Previous research shows that yawn frequency diminishes as ambient temperatures rise and approach body temperature, but a lower bound to the thermal window has not been demonstrated. To test this, a total of 120 pedestrians were sampled for susceptibly to self-reported yawn contagion during distinct temperature ranges and seasons (winter: 1.4°C, n=60; summer: 19.4°C, n=60). As predicted, the proportion of pedestrians reporting yawning was significantly lower during winter than in summer (18.3% vs. 41.7%), with temperature being the only significant predictor of these differences across seasons. The underlying mechanism for yawning in humans, both spontaneous and contagious, appears to be involved in brain thermoregulation. PMID:24721675

  8. Oscillatory brain activity related to control mechanisms during laboratory-induced reactive aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike M Krämer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior is a common reaction in humans after an interpersonal provocation, but little is known about the underlying brain mechanisms. The present study analyzed oscillatory brain activity while participants were involved in an aggressive interaction to examine the neural processes subserving the associated decision and evaluation processes. Participants were selected from a larger sample because of their high scores in trait aggressiveness. We used a competitive reaction time task that induces aggressive behavior through provocation. Each trial is separated in a decision phase, during which the punishment for the opponent is set, and an outcome phase, during which the actual punishment is applied or received. We observed provocation-related differences during the decision phase in the theta band which differed depending on participants’ aggressive behavior: High provocation was associated with an increased frontal theta response in participants refraining from retaliation, but with reduced theta power in those who got back to the opponent. Moreover, more aggressive decisions after being punished were associated with a decrease of frontal theta power. Non-aggressive and aggressive participants differed also in their outcome-related response: Being punished led to an increased frontal theta power compared to win trials in the latter only, pointing to differences in evaluation processes associated with their different behavioral reactions. The data thus support previous evidence for a role of prefrontal areas in the control of reactive aggression and extend behavioral studies on associations between aggression or violence and impaired prefrontal functions.

  9. Social Robots, Brain Machine Interfaces and Neuro/Cognitive Enhancers: Three Emerging Science and Technology Products through the Lens of Technology Acceptance Theories, Models and Frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Wolbring, Gregor; Diep, Lucy; Yumakulov, Sophya; Ball, Natalie; Yergens, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Social robotics, brain machine interfaces and neuro and cognitive enhancement products are three emerging science and technology products with wide-reaching impact for disabled and non-disabled people. Acceptance of ideas and products depend on multiple parameters and many models have been developed to predict product acceptance. We investigated which frequently employed technology acceptance models (consumer theory, innovation diffusion model, theory of reasoned action, theory of planned beh...

  10. Radioactivity material release mechanism and emergency radiation monitor requirements of personnel in core meltdown accident for submarine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some release mechanism of fission products from core meltdown accident of submarine nuclear power plants is described, which include gas-gap, melting, vaporization, steam and explosion. The further release process of them to cabins and environment is described too. The basic requirements and contents of emergency radiation monitor for personnel are approached. A tentative idea of forming emergency radiation monitor net of submarine nuclear power plants and the issue of neutron monitor and protect in the nuclear accident emergency rescue are put forward

  11. Molecular mechanisms associated with ALA-PDT of brain tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqawi, Omar; Espiritu, Myrna; Singh, Gurmit

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that low-dose PDT using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced photoporphyrin IX (PpIX) can induce apoptosis in tumor cells without causing necrosis. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms associated with apoptosis after ALA-PDT treatment in two brain glioma cell lines: human U87, and rat CNS-1cells. We used high energy light at a short time (acute PDT) and low energy light at a long time of exposure (metronomic PDT) to treat both cell lines. The cells were treated with 0.25 mM ALA at 5 joules for energy. We found that CNS-1 cells were more resistant to ALA-PDT than U87 cells when treated by both acute and metronomic PDT. To screen possible apoptosis mechanisms associated with acute and metronomic PDT, microarray analysis of gene expression was performed on RNA from glioblastoma cells treated with either acute or metronomic ALA-PDT. Within the set of genes that were negatively or positively regulated by both treatments are tumor necrosis factor receptors. The expression of TNF receptors was investigated further by RT-PCR and western blotting. The apoptosis mechanism of the cell death occurred through different pathways including BCL-2 and TNF receptors, and in part caused by cleaving caspase 3. Interestingly, metronomic ALA-PDT inhibited the expression of LTβR and the transcription factor NFκB. This inhibition was ALA concentration dependent at low concentrations.

  12. State and Training Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Brain Networks Reflect Neuronal Mechanisms of Its Antidepressant Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Chuan-Chih Yang; Alfonso Barrós-Loscertales; Daniel Pinazo; Noelia Ventura-Campos; Viola Borchardt; Juan-Carlos Bustamante; Aina Rodríguez-Pujadas; Paola Fuentes-Claramonte; Raúl Balaguer; César Ávila; Martin Walter

    2016-01-01

    The topic of investigating how mindfulness meditation training can have antidepressant effects via plastic changes in both resting state and meditation state brain activity is important in the rapidly emerging field of neuroplasticity. In the present study, we used a longitudinal design investigating resting state fMRI both before and after 40 days of meditation training in 13 novices. After training, we compared differences in network connectivity between rest and meditation using common res...

  13. A mechanism for proven technology foresight for emerging fast reactor designs and concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of emerging nuclear fast reactor designs and concepts viability requires a combination of foresight methods. A mechanism that allows for the comparison and quantification of the possibility of being a proven technology in the future, β for the existing fast reactor designs and concepts is proposed as one of the quantitative foresight method. The methodology starts with the identification at the national or regional level, of the factors that would affect β. The factors are then categorized into several groups; economic, social and technology elements. Each of the elements is proposed to be mathematically modelled before all of the elemental models can be combined. Once the overall β model is obtained, the βmin is determined to benchmark the acceptance as a candidate design or concept. The β values for all the available designs and concepts are then determined and compared with the βmin, resulting in a list of candidate designs that possess the β value that is larger than the βmin. The proposed methodology can also be applied to purposes other than technological foresight

  14. A mechanism for proven technology foresight for emerging fast reactor designs and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Nuraslinda; Muhamad Pauzi, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of emerging nuclear fast reactor designs and concepts viability requires a combination of foresight methods. A mechanism that allows for the comparison and quantification of the possibility of being a proven technology in the future, β for the existing fast reactor designs and concepts is proposed as one of the quantitative foresight method. The methodology starts with the identification at the national or regional level, of the factors that would affect β. The factors are then categorized into several groups; economic, social and technology elements. Each of the elements is proposed to be mathematically modelled before all of the elemental models can be combined. Once the overall β model is obtained, the βmin is determined to benchmark the acceptance as a candidate design or concept. The β values for all the available designs and concepts are then determined and compared with the βmin, resulting in a list of candidate designs that possess the β value that is larger than the βmin. The proposed methodology can also be applied to purposes other than technological foresight.

  15. A mechanism for proven technology foresight for emerging fast reactor designs and concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anuar, Nuraslinda, E-mail: nuraslinda@uniten.edu.my; Muhamad Pauzi, Anas, E-mail: anas@uniten.edu.my [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The assessment of emerging nuclear fast reactor designs and concepts viability requires a combination of foresight methods. A mechanism that allows for the comparison and quantification of the possibility of being a proven technology in the future, β for the existing fast reactor designs and concepts is proposed as one of the quantitative foresight method. The methodology starts with the identification at the national or regional level, of the factors that would affect β. The factors are then categorized into several groups; economic, social and technology elements. Each of the elements is proposed to be mathematically modelled before all of the elemental models can be combined. Once the overall β model is obtained, the β{sub min} is determined to benchmark the acceptance as a candidate design or concept. The β values for all the available designs and concepts are then determined and compared with the β{sub min}, resulting in a list of candidate designs that possess the β value that is larger than the β{sub min}. The proposed methodology can also be applied to purposes other than technological foresight.

  16. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms: help or hindrance in drug delivery to the central nervous system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Norman R; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M

    2016-01-01

    Barrier mechanisms in the brain are important for its normal functioning and development. Stability of the brain's internal environment, particularly with respect to its ionic composition, is a prerequisite for the fundamental basis of its function, namely transmission of nerve impulses. In addition, the appropriate and controlled supply of a wide range of nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, monocarboxylates, and vitamins is also essential for normal development and function. These are all cellular functions across the interfaces that separate the brain from the rest of the internal environment of the body. An essential morphological component of all but one of the barriers is the presence of specialized intercellular tight junctions between the cells comprising the interface: endothelial cells in the blood-brain barrier itself, cells of the arachnoid membrane, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and tanycytes (specialized glial cells) in the circumventricular organs. In the ependyma lining the cerebral ventricles in the adult brain, the cells are joined by gap junctions, which are not restrictive for intercellular movement of molecules. But in the developing brain, the forerunners of these cells form the neuroepithelium, which restricts exchange of all but the smallest molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and brain interstitial fluid because of the presence of strap junctions between the cells. The intercellular junctions in all these interfaces are the physical basis for their barrier properties. In the blood-brain barrier proper, this is combined with a paucity of vesicular transport that is a characteristic of other vascular beds. Without such a diffusional restrain, the cellular transport mechanisms in the barrier interfaces would be ineffective. Superimposed on these physical structures are physiological mechanisms as the cells of the interfaces contain various metabolic transporters and efflux pumps, often ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, that

  17. Nurses' perceptions of using an evidence-based care bundle for initial emergency nursing management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damkliang, Jintana; Considine, Julie; Kent, Bridie; Street, Maryann

    2015-10-01

    Evidence to guide initial emergency nursing care of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Thailand is currently not available in a useable form. A care bundle was used to summarise an evidence-based approach to the initial emergency nursing management of patients with severe TBI and was implemented in one Thai emergency department. The aim of this study was to describe Thai emergency nurses' perceptions of care bundle use. A descriptive qualitative study was used to describe emergency nurses' perceptions of care bundle use during the implementation phase (Phase-One) and then post-implementation (Phase-Two). Ten emergency nurses participated in Phase-One, while 12 nurses participated in Phase-Two. In Phase-One, there were five important factors identified in relation to use of the care bundle including quality of care, competing priorities, inadequate equipment, agitated patients, and teamwork. In Phase Two, participants perceived that using the care bundle helped them to improve quality of care, increased nurses' knowledge, skills, and confidence. Care bundles are one strategy to increase integration of research evidence into clinical practice and facilitate healthcare providers to deliver optimal patient care in busy environments with limited resources. PMID:26049810

  18. Hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of neurofilament proteins in Alzheimer brain and the possible mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) neurofibrillary degeneration is characterized by a disruption of the cytoskeleton. The alteration of microtubule system and the microtubule-associated protein has been extensively investigated in this pathology. In the present study, we decided to explore the role of neurofilament (NF) proteins in AD neurofibrillary degeneration. We first investigated the content and the phosphorylation level of NF proteins in AD brain by using a panel of anti-NF antibodies. It was found by quantitative Western blot that the NF subunits were exclusively detected in an insoluble fraction from AD brain grey matter. The level of phosphorylated (p)-NF-H and (p)-NF-M was increased 1.5 and 1.3 times (P<0.05) respectively at phosphorylation specific antibody SMI31 epitope in AD as compared to neurological controls of Huntington disease (HD). A 1.6 fold elevation (P>0.05) of p-NF-H to another phosphate reactive antibody SMI34 was also seen in AD. The level of non-phosphorylated (np)-NF-H/M recognized by SMI33 was similar before alkaline phosphatase (ALP) treatment, but the total level of NF-H/M was 1.5 and 1.6 times (P<0.01) higher in AD than HD after dephosphorylation. Furthermore, a 1.8 fold increase of NF-M to SMI32 was observed in AD only after ALP treatment, suggesting that the NF-H/M are increased in the phosphorylated form. The amount of NF-L determined by NR-4 was 1.6 fold (P<0.01) higher in AD than HD. To our knowledge, this is the first biochemical data shown definite abnormality of NF subunits in AD brain. To understand the possible mechanism for the abnormal hyperphosphorylation and elevation of NF in AD brain, we treated human SY5Y neuroblastoma cell with protein phosphatase(PP)-2A and PP-1 inhibitor okadaic acid(OA). Then, we determined the relationship between an AD-like PP-A and PP-1 activity deficiency and NF phosphorylation as well as intracellular translocation in modeled cell system. It was demonstrated that p-NF-H/M detected by SMI31 and

  19. BRAIN PLASTICITY: MUSICAL TRAINING INVOLVEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Verónika Diaz Abrahan; Nadia Justel

    2012-01-01

    The main research about the effect of musical training in adult and childhood brain was revised in this work. The music realizes unique demands to our ner-vous system. This call the attention of several researchers causing, in the past years, an enhancement of the exploration about this topic; this increment was benefit for the emergence of new neuroimaging techniques, the music positioned as an investigation tool of human cognition and superior brain mechanisms. The musical perception and pr...

  20. Microcavitation as a Neuronal Damage Mechanism in Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Christian; Estrada, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of injury in the armed forces. Diffuse axonal injury, the hallmark feature of blunt TBI, has been investigated in direct mechanical loading conditions. However, recent evidence suggests inertial cavitation as a possible bTBI mechanism, particularly in the case of exposure to blasts. Cavitation damage to free surfaces has been well-studied, but bubble interactions within confined 3D environments, in particular their stress and strain signatures are not well understood. The structural damage due to cavitation in living tissues - particularly at the cellular level - are incompletely understood, in part due to the rapid bubble formation and deformation strain rates of up to ~ 105-106 s-1. This project aims to characterize material damage in 2D and 3D cell culture environments by utilizing a novel high-speed red-blue diffraction assisted image correlation method at speeds of up to 106 frames per second. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of Naval Research (POC: Dr. Tim Bentley).

  1. Review: Insights into molecular mechanisms of disease in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: unifying theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, C E; Li, A; Houlden, H; Wray, S

    2016-04-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of disorders characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism and spasticity. Iron accumulates in the basal ganglia and may be accompanied by Lewy bodies, axonal swellings and hyperphosphorylated tau depending on NBIA subtype. Mutations in 10 genes have been associated with NBIA that include Ceruloplasmin (Cp) and ferritin light chain (FTL), both directly involved in iron homeostasis, as well as Pantothenate Kinase 2 (PANK2), Phospholipase A2 group 6 (PLA2G6), Fatty acid hydroxylase 2 (FA2H), Coenzyme A synthase (COASY), C19orf12, WDR45 and DCAF17 (C2orf37). These genes are involved in seemingly unrelated cellular pathways, such as lipid metabolism, Coenzyme A synthesis and autophagy. A greater understanding of the cellular pathways that link these genes and the disease mechanisms leading to iron dyshomeostasis is needed. Additionally, the major overlap seen between NBIA and more common neurodegenerative diseases may highlight conserved disease processes. In this review, we will discuss clinical and pathological findings for each NBIA-related gene, discuss proposed disease mechanisms such as mitochondrial health, oxidative damage, autophagy/mitophagy and iron homeostasis, and speculate the potential overlap between NBIA subtypes. PMID:25870938

  2. Molecular mechanisms of estrogen for neuroprotection in spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Das, Arabinda; Samantaray, Supriti; Smith, Joshua A; Banik, Naren L; Haque, Azizul; Ray, Swapan K

    2016-04-01

    Estrogen (EST) is a steroid hormone that exhibits several important physiological roles in the human body. During the last few decades, EST has been well recognized as an important neuroprotective agent in a variety of neurological disorders in the central nervous system (CNS), such as spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis. The exact molecular mechanisms of EST-mediated neuroprotection in the CNS remain unclear due to heterogeneity of cell populations that express EST receptors (ERs) in the CNS as well as in the innate and adaptive immune system. Recent investigations suggest that EST protects the CNS from injury by suppressing pro-inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and cell death, while promoting neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and neurotrophic support. In this review, we have described the currently known molecular mechanisms of EST-mediated neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in SCI and TBI. At the same time, we have emphasized on the recent in vitro and in vivo findings from our and other laboratories, implying potential clinical benefits of EST in the treatment of SCI and TBI. PMID:26461840

  3. Psychometric properties of a novel knowledge assessment tool of mechanical ventilation for emergency medicine residents in the northeastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremy B. Richards; Strout, Tania D.; Seigel, Todd A; Wilcox, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Prior descriptions of the psychometric properties of validated knowledge assessment tools designed to determine Emergency medicine (EM) residents understanding of physiologic and clinical concepts related to mechanical ventilation are lacking. In this setting, we have performed this study to describe the psychometric and performance properties of a novel knowledge assessment tool that measures EM residents’ knowledge of topics in mechanical ventilation. Methods: Results from a multic...

  4. Neuroprotective mechanisms of puerarin in middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced brain infarction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb Radix puerariae (kudzu root, has been reported to be useful in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we examined the detailed mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of puerarin on inflammatory and apoptotic responses induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats. Treatment of puerarin (25 and 50 mg/kg; intraperitoneally 10 min before MCAO dose-dependently attenuated focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Administration of puerarin at 50 mg/kg, showed marked reduction in infarct size compared with that of control rats. MCAO-induced focal cerebral ischemia was associated with increases in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and active caspase-3 protein expressions as well as the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in ischemic regions. These expressions were markedly inhibited by the treatment of puerarin (50 mg/kg. In addition, puerarin (10~50 μM concentration-dependently inhibited respiratory bursts in human neutrophils stimulated by formyl-Met-Leu-Phe. On the other hand, puerarin (20~500 μM did not significantly inhibit the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance reaction in rat brain homogenates. An electron spin resonance (ESR method was conducted on the scavenging activity of puerarin on the free radicals formed. Puerarin (200 and 500 μM did not reduce the ESR signal intensity of hydroxyl radical formation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that puerarin is a potent neuroprotective agent on MCAO-induced focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. This effect may be mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of both HIF-1α and TNF-α activation, followed by the inhibition of inflammatory responses (i.e., iNOS expression, apoptosis formation (active caspase-3, and neutrophil activation, resulting in a reduction in the infarct volume in ischemia-reperfusion brain injury. Thus

  5. Heparanase mediates a novel mechanism in lapatinib-resistant brain metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPSE is the dominant mammalian endoglycosidase and important tumorigenic, angiogenic, and pro-metastatic molecule. Highest levels of HPSE activity have been consistently detected in cells possessing highest propensities to colonize the brain, emphasizing the therapeutic potential for targeting HPSE in brain metastatic breast cancer (BMBC. Lapatinib (Tykerb is a small-molecule and dual inhibitor of human epidermal growth factor receptor1 and 2 (EGFR and HER2, respectively which are both high-risk predictors of BMBC. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer. However, its role is limited in BMBC whose response rates to lapatinib are significantly lower than those for extracranial metastasis. Because HPSE can affect EGFR phosphorylation, we examined Roneparstat, a non-anticoagulant heparin with potent anti-HPSE activity, to inhibit EGFR signaling pathways and BMBC onset using lapatinib-resistant clones generated from HER2-transfected, EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231BR cells. Cell growth, EGFR pathways, and HPSE targets were assessed among selected clones in the absence or presence of Roneparstat and/or lapatinib. Roneparstat overcame lapatinib resistance by inhibiting pathways associated with EGFR tyrosine residues that are not targeted by lapatinib. Roneparstat inhibited the growth and BMBC abilities of lapatinib-resistant clones. A molecular mechanism was identified by which HPSE mediates an alternative survival pathway in lapatinib-resistant clones and is modulated by Roneparstat. These results demonstrate that the inhibition of HPSE-mediated signaling plays important roles in lapatinib resistance, and provide mechanistic insights to validate the use of Roneparstat for novel BMBC therapeutic strategies.

  6. Molecular Electrical Doping of Organic Semiconductors: Fundamental Mechanisms and Emerging Dopant Design Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Ingo; Heimel, Georg; Oehzelt, Martin; Winkler, Stefanie; Koch, Norbert

    2016-03-15

    Today's information society depends on our ability to controllably dope inorganic semiconductors, such as silicon, thereby tuning their electrical properties to application-specific demands. For optoelectronic devices, organic semiconductors, that is, conjugated polymers and molecules, have emerged as superior alternative owing to the ease of tuning their optical gap through chemical variability and their potential for low-cost, large-area processing on flexible substrates. There, the potential of molecular electrical doping for improving the performance of, for example, organic light-emitting devices or organic solar cells has only recently been established. The doping efficiency, however, remains conspicuously low, highlighting the fact that the underlying mechanisms of molecular doping in organic semiconductors are only little understood compared with their inorganic counterparts. Here, we review the broad range of phenomena observed upon molecularly doping organic semiconductors and identify two distinctly different scenarios: the pairwise formation of both organic semiconductor and dopant ions on one hand and the emergence of ground state charge transfer complexes between organic semiconductor and dopant through supramolecular hybridization of their respective frontier molecular orbitals on the other hand. Evidence for the occurrence of these two scenarios is subsequently discussed on the basis of the characteristic and strikingly different signatures of the individual species involved in the respective doping processes in a variety of spectroscopic techniques. The critical importance of a statistical view of doping, rather than a bimolecular picture, is then highlighted by employing numerical simulations, which reveal one of the main differences between inorganic and organic semiconductors to be their respective density of electronic states and the doping induced changes thereof. Engineering the density of states of doped organic semiconductors, the Fermi

  7. Intramembrane Cavitation as a Predictive Bio-Piezoelectric Mechanism for Ultrasonic Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaksin, Michael; Shoham, Shy; Kimmel, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasonic waves can remotely and nondestructively excite central nervous system (CNS) neurons. While diverse applications for this effect are already emerging, the biophysical transduction mechanism underlying this excitation remains unclear. Recently, we suggested that ultrasound-induced intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane could underlie the biomechanics of a range of observed acoustic bioeffects. In this paper, we show that, in CNS neurons, ultrasound-induced cavitation of these nanometric bilayer sonophores can induce a complex mechanoelectrical interplay leading to excitation, primarily through the effect of currents induced by membrane capacitance changes. Our model explains the basic features of CNS acoustostimulation and predicts how the experimentally observed efficacy of mouse motor cortical ultrasonic stimulation depends on stimulation parameters. These results support the hypothesis that neuronal intramembrane piezoelectricity underlies ultrasound-induced neurostimulation, and suggest that other interactions between the nervous system and pressure waves or perturbations could be explained by this new mode of biological piezoelectric transduction.

  8. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR

  9. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration. PMID:24338618

  10. Social Robots, Brain Machine Interfaces and Neuro/Cognitive Enhancers: Three Emerging Science and Technology Products through the Lens of Technology Acceptance Theories, Models and Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Social robotics, brain machine interfaces and neuro and cognitive enhancement products are three emerging science and technology products with wide-reaching impact for disabled and non-disabled people. Acceptance of ideas and products depend on multiple parameters and many models have been developed to predict product acceptance. We investigated which frequently employed technology acceptance models (consumer theory, innovation diffusion model, theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behaviour, social cognitive theory, self-determination theory, technology of acceptance model, Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology UTAUT and UTAUT2 are employed in the social robotics, brain machine interfaces and neuro and cognitive enhancement product literature and which of the core measures used in the technology acceptance models are implicit or explicit engaged with in the literature.

  11. Selective sensation based brain-computer interface via mechanical vibrotactile stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yao

    Full Text Available In this work, mechanical vibrotactile stimulation was applied to subjects' left and right wrist skins with equal intensity, and a selective sensation perception task was performed to achieve two types of selections similar to motor imagery Brain-Computer Interface. The proposed system was based on event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS, which had a correlation with processing of afferent inflow in human somatosensory system, and attentional effect which modulated the ERD/ERS. The experiments were carried out on nine subjects (without experience in selective sensation, and six of them showed a discrimination accuracy above 80%, three of them above 95%. Comparative experiments with motor imagery (with and without presence of stimulation were also carried out, which further showed the feasibility of selective sensation as an alternative BCI task complementary to motor imagery. Specifically there was significant improvement ([Formula: see text] from near 65% in motor imagery (with and without presence of stimulation to above 80% in selective sensation on some subjects. The proposed BCI modality might well cooperate with existing BCI modalities in the literature in enlarging the widespread usage of BCI system.

  12. The role of different cues in the brain mechanism on visual spatial attention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Weiqun; LUO Yuejia; CHI Song; JI Xunming; LING Feng; ZHAO Lun; WANG Maobin; SHI Jiannong

    2006-01-01

    The visual spatial attention mechanism in the brain was studied in 16 young subjects through the visual search paradigm of precue-target by the event-related potential (ERP) technique, with the attentive ranges cued by different scales of Chinese character and region cues. The results showed that the response time for Chinese character cues was much longer than that for region cues especially for small region cues. With the exterior interferences, the target stimuli recognition under region cues was much quicker than that under Chinese character cues. Compared with that under region cues, targets under Chinese character cues could lead to increase of the posterior P1,decrease of the N1 and increase of the P2. It should also be noted that the differences between region cues and Chinese character cues were affected by the interference types. Under exterior interferences, no significant difference was found between region cues and Chinese character cues; however, it was not the case under the interior interferences. Considering the difference between the exterior interferences and the interior interferences, we could conclude that with the increase of difficulty in target recognition there was obvious difference in the consumption of anterior frontal resources by target stimuli under the two kinds of cues.

  13. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model of brain white matter in biaxial tension and structural-mechanical relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labus, Kevin M; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2016-09-01

    Computational models of the brain require accurate and robust constitutive models to characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The anisotropy of white matter has been previously demonstrated; however, there is a lack of data describing the effects of multi-axial loading, even though brain tissue experiences multi-axial stress states. Therefore, a biaxial tensile experiment was designed to more fully characterize the anisotropic behavior of white matter in a quasi-static loading state, and the mechanical data were modeled with an anisotropic hyperelastic continuum model. A probabilistic analysis was used to quantify the uncertainty in model predictions because the mechanical data of brain tissue can show a high degree of variability, and computational studies can benefit from reporting the probability distribution of model responses. The axonal structure in white matter can be heterogeneous and regionally dependent, which can affect computational model predictions. Therefore, corona radiata and corpus callosum regions were tested, and histology and transmission electron microscopy were performed on tested specimens to relate the distribution of axon orientations and the axon volume fraction to the mechanical behavior. These measured properties were implemented into a structural constitutive model. Results demonstrated a significant, but relatively low anisotropic behavior, yet there were no conclusive mechanical differences between the two regions tested. The inclusion of both biaxial and uniaxial tests in model fits improved the accuracy of model predictions. The mechanical anisotropy of individual specimens positively correlated with the measured axon volume fraction, and, accordingly, the structural model exhibited slightly decreased uncertainty in model predictions compared to the model without structural properties. PMID:27214689

  14. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Leuner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g. might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease (AD. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, these new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions.

  15. Polysialylation of brain gangliosides as a possible molecular mechanism for survival of antarctic ice fish below the freezing point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Rahmann, H.

    In order to determine possible adaptation strategies of vertebrates to extreme low-temperature environments, we compared the concentration and composition of gangliosides from the brains of eight species of Antarctic Notothenioid ``ice'' fishes with those of warm-adapted species and those of fishes from habitats of moderate temperature. The concentration of whole-brain gangliosides in the ice fishes was comparable with that in moderate-temperature species (between 3.36 and 4.31 mg NeuAc/g protein). The composition of brain gangliosides differed, however. In particular, the relative concentrations of polysialogangliosides (= polarity) and alkali-labile gangliosides was higher in all Antarctic species investigated than in warm-adapted fish species. This difference is considered a suitable mechanism for keeping neuronal membranes functional even below the freezing point. This interpretation is supported by additional physicochemical results with artificial monolayer membranes, which give evidence for a high thermosensitivity of ganglioside complexes in connection with calcium.

  16. Research Review: Cholinergic Mechanisms, Early Brain Development, and Risk for Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Randal G.; Stevens, Karen E.; Proctor, William R.; Leonard, Sherry; Kisley, Michael A.; Hunter, Sharon K.; Freedman, Robert; Adams, Catherine E.

    2010-01-01

    The onset of diagnostic symptomology for neuropsychiatric diseases is often the end result of a decades-long process of aberrant brain development. Identification of novel treatment strategies aimed at normalizing early brain development and preventing mental illness should be a major therapeutic goal. However, there are few models for how this…

  17. AAnti-leakage mechanism and effect of sodium aescinate on the permeability of blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping GUO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the anti-leakage mechanism and protective effect of sodium aescinate on the blood-brain barrier of rats acutely exposed to hypoxia. Methods  Seventy-five healthy SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (25 each: normoxic control (NC, simple hypoxic (SH and drug treated (DT group. Acute hypoxia brain edema rat model was established by a simulation of acute high-altitude hypoxia for 5 days. The cerebral water content was determined by dry-wet method. The permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB was evaluated by Evans blue (EB method. The pathological change of the brain was detected by HE staining. The state of BBB tight junction (TJ and ultrastructures of the brain tissues were observed by lanthanum nitrate tracer method under transmission electron microscope (TEM. Protein and mRNA expression of Occludin, Zo-1 and Claudin-5 were investigated by immunohistochemistry, Western-blotting and real-time PCR respectively. Results  After exposure to acute hypoxia for 5 days, compared with NC group, the water content of brain in SH group increased obviously (PPPPPConclusion  Acute hypoxia exposure may lead to a remarkable decline of the expressions of rat's brain Occludin protein and the Occludin, Zo-1 and Claudin-5 mRNA, and an obvious increase of BBB permeability. Sodium aescinate can up-regulate the expression level of these molecules and decrease BBB permeability, thus playing a profitable role of anti-leakage and BBB protection.

  18. Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in California Over 2000-2009: Implications for Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri C. Mudumbai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients who require invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV often represent a sequence of care between the emergency department (ED and intensive care unit (ICU. Despite being the most populous state, little information exists to define patterns of IMV use within the state of California. Methods: We examined data from the masked Patient Discharge Database of California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development from 2000-2009. Adult patients who received IMV during their stay were identified using the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and Clinical Modification procedure codes (96.70, 96.71, 96.72. Patients were divided into age strata (18-34yr, 35-64yr, and >65yr. Using descriptive statistics and regression analyses, for IMV discharges during the study period, we quantified the number of ED vs. non-ED based admissions; changes in patient characteristics and clinical outcome; evaluated the marginal costs for IMV; determined predictors for prolonged acute mechanical ventilation (PAMV, i.e. IMV>96hr; and projected the number of IMV discharges and ED-based admissions by year 2020. Results: There were 696,634 IMV discharges available for analysis. From 2000–2009, IMV discharges increased by 2.8%/year: n=60,933 (293/100,000 persons in 2000 to n=79,868 (328/100,000 persons in 2009. While ED-based admissions grew by 3.8%/year, non-ED-based admissions remained stable (0%. During 2000-2009, fastest growth was noted for 1 the 35–64 year age strata; 2 Hispanics; 3 patients with non-Medicare public insurance; and 4 patients requiring PAMV. Average total patient cost-adjusted charges per hospital discharge increased by 29% from 2000 (from $42,528 to $60,215 in 2014 dollars along with increases in the number of patients discharged to home and skilled nursing facilities. Higher marginal costs were noted for younger patients (ages 18-34yr, non-whites, and publicly insured patients. Some of the strongest predictors

  19. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats:mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Feng; Ying-jun Zhong; Liang Wang; Tian-qi Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually in-creased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In addition, after the OX1R antagonist, SB334867, was injected into the brain of rats after traumatic brain injury, fewer rats were restored to consciousness, and orexin-A and OXIR expression in the prefrontal cortex was downregulated. Our ifndings indicate that median nerve electrical stimulation induced an up-regulation of orexin-A and OX1R expression in the pre-frontal cortex of traumatic brain injury-induced coma rats, which may be a potential mechanism involved in the wake-promoting effects of median nerve electrical stimulation.

  20. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats: mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually increased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In addition, after the OX1R antagonist, SB334867, was injected into the brain of rats after traumatic brain injury, fewer rats were restored to consciousness, and orexin-A and OXIR expression in the prefrontal cortex was downregulated. Our findings indicate that median nerve electrical stimulation induced an up-regulation of orexin-A and OX1R expression in the prefrontal cortex of traumatic brain injury-induced coma rats, which may be a potential mechanism involved in the wake-promoting effects of median nerve electrical stimulation.

  1. 突发事件中警察应急处置机制研究%Study on Emergency Response Mechanism of Police in Emergencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴同; 王精忠

    2012-01-01

    China is in the key stage of social transition now. Kinds of social contradictions are coming forth continuously. Emergen- cies caused by these will possibly make social order unstable. Emergency response mechanism is organic connections with several essen- tials formed on police emergencies. Police organs should take timely, scientific and flexible measures, get involved in good time and re- spond swiftly, carry out disposition antecedently, communicate with media and disclose the news and strengthen the cooperation with oth- er administrative sections observing the principle of emergency response, the principle of proportion, the principle of publicity.%我国目前正处于社会转型的关键时期,各类新的社会矛盾不断涌现,由此引发的突发事件给社会秩序带来不稳定因素。突发事件处置机制是围绕公安应急处置活动而形成的多种要素的有机联系系统,公安机关在遵循应急性原则、比例原则和公开原则的前提下,处置突发事件应做到实时、科学和灵活的决策,及时介入、快速反应,应急性措施、先行处置权的实施和媒体沟通与信息披露,加强与其他行政部门的合作。

  2. Emergence of overlap in ensembles of spatial multiplexes and statistical mechanics of spatial interacting networks ensembles

    OpenAIRE

    Halu, Arda; Mukherjee, Satyam; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Spatial networks range from the brain networks, to transportation networks and infrastructures. Recently interacting and multiplex networks are attracting great attention because their dynamics and robustness cannot be understood without treating at the same time several networks. Here we present maximal entropy ensembles of spatial multiplex and spatial interacting networks that can be used in order to model spatial multilayer network structures and to build null models of real datasets. We ...

  3. Mindfulness Predicting Physical and Psychological Health in Emerging Adulthood: Understanding Mechanisms of Mindfulness using a Mediation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lisman Lundwall, Christie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATIONMindfulness Predicting Physical and Psychological Health in Emerging Adulthood: Understanding Mechanisms of Mindfulness using a Mediation Modelby Christie Lynn LundwallDoctor of Philosophy, Graduate Program in PsychologyUniversity of California, Riverside, December 2011Dr. Ruth K. Chao, ChairpersonThis study tested a theory derived multiple step structural equation model of four potential mediators of the relation from mindfulness to emotional distress, physical he...

  4. Proceedings of the Third Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: A Review of Emerging Issues and Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, P. Justin; Gunduz, Aysegul; Judy, Jack; Wilson, Linda; Machado, Andre; James J Giordano; Elias, W. Jeff; Rossi, Marvin A.; Butson, Christopher L.; Fox, Michael D.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Pouratian, Nader; Swann, Nicole C.; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Gross, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The proceedings of the 3rd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. Significant innovations of the past year are emphasized. The Think Tank's contributors represent a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers, and members of industry. Present...

  5. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  6. Pathway analysis reveals common pro-survival mechanisms of metyrapone and carbenoxolone after traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Hellmich

    Full Text Available Developing new pharmacotherapies for traumatic brain injury (TBI requires elucidation of the neuroprotective mechanisms of many structurally and functionally diverse compounds. To test our hypothesis that diverse neuroprotective drugs similarly affect common gene targets after TBI, we compared the effects of two drugs, metyrapone (MT and carbenoxolone (CB, which, though used clinically for noncognitive conditions, improved learning and memory in rats and humans. Although structurally different, both MT and CB inhibit a common molecular target, 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive cortisone to cortisol, thereby effectively reducing glucocorticoid levels. We examined injury-induced signaling pathways to determine how the effects of these two compounds correlate with pro-survival effects in surviving neurons of the injured rat hippocampus. We found that treatment of TBI rats with MT or CB acutely induced in hippocampal neurons transcriptional profiles that were remarkably similar (i.e., a coordinated attenuation of gene expression across multiple injury-induced cell signaling networks. We also found, to a lesser extent, a coordinated increase in cell survival signals. Analysis of injury-induced gene expression altered by MT and CB provided additional insight into the protective effects of each. Both drugs attenuated expression of genes in the apoptosis, death receptor and stress signaling pathways, as well as multiple genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway such as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase (Complex1, cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV and ATP synthase (Complex V. This suggests an overall inhibition of mitochondrial function. Complex 1 is the primary source of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway, thus linking the protective effects of these drugs to a reduction in oxidative stress. The net effect of the drug-induced transcriptional changes observed here indicates that

  7. Towards a Pathway Inventory of the Human Brain for Modeling Disease Mechanisms Underlying Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyappan, Anandhi; Gündel, Michaela; Shahid, Mohammad; Wang, Jiali; Li, Hui; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Müller, Bernd; Fluck, Juliane; Jirsa, Viktor; Domide, Lia; Younesi, Erfan; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2016-04-12

    Molecular signaling pathways have been long used to demonstrate interactions among upstream causal molecules and downstream biological effects. They show the signal flow between cell compartments, the majority of which are represented as cartoons. These are often drawn manually by scanning through the literature, which is time-consuming, static, and non-interoperable. Moreover, these pathways are often devoid of context (condition and tissue) and biased toward certain disease conditions. Mining the scientific literature creates new possibilities to retrieve pathway information at higher contextual resolution and specificity. To address this challenge, we have created a pathway terminology system by combining signaling pathways and biological events to ensure a broad coverage of the entire pathway knowledge domain. This terminology was applied to mining biomedical papers and patents about neurodegenerative diseases with focus on Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate the power of our approach by mapping literature-derived signaling pathways onto their corresponding anatomical regions in the human brain under healthy and Alzheimer's disease states. We demonstrate how this knowledge resource can be used to identify a putative mechanism explaining the mode-of-action of the approved drug Rasagiline, and show how this resource can be used for fingerprinting patents to support the discovery of pathway knowledge for Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we propose that based on next-generation cause-and-effect pathway models, a dedicated inventory of computer-processable pathway models specific to neurodegenerative diseases can be established, which hopefully accelerates context-specific enrichment analysis of experimental data with higher resolution and richer annotations. PMID:27079715

  8. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunomodulation in the brain through environmental enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eSinghal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on environmental enrichment (EE have shown cytokines, cellular immune components (e.g. T lymphocytes, NK cells and glial cells in causal relationship to EE in bringing out changes to neurobiology and behavior. The purpose of this review is to evaluate these neuroimmune mechanisms associated with neurobiological and behavioral changes in response to different EE methods. We systematically reviewed common research databases. After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 328 articles remained for this review. Physical exercise, a form of EE, elicits anti-inflammatory and neuromodulatory effects through interaction with several immune pathways including IL-6 secretion from muscle fibers, reduced expression of TLR’s on monocytes and macrophages, reduced secretion of adipokines, modulation of hippocampal T cells, priming of microglia and upregulation of MKP-1 in CNS. In contrast, immunomodulatory roles of other enrichment methods are not studied extensively. Nonetheless, studies showing reduction in the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α in response to enrichment with novel objects and accessories suggest anti-inflammatory effects of novel environment. Likewise, social enrichment, though considered a necessity for healthy behavior, results in immunosuppression in socially defeated animals. This has been attributed to reduction in T lymphocytes, NK cells and IL-10 in subordinate animals. EE through sensory stimuli has been investigated to a lesser extent and the effect on immune factors has not been evaluated yet. Discovery of this multidimensional relationship between immune system, brain functioning and EE has paved a way towards formulating environ-immuno therapies for treating psychiatric illnesses with minimal use of pharmacotherapy. While the immuno-modulatory role of physical exercise has been evaluated extensively, more research is required to investigate neuroimmune changes associated with other enrichment methods.

  9. Speech and music shape the listening brain: evidence for shared domain-general mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomi S. Asaridou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Are there bi-directional influences between speech perception and music perception? An answer to this question is essential for understanding the extent to which the speech and music that we hear are processed by domain-general auditory processes and/or by distinct neural auditory mechanisms. This review summarizes a large body of behavioral and neuroscientific findings which suggest that the musical experience of trained musicians does modulate speech processing, and a sparser set of data, largely on pitch processing, which suggest in addition that linguistic experience, in particular learning a tone language, modulates music processing. Although research has focused mostly on music on speech effects, we argue that both directions of influence need to be studied, and conclude that the picture which thus emerges is one of mutual interaction across domains. In particular, it is not simply that experience with spoken language has some effects on music perception, and vice versa, but that because of shared domain-general subcortical and cortical networks, experiences in both domains influence behavior in both domains.

  10. Speech and music shape the listening brain: evidence for shared domain-general mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaridou, Salomi S; McQueen, James M

    2013-01-01

    Are there bi-directional influences between speech perception and music perception? An answer to this question is essential for understanding the extent to which the speech and music that we hear are processed by domain-general auditory processes and/or by distinct neural auditory mechanisms. This review summarizes a large body of behavioral and neuroscientific findings which suggest that the musical experience of trained musicians does modulate speech processing, and a sparser set of data, largely on pitch processing, which suggest in addition that linguistic experience, in particular learning a tone language, modulates music processing. Although research has focused mostly on music on speech effects, we argue that both directions of influence need to be studied, and conclude that the picture which thus emerges is one of mutual interaction across domains. In particular, it is not simply that experience with spoken language has some effects on music perception, and vice versa, but that because of shared domain-general subcortical and cortical networks, experiences in both domains influence behavior in both domains. PMID:23761776

  11. PREFACE: DICE 2012 : Spacetime Matter Quantum Mechanics - from the Planck scale to emergent phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diósi, Lajos; Elze, Hans-Thomas; Fronzoni, Leone; Halliwell, Jonathan; Prati, Enrico; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Yearsley, James

    2013-06-01

    Presented in this volume are the Invited Lectures and the Contributed Papers of the Sixth International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy - DICE 2012, held at Castello Pasquini, Castiglioncello (Tuscany), 17-21 September 2012. These proceedings may document to the interested public and to the wider scientific community the stimulating exchange of ideas at the meeting. The number of participants has been steadily growing over the years, reflecting an increasing attraction, if not need, of such conference. Our very intention has always been to bring together leading researchers, advanced students, and renowned scholars from various areas, in order to stimulate new ideas and their exchange across the borders of specialization. In this way, the series of meetings successfully continued from the beginning with DICE 20021, followed by DICE 20042, DICE 20063, DICE 20084, and DICE 20105, Most recently, DICE 2012 brought together more than 120 participants representing more than 30 countries worldwide. It has been a great honour and inspiration to have Professor Yakir Aharonov (Tel Aviv) with us, who presented the opening Keynote Lecture 'The two-vector quantum formalism'. With the overarching theme 'Spacetime - Matter - Quantum Mechanics - from the Planck scale to emergent phenomena', the conference took place in the very pleasant and inspiring atmosphere of Castello Pasquini - in beautiful surroundings, overlooking a piece of Tuscany's coast. The 5-day program covered these major topics: Quantum Mechanics, Foundations and Quantum-Classical Border Quantum-Classical Hybrids and Many-Body Systems Spectral Geometry, Path Integrals and Experiments Quantum -/- Gravity -/- Spacetime Quantum Mechanics on all Scales? A Roundtable Discussion under the theme 'Nuovi orizzonti nella ricerca scientifica. Ci troviamo di fronte ad una rivoluzione scientifica?' formed an integral part of the program. With participation of E Del Giudice (INFN & Università di

  12. Toll-like receptor 4 knockout ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Chen, Chang; Zhang, Zongze; Zou, Yufeng; Peng, Mian; Wang, Yanlin

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a crucial receptor in the innate immune system, and increasing evidence supports its role in inflammation, stress, and tissue injury, including injury to the lung and brain. We aimed to investigate the effects of TLR4 on neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice. Male wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and TLR4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were divided into three groups: (1) control group (C): spontaneous breathing; (2) anesthesia group (A): spontaneous breathing under anesthesia; and (3) mechanical ventilation group (MV): 6h of MV under anesthesia. The behavioral responses of mice were tested with fear conditioning tests. The histological changes in the lung and brain were assessed using hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The level of TLR4 mRNA in tissue was measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the TLR4 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus were measured by double immunofluorescence. MV mice exhibited impaired cognition, and this impairment was less severe in TLR4 KO mice than in WT mice. In WT mice, MV increased TLR4 mRNA expression in the lung and brain. MV induced mild lung injury, which was prevented in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, increased microglia and astrocyte activation. Microgliosis was alleviated in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased TLR4 immunoreactivity, which was expressed in microglia and astrocytes. These results demonstrate that TLR4 is involved in neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction and that TLR4 KO ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction after prolonged MV. In addition, Administration of a TLR4 antagonist (100μg/mice) to WT mice also significantly attenuated neuroinflammation of lung-brain interaction due to prolonged MV. TLR4 antagonism

  13. The mechanisms of regional branching: An investigation of the emerging fuel cell industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, Anne Nygaard

    competences that are related to the core scientific principle of the FC. Hence, the findings only partly corroborate the thesis of technological relatedness as an underlying logic for regional branching in the case of an emerging industry, suggesting the need to look further into how agency and supportive...

  14. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats: mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Feng; Ying-jun Zhong; Liang Wang; Tian-qi Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually increased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In additio...

  15. Translational Research for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: Injury Mechanism to Development of Medical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, A.; Ohtani, K.; Arafune, T.; Washio, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Endo, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Kumabe, T.; Takayama, K.; Tominaga, T.

    1. Investigation of shock wave-induced phenomenon: blast-induced traumatic brain injury Blast wave (BW) is generated by explosion and is comprised of lead shock wave (SE) followed by subsequent supersonic flow.

  16. Patent foramen ovale as a preferential mechanism for increasing the likelihood of brain tumor metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Rossi, Andrea; Dell'Avvocata, Fabio; Cardaioli, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Metastases are the most common tumors of the central nervous system which may lie dormant behind the brain blood- barrier sheltering from chemiotherapeutic drugs, and whose presence usually indicates a poor prognosis. Development of brain metastases includes the intravasation of the cancer cells through the tumor blood vessels, their circulation within the venous system, passing through the pulmonary filter thus reaching the systemic circulation. Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a natural commun...

  17. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  18. Maintaining Brain Health by Monitoring Inflammatory Processes: a Mechanism to Promote Successful Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Rosano, Caterina; Marsland, Anna L.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining brain health promotes successful aging. The main determinants of brain health are the preservation of cognitive function and remaining free from structural and metabolic abnormalities, including loss of neuronal synapses, atrophy, small vessel disease and focal amyloid deposits visible by neuroimaging. Promising studies indicate that these determinants are to some extent modifiable, even among adults seventy years and older. Converging animal and human evidence further suggests th...

  19. Drug-Induced Apoptosis: Mechanism by which Alcohol and Many Other Drugs Can Disrupt Brain Development

    OpenAIRE

    Olney, John W.; Creeley, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal ingestion of alcohol during pregnancy can cause a disability syndrome termed Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), which may include craniofacial malformations, structural pathology in the brain, and a variety of long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances. There is compelling evidence that exposure to alcohol during early embryogenesis (4th week of gestation) can cause excessive death of cell populations that are essential for normal development of the face and brain. While this can e...

  20. Epigenetic mechanisms and associated brain circuits in the regulation of positive emotions: A role for transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, Simona; Guffanti, Guia; Fallon, James; Macciardi, Fabio

    2016-10-15

    Epigenetic programming and reprogramming are at the heart of cellular differentiation and represent developmental and evolutionary mechanisms in both germline and somatic cell lines. Only about 2% of our genome is composed of protein-coding genes, while the remaining 98%, once considered "junk" DNA, codes for regulatory/epigenetic elements that control how genes are expressed in different tissues and across time from conception to death. While we already know that epigenetic mechanisms are at play in cancer development and in regulating metabolism (cellular and whole body), the role of epigenetics in the developing prenatal and postnatal brain, and in maintaining a proper brain activity throughout the various stages of life, in addition to having played a critical role in human evolution, is a relatively new domain of knowledge. Here we present the current state-of-the-art techniques and results of these studies within the domain of emotions, and then speculate on how genomic and epigenetic mechanisms can modify and potentially alter our emotional (limbic) brain and affect our social interactions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2944-2954, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27224878

  1. Mechanism of case processing in the brain: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yokoyama

    Full Text Available In sentence comprehension research, the case system, which is one of the subsystems of the language processing system, has been assumed to play a crucial role in signifying relationships in sentences between noun phrases (NPs and other elements, such as verbs, prepositions, nouns, and tense. However, so far, less attention has been paid to the question of how cases are processed in our brain. To this end, the current study used fMRI and scanned the brain activity of 15 native English speakers during an English-case processing task. The results showed that, while the processing of all cases activates the left inferior frontal gyrus and posterior part of the middle temporal gyrus, genitive case processing activates these two regions more than nominative and accusative case processing. Since the effect of the difference in behavioral performance among these three cases is excluded from brain activation data, the observed different brain activations would be due to the different processing patterns among the cases, indicating that cases are processed differently in our brains. The different brain activations between genitive case processing and nominative/accusative case processing may be due to the difference in structural complexity between them.

  2. BRAIN PLASTICITY: MUSICAL TRAINING INVOLVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónika Diaz Abrahan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The main research about the effect of musical training in adult and childhood brain was revised in this work. The music realizes unique demands to our ner-vous system. This call the attention of several researchers causing, in the past years, an enhancement of the exploration about this topic; this increment was benefit for the emergence of new neuroimaging techniques, the music positioned as an investigation tool of human cognition and superior brain mechanisms. The musical perception and production are specific functions of the human brain that depend of a wide cortical-subcortical neural net distributed across both hemi-spheres and cerebellum. The main findings in this area indicated structural and functional differences in the adult and child brain due to musical training, and this is more relevant that innate properties of the subject. There is brain plasticity due to adaptive processes product of the environmental stimulation.

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An emerging field

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego-Durán, Rocío; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging health concern in both developed and non-developed world, encompassing from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and liver cancer. Incidence and prevalence of this disease are increasing due to the socioeconomic transition and change to harmful diet. Currently, gold standard method in NAFLD diagnosis is liver biopsy, despite complications and lack of accuracy due to sampling error. Further, pathogenesis of...

  4. Effect of a water-maze procedure on the redox mechanisms in brain parts of aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Andreevna Krivova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Morris water maze (MWM is a tool for assessment of age-related cognitive deficits. In our work, MWM was used for appraisal of cognitive deficits in 11-month-old rats and investigation of the effect exerted by training in the Morris water maze on the redox mechanisms in rat brain parts. Young adult (3-month-old and aged (11-month-old male rats were trained in the water maze. Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups. The level of pro- and antioxidant capacity in brain tissue homogenates was assessed using the chemiluminescence method.Cognitive deficits were found in 11-month-old rats: at the first day of training they showed only 30% of successful MWM trials. However, at the last training day the percentage of successful trials was equal for young adult and aged animals. This indicates that cognitive deficits in aged rats can be reversed by MWM training. Therewith, the MWM spatial learning procedure itself produces changes in different processes of redox homeostasis in 11-month-old and 3-month-old rats as compared to intact animals. Young adult rats showed a decrease in prooxidant capacity in all brain parts, while 11-month-old rats demonstrated an increase in antioxidant capacity in the olfactory bulb, pons + medulla oblongata and frontal lobe cortex. Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts. The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms responsible for age-related cognitive deficits. This may be useful not only for the development of training procedures applicable to human patients with age-related cognitive impairments, but also for their rehabilitation.

  5. The role of programmed and emergent mechanisms of coordination: How standardized care pathways contribute to coordinate care tasks in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim

    mechanisms of coordination, this paper finds that standardized work processes such as care pathways should be considered as a bundle of coordination mechanisms—plans and rules, objects, routines, roles and proximity—rather than a mechanism of its own. The bundle builds the accountability, predictability and...... attention to identify and reinforce those underlying mechanisms. This provides solutions to deal with the fundamental challenge of care coordination in hospitals. The research builds on an in-depth, embedded case study of hospital care pathways. Care pathways are particularly interesting because they mirror......Hospitals face substantial coordination challenges. To meet this hospitals more and more use standardized work processes such as care pathways. By drawing on recent coordination theory that increasingly emphasizes the role of lateral and emergent interactions alongside traditional, programmed...

  6. Insights from GWAS: emerging landscape of mechanisms underlying complex trait disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background There are now over 2000 loci in the human genome where genome wide association studies (GWAS) have found one or more SNPs to be associated with altered risk of a complex trait disease. At each of these loci, there must be some molecular level mechanism relevant to the disease. What are these mechanisms and how do they contribute to disease? Results Here we consider the roles of three primary mechanism classes: changes that directly alter protein function (missense SNPs), changes that alter transcript abundance as a consequence of variants close-by in sequence, and changes that affect splicing. Missense SNPs are divided into those predicted to have a high impact on in vivo protein function, and those with a low impact. Splicing is divided into SNPs with a direct impact on splice sites, and those with a predicted effect on auxiliary splicing signals. The analysis was based on associations found for seven complex trait diseases in the classic Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC1) GWA study and subsequent studies and meta-analyses, collected from the GWAS catalog. Linkage disequilibrium information was used to identify possible candidate SNPs for involvement in disease mechanism in each of the 356 loci associated with these seven diseases. With the parameters used, we find that 76% of loci have at least of these mechanisms. Overall, except for the low incidence of direct impact on splice sites, the mechanisms are found at similar frequencies, with changes in transcript abundance the most common. But the distribution of mechanisms over diseases varies markedly, as does the fraction of loci with assigned mechanisms. Many of the implicated proteins have previously been suggested as relevant, but the specific mechanism assignments are new. In addition, a number of new disease relevant proteins are proposed. Conclusions The high fraction of GWAS loci with proposed mechanisms suggests that these classes of mechanism play a major role. Other mechanism

  7. Neural Operant Conditioning as a Core Mechanism of Brain-Machine Interface Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Sakurai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of changing the neuronal activity of the brain to acquire rewards in a broad sense is essential for utilizing brain-machine interfaces (BMIs, which is essentially operant conditioning of neuronal activity. Currently, this is also known as neural biofeedback, and it is often referred to as neurofeedback when human brain activity is targeted. In this review, we first illustrate biofeedback and operant conditioning, which are methodological background elements in neural operant conditioning. Then, we introduce research models of neural operant conditioning in animal experiments and demonstrate that it is possible to change the firing frequency and synchronous firing of local neuronal populations in a short time period. We also debate the possibility of the application of neural operant conditioning and its contribution to BMIs.

  8. Emergence of overlap in ensembles of spatial multiplexes and statistical mechanics of spatial interacting networks ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Halu, Arda; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Spatial networks range from the brain networks, to transportation networks and infrastructures. Recently interacting and multiplex networks are attracting great attention because their dynamics and robustness cannot be understood without treating at the same time several networks. Here we present maximal entropy ensembles of spatial multiplex and spatial interacting networks that can be used in order to model spatial multilayer network structures and to build null models of real datasets. We show that spatial multiplex naturally develop a significant overlap of the links, a noticeable property of many multiplexes that can affect significantly the dynamics taking place on them. Additionally, we characterize ensembles of spatial interacting networks and we analyse the structure of interacting airport and railway networks in India, showing the effect of space in determining the link probability.

  9. A stochastic mechanism for signal propagation in the brain: Force of rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of individual neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dawei; Man, Shushuang; Martin, Joseph V

    2016-01-21

    There are two functionally important factors in signal propagation in a brain structural network: the very first synaptic delay-a time delay about 1ms-from the moment when signals originate to the moment when observation on the signal propagation can begin; and rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds. We provide a stochastic analysis of signal propagation in a general setting. The analysis shows that the two factors together result in a stochastic mechanism for the signal propagation as described below. A brain structural network is not a rigid circuit rather a very flexible framework that guides signals to propagate but does not guarantee success of the signal propagation. In such a framework, with the very first synaptic delay, rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network cause an "alter-and-concentrate effect" that almost surely forces signals to successfully propagate. By the stochastic mechanism we provide analytic evidence for the existence of a force behind signal propagation in a brain structural network caused by rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds with a time delay of 1ms. PMID:26555846

  10. Alien Hand, Restless Brain: Salience Network and Interhemispheric Connectivity Disruption Parallel Emergence and Extinction of Diagonistic Dyspraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Ben; Beltramone, Marion; Wirsich, Jonathan; Le Troter, Arnaud; Tramoni, Eve; Aubert, Sandrine; Achard, Sophie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Guye, Maxime; Felician, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Diagonistic dyspraxia (DD) is by far the most spectacular manifestation reported by sufferers of acute corpus callosum (CC) injury (so-called "split-brain"). In this form of alien hand syndrome, one hand acts at cross purposes with the other "against the patient's will". Although recent models view DD as a disorder of motor control, there is still little information regarding its neural underpinnings, due to widespread connectivity changes produced by CC insult, and the obstacle that non-volitional movements represent for task-based functional neuroimaging studies. Here, we studied patient AM, the first report of DD in patient with complete developmental CC agenesis. This unique case also offers the opportunity to study the resting-state connectomics of DD in the absence of diffuse changes subsequent to CC injury or surgery. AM developed DD following status epilepticus (SE) which resolved over a 2-year period. Whole brain functional connectivity (FC) was compared (Crawford-Howell [CH]) to 16 controls during the period of acute DD symptoms (Time 1) and after remission (Time 2). Whole brain graph theoretical models were also constructed and topological efficiency examined. At Time 1, disrupted FC was observed in inter-hemispheric and intra-hemispheric right edges, involving frontal superior and midline structures. Graph analysis indicated disruption of the efficiency of salience and right frontoparietal (FP) networks. At Time 2, after remission of diagnostic dyspraxia symptoms, FC and salience network changes had resolved. In sum, longitudinal analysis of connectivity in AM indicates that DD behaviors could result from disruption of systems that support the experience and control of volitional movements and the ability to generate appropriate behavioral responses to salient stimuli. This also raises the possibility that changes to large-scale functional architecture revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (rs-fMRI) may provide relevant

  11. Proceedings of the Third Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: A Review of Emerging Issues and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P. Justin; Gunduz, Aysegul; Judy, Jack; Wilson, Linda; Machado, Andre; Giordano, James J.; Elias, W. Jeff; Rossi, Marvin A.; Butson, Christopher L.; Fox, Michael D.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Pouratian, Nader; Swann, Nicole C.; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Gross, Robert E.; Chizeck, Howard J.; Tagliati, Michele; Lozano, Andres M.; Goodman, Wayne; Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Alterman, Ron L.; Akbar, Umer; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Grill, Warren M.; Hallett, Mark; Herrington, Todd; Herron, Jeffrey; van Horne, Craig; Kopell, Brian H.; Lang, Anthony E.; Lungu, Codrin; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Mogilner, Alon Y.; Molina, Rene; Opri, Enrico; Otto, Kevin J.; Oweiss, Karim G.; Pathak, Yagna; Shukla, Aparna; Shute, Jonathan; Sheth, Sameer A.; Shih, Ludy C.; Steinke, G. Karl; Tröster, Alexander I.; Vanegas, Nora; Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Cendejas-Zaragoza, Leopoldo; Verhagen, Leonard; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The proceedings of the 3rd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. Significant innovations of the past year are emphasized. The Think Tank's contributors represent a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers, and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including policy and advocacy considerations for the future of DBS, connectomic approaches to DBS targeting, developments in electrophysiology and related strides toward responsive DBS systems, and recent developments in sensor and device technologies. PMID:27092042

  12. Use of biomarker S100B for traumatic brain damage in the emergency department may change observation strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Bouchelouche, Pierre Nourdine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The revised Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee (SNC) guidelines on management of patients with head trauma include an option for measurement of S100B in peripheral blood with 100% sensitivity for neurosurgical intervention. A medical technology assessment was conducted to evaluate any...... impact of using S100B on the use of computed tomographies (CT) of the brain and admission for observation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients referred for assessment of head injury over a period of 1.5 months had their blood sampled for measurement of S100B in serum. Results were not available to the...

  13. Proceedings of the Third Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: A Review of Emerging Issues and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, P Justin; Gunduz, Aysegul; Judy, Jack; Wilson, Linda; Machado, Andre; Giordano, James J; Elias, W Jeff; Rossi, Marvin A; Butson, Christopher L; Fox, Michael D; McIntyre, Cameron C; Pouratian, Nader; Swann, Nicole C; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Gross, Robert E; Chizeck, Howard J; Tagliati, Michele; Lozano, Andres M; Goodman, Wayne; Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Alterman, Ron L; Akbar, Umer; Gerhardt, Greg A; Grill, Warren M; Hallett, Mark; Herrington, Todd; Herron, Jeffrey; van Horne, Craig; Kopell, Brian H; Lang, Anthony E; Lungu, Codrin; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Mogilner, Alon Y; Molina, Rene; Opri, Enrico; Otto, Kevin J; Oweiss, Karim G; Pathak, Yagna; Shukla, Aparna; Shute, Jonathan; Sheth, Sameer A; Shih, Ludy C; Steinke, G Karl; Tröster, Alexander I; Vanegas, Nora; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Cendejas-Zaragoza, Leopoldo; Verhagen, Leonard; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The proceedings of the 3rd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. Significant innovations of the past year are emphasized. The Think Tank's contributors represent a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers, and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including policy and advocacy considerations for the future of DBS, connectomic approaches to DBS targeting, developments in electrophysiology and related strides toward responsive DBS systems, and recent developments in sensor and device technologies. PMID:27092042

  14. Mechanisms of elevation of rat brain tryptophan concentration by various doses of salicylate.

    OpenAIRE

    Badawy, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    1 The roles of inhibition of liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity and of displacement of tryptophan from its binding sites on serum proteins have been investigated in relation to the increase in rat brain tryptophan concentration after administration of various doses of sodium salicylate. 2 The elevation of brain tryptophan concentration by sodium salicylate (0.5 mg/kg) was caused by inhibition of liver pyrrolase activity, whereas that by doses of the drug of 50 mg/kg and above was achieved ma...

  15. Research on Heat-Mechanical Coupling of Ventilated Disc Brakes under the Condition of Emergency Braking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuelong; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Wenxian; Zhang, Yang

    Taking the ventilated disc brake in some company as research object, and using UG to build 3D models of brake disc and pad, and making use of ABAQUS/Standard to set up two parts' finite element model, via the decelerated motion of actual simulation brake disc, which gets ventilated disc brake in the case of emergency breaking in time and space distribution of conditions of temperature and stress field, summarizes the distribution of temperature field and stress field, proves complex coupling between temperature, stress, and supplies the direct basis for brake's fatigue life analysis.

  16. Introduction to Brain mechanisms of selective perception and action. Proceedings of a Discussion Meeting held at the Royal Society of London on 19 and 20 November 1997.

    OpenAIRE

    Humphreys, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction to Brain mechanisms of selective perception and action. Proceedings of a Discussion Meeting held at the Royal Society of London on 19 and 20 November 1997. Organized and edited by G. W. Humphreys, J. Duncan and A. Treisman.

  17. Dual Mechanism of Brain Injury and Novel Treatment Strategy in Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnanti, William J.; Lazovic, Jelena; Griffin, Kathleen; Skvorak, Kristen J.; Paul, Harbhajan S.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Bewley, Maria C.; Cheng, Keith C.; LaNoue, Kathryn F.; Flanagan, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder of branched-chain amino acid metabolism presenting with life-threatening cerebral oedema and dysmyelination in affected individuals. Treatment requires life-long dietary restriction and monitoring of branched-chain amino acids to avoid brain injury. Despite careful management, children…

  18. Clinical Outcome and Mechanisms of Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westen, Maarten; Rietveld, Erik; Figee, Martijn; Denys, D.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcome of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) shows robust effects in terms of a mean Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) reduction of 47.7 % and a mean response percentage (minimum 35 % YBOCS reduction) of 58.2 %. It appears that most patients re

  19. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats II: Potential mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. van Vliet; W.M. Otte; W.J. Wadman; E. Aronica; G. Kooij; H.E. de Vries; R.M. Dijkhuizen; J.A. Gorter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage may play a pro-epileptogenic role after status epilepticus. In the accompanying contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) study we showed that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin reduced BBB leakage and seizure activit

  20. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats II : Potential mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Wim M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage may play a pro-epileptogenic role after status epilepticus. In the accompanying contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) study we showed that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin reduced BBB leakage and seizure activit

  1. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  2. Emergence of cytotoxic resistance in cancer cell populations: Single-cell mechanisms and population-level consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Tommaso; Chisholm, Rebecca H.; Lorz, Alexander; Larsen, Annette K.; de Almeida, Luís Neves; Escargueil, Alexandre; Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    We formulate an individual-based model and a population model of phenotypic evolution, under cytotoxic drugs, in a cancer cell population structured by the expression levels of survival-potential and proliferation-potential. We apply these models to a recently studied experimental system. Our results suggest that mechanisms based on fundamental laws of biology can reversibly push an actively-proliferating, and drug-sensitive, cell population to transition into a weakly-proliferative and drug-tolerant state, which will eventually facilitate the emergence of more potent, proliferating and drug-tolerant cells.

  3. Sub-Quantum Thermodynamics as a Basis of Emergent Quantum Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Grössing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This review presents results obtained from our group’s approach to model quantum mechanics with the aid of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. As has been shown, the exact Schrödinger equation can be derived by assuming that a particle of energy  is actually a dissipative system maintained in a nonequilibrium steady state by a constant throughput of energy (heat flow. Here, also other typical quantum mechanical features are discussed and shown to be completely understandable within our approach, i.e., on the basis of the assumed sub-quantum thermodynamics. In particular, Planck’s relation for the energy of a particle, the Heisenberg uncertainty relations, the quantum mechanical superposition principle and Born’s rule, or the “dispersion of the Gaussian wave packet”, a.o., are all explained on the basis of purely classical physics.

  4. On the molecular mechanisms driving pain perception and emergent collective behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Patti, F.; Fanelli, D.

    2010-05-01

    A stochastic model to investigate the microscopic processes which trigger the sensation of pain is considered. The model, presented in Di Patti and Fanelli [Di Patti F, Fanelli D. Can a microscopic stochastic model explain the emergence of pain cycles in patients? J Stat Mech 2009. doi:10.1088/1742-5468/2009/01/P01004], accounts for the action of analgesic drug and introduces an effect of competition with the inactive species populating the bloodstream. Regular oscillations in the amount of bound receptors are detected, following a resonant amplification of the stochastic component intrinsic to the system. The condition for such oscillations to occur are here studied, resorting to combined numerical and analytical techniques. Extended and connected patches of the admissible parameters space are detected which do correspond to the oscillatory behaviors. These findings are discussed with reference to the existing literature on patients' response to the analgesic treatment.

  5. Chemical Genomics and Emerging DNA Technologies in the Identification of Drug Mechanisms and Drug Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical genomics combines chemistry with molecular biology as a means of exploring the function of unknown proteins or identifying the proteins responsible for a particular phenotype induced by a small cell-permeable bioactive molecule. Chemical genomics therefore has the potential to identify and...... validate therapeutic targets and to discover drug candidates for rapidly and effectively generating new interventions for human diseases. The recent emergence of genomic technologies and their application on genetically tractable model organisms like Drosophila melanogaster,Caenorhabditis elegans and...... Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided momentum to cell biological and biomedical research, particularly in the functional characterization of gene functions and the identification of novel drug targets. We therefore anticipate that chemical genomics and the vast development of genomic technologies will play...

  6. Brain tumor stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  7. Brain circuitry outside the synaptic cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Alexander E Dityatev

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that astroglia, and possibly microglia, play an important part in regulating synaptic networking of the brain. It has also emerged that extracellular matrix (ECM) structures that enwrap synaptic connections can generate molecular signals affecting both neuronal and glial activity. Thus it appears that the mechanism of information processing in the brain, which has hitherto been associated almost exclusively with neural circuits, could also invo...

  8. Brain mechanisms of male sexual function%男性性活动相关的脑机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王营; 窦鑫; 李俊发

    2011-01-01

    本文从正常性功能的脑机制、性功能障碍的脑机制以及药物治疗机制等几个方面综述了近年来男性性相关的脑成像研究.研究发现男性性活动兴奋期、平台期和高潮期由不同脑区构成的神经网络控制.其中,间脑转换区在男性射精中发挥了关键的启动作用.男性性功能障碍患者在性唤起时存在眶额回和额下回的异常激活模式.血清睾酮和脱水吗啡等药物治疗性功能障碍时,主要通过改变眶额回、脑岛、屏状核和颞下回的激活状态来发挥作用.%In this paper, we reviewed the brain imaging studies of male sexual function in recent years from three aspects: the brain mechanism of normal sexual function, the brain mechanism of sexual dysfunction, and the mechanism of drug therapy for sexual dysfunction. Studies show that the development stages of male sexual activities, such as the excitement phase, plateau phase and orgasm phase, are controlled by different neural networks. The mesodiencephalic transition zone may play an important role in the startup of male ejaculation. There are significant differences between sexual dysfunction males and normal males in activation patterns of the brain in sexual arousal. The medial orbitofrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus in the abnormal activation pattern are correlated with sexual dysfunction males in sexual arousal. Serum testosterone and morphine are commonly used drugs for male sexual dysfunction,whose mechanisms are to alter the activating levels of the medial orbitofrontal cortex, insula, claustrum and inferior temporal gyrus.Natl J Androl, 2011, 17 (8): 739-743

  9. Brain mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning%低氧预适应的脑机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕国蔚; 崔秀玉; 赵兰峰; 安仰原; 高翠英

    2004-01-01

    A concept ot tissue adaptation to hypoxia( i.e. hypoxic preconditioning) was developed and its corresponding animal models were reproduced in 1966s. The methods of model reproduction in rat, rabbit, and mouse in particular and the main results are brifly introduced in this review. The tolerance to hypoxia o{ preconditioned animals is significantly increased. Regular changes in animals' behavior, neurophysiology, respiratory and circulatory physiology, neuromorphology in vivo and {unction of brain and spinal cord in vitro are briefly demonstrated. The protective effects in vivo and in vitro of homogenate extract taken from the brain o{ preconditioned animals, neurochemcals and molecular neurobiolcgical alterations are briefly presented. The essence and significance of tissue adaption to hypoxia/hypoxic preconditioning are discussed in the review in terms of evolution and practical implication.

  10. Holographic View of the Brain Memory Mechanism Based on Evanescent Superluminal Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Musha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available D. Pollen and M. Trachtenberg proposed the holographic brain theory to help explain the existence of photographic memories in some people. They suggested that such individuals had more vivid memories because they somehow could access a very large region of their memory holograms. Hameroff suggested in his paper that cylindrical neuronal microtubule cavities, or centrioles, function as waveguides for the evanescent photons for quantum signal processing. The supposition is that microtubular structures of the brain function as a coherent fiber bundle set used to store holographic images, as would a fiber-optic holographic system. In this paper, the author proposes that superluminal photons propagating inside the microtubules via evanescent waves could provide the access needed to record or retrieve a quantum coherent entangled holographic memory.

  11. Emerging broad-spectrum resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: Mechanisms and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug resistance is quite common among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, in particular among clinically relevant species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacterial species, which are mainly nosocomial pathogens, possess a diversity of resistance mechanisms that may lead to multidrug or even pandrug resistance. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenemases conferring resistance to carbapenems, and 16S rRNA methylases conferring resistance to all clinically relevant aminoglycosides are the most important causes of concern. Concomitant resistance to fluoroquinolones, polymyxins (colistin) and tigecycline may lead to pandrug resistance. The most important mechanisms of resistance in P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii and their most recent dissemination worldwide are detailed here. PMID:25857949

  12. Teaching Emergency Surgical Skills for Trauma Resuscitation-Mechanical Simulator versus Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jameel Ali; Anne Sorvari; Anand Pandya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, surgical skills in trauma resuscitation have been taught using animal models in the advanced trauma life support (ATLS) course. We compare one mechanical model (TraumaMan simulator) as an alternative teaching tool for these skills. Method. Eighteen providers and 14 instructors performed four surgical procedures on TraumaMan and compared educational effectiveness with the porcine model. Evaluation was conducted (Likert system 1: very poor to 5: excellent). The partic...

  13. Emerging broad-spectrum resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: Mechanisms and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel , Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is quite common among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, in particular among clinically relevant species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacterial species, which are mainly nosocomial pathogens, possess a diversity of resistance mechanisms that may lead to multidrug or even pandrug resistance. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenemases conferring resistance to carbapenem...

  14. State and Training Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Brain Networks Reflect Neuronal Mechanisms of Its Antidepressant Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan-Chih; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Pinazo, Daniel; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Borchardt, Viola; Bustamante, Juan-Carlos; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Balaguer, Raúl; Ávila, César; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The topic of investigating how mindfulness meditation training can have antidepressant effects via plastic changes in both resting state and meditation state brain activity is important in the rapidly emerging field of neuroplasticity. In the present study, we used a longitudinal design investigating resting state fMRI both before and after 40 days of meditation training in 13 novices. After training, we compared differences in network connectivity between rest and meditation using common resting state functional connectivity methods. Interregional methods were paired with local measures such as Regional Homogeneity. As expected, significant differences in functional connectivity both between states (rest versus meditation) and between time points (before versus after training) were observed. During meditation, the internal consistency in the precuneus and the temporoparietal junction increased, while the internal consistency of frontal brain regions decreased. A follow-up analysis of regional connectivity of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex further revealed reduced connectivity with anterior insula during meditation. After meditation training, reduced resting state functional connectivity between the pregenual anterior cingulate and dorsal medical prefrontal cortex was observed. Most importantly, significantly reduced depression/anxiety scores were observed after training. Hence, these findings suggest that mindfulness meditation might be of therapeutic use by inducing plasticity related network changes altering the neuronal basis of affective disorders such as depression. PMID:26998365

  15. State and Training Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Brain Networks Reflect Neuronal Mechanisms of Its Antidepressant Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Chih Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of investigating how mindfulness meditation training can have antidepressant effects via plastic changes in both resting state and meditation state brain activity is important in the rapidly emerging field of neuroplasticity. In the present study, we used a longitudinal design investigating resting state fMRI both before and after 40 days of meditation training in 13 novices. After training, we compared differences in network connectivity between rest and meditation using common resting state functional connectivity methods. Interregional methods were paired with local measures such as Regional Homogeneity. As expected, significant differences in functional connectivity both between states (rest versus meditation and between time points (before versus after training were observed. During meditation, the internal consistency in the precuneus and the temporoparietal junction increased, while the internal consistency of frontal brain regions decreased. A follow-up analysis of regional connectivity of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex further revealed reduced connectivity with anterior insula during meditation. After meditation training, reduced resting state functional connectivity between the pregenual anterior cingulate and dorsal medical prefrontal cortex was observed. Most importantly, significantly reduced depression/anxiety scores were observed after training. Hence, these findings suggest that mindfulness meditation might be of therapeutic use by inducing plasticity related network changes altering the neuronal basis of affective disorders such as depression.

  16. State and Training Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Brain Networks Reflect Neuronal Mechanisms of Its Antidepressant Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan-Chih; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Pinazo, Daniel; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Borchardt, Viola; Bustamante, Juan-Carlos; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Balaguer, Raúl; Ávila, César; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The topic of investigating how mindfulness meditation training can have antidepressant effects via plastic changes in both resting state and meditation state brain activity is important in the rapidly emerging field of neuroplasticity. In the present study, we used a longitudinal design investigating resting state fMRI both before and after 40 days of meditation training in 13 novices. After training, we compared differences in network connectivity between rest and meditation using common resting state functional connectivity methods. Interregional methods were paired with local measures such as Regional Homogeneity. As expected, significant differences in functional connectivity both between states (rest versus meditation) and between time points (before versus after training) were observed. During meditation, the internal consistency in the precuneus and the temporoparietal junction increased, while the internal consistency of frontal brain regions decreased. A follow-up analysis of regional connectivity of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex further revealed reduced connectivity with anterior insula during meditation. After meditation training, reduced resting state functional connectivity between the pregenual anterior cingulate and dorsal medical prefrontal cortex was observed. Most importantly, significantly reduced depression/anxiety scores were observed after training. Hence, these findings suggest that mindfulness meditation might be of therapeutic use by inducing plasticity related network changes altering the neuronal basis of affective disorders such as depression. PMID:26998365

  17. Centrally administered isoproterenol induces sympathetic outflow via brain prostaglandin E2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Kazuo; Kondo, Fumio; Yamaguchi, Naoko; Tachi, Masahiko; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Gosho, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Okada, Shoshiro

    2015-05-01

    Brain β-adrenoceptor stimulation can induce elevations of plasma levels of noradrenaline. However, there have been no detailed studies related to signaling pathways downstream of β-adrenoceptors responsible for central sympathetic outflow. In the present study, we pharmacologically examined the possibility that centrally administered isoproterenol can induce elevations of plasma noradrenaline levels in a brain prostaglandin-dependent manner. In addition, we also examined whether or not intracerebroventricular administration of isoproterenol could release endogenously synthesized prostaglandin (PG) E2 in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) by using the brain microdialysis technique combined with liquid chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ITMS(n)). Under urethane anesthesia, a femoral venous line was inserted for infusion of saline and a femoral arterial line was inserted for collecting blood samples. Next, animals were placed in a stereotaxic apparatus for application of test agents. Catecholamines in the plasma were extracted by alumina absorption and were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Quantification of PGE2 in rat PVN microdialysates was performed by the LC-ITMS(n) method. We demonstrated that centrally administered isoproterenol-induced elevations of plasma noradrenaline could be mediated via activation of β-adrenoceptors and the downstream phospholipase A2-cyclooxygenase pathway. Furthermore, PGE2 in the PVN and the PGE2 receptor EP3 subtype appear to play an important role in the process. Our results suggest that central isoproterenol-induced sympathetic outflow is mediated via brain PGE2 in a PGE2 receptor EP3 subtype-dependent manner. PMID:25549851

  18. New Insight on the Mechanisms of Epileptogenesis in the Developing Brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Lukasiuk, K.; Pitkänen, A.

    Wien: Springer, 2012 - (Nelat, A.; Di Rocco, C.), s. 3-44. (Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery. Vol.39). ISBN 978-3-7091-1359-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08045 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : epileptogenesis * developing brain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  19. A modified controlled cortical impact technique to model mild traumatic brain injury mechanics in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YungChia eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For the past 25 years, controlled cortical impact (CCI has been a useful tool in traumatic brain injury (TBI research, creating injury patterns that include primary contusion, neuronal loss, and traumatic axonal damage. However, when CCI was first developed, very little was known on the underlying biomechanics of mild TBI. This paper uses information generated from recent computational models of mild TBI in humans to alter CCI and better reflect the biomechanical conditions of mild TBI. Using a finite element model of CCI in the mouse, we adjusted three primary features of CCI: the speed of the impact to achieve strain rates within the range associated with mild TBI, the shape and material of the impounder to minimize strain concentrations in the brain, and the impact depth to control the peak deformation that occurred in the cortex and hippocampus. For these modified cortical impact conditions, we observed peak strains and strain rates throughout the brain were significantly reduced and consistent with estimated strains and strain rates observed in human mild TBI. We saw breakdown of the blood-brain barrier but no primary hemorrhage. Moreover, neuronal degeneration, axonal injury, and both astrocytic and microglia reactivity were observed up to 8 days after injury. Significant deficits in rotarod performance appeared early after injury, but we observed no impairment in spatial object recognition or contextual fear conditioning response 5 days and 8 days after injury, respectively. Together, these data show that simulating the biomechanical conditions of mild TBI with a modified cortical impact technique produces regions of cellular reactivity and neuronal loss that coincide with only a transient behavioral impairment.

  20. Neuropharmacology – Special Issue on Cerebral Ischemia Mechanisms of Ischemic Brain Damage – Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Kristian P.; Simon, Roger P.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P

    2008-01-01

    Each year in the United States approximately 700,000 individuals are afflicted with a stroke and currently there are almost 2 million survivors of stroke living in the US with prolonged disability. In China 1.5 million people die from stroke each year and in developed nations stroke is the third leading cause of death, only surpassed by heart disease and cancer. Brain injury following stroke results from the complex interplay of multiple pathways including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic...

  1. B Vitamins and the Brain: Mechanisms, Dose and Efficacy—A Review

    OpenAIRE

    David O. Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    The B-vitamins comprise a group of eight water soluble vitamins that perform essential, closely inter-related roles in cellular functioning, acting as co-enzymes in a vast array of catabolic and anabolic enzymatic reactions. Their collective effects are particularly prevalent to numerous aspects of brain function, including energy production, DNA/RNA synthesis/repair, genomic and non-genomic methylation, and the synthesis of numerous neurochemicals and signaling molecules. However, human epid...

  2. Decoding brain state transitions in the pedunculopontine nucleus: cooperative phasic and tonic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne ePetzold

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN are most active during the waking state. Their activation is deemed to cause a switch in the global brain activity from sleep to wakefulness, while their sustained discharge may contribute to upholding the waking state and enhancing arousal. Similarly, non-cholinergic PPN neurons are responsive to brain state transitions and their activation may influence some of the same targets of cholinergic neurons, suggesting that they operate in coordination. Yet, it is not clear how the discharge of distinct classes of PPN neurons organize during brain states. Here we monitored the in vivo network activity of PPN neurons in the anesthetized rat across two distinct levels of cortical dynamics and their transitions. We identified a highly structured configuration in PPN network activity during slow-wave activity that was replaced by decorrelated activity during the activated state. During the transition, neurons were predominantly excited (phasically or tonically, but some were inhibited. Identified cholinergic neurons displayed phasic and short latency responses to sensory stimulation, whereas the majority of non-cholinergic showed tonic responses and remained at high discharge rates beyond the state transition. In vitro recordings demonstrate that cholinergic neurons exhibit fast adaptation that prevents them from discharging at high rates over prolonged time periods. Our data shows that PPN neurons have distinct but complementary roles during brain state transitions, where cholinergic neurons provide a fast and transient response to sensory events that drive state transitions, whereas non-cholinergic neurons maintain an elevated firing rate during global activation.

  3. From stimuli to motor responses : Decoding rules and decision mechanisms in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Bode, S

    2010-01-01

    In a dynamically changing environment, we are constantly required to flexibly react to stimuli. It is therefore necessary to adapt behaviour to environmental cues, as well as to successfully perceive relevant stimuli. The present work addressed the question of which brain areas form the basis for task preparation and decisions along the processing chain from stimuli to responses. It combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with multivariate pattern classification to search for the encod...

  4. Brain mechanisms underlying the impact of attachment-related stress on social cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias Nolte; Caitlin Hudac; Peter Fonagy

    2013-01-01

    Mentalizing, in particular the successful attribution of complex mental states to others, is crucial for navigating social interactions. This ability is highly influenced by external factors within one's daily life, such as stress. We investigated the impact of stress on the brain basis of mentalization in adults. Using a novel modification of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET-R) we compared the differential effects of two personalized stress induction procedures: a general stress i...

  5. Effects of intelligent control mechanism on multiple-vehicle collision under emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Chen, Lizhu

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of intelligent control mechanism on multiple-vehicle collision induced by a sudden stop. The control motion of following vehicles is extended by introducing their velocity relative to the braking one into the dynamic models. We study the dynamic process of multiple-vehicle collision under the new control mechanism with finding that the new control mechanism can effectively avoid the first following vehicle's collision with the stopped vehicle, and the new consideration behaves better in reducing the number of crumpled vehicles than the existing control method. We obtain the region maps of the multiple-vehicle collision for the new intelligent control. We show the dependence of the number of the crumpled vehicles on the initial headway, the sensitivity, and the intensity of the intelligent control. In addition, the effects of the transfer delay on multiple-vehicle collision are obtained by drawing the phase diagram of the multiple-vehicle collision for the new intelligent control with different transfer delays. It is revealed that the negative effects of the delay on the multiple-vehicle collision can be mitigated by enhancing the strength of the intelligent control.

  6. Neuroimaging mechanisms of change in psychotherapy for addictive behaviors: Emerging translational approaches that bridge biology and behavior: Introduction to the Special Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.; Chung, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Research on mechanisms of behavior change provides an innovative method to improve treatment for addictive behaviors. An important extension of mechanisms of change research involves the use of translational approaches, which examine how basic biological (i.e., brain-based mechanisms) and behavioral factors interact in initiating and sustaining positive behavior change as a result of psychotherapy. Articles in this special issue include integrative conceptual reviews and innovative empirical ...

  7. Mechanism of Traumatic Brain Injury at Distant Locations After Exposure to Blast Waves: Preliminary Results from Animal and Phantom Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohtani, Kiyonobu; Goda, Keisuke; Kudo, Daisuke; Arafune, Tatsuhiko; Washio, Toshikatsu; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is the least understood of the four phases of blast injury. Distant injury induced by the blast wave, on the opposite side from the wave entry, is not well understood. This study investigated the mechanism of distant injury in bTBI. Materials and Methods Eight 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: group 1 served as the control group and did not receive any shock wave (SW) exposure; group 2 was exposed to SWs (12.5 ± 2.5 MPa). Propagation of SWs within a brain phantom was evaluated by visualization, pressure measurement, and numerical simulation. Results Intracerebral hemorrhage near the ignition site and elongation of the distant nucleus were observed, despite no apparent damage between the two locations in the animal experiment. Visualization, pressure measurement, and numerical simulation indicated the presence of complex wave dynamics accompanying a sudden increase in pressure, followed by negative pressure in the phantom experiment. Conclusion A local increase in pressure above the threshold caused by interference of reflection and rarefaction waves in the vicinity of the brain-skull surface may cause distant injury in bTBI. PMID:27165867

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease:An emerging field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rocío; Gallego-Durán; Manuel; Romero-Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) is an emerging health concern in both developed and non-developed world, encompassing from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH), cirrhosis and liver cancer. Incidence and prevalence of this disease are increasing due to the socioeconomic transition and change to harmful diet. Currently, gold standard method in NAFLD diagnosis is liver biopsy, despite complications and lack of accuracy due to sampling error. Further, pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully understood, but is well-known that obesity, diabetes and metabolic derangements played a major role in disease development and progression. Besides, gut microbioma and host genetic and epigenetic background could explain considerable interindividual variability. Knowledge that epigenetics, heritable events not caused by changes in DNA sequence, contribute to development of diseases has been a revolution in the last few years. Recently, evidences are accumulating revealing the important role of epigenetics in NAFLD pathogenesis and in NASH genesis. Histone modifications, changes in DNA methylation and aberrant profiles or micro RNAs could boost development of NAFLD and transition into clinical relevant status. PNPLA3 genotype GG has been associated with a more progressive disease and epigenetics could modulate this effect. The impact of epigenetic on NAFLD progression could deserve further applications on therapeutic targets together with future non-invasive methods useful for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD.

  9. Epigenetic mechanisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An emerging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Durán, Rocío; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2015-10-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging health concern in both developed and non-developed world, encompassing from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and liver cancer. Incidence and prevalence of this disease are increasing due to the socioeconomic transition and change to harmful diet. Currently, gold standard method in NAFLD diagnosis is liver biopsy, despite complications and lack of accuracy due to sampling error. Further, pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully understood, but is well-known that obesity, diabetes and metabolic derangements played a major role in disease development and progression. Besides, gut microbioma and host genetic and epigenetic background could explain considerable interindividual variability. Knowledge that epigenetics, heritable events not caused by changes in DNA sequence, contribute to development of diseases has been a revolution in the last few years. Recently, evidences are accumulating revealing the important role of epigenetics in NAFLD pathogenesis and in NASH genesis. Histone modifications, changes in DNA methylation and aberrant profiles or microRNAs could boost development of NAFLD and transition into clinical relevant status. PNPLA3 genotype GG has been associated with a more progressive disease and epigenetics could modulate this effect. The impact of epigenetic on NAFLD progression could deserve further applications on therapeutic targets together with future non-invasive methods useful for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD. PMID:26523202

  10. Alien Hand, Restless Brain: Salience Network and Interhemispheric Connectivity Disruption Parallel Emergence and Extinction of Diagonistic Dyspraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Ben; Beltramone, Marion; Wirsich, Jonathan; Le Troter, Arnaud; Tramoni, Eve; Aubert, Sandrine; Achard, Sophie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Guye, Maxime; Felician, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Diagonistic dyspraxia (DD) is by far the most spectacular manifestation reported by sufferers of acute corpus callosum (CC) injury (so-called “split-brain”). In this form of alien hand syndrome, one hand acts at cross purposes with the other “against the patient’s will”. Although recent models view DD as a disorder of motor control, there is still little information regarding its neural underpinnings, due to widespread connectivity changes produced by CC insult, and the obstacle that non-volitional movements represent for task-based functional neuroimaging studies. Here, we studied patient AM, the first report of DD in patient with complete developmental CC agenesis. This unique case also offers the opportunity to study the resting-state connectomics of DD in the absence of diffuse changes subsequent to CC injury or surgery. AM developed DD following status epilepticus (SE) which resolved over a 2-year period. Whole brain functional connectivity (FC) was compared (Crawford-Howell [CH]) to 16 controls during the period of acute DD symptoms (Time 1) and after remission (Time 2). Whole brain graph theoretical models were also constructed and topological efficiency examined. At Time 1, disrupted FC was observed in inter-hemispheric and intra-hemispheric right edges, involving frontal superior and midline structures. Graph analysis indicated disruption of the efficiency of salience and right frontoparietal (FP) networks. At Time 2, after remission of diagnostic dyspraxia symptoms, FC and salience network changes had resolved. In sum, longitudinal analysis of connectivity in AM indicates that DD behaviors could result from disruption of systems that support the experience and control of volitional movements and the ability to generate appropriate behavioral responses to salient stimuli. This also raises the possibility that changes to large-scale functional architecture revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (rs-fMRI) may provide

  11. Neuroelectrophysiological mechanism of disabling brain injury resulting from exposure of rat to blast in a tightly closed compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie GAO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the dynamic changes in disabling brain injury in a closed compartment, and its underlying neuroelectrophysiological mechanism after exposure of rats to blast. Methods Sixty-eight SD rats were randomly divided into control group, OTB group ( blast in an open space, and ECB group (blast in a tightly closed compartment. ECB and OTB groups were exposed to blast in a closed chamber simulating the cabin of an armored vehicle and OT (outside of the cabin with 600-mg detonator electric blasting and 21.5-cm away from the detonating point. The changes of disabled ischemic area of the brain and evoked potential before and 1, 3, 5, 8, 12, 24h and 72h after the blast injury were observed. Results The incapability score of ECB and OTB rats reached the same level (25%. With 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, it was found that the infarct area in OTB group appeared 5h after explosion, reaching the climax at 12h, and disappearing at 72h. In the ECB group, the area of infarct appeared 3h after injury, and still existed till 72h after injury. In ECB group, the N1 latency of sensory evoked potential (SEP and motor evoked potential (MEP was longer than that of control group 5 and 8 hours after explosion respectively, and the changes in sensation appeared earlier than those of motor function. Conclusions The blast wave in EC shows a characteristic of a complex blast wave, and its damage to the brain can be more severe, which is caused more by ECB than by OTB. The size of infarct area and latency of evoked potential might contribute to the brain incapability. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.13

  12. Emerging concepts of how β-amyloid proteins and pro-inflammatory cytokines might collaborate to produce an 'Alzheimer brain' (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pra, Ilaria; Chiarini, Anna; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Chakravarthy, Balu; Whitfield, James F; Armato, Ubaldo

    2008-01-01

    Three steps lead to the development of full-blown sporadic or late-onset Alzheimer's disease or dementia (AD). In the young brain, amyloid β-(1-42) (Aβ 42) is a normal aggregation-prone protein product of neuronal activity that is kept at a safe low level by proteolysis in neurons and glial cells, and by expulsion across the blood-brain barrier. But clearance declines with advancing age. Step 1: Because of the normal decline with age of the Aβ 42-clearing mechanisms, toxic amyloid-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs) made of dodecamers of the aggregation-prone Aβ 42 start accumulating. These Aβ 42 dodecamers selectively target the initially huge numbers of excitatory synapses of neurons and cause them to start slowly dropping, which increasingly impairs plasticity and sooner or later starts noticeably affecting memory formation. At a certain point, this increasing loss of synapses induces the neurons to redirect their still-expressed cell cycle proteins from post-mitotic jobs, such as maintaining synapses, to starting a cell cycle and partially or completely replicating DNA without entering mitosis. The resulting aneuploid or tetraploid neurons survive for as long as 6-12 months as quasi-functional 'undead zombies', with developing tangles of hyperphosphorylated τ protein disrupting the vital anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria and other synapse-vital components. Step 2: The hallmark AD plaques appear as Aβ 42 clearance continues to decline and the formation of Aβ 42 non-diffusible fibrils begins in the aging brain. Step 3: A terminal cytokine-driven maëlstrom begins in the aging brain when microglia, the brain's professional macrophages, are activated in and around the plaques. They produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-1β and TNF-α. One of these, IFN-γ, causes the astrocytes enwrapping the neuronal synapses to express their β-secretase (BACE1) genes and produce and release Aβ 42, which can kill the closely apposed neurons by

  13. A Battery-Less, Implantable Neuro-Electronic Interface for Studying the Mechanisms of Deep Brain Stimulation in Rat Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Po; Yeh, Chun-Yi; Huang, Pin-Yang; Wang, Zong-Ye; Cheng, Hsiang-Hui; Li, Yi-Ting; Chuang, Chi-Fen; Huang, Po-Chiun; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Chang, Yen-Chung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Chen, Hsin

    2016-02-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been a promising alternative for treating several neural disorders, the mechanisms underlying the DBS remain not fully understood. As rat models provide the advantage of recording and stimulating different disease-related regions simultaneously, this paper proposes a battery-less, implantable neuro-electronic interface suitable for studying DBS mechanisms with a freely-moving rat. The neuro-electronic interface mainly consists of a microsystem able to interact with eight different brain regions bi-directionally and simultaneously. To minimize the size of the implant, the microsystem receives power and transmits data through a single coil. In addition, particular attention is paid to the capability of recording neural activities right after each stimulation, so as to acquire information on how stimulations modulate neural activities. The microsystem has been fabricated with the standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The chip area is 7.74 mm (2) , and the microsystem is able to operate with a single supply voltage of 1 V. The wireless interface allows a maximum power of 10 mW to be transmitted together with either uplink or downlink data at a rate of 2 Mbps or 100 kbps, respectively. The input referred noise of recording amplifiers is 1.16 μVrms, and the stimulation voltage is tunable from 1.5 V to 4.5 V with 5-bit resolution. After the electrical functionality of the microsystem is tested, the capability of the microsystem to interface with rat brain is further examined and compared with conventional instruments. All experimental results are presented and discussed in this paper. PMID:25838526

  14. Radiation-induced apoptosis in undifferentiated cells of the developing brain as a biological defense mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undifferentiated neural (UN) cells of the developing mammalian brain are highly sensitive to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation, transglutaminase activation, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage reveal radiation-induced cell death in the ventricular zone of the cerebral mantle and external granular layer of the cerebellum to be due to apoptosis. A statistically significant increase of cell mortality can be induced by 0.03 Gy X-irradiation, and the mortality increases linearly with increasing doses. It is not changed by split doses, probably because of the very slow repair of cellular damage and a lack of adaptive response. Although extensive apoptosis in the UN cell population results in microcephaly and mental retardation, it possesses the ability to recover from a considerable cell loss and to form the normal structure of the central nervous system. The number of cell deaths needed to induce tissue adnormalities in the adult murine brain rises in the range of 15-25% of the germinal cell population; with the threshold doses at about 0.3 Gy for cerebral anomalies and 1 Gy for cerebellar abnormalities. Threshold level is similarly suggested in prenatally exposed A-bomb survivors. High radiosensitivity of UN cells is assumed to be a manifestation of the ability of the cell to commit suicide when injured. Repeated replication of DNA and extensive gene expression are required in future proliferation and differentiation. Once an abnormality in DNA was induced and fixed in the UN cell, it would be greatly amplified and prove a danger in producing malformations and tumors. These cells would thus commit suicide for the benefit of the individual to eliminate their acquired genetic abnormalities rather than make DNA repair. UN cells in the developing brain are highly radiosensitive and readily involved in apoptosis. Paradoxically, however, this may be to protect individuals against teratogenesis and tumorigenesis. (J.P.N.)

  15. Radiation-induced apoptosis in undifferentiated cells of the developing brain as a biological defense mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Minioru [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine; Tamaru, Masao

    1994-12-31

    Undifferentiated neural (UN) cells of the developing mammalian brain are highly sensitive to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation, transglutaminase activation, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage reveal radiation-induced cell death in the ventricular zone of the cerebral mantle and external granular layer of the cerebellum to be due to apoptosis. A statistically significant increase of cell mortality can be induced by 0.03 Gy X-irradiation, and the mortality increases linearly with increasing doses. It is not changed by split doses, probably because of the very slow repair of cellular damage and a lack of adaptive response. Although extensive apoptosis in the UN cell population results in microcephaly and mental retardation, it possesses the ability to recover from a considerable cell loss and to form the normal structure of the central nervous system. The number of cell deaths needed to induce tissue adnormalities in the adult murine brain rises in the range of 15-25% of the germinal cell population; with the threshold doses at about 0.3 Gy for cerebral anomalies and 1 Gy for cerebellar abnormalities. Threshold level is similarly suggested in prenatally exposed A-bomb survivors. High radiosensitivity of UN cells is assumed to be a manifestation of the ability of the cell to commit suicide when injured. Repeated replication of DNA and extensive gene expression are required in future proliferation and differentiation. Once an abnormality in DNA was induced and fixed in the UN cell, it would be greatly amplified and prove a danger in producing malformations and tumors. These cells would thus commit suicide for the benefit of the individual to eliminate their acquired genetic abnormalities rather than make DNA repair. UN cells in the developing brain are highly radiosensitive and readily involved in apoptosis. Paradoxically, however, this may be to protect individuals against teratogenesis and tumorigenesis. (J.P.N.).

  16. Renewable Energy Investment in Emerging Markets: Evaluating Improvements to the Clean Development Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past, industrialized countries have invested in or financed numerous renewable energy projects in developing countries, primarily through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM of the Kyoto Protocol. However, critics have pointed to its bureaucratic structure, problems with additionality and distorted credit prices as ill-equipped to streamline renewable energy investment. In this paper, we simulate the impact of policy on investment decisions on whether or not to invest in wind energy infrastructure in India, Brazil and China. Data from 2,578 past projects as well as literature on investor behaviour is used to inform the model structure and parameters. Our results show that the CDM acts differently in each country and reveal that while streamlining the approval process and reconsidering additionality can lead to non-trivial increase in total investment, stabilizing policy and decreasing investment risk will do the most to spur investment.

  17. A measure of majorization emerging from single-shot statistical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, D.; Dahlsten, O. C. O.; Renner, R.; Vedral, V.

    2015-07-01

    The use of the von Neumann entropy in formulating the laws of thermodynamics has recently been challenged. It is associated with the average work whereas the work guaranteed to be extracted in any single run of an experiment is the more interesting quantity in general. We show that an expression that quantifies majorization determines the optimal guaranteed work. We argue it should therefore be the central quantity of statistical mechanics, rather than the von Neumann entropy. In the limit of many identical and independent subsystems (asymptotic i.i.d) the von Neumann entropy expressions are recovered but in the non-equilbrium regime the optimal guaranteed work can be radically different to the optimal average. Moreover our measure of majorization governs which evolutions can be realized via thermal interactions, whereas the non-decrease of the von Neumann entropy is not sufficiently restrictive. Our results are inspired by single-shot information theory.

  18. Molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) translation in dendrites

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Vera Lúcia Margarido

    2010-01-01

    A especificidade espacial e temporal subjacente à diversidade de processos de plasticidade sináptica que ocorrem no sistema nervoso central está profundamente relacionada com a disponibilidade da proteína brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) em domínios sub-celulares distintos, especialmente na área pós-sináptica. Contudo, os mecanismos moleculares que regulam a síntese proteica de BDNF nas dendrites estão ainda por desvendar. Assim, o principal objectivo deste trabalho foi...

  19. The changing brain--insights into the mechanisms of neural and behavioral adaptation to the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergersen, L H; Bramham, C R; Hugdahl, K;

    2013-01-01

    The Kavli Prize in Neuroscience was awarded for the third time in September 2012, by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in Oslo. The accompanying Kavli Prize Symposium on Neuroscience, held in Bergen and Trondheim, was a showcase of excellence in neuroscience research. The common theme...... by the elaborate burrowing behavior in a rodent species, in which independent genetic regions regulate distinct modules of the burrowing pattern (Hoekstra). Finally, at the other extreme of the nature-nurture scale, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis in children and adults identified a brain...

  20. The Coherent Heart Heart–Brain Interactions, Psychophysiological Coherence, and the Emergence of System-Wide Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Trevor Bradley

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents theory and research on the scientific study of emotion thatemphasizes the importance of coherence as an optimal psychophysiological state. Adynamic systems view of the interrelations between psychological, cognitive andemotional systems and neural communication networks in the human organism providesa foundation for the view presented. These communication networks are examined froman information processing perspective and reveal a fundamental order in heart-braininteractions and a harmonious synchronization of physiological systems associated withpositive emotions. The concept of coherence is drawn on to understand optimalfunctioning which is naturally reflected in the heart’s rhythmic patterns. Research ispresented identifying various psychophysiological states linked to these patterns, withneurocardiological coherence emerging as having significant impacts on well being.These include psychophysiological as well as improved cognitive performance. Fromthis, the central role of the heart is explored in terms of biochemical, biophysical andenergetic interactions. Appendices provide further details and research on;psychophysiological functioning, reference previous research in this area, details onresearch linking coherence with optimal cognitive performance, heart brainsynchronization and the energetic signature of the various psychophysiological modes.

  1. B Vitamins and the Brain: Mechanisms, Dose and Efficacy—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The B-vitamins comprise a group of eight water soluble vitamins that perform essential, closely inter-related roles in cellular functioning, acting as co-enzymes in a vast array of catabolic and anabolic enzymatic reactions. Their collective effects are particularly prevalent to numerous aspects of brain function, including energy production, DNA/RNA synthesis/repair, genomic and non-genomic methylation, and the synthesis of numerous neurochemicals and signaling molecules. However, human epidemiological and controlled trial investigations, and the resultant scientific commentary, have focused almost exclusively on the small sub-set of vitamins (B9/B12/B6 that are the most prominent (but not the exclusive B-vitamins involved in homocysteine metabolism. Scant regard has been paid to the other B vitamins. This review describes the closely inter-related functions of the eight B-vitamins and marshals evidence suggesting that adequate levels of all members of this group of micronutrients are essential for optimal physiological and neurological functioning. Furthermore, evidence from human research clearly shows both that a significant proportion of the populations of developed countries suffer from deficiencies or insufficiencies in one or more of this group of vitamins, and that, in the absence of an optimal diet, administration of the entire B-vitamin group, rather than a small sub-set, at doses greatly in excess of the current governmental recommendations, would be a rational approach for preserving brain health.

  2. B Vitamins and the Brain: Mechanisms, Dose and Efficacy--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David O

    2016-02-01

    The B-vitamins comprise a group of eight water soluble vitamins that perform essential, closely inter-related roles in cellular functioning, acting as co-enzymes in a vast array of catabolic and anabolic enzymatic reactions. Their collective effects are particularly prevalent to numerous aspects of brain function, including energy production, DNA/RNA synthesis/repair, genomic and non-genomic methylation, and the synthesis of numerous neurochemicals and signaling molecules. However, human epidemiological and controlled trial investigations, and the resultant scientific commentary, have focused almost exclusively on the small sub-set of vitamins (B9/B12/B6) that are the most prominent (but not the exclusive) B-vitamins involved in homocysteine metabolism. Scant regard has been paid to the other B vitamins. This review describes the closely inter-related functions of the eight B-vitamins and marshals evidence suggesting that adequate levels of all members of this group of micronutrients are essential for optimal physiological and neurological functioning. Furthermore, evidence from human research clearly shows both that a significant proportion of the populations of developed countries suffer from deficiencies or insufficiencies in one or more of this group of vitamins, and that, in the absence of an optimal diet, administration of the entire B-vitamin group, rather than a small sub-set, at doses greatly in excess of the current governmental recommendations, would be a rational approach for preserving brain health. PMID:26828517

  3. Brain Mechanisms Underlying the Impact of Attachment-Related Stress on Social Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Nolte

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mentalizing, in particular the successful attribution of complex mental states to others, is crucial for navigating social interactions. This ability is highly influenced by external factors within one’s daily life, such as stress. We investigated the impact of stress on the brain basis of mentalization in adults. Using a novel modification of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET-R we compared the differential effects of two personalized stress induction procedures: a general stress induction (GSI and an attachment-related stress induction (ASI. Participants performed the RMET-R at baseline and after each of the two inductions. Baseline results replicated and extended previous findings regarding the neural correlates of the RMET-R. Additionally, we identified brain regions associated with making complex age judgments from the same stimuli. Results after stress exposure showed that the ASI condition resulted in reduced mentalization-related activation in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS, left inferior frontal gyrus and left temporoparietal junction. Moreover, the left middle frontal gyrus and left anterior insula showed greater functional connectivity to the left posterior STS after the ASI. Our findings indicate that attachment-related stress has a unique effect on the neural correlates of mentalization.

  4. New mechanized system for circle spraying of oil palms seedling emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius El Pebrian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new machine system has been designed, developed and evaluated for extensive circle spraying of oil palms (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. in an effort to overcome the inefficient spraying problem with the conventional spraying system. The machine system consists of a four-wheeled drive 4WD prime mover with front mounted machine attachments for the circle spraying operation. The configuration of the circle spraying attachment consists of a hexagonal curved spray boom, lifting arm, opening-tilting mechanism unit, storage tank, spray pump, solid cone nozzles, and associate hydraulic system. Field performance tests on the machine system showed an average effective field capacity of 7.89 ha per man per day and when compared to the earlier reported effective field capacity of the walking spray-operated equipment using Serena LT16 knapsack sprayer; a difference of 1.97 time for circle spraying of mature palms grove. Reduction in the human energy expenditure of 101.28 kJ man-1 h-1 or 10.68 % but an increase in the spraying cost of 1.53 USD ha-1 or 24.9 % were obtained with the machine system against the walking spraying-operated equipment using Serena LT16 knapsack sprayer. Justification for machine system to be cost effective could be satisfied if the present effective field capacity is increased to 1.263 time with good skilled operator or if the current R&D cost is reduced to 0.41 time. This is because the improved field capacity of new machine system could not rationalize its current R&D cost. Admittedly, the machine system has great potential to overcome the limitations with the current employed machine/equipment in the circle spraying operation of oil palms in the plantation.

  5. Mechanisms of oxidative stress in brain ischemia injury%氧化应激在脑缺血损伤中的作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹洋; 吴伟康

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in brain injury after ischemia, which is a complex cascade. These oxidants produced by oxidative stress are directly involved in oxidative damage with cellular macromolecules such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, which lead to cell death. Oxidants are also mediators in signaling involving mitochondria pathway, DNA repair enzymes, and transcription factor that may lead to apoptosis after cerebral ischemia. Antioxidangt enzymes (such as superoxide dismutase,etc) provide useful tools in dissecting the events involving oxidative stress in signaling and damage in ischemic brain injury. This review focuses on the mechanisms of oxidative stress during brain ischemia.

  6. Neuroscience of attentional processes for addiction medicine: from brain mechanisms to practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadardi, Javad Salehi; Cox, W Miles; Rahmani, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The present chapter first argues how having a goal for procuring alcohol or other substances leads to the development of a time-binding, dynamic, and goal oriented motivational state termed current concern, as the origin of substance-related attentional bias. Next, it discusses the importance of attentional bias in the development, continuation of, and relapsing to substance abuse. It further proceeds with a review of selective evidence from cognitive psychology that helps account for making decisions about using an addictive substance or refraining from using it. A discussion on the various brain loci that are involved in attentional bias and other kinds of cue reactivity is followed by presenting findings from neurocognitive research. Finally, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the chapter presents new trends and ideas that can be applied to addiction-related cognitive measurement and training. PMID:26806772

  7. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, F. K. [Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Krembil Discovery Tower, Toronto Western Hospital, 60 Leonard Street, 7th floor, 7KD411, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada); Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Toronto, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Department of Physiology, University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building, 3rd Floor, 1 King' s College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8 (Canada); Ferguson, K. A. [Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Krembil Discovery Tower, Toronto Western Hospital, 60 Leonard Street, 7th floor, 7KD411, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada); Department of Physiology, University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building, 3rd Floor, 1 King' s College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels.

  8. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels

  9. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, Vtmpd (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0, were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P<0.0001, Vsucc (−65%; P<0.0001, and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P<0.001. Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P<0.001. Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P<0.05 and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P<0.001. Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient’s vulnerability to stroke.

  10. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, F. K.; Ferguson, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels.

  11. The emerging role of Notch pathway in ageing: Focus on the related mechanisms in age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Madonna, Rosalinda; Melino, Gerry; Caruso, Calogero

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway, which is fundamental for the development of all tissues, organs and systems of human body. Recently, a considerable and still growing number of studies have highlighted the contribution of Notch signaling in various pathological processes of the adult life, such as age-related diseases. In particular, the Notch pathway has emerged as major player in the maintenance of tissue specific homeostasis, through the control of proliferation, migration, phenotypes and functions of tissue cells, as well as in the cross-talk between inflammatory cells and the innate immune system, and in onset of inflammatory age-related diseases. However, until now there is a confounding evidence about the related mechanisms. Here, we discuss mechanisms through which Notch signaling acts in a very complex network of pathways, where it seems to have the crucial role of hub. Thus, we stress the possibility to use Notch pathway, the related molecules and pathways constituting this network, both as innovative (predictive, diagnostic and prognostic) biomarkers and targets for personalised treatments for age-related diseases. PMID:27328278

  12. Study of the mechanisms for the emergency cooling of the core of the Radioisotope Producing Reator (RPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms for the emergency cooling of the core of the Radioisotope Producing Reactor (R.P.R.) are studied, in particular the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the coolant after reactor shut-down. The coolant operates bd convection, and flows downward through the core passing into beel-shaped plenum that encloses the core and proceeding across the primary cooling loop. When the reactor is shut-down, the coolant flow undergoes a transient period until the steady state of natural convection is reached, after which the coolant flows upwards from the lower plenum. A plocking valve will be installed at the exit of the lower plenum, which will automatically shut in case of an accident that will involve the loss of flow in the primary circuit. The present work aims at evaluating the contribution of natural convection by natural recirculation in the core when the blocking valve is close, and via the external coolant circuit when the blocking valve is open. In particular, we study the natural self-regulating mechanisms of extraction of the heat generated by the fission product after reactor shut-down. (author)

  13. Emerging systems biology approaches in nanotoxicology: Towards a mechanism-based understanding of nanomaterial hazard and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro M; Fadeel, Bengt

    2016-05-15

    Engineered nanomaterials are being developed for a variety of technological applications. However, the increasing use of nanomaterials in society has led to concerns about their potential adverse effects on human health and the environment. During the first decade of nanotoxicological research, the realization has emerged that effective risk assessment of the multitudes of new nanomaterials would benefit from a comprehensive understanding of their toxicological mechanisms, which is difficult to achieve with traditional, low-throughput, single end-point oriented approaches. Therefore, systems biology approaches are being progressively applied within the nano(eco)toxicological sciences. This novel paradigm implies that the study of biological systems should be integrative resulting in quantitative and predictive models of nanomaterial behaviour in a biological system. To this end, global 'omics' approaches with which to assess changes in genes, proteins, metabolites, etc. are deployed allowing for computational modelling of the biological effects of nanomaterials. Here, we highlight omics and systems biology studies in nanotoxicology, aiming towards the implementation of a systems nanotoxicology and mechanism-based risk assessment of nanomaterials. PMID:26721310

  14. Developmental precursors of social brain networks: the emergence of attentional and cortical sensitivity to facial expressions in 5 to 7 months old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrttiaho, Santeri; Forssman, Linda; Kaatiala, Jussi; Leppänen, Jukka M

    2014-01-01

    Biases in attention towards facial cues during infancy may have an important role in the development of social brain networks. The current study used a longitudinal design to examine the stability of infants' attentional biases towards facial expressions and to elucidate how these biases relate to emerging cortical sensitivity to facial expressions. Event-related potential (ERP) and attention disengagement data were acquired in response to the presentation of fearful, happy, neutral, and phase-scrambled face stimuli from the same infants at 5 and 7 months of age. The tendency to disengage from faces was highly consistent across both ages. However, the modulation of this behavior by fearful facial expressions was uncorrelated between 5 and 7 months. In the ERP data, fear-sensitive activity was observed over posterior scalp regions, starting at the latency of the N290 wave. The scalp distribution of this sensitivity to fear in ERPs was dissociable from the topography of face-sensitive modulation within the same latency range. While attentional bias scores were independent of co-registered ERPs, attention bias towards fearful faces at 5 months of age predicted the fear-sensitivity in ERPs at 7 months of age. The current results suggest that the attention bias towards fear could be involved in the developmental tuning of cortical networks for social signals of emotion. PMID:24968161

  15. Examination of the Mechanism of Human Brain Aspartoacylase through the Binding of an Intermediate Analogue†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coq, Johanne; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Malik, Radhika; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Xu, Chengfu; Viola, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Canavan disease is a fatal neurological disorder caused by the malfunctioning of a single metabolic enzyme, aspartoacylase, that catalyzes the deacetylation of N-acetyl-l-aspartate to produce l-aspartate and acetate. The structure of human brain aspartoacylase has been determined in complex with a stable tetrahedral intermediate analogue, N-phosphonomethyl-l-aspartate. This potent inhibitor forms multiple interactions between each of its heteroatoms and the substrate binding groups arrayed within the active site. The binding of the catalytic intermediate analogue induces the conformational ordering of several substrate binding groups, thereby setting up the active site for catalysis. The highly ordered binding of this inhibitor has allowed assignments to be made for substrate binding groups and provides strong support for a carboxypeptidase-type mechanism for the hydrolysis of the amide bond of the substrate, N-acetyl-l-aspartate. PMID:18293939

  16. Perturbations of the cerebrovascular matrisome: A convergent mechanism in small vessel disease of the brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutel, Anne; Haddad, Iman; Ratelade, Julien; Nelson, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    The term matrisome refers to the ensemble of proteins constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) (core matrisome) as well as the proteins associated with the ECM. Every organ has an ECM with a unique composition that not only provides the support and anchorage for cells, but also controls fundamental cellular processes as diverse as differentiation, survival, proliferation, and polarity. The current knowledge of the matrisome of small brain vessels is reviewed with a focus on the basement membrane (BM), a specialized form of ECM located at the interface between endothelial cells, contractile cells (smooth muscle cells and pericytes), and astrocyte endfeet—a very strategic location in the communication pathway between the cerebral microcirculation and astrocytes. We discuss some of the most recent genetic data and relevant findings from experimental models of nonamyloid cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). We propose the concept that perturbations of the cerebrovascular matrisome is a convergent pathologic pathway in monogenic forms of SVD, and is likely relevant to the sporadic disease. PMID:25853907

  17. Brain dynamic mechanisms on the visual attention scale with Chinese characters cues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The temporal dynamics in brain evoked by the scale of visual attention with the cues of Chinese characters were studied by recording event-related potentials (ERPs). With the fixed orientation of visual attention, 14 healthy young participants performed a search task in which the search array was preceded by Chinese characters cues, "大, 中, 小" (large, medium, small). 128 channels scalp ERPs were recorded to study the role of visual attention scale played in the visual spatial attention. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the ERP components evoked by the three Chinese characters cues except the inferoposterior N2 latency. The targets evoked P2, N2 amplitudes and latency have significant differences with the different cues of large, middle and small, while P1 and N1 components had no significant difference. The results suggested that the processing of scale of visual attention was mainly concerned with P2, N2 components, while the P1, N1 components were mainly related with the processing of visual orientation information.

  18. Speech and music shape the listening brain: Evidence for shared domain-general mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asaridou, S.S.; McQueen, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Are there bi-directional influences between speech perception and music perception? An answer to this question is essential for understanding the extent to which the speech and music that we hear are processed by domain-general auditory processes and/or by distinct neural auditory mechanisms. This r

  19. The major brain endocannabinoid 2-AG controls neuropathic pain and mechanical hyperalgesia in patients with neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L Pellkofer

    in patients with NMO. The degree of mechanical hyperalgesia reflecting central sensitization of nociceptive pathways seems to be controlled by the major brain endocannabinoid 2-AG.

  20. Does harmonization of payment mechanisms enhance equitable health outcomes in delivery of emergency medical services in Thailand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyawongpaisal, Paibul; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Tansirisithikul, Rassamee

    2015-12-01

    There are different reimbursement rates by the various insurance schemes in Thailand, which include the Universal Coverage scheme (UCS), civil servant medical benefit scheme (CSMBS) and social security scheme (SSS). Hence, there are concerns about inequitable care standards. Harmonization of the rates of emergency medical services has been started since April 2012. This study analyzed the impact of harmonization on clinical outcomes in private hospitals. Analysis of 22 900 records of the dataset accrued from April 2012 to June 2013 using multiple logistic modelling revealed that beneficiaries under UCS were the worst off [Odds ratio 2.56 95% of confidence interval: 2.35 to 2.80 for non-trauma and 2.19 (1.59-3.0) for trauma, corresponding to 21.26 and 25.09% of bad outcomes, respectively] in terms of not improved or dead outcomes at discharge compared with those under the CSMBS (8.45 and 12.78%, respectively) controlling for age, sex, hospital location, triage priority code, length of stays and adjusted Relative weight (RW) score. Using propensity score, matching analysis found the outcome rates of not improved including dead were highest in UCS 26.27% for trauma and 21.26% for non-trauma patients. Payment mechanism alone is inadequate to ensure equitable distribution of health outcomes in provision of emergency medical care by private providers in urban settings across the country. A secondary finding was that patients accessing hospital services directly showed better improvement or lower in-hospital mortality compared with access through formal pre-hospital means (P < 0.001). Plausible explanations have been discussed with policy implications and recommendations for further studies. PMID:25797471

  1. Bio-Mechanical Model of the Brain for a Per-Operative Image-Guided Neuronavigator Compensating for "Brain-Shift" Deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to address the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as 'brain-shift'. This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on pre-operative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intra-operative image-guided system, we describe a procedure to generate patient specific finite element meshes of the brain and propose a biomechanical model which can take into account tissue deformations and surgical procedures that modify the brain structure, like tumour or tissue resection.

  2. Speech and music shape the listening brain: evidence for shared domain-general mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Salomi S Asaridou; McQueen, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Are there bi-directional influences between speech perception and music perception? An answer to this question is essential for understanding the extent to which the speech and music that we hear are processed by domain-general auditory processes and/or by distinct neural auditory mechanisms. This review summarizes a large body of behavioral and neuroscientific findings which suggest that the musical experience of trained musicians does modulate speech processing, and a sparser set of data, l...

  3. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibition: Targeting Multiple Mechanisms of Ischemic Brain Injury with a Single Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Iliff, Jeffrey J.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2009-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a key enzyme in the metabolic conversion and degradation of P450 eicosanoids called epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Genetic variations in the sEH gene, designated EPHX2, are associated with ischemic stroke risk. In experimental studies, sEH inhibition and gene deletion reduce infarct size after focal cerebral ischemia in mice. Although the precise mechanism of protection afforded by sEH inhibition remains under investigation, EETs exhibit a wide array of p...

  4. Exercise offers anxiolytic potential: A role for stress and brain noradrenergic-galaninergic mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Sciolino, Natale R.; Holmes, Philip V.

    2012-01-01

    Although physical activity reduces anxiety in humans, the neural basis for this response is unclear. Rodent models are essential to understand the mechanisms that underlie the benefits of exercise. However, it is controversial whether exercise exerts anxiolytic-like potential in rodents. Evidence is reviewed to evaluate the effects of wheel running, an experimental mode of exercise in rodents, on behavior in tests of anxiety and on norepinephrine and galanin systems in neural circuits that re...

  5. Individual Differences in Working Memory, Nonverbal IQ, and Mathematics Achievement and Brain Mechanisms Associated with Symbolic and Nonsymbolic Number Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullick, Margaret M.; Sprute, Lisa A.; Temple, Elise

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences in mathematics performance may stem from domain-general factors like working memory and intelligence. Parietal and frontal brain areas have been implicated in number processing, but the influence of such cognitive factors on brain activity during mathematics processing is not known. The relationship between brain mechanisms…

  6. Nucleobases bind to and stabilize aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile, providing a viable mechanism for the emergence of protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Roy A; Blosser, Matthew C; Stottrup, Benjamin L; Tavakley, Ravi; Deamer, David W; Keller, Sarah L

    2013-08-13

    Primordial cells presumably combined RNAs, which functioned as catalysts and carriers of genetic information, with an encapsulating membrane of aggregated amphiphilic molecules. Major questions regarding this hypothesis include how the four bases and the sugar in RNA were selected from a mixture of prebiotic compounds and colocalized with such membranes, and how the membranes were stabilized against flocculation in salt water. To address these questions, we explored the possibility that aggregates of decanoic acid, a prebiotic amphiphile, interact with the bases and sugar found in RNA. We found that these bases, as well as some but not all related bases, bind to decanoic acid aggregates. Moreover, both the bases and ribose inhibit flocculation of decanoic acid by salt. The extent of inhibition by the bases correlates with the extent of their binding, and ribose inhibits to a greater extent than three similar sugars. Finally, the stabilizing effects of a base and ribose are additive. Thus, aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile bind certain heterocyclic bases and sugars, including those found in RNA, and this binding stabilizes the aggregates against salt. These mutually reinforcing mechanisms might have driven the emergence of protocells. PMID:23901105

  7. Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation: Is it controlled by patient brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-07-01

    Tidal volume (VT) is the controlled variable during passive mechanical ventilation (CMV) in order to avoid ventilator-induced-lung-injury. However, recent data indicate that the driving pressure [ΔP; VT to respiratory system compliance (Crs) ratio] is the parameter that best stratifies the risk of death. In order to study which variable (VT or ΔP) is controlled by critically ill patients, 108 previously studied patients were assigned to receive PAV+ (a mode that estimates Crs and permits the patients to select their own breathing pattern) after CMV, were re-analyzed. When patients were switched from CMV to PAV+ they controlled ΔP without constraining VT to narrow limits. VT was increased when the resumption of spontaneous breathing was associated with an increase in Crs. When ΔP was high during CMV, the patients (n=12) decreased it in 58 out of 67 measurements. We conclude that critically ill patients control the driving pressure by sizing the tidal volume to individual respiratory system compliance using appropriate feedback mechanisms aimed at limiting the degree of lung stress. PMID:26994756

  8. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  9. Brain/MINDS: brain-mapping project in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Okano, Hideyuki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    There is an emerging interest in brain-mapping projects in countries across the world, including the USA, Europe, Australia and China. In 2014, Japan started a brain-mapping project called Brain Mapping by Integrated Neurotechnologies for Disease Studies (Brain/MINDS). Brain/MINDS aims to map the structure and function of neuronal circuits to ultimately understand the vast complexity of the human brain, and takes advantage of a unique non-human primate animal model, the common marmoset (Calli...

  10. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms: help or hindrance in drug delivery to the central nervous system? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman R. Saunders

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Barrier mechanisms in the brain are important for its normal functioning and development. Stability of the brain’s internal environment, particularly with respect to its ionic composition, is a prerequisite for the fundamental basis of its function, namely transmission of nerve impulses. In addition, the appropriate and controlled supply of a wide range of nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, monocarboxylates, and vitamins is also essential for normal development and function. These are all cellular functions across the interfaces that separate the brain from the rest of the internal environment of the body. An essential morphological component of all but one of the barriers is the presence of specialized intercellular tight junctions between the cells comprising the interface: endothelial cells in the blood-brain barrier itself, cells of the arachnoid membrane, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and tanycytes (specialized glial cells in the circumventricular organs. In the ependyma lining the cerebral ventricles in the adult brain, the cells are joined by gap junctions, which are not restrictive for intercellular movement of molecules. But in the developing brain, the forerunners of these cells form the neuroepithelium, which restricts exchange of all but the smallest molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and brain interstitial fluid because of the presence of strap junctions between the cells. The intercellular junctions in all these interfaces are the physical basis for their barrier properties. In the blood-brain barrier proper, this is combined with a paucity of vesicular transport that is a characteristic of other vascular beds. Without such a diffusional restrain, the cellular transport mechanisms in the barrier interfaces would be ineffective. Superimposed on these physical structures are physiological mechanisms as the cells of the interfaces contain various metabolic transporters and efflux pumps, often ATP-binding cassette (ABC

  11. Bifurcation mechanisms of regular and chaotic network signaling in brain astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosov, V. V.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    Bifurcation mechanisms underlying calcium oscillations in the network of astrocytes are investigated. Network model includes the dynamics of intracellular calcium concentration and intercellular diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate through gap junctions. Bifurcation analysis of underlying nonlinear dynamical system is presented. Parameter regions and principle bifurcation boundaries have been delineated and described. We show how variations of the diffusion rate can lead to generation of network calcium oscillations in originally nonoscillating cells. Different scenarios of regular activity and its transitions to chaotic dynamics have been obtained. Then, the bifurcations have been associated with statistical characteristics of calcium signals showing that different bifurcation scenarios yield qualitative changes in experimentally measurable quantities of the astrocyte activity, e.g., statistics of calcium spikes.

  12. Mechanism of decline in rat brain 5-hydroxytryptamine after induction of liver tryptophan pyrrolase by hydrocortisone: roles of tryptophan catabolism and kynurenine synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Simon N.

    1981-01-01

    1 Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the decline in brain tryptophan and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) after administration of hydrocortisone and the subsequent induction of liver pyrrolase. These are depletion of tryptophan by high rates of tryptophan catabolism and inhibition of tryptophan uptake by elevated levels of the tryptophan catabolite, kynurenine.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effects of acute exercise on cognitive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T. Piepmeier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that improvements in cognitive performance may be observed following an acute bout of exercise. However, evidence in support of the biological mechanisms of this effect is still limited. Findings from both rodent and human studies suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effect of acute exercise on memory. The molecular properties of BDNF allow this protein to be assessed in the periphery (pBDNF (i.e., blood serum, blood plasma, making measurements of acute exercise-induced changes in BDNF concentration relatively accessible. Studies exploring the acute exercise–pBDNF–cognitive performance relationship have had mixed findings, but this may be more reflective of methodological differences between studies than it is a statement about the role of BDNF. For example, significant associations have been observed between acute exercise-induced changes in pBDNF concentration and cognitive performance in studies assessing memory, and non-significant associations have been found in studies assessing non-memory cognitive domains. Three suggestions are made for future research aimed at understanding the role of BDNF as a biological mechanism of this relationship: 1 Assessments of cognitive performance may benefit from a focus on various types of memory (e.g., relational, spatial, long-term; 2 More fine-grained measurements of pBDNF will allow for the assessment of concentrations of specific isoforms of the BDNF protein (i.e., immature, mature; 3 Statistical techniques designed to test the mediating role of pBDNF in the acute exercise-cognitive performance relationship should be utilized in order to make causal inferences.

  14. Functional MRI studies of the neural mechanisms of human brain attentional networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To identify the neural mechanisms of the anterior attention network (AAN) and posterior attention network (PAN) , investigate the possible interaction between them with event-related functional MRI(ER-fMRI). Methods: Eight right-handed healthy volunteers participated in the experiment designed with inhibition of return in visual orienting and Stroop color-word interference effect. The fMRI data were collected on Siemens 1.5 T Sonata MRI systems and analyzed by AFNI to generate the activation map. Results: The data sets from 6 of 8 subjects were used in the study. The functional localizations of the Stroop and IOR, which manifest the function of the AAN and PAN respectively, were consistent with previous imaging researches. On cued locations, left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), area MT/V5, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and left anterior cingulated cortex (ACC) were significantly activated. On uncued locations, right superior parietal lobule (SPL) and bilateral area MT/V5 were significantly activated. Conclusion: The AAN exerts control over the PAN, while its function can be in turn modulated by the PAN. There are interaction between the AAN and PAN. In addition, it is also proved that ER-fMRI is a feasible method to revise preexisting cognitive model and theory. (authors)

  15. Voluntary exercise promotes beneficial anti-aging mechanisms in SAMP8 female brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayod, Sergi; Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Lalanza, Jaume F; Kaliman, Perla; Ortuño-Sahagun, Daniel; Escorihuela, Rosa M; Pallàs, Mercè

    2015-02-01

    Regular physical exercise mediates health and longevity promotion involving Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-regulated pathways. The anti-aging activity of SIRT1 is achieved, at least in part, by means of fine-tuning the adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway by preventing the transition of an originally pro-survival program into a pro-aging mechanism. Additionally, SIRT1 promotes mitochondrial function and reduces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), the master controller of mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, by using senescence-accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8) as a model for aging, we determined the effect of wheel-running as a paradigm for long-term voluntary exercise on SIRT1-AMPK pathway and mitochondrial functionality measured by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex content in the hippocampus and cortex. We found differential activation of SIRT1 in both tissues and hippocampal-specific activation of AMPK. These findings correlated well with significant changes in OXPHOS in the hippocampal, but not in the cerebral cortex, area. Collectively, the results revealed greater benefits of the exercise in the wheel-running intervention in a murine model of senescence, which was directly related with mitochondrial function and which was mediated through the modulation of SIRT1 and AMPK pathways. PMID:25027560

  16. Thyroid Hormone Homeostasis in Adult Mammalian Brain: A Novel Mechanism for Functional Preservation of Cerebral T3 Content During Initial Peripheral Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samita Kundu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available brain is well known. But the action of THs in the adult brain was not widely a focus of study by endocrinologists based on lack of increased energy metabolism and oxygen consumption with changing thyroid status and thus not widely acknowledged. Extensive research has, however, revealed interesting findings like sequestration of T3, possible release of T3 as a neurotransmitter in nerve terminals, identification of specific membrane binding sites of T3 in the synaptosomal fraction of adult rat brain and many non-genomic neurotransmitter-like actions of TH in the adult mammalian brain. Most importantly, thyroid dysfunction is associated with significant disruption of psychobehavioural system in the adult, which can however be reversed with therapeutic hormonal intervention. A complex regulatory network involving transfer of TH through the brain barriers, interactions between neurons and glial cells, and deiodinase expression works synchronously to deliver the appropriate amount of T3 to the neurons. Despite peripheral hypo- or hyper-thyroidism, brain can maintain a normal level of TH up to certain duration. Thus, presence of a novel homeostatic mechanism in the adult mammalian brain (‘central homeostasis for thyroid hormone’ to defend the adverse neuropsychological manifestations commonly associated with peripheral hypothyroidism has been known for a long time. Unfortunately, the exact time course and the mechanism of such central homeostasis were not determined, till we made a pioneering attempt to evaluate the same. The entire phenomenon appeared to be coupled with nuclear mediated genomic processes like mRNA and protein synthesis. Moreover, the effects of THs on some key enzymes and ions related to neurotransmission during the start and end days of this central homeostatic phenomenon point towards a dependency of the enzymes on TH and an involvement of TH in the neurobiochemical events

  17. Triggering of Protection Mechanism against Phoneutria nigriventer Spider Venom in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapôso, Catarina; Odorissi, Paulo Alexandre Miranda; Savioli, Stefania Fioravanti; Hell, Rafaela Chitarra Rodrigues; Simões, Gustavo Ferreira; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R.; de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2014-01-01

    Severe accidents caused by the “armed” spider Phoneutria nigriventer cause neurotoxic manifestations in victims. In experiments with rats, P. nigriventer venom (PNV) temporarily disrupts the properties of the BBB by affecting both the transcellular and the paracellular route. However, it is unclear how cells and/or proteins participate in the transient opening of the BBB. The present study demonstrates that PNV is a substrate for the multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1) in cultured astrocyte and endothelial cells (HUVEC) and increases mrp1 and cx43 and down-regulates glut1 mRNA transcripts in cultured astrocytes. The inhibition of nNOS by 7-nitroindazole suggests that NO derived from nNOS mediates some of these effects by either accentuating or opposing the effects of PNV. In vivo, MRP1, GLUT1 and Cx43 protein expression is increased differentially in the hippocampus and cerebellum, indicating region-related modulation of effects. PNV contains a plethora of Ca2+, K+ and Na+ channel-acting neurotoxins that interfere with glutamate handling. It is suggested that the findings of the present study are the result of a complex interaction of signaling pathways, one of which is the NO, which regulates BBB-associated proteins in response to PNV interference on ions physiology. The present study provides additional insight into PNV-induced BBB dysfunction and shows that a protective mechanism is activated against the venom. The data shows that PNV has qualities for potential use in drug permeability studies across the BBB. PMID:25211468

  18. Chronic stress and brain plasticity: Mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive changes and implications for stress-related CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, Jason; Morilak, David; Viau, Victor; Campeau, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Stress responses entail neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral changes to promote effective coping with real or perceived threats to one's safety. While these responses are critical for the survival of the individual, adverse effects of repeated exposure to stress are widely known to have deleterious effects on health. Thus, a considerable effort in the search for treatments to stress-related CNS disorders necessitates unraveling the brain mechanisms responsible for adaptation under acute conditions and their perturbations following chronic stress exposure. This paper is based upon a symposium from the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Meeting, summarizing some recent advances in understanding the effects of stress on adaptive and maladaptive responses subserved by limbic forebrain networks. An important theme highlighted in this review is that the same networks mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral processes during adaptive coping also comprise targets of the effects of repeated stress exposure in the development of maladaptive states. Where possible, reference is made to the similarity of neurobiological substrates and effects observed following repeated exposure to stress in laboratory animals and the clinical features of stress-related disorders in humans. PMID:26116544

  19. The cost of brain diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DiLuca, Monica; Olesen, Jes

    2014-01-01

    Brain diseases represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. With yearly costs of about 800 billion euros and an estimated 179 million people afflicted in 2010, brain diseases are an unquestionable emergency and a grand challenge for neuroscientists.......Brain diseases represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. With yearly costs of about 800 billion euros and an estimated 179 million people afflicted in 2010, brain diseases are an unquestionable emergency and a grand challenge for neuroscientists....

  20. Understanding deep brain stimulation in obsessive compulsive disorder: A preclinical study into the mechanism of action and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Dijk

    2013-01-01

    We see a strong impact of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on several aspects of OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder). DBS in different brain areas affects compulsive behaviour, conditioned and unconditioned anxiety. DBS in the internal capsule (IC) shows the most promising behavioural results by uniquel

  1. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel ...

  2. Use of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the Emergency Department, clinical outcomes and correlates of failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Groff

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Despite several studies having been carried in this organizational context, there is an absence of information about the effectiveness of non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV in Emergency Departments (ED, based on a number of suitable patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF of different aetiology. In particular, it has not yet been defined as to whether the context of the ED suits the necessary requirement of quality for the correct application of the method and if the obtained results are different from those taken in other studies in general or respiratory intensive care unit. Finally there are few data related to the predictive factors to NIV failure (endotracheal intubation, in-hospital mortality when applied in the emergency setting.

    Methods: To answer these questions we have retrospectively studied a population of 210 patients (95 with COPD exsacerbation ; 92 with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema; 23 with severe community acquired pneumonia treated for ARF in the “critical area” of four Italian level II Emergency Departments. For all patients demographic data; some comorbidities (diabetes, dementia, sopraventricular arrhythmias, obesity; the physiological scores (Kelly, SAPS II, Apache II; the need for pharmacological sedation; vital and blood gas parameters (evaluated at entry, after one hour of treatment and before its suspension; the ventilatory modality applied (CPAP or PSV + PEEP and some parameters of in-hospital stay (duration of the hospitalization in the critical area, duration of ventilation, compliance to the treatment, patient's refusal to continue it, development of skin necrosis, need for endotracheal intubation, in-hospital mortality were considered. Finally demographic, event of death with Cox regression or to the need for ETI through linear regression analysis.

    Results: Globally, in-hospital mortality reached 13,3%, the percentage

  3. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  4. Framework and Bio-Mechanical Model for a Per-Operative Image-Guided Neuronavigator Including 'Brain-Shift' Compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Bucki, M; Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to adress the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as "brainshift". This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on preoperative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intraoperative image-guided system, we propose a biomechanical model of the brain which can take into account interactively such deformations as well as surgical procedures that modify the brain structure, like tumour or tissue resection.

  5. Firms' innovation capability‐building paths and the nature of changes in learning mechanisms : multiple case-study evidence from an emerging economy

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, P. N.; Cohen, M.; Gomes, S

    2013-01-01

    Although much has been written about organizational-level learning, there is a dearth of empirical studies that explore the role of changes in the nature of firm-centred learning mechanisms in affecting inter-firm differences and similarities in the accumulation of innovation capabilities, especially among firms from emerging economies, known as latecomers. By examining the relationships between these issues based on fieldwork evidence from 13 natural resource-processing firms in Brazil (1950...

  6. Firms' innovation capability-building paths and the nature of changes in learning mechanisms: Multiple case-study evidence from an emerging economy

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo N. Figueiredo; Cohen, Marcela; Gomes, Saulo

    2013-01-01

    Although much has been written about organizational-level learning, there is a dearth of empirical studies that explore the role of changes in the nature of firm-centred learning mechanisms in affecting inter-firm differences and similarities in the accumulation of innovation capabilities, especially among firms from emerging economies, known as latecomers. By examining the relationships between these issues based on fieldwork evidence from 13 natural resource-processing firms in Brazil (1950...

  7. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  8. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG)

  9. Differences in the neural mechanisms of selective attention in children from different socioeconomic backgrounds: An event-related brain potential study

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Courtney; Lauinger, Brittni; Neville, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Previous research indicates that children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds show deficits in aspects of attention, including a reduced ability to filter irrelevant information and to suppress prepotent responses. However, less is known about the neural mechanisms of group differences in attention, which could reveal the stages of processing at which attention deficits arise. The present study examined this question using an event-related brain potential (ERP) measure of selective auditory ...

  10. The Mechanical Activation of mTOR Signaling: An Emerging Role for Late Endosome/Lysosomal Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Brittany L.; Goodman, Craig A.; Hornberger, Troy A.

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that mechanical signals play a critical role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass is essential for mobility, disease prevention and quality of life. Furthermore, over the last 15 years it has become established that signaling through a protein kinase called the mammalian [or mechanistic] Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for mechanically-induced changes in protein synthesis and muscle mass, however, the mechanism(s) via whic...

  11. The low levels of eicosapentaenoic acid in rat brain phospholipids are maintained via multiple redundant mechanisms[S

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chuck T; Domenichiello, Anthony F.; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Liu, Zhen; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Brain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels are 250- to 300-fold lower than docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at least partly, because EPA is rapidly β-oxidized and lost from brain phospholipids. Therefore, we examined if β-oxidation was necessary for maintaining low EPA levels by inhibiting β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP). Furthermore, because other metabolic differences between DHA and EPA may also contribute to their vastly different levels, this study aimed to quantify the incorporation ...

  12. Fetal Stress and Programming of Hypoxic/Ischemic-Sensitive Phenotype in the Neonatal Brain: Mechanisms and Possible Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yong; Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has clearly shown a close link between adverse in utero environment and the increased risk of neurological, psychological and psychiatric disorders in later life. Fetal stresses, such as hypoxia, malnutrition, and fetal exposure to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and glucocorticoids may directly or indirectly act at cellular and molecular levels to alter the brain development and result in programming of heightened brain vulner...

  13. Understanding deep brain stimulation in obsessive compulsive disorder: A preclinical study into the mechanism of action and behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk, van, G.

    2013-01-01

    We see a strong impact of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on several aspects of OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder). DBS in different brain areas affects compulsive behaviour, conditioned and unconditioned anxiety. DBS in the internal capsule (IC) shows the most promising behavioural results by uniquely reducing conditioned anxiety and by shortening the compulsive grooming bout in the sapap3 mutant mouse. This suggests that the IC is possibly the best target for DBS in relation to OCD. Further r...

  14. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren L Smith

    Full Text Available Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD. Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC. In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a

  15. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maren L; Lopez, Marcelo F; Archer, Kellie J; Wolen, Aaron R; Becker, Howard C; Miles, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive ethanol consumption in rodents. Brain CIE-responsive expression networks were identified by microarray analysis across five regions of the mesolimbic dopamine system and extended amygdala with tissue harvested from 0-hours to 7-days following CIE. Weighted Gene Correlated Network Analysis (WGCNA) was used to identify gene networks over-represented for CIE-induced temporal expression changes across brain regions. Differential gene expression analysis showed that long-lasting gene regulation occurred 7-days after the final cycle of ethanol exposure only in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Across all brain regions, however, ethanol-responsive expression changes occurred mainly within the first 8-hours after removal from ethanol. Bioinformatics analysis showed that neuroinflammatory responses were seen across multiple brain regions at early time-points, whereas co-expression modules related to neuroplasticity, chromatin remodeling, and neurodevelopment were seen at later time-points and in specific brain regions (PFC or HPC). In PFC a module containing Bdnf was identified as highly CIE responsive in a biphasic manner, with peak changes at 0 hours and 5 days following CIE, suggesting a possible role in mechanisms underlying long-term molecular and behavioral response to CIE. Bioinformatics analysis of this network and several other modules identified Let-7 family microRNAs as potential regulators of gene expression changes induced by CIE. Our results suggest a complex temporal

  16. New Heuristics for Interfacing Human Motor System using Brain Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El-Dosuky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many new forms of interfacing human users to machines. We persevere here electric-mechanical form of interaction between human and machine. The emergence of brain-computer interface allows mind-to-movement systems. The story of the Pied Piper inspired us to devise some new heuristics for interfacing human motor system using brain waves, by combining head helmet and LumbarMotionMonitor. For the simulation we use java GridGain. Brain responses of classified subjects during training indicates that Probe can be the best stimulus to rely on in distinguishing between knowledgeable and not knowledgeable

  17. New Heuristics for Interfacing Human Motor System using Brain Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed El-Dosuky; Ahmed El-Bassiouny; Taher Hamza; Magdy Rashad

    2012-01-01

    There are many new forms of interfacing human users to machines. We persevere here electric-mechanical form of interaction between human and machine. The emergence of brain-computer interface allows mind-to-movement systems. The story of the Pied Piper inspired us to devise some new heuristics for interfacing human motor system using brain waves, by combining head helmet and LumbarMotionMonitor. For the simulation we use java GridGain. Brain responses of classified subjects during training in...

  18. Numerical Modeling of Cloud Convection in Jupiter's Atmosphere: robustness and a mechanism of the intermittent emergence of vigorous cumulonimbus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, K.; Nakajima, K.; Odaka, M.; Ishiwatari, M.; Kuramoto, K.; Nishizawa, S.; Takahashi, Y. O.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The mean structure of cloud layer of Jupiter's atmosphere is thought to be maintained by the statistical contribution of a large number of clouds driven by internal and radiative heating/cooling over multiple cloud life cycles. The mean structure and its relationship to cloud convection remain unclear, because it is difficult to observe the structure under the extensive surface cloud layer by remote sensing. Sugiyama et al. (2009) develop a two-dimensional numerical fluid model that incorporates condensation of H2O and NH3 and production reaction of NH4SH, and Sugiyama et al. (2011) investigate a possible cloud layer structure with thermal forcing whose intensity is of the order of that expected in the real Jupiter's atmosphere. The purpose of this study is to confirm robustness of the characteristics of the structure demonstrated by Sugiyama et al. (2011) and to discuss a mechanism that causes their most remarkable characteristic, intermittent emergence of vigorous cumulonimbus clouds. Many long-term numerical calculations are performed in order to examine the dependency of the structure of cloud layer on both key parameter of cloud microphysics and abundance of condensible gases in the sub-cloud layer. In the parameter study about the time scale of conversion from cloud to rain, the intermittent cloud activity exists. In the parameter study about the abundance of the condensible gases in sub-cloud layer, the intermittent cloud activity exists except for the case in which the abundance of condensible gases is extremely small. The period of the intermittency is roughly proportional to the abundance of H2O gas in the sub-cloud layer. As the abundance of condensible gases increases, the condensation levels and the formation level become stronger barrier for the vertical convective motion. Our results do not reproduce the Galileo probe observation that all of the condensible gases are significantly depleted below the H2O condensation level. The trigger that starts

  19. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  20. Deep brain stimulation for cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grover, Patrick J; Pereira, Erlick A C; Green, Alexander L;

    2009-01-01

    Cluster headache is a severely debilitating disorder that can remain unrelieved by current pharmacotherapy. Alongside ablative neurosurgical procedures, neuromodulatory treatments of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and occipital nerve simulation have emerged in the last few years as effective...... circumstances to intervene. Here we review current data on neurosurgical interventions for chronic cluster headache focusing upon DBS and occipital nerve stimulation, and discuss the indications for and putative mechanisms of DBS including translational insights from functional neuroimaging, diffusion weighted...

  1. Role of mechanical factors in cortical folding development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Zhang, Tuo; Li, Xiao; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Deciphering mysteries of the structure-function relationship in cortical folding has emerged as the cynosure of recent research on brain. Understanding the mechanism of convolution patterns can provide useful insight into the normal and pathological brain function. However, despite decades of speculation and endeavors the underlying mechanism of the brain folding process remains poorly understood. This paper focuses on the three-dimensional morphological patterns of a developing brain under different tissue specification assumptions via theoretical analyses, computational modeling, and experiment verifications. The living human brain is modeled with a soft structure having outer cortex and inner core to investigate the brain development. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into the critical growth ratio for instability and crease formation of the developing brain followed by computational modeling as a way to offer clues for brain's postbuckling morphology. Especially, tissue geometry, growth ratio, and material properties of the cortex are explored as the most determinant parameters to control the morphogenesis of a growing brain model. As indicated in results, compressive residual stresses caused by the sufficient growth trigger instability and the brain forms highly convoluted patterns wherein its gyrification degree is specified with the cortex thickness. Morphological patterns of the developing brain predicted from the computational modeling are consistent with our neuroimaging observations, thereby clarifying, in part, the reason of some classical malformation in a developing brain.

  2. Brain barrier systems: a new frontier in metal neurotoxicological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of brain barriers or a brain barrier system embraces the blood-brain interface, referred to as the blood-brain barrier, and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interface, referred to as the blood-CSF barrier. These brain barriers protect the CNS against chemical insults, by different complementary mechanisms. Toxic metal molecules can either bypass these mechanisms or be sequestered in and therefore potentially deleterious to brain barriers. Supportive evidence suggests that damage to blood-brain interfaces can lead to chemical-induced neurotoxicities. This review article examines the unique structure, specialization, and function of the brain barrier system, with particular emphasis on its toxicological implications. Typical examples of metal transport and toxicity at the barriers, such as lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn), are discussed in detail with a special focus on the relevance to their toxic neurological consequences. Based on these discussions, the emerging research needs, such as construction of the new concept of blood-brain regional barriers, understanding of chemical effect on aged or immature barriers, and elucidation of the susceptibility of tight junctions to toxicants, are identified and addressed in this newly evolving field of neurotoxicology. They represent both clear challenges and fruitful research domains not only in neurotoxicology, but also in neurophysiology and pharmacology

  3. Reaction with glutathione. A possible mechanism involved in rodent brain retention of a 99mTc SNS/S complex containing a pendant ester functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis, characterization of MvO([CH3CH2N(CH2CH2S)2](p-S-Ph-COOCH2-CH3)) (M:99mTc: I, Re: II) is presented in this work, where a pendant ester function is attached to the monothiolate ligand. Chemical structure of I is established after chromatographic comparison with II, synthesized in macroscopic amounts. Complex II is fully characterized by classical methods of analysis showing that the compound adopts a distorted trigonal bipyramidal configuration around the metal. The two sulfur atoms of the tridentate ligand and the oxo group form the basal plane, while the remaining nitrogen atom of the tridentate ligand and the sulfur atom of the monothiolate ligand occupy the apices of the bipyramid. In vitro challenge experiments with glutathione (GSH) in neutral aqueous medium demonstrate, that I suffers nucleophilic attack by GSH and thereby transformation to a more hydrophilic daughter metal compound. Formation of the latter depends on time and GSH concentration. Tissue distribution in mice shows minor retention in brain. As rodent brain presents no esterases to hydrolyze the ester group of I, while the intracerebral content in GSH amounts to 2 mM, the above described mechanism is suspected for the observed brain retention. However, in primate brain cells retention of I may additionally involve the hydrolysis of the ester function to the corresponding acid, as already revealed by preliminary in vitro experiments using esterase incubates. (author)

  4. Social Plasticity Relies on Different Neuroplasticity Mechanisms across the Brain Social Decision-Making Network in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Magda C; Cardoso, Sara D; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Social living animals need to adjust the expression of their behavior to their status within the group and to changes in social context and this ability (social plasticity) has an impact on their Darwinian fitness. At the proximate level social plasticity must rely on neuroplasticity in the brain social decision-making network (SDMN) that underlies the expression of social behavior, such that the same neural circuit may underlie the expression of different behaviors depending on social context. Here we tested this hypothesis in zebrafish by characterizing the gene expression response in the SDMN to changes in social status of a set of genes involved in different types of neural plasticity: bdnf, involved in changes in synaptic strength; npas4, involved in contextual learning and dependent establishment of GABAergic synapses; neuroligins (nlgn1 and nlgn2) as synaptogenesis markers; and genes involved in adult neurogenesis (wnt3 and neurod). Four social phenotypes were experimentally induced: Winners and Losers of a real-opponent interaction; Mirror-fighters, that fight their own image in a mirror and thus do not experience a change in social status despite the expression of aggressive behavior; and non-interacting fish, which were used as a reference group. Our results show that each social phenotype (i.e., Winners, Losers, and Mirror-fighters) present specific patterns of gene expression across the SDMN, and that different neuroplasticity genes are differentially expressed in different nodes of the network (e.g., BDNF in the dorsolateral telencephalon, which is a putative teleost homolog of the mammalian hippocampus). Winners expressed unique patterns of gene co-expression across the SDMN, whereas in Losers and Mirror-fighters the co-expression patterns were similar in the dorsal regions of the telencephalon and in the supracommissural nucleus of the ventral telencephalic area, but differents in the remaining regions of the ventral telencephalon. These results

  5. Social Plasticity Relies on Different Neuroplasticity Mechanisms across the Brain Social Decision-Making Network in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Magda C.; Cardoso, Sara D.; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2016-01-01

    Social living animals need to adjust the expression of their behavior to their status within the group and to changes in social context and this ability (social plasticity) has an impact on their Darwinian fitness. At the proximate level social plasticity must rely on neuroplasticity in the brain social decision-making network (SDMN) that underlies the expression of social behavior, such that the same neural circuit may underlie the expression of different behaviors depending on social context. Here we tested this hypothesis in zebrafish by characterizing the gene expression response in the SDMN to changes in social status of a set of genes involved in different types of neural plasticity: bdnf, involved in changes in synaptic strength; npas4, involved in contextual learning and dependent establishment of GABAergic synapses; neuroligins (nlgn1 and nlgn2) as synaptogenesis markers; and genes involved in adult neurogenesis (wnt3 and neurod). Four social phenotypes were experimentally induced: Winners and Losers of a real-opponent interaction; Mirror-fighters, that fight their own image in a mirror and thus do not experience a change in social status despite the expression of aggressive behavior; and non-interacting fish, which were used as a reference group. Our results show that each social phenotype (i.e., Winners, Losers, and Mirror-fighters) present specific patterns of gene expression across the SDMN, and that different neuroplasticity genes are differentially expressed in different nodes of the network (e.g., BDNF in the dorsolateral telencephalon, which is a putative teleost homolog of the mammalian hippocampus). Winners expressed unique patterns of gene co-expression across the SDMN, whereas in Losers and Mirror-fighters the co-expression patterns were similar in the dorsal regions of the telencephalon and in the supracommissural nucleus of the ventral telencephalic area, but differents in the remaining regions of the ventral telencephalon. These results

  6. Adsorption Mechanisms of Emerging Micro-pollutants with a clay Mineral: Case of Tramadol and Doxepine Pharmaceutical Products

    OpenAIRE

    Thiebault, Thomas; Guégan, Régis; Boussafir, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    International audience A sodium exchanged smectite clay mineral (Mt) was used as geo-sorbent for the adsorption of tramadol and doxepin: two pharmaceutical products (PPs) defined as emerging pollutants due to their presence at significant concentration in numerous water compartments. The adsorption isotherms for both the temperatures of 20 and 40 °C and the derived data determined through the fitting procedure by using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin–Radushkevich equation models explicitl...

  7. Borneol Depresses P-Glycoprotein Function by a NF-κB Signaling Mediated Mechanism in a Blood Brain Barrier in Vitro Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Fan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (P-gp on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs that form the blood brain barrier (BBB, influences transportation of substances between blood and brain. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of borneol on P-gp efflux function on BBB and explore the potential mechanisms. We established an in vitro BBB model comprised of rat BMECs and astrocytes to measure the effects of borneol on the known P-gp substrates transport across BBB, and examined the function and expression of P-gp in BMECs and the signaling pathways regulating P-gp expression. Borneol increased intracellular accumulation of Rhodamine 123, enhanced verapamil and digoxin across the BBB in vitro model, and depressed mdr1a mRNA and P-gp expression. Borneol could activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and inhibition of NF-κB with MG132 (carbobenzoxy-Leu-Leu-leucinal and SN50 (an inhibitory peptide obscuring the P-gp decreases induced by borneol. These data suggested that borneol depresses P-gp function in BMECs by a NF-κB signaling medicated mechanism in a BBB in vitro model.

  8. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  9. Cryptococcal transmigration across a model brain blood-barrier: evidence of the Trojan horse mechanism and differences between Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii strain H99 and Cryptococcus gattii strain R265.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Tania C; Juillard, Pierre-Georges; Djordjevic, Julianne T; Kaufman-Francis, Keren; Dietmann, Anelia; Milonig, Alban; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges E R

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Cryptococcus gattii (Cg) cause neurological disease and cross the BBB as free cells or in mononuclear phagocytes via the Trojan horse mechanism, although evidence for the latter is indirect. There is emerging evidence that Cn and the North American outbreak Cg strain (R265) more commonly cause neurological and lung disease, respectively. We have employed a widely validated in vitro model of the BBB, which utilizes the hCMEC/D3 cell line derived from human brain endothelial cells (HBEC) and the human macrophage-like cell line, THP-1, to investigate whether transport of dual fluorescence-labelled Cn and Cg across the BBB occurs within macrophages. We showed that phagocytosis of Cn by non-interferon (IFN)-γ stimulated THP-1 cells was higher than that of Cg. Although Cn and Cg-loaded THP-1 bound similarly to TNF-activated HBECs under shear stress, more Cn-loaded macrophages were transported across an intact HBEC monolayer, consistent with the predilection of Cn for CNS infection. Furthermore, Cn exhibited a higher rate of expulsion from transmigrated THP-1 compared with Cg. Our results therefore provide further evidence for transmigration of both Cn and Cg via the Trojan horse mechanism and a potential explanation for the predilection of Cn to cause CNS infection. PMID:26369713

  10. Pathobiology of brain metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Nathoo, N; Chahlavi, A; Barnett, G. H.; Toms, S A

    2005-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a major cause of systemic cancer morbidity and mortality. Many factors participate in the development and maintenance of brain metastases. The survival of the metastasis depends upon crucial interactions between tumour cells and the brain microenvironment during its development at the new site. This review focuses on the pathobiological mechanisms involved in the establishment and regulation of brain metastases. Developments in molecular biology have vastly expanded our kn...

  11. Diverging mechanisms for TNF-alpha receptors in normal mouse brains and in functional recovery after injury: From gene to behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Molinero, Amalia; Florit, Sergi;

    2007-01-01

    Cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and lymphotoxin-alpha, have been described widely to play important roles in the brain in physiologic conditions and after traumatic injury. However, the exact mechanisms involved in their function have not been fully elucidated. We give some...... ambulations, compared with wild-type mice, suggesting an inhibitory role of TNFR1/TNFR2 signaling. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the elevated plus maze test, ruling out a major role of these receptors in the control of anxiety. We next evaluated the response to a freeze injury to...... the somatosensorial cortex. The effect of the cryolesion on motor function was evaluated with the horizontal ladder beam test, and the results showed that both TNFR1KO and TNFR2KO mice made fewer errors, suggesting a detrimental role for TNFR1/TNFR2 signaling for coping with brain damage. Expression...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  15. Ginkgo biloba Extract Prevents Female Mice from Ischemic Brain Damage and the Mechanism Is Independent of the HO1/Wnt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsulkar, Jatin; Glueck, Bryan; Hinds, Terry D; Shah, Zahoor A

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that gender differences exist in experimental or clinical stroke with respect to brain damage and loss of functional outcome. We have previously reported neuroprotective properties of Ginkgo biloba/EGb 761® (EGb 761) in transient and permanent mouse models of brain ischemia using male mice, and the mechanism of action was attributed to the upregulation of the heme oxygenase 1 (HO1)/Wnt pathway. Here, we sought to investigate whether EGb 761's protective effect in ovariectomized female mice following stroke is also mediated by the HO1/Wnt pathway. Female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) to remove the protective effect of estrogen and were treated with EGb 761 for 7 days prior to inducing permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) and allowed to survive for an additional 7 days. At day 8, animals were sacrificed, and the brains were harvested for infarct volume analysis, western blots, and immunohistochemistry. The OVX female mice treated with EGb 761 showed significantly lower infarct size as compared to Veh/OVX animals. EGb 761 treatment in female mice inhibited apoptosis by preventing caspase-3 cleavage and blocking the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. EGb 761 pretreatment significantly enhanced neurogenesis in OVX mice as compared to the Veh/OVX group and significantly upregulated androgen receptor expression with no changes in HO1/Wnt signaling. These results suggest that EGb 761 prevented brain damage in OVX female mice by improving grip strength and neurological deficits, and the mechanism of action is not through HO1/Wnt but via blocking the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:26573919

  16. SPARC/osteonectin, an endogenous mechanism for targeting albumin to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid interface during brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liddelow, S A; Dziegielewska, K M; Møllgård, K;

    2011-01-01

    Specialized populations of choroid plexus epithelial cells have previously been shown to be responsible for the transfer of individual plasma proteins from blood to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), contributing to their characteristically high concentrations in CSF of the developing brain. The mech...

  17. Processing of visual semantic information to concrete words: temporal dynamics and neural mechanisms indicated by event-related brain potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schie, H.T. van; Wijers, A.A.; Mars, R.B.; Benjamins, J.S.; Stowe, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials were used to study the retrieval of visual semantic information to concrete words, and to investigate possible structural overlap between visual object working memory and concreteness effects in word processing. Subjects performed an object working memory task that inv

  18. Protection of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor to Brain Edema Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Its Involved Mechanisms: Effect of Aquaporin-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heling Chu

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has protective effects on many neurological diseases. However, whether VEGF acts on brain edema following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is largely unknown. Our previous study has shown aquaporin-4 (AQP4 plays an important role in brain edema elimination following ICH. Meanwhile, there is close relationship between VEGF and AQP4. In this study, we aimed to test effects of VEGF on brain edema following ICH and examine whether they were AQP4 dependent. Recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165 was injected intracerebroventricularly 1 d after ICH induced by microinjecting autologous whole blood into striatum. We detected perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression, then examined the effects of rhVEGF165 on perihemotomal brain edema at 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after injection in wild type (AQP4(+/+ and AQP4 knock-out (AQP4(-/- mice. Furthermore, we assessed the possible signal transduction pathways activated by VEGF to regulate AQP4 expression via astrocyte cultures. We found perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression was highly increased by rhVEGF165. RhVEGF165 alleviated perihemotomal brain edema in AQP4(+/+ mice at each time point, but had no effect on AQP4(-/- mice. Perihemotomal EB extravasation was increased by rhVEGF165 in AQP4(-/- mice, but not AQP4(+/+ mice. RhVEGF165 reduced neurological deficits and increased Nissl's staining cells surrounding hemotoma in both types of mice and these effects were related to AQP4. RhVEGF165 up-regulated phospharylation of C-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK and AQP4 protein in cultured astrocytes. The latter was inhibited by JNK and ERK inhibitors. In conclusion, VEGF reduces neurological deficits, brain edema, and neuronal death surrounding hemotoma but has no influence on BBB permeability. These effects are closely related to AQP4 up-regulation, possibly through activating JNK and ERK pathways. The current study may present new insights to

  19. Orchestrating Proactive and Reactive Mechanisms for Filtering Distracting Information: Brain-Behavior Relationships Revealed by a Mixed-Design fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesco; Demeter, Elise; Roberts, Kenneth C; Chelazzi, Leonardo; Woldorff, Marty G

    2016-01-20

    Given the information overload often imparted to human cognitive-processing systems, suppression of irrelevant and distracting information is essential for successful behavior. Using a hybrid block/event-related fMRI design, we characterized proactive and reactive brain mechanisms for filtering distracting stimuli. Participants performed a flanker task, discriminating the direction of a target arrow in the presence versus absence of congruent or incongruent flanking distracting arrows during either Pure blocks (distracters always absent) or Mixed blocks (distracters on 80% of trials). Each Mixed block had either 20% or 60% incongruent trials. Activations in the dorsal frontoparietal attention network during Mixed versus Pure blocks evidenced proactive (blockwise) recruitment of a distraction-filtering mechanism. Sustained activations in right middle frontal gyrus during 60% Incongruent blocks correlated positively with behavioral indices of distraction-filtering (slowing when distracters might occur) and negatively with distraction-related behavioral costs (incongruent vs congruent trials), suggesting a role in coordinating proactive filtering of potential distracters. Event-related analyses showed that incongruent trials elicited greater reactive activations in 20% (vs 60%) Incongruent blocks for counteracting distraction and conflict, including in the insula and anterior cingulate. Context-related effects in occipitoparietal cortex consisted of greater target-evoked activations for distracter-absent trials (central-target-only) in Mixed versus Pure blocks, suggesting enhanced attentional engagement. Functional-localizer analyses in V1/V2/V3 revealed less distracter-processing activity in 60% (vs 20%) Incongruent blocks, presumably reflecting tonic suppression by proactive filtering mechanisms. These results delineate brain mechanisms underlying proactive and reactive filtering of distraction and conflict, and how they are orchestrated depending on distraction

  20. The birth of new neurons in the maternal brain: Hormonal regulation and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuner, Benedetta; Sabihi, Sara

    2016-04-01

    The maternal brain is remarkably plastic and exhibits multifaceted neural modifications. Neurogenesis has emerged as one of the mechanisms by which the maternal brain exhibits plasticity. This review highlights what is currently known about peripartum-associated changes in adult neurogenesis and the underlying hormonal mechanisms. We also consider the functional consequences of neurogenesis in the peripartum brain and extent to which this process may play a role in maternal care, cognitive function and postpartum mood. Finally, while most work investigating the effects of parenting on adult neurogenesis has focused on mothers, a few studies have examined fathers and these results are also discussed. PMID:26969795

  1. Clinical and cost effectiveness of mechanical support for severe ankle sprains: design of a randomised controlled trial in the emergency department [ISRCTN 37807450

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutton JL

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal management for severe sprains (Grades II and III of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle is unclear. The aims of this randomised controlled trial are to estimate (1 the clinical effectiveness of three methods of providing mechanical support to the ankle (below knee cast, Aircast® brace and Bledsoe® boot in comparison to Tubigrip®, and (2 to compare the cost of each strategy, including subsequent health care costs. Methods/design Six hundred and fifty people with a diagnosis of severe sprain are being identified through emergency departments. The study has been designed to complement routine practice in the emergency setting. Outcomes are recovery of mobility (primary outcome and usual activity, residual symptoms and need for further medical, rehabilitation or surgical treatment. Parallel economic and qualitative studies are being conducted to aid interpretation of the results and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the interventions. Discussion This paper highlights the design, methods and operational aspects of a clinical trial of acute injury management in the emergency department.

  2. Arctigenin Treatment Protects Against Brain Damage Through an Anti-inflammatory and Anti-apoptotic Mechanism After Needle Insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Song; Na Li; Xia Yang; Zhong Gao; Liang Kong; Yingjia Yao; Yanan Jiao; Yuhui Yan; Shaoheng Li; Zhenyu Tao; Guan Lian; Jingxian Yang; Tingguo Kang

    2016-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) infuses drugs directly into brain tissue. Needle insertion is required and results in a stab wound injury (SWI). Subsequent secondary injury involves the release of inflammatory and apoptotic cytokines, which have dramatic consequences on the integrity of damaged tissue, leading to the evolution of a pericontusional-damaged area minutes to days after in the initial injury. The present study investigated the capacity for arctigenin (ARC) to prevent secondary ...

  3. Social Plasticity Relies on Different Neuroplasticity Mechanisms across the Brain Social Decision-Making Network in Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Teles, Magda C.; Cardoso, Sara D.; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2016-01-01

    Social living animals need to adjust the expression of their behavior to their status within the group and to changes in social context and this ability (social plasticity) has an impact on their Darwinian fitness. At the proximate level social plasticity must rely on neuroplasticity in the brain social decision-making network (SDMN) that underlies the expression of social behavior, such that the same neural circuit may underlie the expression of different behaviors depending on social contex...

  4. Injury to the Preterm Brain and Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Unanswered Questions, and Future Research Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Babcock, Michael A.; Kostova, Felina V.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Johnston, Michael V.; Brunstrom, Jan E.; Hagberg, Henrik; Maria, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy will affect nearly 10% of the 60,000 very-low-birth-weight infants born in the United States in the next year, and an even greater percentage will display some form of permanent neurological impairment resulting from injury to the preterm brain. The 2008 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 37th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to define current knowledge and to develop specific aims for future clinical, translational, ...

  5. Examination of the Mechanism of Human Brain Aspartoacylase through the Binding of an Intermediate Analogue†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Le Coq, Johanne; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Malik, Radhika; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Xu, Chengfu; Ronald E. Viola

    2008-01-01

    Canavan disease is a fatal neurological disorder caused by the malfunctioning of a single metabolic enzyme, aspartoacylase, that catalyzes the deacetylation of N-acetyl-l-aspartate to produce l-aspartate and acetate. The structure of human brain aspartoacylase has been determined in complex with a stable tetrahedral intermediate analogue, N-phosphonomethyl-l-aspartate. This potent inhibitor forms multiple interactions between each of its heteroatoms and the substrate binding groups arrayed wi...

  6. Erythropoietin Restores Long-Term Neurocognitive Function Involving Mechanisms of Neuronal Plasticity in a Model of Hyperoxia-Induced Preterm Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Herz, Josephine; Sizonenko, Stéphane V.; Kempe, Karina; Palasz, Joanna; Hadamitzky, Martin; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral white and grey matter injury is the leading cause of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants. High oxygen concentrations have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal brain damage. Here, we focused on motor-cognitive outcome up to the adolescent and adult age in an experimental model of preterm brain injury. In search of the putative mechanisms of action we evaluated oligodendrocyte degeneration, myelination, and modulation of synaptic plasticity-related molecules. A single dose of erythropoietin (20,000 IU/kg) at the onset of hyperoxia (24 hours, 80% oxygen) in 6-day-old Wistar rats improved long-lasting neurocognitive development up to the adolescent and adult stage. Analysis of white matter structures revealed a reduction of acute oligodendrocyte degeneration. However, erythropoietin did not influence hypomyelination occurring a few days after injury or long-term microstructural white matter abnormalities detected in adult animals. Erythropoietin administration reverted hyperoxia-induced reduction of neuronal plasticity-related mRNA expression up to four months after injury. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of erythropoietin as a neuroregenerative treatment option in neonatal brain injury, leading to improved memory function in adolescent and adult rats which may be linked to increased neuronal network connectivity. PMID:27493706

  7. Erythropoietin Restores Long-Term Neurocognitive Function Involving Mechanisms of Neuronal Plasticity in a Model of Hyperoxia-Induced Preterm Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hoeber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral white and grey matter injury is the leading cause of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants. High oxygen concentrations have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal brain damage. Here, we focused on motor-cognitive outcome up to the adolescent and adult age in an experimental model of preterm brain injury. In search of the putative mechanisms of action we evaluated oligodendrocyte degeneration, myelination, and modulation of synaptic plasticity-related molecules. A single dose of erythropoietin (20,000 IU/kg at the onset of hyperoxia (24 hours, 80% oxygen in 6-day-old Wistar rats improved long-lasting neurocognitive development up to the adolescent and adult stage. Analysis of white matter structures revealed a reduction of acute oligodendrocyte degeneration. However, erythropoietin did not influence hypomyelination occurring a few days after injury or long-term microstructural white matter abnormalities detected in adult animals. Erythropoietin administration reverted hyperoxia-induced reduction of neuronal plasticity-related mRNA expression up to four months after injury. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of erythropoietin as a neuroregenerative treatment option in neonatal brain injury, leading to improved memory function in adolescent and adult rats which may be linked to increased neuronal network connectivity.

  8. Erythropoietin Restores Long-Term Neurocognitive Function Involving Mechanisms of Neuronal Plasticity in a Model of Hyperoxia-Induced Preterm Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeber, Daniela; Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Herz, Josephine; Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Kempe, Karina; Serdar, Meray; Palasz, Joanna; Hadamitzky, Martin; Endesfelder, Stefanie; Fandrey, Joachim; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Bendix, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral white and grey matter injury is the leading cause of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants. High oxygen concentrations have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal brain damage. Here, we focused on motor-cognitive outcome up to the adolescent and adult age in an experimental model of preterm brain injury. In search of the putative mechanisms of action we evaluated oligodendrocyte degeneration, myelination, and modulation of synaptic plasticity-related molecules. A single dose of erythropoietin (20,000 IU/kg) at the onset of hyperoxia (24 hours, 80% oxygen) in 6-day-old Wistar rats improved long-lasting neurocognitive development up to the adolescent and adult stage. Analysis of white matter structures revealed a reduction of acute oligodendrocyte degeneration. However, erythropoietin did not influence hypomyelination occurring a few days after injury or long-term microstructural white matter abnormalities detected in adult animals. Erythropoietin administration reverted hyperoxia-induced reduction of neuronal plasticity-related mRNA expression up to four months after injury. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of erythropoietin as a neuroregenerative treatment option in neonatal brain injury, leading to improved memory function in adolescent and adult rats which may be linked to increased neuronal network connectivity. PMID:27493706

  9. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes are coupled with distinct signal-transduction mechanisms in neurons and astrocytes from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumners, C.; Wei Tang; Zelezna, B.; Raizada, M.K. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Both neurons and astrocytes contain specific receptors for angiotensin II (AII). The authors used selective ligands for the AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} types of AII receptors to investigate the expression of functional receptor subtypes in astrocyte cultures and neuron cultures from 1-day-old (neonatal) rat brain. In astrocyte cultures, competition of {sup 125}I-labeled AII ({sup 125}I-AII) specific binding with AT{sub 1} (DuP753) or AT{sub 2} {l brace}PD123177, CGP42112A, (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII{r brace} selective receptor ligands revealed a potency series of AII > DuP753 > > > CGP42112A > (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII > PD123177. These results suggest a predominance of the AT{sub 1} receptor subtype in neonatal astrocytes. {sup 125}I-AII specific binding to neonate neuronal cultures was reduced 73-84% by 1 {mu} MPD123177, and the residual {sup 125}I-AII specific binding was eliminated by DuP753. The results suggest that astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brains contain predominantly AT{sub 1} receptors that are coupled to a stimulation of inositophospholipid hydrolysis. In contrast, neuron cultures from neonatal rat brain contain mostly AT{sub 2} receptors that are coupled to a reduction in basal cGMP levels, but a smaller population of AT{sub 1} receptors is also present in these neurons.

  10. Pathological relationships involving iron and myelin may constitute a shared mechanism linking various rare and common brain diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Moones; Gerami, Sam H.; Bassett, Brianna; Graham, Ross M.; Chua, Anita C.G.; Aryal, Ritambhara; House, Michael J.; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Ryten, Mina; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie; Johnstone, Daniel M.; Milward, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated elevated brain iron levels in myelinated structures and associated cells in a hemochromatosis Hfe−/−xTfr2mut mouse model. This was accompanied by altered expression of a group of myelin-related genes, including a suite of genes causatively linked to the rare disease family ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation’ (NBIA). Expanded data mining and ontological analyses have now identified additional myelin-related transcriptome changes in response to brain iron loading. Concordance between the mouse transcriptome changes and human myelin-related gene expression networks in normal and NBIA basal ganglia testifies to potential clinical relevance. These analyses implicate, among others, genes linked to various rare central hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and peripheral neuropathies including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as well as genes linked to other rare neurological diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease. The findings may help understand interrelationships of iron and myelin in more common conditions such as hemochromatosis, multiple sclerosis and various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27500074

  11. Inferring common cognitive mechanisms from brain blood-flow lateralisation data obtained with functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NatalieUomini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Current neuroimaging techniques with high spatial resolution constrain participant motion so that many natural tasks cannot be carried out. The aim of this paper is to show how a time-locked correlation-analysis of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV lateralisation data, obtained with functional TransCranial Doppler (fTCD ultrasound, can be used to infer cerebral activation patterns across tasks. In a first experiment we demonstrate that the proposed analysis method results in data that are comparable with the standard Lateralisation Index (LI for within-task comparisons of CBFV patterns, recorded during cued word generation (CWG at two difficulty levels. In the main experiment we demonstrate that the proposed analysis method shows correlated blood-flow patterns for two different cognitive tasks that are known to draw on common brain areas, CWG and Music Synthesis. We show that CBFV patterns for Music and CWG are correlated only for participants with prior musical training. CBFV patterns for tasks that draw on distinct brain areas, the Tower of London and CWG, are not correlated. The proposed methodology extends conventional fTCD analysis by including temporal information in the analysis of cerebral blood-flow patterns to provide a robust, non-invasive method to infer whether common brain areas are used in different cognitive tasks. It complements conventional high resolution imaging techniques.

  12. Inferring common cognitive mechanisms from brain blood-flow lateralization data: a new methodology for fTCD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Georg F; Spray, Amy; Fairlie, Jo E; Uomini, Natalie T

    2014-01-01

    Current neuroimaging techniques with high spatial resolution constrain participant motion so that many natural tasks cannot be carried out. The aim of this paper is to show how a time-locked correlation-analysis of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) lateralization data, obtained with functional TransCranial Doppler (fTCD) ultrasound, can be used to infer cerebral activation patterns across tasks. In a first experiment we demonstrate that the proposed analysis method results in data that are comparable with the standard Lateralization Index (LI) for within-task comparisons of CBFV patterns, recorded during cued word generation (CWG) at two difficulty levels. In the main experiment we demonstrate that the proposed analysis method shows correlated blood-flow patterns for two different cognitive tasks that are known to draw on common brain areas, CWG, and Music Synthesis. We show that CBFV patterns for Music and CWG are correlated only for participants with prior musical training. CBFV patterns for tasks that draw on distinct brain areas, the Tower of London and CWG, are not correlated. The proposed methodology extends conventional fTCD analysis by including temporal information in the analysis of cerebral blood-flow patterns to provide a robust, non-invasive method to infer whether common brain areas are used in different cognitive tasks. It complements conventional high resolution imaging techniques. PMID:24982641

  13. A possible mechanism for PTSD symptoms in patients with traumatic brain injury: The role of central autonomic network disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B Williamson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI often develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. This syndrome, defined and diagnosed by psychological and behavioral features, is associated with symptoms such as anxiety and anger with an increase of arousal and vigilance, as well as flashbacks and nightmares. Many of these features and symptoms observed in PTSD may be in part the result of altered autonomic nervous system (ANS activity in response to psychological and physical challenges. Brain imaging has documented that TBI often induces white matter damage to pathways associated with the anterior limb of the internal capsule and uncinate fasciculus. Since these white matter structures link neocortical networks with subcortical and limbic structures that regulate autonomic control centers, injury to these pathways may induce a loss of inhibitory control of the ANS. In this review, the autonomic features associated with PTSD are discussed in the context of traumatic brain injury. We posit that TBI induced damage to networks that regulate the ANS increase vulnerability to PTSD. The means by which the vulnerability can be measured and tested are also discussed.

  14. Individualized quantification of brain β-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as β-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([18F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel β-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched (≥ 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 μg. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain β-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be β-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa ≥ 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain β-amyloid load yielded the closest correlation with

  15. Study on dynamic mechanism model of emergency industry development in China%我国应急产业发展动力机制模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建光

    2015-01-01

    调研分析了应急产业有关定义,明确了应急产业的范围;从产业内容、产业发展阶段等角度,分析了应急产业的特点;基于自组织理论和新古典经济理论,结合应急产业特点,建立了应急产业发展动力机制“内切圆”模型。模型中,应急产业的发展动力机制系统包括产业成长的外部动力因素和内部动力因素,其中,外部动力因素包括有市场需求、技术创新、产业政策、产业投资等,内部动力因素包括应急产业内相关企业间的竞争与协作、针对市场失效的产业政策。内部动力因素和外部动力因素之间存在着相互作用,在一定的条件下,外部动力可以与内部动力相互转化。内部和外部动力因素的综合作用,推动应急产业不断发展。%Some conceptions related to emergency industry were investigated .From the view of emergency manage-ment, the definition of emergency industry was analyzed and the scope was cleared .From the view of industry de-velopment phase and content of industry , the features of emergency industry were analyzed .Combining with the characteristics of emergency industry , based on the self-organization theory and the Neo-classical Economics theory , an "inscribed circle"model for development dynamic mechanism of emergency industry was established .In this model , the dynamic mechanism system of emergency industry development includes exogenous dynamic factors and endogenous dynamic factors , the exogenous factors include market demand , technological innovation , industrial policy and industrial investment , and the endogenous factors include the competition and cooperation between enter-prises, and industrial policy aiming at market failure .There is interaction between the endogenous dynamic factors and the exogenous dynamic factors .Under certain conditions , the endogenous dynamic factors and exogenous dy-namic factors can be transformed into each

  16. The potential mechanism of recombinant human erythropoietin treatment in vivo promoting the cognitive function recovery after traumatic brain injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Ping

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammation after traumatic brain injury (TBI could exacerbate secondary brain injury, resulting in neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficit. It is confirmed that recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO plays an important role in neuroprotection after brain injury. This article discusses the potential mechanism of rhEPO therapy that promotes the neurological function recovery after TBI by observing the changes of neutropils and neuronal apoptosis in the brain tissue of mice after fluid percussion injury (FPI. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: Sham group, TBI group, rhEPO group and normal saline (NS group. On the first, third and seventh days after FPI, 3 mice were randomly taken from each group, the brain tissue of which was obtained. Then, immunohistochemistry was adopted to observe the expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO positive neutrophils and Caspase-3 positive neuronal cells in the hippocampal area. During seventh to eleventh day after FPI, 10 mice of each group were subjected to Morris Water Maze Test and escaping latencies were recorded. Results Compared to Sham group, the number of MPO positive neutrophils began increasing from the first day after FPI (P = 0.000, for all and reached the peak on the third day ( P = 0.000, for all in the TBI group, NS group and rhEPO group, but reduced on the seventh day (P = 0.000, for all; whereas Caspase-3 positive neurons increased significantly 1 d after FPI, peaking on the seventh day. However, the increase of MPO positive cells and Caspase-3 positive neurons in rhEPO group was not obvious. Compared to NS group, MPO positive neutrophils and Caspase-3 positive cells reduced significantly in rhEPO group (P = 0.000, for all 1 to 7 d after FPI in the observed time points. In the Morris Water Maze (MWM, the latency of mice in rhEPO group reduced as compared to the NS group from the third day after FPI (P = 0.013. The differences were statistically

  17. Complex decision-making in stroke: preoperative mechanical thrombectomy of septic embolus for emergency cardiac valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Kirshner, Howard S; Froehler, Michael T; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is a common and devastating embolic manifestation of infective endocarditis. We report a case of cardioembolic stroke in a patient with enterococcal endocarditis, with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3. A middle-aged patient with bacterial endocarditis exhibited mild intermittent left hemiparesis and dysarthria in the setting of severe aortic insufficiency requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. Cerebrovascular imaging revealed a partially occlusive thrombus in the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery, which became symptomatic during relative hypotension. Given the expected hypotension during the urgently needed aortic valve replacement, there was a significant risk of infarction of most of the right hemisphere. Thus, mechanical thrombectomy was performed immediately prior to thoracotomy, and the patient awoke neurologically intact. This case demonstrates avoidance of a large stroke due to a subocclusive thrombus and anticipated intraoperative hypotension with preoperative mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:25422318

  18. Emerging roles of epigenetic mechanisms in the enduring effects of neonatal stress and experience on learning and memory

    OpenAIRE

    McClelland, Shawn; Korosi, Aniko; Cope, Jessica; Ivy, Autumn; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are involved in programming gene expression throughout development. In addition, they are key contributors to the processes by which early-life experience fine-tunes the expression levels of key neuronal genes, governing learning and memory throughout life. Here we describe the long-lasting, bi-directional effects of early-life experience on learning and memory. We discuss how enriched postnatal experience enduringly augments spatial learning, and how chronic early-life ...

  19. Correlation between emergency treatment time and prognosis of acute traumatic brain injury patients caused by external violence%外部暴力所致急性颅脑创伤预后的相关性因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玲昌

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation of prognosis with emergency treatment time,gender,age and GCS score of acute traumatic brain injury patients caused by external violence.Methods 92 acute traumatic brain injury patients caused by external violence were selected.The gender,age,emergency treatment time,post-resuscita-tion GCS and GOS after 5 months were collected and analyzed.The relationship between patients′signs and emergency treatment time and prognosis were analyzed.Results The differences of prognosis between elderly patients and youn-ger patients were statistically significant(χ2 =5.30,P<0.05).The differences of prognosis in patients with different GCS scores were statistically significant(χ2 =11.97,P<0.01).The differences of prognosis in patients with different emergency treatment time were statistically significant(χ2 =15.74,P<0.01).The prognosis with age and emergency treatment time had a significant correlation(P=0.016,0.007).The prognosis of patients with different emergency treatment time had a significant difference(χ2 =28.45,P<0.01).Conclusion The age,post-resuscitation GCS and emergency treatment time are meaningful in predicating patients′mortality and prognosis.The shorter the emer-gency treatment time,the better the prognosis.%目的:探讨外部暴力所致急性颅脑创伤患者现场及院内抢救时间、性别、年龄及格拉斯哥昏迷评分(GCS评分)与预后的相关性。方法选取92例外部暴力所致急性颅脑创伤患者为研究对象,回顾性分析其临床资料。收集患者的性别、年龄、受伤到抢救的时间、入院时 GCS 及5个月后格拉斯哥预后评分(GOS),分析各征象及抢救时间与临床预后的相关性。结果高龄和低龄患者的预后差异有统计学意义(χ2=5.30,P<0.05);GCS评分不同对预后好坏的影响有统计学意义(χ2=11.97,P<0.01);伤后到抢救的时间不同亦对预后好坏产生显著性影响(χ2

  20. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  1. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  2. "THE EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF POSITIVE END EXPIRATORY PRESSURE (PEEP ON PHARMACOKINETICS OF PHENYTOIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BRAIN INJURY UNDER MECHANICAL VENTILATION."

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Elham Hadidi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Positive ventilation has shown to have an influence on pharmacokinetic and disposition of some drugs.Beacause phenytoin with a narrow therapautic range, is the most commonly used drug for prophylaxis and treatment of early seizures after acute brain injuries, in the present study the effect of short term PEEP (5-10 cm H2O for at least 8 hours on phenytoin serum concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vmax and clearance in brain injured patients under mechanical ventilation was examined. Ten patients with moderate to severe acute brain injury who were placed on mechanical ventilation with an initial PEEP level of 0-5 cm H2O were included in the study. Patients received phenytoin loading dose of 15 mg/kg followed by a maintenance daily dose of 3-7 mg/kg initiated within 12 hours of loading dose. Sampels were taken on two different occasions before and after PEEP elevation. Total phenytoin serum concentrations were determined by HPLC method. A time invarient Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetic model was used to calculate Vmax and clearance for each patient.Derrived variables were calculated as follows: Vmax, 3.5-6.8 and 3.7-8.2 mg/kg/day; Clearance, 0.1-0.7 and 0.1-1.2 l/kg/day (before and after PEEP elevation, respectively. Our data have shown a wide range of variability (2.6-32.5 mg/l in phenytoin serum concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured total concentrations (p=0.721 and calculated Vmax and clearance (p=0.285before and after PEEP elevation. Administration of fluid and inotropic agents, limitation in application of higher levels of PEEP and drug interactions, shall be considered as possible explanations for these findings.

  3. Implementing evidence-based recommended practices for the management of patients with mild traumatic brain injuries in Australian emergency care departments: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mild head injuries commonly present to emergency departments. The challenges facing clinicians in emergency departments include identifying which patients have traumatic brain injury, and which patients can safely be sent home. Traumatic brain injuries may exist with subtle symptoms or signs, but can still lead to adverse outcomes. Despite the existence of several high quality clinical practice guidelines, internationally and in Australia, research shows inconsistent implementation of these recommendations. The aim of this trial is to test the effectiveness of a targeted, theory- and evidence-informed implementation intervention to increase the uptake of three key clinical recommendations regarding the emergency department management of adult patients (18 years of age or older) who present following mild head injuries (concussion), compared with passive dissemination of these recommendations. The primary objective is to establish whether the intervention is effective in increasing the percentage of patients for which appropriate post-traumatic amnesia screening is performed. Methods/design The design of this study is a cluster randomised trial. We aim to include 34 Australian 24-hour emergency departments, which will be randomised to an intervention or control group. Control group departments will receive a copy of the most recent Australian evidence-based clinical practice guideline on the acute management of patients with mild head injuries. The intervention group will receive an implementation intervention based on an analysis of influencing factors, which include local stakeholder meetings, identification of nursing and medical opinion leaders in each site, a train-the-trainer day and standardised education and interactive workshops delivered by the opinion leaders during a 3 month period of time. Clinical practice outcomes will be collected retrospectively from medical records by independent chart auditors over the 2 month period following

  4. Respiratory induced heart rate and blood pressure variability during mechanical ventilation in critically ill and brain death patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurák, Pavel; Zvoníček, V.; Leinveber, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Vondra, Vlastimil

    Piscataway: IEEE, 2012, s. 3821-3824. ISBN 978-1-4244-4119-8. [EMBC 2012. Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society /34./. San Diego (US), 28.08.2012-01.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk ME09050; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MZd NS10105 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : blood pressure measurement * brain * electrocardiography * neurophysiology * pneumodynamics * ventilation Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  5. [Mechanisms of the stimulating effect of brain antibodies on the Ca2 current in the neuron membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solntseva, E I; Pozdniakova, A L; Savich, V; Khorvat, I; Iankovich, B

    1987-11-01

    Antibodies against rat brain microsomes induce a 16 +/- 3% increase in the amplitude of Ca-current (ICa) in snail neurons. Ca-ions block ICa in dose-dependent and potential-dependent manner. Antibodies against microsomes decrease the effectiveness of ICa blockade by Ca-ions: a 85 +/- 10% increase in ICa is observed and I-V curve is normalized. It is suggested that an enhancing effect of antibodies on ICa and the elimination of blocking Ca-effect on ICa are connected with the weakening of divalent cations binding by the anionic groups of calcium channels. PMID:2445395

  6. The Brain Mechanism of Developmental Dyslexia:Evidences From The Brain Image%发展性阅读障碍的脑机制——来自脑成像研究的证据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨炀; 毕鸿燕; 王久菊

    2009-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a specific learning disability. The cerebral mechanism of development dyslexia is an important topic that has fascinated many researchers. With the introduction of brain imaging in studies of cerebral mechanism of development dyslexia, many achievements have been made. Studies of developmental dyslexia structure image found that development dyslexia showed brain structure abnormal in the parietotemporal region, occipitotemporal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and cerebellum et al, manifesting either in one specific area or by the asymmetry of one area; the functional image studies revealed that development dyslexia showed activity abnormal in most regions that proved to display structure abnormality; studies of brain functional connectivity demonstrates that the abnormality of development dyslexia happened not only in the connection between front-back part in one cerebral hemisphere, but also in the connection between the two hemispheres. In addition, some studies indicate Chinese development dyslexia has different brain mechanisms compared to that of alphabetic languages. These findings provide valuable insight for future developmental cerebral mechanisms research and for the expansion of Chinese development dyslexia research.%发展性阅读障碍是一种特殊的学习障碍,发展性阅读障碍的脑机制一直是研究者们关心的一个重要问题.随着脑成像技术的应用,人们在发展性阅读障碍的脑机制研究方面取得了重大进展.脑结构研究发现,发展性阅读障碍者在颞-顶叶、颢.枕叶、额下回、小脑等区域都存在一定的脑结构异常,这些脑结构异常要么表现在某个脑区的结构上,要么表现某个脑区结构的左右不对称性上.脑功能研究发现,发展性阅读障碍者出现脑结构异常的区域也大多表现出脑功能的异常.脑功能连接的研究发现,发展性阅读障碍者脑功能连接的异常不仅涉及到同侧脑区前后部分

  7. Engines of the Brain: The Computational Instruction Set of Human Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Granger, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Vast information from the neurosciences may enable bottom-up understanding of human intelligence; that is, derivation of function from mechanism. This article describes such a research program: simulation and analysis of the circuits of the brain has led to derivation of a detailed set of elemental and composed operations emerging from individual and combined circuits. The specific hypothesis is forwarded that these operations constitute the "instruction set" of the brain, that is, the basic ...

  8. Influence of vector design and host cell on the mechanism of recombination and emergence of mutant subpopulations of replicating retroviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günzburg Walter H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent advent of murine leukaemia virus (MLV-based replication-competent retroviral (RCR vector technology has provided exciting new tools for gene delivery, albeit the advances in vector efficiency which have been realized are also accompanied by a set of fresh challenges. The expression of additional transgene sequences, for example, increases the length of the viral genome, which can lead to reductions in replication efficiency and in turn to vector genome instability. This necessitates efforts to analyse the rate and mechanism of recombinant emergence during the replication of such vectors to provide data which should contribute to improvements in RCR vector design. Results In this study, we have performed detailed molecular analyses on packaged vector genomes and proviral DNA following propagation of MLV-based RCR vectors both in cell culture and in pre-formed subcutaneous tumours in vivo. The effects of strain of MLV, transgene position and host cell type on the rate of emergence of vector recombinants were quantitatively analysed by applying real-time PCR and real-time RT-PCR assays. Individual mutants were further characterized by PCR, and nucleotide sequence and structural motifs associated with these mutants were determined by sequencing. Our data indicate that virus strain, vector design and host cell influence the rate of emergence of predominating vector mutants, but not the underlying recombination mechanisms in vitro. In contrast, however, differences in the RNA secondary structural motifs associated with sequenced mutants emerging in cell culture and in solid tumours in vivo were observed. Conclusion Our data provide further evidence that MLV-based RCR vectors based on the Moloney strain of MLV and containing the transgene cassette in the 3' UTR region are superior to those based on Akv-MLV and/or containing the transgene cassette in the U3 region of the LTR. The observed discrepancies between the data

  9. 快速气管切开术在颅脑创伤急救中的应用%Application of Rapid Tracheostomy in Traumatic Brain Injury in Emergency Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍利; 吕利英

    2013-01-01

      目的:探讨快速气管切开术在颅脑创伤急救中的应用。方法:38例重型颅脑损伤患者入院后行快速气管切开术。结果:能在短时间内解除呼吸道梗阻,改善通气,纠正低氧血症。结论:快速气管切开术在颅脑创伤急救中为抢救生命及为进一步治疗原发病创造有利时机。%Objective:To explore the application of rapid tracheostomy in traumatic brain injury in emergency treatment.Methods:38 patients with severe craniocerebral injury were given quick tracheotomy.Results:It can relieve airway obstruction,improve ventilation in a short period of time,correct hypoxemia.Conclusion:Rapid tracheostomy in traumatic brain injury first aid for saving lives and further treatment of the primary disease and create the favorable opportunity.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism ...

  11. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants with multidrug resistance: history of origin, genetic and molecular mechanisms of resistance, and emerging challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozorov, A A; Zaĭchikova, M V; Danilenko, V N

    2012-01-01

    The review summarizes the data on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations that lead to multidrug resistance (MDR) to various antibiotics. MDR strains arose over the past 30 years as a variety of antituberculosis drugs were introduced in medicine, and they largely discount the results of chemotherapy for tuberculosis. The most dangerous of them are strains with extensive drug resistance (XDR), which are resistant to four or five different drugs on average. The molecular mechanisms that make a strain resistant are considered. XDR and MDR strains result from successive and usually independent resistance mutations, which arise in various regions of the mycobacterial genome. In addition, the formation of resistant strains is affected by the phenomenon of tolerance and mycobacterial latency in infected tissues. PMID:22567849

  12. Emergence of a Wiener process as a result of the quantum mechanical interaction with a macroscopic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, R; Namiki, M; Pascazio, S; Blasi, Raffaella; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Namiki, Mikio; Pascazio, Saverio

    1996-01-01

    We analyze a modified version of the Coleman-Hepp model, that is able to take into account energy-exchange processes between the incoming particle and the linear array made up of $N$ spin-1/2 systems. We bring to light the presence of a Wiener dissipative process in the weak-coupling, macroscopic ($N \\rightarrow Hilbert space, the particle undergoes a sort of Brownian motion, while the free Hamiltonian of the spin array serves as a Wiener process. No assumptions are made on the spectrum of the Hamiltonian of the spin system, and no partial trace is computed over its states. The mechanism of appearance of the stochastic process is discussed and contrasted to other noteworthy examples in the literature. The links with van Hove's ``$\\lambda^2 T$ limits are emphasized.

  13. 应激影响脑老化的相关学说与机制%Stress Affecting on Brain Aging:Related Hypothesis and Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王铭维; 王培芝; 张忠霞; 耿媛

    2014-01-01

    应激是机体受到各种内外环境因素刺激时的适应性反应,当反应持续时间过久或长期处于激活状态,则会对机体产生不良影响。目前认为,老化与糖皮质激素的过量分泌所致大脑相关区域的损伤相关,这些区域不仅参与认知与情绪,而且与下丘脑-垂体-肾上腺轴控制的其他活动相关。除此之外,皮质醇基础水平的差异性、皮质醇在脑内的可用性、糖皮质激素受体的失衡及大脑本身的易损性、回弹性等都是应激影响脑老化的参与因素。本文将对应激所致正常或非正常老化过程的相关影响机制与学说进行综述。%Stress is an adaptive response when suffering from various internal and external environmental stimulation factors .However ,if this response sustains for more time than necessary or if the body is activated chronically ,harmful effects will be on the body .Now it is considered that aging is related to the injury of correlated brain areas caused by the excessive secretion of glucocorticoid .These areas not only involved in cognition and emotion ,but also with other activities controlled by hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis .In addition ,differences in basal levels of cortisol ,the availability of cortisol in brain ,the imbalance of the glucocorticoid receptor ,the vulnerability and the resilience of the brain itself are all the factors that affect brain aging .This review will give an account of the related mechanism and hypothesis for the stress response that leads to the normal or abnormal brain aging .

  14. Application of optimize the entire pre-hospital emergency care in patients with traumatic brain injury in emergency%院前急救全程优化护理在颅脑损伤患者急救中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚菊平; 毛青

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of optimize the entire pre-hospital emergency care in patients with traumat-ic brain injury in emergency. Methods A total of 132 cases of traumatic brain injury patients were selected for the study, accorded to the time of admission, 62 patients treated from June to December in 2012 were selected as the con-trol group, 70 cases treated from January to July in 2013 were selected as the intervention group, the control group pre-hospital were cared by conventional implementation, while the intervention group to optimize the use of the entire pre-hospital emergency care. Results The intervention group with the pre-hospital emergency GCS and transferred to APS score had no significantly different (P>0.05), while the control group pre-hospital emergency and transferred to GCS and APS scores had significantly different (P0.05),对照组院前急救与转入急诊时GCS和APS评分均有显著差异(P<0.05)。转入急诊时干预组GCS评分显著高于对照组,APS评分显著低于对照组(P<0.05)。两组住院治疗期间预后GOS评价有显著性差异,干预组预后显著优于对照组(P<0.05)。干预组急救反应时间、急诊反应时间、住院时间均显著少于对照组(P<0.05),死亡率显著低于对照组(P<0.05)。干预组患者及家属对院前护理的评价明显高于对照组(P<0.05)。结论院前急救实施全程优化护理可有效提高救治效率缩短患者获得救治时间,提高抢救质量,减低死亡率,缩短住院时间,改善患者预后。

  15. Brain glucose sensing, glucokinase and neural control of metabolism and islet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunnowo-Bada, E O; Heeley, N; Brochard, L; Evans, M L

    2014-09-01

    It is increasingly apparent that the brain plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis, including the maintenance of blood glucose. This is achieved by various efferent pathways from the brain to periphery, which help control hepatic glucose flux and perhaps insulin-stimulated insulin secretion. Also, critically important for the brain given its dependence on a constant supply of glucose as a fuel--emergency counter-regulatory responses are triggered by the brain if blood glucose starts to fall. To exert these control functions, the brain needs to detect rapidly and accurately changes in blood glucose. In this review, we summarize some of the mechanisms postulated to play a role in this and examine the potential role of the low-affinity hexokinase, glucokinase, in the brain as a key part of some of this sensing. We also discuss how these processes may become altered in diabetes and related metabolic diseases. PMID:25200293

  16. Physical mechanism of mind changes and tradeoffs among speed, accuracy, and energy cost in brain decision making: Landscape, flux, and path perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Kun, Zhang; Jin, Wang

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive behaviors are determined by underlying neural networks. Many brain functions, such as learning and memory, have been successfully described by attractor dynamics. For decision making in the brain, a quantitative description of global attractor landscapes has not yet been completely given. Here, we developed a theoretical framework to quantify the landscape associated with the steady state probability distributions and associated steady state curl flux, measuring the degree of non-equilibrium through the degree of detailed balance breaking for decision making. We quantified the decision-making processes with optimal paths from the undecided attractor states to the decided attractor states, which are identified as basins of attractions, on the landscape. Both landscape and flux determine the kinetic paths and speed. The kinetics and global stability of decision making are explored by quantifying the landscape topography through the barrier heights and the mean first passage time. Our theoretical predictions are in agreement with experimental observations: more errors occur under time pressure. We quantitatively explored two mechanisms of the speed-accuracy tradeoff with speed emphasis and further uncovered the tradeoffs among speed, accuracy, and energy cost. Our results imply that there is an optimal balance among speed, accuracy, and the energy cost in decision making. We uncovered the possible mechanisms of changes of mind and how mind changes improve performance in decision processes. Our landscape approach can help facilitate an understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms of cognitive processes and identify the key factors in the corresponding neural networks. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21190040, 91430217, and 11305176).

  17. Emerging issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some formal and informal mechanisms were implemented at the Ontario Ministry of the Environment that allow the identification of emerging environmental issues. The early warning is most often provided through the expertise of the personnel and their contacts. The Ministry commissioned a study to review the process, learn from the processes in place in other organizations, and implement the appropriate changes into its emerging issues procedure. The team conducting the review answered four specific questions. The first question was: What are the necessary elements of an emerging issues tool? The second question was: What are some of the best practices in other jurisdictions? It was followed by the question: How do those jurisdictions implement emerging issues models? The final question was: What implementation is appropriate for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment? The approach involved reviewing the appropriate literature and reviewing the best practices in place in other jurisdictions, both in the United States and in Europe. Senior officials in Canada and the United States were interviewed, and the procedure was identified and described. A case study concerning the acid rain problem in the 1960s and 1970s was used to test the developed procedure retroactively. This procedure involves a variation of the top-down, bottom-up input procedure at the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), with a formal issues scanning process, and the prioritizing and analysis of the steps. It was noted that if the procedure had been in place in the late 1960s in Ontario, it would have been possible to identify one or more impacts from the acid rain situation ten years earlier. Preventive and remedial action could have been implemented, leading to environmental and economic benefits for the province of Ontario. The broad involvement of stakeholders is required for an open and systematic prioritization of the issues. The authors concluded the study by identifying

  18. PEPTIDES INVOLVED IN THE REGULATION OF BRAIN ASYMMETRY IN MAMMALS AND THE POSSIBLE NEUROCHEMICAL MECHANISMS: AN EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Sollertinskaya

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article the results of the comparative physiological studyng of active drugs of the peptides nature (Semax and Selank have been presented and their role in the compensation of the cognitive functions disturbanced and the brain interhemispheric asymmetry in the ascending row of the mammals. The new data have been obtained that in the insectivores level the influence of the Semax and Selank in the interhemispheric asymmetry regulation has the nonspecific general feature. The differentiation of the drugs effects on the profile behaviour changes appeared as a tendency. At the rodents level the differentiation of the Semax and Selank influence on the motor asymmetry takes place. The regulation effects of the drugs manifested in different ways speking about rats on the right side profil of the behaviour and on the left one and the ambidexters. At the monkey’s level the compensatory effects of the Semax and Selank on the cognitive functions disturbances exertes the distincles different features. It has been established that Semax has the significant cerebroprotective influence on the disturbanced reactions of the selection the side reinforcement. The new data have been established that in rats the ascending influence of the Selank on the new cortex is exerted over the hippocampal structures. The ascending effects of the Semax are obviously exerted over the baso-lateral nuclei of the amygdala and the field CA1 of the hippocampus. The analysis of the data has led us the next conclusions: the formation of the regulatory and compensatory influence of the peptides drugs on the disturbanced brain function is exerted on the common principe of the evolution to the development from diffuse nonspecific influence to the discrete specialization.

  19. Biospheric Cooling and the Emergence of Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, David; Middendorf, George

    The long-term cooling history of the Earth's biosphere implies a temperature constraint on the timing of major events in biologic evolution, e.g., emergence of cyanobacteria, eucaryotes and Metazoa apparently occurred at times when temperatures were near their upper growth limits. Could biospheric cooling also have been a necessary condition for the emergence of veterbrates and their encephalization? The upper temperature limit for vertebrate growth is about 10 degrees below the limit for Metazoa (50 degrees C). Heterothermy followed by full homeothermy was likely a necessary condition for greater encephalization because of the energy requirement of larger brains. The temperature differential between an animal and a cooler environment, all other factors equal, will increase the efficiency of heat loss from the brain, but too large a differential will shift metabolic energy away from the brain to the procurement of food. Encephalization has also entailed the evolution of internal cooling mechanisms to avoid overheating the brain. The two periods of pronounced Phanerozoic cooling, the PermoCarboniferous and late Cenozoic, corresponded to the emergence of mammal-like reptiles and hominids respectively, with a variety of explanations offered for the apparent link. The origin of highly encephalized whales, dolphins and porpoises occurred with the drop in ocean temperatures 25-30 mya. Of course, other possible paths to encephalization are conceivable, with radically different solutions to the problem of heat dissipation. But the intrinsic requirements for information processing capacity necessary for intelligence suggest our terrestrial pattern may resemble those of alien biospheres given similar histories.

  20. The human brain and face: mechanisms of cranial, neurological and facial development revealed through malformations of holoprosencephaly, cyclopia and aberrations in chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Gboluaje, Temitayo; Reid, Shaina N; Lin, Stephen; Wang, Paul; Green, William; Diogo, Rui; Fidélia-Lambert, Marie N; Herman, Mary M

    2015-09-01

    The study of inborn genetic errors can lend insight into mechanisms of normal human development and congenital malformations. Here, we present the first detailed comparison of cranial and neuro pathology in two exceedingly rare human individuals with cyclopia and alobar holoprosencephaly (HPE) in the presence and absence of aberrant chromosome 18 (aCh18). The aCh18 fetus contained one normal Ch18 and one with a pseudo-isodicentric duplication of chromosome 18q and partial deletion of 18p from 18p11.31 where the HPE gene, TGIF, resides, to the p terminus. In addition to synophthalmia, the aCh18 cyclopic malformations included a failure of induction of most of the telencephalon - closely approximating anencephaly, unchecked development of brain stem structures, near absence of the sphenoid bone and a malformed neurocranium and viscerocranium that constitute the median face. Although there was complete erasure of the olfactory and superior nasal structures, rudiments of nasal structures derived from the maxillary bone were evident, but with absent pharyngeal structures. The second non-aCh18 cyclopic fetus was initially classified as a true Cyclops, as it appeared to have a proboscis and one median eye with a single iris, but further analysis revealed two eye globes as expected for synophthalmic cyclopia. Furthermore, the proboscis was associated with the medial ethmoid ridge, consistent with an incomplete induction of these nasal structures, even as the nasal septum and paranasal sinuses were apparently developed. An important conclusion of this study is that it is the brain that predicts the overall configuration of the face, due to its influence on the development of surrounding skeletal structures. The present data using a combination of macroscopic, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide an unparalleled analysis on the extent of the effects of median defects, and insight into normal development and patterning of the brain