WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain diseases

  1. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  2. The cost of brain diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DiLuca, Monica; Olesen, Jes

    2014-01-01

    Brain diseases represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. With yearly costs of about 800 billion euros and an estimated 179 million people afflicted in 2010, brain diseases are an unquestionable emergency and a grand challenge for neuroscientists.......Brain diseases represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. With yearly costs of about 800 billion euros and an estimated 179 million people afflicted in 2010, brain diseases are an unquestionable emergency and a grand challenge for neuroscientists....

  3. Prion diseases of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Kira; Urbach, Horst

    2015-01-01

    The prion diseases of the brain, especially Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, are rare fatal neurodegenerative disorders. A definitive CJD diagnosis is currently only possible by a brain biopsy or post mortem autopsy. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is based on clinical signs, pathognomonic EEG, on typical MRI findings and the examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Using the MRI the diagnosis Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can be confirmed or excluded with high certainty. The MRI examination should contain diffusion-weighted and FLAIR imaging sequences. This review article provides an overview of the prion diseases of the brain with the corresponding imaging findings.

  4. Urinary Biomarkers of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manxia An

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are the measurable changes associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood, urine is not subject to homeostatic mechanisms. Therefore, greater fluctuations could occur in urine than in blood, better reflecting the changes in human body. The roadmap of urine biomarker era was proposed. Although urine analysis has been attempted for clinical diagnosis, and urine has been monitored during the progression of many diseases, particularly urinary system diseases, whether urine can reflect brain disease status remains uncertain. As some biomarkers of brain diseases can be detected in the body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood, there is a possibility that urine also contain biomarkers of brain diseases. This review summarizes the clues of brain diseases reflected in the urine proteome and metabolome.

  5. Inflammatory diseases of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehnel, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of inflammatory brain diseases from a neuroradiological point of view. Such diseases may be either infectious (e.g., viral encephalitis and pyogenic brain abscess) or non-infectious (e.g., multiple sclerosis), and many of these entities are becoming increasingly important for differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging contributes greatly to the differentiation of infectious and noninfectious brain diseases and to the distinction between brain inflammation and other, for instance neoplastic, diseases. In order to ensure a standardized approach throughout the book, each chapter is subdivided into three principal sections: epidemiology, clinical presentation and therapy; imaging; and differential diagnosis. A separate chapter addresses technical and methodological issues and imaging protocols. All of the authors are recognized experts in their fields, and numerous high-quality and informative illustrations are included. This book will be of great value not only to neuroradiologists but also to neurologists, neuropediatricians, and general radiologists. (orig.)

  6. Radiotherapy of brain inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pil', B.N.

    1982-01-01

    An experience of radiation treatment of brain inflammatory diseases is described. Radiation treatment goes with antiinflammatory, anticonvulsive agents, with resorbing and dehydrating measures and some times with surgical treatment. The methods of radiation treatment of convexital and optochiasmic arachnoiditis

  7. Inflammatory diseases of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Stefan (ed.) [University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2009-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of inflammatory brain diseases from a neuroradiological point of view. Such diseases may be either infectious (e.g., viral encephalitis and pyogenic brain abscess) or non-infectious (e.g., multiple sclerosis), and many of these entities are becoming increasingly important for differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging contributes greatly to the differentiation of infectious and noninfectious brain diseases and to the distinction between brain inflammation and other, for instance neoplastic, diseases. In order to ensure a standardized approach throughout the book, each chapter is subdivided into three principal sections: epidemiology, clinical presentation and therapy; imaging; and differential diagnosis. A separate chapter addresses technical and methodological issues and imaging protocols. All of the authors are recognized experts in their fields, and numerous high-quality and informative illustrations are included. This book will be of great value not only to neuroradiologists but also to neurologists, neuropediatricians, and general radiologists. (orig.)

  8. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  9. Brain and heart disease studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Sargent, T.W. III; Yen, C.K.; Friedland, R.F.; Moyer, B.R.

    1981-01-01

    Highlights of important studies completed during the past year using the Donner 280-crystal positron ring tomograph are summarized in this article. Using rubidium-82, images of a brain tumor and an arteriovenous malformation are described. An image demonstrating methionine uptake in a patient with schizophrenia and an image reflecting sugar metabolism in the brain of a man with Alzheimer's disease are also included. Uptake of rubidium-82 in subjects before and after exercise is being investigated. The synthesis of new radiopharmaceuticals and the development of a new synthesis for C-taurine for use in the study of metabolism in the human heart are also being studied

  10. Brain Diseases in Mesopotamian Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedad Yuste

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In ancient Mesopotamia were not practiced neither autopsies nor dissections, so the internal organs of human body were known only from occasional inspections on wounds and injuries. The
    brain was considered as a part of the head and was not related to mental activity. However, Babylonian and Assyrian physicians were able to identify the symptoms of many diseases that affect this organ. We will make here a brief overview of them.

  11. Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Fox, Nick C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies. PMID:22474610

  12. Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Diamond, B.; Honig, G.; Mader, S.; Brimberg, L.; Volpe, B.T.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases currently affect 5–7% of the world's population; in most diseases there are circulating autoantibodies. Brain-reactive antibodies are present in approximately 2–3% of the general population but do not usually contribute to brain pathology. These antibodies penetrate brain tissue only early in development or under pathologic conditions. This restriction on their pathogenicity and the lack of correlation between serum titers and brain pathology have, no doubt, contributed to...

  13. FLAIR images of brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Fuminori; Kinoshita, Masao; Kishibayashi, Jun; Kamada, Kazuhiko; Sunohara, Nobuhiko.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the usefulness of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in diagnosing brain diseases. The subjects were 20 patients with multiple cerebral infarction, multiple sclerosis, temporal epilepsy, or brain trauma, and 20 other healthy adults. FLAIR images, with a long repetitive time of 6000 msec and a long inversion time of 1400-1600 msec, showed low signal intensity in the cerebrospinal fluid in the lateral ventricles and the cerebral sulci, and high signal intensity in brain tissues. Signal intensity on FLAIR images correlated well with T2 relaxation times under 100 msec. For multiple sclerosis and cerebral infarction, cystic lesions, which were shown on T2-weighted images with long relaxation times over 100 msec, appeared as low-signal areas; and the lesions surrounding the cystic lesions appeared as high-signal areas. For temporal lobe epilepsy, the hippocampus was visualized as a high-signal area. Hippocampal lesions were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. In a patient with cerebral trauma, FLAIR images revealed the lobulated structure with the residual cortex shown as a high signal area. The lesions surrounding the cystic change were imaged as high signal areas. These structural changes were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted sequences. FLAIR images were useful in detecting white matter lesions surrounding the lateral ventricles and cortical and subcortical lesions near the brain surface, which were unclear on conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. (N.K.)

  14. MRI in ischemic brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Friedmann, G.; Pawlik, G.; Boecher-Schwarz, H.G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of MRI and CT in 55 patients with brain infarcts were compared; in 26 of these cases an additional PET examination was obtained in order to study the regional glucose utilisation. MRI was superior to CT, demonstrating 11% more of the infarcts, particularly during the first 24 hours, in small lesions confined to the grey or subcortical white matter and in infratentorial ischemic lesion. On the other hand, only CT was able to show fresh hemorrhage, although MRI was the method of choice to demonstrate old blood collections. To characterise the follow up of an infarct, CT and MRI were similar, except the marginal contrast enhancement sometimes demonstrated by CT studies between the 2nd and 4th week after stroke event. PET was inferior to show details because of its poorer spatial resolution, but anyhow had a high sensitivity and provided additional informations concerning secondary inactivations of brain areas not directly damaged. Additionally PET was able to demonstrate areas of anaerobic glycolysis and lesions of diminished glucose utilisation in TIAs. Small areas of gliosis in the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres were frequently found in patients with cerebro-vascular diseases; they were best shown by MRI, but do not correlate with the extent of vascular stenoses or occlusions, shown by angiography. (orig) [de

  15. Brain aging, Alzheimer's disease, and mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is contentious. One view holds AD results when brain aging surpasses a threshold. The other view postulates AD is not a consequence of brain aging. This review discusses this conundrum from the perspective of different investigative lines that have tried to address it, as well as from the perspective of the mitochondrion, an organelle that appears to play a role in both AD and brain aging. Specific issues addressed include the question of whether AD and brain aging should be conceptually lumped or split, the extent to which AD and brain aging potentially share common molecular mechanisms, whether beta amyloid should be primarily considered a marker of AD or simply brain aging, and the definition of AD itself. PMID:21920438

  16. Specific diagnosis of brain disease with double isotope brain scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ell, P J; Lotritsch, K H; Hilbrand, E; Meixner, M; Barolin, G; Scholz, H [Landesunfallkrankenhaus, Feldkirch (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Landesnervenkrankenhaus, Feldkirch (Austria). Dept. of Neurology)

    1976-02-01

    25 patients with known cerebral disease (either CVA's or primary or secondary tumours) diagnosed by clinical and angiographic criteria were submitted to a double siotope imaging technique using sup(99m)TcO/sub 4/- and sup(99m)Tc-EHDP. The different biological behaviour of these radiopharmaceuticals has provided specific and differential diagnosis between vascular and neoplastic disease of the brain. sup(99m)Tc-EHDP is shown to be the tracer of choice for the imaging of CVA's and sup(99m)TcO/sub 4/- is confirmed as the tracer of choice for the imaging of primary or secondary tumours in the brain.

  17. CT evaluation of cystic brain disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joon Woo; Lee, Jin Woo; Joo, Yang Goo; Kim, Hong; Zeon, Seok Kil; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1987-01-01

    We retrospectively analysed CT findings of 47 cystic brain lesions of 44 patients, in which operation, biopsy or follow-up study was needed for their final diagnosis. The results were as follows: 1. The etiologic diseases of cystic brain lesions were 15 cases of brain abscess, 9 cases of astrocytoma, 5 cases of glioblastoma multiforme, 3 cases of meningioma, 5 cases of craniopharyngioma, 1 case of hemangioblastoma, 2 cases of dermoid cyst and 4 cases of metastasis. 2. We analyses the cystic lesions in view of their number, location, shape, perifocal edema, mass effect, wall and its thickness, evenness and characteristics of their inner and outer surfaces, mural nodule, calcification and contrast enhancement. a. 13.3% of brain abscess and 75% of metastases were multiple in number, but the remainder showed single lesion. b. The shape of cystic lesions were round or ovoid in 68%, lobulated in 8.5% and irregular in 23.5%, and no demonstrable difference of shape were noticed in different disease. c. In brain abscess, the wall of cystic lesions tend to be thin, even and smooth in inner surface, but the outer surfaces were equally smooth or irregular. d. Mural nodules were found in nearly half of the cases of astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, metastasis and hemangioblastoma, but the brain abscess and dermoid cyst contained no mural nodule. e. Meningiomas were found to be attached to dura mater and showed thickening of the inner table of adjacent skull or of the falx. f. The presence of preceding infectious disease may be helpful in the diagnosis of brain abscess, but in 20% there were no demonstrable preceding infection. g. Lung cancer was confirmed as primary site in two of the cystic metastatic disease, but other 2 cases showed no demonstrable primary malignancy

  18. CT evaluation of cystic brain disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joon Woo; Lee, Jin Woo; Joo, Yang Goo; Kim, Hong; Zeon, Seok Kil; Suh, Soo Jhi [Keimyung University, School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    We retrospectively analysed CT findings of 47 cystic brain lesions of 44 patients, in which operation, biopsy or follow-up study was needed for their final diagnosis. The results were as follows: 1. The etiologic diseases of cystic brain lesions were 15 cases of brain abscess, 9 cases of astrocytoma, 5 cases of glioblastoma multiforme, 3 cases of meningioma, 5 cases of craniopharyngioma, 1 case of hemangioblastoma, 2 cases of dermoid cyst and 4 cases of metastasis. 2. We analyses the cystic lesions in view of their number, location, shape, perifocal edema, mass effect, wall and its thickness, evenness and characteristics of their inner and outer surfaces, mural nodule, calcification and contrast enhancement. a. 13.3% of brain abscess and 75% of metastases were multiple in number, but the remainder showed single lesion. b. The shape of cystic lesions were round or ovoid in 68%, lobulated in 8.5% and irregular in 23.5%, and no demonstrable difference of shape were noticed in different disease. c. In brain abscess, the wall of cystic lesions tend to be thin, even and smooth in inner surface, but the outer surfaces were equally smooth or irregular. d. Mural nodules were found in nearly half of the cases of astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, metastasis and hemangioblastoma, but the brain abscess and dermoid cyst contained no mural nodule. e. Meningiomas were found to be attached to dura mater and showed thickening of the inner table of adjacent skull or of the falx. f. The presence of preceding infectious disease may be helpful in the diagnosis of brain abscess, but in 20% there were no demonstrable preceding infection. g. Lung cancer was confirmed as primary site in two of the cystic metastatic disease, but other 2 cases showed no demonstrable primary malignancy.

  19. Brain glycogen in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Jordi; Guinovart, Joan J

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain at much lower concentrations than in muscle or liver. However, by characterizing an animal depleted of brain glycogen, we have shown that the polysaccharide plays a key role in learning capacity and in activity-dependent changes in hippocampal synapse strength. Since glycogen is essentially found in astrocytes, the diverse roles proposed for this polysaccharide in the brain have been attributed exclusively to these cells. However, we have demonstrated that neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia. However, these cells can store only minute amounts of glycogen, since the progressive accumulation of this molecule leads to neuronal loss. Loss-of-function mutations in laforin and malin cause Lafora disease. This condition is characterized by the presence of high numbers of insoluble polyglucosan bodies, known as Lafora bodies, in neuronal cells. Our findings reveal that the accumulation of this aberrant glycogen accounts for the neurodegeneration and functional consequences, as well as the impaired autophagy, observed in models of this disease. Similarly glycogen synthase is responsible for the accumulation of corpora amylacea, which are polysaccharide-based aggregates present in the neurons of aged human brains. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism is important under stress conditions and that neuronal glycogen accumulation contributes to neurodegenerative diseases and to aging-related corpora amylacea formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary brain lymphoma presenting as Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Guerra, M.; Leno, C.; Berciano, J.; Cerezal, L.; Diez, C.; Figols, J.

    2001-01-01

    Neoplasm is an uncommon cause of a parkinsonian syndrome. We report a woman with primary brain B-cell lymphoma presenting as Parkinson's disease. After 1 year of the illness, CT and MRI showed lesions without mass effect in the basal ganglia and corpus callosum. The patient did not respond to levodopa and right cerebellar and brain-stem signs appeared, which prompted further neuroimaging, showing an increase in size of the lesions and a right cerebellar and pontine mass. Stereotactic biopsy of the basal ganglia showed high-grade B-cell lymphoma. Despite the basal ganglia frequently being involved in lymphoma of the brain, presentation with typical or atypical parkinsonism is exceptional. (orig.)

  1. Features of brain atrophy in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, I; Melamed, E; Gomori, J M

    1985-03-01

    Multiple parameters for brain volume and mass were studied in 85 parkinsonian patients and in 149 normal controls aged 24 to 89 using CT scanning. In controls there was reduction in brain substance with advancing age. Increased brain atrophy in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) was mainly observed in the younger age group of 24 to 49. This included parameters evaluating the size of the lateral and third ventricles and the size of the subarachnoid space in the frontal interhemispheric and Sylvian fissures. With computed canonical correlation analysis a formula was obtained which expressed the tendency of the atrophic process in PD to involve the areas surrounding the third ventricle and the mesial aspect of the frontal lobes more than during normal aging.

  2. ADDICTION IS NOT A BRAIN DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisardo Becoña

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea that addiction is a “brain disease” has gradually been consolidated in the medical-psychiatric field over the last years, as it appears in the current DSM-5. In this paper we analyse the way this idea has arisen and been consolidated, as well as the criticisms that it has received, the professional consequences if this model becomes hegemonic, and the underlying interests. The conclusion defends the need to show, as psychologists, our clear contributions to the field of addictions, and the psychological variables that are necessary in order to understand and prevent addictions, as well as the central role of psychological treatment due to its effectiveness. We must also denounce the reductionism that the model of brain disease represents in comparison with a biopsychosocial model of addiction.

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about the BRAIN initiative, see www.nih.gov/science/brain . Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Deep ...

  4. Prion diseases of the brain; Prionenerkrankung des Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Kira; Urbach, Horst [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Neuroradiologie

    2015-09-15

    The prion diseases of the brain, especially Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, are rare fatal neurodegenerative disorders. A definitive CJD diagnosis is currently only possible by a brain biopsy or post mortem autopsy. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is based on clinical signs, pathognomonic EEG, on typical MRI findings and the examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Using the MRI the diagnosis Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can be confirmed or excluded with high certainty. The MRI examination should contain diffusion-weighted and FLAIR imaging sequences. This review article provides an overview of the prion diseases of the brain with the corresponding imaging findings.

  5. Characterizing brain oscillations in cognition and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, H.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuronal oscillations play a fundamental role for shaping the functional architecture of the working brain. This thesis investigates brain oscillations in rat, human healthy population and major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. A novel measurement termed

  6. Blood-brain barrier transport of drugs for the treatment of brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2009-06-01

    The central nervous system is a sanctuary protected by barriers that regulate brain homeostasis and control the transport of endogenous compounds into the brain. The blood-brain barrier, formed by endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells allowing entry only to amino acids, glucose and hormones needed for normal brain cell function and metabolism. This very tight regulation of brain cell access is essential for the survival of neurons which do not have a significant capacity to regenerate, but also prevents therapeutic compounds, small and large, from reaching the brain. As a result, various strategies are being developed to enhance access of drugs to the brain parenchyma at therapeutically meaningful concentrations to effectively manage disease.

  7. Mechanisms of action of brain insulin against neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Insulin, a pancreatic hormone, is best known for its peripheral effects on the metabolism of glucose, fats and proteins. There is a growing body of evidence linking insulin action in the brain to neurodegenerative diseases. Insulin present in central nervous system is a regulator of central glucose metabolism nevertheless this glucoregulation is not the main function of insulin in the brain. Brain is known to be specifically vulnerable to oxidative products relative to other organs and altered brain insulin signaling may cause or promote neurodegenerative diseases which invalidates and reduces the quality of life. Insulin located within the brain is mostly of pancreatic origin or is produced in the brain itself crosses the blood-brain barrier and enters the brain via a receptor-mediated active transport system. Brain Insulin, insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the regulation of peripheral metabolism, feeding behavior, memory and maintenance of neural functions such as neuronal growth and differentiation, neuromodulation and neuroprotection. In the present review, we would like to summarize the novel biological and pathophysiological roles of neuronal insulin in neurodegenerative diseases and describe the main signaling pathways in use for therapeutic strategies in the use of insulin to the cerebral tissues and their biological applications to neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s dis...

  9. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James H; Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W A; De Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A; Majoie, Charles B L M; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J

    2017-04-04

    To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. A large sample of virologically suppressed HIV-positive adults (n = 162, age 45-82 years) and highly comparable HIV-negative controls (n = 105) were recruited as part of the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) collaboration. Using T1-weighted MRI scans, a machine-learning model of healthy brain aging was defined in an independent cohort (n = 2,001, aged 18-90 years). Neuroimaging data from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals were then used to estimate brain-predicted age; then brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD = brain-predicted brain age - chronological age) scores were calculated. Neuropsychological and clinical assessments were also carried out. HIV-positive individuals had greater brain-PAD score (mean ± SD 2.15 ± 7.79 years) compared to HIV-negative individuals (-0.87 ± 8.40 years; b = 3.48, p brain-PAD score was associated with decreased performance in multiple cognitive domains (information processing speed, executive function, memory) and general cognitive performance across all participants. Brain-PAD score was not associated with age, duration of HIV infection, or other HIV-related measures. Increased apparent brain aging, predicted using neuroimaging, was observed in HIV-positive adults, despite effective viral suppression. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased apparent brain aging related to cognitive deficits. However, predicted brain age difference did not correlate with chronological age or duration of HIV infection, suggesting that HIV disease may accentuate rather than accelerate brain aging. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Lysosomal storage diseases and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, David J; Pontikis, Charles C; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier becomes a crucial issue in neuronopathic lysosomal storage diseases for three reasons. Firstly, the function of the blood-brain barrier may be compromised in many of the lysosomal storage diseases and this barrier dysfunction may contribute to the neuropathology seen in the diseases and accelerate cell death. Secondly, the substrate reduction therapies, which successfully reduce peripheral lysosomal storage, because of the blood-brain barrier may not have as free an access to brain cells as they do to peripheral cells. And thirdly, enzyme replacement therapy appears to have little access to the central nervous system as the mannose and mannose-6-phosphate receptors involved in their cellular uptake and transport to the lysosome do not appear to be expressed at the adult blood-brain barrier. This review will discuss in detail these issues and their context in the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  11. Deregulation of brain insulin signaling in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxing; Deng, Yanqiu; Zhang, Baorong; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-04-01

    Contrary to the previous belief that insulin does not act in the brain, studies in the last three decades have demonstrated important roles of insulin and insulin signal transduction in various functions of the central nervous system. Deregulated brain insulin signaling and its role in molecular pathogenesis have recently been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this article, we review the roles of brain insulin signaling in memory and cognition, the metabolism of amyloid β precursor protein, and tau phosphorylation. We further discuss deficiencies of brain insulin signaling and glucose metabolism, their roles in the development of AD, and recent studies that target the brain insulin signaling pathway for the treatment of AD. It is clear now that deregulation of brain insulin signaling plays an important role in the development of sporadic AD. The brain insulin signaling pathway also offers a promising therapeutic target for treating AD and probably other neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Hyper-connectivity of functional networks for brain disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Biao; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Shen, Dinggang; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2016-08-01

    Exploring structural and functional interactions among various brain regions enables better understanding of pathological underpinnings of neurological disorders. Brain connectivity network, as a simplified representation of those structural and functional interactions, has been widely used for diagnosis and classification of neurodegenerative diseases, especially for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its early stage - mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the conventional functional connectivity network is usually constructed based on the pairwise correlation among different brain regions and thus ignores their higher-order relationships. Such loss of high-order information could be important for disease diagnosis, since neurologically a brain region predominantly interacts with more than one other brain regions. Accordingly, in this paper, we propose a novel framework for estimating the hyper-connectivity network of brain functions and then use this hyper-network for brain disease diagnosis. Here, the functional connectivity hyper-network denotes a network where each of its edges representing the interactions among multiple brain regions (i.e., an edge can connect with more than two brain regions), which can be naturally represented by a hyper-graph. Specifically, we first construct connectivity hyper-networks from the resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) time series by using sparse representation. Then, we extract three sets of brain-region specific features from the connectivity hyper-networks, and further exploit a manifold regularized multi-task feature selection method to jointly select the most discriminative features. Finally, we use multi-kernel support vector machine (SVM) for classification. The experimental results on both MCI dataset and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) dataset demonstrate that, compared with the conventional connectivity network-based methods, the proposed method can not only improve the classification performance, but also help

  13. Lipidomics of human brain aging and Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudí, Alba; Cabré, Rosanna; Jové, Mariona; Ayala, Victoria; Gonzalo, Hugo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald

    2015-01-01

    Lipids stimulated and favored the evolution of the brain. Adult human brain contains a large amount of lipids, and the largest diversity of lipid classes and lipid molecular species. Lipidomics is defined as "the full characterization of lipid molecular species and of their biological roles with respect to expression of proteins involved in lipid metabolism and function, including gene regulation." Therefore, the study of brain lipidomics can help to unravel the diversity and to disclose the specificity of these lipid traits and its alterations in neural (neurons and glial) cells, groups of neural cells, brain, and fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, thus helping to uncover potential biomarkers of human brain aging and Alzheimer disease. This review will discuss the lipid composition of the adult human brain. We first consider a brief approach to lipid definition, classification, and tools for analysis from the new point of view that has emerged with lipidomics, and then turn to the lipid profiles in human brain and how lipids affect brain function. Finally, we focus on the current status of lipidomics findings in human brain aging and Alzheimer's disease pathology. Neurolipidomics will increase knowledge about physiological and pathological functions of brain cells and will place the concept of selective neuronal vulnerability in a lipid context. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, James H; Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W A; De Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A; Majoie, Charles B L M; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J; Kalsbeek, A.

    OBJECTIVE: To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. METHODS: A

  15. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, James H.; Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W. A.; de Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A.; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W. N. M.; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J.; Schouten, J.; Kooij, K. W.; Elsenga, B. C.; Janssen, F. R.; Heidenrijk, M.; Schrijver, J. H. N.; Zikkenheiner, W.; van der Valk, M.; Henderiks, A.; Kootstra, N. A.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Maurer, I.; Ruiz, M. M. Mangas; Booiman, T.; Girigorie, A. F.; Villaudy, J.; Frankin, E.; Pasternak, A.; Berkhout, B.; van der Kuyl, T.; Stege, J. A. ter; Twennaar, M. Klein; Su, T.; Siteur-van Rijnstra, E.; Weijer, K.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, A.; Wezel, M.; Visser, I.; Ruhé , H. G.; Tembo, L.; Stott, M.; Prins, M. [= Maria

    2017-01-01

    To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. A large sample of

  16. Resting-state oscillatory brain dynamics in Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, W.; Stam, C.J.; Jones, B.F.; Zuiderwijk, I.M.; van Dijk, B.W.; Scheltens, P.

    2008-01-01

    Altered oscillatory brain activity in Alzheimer disease (AD) may reflect underlying neuropathological changes, and its characterization might lead to new diagnostic possibilities. The present study using quantitative magnetoencephalography was set up to examine power spectrum changes in AD patients,

  17. Evidence for brain glucose dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yang; Varma, Vijay R; Varma, Sudhir; Casanova, Ramon; Dammer, Eric; Pletnikova, Olga; Chia, Chee W; Egan, Josephine M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Troncoso, Juan; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; O'Brien, Richard; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2018-03-01

    It is unclear whether abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Within the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, we measured brain glucose concentration and assessed the ratios of the glycolytic amino acids, serine, glycine, and alanine to glucose. We also quantified protein levels of the neuronal (GLUT3) and astrocytic (GLUT1) glucose transporters. Finally, we assessed the relationships between plasma glucose measured before death and brain tissue glucose. Higher brain tissue glucose concentration, reduced glycolytic flux, and lower GLUT3 are related to severity of AD pathology and the expression of AD symptoms. Longitudinal increases in fasting plasma glucose levels are associated with higher brain tissue glucose concentrations. Impaired glucose metabolism due to reduced glycolytic flux may be intrinsic to AD pathogenesis. Abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis may begin several years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  18. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuroimaging Studies Illustrate the Commonalities Between Ageing and Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James H

    2018-07-01

    The lack of specificity in neuroimaging studies of neurological and psychiatric diseases suggests that these different diseases have more in common than is generally considered. Potentially, features that are secondary effects of different pathological processes may share common neurobiological underpinnings. Intriguingly, many of these mechanisms are also observed in studies of normal (i.e., non-pathological) brain ageing. Different brain diseases may be causing premature or accelerated ageing to the brain, an idea that is supported by a line of "brain ageing" research that combines neuroimaging data with machine learning analysis. In reviewing this field, I conclude that such observations could have important implications, suggesting that we should shift experimental paradigm: away from characterizing the average case-control brain differences resulting from a disease toward methods that place individuals in their age-appropriate context. This will also lead naturally to clinical applications, whereby neuroimaging can contribute to a personalized-medicine approach to improve brain health. © 2018 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A new treatment method for brain diseases. Stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with stereotactic radiosurgery, a novel medical treatment technique for brain diseases. It is the most sophisticated modality that allows the functional preservation. Recently, CT scan and MRI scan have dramatically changed the diagnostic accuracy of tumor localization in the brain. A device named stereotactic head fixation system makes it possible to localize deep-seated brain diseases with an accuracy of 1-1.5 mm. Using multiple convergent narrow beams of high-energy X-ray, a stereotactic head frame, and a three dimensional computer graphics of CT images, patients with deep-seated nidus can be treated without any complications. Normal tissues would not receive large doses but the center of the nidus is irradiated heavily because of the convergence of X-ray beams. Thus stereotactic radiosurgery is more accurate, effective, and less toxic than conventional radiotherapy and is safer and more effective than surgery for many brain diseases. Small arteriovenous malformation in the brain, which is a fetal disease, and small acoustic neurinomas, in which surgery often causes facial nerve palsy and hearing loss, are presented as good candidates for radiosurgery. For metastatic brain tumors, stereotactic radiosurgery makes such patients free from neurological symptoms, such as difficulty in walking and speaking, in a few days. (N.K.)

  1. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skehan, S.; Norris, S.; Hegarty, J.; Owens, A.; MacErlaine, D.

    1997-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs

  3. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease patients, changes in glucose transporter function and expression have been observed, but a possible link between the altered glucose transporter function and disease progress is missing. Future recognition of the role of new glucose transporter isoforms in the brain may provide a better understanding of brain glucose metabolism in normal and disease states. Elucidation of clinical pathological mechanisms related to glucose transport and metabolism may provide common links to the etiology of these two diseases. Considering these facts, in this review we provide a current understanding of the vital roles of a variety of glucose transporters in the normal, diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease brain. PMID:23202918

  4. Cholesterol in brain disease: sometimes determinant and frequently implicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Mauricio G; Pfrieger, Frank; Dotti, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential for neuronal physiology, both during development and in the adult life: as a major component of cell membranes and precursor of steroid hormones, it contributes to the regulation of ion permeability, cell shape, cell–cell interaction, and transmembrane signaling. Consistently, hereditary diseases with mutations in cholesterol-related genes result in impaired brain function during early life. In addition, defects in brain cholesterol metabolism may contribute to neurological syndromes, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), and Parkinson's disease (PD), and even to the cognitive deficits typical of the old age. In these cases, brain cholesterol defects may be secondary to disease-causing elements and contribute to the functional deficits by altering synaptic functions. In the first part of this review, we will describe hereditary and non-hereditary causes of cholesterol dyshomeostasis and the relationship to brain diseases. In the second part, we will focus on the mechanisms by which perturbation of cholesterol metabolism can affect synaptic function. PMID:25223281

  5. Energy metabolism and inflammation in brain aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Patil, Ishan; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    The high energy demand of the brain renders it sensitive to changes in energy fuel supply and mitochondrial function. Deficits in glucose availability and mitochondrial function are well-known hallmarks of brain aging and are particularly accentuated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. As important cellular sources of H 2 O 2 , mitochondrial dysfunction is usually associated with altered redox status. Bioenergetic deficits and chronic oxidative stress are both major contributors to cognitive decline associated with brain aging and Alzheimer's disease. Neuroinflammatory changes, including microglial activation and production of inflammatory cytokines, are observed in neurodegenerative diseases and normal aging. The bioenergetic hypothesis advocates for sequential events from metabolic deficits to propagation of neuronal dysfunction, to aging, and to neurodegeneration, while the inflammatory hypothesis supports microglia activation as the driving force for neuroinflammation. Nevertheless, growing evidence suggests that these diverse mechanisms have redox dysregulation as a common denominator and connector. An independent view of the mechanisms underlying brain aging and neurodegeneration is being replaced by one that entails multiple mechanisms coordinating and interacting with each other. This review focuses on the alterations in energy metabolism and inflammatory responses and their connection via redox regulation in normal brain aging and Alzheimer's disease. Interaction of these systems is reviewed based on basic research and clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss of brain function - liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatic coma; Encephalopathy - hepatic; Hepatic encephalopathy; Portasystemic encephalopathy ... 2017:417-421. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal ... of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  7. Influence of cerebrovascular disease on brain networks in prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Liu, Siwei; Loke, Yng Miin; Hilal, Saima; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Xu, Xin; Tan, Boon Yeow; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Zhou, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Network-sensitive neuroimaging methods have been used to characterize large-scale brain network degeneration in Alzheimer's disease and its prodrome. However, few studies have investigated the combined effect of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease on brain network degeneration. Our study sought to examine the intrinsic functional connectivity and structural covariance network changes in 235 prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. We focused particularly on two higher-order cognitive networks-the default mode network and the executive control network. We found divergent functional connectivity and structural covariance patterns in Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. Alzheimer's disease patients without cerebrovascular disease, but not Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease, showed reductions in posterior default mode network functional connectivity. By comparison, while both groups exhibited parietal reductions in executive control network functional connectivity, only Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease showed increases in frontal executive control network connectivity. Importantly, these distinct executive control network changes were recapitulated in prodromal Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease. Across Alzheimer's disease patients with and without cerebrovascular disease, higher default mode network functional connectivity z-scores correlated with greater hippocampal volumes while higher executive control network functional connectivity z-scores correlated with greater white matter changes. In parallel, only Alzheimer's disease patients without cerebrovascular disease showed increased default mode network structural covariance, while only Alzheimer's disease patients with cerebrovascular disease showed increased executive control network structural covariance compared to controls. Our

  8. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Brock, Birgitte; Egefjord, Lærke

    2017-01-01

    There are fewer than normal glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). When reduced expression of transporters aggravates the symptoms of AD, the transporters become a potential target of therapy. The incretin hormone GLP-1 prevents the decline of cerebral...... metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) in AD, and GLP-1 may serve to raise transporter numbers. We hypothesized that the GLP-1 analog liraglutide would prevent the decline of CMRglc in AD by raising blood-brain glucose transfer, depending on the duration of disease. We randomized 38 patients with AD...

  9. MRI of the brain and craniocervical junction in Morquio's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.G.; Chadderton, R.D.; Cowie, R.A.; Wraith, J.E.; Jenkins, J.P.R.

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed MRI of the brain and cervical spine in 11 patients with Morquio's disease. No abnormality was seen in the brain. The odontoid peg was abnormal in all patients, with varying degrees of cord compression due to an anterior soft tissue mass and indentation by the posterior arch of the atlas. The degree of cord compression was more marked than suggested by the symptoms and signs. We recommend MRI of the cervical spine in children with Morquio's disease before the development of neurological symptoms, to optimise the timing and type of surgical intervention. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Changes in brain glucose metabolism in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonté, M A; Garibotto, V; Spagnolo, F; Panzacchi, A; Picozzi, P; Franzin, A; Giovannini, E; Leocani, L; Cursi, M; Comi, G; Perani, D

    2012-07-01

    Despite its large clinical application, our understanding about the mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is still limited. Aim of the present study was to explore cortical and subcortical metabolic modulations measured by Positron Emission Tomography associated with improved motor manifestations after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease, comparing the ON and OFF conditions. Investigations were performed in the stimulator off- and on-conditions in 14 parkinsonian patients and results were compared with a group of matched healthy controls. The results were also used to correlate metabolic changes with the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. The comparisons using Statistical parametric mapping revealed a brain metabolic pattern typical of advanced Parkinson disease. The direct comparison in ON vs OFF condition showed mainly an increased metabolism in subthalamic regions, corresponding to the deep brain stimulation site. A positive correlation exists between neurostimulation clinical effectiveness and metabolic differences in ON and OFF state, including the primary sensorimotor, premotor and parietal cortices, anterior cingulate cortex. Deep brain stimulation seems to operate modulating the neuronal network rather than merely exciting or inhibiting basal ganglia nuclei. Correlations with Parkinson Disease cardinal features suggest that the improvement of specific motor signs associated with deep brain stimulation might be explained by the functional modulation, not only in the target region, but also in surrounding and remote connecting areas, resulting in clinically beneficial effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. White matter disease of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melville, G.E.; Fernandez, R.E.; Kishore, P.R.S.; Lee, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The white matter disorders that are discussed in this chapter are subdivided into those disorders within which there is breakdown of normal myelin, termed myelinoclastic, and those diseases involving either formation or maintenance of abnormal myeline, termed dysmyelinating. CT is a well-established technique for studying white matter disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive technique which has shown greater sensitivity to white matter abnormalities. However, because of the rarity of may white matter diseases coupled with limited availability of MR facilities, the MRI experience in evaluating these patients is not extensive yet. Some patients may not be suitable for MRI because of the longer period of patient immobility that is required to avoid motion artifacts

  12. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  13. [Inflammatory brain diseases in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungwitz, J; Voigt, W

    1984-06-01

    Over a period of twenty years all cases of inflammatory diseases treated in a neurological intensive-care unit were analysed in retrospective. For 90 cases of purulent bacterial meningitis, letality amounted to 30%. The need for agent-oriented, intensive early treatment is discussed. At a reduced incidence of tuberculosis, meningitis tuberculosa is generally neglected. In the majority of cases patients suffering from "encephalitic syndrome" make high demands on intensive-therapeutic concepts, including interdisciplinary cooperation, due to high complication-rates and lack of causal therapy. In 95 cases, letality also amounted to 30%.

  14. Clearance systems in the brain-implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasoff-Conway, Jenna M; Carare, Roxana O; Osorio, Ricardo S; Glodzik, Lidia; Butler, Tracy; Fieremans, Els; Axel, Leon; Rusinek, Henry; Nicholson, Charles; Zlokovic, Berislav V; Frangione, Blas; Blennow, Kaj; Ménard, Joël; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wisniewski, Thomas; de Leon, Mony J

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation of toxic protein aggregates-amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau tangles-is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ accumulation has been hypothesized to result from an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance; indeed, Aβ clearance seems to be impaired in both early and late forms of AD. To develop efficient strategies to slow down or halt AD, it is critical to understand how Aβ is cleared from the brain. Extracellular Aβ deposits can be removed from the brain by various clearance systems, most importantly, transport across the blood-brain barrier. Findings from the past few years suggest that astroglial-mediated interstitial fluid (ISF) bulk flow, known as the glymphatic system, might contribute to a larger portion of extracellular Aβ (eAβ) clearance than previously thought. The meningeal lymphatic vessels, discovered in 2015, might provide another clearance route. Because these clearance systems act together to drive eAβ from the brain, any alteration to their function could contribute to AD. An understanding of Aβ clearance might provide strategies to reduce excess Aβ deposits and delay, or even prevent, disease onset. In this Review, we describe the clearance systems of the brain as they relate to proteins implicated in AD pathology, with the main focus on Aβ.

  15. Diamox-enhanced brain SPECT in cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young

    2007-01-01

    Acute event in cerebrovascular disease is the second most common cause of death in Korea following cancer, and it can also cause serious neurologic deficits. Understanding of perfusion status is important for clinical applications in management of patients with cerebrovascular diseases, and then the attacks of ischemic neurologic symptoms and the risk of acute events can be reduced. Therefore, the normal vascular anatomy of brain, various clinical applications of acetazolamide-enhanced brain perfusion SPECT, including meaning and role of assessment of vascular reserve in carotid stenosis before procedure, in pediatric Moyamoya disease before and after operation, in prediction of development of hyperperfusion syndrome before procedure, and in prediction of vasospasm and of prognosis in subarachnoid hemorrhage were reviewed in this paper

  16. Adaptive deep brain stimulation in advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Simon; Pogosyan, Alex; Neal, Spencer; Zavala, Baltazar; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Ashkan, Keyoumars; FitzGerald, James; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Brown, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) could potentially be used to interact with pathological brain signals to intervene and ameliorate their effects in disease states. Here, we provide proof-of-principle of this approach by using a BCI to interpret pathological brain activity in patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD) and to use this feedback to control when therapeutic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is delivered. Our goal was to demonstrate that by personalizing and optimizing stimulation in real time, we could improve on both the efficacy and efficiency of conventional continuous DBS. We tested BCI-controlled adaptive DBS (aDBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in 8 PD patients. Feedback was provided by processing of the local field potentials recorded directly from the stimulation electrodes. The results were compared to no stimulation, conventional continuous stimulation (cDBS), and random intermittent stimulation. Both unblinded and blinded clinical assessments of motor effect were performed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Motor scores improved by 66% (unblinded) and 50% (blinded) during aDBS, which were 29% (p = 0.03) and 27% (p = 0.005) better than cDBS, respectively. These improvements were achieved with a 56% reduction in stimulation time compared to cDBS, and a corresponding reduction in energy requirements (p random intermittent stimulation. BCI-controlled DBS is tractable and can be more efficient and efficacious than conventional continuous neuromodulation for PD. Copyright © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  17. Brain metastasis from extramammary Paget's disease of the scrotum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Young; Yun, Suk-Jung; Lee, Ji-Shin; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Jang, Woo-Youl

    2014-04-01

    We present to our knowledge the first patient with histopathologically proven brain metastasis from extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) and discuss the effect of brain radiation therapy for this condition. A 68-year-old man presented to our hospital with headache and gait disturbance. Brain MRI showed multiple enhancing mass lesions, and two large cystic lesions in the left cerebellum. The patient had been diagnosed with scrotal Paget's disease 3 months previously but no further management had been performed due to his refusal. The patient underwent stereotactic aspiration and biopsy of the two large cystic lesions. A histopathological examination revealed that the tumor was a metastatic adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the tumor cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin 7 and moderately positive for carcinoembryonic antigen and gross cystic disease fluid protein 15. These findings were similar to those of his scrotal skin lesions and were consistent with metastatic EMPD. The patient underwent brain radiation therapy with a total radiation dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The patient improved neurologically so as to be self-ambulatory, and a mild improvement in the metastatic tumors was found on follow-up MRI. We had planned systemic chemotherapy, but the patient died of acute respiratory failure 2 months after radiation therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CARS microscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika; Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jakob; Li, Jia-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder currently without cure, characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques surrounded by dystrophic neurites. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms, biochemical analysis (protein immunoblot) of plaque extracts reveals that they consist of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides assembled as oligomers, protofibrils and aggregates. Their spatial distribution has been confirmed by Thioflavin-S or immuno-staining with fluorescence microscopy. However, it is increasingly understood that the protein aggregation is only one of several mechanism that causes neuronal dysfunction and death. This raises the need for a more complete biochemical analysis. In this study, we have complemented 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S and Aβ immuno-stained human AD plaques with CARS microscopy. We show that the chemical build-up of AD plaques is more complex and that Aβ staining does not provide the complete picture of the spatial distribution or the molecular composition of AD plaques. CARS images provide important complementary information to that obtained by fluorescence microscopy, motivating a broader introduction of CARS microscopy in the AD research field.

  19. Imaging of Brain Connectivity in Dementia: Clinical Implications for Diagnosis of its Underlying Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Meijboom (Rozanna)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIn this thesis we investigated the use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in identifying subtle brain abnormalities, associating brain abnormalities with disease symptomatology, and improving early (differential) diagnosis in several diseases underlying dementia.

  20. In vivo calcium imaging of the aging and diseased brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhoff, Gerhard; Busche, Marc A.; Garaschuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, in vivo calcium imaging became a powerful tool for studying brain function. With the use of two-photon microscopy and modern labelling techniques, it allows functional studies of individual living cells, their processes and their interactions within neuronal networks. In vivo calcium imaging is even more important for studying the aged brain, which is hard to investigate in situ due to the fragility of neuronal tissue. In this article, we give a brief overview of the techniques applicable to image aged rodent brain at cellular resolution. We use multicolor imaging to visualize specific cell types (neurons, astrocytes, microglia) as well as the autofluorescence of the ''aging pigment'' lipofuscin. Further, we illustrate an approach for simultaneous imaging of cortical cells and senile plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  1. Psychopathology of Time in Brain Disease and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cutting

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature on disturbance of time-sense in brain disease and schizophrenia is reviewed and the subjective experience of altered time-sense reported by 45 out of 350 personally interviewed schizophrenics is analyzed. A review of the literature on the effect of brain damage revealed that some phenomena (déjà vu, reduplication of time, altered tempo to events were linked with right hemisphere dysfunction, one phenomenon (incorrect sequencing of events was linked with left anterior brain damage, and others (disrupted “biological clock”, disturbed serise of rate of flow of current or past events could arise from subcortical as well as focal cortical damage. The sparse literature on disturbed time-sense in schizophrenia suggested that there was a shared psychopathology in this respect with right hemisphere dysfunction. The phenomena encountered in the 45 schizophrenics are described and classified.

  2. Altered resting state brain networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Göttlich

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra leading to dysfunctional cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical loops. In addition to the characteristic motor symptoms, PD patients often show cognitive impairments, affective changes and other non-motor symptoms, suggesting system-wide effects on brain function. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph-theory based analysis methods to investigate altered whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity in PD patients (n = 37 compared to healthy controls (n = 20. Global network properties indicated less efficient processing in PD. Analysis of brain network modules pointed to increased connectivity within the sensorimotor network, but decreased interaction of the visual network with other brain modules. We found lower connectivity mainly between the cuneus and the ventral caudate, medial orbitofrontal cortex and the temporal lobe. To identify regions of altered connectivity, we mapped the degree of intrinsic functional connectivity both on ROI- and on voxel-level across the brain. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients showed lower connectedness in the medial and middle orbitofrontal cortex. The degree of connectivity was also decreased in the occipital lobe (cuneus and calcarine, but increased in the superior parietal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, supramarginal gyrus and supplementary motor area. Our results on global network and module properties indicated that PD manifests as a disconnection syndrome. This was most apparent in the visual network module. The higher connectedness within the sensorimotor module in PD patients may be related to compensation mechanism in order to overcome the functional deficit of the striato-cortical motor loops or to loss of mutual inhibition between brain networks. Abnormal connectivity in the visual network may be related to adaptation and compensation processes as a consequence

  3. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The brain's default network: anatomy, function, and relevance to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Randy L; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R; Schacter, Daniel L

    2008-03-01

    Thirty years of brain imaging research has converged to define the brain's default network-a novel and only recently appreciated brain system that participates in internal modes of cognition. Here we synthesize past observations to provide strong evidence that the default network is a specific, anatomically defined brain system preferentially active when individuals are not focused on the external environment. Analysis of connectional anatomy in the monkey supports the presence of an interconnected brain system. Providing insight into function, the default network is active when individuals are engaged in internally focused tasks including autobiographical memory retrieval, envisioning the future, and conceiving the perspectives of others. Probing the functional anatomy of the network in detail reveals that it is best understood as multiple interacting subsystems. The medial temporal lobe subsystem provides information from prior experiences in the form of memories and associations that are the building blocks of mental simulation. The medial prefrontal subsystem facilitates the flexible use of this information during the construction of self-relevant mental simulations. These two subsystems converge on important nodes of integration including the posterior cingulate cortex. The implications of these functional and anatomical observations are discussed in relation to possible adaptive roles of the default network for using past experiences to plan for the future, navigate social interactions, and maximize the utility of moments when we are not otherwise engaged by the external world. We conclude by discussing the relevance of the default network for understanding mental disorders including autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease.

  5. How does brain insulin resistance develop in Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Fernanda G; Lourenco, Mychael V; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2014-02-01

    Compelling preclinical and clinical evidence supports a pathophysiological connection between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and diabetes. Altered metabolism, inflammation, and insulin resistance are key pathological features of both diseases. For many years, it was generally considered that the brain was insensitive to insulin, but it is now accepted that this hormone has central neuromodulatory functions, including roles in learning and memory, that are impaired in AD. However, until recently, the molecular mechanisms accounting for brain insulin resistance in AD have remained elusive. Here, we review recent evidence that sheds light on how brain insulin dysfunction is initiated at a molecular level and why abnormal insulin signaling culminates in synaptic failure and memory decline. We also discuss the cellular basis underlying the beneficial effects of stimulation of brain insulin signaling on cognition. Discoveries summarized here provide pathophysiological background for identification of novel molecular targets and for development of alternative therapeutic approaches in AD. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Ciregia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs can be classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles (MVs, and exosomes, based on their origin or size. Exosomes are the smallest and best characterized vesicles which derived from the endosomal system. These vesicles are released from many different cell types including neuronal cells and their functions in the nervous system are investigated. They have been proposed as novel means for intercellular communication, which takes part not only to the normal neuronal physiology but also to the transmission of pathogenic proteins. Indeed, exosomes are fundamental to assemble and transport proteins during development, but they can also transfer neurotoxic misfolded proteins in pathogenesis. The present review will focus on their roles in neurological diseases, specifically brain tumors, such as glioblastoma (GBM, neuroblastoma (NB, medulloblastoma (MB, and metastatic brain tumors and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Huntington, and Prion diseseases highlighting their involvement in spreading neurotoxicity, in therapeutics, and in pathogenesis.

  7. A Novel Human Body Area Network for Brain Diseases Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Xu, Tianlang

    2016-10-01

    Development of wireless sensor and mobile communication technology provide an unprecedented opportunity for realizing smart and interactive healthcare systems. Designing such systems aims to remotely monitor the health and diagnose the diseases for users. In this paper, we design a novel human body area network for brain diseases analysis, which is named BABDA. Considering the brain is one of the most complex organs in the human body, the BABDA system provides four function modules to ensure the high quality of the analysis result, which includes initial data collection, data correction, data transmission and comprehensive data analysis. The performance evaluation conducted in a realistic environment with several criteria shows the availability and practicability of the BABDA system.

  8. Microbiota-Brain-Gut Axis and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2017-10-17

    The purposes of this review were as follows: first, to provide an overview of the gut microbiota and its interactions with the gut and the central nervous system (the microbiota-gut-brain axis) in health, second, to review the relevance of this axis to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, and, finally, to assess the potential for microbiota-targeted therapies. Work on animal models has established the microbiota-gut-brain axis as a real phenomenon; to date, the evidence for its operation in man has been limited and has been confronted by considerable logistical challenges. Animal and translational models have incriminated a disturbed gut microbiota in a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson's disease; data from human studies is scanty. While a theoretical basis can be developed for the use of microbiota-directed therapies in neurodegenerative disorders, support is yet to come from high-quality clinical trials. In theory, a role for the microbiota-gut-brain axis is highly plausible; clinical confirmation is awaited.

  9. Clinical significance of I-123 IMP brain SPECT in children with brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takishima, Teruo; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari; Mamiya, Toshio; Takahashi, Taku; Kamano, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Noriko

    1990-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain using N-isopropyl p-I-123-iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) was performed in 43 children with suspected brain diseases. Forty-three children (25 males and 18 females), with an age range of 24 days-15 years (mean: 6.6 years), were included in the study. Six patients were subsequently diagnosed as normal. Early SPECT of the brain was performed 30 minutes after intravenous administration of 74-111 MBq (2-3 mCi) I-123 IMP using a rotating gamma camera equipped with a 30-degree slant hole and medium energy collimator. Transverse images were reconstructed by Shepp-Logan filtered back projection method with attenuation correction after spatial filtering using an 8th order Butterworth-Wiener filter. Findings of I-123 IMP SPECT were compared with those of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and electroencephalography (EEG). The results showed that in I-123 IMP SPECT, abnormality was found in 30 out of 37 children with brain diseases. The incidence of abnormal findings in the 37 patients was 81% in I-123 IMP SPECT, 61% in X-ray CT, and 78% in EEG; in both cryptogenic and secondary epilepsy, the incidence of abnormality was higher in I-123 IMP SPECT than in X-ray CT. (70% and 94% vs 50% and 81% respectively), and epileptic foci detected by EEG did not correspond with defects found using I-123 IMP SPECT in 27% of the patients; and in asphyxiated infants, a high incidence of abnormality was observed on both I-123 IMP SPECT (86%) and X-ray CT (86%). In conclusion, I-123 IMP SPECT is a clinically useful examination in children with brain disease. (author)

  10. Complement mRNA in the mammalian brain: responses to Alzheimer's disease and experimental brain lesioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S A; Lampert-Etchells, M; Pasinetti, G M; Rozovsky, I; Finch, C E

    1992-01-01

    This study describes evidence in the adult human and rat brain for mRNAs that encode two complement (C) proteins, C1qB and C4. C proteins are important effectors of humoral immunity and inflammation in peripheral tissues but have not been considered as normally present in brain. Previous immunocytochemical studies showed that C proteins are associated with plaques, tangles, and dystrophic neurites in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but their source is unknown. Combined immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization techniques show C4 mRNA in pyramidal neurons and C1qB mRNA in microglia. Primary rat neuron cultures also show C1qB mRNA. In the cortex from AD brains, there were two- to threefold increases of C1qB mRNA and C4 mRNA, and increased C1qB mRNA prevalence was in part associated with microglia. As a model for AD, we examined entorhinal cortex perforant path transection in the rat brain, which caused rapid increases of C1qB mRNA in the ipsilateral, but not contralateral, hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. The role of brain-derived acute and chronic C induction during AD and experimental lesions can now be considered in relation to functions of C proteins that pertain to cell degeneration and/or cell preservation and synaptic plasticity.

  11. Interpersonal traits change as a function of disease type and severity in degenerative brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollberger, Marc; Neuhaus, John; Ketelle, Robin; Stanley, Christine M; Beckman, Victoria; Growdon, Matthew; Jang, Jung; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P

    2011-07-01

    Different degenerative brain diseases result in distinct personality changes as a result of divergent patterns of brain damage; however, little is known about the natural history of these personality changes throughout the course of each disease. To investigate how interpersonal traits change as a function of degenerative brain disease type and severity. Using the Interpersonal Adjective Scales, informant ratings of retrospective premorbid and current scores for dominance, extraversion, warmth and ingenuousness were collected annually for 1 to 4 years on 188 patients (67 behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 40 semantic dementia (SemD), 81 Alzheimer's disease (AD)) and 65 older healthy controls. Using random coefficient models, interpersonal behaviour scores at very mild, mild or moderate-to-severe disease stages were compared within and between patient groups. Group-level changes from premorbid personality occurred as a function of disease type and severity, and were apparent even at a very mild disease stage (Clinical Dementia Rating=0.5) for all three diseases. Decreases in interpersonal traits were associated with emotional affiliation (ie, extraversion, warmth and ingenuousness) and more rigid interpersonal behaviour differentiated bvFTD and SemD patients from AD patients. Specific changes in affiliative interpersonal traits differentiate degenerative brain diseases even at a very mild disease stage, and patterns of personality change differ across bvFTD, SemD and AD with advancing disease. This study describes the typical progression of change of interpersonal traits in each disease, improving the ability of clinicians and caregivers to predict and plan for symptom progression.

  12. Characteristics of Brain Perfusion in Patients of Parkinson's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Jae Woo; Kang, Young Kang

    2008-01-01

    It was well known that cerebral blood perfusion is normal or diffusely decreased in the majority of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Actually we interpreted brain perfusion SPECT images of PD patients in the clinical situation, we observed various cerebral perfusion patterns in patients with PD. So we performed brain perfusion SPECT to know the brain perfusion patterns of PD patients and the difference of perfusion patterns according to the sex and the age. Also we classified PD patients into small groups based on the brain perfusion pattern. Two hundred nineteen patients (M: 70, F: 149, mean age: 62.9±6.9 y/o) who were diagnosed as PD without dementia clinically and 55 patients (M: 15, F: 40, mean age: 61.4±9.2 y/o) as normal controls who had no past illness history were performed 99m Tc-HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT and neuropsychological test. At first, we compared all patients with PD and normal controls. Brain perfusion in left inferior frontal gyrus, left insula, left transverse temporal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left superior parietal lobule, right precuneus, right caudate tail were lower in patients with PD than normal controls. Secondly, we compared male and female patients with PD and normal controls, respectively. Brain perfusion SPECT showed more decreased cerebral perfusion in left hemisphere than right side in both male and female patients compared to normal controls. And there was larger hypoperfusion area in female patients compared with male. Thirdly, we classified patients with PD and normal controls into 4 groups according to the age and compared brain perfusion respectively. In patient below fifties, brain perfusion in both occipitoparietal and left temporal lobe were lower in PD group. As the patients with PD grew older, hypoperfusion area were shown in both frontal, temporal and limbic lobes. Fourthly, We were able to divide patients into small groups based on cerebral perfusion pattern. There was normal cerebral blood

  13. Sleep disorders of Whipple's disease of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, P K; Goh, J

    2015-02-01

    To understand the effects of Whipple's disease (WD) of the brain on sleep function. Clinical and polysomnographic studies of two patients with severe disruption of sleep due to WD: a 48-year-old female with primary WD of the brain and a 41-year-old male with secondary WD of the brain. The patient with primary WD had hypersomnolence with severe obstructive sleep apnoea, reduced sleep efficiency, frequent waking and sleep fragmentation. The patient with secondary WD was also hypersomnolent with oculomastictory myorhythmia. He was shown to have severe sleep initiation insomnia with poor sleep efficiency, severe obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea and oculomasticatory myorhythmia at sleep-wake transitions. WD of the brain may affect sleep biology in its primary and secondary forms leading to hypersomnolence from obstructive sleep apnoea, sleep fragmentation, reduced sleep efficiency, sleep initiation insomnia and intrusive oculomasticatory myorhythmia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Imaging of demyelinating and degenerative diseases of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drayer, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    The emergence of cross-sectional brain imaging in the past decade has greatly expanded the role of imaging as a primary diagnostic modality for demyelinating and degenerative brain disorders. To remain an effective neurologic consultant, the radiologist must better understand the neuropathology and functional significance of these disorders. MR imaging has become the dominant imaging modality for multiple sclerosis and all demyelinating and dysmyelinating disorders. Detection is most sensitive with intermediate and T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Although increased signal intensity in the white matter is a sensitive but nonspecific finding, a knowledge of the patient's history and disease pathoanatomy greatly improves diagnostic specificity. Since an increasing proportion of the population is over 65 years of age, the distinction of normal versus pathologic aging becomes critical. The role of imaging in dementing illness is to distinguish primary degenerative dementia from normal aging changes, vascular medullary artery distribution disease, microangiopathic leukoencephalopathy, communicating hydrocephalus, and mass lesions. The role of MR imaging, including brain iron mapping, is analyzed in bradykinetic, choreiform, and dystonic disorders. The complications of chronic ethanol abuse, including vermian atrophy, central pontine myelinolysis, and Wernicke encephalopathy, are also reviewed

  15. Imaging neuroreceptors in the human brain in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Dannals, R.F.; Frost, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    For nearly a century it has been known that chemical activity accompanies mental activity, but only recently has it been possible to begin to examine its exact nature. Positron-emitting radioactive tracers have made it possible to study the chemistry of the human brain in health and disease, using chiefly cyclotron-produced radionuclides, carbon-11, fluorine-18 and oxygen-15. It is now well established that measurable increases in regional cerebral blood flow, and glucose and oxygen metabolism accompany the mental functions of perception, cognition, emotion and motion. On 25 May 1983 the first imaging of a neuroreceptor in the human brain was accomplished with carbon-11 N-methyl spiperone, a ligand that binds preferentially to dopamine-2 receptors, 80% of which are located in the caudate nucleus and putamen. Quantitative imaging of serotonin-2, opiate, benzodiazapine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors has subsequently been accomplished. In studies of normal men and women, it has been found that dopamine and serotonin receptor activity decreases dramatically with age, such a decrease being more pronounced in men than in women and greater in the case of dopamine-2 receptors than in serotonin-2 receptors. Preliminary studies of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders suggest that dopamine-2 receptor activity is diminished in the caudate nucleus of patients with Huntington's disease. Positron tomography permits a quantitative assay of picomolar quantities of neuroreceptors within the living human brain. Studies of patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, acute and chronic pain states and drug addiction are now in progress. (author)

  16. Metabolism of glucose in brain of patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, Fuji; Ando, Kazuya; Iio, Masaaki.

    1984-01-01

    We examined 11 C accumulation by positron emission computed tomography in the region of interest (ROI) in the brain of 8 patients with Parkinson's disease and 5 normal controls when administered with 11 C-glucose (per os). 11 C-glucose was prepared from 11 CO 2 by photosynthesis. 1) No significant difference was observed in the 11 C accumulation in the striatum and cerebral cortex (frontal cortex, temporal cortex and occipital cortex) in 4 patients with Parkinson's disease between continuous medication and 7--10 day interruption of medication. 2) No difference was observed in the 11 C accumulation in the striatum and cerebral cortex between 8 patients with Parkinson's disease and 5 normal controls. (author)

  17. Wilson's disease: start with psychiatric symptoms. Brain magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, Jorge; Miralles, Sabrina

    2007-01-01

    Wilson's disease - hepatolenticular degeneration - is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder, characterized by an excessive and toxic accumulation of cooper in different tissues. This accumulation is produced by an inherited defect in cooper's biliary excretion. This rare disorder affects approximately one on 30.000 individuals. Signs and symptoms of hepatic, neurologic and psychiatric disease are the most common clinical presentations of symptomatic Wilson's disease. The diagnosis can usually be made by laboratory tests that find a decreased cooper binding protein in blood called ceruloplasmin, an increase in the excretion of cooper in 24 hour urine and the appearance of corneal Kayser-Fleischer ring. We present a 28 years patient who began with depression and panic attacks, followed by neurologic symptoms. Brain MRI was performed and showed different alterations suggesting the diagnosis of this infrequent sickness. (author) [es

  18. Aging leads to altered microglial function that reduces brain resiliency increasing vulnerability to neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, Paula C; Flowers, Antwoine; Grimmig, Bethany

    2017-08-01

    Aging is the primary risk factor for many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, understanding the basic biological changes that take place with aging that lead to the brain being less resilient to disease progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease or insults to the brain such as stroke or traumatic brain injuries. Clearly this will not cure the disease per se, yet increasing the ability of the brain to respond to injury could improve long term outcomes. The focus of this review is examining changes in microglia with age and possible therapeutic interventions involving the use of polyphenol rich dietary supplements. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Changes in spontaneous brain activity in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Zhang, Min-Ming; Zheng, Xu-Ning; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-09

    Resting state brain activity can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of the present study was (a) to investigate abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in early PD patients using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with a regional homogeneity (ReHo) method and (b) to demonstrate the potential of using changes in abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity for monitoring the progression of PD during its early stages. Seventeen early PD patients were assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hoehn and Yahr disability scale and the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) were compared with seventeen gender- and age-matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent MRI scans using a 1.5T General Electric Signa Excite II scanner. The MRI scan protocol included whole-brain volumetric imaging using a 3D inversion recovery prepared (IR-Prep) fast spoiled gradient-echo pulse sequence and 2D multi-slice (22 axial slices covering the whole brain) resting-state fMRI using an echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence. Images were analyzed in SPM5 together with a ReHo algorithm using the in-house software program REST. A corrected threshold of pbrain regions, including the left cerebellum, left parietal lobe, right middle temporal lobe, right sub-thalamic nucleus areas, right superior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus (MFG), right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), right precuneus lobe, left MFG and left IPL. Additionally, significantly reduced ReHo was also observed in the early PD patients in the following brain regions: the left putamen, left inferior frontal gyrus, right hippocampus, right anterior cingulum, and bilateral lingual gyrus. Moreover, in PD patients, ReHo in the left putamen was negatively correlated with the UPDRS scores (r=-0.69). These results indicate that the abnormal resting state spontaneous brain activity associated with patients with early PD can be revealed by Reho analysis. Copyright

  20. Brain-Eating Amoebae: Predilection Sites in the Brain and Disease Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Timothy Yu Yee; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acanthamoeba spp. and Balamuthia mandrillaris are causative agents of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE), while Naegleria fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). PAM is an acute infection that lasts a few days, while GAE is a chronic to subacute infection that can last up to several months. Here, we present a literature review of 86 case reports from 1968 to 2016, in order to explore the affinity of these amoebae for particular sites of the brain, diagnostic modalities, treatment options, and disease outcomes in a comparative manner. PMID:28404683

  1. Genetic biomarkers for brain hemisphere differentiation in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Mou'ath; Mendes, Alexandre; Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2007-11-01

    This work presents a study on the genetic profile of the left and right hemispheres of the brain of a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The goal is to characterize, in a genetic basis, PD as a disease that affects these two brain regions in different ways. Using the same whole-genome microarray expression data introduced by Brown et al. (2002) [1], we could find significant differences in the expression of some key genes, well-known to be involved in the mechanisms of dopamine production control and PD. The problem of selecting such genes was modeled as the MIN (α,β)—FEATURE SET problem [2]; a similar approach to that employed previously to find biomarkers for different types of cancer using gene expression microarray data [3]. The Feature Selection method produced a series of genetic signatures for PD, with distinct expression profiles in the Parkinson's model and control mice experiments. In addition, a close examination of the genes composing those signatures shows that many of them belong to genetic pathways or have ontology annotations considered to be involved in the onset and development of PD. Such elements could provide new clues on which mechanisms are implicated in hemisphere differentiation in PD.

  2. Inflaming the diseased brain: a role for tainted melanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeitner, T M; Kalogiannis, M; Patrick, P A; Gomolin, I; Palaia, T; Ragolia, L; Brand, D; Delikatny, E J

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases, but the irritants responsible for this response remain largely unknown. This report addressed the hypothesis that hypochlorous acid reacts with dopamine to produce melanic precipitates that promote cerebral inflammation. Spectrophotometric studies demonstrated that nM amounts of HOCl and dopamine react within seconds. A second-order rate constant for the reaction of HOCl and dopamine of 2.5 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) was obtained by measuring loss of dopaminergic fluorescence due to HOCl. Gravimetric measurements, electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and a novel use of flow cytometry confirmed that the major product of this reaction is a precipitate with an average diameter of 1.5 μm. Flow cytometry was also used to demonstrate the preferential reaction of HOCl with dopamine rather than albumin. Engulfment of the chlorodopamine particulates by phagocytes in vitro caused these cells to release TNFα and die. Intrastriatal administration of 10(6) particles also increased the content of TNFα in the brain and led to a 50% loss of the dopaminergic neurons in the nigra. These studies indicate that HOCl and dopamine react quickly and preferentially with each other to produce particles that promote inflammation and neuronal death in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Tatjana; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of control cases, the most pronounced ODC immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus. In possible and definite AD the immunoreactivity had shifted to the cytoplasm. In cerebellum of control cases, ODC staining was found in a small portion of Purkinje cells, mostly in the nucleus. In AD, both possible and definite, the number of stained Purkinje cells increased significantly and immunoreactivity was shifted to the cytoplasm, even though it was still prominent in the nucleus. In conclusion, our study reveals an early shift of the ODC immunoreactivity in AD from the nuclear compartment towards the cytoplasm

  4. Dendritic protein synthesis in the normal and diseased brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Bassell, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a spatially-limited process that requires a precise, yet dynamic, complement of proteins within the synaptic micro-domain. The maintenance and regulation of these synaptic proteins is regulated, in part, by local mRNA translation in dendrites. Protein synthesis within the postsynaptic compartment allows neurons tight spatial and temporal control of synaptic protein expression, which is critical for proper functioning of synapses and neural circuits. In this review, we discuss the identity of proteins synthesized within dendrites, the receptor-mediated mechanisms regulating their synthesis, and the possible roles for these locally synthesized proteins. We also explore how our current understanding of dendritic protein synthesis in the hippocampus can be applied to new brain regions and to understanding the pathological mechanisms underlying varied neurological diseases. PMID:23262237

  5. Expression of novel Alzheimer's disease risk genes in control and Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste M Karch

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD etiology is influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors. Large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS for LOAD have identified 10 novel risk genes: ABCA7, BIN1, CD2AP, CD33, CLU, CR1, EPHA1, MS4A6A, MS4A6E, and PICALM. We sought to measure the influence of GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and gene expression levels on clinical and pathological measures of AD in brain tissue from the parietal lobe of AD cases and age-matched, cognitively normal controls. We found that ABCA7, CD33, and CR1 expression levels were associated with clinical dementia rating (CDR, with higher expression being associated with more advanced cognitive decline. BIN1 expression levels were associated with disease progression, where higher expression was associated with a delayed age at onset. CD33, CLU, and CR1 expression levels were associated with disease status, where elevated expression levels were associated with AD. Additionally, MS4A6A expression levels were associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque scores, with elevated expression levels being associated with more advanced brain pathology. We failed to detect an association between GWAS SNPs and gene expression levels in our brain series. The minor allele of rs3764650 in ABCA7 is associated with age at onset and disease duration, and the minor allele of rs670139 in MS4A6E was associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque score. These findings suggest that expression of some GWAS genes, namely ABCA7, BIN1, CD33, CLU, CR1 and the MS4A family, are altered in AD brains.

  6. [Theoretic basis on the same therapeutic program for different degenerative brain diseases in terms of the Governor Vessel: Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junyan; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Junlong

    2015-05-01

    Through the consultation of TCM ancient classical theory, the relationship of kidney essence, marrow and brain is analyzed. It is discovered that the degenerative brain diseases, represented by Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) share the same etiological basis as "kidney essence deficiency and brain marrow emptiness" and have the mutual pathological outcomes as yang qi declining. The Governor Vessel gathers yang qi of the whole body and maintains the normal functional activity of zangfu organs in the human body through the storage, regulation and invigoration of yang qi. It is viewed that the theory of the Governor Vessel is applied to treat the different degenerative brain diseases, which provides the theoretic support and practice guide for the thought of TCM as the same therapeutic program for the different diseases. As a result, the degenerative brain diseases can be retarded and the approach is provided to the effective prevention and treatment of degenerative diseases in central nerve system:

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors.

  8. Brain disease, connectivity, plasticity and cognitive therapy: A neurological view of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrini, G; Martín-Montes, A; Díez-Ascaso, O; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2018-04-01

    Our conception of the mind-brain relationship has evolved from the traditional idea of dualism to current evidence that mental functions result from brain activity. This paradigm shift, combined with recent advances in neuroimaging, has led to a novel definition of brain functioning in terms of structural and functional connectivity. The purpose of this literature review is to describe the relationship between connectivity, brain lesions, cerebral plasticity, and functional recovery. Assuming that brain function results from the organisation of the entire brain in networks, brain dysfunction would be a consequence of altered brain network connectivity. According to this approach, cognitive and behavioural impairment following brain damage result from disrupted functional organisation of brain networks. However, the dynamic and versatile nature of these circuits makes recovering brain function possible. Cerebral plasticity allows for functional reorganisation leading to recovery, whether spontaneous or resulting from cognitive therapy, after brain disease. Current knowledge of brain connectivity and cerebral plasticity provides new insights into normal brain functioning, the mechanisms of brain damage, and functional recovery, which in turn serve as the foundations of cognitive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Infectious diseases of brain parenchyma in adults: imaging and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehnel, S.; Kress, B.; Stippich, C.; Sartor, K.; Seitz, A.; Storch-Hagenlocher, B.; Forsting, M.; Jansen, O.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious diseases of the central nervous system have often to be considered in differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging, specifically advanced techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI and perfusion MRI contribute much to the differentiation of various brain infections and to delineation of brain infections from other, for instance, neoplastic diseases. In this review we present the imaging criteria for the most important brain infections in adults and discuss in detail differential diagnostic aspects. (orig.)

  10. Infectious diseases of the brain: imaging and differential diagnosis; Infektioese Hirnerkrankungen: Bildgebung und differenzialdiagnostische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, S.; Seitz, A. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany); Storch-Hagenlocher, B. [Abt. Neurologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Infectious diseases of the central nervous system have to be considered in differential diagnosis particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuro-imaging, specifically advanced techniques such as diffusion weighted MRI and perfusion MRI contribute much to the differentiation of brain infections and for differentiating brain infections from other, for instance, neoplastic diseases. In this review we present the imaging criteria of the most important brains infections in adults and in pediatric patients and discuss differential diagnostic aspects in detail. (orig.)

  11. MRI/MRA evaluation of sickle cell disease of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a major cause of pediatric stroke. Understanding the disease that affects the brain as infarctions, both clinically apparent and silent, requires an understanding of how the blood vessels are affected, the way in which both the brain and the blood vessels are imaged by MRI and MRA and the mechanism of injury. (orig.)

  12. Systems pharmacology and blood-brain barrier functionality in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravenstijn, Paulien Gerarda Maria

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, which is composed of many components, each caused by interplay of a number of genetic and nongenetic causes. As the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key player in the relationship between plasma and brain pharmacokinetics, the influences

  13. Clinicoelectrophysiologic and magnetoresonance and tomographic investigation of hereditary and congenital diseases of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalov, I.I.; Pikuza, O.I.; Idrisova, L.G.; Uryvskij, V.I.

    1996-01-01

    The combined investigation of hereditary and congenital diseases of the brain using magnetoresonance tomography is performed. The hereditary and congenital diseases of the brain accompanied by disorders of liquoroconductive tracts with medullary substance lesion are revealed. The investigation results provide timely development of the treatment tactics and rehabilitation of sick children. Refs. 3

  14. Brain imaging and cognitive dysfunctions in Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Alonso; Price, Bruce H.; Menear, Matthew; Lepage, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Recent decades have seen tremendous growth in our understanding of the cognitive dysfunctions observed in Huntington's disease (HD). Advances in neuroimaging have contributed greatly to this growth. We reviewed the role that structural and functional neuroimaging techniques have played in elucidating the cerebral bases of the cognitive deficits associated with HD. We conducted a computer-based search using PubMed and PsycINFO databases to retrieve studies of patients with HD published between 1965 and December 2004 that reported measures on cognitive tasks and used neuroimaging techniques. Structural neuroimaging has provided important evidence of morphological brain changes in HD. Striatal and cortical atrophy are the most common findings, and they correlate with cognitive deficits in attention, working memory and executive functions. Functional studies have also demonstrated correlations between striatal dysfunction and cognitive performance. Striatal hypoperfusion and decreased glucose utilization correlate with executive dysfunction. Hypometabolism also occurs throughout the cerebral cortex and correlates with performance on recognition memory, language and perceptual tests. Measures of presynaptic and postsynaptic dopamine biochemistry have also correlated with measurements of episodic memory, speed of processing and executive functioning. Aided by the results of numerous neuroimaging studies, it is becoming increasingly clear that cognitive deficits in HD involve abnormal connectivity between the basal ganglia and cortical areas. In the future, neuroimaging techniques may shed the most light on the pathophysiology of HD by defining neurodegenerative disease phenotypes as a valuable tool for knowing when patients become “symptomatic,” having been in a gene-positive presymptomatic state, and as a biomarker in following the disease, thereby providing a prospect for improved patient care. PMID:16496032

  15. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, S.; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Fujii, K.; Kakimi, S.; Mizutani, T.; Matsushima, H.; Ishikawa, A.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer's disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer's disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+ ) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si 2+ ) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease using 5 MeV Si 3+ microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  16. Presence of brain pathology in deceased subjects with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleutjens, Fiona A H M; Spruit, Martijn A; Beckervordersandforth, Jan; Franssen, Frits M E; Dijkstra, Jeanette B; Ponds, Rudolf W H M; Wouters, Emiel F B; Janssen, Daisy J A

    2015-11-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have extrapulmonary co-morbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal wasting and neuropsychological conditions. To date, it remains unknown whether and to what extent COPD is associated with a higher prevalence of brain pathology. Therefore, the aim of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of neuropathological brain changes between deceased donors with and without COPD. Brain autopsy reports of age-matched donors with (n = 89) and without COPD (n = 89) from the Netherlands Brain Bank were assessed for demographics, cause of death, co-morbidities and brain pathology. The prevalence of degenerative brain changes was comparable for donors with and without COPD (50.6% vs. 61.8%, p > 0.05). Neoplastic brain changes were reported in a minority of the donors (5.6% vs. 10.1%, p > 0.05). After correction for cerebrovascular accident or cardiac cause of death and Charlson co-morbidity index score, the prevalence of vascular brain changes was higher among control versus COPD donors (27.0% vs. 11.2%, adjusted p = 0.013, odds ratio = 2.98). Brain autopsy reports of donors with and without COPD did not reveal differences in the presence of degenerative or neoplastic brain changes. Vascular brain changes were described more often in controls. Prospective studies including spirometry and structural and functional brain imaging should corroborate our findings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Functional brain imaging of gastrointestinal sensation in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lukas Van Oudenhove; Steven J Coen; Qasim Aziz

    2007-01-01

    It has since long been known, from everyday experience as well as from animal and human studies, that psychological processes-both affective and cognitiveexert an influence on gastrointestinal sensorimotor function. More specifically, a link between psychological factors and visceral hypersensitivity has been suggested,mainly based on research in functional gastrointestinal disorder patients. However, until recently, the exact nature of this putative relationship remained unclear,mainly due to a lack of non-invasive methods to study the (neurobiological) mechanisms underlying this relationship in non-sleeping humans. As functional brain imaging, introduced in visceral sensory neuroscience some 10 years ago, does provide a method for in vivo study of brain-gut interactions, insight into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral sensation in general and the influence of psychological factors more particularly,has rapidly grown. In this article, an overview of brain imaging evidence on gastrointestinal sensation will be given, with special emphasis on the brain mechanisms underlying the interaction between affective & cognitive processes and visceral sensation. First, the reciprocal neural pathways between the brain and the gut (braingut axis) will be briefly outlined, including brain imaging evidence in healthy volunteers. Second, functional brain imaging studies assessing the influence of psychological factors on brain processing of visceral sensation in healthy humans will be discussed in more detail.Finally, brain imaging work investigating differences in brain responses to visceral distension between healthy volunteers and functional gastrointestinal disorder patients will be highlighted.

  18. The value of brain scanning in cerebro-vascular disease by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, G.; Emde, H.

    1980-01-01

    Brain scanning by scintigraphy and CT studies of the brain are complementary methods. The precise demonstration of the anatomy and the pathology of the brain by CT is supplemented by brain scintigraphy due to the latter's value to assess the hemodynamic properties of a lesion and thus provide important clues to its site and sometimes even its histology. This is especially true in vascular brain disease thus either dispensing the need for an invasive procedure such as angiography or providing information for a specific approach. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MKO [de

  19. Diagnostic evaluation of brain SPECT imaging in diseases of nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsheng, Jiang; Chengmo, Zhu; Jixian, Zhang; Weijia, Tian [Shanghai Second Medical Univ. (China). Ruijing Hospital

    1992-11-01

    The dynamic distributions of home made ECD and the Amersham brain SPECT imaging agent 'Ceretec' in normal person as well as their diagnostic use in diseases of nervous system were investigated. Semi-quantitative analysis combined with direct observation was more accurate for the diagnosis. Aside from cerebrovascular diseases, SPECT brain imaging has its unique value for the diagnosis of transient ischemic attack, Alzheimer disease, multiple ischemic dementia and epilepsy etc.

  20. Brain volumes predict neurodevelopment in adolescents after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rhein, Michael; Buchmann, Andreas; Hagmann, Cornelia; Huber, Reto; Klaver, Peter; Knirsch, Walter; Latal, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Patients with complex congenital heart disease are at risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. Evidence suggests that brain maturation can be delayed and pre- and postoperative brain injury may occur, and there is limited information on the long-term effect of congenital heart disease on brain development and function in adolescent patients. At a mean age of 13.8 years, 39 adolescent survivors of childhood cardiopulmonary bypass surgery with no structural brain lesions evident through conventional cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and 32 healthy control subjects underwent extensive neurodevelopmental assessment and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral scans were analysed quantitatively using surface-based and voxel-based morphometry. Compared with control subjects, patients had lower total brain (P = 0.003), white matter (P = 0.004) and cortical grey matter (P = 0.005) volumes, whereas cerebrospinal fluid volumes were not different. Regional brain volume reduction ranged from 5.3% (cortical grey matter) to 11% (corpus callosum). Adolescents with cyanotic heart disease showed more brain volume loss than those with acyanotic heart disease, particularly in the white matter, thalami, hippocampi and corpus callosum (all P-values Brain volume reduction correlated significantly with cognitive, motor and executive functions (grey matter: P < 0.05, white matter: P < 0.01). Our findings suggest that there are long-lasting cerebral changes in adolescent survivors of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease and that these changes are associated with functional outcome.

  1. Brain Chagas'disease: increasing differential diagnosis of brain mass in immunosuppressed patients - a case report and literature revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, Laercio Leitao; centola, Crescencio A.P.; Kakudate, Milton Y.

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a case of Chagas'disease as tumor-like lesion of the brain, in a patient with Aids, simulating the lesions most frequently found in these patients, as toxoplasmosis, lymphoma and cryptococcosis. Furthermore, the case reported have peculiarity to be the only with lesion documented in cerebellum, and unusual due to be secondary by reactivation of chronic Chagas disease. Moreover, emphasize analysis of cerebrospinal fluid with realization of sorologic tests to Chagas's disease, as simple as effective method, to make use of biopsy with stereotaxia in unfinished cases and bad evolution. Finally, after a wide world literature review about Chagas'disease as a tumor-like lesion of the brain, emphasizing this publication as the first written in a radiology journal of specialty. (author). 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Proteomics analyses for the global proteins in the brain tissues of different human prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi; Chen, Li-Na; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Cao; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Wang, Jing; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Proteomics changes of brain tissues have been described in different neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the brain proteomics of human prion disease remains less understood. In the study, the proteomics patterns of cortex and cerebellum of brain tissues of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD were analyzed with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography and MS analysis, with the brains from three normal individuals as controls. Global protein profiling, significant pathway, and functional categories were analyzed. In total, 2287 proteins were identified with quantitative information both in cortex and cerebellum regions. Cerebellum tissues appeared to contain more up- and down-regulated proteins (727 proteins) than cortex regions (312 proteins) of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD. Viral myocarditis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, lysosome, oxidative phosphorylation, protein export, and drug metabolism-cytochrome P450 were the most commonly affected pathways of the three kinds of diseases. Almost coincident biological functions were identified in the brain tissues of the three diseases. In all, data here demonstrate that the brain tissues of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD have obvious proteomics changes at their terminal stages, which show the similarities not only among human prion diseases but also with other neurodegeneration diseases. This is the first study to provide a reference proteome map for human prion diseases and will be helpful for future studies focused on potential biomarkers for the diagnosis and therapy of human prion diseases. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Brain insulin signaling and Alzheimer's disease: current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiöth, Helgi B; Craft, Suzanne; Brooks, Samantha J; Frey, William H; Benedict, Christian

    2012-08-01

    Insulin receptors in the brain are found in high densities in the hippocampus, a region that is fundamentally involved in the acquisition, consolidation, and recollection of new information. Using the intranasal method, which effectively bypasses the blood-brain barrier to deliver and target insulin directly from the nose to the brain, a series of experiments involving healthy humans has shown that increased central nervous system (CNS) insulin action enhances learning and memory processes associated with the hippocampus. Since Alzheimer's disease (AD) is linked to CNS insulin resistance, decreased expression of insulin and insulin receptor genes and attenuated permeation of blood-borne insulin across the blood-brain barrier, impaired brain insulin signaling could partially account for the cognitive deficits associated with this disease. Considering that insulin mitigates hippocampal synapse vulnerability to amyloid beta and inhibits the phosphorylation of tau, pharmacological strategies bolstering brain insulin signaling, such as intranasal insulin, could have significant therapeutic potential to deter AD pathogenesis.

  4. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    stages of repetitive brain trauma as well. Current methods of measure brain glutamate using proton spectroscopy is not specific to different cell...covering a representative range of clinical cases: a young female , young male , middle-aged male (all healthy volunteers) and a male patient with...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0412 TITLE: Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  6. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  7. The Diagnostic Value of Brain Scanning in the Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Won; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Choi, Kil Su; Son, Hyo Chung; Cho, Byung Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of the brain scanning and compare the diagnostic accuracy between the scan and carotid angiography. 109 cases which are proved by specific method to each disease, are analyzed to evaluate the diagnostic value of the brain scanning. The 70 cases among the proven 109 case are performed both the scanning and the arteriography and analyzed to compare the accuracy between the scanning and the arteriography. The results are as follows; 1) The diagnostic accuracy of the brain scanning in the diseases of the central nervous system is 64.2%. 2) The diagnostic accuracy of the brain scanning in the brain tumor is 88%, especially brain abscess, glioma, glioblastoma multiforme, meningioma and metastic tumor show high positive rate. 3) The diagnostic accuracy in the disease of the brain vessels is 54%. The comparison of the diagnostic value between the scanning and the arteriography is as follows;1) The diagnostic value in all diseases of the central nervous system is nearly equal. 2) The diagnostic accuracy in the intracranial tumor is slightly higher in the brain scanning (90. 9%) than in the arteriography (81.8%). 3) The diagnostic accuracy in the disease of the brain vessel is higher in the arteriography (77.3%) than in the scanning (54.5%). 5) The diagnostic value when combining the scanning and the arteriography, is 83% in the all central nervous system-lesions, 97% in the cranial tumor and 81.8% in the disease of the central nervous system-vessel. The brain scanning is simple and safe procedure, and moreover has excellent diagnostic value in the diagnosis of the central nervous system lesion.

  8. The Diagnostic Value of Brain Scanning in the Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Won; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Choi, Kil Su; Son, Hyo Chung; Cho, Byung Kyu

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of the brain scanning and compare the diagnostic accuracy between the scan and carotid angiography. 109 cases which are proved by specific method to each disease, are analyzed to evaluate the diagnostic value of the brain scanning. The 70 cases among the proven 109 case are performed both the scanning and the arteriography and analyzed to compare the accuracy between the scanning and the arteriography. The results are as follows; 1) The diagnostic accuracy of the brain scanning in the diseases of the central nervous system is 64.2%. 2) The diagnostic accuracy of the brain scanning in the brain tumor is 88%, especially brain abscess, glioma, glioblastoma multiforme, meningioma and metastic tumor show high positive rate. 3) The diagnostic accuracy in the disease of the brain vessels is 54%. The comparison of the diagnostic value between the scanning and the arteriography is as follows;1) The diagnostic value in all diseases of the central nervous system is nearly equal. 2) The diagnostic accuracy in the intracranial tumor is slightly higher in the brain scanning (90. 9%) than in the arteriography (81.8%). 3) The diagnostic accuracy in the disease of the brain vessel is higher in the arteriography (77.3%) than in the scanning (54.5%). 5) The diagnostic value when combining the scanning and the arteriography, is 83% in the all central nervous system-lesions, 97% in the cranial tumor and 81.8% in the disease of the central nervous system-vessel. The brain scanning is simple and safe procedure, and moreover has excellent diagnostic value in the diagnosis of the central nervous system lesion.

  9. Lymphatic drainage system of the brain: A novel target for intervention of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Liang; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Tuo; Sun, Jing-Yi; Mao, Lei-Lei; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Colvin, Robert A; Yang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-09-10

    The belief that the vertebrate brain functions normally without classical lymphatic drainage vessels has been held for many decades. On the contrary, new findings show that functional lymphatic drainage does exist in the brain. The brain lymphatic drainage system is composed of basement membrane-based perivascular pathway, a brain-wide glymphatic pathway, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage routes including sinus-associated meningeal lymphatic vessels and olfactory/cervical lymphatic routes. The brain lymphatic systems function physiological as a route of drainage for interstitial fluid (ISF) from brain parenchyma to nearby lymph nodes. Brain lymphatic drainage helps maintain water and ion balance of the ISF, waste clearance, and reabsorption of macromolecular solutes. A second physiological function includes communication with the immune system modulating immune surveillance and responses of the brain. These physiological functions are influenced by aging, genetic phenotypes, sleep-wake cycle, and body posture. The impairment and dysfunction of the brain lymphatic system has crucial roles in age-related changes of brain function and the pathogenesis of neurovascular, neurodegenerative, and neuroinflammatory diseases, as well as brain injury and tumors. In this review, we summarize the key component elements (regions, cells, and water transporters) of the brain lymphatic system and their regulators as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of neurologic diseases and their resulting complications. Finally, we highlight the clinical importance of ependymal route-based targeted gene therapy and intranasal drug administration in the brain by taking advantage of the unique role played by brain lymphatic pathways in the regulation of CSF flow and ISF/CSF exchange. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: COL4A1-related brain small-vessel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Intracerebral Hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Stroke MalaCards: col4a1-related brain small-vessel disease ...

  11. Insights into brain development and disease from neurogenetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-08

    Jul 8, 2014 ... powers of man could have evolved from those of higher animals. From a series of ... neuroanatomical level, the brains and central nervous sys- tems of higher .... Through their proliferative activity, neuroblasts each gen-.

  12. Brain-Gut-Microbe Communication in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sue eGrenham; Gerard eClarke; Gerard eClarke; John F Cryan; John F Cryan; Timothy G Dinan; Timothy G Dinan

    2011-01-01

    Bidirectional signalling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is regulated at neural, hormonal and immunological levels. This construct is known as the brain-gut axis and is vital for maintaining homeostasis. Bacterial colonisation of the intestine plays a major role in the post-natal development and maturation of the immune and endocrine systems. These processes are key factors underpinning central nervous system (CNS) signalling. Recent research advances have seen a tremendous i...

  13. The aging brain in patients with manifest arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, P.H. van der

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that cardiovascular disease and a high cardiovascular risk play an important role in the etiology of cognitive decline and dementia. As intermediates in this relation between cardiovascular disease and

  14. Altered Markers of Brain Development in Crohn's Disease with Extraintestinal Manifestations - A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne K Thomann

    Full Text Available Alterations of brain morphology in Crohn's disease have been reported, but data is scarce and heterogenous and the possible impact of disease predisposition on brain development is unknown. Assuming a systemic course of the disease, brain involvement seems more probable in presence of extraintestinal manifestations, but this question has not yet been addressed. The present study examined the relationship between Crohn's disease and brain structure and focused on the connection with extraintestinal manifestations and markers of brain development.In a pilot study, brains of 15 patients with Crohn's disease (of which 9 had a history of extraintestinal manifestations, i.e. arthritis, erythema nodosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis were compared to matched healthy controls using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and controls were tested for depression, fatigue and global cognitive function. Cortical thickness, surface area and folding were determined via cortical surface modeling.The overall group comparison (i.e. all patients vs. controls yielded no significant results. In the patient subgroup with extraintestinal manifestations, changes in cortical area and folding, but not thickness, were identified: Patients showed elevated cortical surface area in the left middle frontal lobe (p<0.05 and hypergyrification in the left lingual gyrus (p<0.001 compared to healthy controls. Hypogyrification of the right insular cortex (p<0.05 and hypergyrification of the right anterior cingulate cortex (p<0.001 were detected in the subgroup comparison of patients with against without extraintestinal manifestations. P-values are corrected for multiple comparisons.Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that Crohn's disease is associated with aberrant brain structure and preliminary support for the hypothesis that these changes are associated with a systemic course of the disease as indicated by extraintestinal manifestations. Changes

  15. Corpus callosum thickness on mid-sagittal MRI as a marker of brain volume: a pilot study in children with HIV-related brain disease and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Ackermann, Christelle; Laughton, Barbara; Cotton, Mark; Tomazos, Nicollette; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Mauff, Katya; Pettifor, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Corpus callosum thickness measurement on mid-sagittal MRI may be a surrogate marker of brain volume. This is important for evaluation of diseases causing brain volume gain or loss, such as HIV-related brain disease and HIV encephalopathy. To determine if thickness of the corpus callosum on mid-sagittal MRI is a surrogate marker of brain volume in children with HIV-related brain disease and in controls without HIV. A retrospective MRI analysis in children (<5 years old) with HIV-related brain disease and controls used a custom-developed semi-automated tool, which divided the midline corpus callosum and measured its thickness in multiple locations. Brain volume was determined using volumetric analysis. Overall corpus callosum thickness and thickness of segments of the corpus callosum were correlated with overall and segmented (grey and white matter) brain volume. Forty-four children (33 HIV-infected patients and 11 controls) were included. Significant correlations included overall corpus callosum (mean) and total brain volume (P = 0.05); prefrontal corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02); premotor corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.04) and white matter volume (P = 0.02), premotor corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02) and sensory corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.02). Corpus callosum thickness correlates with brain volume both in HIV-infected patients and controls. (orig.)

  16. Corpus callosum thickness on mid-sagittal MRI as a marker of brain volume: a pilot study in children with HIV-related brain disease and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Ackermann, Christelle [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Laughton, Barbara; Cotton, Mark [Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Children' s Hospital, Children' s Infectious Diseases Research Unit, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Tomazos, Nicollette [University of Cape Town, Faculty of Commerce, Department of Management Studies, Cape Town (South Africa); Spottiswoode, Bruce [University of Cape Town, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, Department of Human Biology, Cape Town (South Africa); Mauff, Katya [University of Cape Town, Department of Statistical Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Pettifor, John M. [University of the Witwatersrand, MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2015-07-15

    Corpus callosum thickness measurement on mid-sagittal MRI may be a surrogate marker of brain volume. This is important for evaluation of diseases causing brain volume gain or loss, such as HIV-related brain disease and HIV encephalopathy. To determine if thickness of the corpus callosum on mid-sagittal MRI is a surrogate marker of brain volume in children with HIV-related brain disease and in controls without HIV. A retrospective MRI analysis in children (<5 years old) with HIV-related brain disease and controls used a custom-developed semi-automated tool, which divided the midline corpus callosum and measured its thickness in multiple locations. Brain volume was determined using volumetric analysis. Overall corpus callosum thickness and thickness of segments of the corpus callosum were correlated with overall and segmented (grey and white matter) brain volume. Forty-four children (33 HIV-infected patients and 11 controls) were included. Significant correlations included overall corpus callosum (mean) and total brain volume (P = 0.05); prefrontal corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02); premotor corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.04) and white matter volume (P = 0.02), premotor corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02) and sensory corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.02). Corpus callosum thickness correlates with brain volume both in HIV-infected patients and controls. (orig.)

  17. Prognosis of patients treated with whole brain radiation therapy for metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, Naomi R.; Mychalczak, Borys; Jones, Walter; Spriggs, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the effect of multiple treatment and disease related variables on the local control and survival of patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy for metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease. Materials and Methods: Between November 1967 and December 1994, 21 patients were treated at our institution for gestational trophoblastic disease metastatic to the brain. 29% ((6(21))) were diagnosed with their brain metastases before the onset of chemotherapy (early group). 79% ((15(21))) developed their brain metastases during or after the administration of first-line chemotherapy (late group). All patients were treated with whole brain radiation therapy. The total dose ranged from 200 cGy to 3600 cGy (median 2200 cGy). Sixteen patients (76%) received concurrent systemic chemotherapy. None of the patients received intrathecal chemotherapy as a component of their initial treatment. Survival and local control were calculated from the date of diagnosis of brain metastases. Follow-up ranged from 11 months to 170 months with a median of 77 months. Results: The median overall survival was 21 months, with 2- and 5-year actuarial survivals of 46% and 31%, respectively. Neither survival nor local control was significantly affected by age at diagnosis of brain metastases (<35 vs. ≥35 years), time of presentation of brain metastases (early vs. late), or use of concurrent chemotherapy. The total dose of radiation (<2200 cGy vs. ≥2200 cGy) significantly affected initial local control, but not survival. The 5-year actuarial local control of the initial brain metastases with ≥2200 cGy was 91%, as compared to 24% with <2200 cGy (p=0.05). Survival was significantly affected by control of disease at extracranial sites. The 2- and 5-year actuarial survivals of the 9 patients whose disease was controlled at extracranial sites were 100% and 83%, respectively, as compared to 8% and 0% for the 12 whose extracranial disease was not controlled (p=0

  18. The Brain in Congenital Heart Disease across the Lifespan: The Cumulative Burden of Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Ariane; Miller, Steven P.; Marino, Bradley Scott; Jefferson, Angela L.; Newburger, Jane W.

    2017-01-01

    The number of patients surviving with congenital heart disease (CHD) has soared over the last three decades. Adults constitute the fastest growing segment of the CHD population, now outnumbering children. Research to date on the heart-brain intersection in this population has largely been focused on neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood and adolescence. Mutations in genes that are highly expressed in heart and brain may cause cerebral dysgenesis. Together with altered cerebral perfusion in utero, these factors are associated with abnormalities of brain structure and brain immaturity in a significant portion of neonates with critical CHD even before they undergo cardiac surgery. In infancy and childhood, the brain may be affected by risk factors related to heart disease itself or to its interventional treatments. As children with CHD become adults, they increasingly develop heart failure, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes and coronary disease. These acquired cardiovascular comorbidities can be expected to have effects similar to those in the general population on cerebral blood flow, brain volumes, and dementia. In both children and adults, cardiovascular disease may have adverse effects on achievement, executive function, memory, language, social interactions, and quality of life. In summary, against the backdrop of shifting demographics, risk factors for brain injury in the CHD population are cumulative and synergistic. As neurodevelopmental sequelae in children with CHD evolve to cognitive decline or dementia during adulthood, a growing population of CHD can be expected to require support services. We highlight evidence gaps and future research directions. PMID:27185022

  19. Segmentation of brain parenchymal regions into gray matter and white matter with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Chiaki; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Yasuo; Magome, Taiki; Honda, Hiroshi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Toyofuku, Fukai; Ohki, Masafumi

    2010-01-01

    It is very difficult and time consuming for neuroradiologists to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy based on the volume of cortical regions etc. Our purpose of this study was to develop an automated segmentation of the brain parenchyma into gray and white matter regions with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted MR images. Our proposed method consisted of extraction of a brain parenchymal region based on a brain model matching and segmentation of the brain parenchyma into gray and white matter regions based on a fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. We applied our proposed method to MR images of the whole brains obtained from 9 cases, including 4 clinically AD cases and 5 control cases. The mean volume percentage of a cortical region (41.7%) to a brain parenchymal region in AD patients was smaller than that (45.2%) in the control subjects (p=0.000462). (author)

  20. Influence of deep brain stimulation on postural stability in patients with Parkinson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zelenková, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease of the basal ganglia. Its main symptoms are rigidity, tremor, bradykinesia, hypokinesia and postural instability. One possible way how to infuence diseases is neurosurgical treatment - deep brain stimulation. The principle is the implantation of electrodes in the basal ganglia and modulation of activity of the basal ganglia circuits due to electrical stimulation. Stimulation affects the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. This thesis deals...

  1. Schooling mediates brain reserve in Alzheimer's disease: findings of fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perneczky, R; Drzezga, A; Diehl-Schmid, J; Schmid, G; Wohlschläger, A; Kars, S; Grimmer, T; Wagenpfeil, S; Monsch, A; Kurz, A

    2006-09-01

    Functional imaging studies report that higher education is associated with more severe pathology in patients with Alzheimer's disease, controlling for disease severity. Therefore, schooling seems to provide brain reserve against neurodegeneration. To provide further evidence for brain reserve in a large sample, using a sensitive technique for the indirect assessment of brain abnormality (18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)), a comprehensive measure of global cognitive impairment to control for disease severity (total score of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease Neuropsychological Battery) and an approach unbiased by predefined regions of interest for the statistical analysis (statistical parametric mapping (SPM)). 93 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and 16 healthy controls underwent 18F-FDG-PET imaging of the brain. A linear regression analysis with education as independent and glucose utilisation as dependent variables, adjusted for global cognitive status and demographic variables, was conducted in SPM2. The regression analysis showed a marked inverse association between years of schooling and glucose metabolism in the posterior temporo-occipital association cortex and the precuneus in the left hemisphere. In line with previous reports, the findings suggest that education is associated with brain reserve and that people with higher education can cope with brain damage for a longer time.

  2. Novel Noninvasive Brain Disease Detection System Using a Facial Image Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain disease including any conditions or disabilities that affect the brain is fast becoming a leading cause of death. The traditional diagnostic methods of brain disease are time-consuming, inconvenient and non-patient friendly. As more and more individuals undergo examinations to determine if they suffer from any form of brain disease, developing noninvasive, efficient, and patient friendly detection systems will be beneficial. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a novel noninvasive brain disease detection system based on the analysis of facial colors. The system consists of four components. A facial image is first captured through a specialized sensor, where four facial key blocks are next located automatically from the various facial regions. Color features are extracted from each block to form a feature vector for classification via the Probabilistic Collaborative based Classifier. To thoroughly test the system and its performance, seven facial key block combinations were experimented. The best result was achieved using the second facial key block, where it showed that the Probabilistic Collaborative based Classifier is the most suitable. The overall performance of the proposed system achieves an accuracy −95%, a sensitivity −94.33%, a specificity −95.67%, and an average processing time (for one sample of <1 min at brain disease detection.

  3. A brain mass in a patient with Behcet's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfedaghi, Ahmad S; Masters, Y; Mourou, M; Eshak, O

    2015-09-30

    This case report describes an uncommon presentation of Behcet's disease which manifested as neuro-Behcet's disease. Although it is not the first reported case in the medical literature, it is a possible differential in a patient presenting with a brain tumor. Since the diagnosis of neuro-Behcet's disease depends largely on the clinical picture and medical history, it should be considered prior to opting for invasive diagnostic methods. Our patient is a 36-year-old white man from Kuwait. He presented with acute onset of headache, vomiting, and right-sided weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of his brain showed a mass in the brain stem. He then revealed that he had a history of recurrent painful oral and genital ulcers for the past 10 years, which suggested a diagnosis of Behcet's disease. A brain biopsy was recommended by a neurosurgeon at the time, but the patient refused the procedure. After initiating steroid therapy, the mass began to regress and, eventually, was undetectable on subsequent imaging of his brain. This case of neuro-Behcet's disease reflects the need to consider this diagnosis in a patient of less than 40 years of age presenting with a suspected brain tumor. This may delay the need for invasive diagnostic methods, especially if such methods are not desired by the patient. In the management of suspected neuro-Behcet's disease, initiating steroid therapy and measuring the response is a reasonable option before seeking a definitive diagnosis via brain biopsy. If the response to steroids is minimal then a brain biopsy should be performed.

  4. Modeling and simulation of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Moroney, R.; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, K.G.; Pereira, M.; Freire, M.

    2009-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is effective in the Parkinsonian state, while it seems to produce rather non-selective stimulation over an unknown volume of tissue. Despite a huge amount of anatomical and physiological data regarding the structure of the basal ganglia (BG) and their connections, the

  5. The Alzheimer's Disease-Related Glucose Metabolic Brain Pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Strijkert, Fijanne; Renken, Remco J.; Izaks, Gerbrand J.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; Segbers, Marcel; Roerdink, Jos B. T. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging of the brain can be used to assist in the differential diagnosis of dementia. Group differences in glucose uptake between patients with dementia and controls are well-known. However, a multivariate analysis technique called scaled subprofile

  6. Prediction of neurodegenerative diseases from functional brain imaging data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudali, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a challenge, especially in the developed society where life expectancy is high. Since these diseases progress slowly, they are not easy to diagnose at an early stage. Moreover, they portray similar disease features, which makes them hard to differentiate. In this

  7. A common brain network links development, aging, and vulnerability to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Groves, Adrian R; Tamnes, Christian K; Westlye, Lars Tjelta; Duff, Eugene P; Engvig, Andreas; Walhovd, Kristine B; James, Anthony; Gass, Achim; Monsch, Andreas U; Matthews, Paul M; Fjell, Anders M; Smith, Stephen M; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2014-12-09

    Several theories link processes of development and aging in humans. In neuroscience, one model posits for instance that healthy age-related brain degeneration mirrors development, with the areas of the brain thought to develop later also degenerating earlier. However, intrinsic evidence for such a link between healthy aging and development in brain structure remains elusive. Here, we show that a data-driven analysis of brain structural variation across 484 healthy participants (8-85 y) reveals a largely--but not only--transmodal network whose lifespan pattern of age-related change intrinsically supports this model of mirroring development and aging. We further demonstrate that this network of brain regions, which develops relatively late during adolescence and shows accelerated degeneration in old age compared with the rest of the brain, characterizes areas of heightened vulnerability to unhealthy developmental and aging processes, as exemplified by schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Specifically, this network, while derived solely from healthy subjects, spatially recapitulates the pattern of brain abnormalities observed in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. This network is further associated in our large-scale healthy population with intellectual ability and episodic memory, whose impairment contributes to key symptoms of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Taken together, our results suggest that the common spatial pattern of abnormalities observed in these two disorders, which emerge at opposite ends of the life spectrum, might be influenced by the timing of their separate and distinct pathological processes in disrupting healthy cerebral development and aging, respectively.

  8. The medical food Souvenaid affects brain phospholipid metabolism in mild Alzheimer's disease: results from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.; Graaf, M. van der; Lansbergen, M.M.; Meulenbroek, O.V.; Cetinyurek-Yavuz, A.; Sijben, J.W.; Heerschap, A.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Synaptic dysfunction contributes to cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease and may be countered by increased intake of nutrients that target brain phospholipid metabolism. In this study, we explored whether the medical food Souvenaid affects brain phospholipid metabolism in patients

  9. Deep-brain-stimulation does not impair deglutition in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Sabrina; Kipping, Judy; Rommel, Natalie; Weiss, Daniel; Breit, Sorin; Gasser, Thomas; Plewnia, Christian; Krüger, Rejko; Wächter, Tobias

    2012-08-01

    A large proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease develop dysphagia during the course of the disease. Dysphagia in Parkinson's disease affects different phases of deglutition, has a strong impact on quality of life and may cause severe complications, i.e., aspirational pneumonia. So far, little is known on how deep-brain-stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus influences deglutition in PD. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies on 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, which had been performed preoperatively, and postoperatively with deep-brain-stimulation-on and deep-brain-stimulation-off, were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were examined in each condition with three consistencies (viscous, fluid and solid). The 'New Zealand index for multidisciplinary evaluation of swallowing (NZIMES) Subscale One' for qualitative and 'Logemann-MBS-Parameters' for quantitative evaluation were assessed. Preoperatively, none of the patients presented with clinically relevant signs of dysphagia. While postoperatively, the mean daily levodopa equivalent dosage was reduced by 50% and deep-brain-stimulation led to a 50% improvement in motor symptoms measured by the UPDRS III, no clinically relevant influence of deep-brain-stimulation-on swallowing was observed using qualitative parameters (NZIMES). However quantitative parameters (Logemann scale) found significant changes of pharyngeal parameters with deep-brain-stimulation-on as compared to preoperative condition and deep-brain-stimulation-off mostly with fluid consistency. In Parkinson patients without dysphagia deep-brain-stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates the pharyngeal deglutition phase but has no clinically relevant influence on deglutition. Further studies are needed to test if deep-brain-stimulation is a therapeutic option for patients with swallowing disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Computer-Aided Diagnosis Systems for Brain Diseases in Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Yamashita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the basics and recent researches of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD systems for assisting neuroradiologists in detection of brain diseases, e.g., asymptomatic unruptured aneurysms, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and multiple sclerosis (MS, in magnetic resonance (MR images. The CAD systems consist of image feature extraction based on image processing techniques and machine learning classifiers such as linear discriminant analysis, artificial neural networks, and support vector machines. We introduce useful examples of the CAD systems in the neuroradiology, and conclude with possibilities in the future of the CAD systems for brain diseases in MR images.

  11. Graph theoretical analysis and application of fMRI-based brain network in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Xue-na

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is clinically characterized by impaired memory and many other cognitive functions. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease are not thoroughly understood. In recent years, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI as well as advanced graph theory based network analysis approach, several studies of patients with AD suggested abnormal topological organization in both global and regional properties of functional brain networks, specifically, as demonstrated by a loss of small-world network characteristics. These studies provide novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of AD and could be helpful in developing imaging biomarkers for disease diagnosis. In this paper we introduce the essential concepts of complex brain networks theory, and review recent advances of the study on human functional brain networks in AD, especially focusing on the graph theoretical analysis of small-world network based on fMRI. We also propound the existent problems and research orientation.

  12. Atrophy-specific MRI brain template for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonov, Vladimir; Coupe, Pierrick; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    Background Rapid brain loss is characteristic for the patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) [1]. Increase of the lateral ventricular volume is strongly correlated with the progression of the disease. High variability in the degree of atrophy for subjects with AD....... Alzheimer's and Dementia, 2010. 6(4, Supplement 1). [3] Fonov, V, et al. NeuroImage, 2011. 54(1).......Background Rapid brain loss is characteristic for the patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) [1]. Increase of the lateral ventricular volume is strongly correlated with the progression of the disease. High variability in the degree of atrophy for subjects with AD...... of the brain and the contrast between different tissue types for the given level of atrophy. Figure 1 shows images through 6 example values of increasing RLVV. Conclusions The proposed method and resulting template will be useful tools for the development of robust automatic image processing methods targeted...

  13. Brain perivascular macrophages: characterization and functional roles in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, Giuseppe; Park, Laibaik; Anrather, Josef; Iadecola, Costantino

    2017-11-01

    Perivascular macrophages (PVM) are a distinct population of resident brain macrophages characterized by a close association with the cerebral vasculature. PVM migrate from the yolk sac into the brain early in development and, like microglia, are likely to be a self-renewing cell population that, in the normal state, is not replenished by circulating monocytes. Increasing evidence implicates PVM in several disease processes, ranging from brain infections and immune activation to regulation of the hypothalamic-adrenal axis and neurovascular-neurocognitive dysfunction in the setting of hypertension, Alzheimer disease pathology, or obesity. These effects involve crosstalk between PVM and cerebral endothelial cells, interaction with circulating immune cells, and/or production of reactive oxygen species. Overall, the available evidence supports the idea that PVM are a key component of the brain-resident immune system with broad implications for the pathogenesis of major brain diseases. A better understanding of the biology and pathobiology of PVM may lead to new insights and therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of brain diseases.

  14. Targeting the brain: considerations in 332 consecutive patients treated by deep brain stimulation (DBS) for severe neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Angelo; Cordella, Roberto; Messina, Giuseppe; Marras, Carlo Efisio; Romito, Luigi Michele; Albanese, Alberto; Rizzi, Michele; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Zekaj, Edvin; Villani, Flavio; Leone, Massimo; Gambini, Orsola; Broggi, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) extends the treatment of some severe neurological diseases beyond pharmacological and conservative therapy. Our experience extends the field of DBS beyond the treatment of Parkinson disease and dystonia, including several other diseases such as cluster headache and disruptive behavior. Since 1993, at the Istituto Nazionale Neurologico "Carlo Besta" in Milan, 580 deep brain electrodes were implanted in 332 patients. The DBS targets include Stn, GPi, Voa, Vop, Vim, CM-pf, pHyp, cZi, Nacc, IC, PPN, and Brodmann areas 24 and 25. Three hundred patients are still available for follow-up and therapeutic considerations. DBS gave a new therapeutic chance to these patients affected by severe neurological diseases and in some cases controlled life-threatening pathological conditions, which would otherwise result in the death of the patient such as in status dystonicus, status epilepticus and post-stroke hemiballismus. The balance of DBS in severe neurological disease is strongly positive even if further investigations and studies are needed to search for new applications and refine the selection criteria for the actual indications.

  15. The microbiome-gut-brain axis in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Gut microbes are capable of producing most neurotransmitters found in the human brain. While these neurotransmitters primarily act locally in the gut, modulating the enteric nervous system, evidence is now accumulating to support the view that gut microbes through multiple mechanisms can influence central neurochemistry and behavior. This has been described as a fundamental paradigm shift in neuroscience. Bifidobacteria for example can produce and increase plasma levels of the serotonin precu...

  16. Brain-Gut-Microbe Communication in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eGrenham

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional signalling between the gastrointestinal tract and the brain is regulated at neural, hormonal and immunological levels. This construct is known as the brain-gut axis and is vital for maintaining homeostasis. Bacterial colonisation of the intestine plays a major role in the post-natal development and maturation of the immune and endocrine systems. These processes are key factors underpinning central nervous system (CNS signalling. Recent research advances have seen a tremendous improvement in our understanding of the scale, diversity and importance of the gut microbiome. This has been reflected in the form of a revised nomenclature to the more inclusive brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis and a sustained research effort to establish how communication along this axis contributes to both normal and pathological conditions. In this review, we will briefly discuss the critical components of this axis and the methodological challenges that have been presented in attempts to define what constitutes a normal microbiota and chart its temporal development. Emphasis is placed on the new research narrative that confirms the critical influence of the microbiota on mood and behaviour. Mechanistic insights are provided with examples of both neural and humoral routes through which these effects can be mediated. The evidence supporting a role for the enteric flora in brain-gut axis disorders is explored with the spotlight on the clinical relevance for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a stress-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. We also critically evaluate the therapeutic opportunities arising from this research and consider in particular whether targeting the microbiome might represent a valid strategy for the management of CNS disorders and ponder the pitfalls inherent in such an approach. Despite the considerable challenges that lie ahead, this is an exciting area of research and one that is destined to remain the centre of focus for some

  17. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Fujii, K.; Kakimi, S.; Mizutani, T.; Matsushima, H.; Ishikawa, A.

    1996-12-31

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer`s disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer`s disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si{sup 3+}) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si{sup 2+}) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using 5 MeV Si{sup 3+} microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer`s disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  18. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahmiri, Salim; Boukadoum, Mounir

    2013-01-01

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD

  19. Brain region's relative proximity as marker for Alzheimer's disease based on structural MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Lene Lillemark; Sørensen, Lauge Emil; Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, incurable neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia. It cannot be prevented, cured or drastically slowed, even though AD research has increased in the past 5-10 years. Instead of focusing on the brain volume or on the single...... brain structures like hippocampus, this paper investigates the relationship and proximity between regions in the brain and uses this information as a novel way of classifying normal control (NC), mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and AD subjects.METHODS:A longitudinal cohort of 528 subjects (170 NC, 240...... to whole brain and hippocampus volume.RESULTS:We found that both our markers was able to significantly classify the subjects. The surface connectivity marker showed the best results with an area under the curve (AUC) at 0.877 (p...

  20. Early brain connectivity alterations and cognitive impairment in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz-Moreno, Emma; Tudela, Raúl; López-Gil, Xavier; Soria, Guadalupe

    2018-01-01

    Background Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are essential to understanding the disease progression and to development of early biomarkers. Because AD has been described as a disconnection syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based connectomics provides a highly translational approach to characterizing the disruption in connectivity associated with the disease. In this study, a transgenic rat model of AD (TgF344-AD) was analyzed to describe both cognitive performance and brain c...

  1. Assessment of brain reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rydbirk, Rasmus; Folke, Jonas; Winge, Kristian; Aznar, Susana; Pakkenberg, Bente; Brudek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of gene expression levels by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) has for many years been the favourite approach for discovering disease-associated alterations. Normalization of results to stably expressed reference genes (RGs) is pivotal to obtain reliable results. This is especially important in relation to neurodegenerative diseases where disease-related structural changes may affect the most commonly used RGs. We analysed 15 candidate RGs in 98 brain sampl...

  2. Brain perfusion spect imaging with sup 99m Tc-HM-PAO in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzhong, Song; Xiangtong, Lin [Shanghai Medical Univ. (China). Huashan Hospital

    1991-02-01

    Forty patients with Parkinson's disease were studied using {sup 99m}Tc-HM-PAO brain perfusion SPECT. 62.5% (25 cases) showed abnormal blood perfusion. Among them 55% showed local decreased blood perfusion of cerebral cortex, 22% showed asymmetric decreased blood perfusion in basal gaglia, 10% showed decreased uptake of tracer in cerebellum. The pathophysiologic basis of the abnormality of brain blood perfusion were briefly discussed.

  3. Huntington's disease accelerates epigenetic aging of human brain and disrupts DNA methylation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Steve; Langfelder, Peter; Kwak, Seung; Aaronson, Jeff; Rosinski, Jim; Vogt, Thomas F; Eszes, Marika; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Waldvogel, Henry J; Choi, Oi-Wa; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Coppola, Giovanni; Yang, X William

    2016-07-01

    Age of Huntington's disease (HD) motoric onset is strongly related to the number of CAG trinucleotide repeats in the huntingtin gene, suggesting that biological tissue age plays an important role in disease etiology. Recently, a DNA methylation based biomarker of tissue age has been advanced as an epigenetic aging clock. We sought to inquire if HD is associated with an accelerated epigenetic age. DNA methylation data was generated for 475 brain samples from various brain regions of 26 HD cases and 39 controls. Overall, brain regions from HD cases exhibit a significant epigenetic age acceleration effect (p=0.0012). A multivariate model analysis suggests that HD status increases biological age by 3.2 years. Accelerated epigenetic age can be observed in specific brain regions (frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and cingulate gyrus). After excluding controls, we observe a negative correlation (r=-0.41, p=5.5×10-8) between HD gene CAG repeat length and the epigenetic age of HD brain samples. Using correlation network analysis, we identify 11 co-methylation modules with a significant association with HD status across 3 broad cortical regions. In conclusion, HD is associated with an accelerated epigenetic age of specific brain regions and more broadly with substantial changes in brain methylation levels.

  4. Multimodal neuroimaging of male and female brain structure in health and disease across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Thompson, Paul M

    2017-01-02

    Sex differences in brain development and aging are important to identify, as they may help to understand risk factors and outcomes in brain disorders that are more prevalent in one sex compared with the other. Brain imaging techniques have advanced rapidly in recent years, yielding detailed structural and functional maps of the living brain. Even so, studies are often limited in sample size, and inconsistent findings emerge, one example being varying findings regarding sex differences in the size of the corpus callosum. More recently, large-scale neuroimaging consortia such as the Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics through Meta Analysis Consortium have formed, pooling together expertise, data, and resources from hundreds of institutions around the world to ensure adequate power and reproducibility. These initiatives are helping us to better understand how brain structure is affected by development, disease, and potential modulators of these effects, including sex. This review highlights some established and disputed sex differences in brain structure across the life span, as well as pitfalls related to interpreting sex differences in health and disease. We also describe sex-related findings from the ENIGMA consortium, and ongoing efforts to better understand sex differences in brain circuitry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  6. Blood N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide and Interleukin-17 for Distinguishing Incomplete Kawasaki Disease from Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Chen, Yuanling; Zhong, Shiling; Li, Yunyan; Dai, Xiahua; Di, Yazhen

    2015-06-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of blood N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and interleukin-17(IL-17) for incomplete Kawasaki disease. Patients with Kawasaki disease, Incomplete Kawasaki disease and unclear infectious fever were included in this retrospective study. Their clinical features, and laboratory test results of blood NT-proBNP and IL-17 were collected and compared. 766 patients with complete clinical information were recruited, consisting of 291 cases of Kawasaki disease, 74 cases of incomplete Kawasaki disease, and 401 cases of unclear infectious diseases. When the consistency with indicator 2 and 3 in Kawasaki disease diagnosis criteria was assessed with blood IL-17 ?11.55 pg/mL and blood NT-proBNP ? 225.5 pg/dL as the criteria, the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases reached 86.5% and 94.8%, respectively. When we chose the consistency with indicator 1 and 2 in Kawasaki disease diagnosis criteria, the appearance of decrustation and/or the BCG erythema, blood IL-17 ?11.55 pg/mL and blood NT-Pro BNP ?225.5 pg/dL as the criteria, the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases was 43.2% and 100%, respectively. Blood NT-proBNP and IL-17 are useful laboratory indicators for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases at the early stage.

  7. Brain metastasis from melanoma: the prognostic value of varying sites of extracranial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, James E; Youn, Paul; Usuki, Kenneth Y; Walter, Kevin A; Huggins, Christine F; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Patients with brain metastasis from melanoma have poor outcomes. Radiation is used both for prognostic and symptomatic value. We aimed to further clarify the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as well as the prognostic implication of various sites of extracranial disease. The records of 73 consecutive patients treated at the University of Rochester Medical Center for brain-metastatic melanoma from January 2004 to October 2013 were reviewed. The median overall survival (OS) was 3.0 months. Patients treated with WBRT alone had decreased OS compared to those treated with SRS alone (HR = 0.38, p = 0.001) or WBRT and SRS (HR = 0.51, p = 0.039). The mean number of brain metastasis differed (p = 0.002) in patients in patients who received WBRT (4.0) compared to those who did not (2.0). Among patients with extracranial disease (n = 63), bone metastasis (HR = 1.86, p = 0.047, n = 15) was a negative prognostic factor; liver (HR = 1.59, p = 0.113, n = 17), lung (HR = 1.51, p = 0.23, n = 51) and adrenal metastasis (HR = 1.70, p = 0.15, n = 10) were not. In patients with concurrent brain and lung metastasis, those with disease limited to those two sites (OS = 8.7 mo, n = 13) had improved OS (HR = 0.44, p = 0.014) compared to those with additional disease (OS = 1.8 mo, n = 50). Based on this hypothesis-generating retrospective analysis, SRS may offer survival benefit compared to WBRT alone in patients with brain metastatic melanoma. Bone metastasis appears to confer a particularly poor prognosis. Those with disease confined to the lung and brain may represent a population with improved prognosis.

  8. Brain-Eating Amoebae: Predilection Sites in the Brain and Disease Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Timothy Yu Yee; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah

    2017-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. and Balamuthia mandrillaris are causative agents of granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE), while Naegleria fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). PAM is an acute infection that lasts a few days, while GAE is a chronic to subacute infection that can last up to several months. Here, we present a literature review of 86 case reports from 1968 to 2016, in order to explore the affinity of these amoebae for particular sites of the brain, diagnostic modalities...

  9. Brain MRI in 17 patients with ocular Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accorinti, Massimo; Pivetti Pezzi, Paola; Di Biasi, Claudio; Trasimeni, Guido; Melone, Antonio; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    1997-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a chronic relapsing disorder of unknown etiology characterized by oral aphthous ulcerations, uveitis, genital ulcerations and bone lesions. A variety of other signs including polyarthritis, vascular conditions (blood vessel occlusions and aneurysms), epididymitis, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and heart lesions may also occur. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is reported in 10-49 % of cases and it is the first symptom of the disease in 5 % of subjects. The neuro-Behcet's syndrome may appear as a brainstem syndrome, and an organic confusional syndrome or dementia. cranial hypertension, mostly related to cerebral venus thrombosis, is also present in neuro-Behcet's disease and its incidence is reported in up to 10 % of Behcet's patients. MRI is reportedly the most sensitive neuroradiological approach to detect the focal lesions related to neuro-Behcet disease and several single cases or series of Behcet's patients with neurologic sings have been examined with MRI. They used MRI to investigate CNS involvement in Behcet's disease patients with and without previous neurologic sings. MRI was carried out on 17 patients with ocular Behcet's disease without neurological symptoms to assess the possible subclinical involvement of the CNS. PD and T2-weighted hypersignal foci were demonstrated in parietal, frontal, subcortical and periventricular white matter in 6 subjects. Neuroradiological abnormalities were found only in patients with complete disease and with the disease diagnosed more than 10 years earlier. Even though the pathogenesis of these neuroradiological abnormalities and their correlation with Behcet's disease remain to be clarified, their study suggests the possibility of subclinical CNS involvement in these patients, which may affect the therapeutic approach and their prognosis

  10. Exosomal biomarkers of brain insulin resistance associated with regional atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Roger J; Mustapic, Maja; Goetzl, Edward J; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Brain insulin resistance (IR), which depends on insulin-receptor-substrate-1 (IRS-1) phosphorylation, is characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we demonstrated higher pSer312-IRS-1 (ineffective insulin signaling) and lower p-panTyr-IRS-1 (effective insulin signaling) in neural origin-enriched plasma exosomes of AD patients vs. Here, we hypothesized that these exosomal biomarkers associate with brain atrophy in AD. We studied 24 subjects with biomarker-supported probable AD (low CSF Aβ 42 ). Exosomes were isolated from plasma, enriched for neural origin using immunoprecipitation for L1CAM, and measured for pSer 312 - and p-panTyr-IRS-1 phosphotypes. MPRAGE images were segmented by brain tissue type and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis for gray matter against pSer 312 - and p-panTyr-IRS-1 was conducted. Given the regionally variable brain expression of IRS-1, we used the Allen Brain Atlas to make spatial comparisons between VBM results and IRS-1 expression. Brain volume was positively associated with P-panTyr-IRS-1 and negatively associated with pSer 312 -IRS-1 in a strikingly similar regional pattern (bilateral parietal-occipital junction, R middle temporal gyrus). This volumetric association pattern was spatially correlated with Allen Human Brain atlas normal brain IRS-1 expression. Exosomal biomarkers of brain IR are thus associated with atrophy in AD as could be expected by their pathophysiological roles and do so in a pattern that reflects regional IRS-1 expression. Furthermore, neural-origin plasma exosomes may recover molecular signals from specific brain regions. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1933-1940, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. X-ray diffraction evidence for myelin disorder in brain from humans with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, L S; Thompson, J E; Moscarello, M A

    1984-09-05

    Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the lipid phase transition temperature of myelin from brain tissue of humans with Alzheimer's disease was about 12 degrees C lower than that of normal age-matched controls, indicating differences in the physical organization of the myelin lipid bilayer. Elevated levels of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene were found in brain tissue from humans with Alzheimer's disease, indicating an increased amount of lipid peroxidation over the controls. An increase in myelin disorder and in lipid peroxidation can both be correlated with aging in human brain, but the changes in myelin from humans with Alzheimer's disease are more pronounced than in normal aging. These changes might represent severe or accelerated aging.

  12. An experience of detection brain disease by roentgenographic CT on head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobata, Daikichi

    1996-01-01

    MRI and MRA are recommended today from the standpoint of sensitivity for the detraction of asymptomatic brain disease, and roentgenographic CT on head is not recommended. Under certain circumstances, however, having recently been given an opportunity of detecting brain disease by means of roentgenographic CT on head, we make a report of the diagnostic results. The examinees were the staff members of a non-profit organization consisting of 62 men and 56 women whose age was 48.6 years on the average. Asymptomatic brain disease was found in 6 cases including 1 case of cerebral infarction, 1 case of calcification of cerebral vascular wall and 1 case of cranial osteoma with a suspicion of Gardner syndrome. Incidentally, there were 31 cases with a complaint of headache, 20 cases of hypertension and 3 cases with a past history of head trauma. After such findings were obtained, guidance was provided to each of them. (author)

  13. The effect of aging on brain barriers and the consequences for Alzheimer's disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlé, Nina; Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-08-01

    Life expectancy has increased in most developed countries, which has led to an increase in the proportion of elderly people in the world's population. However, this increase in life expectancy is not accompanied by a lengthening of the health span since aging is characterized with progressive deterioration in cellular and organ functions. The brain is particularly vulnerable to disease, and this is reflected in the onset of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Research shows that dysfunction of two barriers in the central nervous system (CNS), the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB), plays an important role in the progression of these neurodegenerative diseases. The BBB is formed by the endothelial cells of the blood capillaries, whereas the BCSFB is formed by the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), both of which are affected during aging. Here, we give an overview of how these barriers undergo changes during aging and in Alzheimer's disease, thereby disturbing brain homeostasis. Studying these changes is needed in order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of aging at the brain barriers, which might lead to the development of new therapies to lengthen the health span (including mental health) and reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Energy Metabolism and Inflammation in Brain Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Patil, Ishan; Cadenas, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The high energy demand of the brain renders it sensitive to changes in energy fuel supply and mitochondrial function. Deficits in glucose availability and mitochondrial function are well-known hallmarks of brain aging and are particularly accentuated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. As important cellular sources of H2O2, mitochondrial dysfunction is usually associated with altered redox status. Bioenergetic deficits and chronic oxidative stress are both major contributors to cognitive decline associated with brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Neuroinflammatory changes, including microglial activation and production of inflammatory cytokines, are observed in neurodegenerative diseases and normal aging. The bioenergetic hypothesis advocates for sequential events from metabolic deficits to propagation of neuronal dysfunction, to aging, and to neurodegeneration, while the inflammatory hypothesis supports microglia activation as the driving force for neuroinflammation. Nevertheless, growing evidence suggests that these diverse mechanisms have redox dysregulation as a common denominator and connector. An independent view of the mechanisms underlying brain aging and neurodegeneration is being replaced by one that entails multiple mechanisms coordinating and interacting with each other. This review focuses on the alterations in energy metabolism and inflammatory responses and their connection via redox regulation in normal brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Interactions of these systems is reviewed based on basic research and clinical studies. PMID:27154981

  15. Alzheimer’s disease is not “brain aging”: neuropathological, genetic, and epidemiological human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Davis, Paulina R.; Neltner, Janna H.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Abner, Erin L.; Smith, Charles D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    Human studies are reviewed concerning whether “aging”-related mechanisms contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. AD is defined by specific neuropathology: neuritic amyloid plaques and neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. AD pathology is driven by genetic factors related not to aging per se, but instead to the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In contrast to genes involved in APP-related mechanisms, there is no firm connection between genes implicated in human “accelerated aging” diseases (progerias) and AD. The epidemiology of AD in advanced age is highly relevant but deceptively challenging to address given the low autopsy rates in most countries. In extreme old age, brain diseases other than AD approximate AD prevalence while the impact of AD pathology appears to peak by age 95 and decline thereafter. Many distinct brain diseases other than AD afflict older human brains and contribute to cognitive impairment. Additional prevalent pathologies include cerebrovascular disease and hippocampal sclerosis, both high-morbidity brain diseases that appear to peak in incidence later than AD chronologically. Because of these common brain diseases of extreme old age, the epidemiology differs between clinical “dementia” and the subset of dementia cases with AD pathology. Additional aging-associated mechanisms for cognitive decline such as diabetes and synapse loss have been linked to AD and these hypotheses are discussed. Criteria are proposed to define an “aging-linked” disease, and AD fails all of these criteria. In conclusion, it may be most fruitful to focus attention on specific pathways involved in AD rather than attributing it to an inevitable consequence of aging. PMID:21516511

  16. Large-Scale Functional Brain Network Abnormalities in Alzheimer’s Disease: Insights from Functional Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford C. Dickerson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI (fMRI studies of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD have begun to reveal abnormalities in large-scale memory and cognitive brain networks. Since the medial temporal lobe (MTL memory system is a site of very early pathology in AD, a number of studies have focused on this region of the brain. Yet it is clear that other regions of the large-scale episodic memory network are affected early in the disease as well, and fMRI has begun to illuminate functional abnormalities in frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices as well in MCI and AD. Besides predictable hypoactivation of brain regions as they accrue pathology and undergo atrophy, there are also areas of hyperactivation in brain memory and cognitive circuits, possibly representing attempted compensatory activity. Recent fMRI data in MCI and AD are beginning to reveal relationships between abnormalities of functional activity in the MTL memory system and in functionally connected brain regions, such as the precuneus. Additional work with “resting state” fMRI data is illuminating functional-anatomic brain circuits and their disruption by disease. As this work continues to mature, it will likely contribute to our understanding of fundamental memory processes in the human brain and how these are perturbed in memory disorders. We hope these insights will translate into the incorporation of measures of task-related brain function into diagnostic assessment or therapeutic monitoring, which will hopefully one day be useful for demonstrating beneficial effects of treatments being tested in clinical trials.

  17. A study of 99mTc-HM-PAO brain SPECT in the senile parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxin; Lin Xiangtong; Song Wenzhong; Liu Yongchang

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-three cases of senile Parkinson's disease (PD) imaged by 99m Tc-HM-PAO brain SPECT were reported. 66.7% of the patients had cortical hypoperfusion and 18.2% showed asymmetrical hypoperfusion in the basal ganglia. Such a finding was not related with the Hoehn-Yahr stage and the laterality of motor symptoms. If complicated with dementia, the SPECT brain imaging showed similar pattern in Alzheimer's disease with diffuse hypoperfusion in cortical area reflecting widespread pathological changes in tremor paralysis

  18. Brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: A CT-scan study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkstein, S.E.; Folstein, S.E.; Brandt, J.; McDonnell, A.; Folstein, M.

    1989-01-01

    CT-scan measurements of cortical and subcortical atrophy were carried out in 34 patients with Huntington's disease (HD). While a significant correlation was observed between parameters of subcortical atrophy (bicaudate ratio, bifrontal ratio and third ventricular ratio) and duration of the disease, there was no significant correlation between these parameters and age. On the other hand, measurements of cortical atrophy (frontal fissure ratio and cortical sulci ratio) correlated significantly with age but not with duration of the disease. When a group of 24 HD patients were compared on CT-scan measurements with a group of 24 age-matched normal controls, significant differences were obtained for all the variables examined, but the bicaudate ratio showed the highest sensitivity and specificity. Even mildly affected patients, with duration of motor symptoms less than 3 years had higher bicaudate ratios than age-matched controls. (orig.)

  19. Framing Tobacco Dependence as a "Brain Disease": Implications for Policy and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphett, Kylie; Carter, Adrian; Hall, Wayne; Gartner, Coral

    2017-07-01

    Like other forms of drug dependence, tobacco dependence is increasingly being described as a "chronic brain disease." The potential consequences of this medical labelling have been examined in relation to other addictions, but the implications for tobacco control have been neglected. Some have posited that biomedical conceptions of addiction will reduce stigma and increase uptake of efficacious treatments. Others have countered that it could increase stigma, reduce treatment seeking, and deter unassisted quitting. We explored how smokers respond to the labelling of smoking as a brain disease. Semi-structured interviews with 29 Australian smokers recruited using purposive sampling. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the results. Most participants questioned the accuracy of the brain disease label as applied to smoking. They believed that smoking was not a chronic disease because they perceived smoking to be an individual's choice. In addition, many believed that this label would increase the stigma that they already felt and, did not want to adopt a "sick role" in relation to their smoking. Describing smoking as a brain disease is more likely to alienate smokers than to engage them in quitting. The application of overly medical labels of smoking are inconsistent with smokers own conceptualizations of their smoking, and may have unintended consequences if they are widely disseminated in healthcare settings or antismoking campaigns. The participants in this project believed that biomedical labels of smoking as a "brain disease" or a "chronic disease" were discordant their existing understandings of their smoking. Explanations of addiction that downplay or ignore the role of choice and autonomy risk being perceived as irrelevant by smokers, and could lead to suspicion of health professionals or an unwillingness to seek treatment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights

  20. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: updated diagnostic criteria, treatment algorithm, and the utility of brain biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manix, Marc; Kalakoti, Piyush; Henry, Miriam; Thakur, Jai; Menger, Richard; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2015-11-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare neurodegenerative condition with a rapid disease course and a mortality rate of 100%. Several forms of the disease have been described, and the most common is the sporadic type. The most challenging aspect of this disease is its diagnosis-the gold standard for definitive diagnosis is considered to be histopathological confirmation-but newer tests are providing means for an antemortem diagnosis in ways less invasive than brain biopsy. Imaging studies, electroencephalography, and biomarkers are used in conjunction with the clinical picture to try to make the diagnosis of CJD without brain tissue samples, and all of these are reviewed in this article. The current diagnostic criteria are limited; test sensitivity and specificity varies with the genetics of the disease as well as the clinical stage. Physicians may be unsure of all diagnostic testing available, and may order outdated tests or prematurely request a brain biopsy when the diagnostic workup is incomplete. The authors review CJD, discuss the role of brain biopsy in this patient population, provide a diagnostic pathway for the patient presenting with rapidly progressive dementia, and propose newer diagnostic criteria.

  1. Insulin-Resistant Brain State: the culprit in sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Sónia C.; Santos, Renato X.; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Moreira, Paula I.; Smith, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe abnormalities in brain glucose/energy metabolism and insulin signaling have been documented to take a pivotal role in early sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (sAD) pathology. Indeed, the “insulin-resistant brain state” has been hypothesized to form the core of the neurodegenerative events that occur in sAD. In this vein, intracerebroventricular administration of subdiabetogenic doses of streptozotocin (STZ) in rats can induce an insulin-resistant brain state, which is proposed as a suitable experimental model of sAD. This review highlights the involvement of disturbed brain insulin metabolism in sAD etiopathogenesis. Furthermore, current knowledge demonstrates that central STZ administration produces brain pathology and behavioral changes that resemble changes found in sAD patients. The STZ-intracerebroventricularly treated rat represents a promising experimental tool in this field by providing new insights concerning early brain alterations in sAD, which can be translated in novel etiopathogenic and therapeutic approaches in this disease. PMID:21262392

  2. Quantifying structural alterations in Alzheimer's disease brains using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moosung; Lee, Eeksung; Jung, JaeHwang; Yu, Hyeonseung; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Lee, Shinhwa; Jeong, Yong; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    Imaging brain tissues is an essential part of neuroscience because understanding brain structure provides relevant information about brain functions and alterations associated with diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography exemplify conventional brain imaging tools, but these techniques suffer from low spatial resolution around 100 μm. As a complementary method, histopathology has been utilized with the development of optical microscopy. The traditional method provides the structural information about biological tissues to cellular scales, but relies on labor-intensive staining procedures. With the advances of illumination sources, label-free imaging techniques based on nonlinear interactions, such as multiphoton excitations and Raman scattering, have been applied to molecule-specific histopathology. Nevertheless, these techniques provide limited qualitative information and require a pulsed laser, which is difficult to use for pathologists with no laser training. Here, we present a label-free optical imaging of mouse brain tissues for addressing structural alteration in Alzheimer's disease. To achieve the mesoscopic, unlabeled tissue images with high contrast and sub-micrometer lateral resolution, we employed holographic microscopy and an automated scanning platform. From the acquired hologram of the brain tissues, we could retrieve scattering coefficients and anisotropies according to the modified scattering-phase theorem. This label-free imaging technique enabled direct access to structural information throughout the tissues with a sub-micrometer lateral resolution and presented a unique means to investigate the structural changes in the optical properties of biological tissues.

  3. Agrin in Alzheimer's Disease: Altered Solubility and Abnormal Distribution within Microvasculature and Brain Parenchyma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, John E.; Berzin, Tyler M.; Rafii, Michael S.; Glass, David J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Fallon, Justin R.; Stopa, Edward G.

    1999-05-01

    Agrin is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is widely expressed in neurons and microvascular basal lamina in the rodent and avian central nervous system. Agrin induces the differentiation of nerve-muscle synapses, but its function in either normal or diseased brains is not known. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by loss of synapses, changes in microvascular architecture, and formation of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. Here we have asked whether AD causes changes in the distribution and biochemical properties of agrin. Immunostaining of normal, aged human central nervous system revealed that agrin is expressed in neurons in multiple brain areas. Robust agrin immunoreactivity was observed uniformly in the microvascular basal lamina. In AD brains, agrin is highly concentrated in both diffuse and neuritic plaques as well as neurofibrillary tangles; neuronal expression of agrin also was observed. Furthermore, patients with AD had microvascular alterations characterized by thinning and fragmentation of the basal lamina. Detergent extraction and Western blotting showed that virtually all the agrin in normal brain is soluble in 1% SDS. In contrast, a large fraction of the agrin in AD brains is insoluble under these conditions, suggesting that it is tightly associated with β -amyloid. Together, these data indicate that the agrin abnormalities observed in AD are closely linked to β -amyloid deposition. These observations suggest that altered agrin expression in the microvasculature and the brain parenchyma contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  4. Automatic detection of the hippocampal region associated with Alzheimer's disease from microscopic images of mice brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaidhani, Tahseen; Hawkes, Cheryl; Jassim, Sabah; Al-Assam, Hisham

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus is the region of the brain that is primarily associated with memory and spatial navigation. It is one of the first brain regions to be damaged when a person suffers from Alzheimer's disease. Recent research in this field has focussed on the assessment of damage to different blood vessels within the hippocampal region from a high throughput brain microscopic images. The ultimate aim of our research is the creation of an automatic system to count and classify different blood vessels such as capillaries, veins, and arteries in the hippocampus region. This work should provide biologists with efficient and accurate tools in their investigation of the causes of Alzheimer's disease. Locating the boundary of the Region of Interest in the hippocampus from microscopic images of mice brain is the first essential stage towards developing such a system. This task benefits from the variation in colour channels and texture between the two sides of the hippocampus and the boundary region. Accordingly, the developed initial step of our research to locating the hippocampus edge uses a colour-based segmentation of the brain image followed by Hough transforms on the colour channel that isolate the hippocampus region. The output is then used to split the brain image into two sides of the detected section of the boundary: the inside region and the outside region. Experimental results on a sufficiently number of microscopic images demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed solution.

  5. Foundation for PSP/CBD and Related Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients for clinical trials and better overall disease management. See our interactive map News Events Social 11.10.17 Support News Make Meaning to Stay Positive November is carepartner month, so we will run a series of articles taken from ou... 11.07.17 Support News ...

  6. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Tatjana; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD...

  7. A pilot study of three dimensional color CT images of brain diseases to improve informed consent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanizaki, Yoshio; Akiyama, Takenori; Hiraga, Kenji; Akaji, Kazunori

    2005-01-01

    We have described brain diseases to patients and their family using monochrome CT images. It is thought that patients have difficulties in giving their consent to our conventional explanation because their understanding of brain diseases is based on three dimensional and color images, however, standard CT images are two dimensional and gray scale images. We have been trying to use three dimensional color CT images to improve the typical patient's comprehension of brain diseases. We also try to simulate surgery using these images. Multi-slice CT accumulates precise isotropic voxel data within a half minute. These two dimensional and monochrome data are converted to three dimensional color CT images by 3D workstation. Three dimensional color CT images of each brain structures (e.g. scalp, skull, brain, ventricles and lesions) are created separately. Then, selected structures are fused together for different purposes. These images are able to rotate around any axis. Because the methods to generate three-dimensional color images have not established, we neurosurgeons must create these images. In particular, when an operation is required, the surgeon should create the images. In this paper, we demonstrate how three-dimensional color CT images can improve informed consent. (author)

  8. Midbrain morphology reflects extent of brain damage in Krabbe disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Narayanan, Srikala; Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Section of Neuroradiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Poe, Michele D.; Escolar, Maria L. [University of Pittsburgh, Program for the Study of Neurodevelopment in Rare Disorders, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    To study the relationships between midbrain morphology, Loes score, gross motor function, and cognitive function in infantile Krabbe disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated by two neuroradiologists blinded to clinical status and neurodevelopmental function of children with early or late infantile Krabbe disease. A simplified qualitative 3-point scoring system based on midbrain morphology on midsagittal MRI was used. A score of 0 represented normal convex morphology of the midbrain, a score of 1 represented flattening of the midbrain, and a score of 3 represented concave morphology of the midbrain (hummingbird sign). Spearman correlations were estimated between this simplified MRI scoring system and the Loes score, gross motor score, and cognitive score. Forty-two MRIs of 27 subjects were reviewed. Analysis of the 42 scans showed normal midbrain morphology in 3 (7.1 %) scans, midbrain flattening in 11 (26.2 %) scans, and concave midbrain morphology (hummingbird sign) in 28 (66.7 %) scans. Midbrain morphology scores were positively correlated with the Loes score (r = 0.81, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with both gross motor and cognitive scores (r = -.84, p < 0.001; r = -0.87, p < 0.001, respectively). The inter-rater reliability for the midbrain morphology scale was κ =.95 (95 % CI: 0.86-1.0), and the inter-rater reliability for the Loes scale was κ =.58 (95 % CI: 0.42-0.73). Midbrain morphology scores of midsagittal MRI images correlates with cognition and gross motor function in children with Krabbe disease. This MRI scoring system represents a simple but reliable method to assess disease progression in patients with infantile Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  9. Midbrain morphology reflects extent of brain damage in Krabbe disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Narayanan, Srikala; Panigrahy, Ashok; Poe, Michele D.; Escolar, Maria L.

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationships between midbrain morphology, Loes score, gross motor function, and cognitive function in infantile Krabbe disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated by two neuroradiologists blinded to clinical status and neurodevelopmental function of children with early or late infantile Krabbe disease. A simplified qualitative 3-point scoring system based on midbrain morphology on midsagittal MRI was used. A score of 0 represented normal convex morphology of the midbrain, a score of 1 represented flattening of the midbrain, and a score of 3 represented concave morphology of the midbrain (hummingbird sign). Spearman correlations were estimated between this simplified MRI scoring system and the Loes score, gross motor score, and cognitive score. Forty-two MRIs of 27 subjects were reviewed. Analysis of the 42 scans showed normal midbrain morphology in 3 (7.1 %) scans, midbrain flattening in 11 (26.2 %) scans, and concave midbrain morphology (hummingbird sign) in 28 (66.7 %) scans. Midbrain morphology scores were positively correlated with the Loes score (r = 0.81, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with both gross motor and cognitive scores (r = -.84, p < 0.001; r = -0.87, p < 0.001, respectively). The inter-rater reliability for the midbrain morphology scale was κ =.95 (95 % CI: 0.86-1.0), and the inter-rater reliability for the Loes scale was κ =.58 (95 % CI: 0.42-0.73). Midbrain morphology scores of midsagittal MRI images correlates with cognition and gross motor function in children with Krabbe disease. This MRI scoring system represents a simple but reliable method to assess disease progression in patients with infantile Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  10. The Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hee Seok; Kim, Kwang Ki; Yoon, Yup Yoon; Seo, Hyung Suk

    2009-01-01

    To compare the corpus callosum (CC) area and brain volume among individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HC). To evaluate the relationship of CC area and brain volume in 111 subjects (M:F = 48:63; mean age, 56.9 years) without memory disturbance and 28 subjects (11:17; 66.7years) with memory disturbance. The 11 AD (3:8; 75.7 years), 17 MCI (8:9; 60.9 years) and 28 selected HC (11:17; 66.4 years) patients were investigated for comparison of their CC area and brain volume. A good positive linear correlation was found between CC area and brain volume in subjects without and with memory disturbance (r = 0.64 and 0.66, respectively, p 2 , 715.4 ± 107 cm3) were significantly smaller than in MCI patients (595.9 ± 108, 844.1 ± 85) and the HCs (563.2 ± 75, 818.9 ± 109) (p < 0.05). The CC area and brain volume were not significantly different between MCI patients and the HCs. The CC area was significantly correlated with brain volume. Both CC area and brain volume were significantly smaller in the AD patients

  11. Staphylococcus cohnii as a cause of multiple brain abscesses in Weber-Christian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Yonemura, Kiminobu; Sugimoto, Ryoko; Tokunaga, Makoto; Uchino, Makoto

    2005-11-15

    We report a patient with multiple brain abscesses due to Staphylococcus cohnii. While these brain abscesses markedly responded to the antibiotics, this patient was subsequently suffered from subcutaneous inflammatory nodules in the adipose tissue, which diagnosed him as having Weber-Christian disease (WCD). This is the first report that subcutaneous inflammatory nodules in the adipose tissue, which lead the diagnosis of WCD, followed multiple brain abscesses. To our knowledge, S. cohnii has not yet been reported to cause multiple brain abscesses in humans. Although the etiology of WCD is unknown, an immune mechanism has been implicated in the pathogenesis. Therefore, we should notice that patients with WCD could be immunocompromised hosts with a higher risk to suffer from severe opportunistic infections.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain in Fabry Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Granqvist, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PATIENTS: Forty patients with Fabry disease (14 males, 26 females, age at inclusion: 10-66 years, median: 39 years) underwent a brain F-18-FDG-PET-scan at inclusion, and 31 patients were followed with FDG-PET biannually for up to seven years. All...... patients (except one) had a brain MRI-scan at inclusion, and 34 patients were followed with MRI biannually for up to nine years. IMAGE ANALYSIS: The FDG-PET-images were inspected visually and analysed using a quantitative 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection analysis (Neurostat). MRI images were...... also inspected visually and severity of white matter lesions (WMLs) was graded using a visual rating scale. RESULTS: In 28 patients brain-FDG-PET was normal; in 23 of these 28 patients brain MRI was normal--of the remaining five patients in this group, four patients had WMLs and one patient never had...

  13. Neuro-Behçet disease mimicking brain tumor: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontini, Pedro L.; Finkelsztejn, Alessandro; Duarte, Juliana Á.; Santos, Guilherme T.; Roesler, Rafael; Isolan, Gustavo R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Behçet's disease (BD) is an inflammatory multisystem disease with unknown etiology, and consists of a TRIAD comprising recurrent oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. In some cases, the disease affects the central nervous system, called Neuro-Behçet Disease (NBD). Few cases of NBD simulating a brain tumor have been previously reported. Case Description: Here, we describe the case of a 46-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of brain tumor who was later diagnosed for BD. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of differential diagnosis of lesions with tumoral features. Checking for the possibility of NBD may help avoiding biopsy in these types of cases. PMID:28695044

  14. Brain region specific mitophagy capacity could contribute to selective neuronal vulnerability in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabel Claus

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD is histologically well defined by its characteristic degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Remarkably, divergent PD-related mutations can generate comparable brain region specific pathologies. This indicates that some intrinsic region-specificity respecting differential neuron vulnerability exists, which codetermines the disease progression. To gain insight into the pathomechanism of PD, we investigated protein expression and protein oxidation patterns of three different brain regions in a PD mouse model, the PINK1 knockout mice (PINK1-KO, in comparison to wild type control mice. The dysfunction of PINK1 presumably affects mitochondrial turnover by disturbing mitochondrial autophagic pathways. The three brain regions investigated are the midbrain, which is the location of substantia nigra; striatum, the major efferent region of substantia nigra; and cerebral cortex, which is more distal to PD pathology. In all three regions, mitochondrial proteins responsible for energy metabolism and membrane potential were significantly altered in the PINK1-KO mice, but with very different region specific accents in terms of up/down-regulations. This suggests that disturbed mitophagy presumably induced by PINK1 knockout has heterogeneous impacts on different brain regions. Specifically, the midbrain tissue seems to be most severely hit by defective mitochondrial turnover, whereas cortex and striatum could compensate for mitophagy nonfunction by feedback stimulation of other catabolic programs. In addition, cerebral cortex tissues showed the mildest level of protein oxidation in both PINK1-KO and wild type mice, indicating either a better oxidative protection or less reactive oxygen species (ROS pressure in this brain region. Ultra-structural histological examination in normal mouse brain revealed higher incidences of mitophagy vacuoles in cerebral cortex than in striatum and substantia

  15. Possible neuro-Sweet disease mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Chihiro; Esaki, Takanori; Ando, Maya; Furuya, Tsuyoshi; Noda, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Mori, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of possible neuro-Sweet Disease (NSD) mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata, manifesting as numbness in the bilateral upper and lower extremities, gait disturbance, dysarthria, and swallowing disturbance which gradually deteriorated over 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion in the medulla oblongata, extending to the upper cervical cord with rim enhancement by gadolinium. The preoperative diagnosis was brain tumor, such as glioma, or inflammatory disease. His neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated, so biopsy was performed through the midline suboccipital approach. Histological examination showed infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes and macrophages. Human leukocyte antigen typing showed Cw1 and B54 which strongly suggested possible NSD. Steroid pulse therapy was started after surgery and the clinical symptoms improved. Neurosurgeons should be aware of inflammatory disorders such as NSD mimicking brain tumor.

  16. The bidirectional gut-brain-microbiota axis as a potential nexus between traumatic brain injury, inflammation, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundman, Mark H; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Subbian, Vignesh; Chou, Ying-Hui

    2017-11-01

    As head injuries and their sequelae have become an increasingly salient matter of public health, experts in the field have made great progress elucidating the biological processes occurring within the brain at the moment of injury and throughout the recovery thereafter. Given the extraordinary rate at which our collective knowledge of neurotrauma has grown, new insights may be revealed by examining the existing literature across disciplines with a new perspective. This article will aim to expand the scope of this rapidly evolving field of research beyond the confines of the central nervous system (CNS). Specifically, we will examine the extent to which the bidirectional influence of the gut-brain axis modulates the complex biological processes occurring at the time of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and over the days, months, and years that follow. In addition to local enteric signals originating in the gut, it is well accepted that gastrointestinal (GI) physiology is highly regulated by innervation from the CNS. Conversely, emerging data suggests that the function and health of the CNS is modulated by the interaction between 1) neurotransmitters, immune signaling, hormones, and neuropeptides produced in the gut, 2) the composition of the gut microbiota, and 3) integrity of the intestinal wall serving as a barrier to the external environment. Specific to TBI, existing pre-clinical data indicates that head injuries can cause structural and functional damage to the GI tract, but research directly investigating the neuronal consequences of this intestinal damage is lacking. Despite this void, the proposed mechanisms emanating from a damaged gut are closely implicated in the inflammatory processes known to promote neuropathology in the brain following TBI, which suggests the gut-brain axis may be a therapeutic target to reduce the risk of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. To better appreciate how various peripheral

  17. Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on Speech Performance in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Skodda, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been reported to be successful in relieving the core motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and motor fluctuations in the more advanced stages of the disease. However, data on the effects of DBS on speech performance are inconsistent. While there are some series of patients documenting that speech function was relatively unaffected by DBS of the nucleus subthalamicus (STN), other investigators reported on improvements of distinct parameters of oral control...

  18. Gene co-expression networks shed light into diseases of brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Wiethoff, Sarah; Heidari, Moones; Johnstone, Daniel M; Botía, Juan A; Collingwood, Joanna F; Hardy, John; Milward, Elizabeth A; Ryten, Mina; Houlden, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant brain iron deposition is observed in both common and rare neurodegenerative disorders, including those categorized as Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), which are characterized by focal iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Two NBIA genes are directly involved in iron metabolism, but whether other NBIA-related genes also regulate iron homeostasis in the human brain, and whether aberrant iron deposition contributes to neurodegenerative processes remains largely unknown. This study aims to expand our understanding of these iron overload diseases and identify relationships between known NBIA genes and their main interacting partners by using a systems biology approach. We used whole-transcriptome gene expression data from human brain samples originating from 101 neuropathologically normal individuals (10 brain regions) to generate weighted gene co-expression networks and cluster the 10 known NBIA genes in an unsupervised manner. We investigated NBIA-enriched networks for relevant cell types and pathways, and whether they are disrupted by iron loading in NBIA diseased tissue and in an in vivo mouse model. We identified two basal ganglia gene co-expression modules significantly enriched for NBIA genes, which resemble neuronal and oligodendrocytic signatures. These NBIA gene networks are enriched for iron-related genes, and implicate synapse and lipid metabolism related pathways. Our data also indicates that these networks are disrupted by excessive brain iron loading. We identified multiple cell types in the origin of NBIA disorders. We also found unforeseen links between NBIA networks and iron-related processes, and demonstrate convergent pathways connecting NBIAs and phenotypically overlapping diseases. Our results are of further relevance for these diseases by providing candidates for new causative genes and possible points for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chagas disease: modulation of the inflammatory response by acetylcholinesterase in hematological cells and brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Aniélen D; Bottari, Nathieli B; do Carmo, Guilherme M; Baldissera, Matheus D; Souza, Carine F; Machado, Vanessa S; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Mendes, Ricardo E; Monteiro, Silvia G; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2018-01-01

    Chagas disease is an acute or chronic illness that causes severe inflammatory response, and consequently, it may activate the inflammatory cholinergic pathway, which is regulated by cholinesterases, including the acetylcholinesterase. This enzyme is responsible for the regulation of acetylcholine levels, an anti-inflammatory molecule linked to the inflammatory response during parasitic diseases. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether Trypanosoma cruzi infection can alter the activity of acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine levels in mice, and whether these alterations are linked to the inflammatory cholinergic signaling pathway. Twenty-four mice were divided into two groups: uninfected (control group, n = 12) and infected by T. cruzi, Y strain (n = 12). The animals developed acute disease with a peak of parasitemia on day 7 post-infection (PI). Blood, lymphocytes, and brain were analyzed on days 6 and 12 post-infection. In the brain, acetylcholine and nitric oxide levels, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathology were analyzed. In total blood and brain, acetylcholinesterase activity decreased at both times. On the other hand, acetylcholinesterase activity in lymphocytes increased on day 6 PI compared with the control group. Infection by T. cruzi increased acetylcholine and nitric oxide levels and histopathological damage in the brain of mice associated to increased myeloperoxidase activity. Therefore, an intense inflammatory response in mice with acute Chagas disease in the central nervous system caused an anti-inflammatory response by the activation of the cholinergic inflammatory pathway.

  20. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  1. Hemodynamic control of in patients with concomitant hypertensive disease during brain aneurysm clipping

    OpenAIRE

    Dzyuba, D.O.; Melnik, A.F.; Yavorsky, F.A.

    2018-01-01

    The article describes the state of the problem of hemodynamic control during brain aneurysm clipping in concomitant hypertensive disease. Author studies hemodynamic control by using magnesia therapy with the addition of clonidine solution and infusion of urapidil solution. Based on the results of the study, the advantages of urapidil infusion are given.

  2. Decreased alternative splicing of estrogen receptor-α mRNA in the Alzheimer's disease brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishunina, Tatjana A.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we identified 62 estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) mRNA splice variants in different human brain areas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control cases and classified them into 12 groups. Forty-eight of these splice forms were identified for the first time. The distribution of alternatively

  3. Slowing of oscillatory brain activity is a stable characteristic of Parkinson's disease without dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, D.; Bosboom, JL; Deijen, J.B.; Wolters, E.C.M.J.; Berendse, H.W.; Stam, L.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive changes in resting-state oscillatory brain activity have recently been demonstrated using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in moderately advanced, non-demented Parkinson's disease patients relative to age-matched controls. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset and evolution

  4. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M.; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been

  5. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Oswal et al. characterise the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on STN-cortical synchronisation in Parkinson-s disease. They propose that cortical driving of the STN in beta frequencies is subdivided anatomically and spectrally, corresponding to the hyperdirect and indirect pathways. DBS

  6. Dual Mechanism of Brain Injury and Novel Treatment Strategy in Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnanti, William J.; Lazovic, Jelena; Griffin, Kathleen; Skvorak, Kristen J.; Paul, Harbhajan S.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Bewley, Maria C.; Cheng, Keith C.; LaNoue, Kathryn F.; Flanagan, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder of branched-chain amino acid metabolism presenting with life-threatening cerebral oedema and dysmyelination in affected individuals. Treatment requires life-long dietary restriction and monitoring of branched-chain amino acids to avoid brain injury. Despite careful management, children…

  7. Rest and action tremor in Parkinson's disease: effects of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Wentink, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is rest tremor. While rest tremor generally disappears during sleep and voluntary movement, action tremor may be triggered by voluntary movement, and may even be more disabling than rest tremor. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic

  8. Alternaria infectoria brain abscess in a child with chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hipolito, E.; Faria, E.; Alves, A.; de Hoog, G.S.; Anjos, J.; Goncalves, T.; Morais, P.V.; Estevao, H.

    2009-01-01

    In the present report, we describe the first case of a phaeohyphomycotic brain abscess in a 5-year-old boy with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) admitted to hospital with seizures. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a cerebral abscess and the microbiology study showed a dark,

  9. Elemental analysis of the frontal lobe of 'normal' brain tissue and that affected by Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stedman, J.D.; Spyrou, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    'Normal' brain tissue and brain tissue affected by Alzheimer's disease has been taken from the frontal lobe of both hemispheres and their elemental compositions in terms of major, minor and trace elements compared. Brain samples were obtained from the MRC Alzheimer's Disease Brain Bank, London. 25 samples were taken from 18 individuals (5 males and 13 females) of mean age 79.9 ± 7.3 years with pathologically confirmed Alzheimer's disease and 26 samples from 15 individuals (8 males and 7 females) of mean age 71.8 ± 13.0 years with no pathological sings of Alzheimer's disease ('normals'). The elemental concentration of the samples were determined by the techniques of Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analysis, particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Sc, Fe, Zn, Se, Br, Rb and Cs were detected by INAA and significant differences in concentrations were found between concentrations in normal and Alzheimer tissue for the elements. Na, Cl, K, Se, Br and Rb, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Zn and Cd were detected by PIXE analysis and significant differences found for the elements P, S, Cl, K and Ca. (author)

  10. Non-monotonic reorganization of brain networks with Alzheimer’s disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoungkyu eKim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identification of stage-specific changes in brain network of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD is critical for rationally designed therapeutics that delays the progression of the disease. However, pathological neural processes and their resulting changes in brain network topology with disease progression are not clearly known. Methods: The current study was designed to investigate the alterations in network topology of resting state fMRI among patients in three different clinical dementia rating (CDR groups (i.e., CDR = 0.5, 1, 2 and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and age-matched healthy subject groups. We constructed cost networks from these 5 groups and analyzed their network properties using graph theoretical measures.Results: The topological properties of AD brain networks differed in a non-monotonic, stage-specific manner. Interestingly, local and global efficiency and betweenness of the network were rather higher in the aMCI and AD (CDR 1 groups than those of prior stage groups. The number, location, and structure of rich-clubs changed dynamically as the disease progressed.Conclusions: The alterations in network topology of the brain are quite dynamic with AD progression, and these dynamic changes in network patterns should be considered meticulously for efficient therapeutic interventions of AD.

  11. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, Judith A.; Odekerken, Vincent J. J.; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Cath, Danielle C.; Figee, Martijn; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; de Haan, Rob J.; Schuurman, P. Richard; de Bie, Rob M. A.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Staal, Michael

    BackgroundThe aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). MethodsWe randomly assigned patients to receive GPi DBS

  12. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, J.A.; Odekerken, V.J.J.; Geurtsen, G.J.; Schmand, B.A.; Cath, D.C.; Figee, M.; van den Munckhof, P.; de Haan, R.J.; Schuurman, P.R.; de Bie, R.M.A.

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We randomly assigned patients to receive GPi

  13. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, Judith A.; Odekerken, Vincent J. J.; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Cath, Danielle C.; Figee, Martijn; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; de Haan, Rob J.; Schuurman, P. Richard; de Bie, Rob M. A.; van Laar, Teus; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Mosch, Arne; Hoffmann, Carel F. E.; Nijssen, Peter C. G.; Beute, Guus N.; van Vugt, Jeroen P. P.; Lenders, Mathieu W. P. M.; Contarino, M. Fiorella; Bour, Lo J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We randomly assigned patients to receive GPi DBS (n = 65) or STN

  14. Psychiatric and social outcome after deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, Judith A; Odekerken, Vincent J J; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Cath, Danielle C; Figee, Martijn; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; de Haan, Rob J; Schuurman, P Richard; de Bie, Rob M A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric and social outcome 12 months after bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We randomly assigned patients to receive GPi

  15. Brains with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and copathology showed a prolonged end-stage of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguelez-Rodriguez, Aitzol; Santos-Juanes, Jorge; Vicente-Etxenausia, Ikerne; Perez de Heredia-Goñi, Katty; Garcia, Beatriz; Quiros, Luis M; Lorente-Gea, Laura; Guerra-Merino, Isabel; Aguirre, Jose J; Fernandez-Vega, Ivan

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the expression of major proteins related to primary neurodegenerative diseases and their prognostic significance in brains with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Thirty consecutive cases of confirmed CJD during the period 2010-2015 at Basque Brain bank were retrospectively reviewed. Moreover, major neurodegenerative-associated proteins (phosphorylated Tau, 4R tau, 3R tau, alpha-synuclein, TDP43, amyloid beta) were tested. Clinical data were reviewed. Cases were divided according to the presence or absence of copathology. Survival curves were also determined. Copathology was significantly associated with survival in brains with CJD (4.2±1.2 vs 9.2±1.9; P=0.019) and in brains with MM1/MV1 CJD (2.1±1.0 vs 6.7±2.8; P=0.012). Besides, the presence of more than one major neurodegenerative-associated protein was significantly associated with survival (4.2±1.2 vs 10.7±2.6; P=0.017). Thus, univariate analyses further pointed out variables significantly associated with better survival: copathology in CJD (HR=0.430; P=0.033); more than one neurodegenerative-associated protein in CJD (HR=0.369; P=0.036) and copathology in MM1/MV1 CJD (HR=0.525; P=0.032). The existence of copathology significantly prolongs survival in patients with rapidly progressive dementia due to CJD. The study of major neurodegenerative-associated proteins in brains with CJD could allow us to further understand the molecular mechanisms behind prion diseases. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Integration of temporal and spatial properties of dynamic connectivity networks for automatic diagnosis of brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Biao; Liu, Mingxia; Shen, Dinggang

    2018-07-01

    Functional connectivity networks (FCNs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) have been applied to the analysis and diagnosis of brain disease, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodrome, i.e., mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Different from conventional studies focusing on static descriptions on functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions in rs-fMRI, recent studies have resorted to dynamic connectivity networks (DCNs) to characterize the dynamic changes of FC, since dynamic changes of FC may indicate changes in macroscopic neural activity patterns in cognitive and behavioral aspects. However, most of the existing studies only investigate the temporal properties of DCNs (e.g., temporal variability of FC between specific brain regions), ignoring the important spatial properties of the network (e.g., spatial variability of FC associated with a specific brain region). Also, emerging evidence on FCNs has suggested that, besides temporal variability, there is significant spatial variability of activity foci over time. Hence, integrating both temporal and spatial properties of DCNs can intuitively promote the performance of connectivity-network-based learning methods. In this paper, we first define a new measure to characterize the spatial variability of DCNs, and then propose a novel learning framework to integrate both temporal and spatial variabilities of DCNs for automatic brain disease diagnosis. Specifically, we first construct DCNs from the rs-fMRI time series at successive non-overlapping time windows. Then, we characterize the spatial variability of a specific brain region by computing the correlation of functional sequences (i.e., the changing profile of FC between a pair of brain regions within all time windows) associated with this region. Furthermore, we extract both temporal variabilities and spatial variabilities from DCNs as features, and integrate them for classification by using manifold regularized multi

  17. Therapeutic potential of systemic brain rejuvenation strategies for neurodegenerative disease [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana M. Horowitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are a devastating group of conditions that cause progressive loss of neuronal integrity, affecting cognitive and motor functioning in an ever-increasing number of older individuals. Attempts to slow neurodegenerative disease advancement have met with little success in the clinic; however, a new therapeutic approach may stem from classic interventions, such as caloric restriction, exercise, and parabiosis. For decades, researchers have reported that these systemic-level manipulations can promote major functional changes that extend organismal lifespan and healthspan. Only recently, however, have the functional effects of these interventions on the brain begun to be appreciated at a molecular and cellular level. The potential to counteract the effects of aging in the brain, in effect rejuvenating the aged brain, could offer broad therapeutic potential to combat dementia-related neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. In particular, results from heterochronic parabiosis and young plasma administration studies indicate that pro-aging and rejuvenating factors exist in the circulation that can independently promote or reverse age-related phenotypes. The recent demonstration that human umbilical cord blood similarly functions to rejuvenate the aged brain further advances this work to clinical translation. In this review, we focus on these blood-based rejuvenation strategies and their capacity to delay age-related molecular and functional decline in the aging brain. We discuss new findings that extend the beneficial effects of young blood to neurodegenerative disease models. Lastly, we explore the translational potential of blood-based interventions, highlighting current clinical trials aimed at addressing therapeutic applications for the treatment of dementia-related neurodegenerative disease in humans.

  18. Reduced integration and improved segregation of functional brain networks in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbara, A; Eid, H; El Falou, W; Khalil, M; Wendling, F; Hassan, M

    2018-04-01

    Emerging evidence shows that cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are associated with disruptions in brain functional connectivity. Thus, the identification of alterations in AD functional networks has become a topic of increasing interest. However, to what extent AD induces disruption of the balance of local and global information processing in the human brain remains elusive. The main objective of this study is to explore the dynamic topological changes of AD networks in terms of brain network segregation and integration. We used electroencephalography (EEG) data recorded from 20 participants (10 AD patients and 10 healthy controls) during resting state. Functional brain networks were reconstructed using EEG source connectivity computed in different frequency bands. Graph theoretical analyses were performed assess differences between both groups. Results revealed that AD networks, compared to networks of age-matched healthy controls, are characterized by lower global information processing (integration) and higher local information processing (segregation). Results showed also significant correlation between the alterations in the AD patients' functional brain networks and their cognitive scores. These findings may contribute to the development of EEG network-based test that could strengthen results obtained from currently-used neurophysiological tests in neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Reduced integration and improved segregation of functional brain networks in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbara, A.; Eid, H.; El Falou, W.; Khalil, M.; Wendling, F.; Hassan, M.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Emerging evidence shows that cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are associated with disruptions in brain functional connectivity. Thus, the identification of alterations in AD functional networks has become a topic of increasing interest. However, to what extent AD induces disruption of the balance of local and global information processing in the human brain remains elusive. The main objective of this study is to explore the dynamic topological changes of AD networks in terms of brain network segregation and integration. Approach. We used electroencephalography (EEG) data recorded from 20 participants (10 AD patients and 10 healthy controls) during resting state. Functional brain networks were reconstructed using EEG source connectivity computed in different frequency bands. Graph theoretical analyses were performed assess differences between both groups. Main results. Results revealed that AD networks, compared to networks of age-matched healthy controls, are characterized by lower global information processing (integration) and higher local information processing (segregation). Results showed also significant correlation between the alterations in the AD patients’ functional brain networks and their cognitive scores. Significance. These findings may contribute to the development of EEG network-based test that could strengthen results obtained from currently-used neurophysiological tests in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Sex differences in metabolic aging of the brain: insights into female susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Woody, Sarah K; Brinton, Roberta D

    2016-06-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of clinical aspects of sex differences in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms, for instance, how sex modifies AD risk and why the female brain is more susceptible to AD, are not clear. The purpose of this study is to elucidate sex disparities in brain aging profiles focusing on 2 major areas-energy and amyloid metabolism-that are most significantly affected in preclinical development of AD. Total RNA isolated from hippocampal tissues of both female and male 129/C57BL/6 mice at ages of 6, 9, 12, or 15 months were comparatively analyzed by custom-designed Taqman low-density arrays for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of a total of 182 genes involved in a broad spectrum of biological processes modulating energy production and amyloid homeostasis. Gene expression profiles revealed substantial differences in the trajectory of aging changes between female and male brains. In female brains, 44.2% of genes were significantly changed from 6 months to 9 months and two-thirds showed downregulation. In contrast, in male brains, only 5.4% of genes were significantly altered at this age transition. Subsequent changes in female brains were at a much smaller magnitude, including 10.9% from 9 months to 12 months and 6.1% from 12 months to 15 months. In male brains, most changes occurred from 12 months to 15 months and the majority were upregulated. Furthermore, gene network analysis revealed that clusterin appeared to serve as a link between the overall decreased bioenergetic metabolism and increased amyloid dyshomeostasis associated with the earliest transition in female brains. Together, results from this study indicate that: (1) female and male brains follow profoundly dissimilar trajectories as they age; (2) female brains undergo age-related changes much earlier than male brains; (3) early changes in female brains signal the onset of a hypometabolic phenotype at risk for AD. These

  1. A putative Alzheimer's disease risk allele in PCK1 influences brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

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    Zongqi Xia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain atrophy and cognitive dysfunction are neurodegenerative features of Multiple Sclerosis (MS. We used a candidate gene approach to address whether genetic variants implicated in susceptibility to late onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD influence brain volume and cognition in MS patients.MS subjects were genotyped for five single nucleotide polymorphisms (snps associated with susceptibility to AD: PICALM, CR1, CLU, PCK1, and ZNF224. We assessed brain volume using Brain Parenchymal Fraction (BPF measurements obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI data and cognitive function using the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT. Genotypes were correlated with cross-sectional BPF and SDMT scores using linear regression after adjusting for sex, age at symptom onset, and disease duration. 722 MS patients with a mean (±SD age at enrollment of 41 (±10 years were followed for 44 (±28 months. The AD risk-associated allele of a non-synonymous SNP in the PCK1 locus (rs8192708G is associated with a smaller average brain volume (P=0.0047 at the baseline MRI, but it does not impact our baseline estimate of cognition. PCK1 is additionally associated with higher baseline T2-hyperintense lesion volume (P=0.0088. Finally, we provide technical validation of our observation in a subset of 641 subjects that have more than one MRI study, demonstrating the same association between PCK1 and smaller average brain volume (P=0.0089 at the last MRI visit.Our study provides suggestive evidence for greater brain atrophy in MS patients bearing the PCK1 allele associated with AD-susceptibility, yielding new insights into potentially shared neurodegenerative process between MS and late onset AD.

  2. Oxidative modification of lipoic acid by HNE in Alzheimer disease brain

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    Sarita S. Hardas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized by the presence of three pathological hallmarks: synapse loss, extracellular senile plaques (SP and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs. The major component of SP is amyloid β-peptide (Aβ, which has been shown to induce oxidative stress. The AD brain shows increased levels of lipid peroxidation products, including 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE. HNE can react covalently with Cys, His, or Lys residues on proteins, altering structure and function of the latter. In the present study we measured the levels of the HNE-modified lipoic acid in brain of subjects with AD and age-matched controls. Lipoic acid is a key co-factor for a number of proteins including pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, key complexes for cellular energetics. We observed a significant decrease in the levels of HNE-lipoic acid in the AD brain compared to that of age-matched controls. To investigate this phenomenon further, the levels and activity of lipoamide dehydrogenase (LADH were measured in AD and control brains. Additionally, LADH activities were measured after in-vitro HNE-treatment to mice brains. Both LADH levels and activities were found to be significantly reduced in AD brain compared to age-matched control. HNE-treatment also reduced the LADH activity in mice brain. These data are consistent with a two-hit hypothesis of AD: oxidative stress leads to lipid peroxidation that, in turn, causes oxidative dysfunction of key energy-related complexes in mitochondria, triggering neurodegeneration. This study is consonant with the notion that lipoic acid supplementation could be a potential treatment for the observed loss of cellular energetics in AD and potentiate the antioxidant defense system to prevent or delay the oxidative stress in and progression of this devastating dementing disorder.

  3. Fine-mapping the effects of Alzheimer's disease risk loci on brain morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchupkin, Gennady V; Adams, Hieab H; van der Lee, Sven J; Vernooij, Meike W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van der Lugt, Aad; Hofman, Albert; Niessen, Wiro J; Ikram, Mohammad A

    2016-12-01

    The neural substrate of genetic risk variants for Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains unknown. We studied their effect on healthy brain morphology to provide insight into disease etiology in the preclinical phase. We included 4071 nondemented, elderly participants of the population-based Rotterdam Study who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and genotyping. We performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on all gray-matter voxels for 19 previously identified, common AD risk variants. Whole-brain expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas was used to examine spatial overlap between VBM association results and expression of genes in AD risk loci regions. Brain regions most significantly associated with AD risk variants were the left postcentral gyrus with ABCA7 (rs4147929, p = 4.45 × 10 -6 ), right superior frontal gyrus by ZCWPW1 (rs1476679, p = 5.12 × 10 -6 ), and right postcentral gyrus by APOE (p = 6.91 × 10 -6 ). Although no individual voxel passed multiple-testing correction, we found significant spatial overlap between the effects of AD risk loci on VBM and the expression of genes (MEF2C, CLU, and SLC24A4) in the Allen Brain Atlas. Results are available online on www.imagene.nl/ADSNPs/. In this single largest imaging genetics data set worldwide, we found that AD risk loci affect cortical gray matter in several brain regions known to be involved in AD, as well as regions that have not been implicated before. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipid alterations in lipid rafts from Alzheimer's disease human brain cortex.

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    Martín, Virginia; Fabelo, Noemí; Santpere, Gabriel; Puig, Berta; Marín, Raquel; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains intimately associated with cell signaling. These biochemical microstructures are characterized by their high contents of sphingolipids, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids and a reduced content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Here, we have purified lipid rafts of human frontal brain cortex from normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and characterized their biochemical lipid composition. The results revealed that lipid rafts from AD brains exhibit aberrant lipid profiles compared to healthy brains. In particular, lipid rafts from AD brains displayed abnormally low levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA, mainly 22:6n-3, docosahexaenoic acid) and monoenes (mainly 18:1n-9, oleic acid), as well as reduced unsaturation and peroxidability indexes. Also, multiple relationships between phospholipids and fatty acids were altered in AD lipid rafts. Importantly, no changes were observed in the mole percentage of lipid classes and fatty acids in rafts from normal brains throughout the lifespan (24-85 years). These indications point to the existence of homeostatic mechanisms preserving lipid raft status in normal frontal cortex. The disruption of such mechanisms in AD brains leads to a considerable increase in lipid raft order and viscosity, which may explain the alterations in lipid raft signaling observed in AD.

  5. Non-invasive brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Current concepts and outlook 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, David H; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses a therapeutic challenge. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in non-invasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, though whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of non-invasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the primary motor cortex and cortical areas of the motor circuit. Published studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential of rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible regarding functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS, including increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters, derive their rationale from studies of brain physiology. These novel parameters simulate normal firing patterns or act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia in motor control. There may also be diagnostic potential of TMS in characterizing individual traits for personalized medicine.

  6. Rapid and Quantitative Assay of Amyloid-Seeding Activity in Human Brains Affected with Prion Diseases.

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    Hanae Takatsuki

    Full Text Available The infectious agents of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are composed of amyloidogenic prion protein, PrPSc. Real-time quaking-induced conversion can amplify very small amounts of PrPSc seeds in tissues/body fluids of patients or animals. Using this in vitro PrP-amyloid amplification assay, we quantitated the seeding activity of affected human brains. End-point assay using serially diluted brain homogenates of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients demonstrated that 50% seeding dose (SD50 is reached approximately 10(10/g brain (values varies 10(8.79-10.63/g. A genetic case (GSS-P102L yielded a similar level of seeding activity in an autopsy brain sample. The range of PrPSc concentrations in the samples, determined by dot-blot assay, was 0.6-5.4 μg/g brain; therefore, we estimated that 1 SD50 unit was equivalent to 0.06-0.27 fg of PrPSc. The SD50 values of the affected brains dropped more than three orders of magnitude after autoclaving at 121°C. This new method for quantitation of human prion activity provides a new way to reduce the risk of iatrogenic prion transmission.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): An essential nutrient and a nutraceutical for brain health and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes; Fritsche, Kevin L; Chuang, Dennis Y; Hannink, Mark; Gu, Zezong; Greenlief, C Michael; Yao, Jeffrey K; Lee, James C; Beversdorf, David Q

    2017-03-10

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) enriched in phospholipids in the brain and retina, is known to play multi-functional roles in brain health and diseases. While arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A 2 (cPLA 2 ), DHA is linked to action of the Ca 2+ -independent iPLA2. DHA undergoes enzymatic conversion by 15-lipoxygenase (Alox 15) to form oxylipins including resolvins and neuroprotectins, which are powerful lipid mediators. DHA can also undergo non-enzymatic conversion by reacting with oxygen free radicals (ROS), which cause the production of 4-hydoxyhexenal (4-HHE), an aldehyde derivative which can form adducts with DNA, proteins and lipids. In studies with both animal models and humans, there is evidence that inadequate intake of maternal n-3 PUFA may lead to aberrant development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). What is less certain is whether consumption of n-3 PUFA is important in maintaining brain health throughout one's life span. Evidence mostly from non-human studies suggests that DHA intake above normal nutritional requirements might modify the risk/course of a number of diseases of the brain. This concept has fueled much of the present interest in DHA research, in particular, in attempts to delineate mechanisms whereby DHA may serve as a nutraceutical and confer neuroprotective effects. Current studies have revealed ability for the oxylipins to regulation of cell redox homeostasis through the Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2/Antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) anti-oxidant pathway, and impact signaling pathways associated with neurotransmitters, and modulation of neuronal functions involving brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). This review is aimed at describing recent studies elaborating these mechanisms with special regard to aging and Alzheimer's disease, autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, and stroke

  8. Assessment of brain reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydbirk, Rasmus; Folke, Jonas; Winge, Kristian; Aznar, Susana; Pakkenberg, Bente; Brudek, Tomasz

    2016-11-17

    Evaluation of gene expression levels by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) has for many years been the favourite approach for discovering disease-associated alterations. Normalization of results to stably expressed reference genes (RGs) is pivotal to obtain reliable results. This is especially important in relation to neurodegenerative diseases where disease-related structural changes may affect the most commonly used RGs. We analysed 15 candidate RGs in 98 brain samples from two brain regions from Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Multiple System Atrophy, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy patients. Using RefFinder, a web-based tool for evaluating RG stability, we identified the most stable RGs to be UBE2D2, CYC1, and RPL13 which we recommend for future RT-qPCR studies on human brain tissue from these patients. None of the investigated genes were affected by experimental variables such as RIN, PMI, or age. Findings were further validated by expression analyses of a target gene GSK3B, known to be affected by AD and PD. We obtained high variations in GSK3B levels when contrasting the results using different sets of common RG underlining the importance of a priori validation of RGs for RT-qPCR studies.

  9. Nanoparticle technology for treatment of Parkinson's disease: the role of surface phenomena in reaching the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Cortés, Hernán; Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-García, Norberto; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-07-01

    The absence of a definitive treatment for Parkinson's disease has driven the emerging investigation in the search for novel therapeutic alternatives. At present, the formulation of different drugs on nanoparticles has represented several advantages over conventional treatments. This type of multifunctional carrier, owing to its size and composition, has different interactions in biological systems that can lead to a decrease in ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, this review focuses on the latest advances in obtaining nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease and provides an overview of technical aspects in the design of brain drug delivery of nanoparticles and an analysis of surface phenomena, a key aspect in the development of functional nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosinski, Lauren P; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N; Harrington, Michael G; Christensen, Trace A; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-12-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical.

  11. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren P. Klosinski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical.

  12. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease.

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    Zhigang Bai

    Full Text Available To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease.Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18-61 years and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22-58 years. A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain in the ESRD patients compared with the HCs. Multiple biochemical measures of renal metabolin, vascular risk factors, general cognitive ability and dialysis duration were correlated with microstructural integrity for the patients.Compared to the HCs, the ESRD patients exhibited disrupted microstructural integrity in not only white matter (WM but also gray matter (GM regions, as characterized by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA and increased mean diffusivity (MD, axial diffusivity (AD and radial diffusivity (RD. Further correlation analyses revealed that the in MD, AD and RD values showed significantly positive correlations with the blood urea nitrogen in the left superior temporal gyrus and significantly negative correlations with the calcium levels in the left superior frontal gyrus (orbital part in the patients.Our findings suggest that ESRD is associated with widespread diffusion abnormalities in both WM and GM regions in the brain, and microstructural integrity of several GM regions are related to biochemical alterations in the disease.

  13. Bilingualism as a contributor to cognitive reserve: evidence from brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Tom A; Ware, Jenna; Fischer, Corinne E; Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    Much of the research on delaying the onset of symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has focused on pharmacotherapy, but environmental factors have also been acknowledged to play a significant role. Bilingualism may be one factor contributing to 'cognitive reserve' (CR) and therefore to a delay in symptom onset. If bilingualism is protective, then the brains of bilinguals should show greater atrophy in relevant areas, since their enhanced CR enables them to function at a higher level than would be predicted from their level of disease. We analyzed a number of linear measurements of brain atrophy from the computed tomography (CT) scans of monolingual and bilingual patients diagnosed with probable AD who were matched on level of cognitive performance and years of education. Bilingual patients with AD exhibited substantially greater amounts of brain atrophy than monolingual patients in areas traditionally used to distinguish AD patients from healthy controls, specifically, the radial width of the temporal horn and the temporal horn ratio. Other measures of brain atrophy were comparable for the two groups. Bilingualism appears to contribute to increased CR, thereby delaying the onset of AD and requiring the presence of greater amounts of neuropathology before the disease is manifest. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of melatonin on brain iron homeostasis and its relation to Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Hien Tet

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is the second most common neurological disorder after Alzheimer’s Disease. The disease will manifest with the loss of up to 70% of the dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra (SN) region and it mainly affects the elderly. One of the common pathological hallmarks for PD is the excessive iron accumulation within the SN region of the brain. However, the pathogenesis for of the excessive iron levels accumulation in the SN is unclear. The increase in intracellular oxi...

  15. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus-cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise the

  16. Chinese expert consensus on programming deep brain stimulation for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengdi; Gao, Guodong; Feng, Tao; Zhang, Jianguo

    2018-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease (PD) is now a well-established option for some patients. Postoperative standardized programming processes can improve the level of postoperative management and programming, relieve symptoms and improve quality of life. In order to improve the quality of the programming, the experts on DBS and PD in neurology and neurosurgery in China reviewed the relevant literatures and combined their own experiences and developed this expert consensus on the programming of deep brain stimulation in patients with PD in China. This Chinese expert consensus on postoperative programming can standardize and improve postoperative management and programming of DBS for PD.

  17. Intraoperative functional MRI as a new approach to monitor deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Sorger, Bettina; Girnus, Ralf; Lasek, Kathrin; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus; Maarouf, Mohammad; Sturm, Volker; Wedekind, Christoph; Bunke, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with technical aspects of intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for monitoring the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Under motor activation, therapeutic high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus was accompanied by an activation decrease in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and the ipsilateral cerebellum. Furthermore, an activation increase in the contralateral basal ganglia and insula region were detected. These findings demonstrate that fMRI constitutes a promising clinical application for investigating brain activity changes induced by DBS. (orig.)

  18. The expression and significance of tyrosine hydroxylase in the brain tissue of Parkinsons disease rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuan; Lian, Yajun; Ma, Yunqing; Wu, Chuanjie; Zheng, Yake; Xie, Nanchang

    2017-01-01

    The expression and significance of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in brain tissue of rats with Parkinson's disease (PD) were explored and analyzed. A total of 120 clean-grade and healthy adult Wistar rats weighing 180–240 g were randomly divided equally into four groups according to the random number table method. Rats were sacrificed before and after the model establishment for 3, 6 or 8 weeks. The number of revolutions in rats was observed and the relative expression of TH mRNA in brain tissue w...

  19. Functional Brain Connectome and Its Relation to Hoehn and Yahr Stage in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Xueling; Lei, Du; Li, Nannan; Cheng, Lan; Chen, Fuqin; Wang, Meiyun; Kemp, Graham J; Peng, Rong; Gong, Qiyong

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To use resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and graph theory approaches to investigate the brain functional connectome and its potential relation to disease severity in Parkinson disease (PD). Materials and Methods This case-control study was approved by the local research ethics committee, and all participants provided informed consent. There were 153 right-handed patients with PD and 81 healthy control participants recruited who were matched for age, sex, and handedness to undergo a 3-T resting-state functional MR examination. The whole-brain functional connectome was constructed by thresholding the Pearson correlation matrices of 90 brain regions, and the topologic properties were analyzed by using graph theory approaches. Nonparametric permutation tests were used to compare topologic properties, and their relationship to disease severity was assessed. Results The functional connectome in PD showed abnormalities at the global level (ie, decrease in clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency, and increase in characteristic path length) and at the nodal level (decreased nodal centralities in the sensorimotor cortex, default mode, and temporal-occipital regions; P left postcentral gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus correlated negatively with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III score (P = .038, false discovery rate corrected, r = -0.198; and P = .009, false discovery rate corrected, r = -0.270, respectively) and decreased with increasing Hoehn and Yahr stage in patients with PD. Conclusion The configurations of brain functional connectome in patients with PD were perturbed and correlated with disease severity, notably with those responsible for motor functions. These results provide topologic insights into understanding the neural functional changes in relation to disease severity of PD. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article. An earlier incorrect version of this article

  20. The neurotechnological revolution: unlocking the brain's secrets to develop innovative technologies as well as treatments for neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The brain contains all that makes us human, but its complexity is the source of both inspiration and frailty. Aging population is increasingly in need of effective care and therapies for brain diseases, including stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The world's scientific community working hard to unravel the secrets of the brain's computing power and to devise technologies that can heal it when it fails and restore critical functions to patients with neurological conditions. Neurotechnology is the emerging field that brings together the development of technologies to study the brain and devices that improve and repair brain function. What is certain is the momentum behind neurotechnological research is building, and whether through implants, BCIs, or innovative computational systems inspired by the human brain, more light will be shed on our most complex and most precious organ, which will no doubt lead to effective treatment for many neurological conditions.

  1. Clinical application of 1H-chemical-shift imaging (CSI) to brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Furuya, Seiichi; Ide, Mariko

    1992-01-01

    An H-1 chemical shift imaging (CSI) was developed as part of the clinical MRI system, by which magnetic resonance spectra (MRS) can be obtained from multiple small voxels and metabolite distribution in the brain can be visualized. The present study was to determine the feasibility and clinical potential of using an H-1 CSI. The device used was a Magnetom H 15 apparatus. The study population was comprised of 25 healthy subjects, 20 patients with brain tumor, 4 with ischemic disease, and 6 with miscellaneous degenerative disease. The H-1 CSI was obtained by the 3-dimensional Fourier transformation. After suppressing the lipid signal by the inversion-recovery method and the water signal by the chemical-shift selective pulse with a following dephasing gradient, 2-directional 16 x 16 phase encodings were applied to the 16 x 16∼18 x 18 cm field of view, in which a 8 x 8 x 2∼10 x 10 x 2 cm area was selected by the stimulated echo or spin-echo method. The metabolite mapping and its contour mapping were created by using the curve-fitted area, with interpolation to the 256 x 256 matrix. In the healthy group, high resolution spectra for N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine, choline (Cho), and glutamine/glutamate were obtained from each voxel; and metabolite mapping and contour mapping also clearly showed metabolite distribution in the brain. In the group of brain tumor, an increased Cho and lactate and loss of NAA were observed, along with heterogeneity within the tumor and changes in the surrounding tissue; and there was a good correlation between lactate peak and tumor malignancy. The group of ischemic and degenerative disease had a decreased NAA and increased lactate on both spectra and metabolite mapping, depending on disease stage. These findings indicated that H-1 CSI is helpful for detecting spectra over the whole brain, as well as for determining metabolite distribution. (N.K.)

  2. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matioli, Maria Niures P.S.; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM) can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection. PMID:29213950

  3. Brain correlates of progressive olfactory loss in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campabadal, Anna; Uribe, Carme; Segura, Barbara; Baggio, Hugo C; Abos, Alexandra; Garcia-Diaz, Anna Isabel; Marti, Maria Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Bargallo, Nuria; Junque, Carme

    2017-08-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is present in a large proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) upon diagnosis. However, its progression over time has been poorly investigated. The few available longitudinal studies lack control groups or MRI data. To investigate the olfactory changes and their structural correlates in non-demented PD over a four-year follow-up. We assessed olfactory function in a sample of 25 PD patients and 24 normal controls of similar age using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification test (UPSIT). Structural magnetic resonance imaging data, obtained with a 3-T Siemens Trio scanner, were analyzed using FreeSurfer software. Analysis of variance showed significant group (F = 53.882; P effects, but the group-by-time interaction was not statistically significant. UPSIT performance declined ≥1.5 standard deviations in 5 controls and 7 patients. Change in UPSIT scores of patients correlated positively with volume change in the left putamen, right thalamus, and right caudate nucleus. Olfactory loss over time in PD and controls is similar, but we have observed significant correlation between this loss and basal ganglia volumes only in patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

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    Maria Niures P.S. Matioli

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection.

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites in brain function and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Richard P; Layé, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    The brain is highly enriched with fatty acids. These include the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which are largely esterified to the phospholipid cell membrane. Once PUFAs are released from the membrane, they can participate in signal transduction, either directly or after enzymatic conversion to a variety of bioactive derivatives ('mediators'). PUFAs and their mediators regulate several processes within the brain, such as neurotransmission, cell survival and neuroinflammation, and thereby mood and cognition. PUFA levels and the signalling pathways that they regulate are altered in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. Diet and drugs targeting PUFAs may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of brain disorders.

  6. The treatment of Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulation: current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Alexia-Sabine; Groiss, Stefan Jun; Elben, Saskia; Südmeyer, Martin; Schnitzler, Alfons; Wojtecki, Lars

    2015-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation has become a well-established symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease during the last 25 years. Besides improving motor symptoms and long-term motor complications, positive effects on patients' mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being and health-related quality of life have been recognized. Apart from that, numerous clinical trials analyzed effects on non-motor symptoms and side effects of deep brain stimulation. Several technical issues and stimulation paradigms have been and are still being developed to optimize the therapeutic effects, minimize the side effects and facilitate handling. This review summarizes current therapeutic issues, i.e., patient and target selection, surgical procedure and programming paradigms. In addition it focuses on neuropsychological effects and side effects of deep brain stimulation.

  7. The treatment of Parkinson′s disease with deep brain stimulation: current issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia-Sabine Moldovan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation has become a well-established symptomatic treatment for Parkinson′s disease during the last 25 years. Besides improving motor symptoms and long-term motor complications, positive effects on patients′ mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being and health-related quality of life have been recognized. Apart from that, numerous clinical trials analyzed effects on non-motor symptoms and side effects of deep brain stimulation. Several technical issues and stimulation paradigms have been and are still being developed to optimize the therapeutic effects, minimize the side effects and facilitate handling. This review summarizes current therapeutic issues, i.e., patient and target selection, surgical procedure and programming paradigms. In addition it focuses on neuropsychological effects and side effects of deep brain stimulation.

  8. Landmark-based deep multi-instance learning for brain disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Jun; Adeli, Ehsan; Shen, Dinggang

    2018-01-01

    In conventional Magnetic Resonance (MR) image based methods, two stages are often involved to capture brain structural information for disease diagnosis, i.e., 1) manually partitioning each MR image into a number of regions-of-interest (ROIs), and 2) extracting pre-defined features from each ROI for diagnosis with a certain classifier. However, these pre-defined features often limit the performance of the diagnosis, due to challenges in 1) defining the ROIs and 2) extracting effective disease-related features. In this paper, we propose a landmark-based deep multi-instance learning (LDMIL) framework for brain disease diagnosis. Specifically, we first adopt a data-driven learning approach to discover disease-related anatomical landmarks in the brain MR images, along with their nearby image patches. Then, our LDMIL framework learns an end-to-end MR image classifier for capturing both the local structural information conveyed by image patches located by landmarks and the global structural information derived from all detected landmarks. We have evaluated our proposed framework on 1526 subjects from three public datasets (i.e., ADNI-1, ADNI-2, and MIRIAD), and the experimental results show that our framework can achieve superior performance over state-of-the-art approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The medical food Souvenaid affects brain phospholipid metabolism in mild Alzheimer's disease: results from a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rijpma, A.; Graaf, M. van der; Lansbergen, M.M.; Meulenbroek, O.V.; Cetinyurek-Yavuz, A.; Sijben, J.W.; Heerschap, A.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Synaptic dysfunction contributes to cognitive impairment in Alzheimer?s disease and may be countered by increased intake of nutrients that target brain phospholipid metabolism. In this study, we explored whether the medical food Souvenaid affects brain phospholipid metabolism in patients with Alzheimer?s disease. Methods Thirty-four drug-naive patients with mild Alzheimer?s disease (Mini Mental State Examination score ?20) were enrolled in this exploratory, double-blind, randomized...

  10. Brain imaging for oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazawa, H.; Tsujikawa, T.; Kiyono, Y.; Ikawa, M.; Yoneda, M.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, one of the most probable molecular mechanisms for neuronal impairment, is reported to occur in the affected brain regions of various neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, many studies showed evidence of a link between oxidative stress or mitochondrial damage and neuronal degeneration. Basic in vitro experiments and postmortem studies demonstrated that biomarkers for oxidative damage can be observed in the pathogenic regions of the brain and the affected neurons. Model animal studies also showed oxidative damage associated with neuronal degeneration. The molecular imaging method with positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to delineate oxidatively stressed microenvironments to elucidate pathophysiological changes of the in vivo brain; however, only a few studies have successfully demonstrated enhanced stress in patients. Radioisotope copper labeled diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) may be the most promising candidate for this oxidative stress imaging. The tracer is usually known as a hypoxic tissue imaging PET probe, but the accumulation mechanism is based on the electron rich environment induced by mitochondrial impairment and/or microsomal over-reduction, and thus it is considered to represent the oxidative stress state correlated with the degree of disease severity. In this review, Cu-ATSM PET is introduced in detail from the basics to practical methods in clinical studies, as well as recent clinical studies on cerebrovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. Several other PET probes are also introduced from the point of view of neuronal oxidative stress imaging. These molecular imaging methods should be promising tools to reveal oxidative injuries in various brain diseases

  11. Synaptic Tau Seeding Precedes Tau Pathology in Human Alzheimer's Disease Brain

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    Sarah L. DeVos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is defined by the presence of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs composed of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates as well as extracellular amyloid-beta plaques. The presence and spread of tau pathology through the brain is classified by Braak stages and thought to correlate with the progression of AD. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the ability of tau pathology to move from one neuron to the next, suggesting a “prion-like” spread of tau aggregates may be an underlying cause of Braak tau staging in AD. Using the HEK293 TauRD-P301S-CFP/YFP expressing biosensor cells as a highly sensitive and specific tool to identify the presence of seed competent aggregated tau in brain lysate—i.e., tau aggregates that are capable of recruiting and misfolding monomeric tau—, we detected substantial tau seeding levels in the entorhinal cortex from human cases with only very rare NFTs, suggesting that soluble tau aggregates can exist prior to the development of overt tau pathology. We next looked at tau seeding levels in human brains of varying Braak stages along six regions of the Braak Tau Pathway. Tau seeding levels were detected not only in the brain regions impacted by pathology, but also in the subsequent non-pathology containing region along the Braak pathway. These data imply that pathogenic tau aggregates precede overt tau pathology in a manner that is consistent with transneuronal spread of tau aggregates. We then detected tau seeding in frontal white matter tracts and the optic nerve, two brain regions comprised of axons that contain little to no neuronal cell bodies, implying that tau aggregates can indeed traverse along axons. Finally, we isolated cytosolic and synaptosome fractions along the Braak Tau Pathway from brains of varying Braak stages. Phosphorylated and seed competent tau was significantly enriched in the synaptic fraction of brain regions that did not have extensive cellular tau

  12. Microbiome-Derived Lipopolysaccharide Enriched in the Perinuclear Region of Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

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    Yuhai Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abundant clinical, epidemiological, imaging, genetic, molecular, and pathophysiological data together indicate that there occur an unusual inflammatory reaction and a disruption of the innate-immune signaling system in Alzheimer’s disease (AD brain. Despite many years of intense study, the origin and molecular mechanics of these AD-relevant pathogenic signals are still not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that an intensely pro-inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, part of a complex mixture of pro-inflammatory neurotoxins arising from abundant Gram-negative bacilli of the human gastrointestinal (GI tract, are abundant in AD-affected brain neocortex and hippocampus. For the first time, we provide evidence that LPS immunohistochemical signals appear to aggregate in clumps in the parenchyma in control brains, and in AD, about 75% of anti-LPS signals were clustered around the periphery of DAPI-stained nuclei. As LPS is an abundant secretory product of Gram-negative bacilli resident in the human GI-tract, these observations suggest (i that a major source of pro-inflammatory signals in AD brain may originate from internally derived noxious exudates of the GI-tract microbiome; (ii that due to aging, vascular deficits or degenerative disease these neurotoxic molecules may “leak” into the systemic circulation, cerebral vasculature, and on into the brain; and (iii that this internal source of microbiome-derived neurotoxins may play a particularly strong role in shaping the human immune system and contributing to neural degeneration, particularly in the aging CNS. This “Perspectives” paper will further highlight some very recent developments that implicate GI-tract microbiome-derived LPS as an important contributor to inflammatory-neurodegeneration in the AD brain.

  13. Framingham coronary heart disease risk score can be predicted from structural brain images in elderly subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Maryam Rondina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent literature has presented evidence that cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF play an important role on cognitive performance in elderly individuals, both those who are asymptomatic and those who suffer from symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. Findings from studies applying neuroimaging methods have increasingly reinforced such notion. Studies addressing the impact of CVRF on brain anatomy changes have gained increasing importance, as recent papers have reported gray matter loss predominantly in regions traditionally affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and vascular dementia in the presence of a high degree of cardiovascular risk. In the present paper, we explore the association between CVRF and brain changes using pattern recognition techniques applied to structural MRI and the Framingham score (a composite measure of cardiovascular risk largely used in epidemiological studies in a sample of healthy elderly individuals. We aim to answer the following questions: Is it possible to decode (i.e., to learn information regarding cardiovascular risk from structural brain images enabling individual predictions? Among clinical measures comprising the Framingham score, are there particular risk factors that stand as more predictable from patterns of brain changes? Our main findings are threefold: i we verified that structural changes in spatially distributed patterns in the brain enable statistically significant prediction of Framingham scores. This result is still significant when controlling for the presence of the APOE 4 allele (an important genetic risk factor for both AD and cardiovascular disease. ii When considering each risk factor singly, we found different levels of correlation between real and predicted factors; however, single factors were not significantly predictable from brain images when considering APOE4 allele presence as covariate. iii We found important gender differences, and the possible causes of that finding are discussed.

  14. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

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    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  15. Differential pharmacological effects on brain reactivity and plasticity in Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Anna-Katharine eBrem

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI are the most commonly prescribed monotherapeutic medications for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, their underlying neurophysiological effects remain largely unknown.We investigated the effects of monotherapy (AChEI and combination therapy (AChEI and memantine on brain reactivity and plasticity. Patients treated with monotherapy (AChEI (N=7 were compared to patients receiving combination therapy (COM (N=9 and a group of age-matched, healthy controls (HC (N=13. Cortical reactivity and plasticity of the motor cortex (MC were examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Cognitive functions were assessed with the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-Cog, activities of daily living with the ADCS-ADL. In addition we assessed the degree of brain atrophy by measuring brain-scalp distances in seven different brain areas.Patient groups differed in resting motor threshold and brain atrophy, with COM showing a lower motor threshold but less atrophy than AChEI. COM showed similar plasticity effects as the HC group, while plasticity was reduced in AChEI. Long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI was impaired in both patient groups when compared to HC. ADAS-Cog scores were positively correlated with LICI measures and with brain atrophy, specifically in the left IPL.AD patients treated with mono- or combination therapy show distinct neurophysiological patterns. Further studies should investigate whether these measures might serve as biomarkers of treatment response and whether they could guide other therapeutic interventions.

  16. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoto, Masafumi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Toyoguchi, Yuuki; Oda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis

  17. Graph analysis of structural brain networks in Alzheimer's disease: beyond small world properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Majnu; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Ferbinteanu, Janina

    2017-03-01

    Changes in brain connectivity in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been investigated using graph analysis. However, these studies were based on small data sets, explored a limited range of network parameters, and did not focus on more restricted sub-networks, where neurodegenerative processes may introduce more prominent alterations. In this study, we constructed structural brain networks out of 87 regions using data from 135 healthy elders and 100 early AD patients selected from the Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS) database. We evaluated the graph properties of these networks by investigating metrics of network efficiency, small world properties, segregation, product measures of complexity, and entropy. Because degenerative processes take place at different rates in different brain areas, analysis restricted to sub-networks may reveal changes otherwise undetected. Therefore, we first analyzed the graph properties of a network encompassing all brain areas considered together, and then repeated the analysis after dividing the brain areas into two sub-networks constructed by applying a clustering algorithm. At the level of large scale network, the analysis did not reveal differences between AD patients and controls. In contrast, the same analysis performed on the two sub-networks revealed that small worldness diminished with AD only in the sub-network containing the areas of medial temporal lobe known to be heaviest and earliest affected. The second sub-network, which did not present significant AD-induced modifications of 'classical' small world parameters, nonetheless showed a trend towards an increase in small world propensity, a novel metric that unbiasedly quantifies small world structure. Beyond small world properties, complexity and entropy measures indicated that the intricacy of connection patterns and structural diversity decreased in both sub-networks. These results show that neurodegenerative processes impact volumetric

  18. Alterations in urine, serum and brain metabolomic profiles exhibit sexual dimorphism during malaria disease progression

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    Sharma Shobhona

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic changes in the host in response to Plasmodium infection play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of malaria. Alterations in metabolism of male and female mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA are reported here. Methods 1H NMR spectra of urine, sera and brain extracts of these mice were analysed over disease progression using Principle Component Analysis and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis. Results Analyses of overall changes in urinary profiles during disease progression demonstrate that females show a significant early post-infection shift in metabolism as compared to males. In contrast, serum profiles of female mice remain unaltered in the early infection stages; whereas that of the male mice changed. Brain metabolite profiles do not show global changes in the early stages of infection in either sex. By the late stages urine, serum and brain profiles of both sexes are severely affected. Analyses of individual metabolites show significant increase in lactate, alanine and lysine, kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid in sera of both males and females at this stage. Early changes in female urine are marked by an increase of ureidopropionate, lowering of carnitine and transient enhancement of asparagine and dimethylglycine. Several metabolites when analysed individually in sera and brain reveal significant changes in their levels in the early phase of infection mainly in female mice. Asparagine and dimethylglycine levels decrease and quinolinic acid increases early in sera of infected females. In brain extracts of females, an early rise in levels is also observed for lactate, alanine and glycerol, kynurenic acid, ureidopropionate and 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutyrate. Conclusions These results suggest that P. berghei infection leads to impairment of glycolysis, lipid metabolism, metabolism of tryptophan and degradation of uracil. Characterization of early changes along these pathways may be crucial for

  19. Lipopolysaccharide Associates with Amyloid Plaques, Neurons and Oligodendrocytes in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain: A Review

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    Xinhua Zhan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This review proposes that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, found in the wall of all Gram-negative bacteria could play a role in causing sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This is based in part upon recent studies showing that: Gram-negative E. coli bacteria can form extracellular amyloid; bacterial-encoded 16S rRNA is present in all human brains with over 70% being Gram-negative bacteria; ultrastructural analyses have shown microbes in erythrocytes of AD patients; blood LPS levels in AD patients are 3-fold the levels in control; LPS combined with focal cerebral ischemia and hypoxia produced amyloid-like plaques and myelin injury in adult rat cortex. Moreover, Gram-negative bacterial LPS was found in aging control and AD brains, though LPS levels were much higher in AD brains. In addition, LPS co-localized with amyloid plaques, peri-vascular amyloid, neurons, and oligodendrocytes in AD brains. Based upon the postulate LPS caused oligodendrocyte injury, degraded Myelin Basic Protein (dMBP levels were found to be much higher in AD compared to control brains. Immunofluorescence showed that the dMBP co-localized with β amyloid (Aβ and LPS in amyloid plaques in AD brain, and dMBP and other myelin molecules were found in the walls of vesicles in periventricular White Matter (WM. These data led to the hypothesis that LPS acts on leukocyte and microglial TLR4-CD14/TLR2 receptors to produce NFkB mediated increases of cytokines which increase Aβ levels, damage oligodendrocytes and produce myelin injury found in AD brain. Since Aβ1–42 is also an agonist for TLR4 receptors, this could produce a vicious cycle that accounts for the relentless progression of AD. Thus, LPS, the TLR4 receptor complex, and Gram-negative bacteria might be treatment or prevention targets for sporadic AD.

  20. Increased White Matter Inflammation in Aging- and Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

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    Divya Raj

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neuroinflammation, which is primarily mediated by microglia, plays an essential role in aging and neurodegeneration. It is still unclear whether this microglia-induced neuroinflammation occurs globally or is confined to distinct brain regions. In this study, we investigated microglia activity in various brain regions upon healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD-related pathology in both human and mouse samples. In purified microglia isolated from aging mouse brains, we found a profound gene expression pattern related to pro-inflammatory processes, phagocytosis, and lipid homeostasis. Particularly in white matter microglia of 24-month-old mice, abundant expression of phagocytic markers including Mac-2, Axl, CD16/32, Dectin1, CD11c, and CD36 was detected. Interestingly, in white matter of human brain tissue the first signs of inflammatory activity were already detected during middle age. Thus quantification of microglial proteins, such as CD68 (commonly associated with phagocytosis and HLA-DR (associated with antigen presentation, in postmortem human white matter brain tissue showed an age-dependent increase in immunoreactivity already in middle-aged people (53.2 ± 2.0 years. This early inflammation was also detectable by non-invasive positron emission tomography imaging using [11C]-(R-PK11195, a ligand that binds to activated microglia. Increased microglia activity was also prominently present in the white matter of human postmortem early-onset AD (EOAD brain tissue. Interestingly, microglia activity in the white matter of late-onset AD (LOAD CNS was similar to that of the aged clinically silent AD cases. These data indicate that microglia-induced neuroinflammation is predominant in the white matter of aging mice and humans as well as in EOAD brains. This white matter inflammation may contribute to the progression of neurodegeneration, and have prognostic value for detecting the onset and progression of aging and neurodegeneration.

  1. Preliminary study of Alzheimer's Disease diagnosis based on brain electrical signals using wireless EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, N.; Akbar, Y.; Khotimah, S. N.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.; Taruno, W. P.

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to study brain's electrical signals recorded using EEG as a basis for the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The subjects consisted of patients with AD, and normal subjects are used as the control. Brain signals are recorded for 3 minutes in a relaxed condition and with eyes closed. The data is processed using power spectral analysis, brain mapping and chaos test to observe the level of complexity of EEG's data. The results show a shift in the power spectral in the low frequency band (delta and theta) in AD patients. The increase of delta and theta occurs in lobus frontal area and lobus parietal respectively. However, there is a decrease of alpha activity in AD patients where in the case of normal subjects with relaxed condition, brain alpha wave dominates the posterior area. This is confirmed by the results of brain mapping. While the results of chaos analysis show that the average value of MMLE is lower in AD patients than in normal subjects. The level of chaos associated with neural complexity in AD patients with lower neural complexity is due to neuronal damage caused by the beta amyloid plaques and tau protein in neurons.

  2. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna; Sonntag, William E

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Recent Developments in Understanding Brain Aging: Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease and Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Ferenc; Freeman, Willard M.; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the Western world is aging, there is increasing awareness of age-related impairments in cognitive function and a rising interest in finding novel approaches to preserve cerebral health. A special collection of articles in The Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences brings together information of different aspects of brain aging, from latest developments in the field of neurodegenerative disorders to cerebral microvascular mechanisms of cognitive decline. It is emphasized that although the cellular changes that occur within aging neurons have been widely studied, more research is required as new signaling pathways are discovered that can potentially protect cells. New avenues for research targeting cellular senescence, epigenetics, and endocrine mechanisms of brain aging are also discussed. Based on the current literature it is clear that understanding brain aging and reducing risk for neurological disease with age requires searching for mechanisms and treatment options beyond the age-related changes in neuronal function. Thus, comprehensive approaches need to be developed that address the multiple, interrelated mechanisms of brain aging. Attention is brought to the importance of maintenance of cerebromicrovascular health, restoring neuroendocrine balance, and the pressing need for funding more innovative research into the interactions of neuronal, neuroendocrine, inflammatory and microvascular mechanisms of cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26590911

  4. ROS and Brain Diseases: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel Popa-Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a major metabolizer of oxygen and yet has relatively feeble protective antioxidant mechanisms. This paper reviews the Janus-faced properties of reactive oxygen species. It will describe the positive aspects of moderately induced ROS but it will also outline recent research findings concerning the impact of oxidative and nitrooxidative stress on neuronal structure and function in neuropsychiatric diseases, including major depression. A common denominator of all neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia and ADHD is an increased inflammatory response of the brain caused either by an exposure to proinflammatory agents during development or an accumulation of degenerated neurons, oxidized proteins, glycated products, or lipid peroxidation in the adult brain. Therefore, modulation of the prooxidant-antioxidant balance provides a therapeutic option which can be used to improve neuroprotection in response to oxidative stress. We also discuss the neuroprotective role of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2 in the aged brain in response to oxidative stressors and nanoparticle-mediated delivery of ROS-scavenging drugs. The antioxidant therapy is a novel therapeutic strategy. However, the available drugs have pleiotropic actions and are not fully characterized in the clinic. Additional clinical trials are needed to assess the risks and benefits of antioxidant therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. A Culture-Brain Link: Negative Age Stereotypes Predict Alzheimer’s-disease Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Becca R.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B.; Slade, Martin D.; Troncoso, Juan; Resnick, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Although negative age stereotypes have been found to predict adverse outcomes among older individuals, it was unknown whether the influence of stereotypes extends to brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease. To consider this possibility, we drew on the age stereotypes of dementia-free participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging that had been measured decades before yearly MRIs and brain autopsies were performed. Those with more negative age stereotypes earlier in life had significantly steeper hippocampal-volume loss, and significantly greater accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques at autopsy, adjusting for relevant covariates. These findings suggest a new pathway to identifying mechanisms and potential interventions related to the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26641877

  6. A culture-brain link: Negative age stereotypes predict Alzheimer's disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Becca R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B; Slade, Martin D; Troncoso, Juan; Resnick, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    Although negative age stereotypes have been found to predict adverse outcomes among older individuals, it was unknown whether the influence of stereotypes extends to brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. To consider this possibility, we drew on dementia-free participants, in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, whose age stereotypes were assessed decades before yearly magnetic resonance images and brain autopsies were performed. Those holding more-negative age stereotypes earlier in life had significantly steeper hippocampal-volume loss and significantly greater accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques, adjusting for relevant covariates. These findings suggest a new pathway to identifying mechanisms and potential interventions related to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. MR imaging of the brain: metabolic and toxic white matter diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsting, M.

    1999-01-01

    Metabolic disorders of the brain are rare, complex and confusing. The diagnostic modality of choice nowadays is MRI. The high diagnostic sensitivity, however, is coupled with a lack of specificity and usually results in the depiction of similar appearing but clinically diverse white matter processes. For this reason it is essential to perform the MRI as early as possible during the course of the disease and to keep in close contact to the referring clinician to optimize image interpretation. Another precondition is to know the natural course of brain myelination and to know how this appears on the individual MR machine with different parameters. In some diseases like phenylketonuria MRI seems to be an excellent tool to monitor dietary treatment and patient compliance. In patients after radio- and / or chemotherapy MRI reveals the radiation induced leucencephalopathy and can usually differentiate between a recurrent malignancy. (orig.)

  8. MR imaging of the brain: metabolic and toxic white matter diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsting, M. [Univ. of Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    1999-08-01

    Metabolic disorders of the brain are rare, complex and confusing. The diagnostic modality of choice nowadays is MRI. The high diagnostic sensitivity, however, is coupled with a lack of specificity and usually results in the depiction of similar appearing but clinically diverse white matter processes. For this reason it is essential to perform the MRI as early as possible during the course of the disease and to keep in close contact to the referring clinician to optimize image interpretation. Another precondition is to know the natural course of brain myelination and to know how this appears on the individual MR machine with different parameters. In some diseases like phenylketonuria MRI seems to be an excellent tool to monitor dietary treatment and patient compliance. In patients after radio- and / or chemotherapy MRI reveals the radiation induced leucencephalopathy and can usually differentiate between a recurrent malignancy. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 23 refs.

  9. Cell Therapy in Parkinson's Disease: Host Brain Repair Machinery Gets a Boost From Stem Cell Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-06-01

    This commentary highlights the major findings and future research directions arising from the recent publication by Zuo and colleagues in Stem Cells 2017 (in press). Here, we discuss the novel observations that transplanted human neural stem cells can induce endogenous brain repair by specifically stimulating a host of regenerative processes in the neurogenic niche (i.e., subventricular zone [SVZ]) in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. That the identified therapeutic proteomes, neurotrophic factors, and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the SVZ may facilitate brain regeneration and behavioral recovery open a new venue of research for our understanding of the pathology and treatment of Parkinson's disease. Stem Cells 2017;35:1443-1445. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  10. [The brain and cytokines - the mutual origin of depression, obesity and cardiovascular diseases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnal, Marcin; Wolynczyk-Gmaj, Dorota

    2011-04-19

    Accumulating evidence points to a pivotal role of the brain in the regulation of the circulatory system and energy balance. It has also been found that common civilization diseases such as depression, obesity, hypertension, myocardial infarction or heart failure are accompanied by an increase in concentration of inflammatory mediators in the blood, cerebrospinal fluid and various tissues. Recent studies have revealed that inflammatory mediators that are synthesized peripherally or in the brain may affect the nervous regulation of animal body systems. For example, it has been found that non-specific pro-inflammatory stimuli as well as treatment with several cytokines may cause depressive behavior, disturbances in energy balance and alterations in the circulatory system. On the other hand, knockout of genes for pro-inflammatory cytokines or administration of anti-inflammatory mediators may normalize the pathological changes. In the present manuscript we will review studies that imply the common neuroinflammatory pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, depression and energy balance disorders.

  11. Synaptic activity and bioenergy homeostasis: implications in brain trauma and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha eKhatri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Powered by glucose metabolism, the brain is the most energy-demanding organ in our body, accounting for a quarter of total oxygen consumption. Adequate ATP production and regulation of the metabolic processes are essential for the maintenance of synaptic transmission and neuronal function. Glutamatergic synaptic activity utilizes the largest portion of bioenergy for synaptic events including neurotransmitter synthesis, vesicle recycling, and most importantly the postsynaptic activities leading to channel activation and rebalancing of ionic gradients. Bioenergy homeostasis is coupled with synaptic function via activities of the sodium pumps, glutamate transporters, glucose transport and mitochondria translocation. Energy insufficiency will be sensed by the AMP-activated dependent protein kinase (AMPK, a master metabolic regulator that stimulates the catalytic process to enhance energy production. A decline in energy supply and a disruption in bioenergy homeostasis play a critical role in multiple neuropathological conditions including ischemia, stroke and neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injuries.

  12. Mild traumatic brain injury is associated with reduced cortical thickness in those at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jasmeet P; Logue, Mark W; Sadeh, Naomi; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Verfaellie, Mieke; Hayes, Scott M; Reagan, Andrew; Salat, David H; Wolf, Erika J; McGlinchey, Regina E; Milberg, William P; Stone, Annjanette; Schichman, Steven A; Miller, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury is one of the strongest environmental risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as late-onset Alzheimer's disease, although it is unclear whether mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, also confers risk. This study examined mild traumatic brain injury and genetic risk as predictors of reduced cortical thickness in brain regions previously associated with early Alzheimer's disease, and their relationship with episodic memory. Participants were 160 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans between the ages of 19 and 58, many of whom carried mild traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder diagnoses. Whole-genome polygenic risk scores for the development of Alzheimer's disease were calculated using summary statistics from the largest Alzheimer's disease genome-wide association study to date. Results showed that mild traumatic brain injury moderated the relationship between genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and cortical thickness, such that individuals with mild traumatic brain injury and high genetic risk showed reduced cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease-vulnerable regions. Among males with mild traumatic brain injury, high genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease was associated with cortical thinning as a function of time since injury. A moderated mediation analysis showed that mild traumatic brain injury and high genetic risk indirectly influenced episodic memory performance through cortical thickness, suggesting that cortical thinning in Alzheimer's disease-vulnerable brain regions is a mechanism for reduced memory performance. Finally, analyses that examined the apolipoprotein E4 allele, post-traumatic stress disorder, and genetic risk for schizophrenia and depression confirmed the specificity of the Alzheimer's disease polygenic risk finding. These results provide evidence that mild traumatic brain injury is associated with greater neurodegeneration and reduced memory performance

  13. Abnormal metabolic brain network associated with Parkinson's disease: replication on a new European sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomse, Petra; Jensterle, Luka; Grmek, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Trost, Maja; Dhawan, Vijay; Peng, Shichun; Eidelberg, David; Ma, Yilong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the specific metabolic brain pattern characteristic for Parkinson's disease (PD): Parkinson's disease-related pattern (PDRP), using network analysis of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) brain images in a cohort of Slovenian PD patients. Twenty PD patients (age 70.1 ± 7.8 years, Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Motor Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS-III) 38.3 ± 12.2; disease duration 4.3 ± 4.1 years) and 20 age-matched normal controls (NCs) underwent FDG-PET brain imaging. An automatic voxel-based scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA) was applied to these scans for PDRP-Slovenia identification. The pattern was characterized by relative hypermetabolism in pallidum, putamen, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum associated with hypometabolism in sensorimotor cortex, posterior parietal, occipital, and frontal cortices. The expression of PDRP-Slovenia discriminated PD patients from NCs (p < 0.0001) and correlated positively with patients' clinical score (MDS-UPDRS-III, p = 0.03). Additionally, its topography agrees well with the original PDRP (p < 0.001) identified in American cohort of PD patients. We validated the PDRP-Slovenia expression on additional FDG-PET scans of 20 PD patients, 20 NCs, and 25 patients with atypical parkinsonism (AP). We confirmed that the expression of PDRP-Slovenia manifests good diagnostic accuracy with specificity and sensitivity of 85-90% at optimal pattern expression cutoff for discrimination of PD patients and NCs and is not expressed in AP. PDRP-Slovenia proves to be a robust and reproducible functional imaging biomarker independent of patient population. It accurately differentiates PD patients from NCs and AP and correlates well with the clinical measure of PD progression. (orig.)

  14. Pictures as a neurological tool: lessons from enhanced and emergent artistry in brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, G D

    2012-06-01

    Pictures created spontaneously by patients with brain disease often display impaired or diminished artistry, reflecting the patient's cerebral damage. This article explores the opposite: those pictures created in the face of brain disease that show enhanced or enduring artistry, and those that emerge for the first time in artistically naïve patients. After comments on background issues relating to the patient and the viewer, the paintings and drawings are considered in relation to the heterogeneous conditions in which this artistic creativity is seen. These conditions include various dementias-most notably frontotemporal lobar dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease, autism and related disorders and psychiatric disease, epilepsy, migraine and trauma. In the discussion, it is argued that evidence of underlying brain dysfunction revealed by these pictures often rests on the abnormal context in which the pictures are created, or on changes in artistry demonstrated by a sequence of pictures. In the former, the compulsive element and sensory and emotional accompaniments are often important features; in the latter, evolving changes are evident, and have included depiction of increasing menace in portrayal of faces. The occurrence of synaesthesia, and its relation to creativity, are briefly discussed in respect of two unusual patients, followed by considering the role of the anterior and frontal lobes, mesolimbic connections and the right hemisphere. In at least some patients, impaired inhibition leading to paradoxical functional facilitation, with compensatory changes particularly in the right posterior hemisphere, is likely to be pivotal in enabling unusual artistry to emerge; preservation of language, however, is not a prerequisite. Many patients studied have been artists, and it appears possible that some of those with an artistic predisposition may be more likely to experience pathologically obsessive creativity. The discussion concludes that occasionally pictures

  15. Impaired brain glymphatic flow in a rodent model of chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lythgoe, Mark; Hosford, Patrick; Arias, Natalia; Gallego-Duran, Rocio; Hadjihambi, Anna; Jalan, Rajiv; Gourine, Alexander; Habtesion, Abeba; Davies, Nathan; Harrison, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal function is exquisitely sensitive to alterations in extracellular environment. In patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE), accumulation of metabolic waste products and noxious substances in the interstitial fluid of the brain may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairment. In a rat model of chronic liver disease, we used an emerging dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI technique to assess the efficacy of the glymphatic system, which facilitates clearance of solutes from t...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of functional connectivity in Parkinson disease in the resting brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xian; Liu Bo; Luo Xiaodong; Li Ningna; Chen Zhiguang; Chen Jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate functional connectivity changes in Parkinson disease in the resting brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Nine patients with Parkinson disease and eight age-matched healthy volunteers were entered into the study. The bilateral globus pallidus were chosen as seed points, the functional MR data acquired in the resting state were processed to investigate functional connectivity in PD patients and the results were compared with those of the controls. Results: In age-matched healthy controls, there are regions which had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus, including bilateral temporal poles, bilateral hippocampus, bilateral thalami, posterior cingulate cortex, right middle occipital gyms and right superior parietal gyms. In PD patients, brain regions including bilateral cerebellum, left hippocampus, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, left inferior parietal gyrus and left superior parietal gyrus, had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus. Compared to healthy controls, increased functional connectivity in bilateral cerebellum, bilateral temporal lobes, left frontal lobe and left parietal lobe, and decreased functional connectivity in bilateral thalami were observed in PD patients. Conclusion: Abnormal changes of brain functional connectivity exists in Parkinson's disease in the resting state. (authors)

  17. Brain amyloid β protein and memory disruption in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Xia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Weiming XiaCenter for Neurologic Diseases, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The development of amyloid-containing neuritic plaques is an invariable characteristic of Alzheimer’s diseases (AD. The conversion from monomeric amyloid β protein (Aβ to oligomeric Aβ and finally neuritic plaques is highly dynamic. The specific Aß species that is correlated with disease severity remains to be discovered. Oligomeric Aβ has been detected in cultured cells, rodent and human brains, as well as human cerebrospinal fluid. Synthetic, cell, and brain derived Aβ oligomers have been found to inhibit hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP and this effect can be suppressed by the blockage of Aβ oligomer formation. A large body of evidence suggests that Aβ oligomers inhibit N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor dependent LTP; additional receptors have also been found to elicit downstream pathways upon binding to Aβ oligomers. Amyloid antibodies and small molecular compounds that reduce brain Aβ levels and block Aβ oligomer formation are capable of reversing synaptic dysfunction and these approaches hold a promising therapeutic potential to rescue memory disruption.Keywords: Alzheimer, amyloid, oligomer, long-term potentiation, NMDA

  18. Cerebral hemodynamics of the aging brain: risk of Alzheimer disease and benefit of aerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eTarumi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD and cerebrovascular disease often coexist with advanced age. Mounting evidence indicates that the presence of vascular disease and its risk factors increase the risk of AD, suggesting a potential overlap of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. In particular, atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and stiffening of central elastic arteries have been shown to associate with AD. Currently, there are no effective treatments for the cure and prevention of AD. Vascular risk factors are modifiable via either pharmacological or lifestyle intervention. In this regard, habitual aerobic exercise is increasingly recognized for its benefits on brain structure and cognitive function. Considering the well-established benefits of regular aerobic exercise on vascular health, exercise-related improvements in brain structure and cognitive function may be mediated by vascular adaptations. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the physiological mechanisms by which vascular health alters the structural and functional integrity of the aging brain and how improvements in vascular health, via regular aerobic exercise, potentially benefits cognitive function.

  19. Fluorescent nanodiamond tracking reveals intraneuronal transport abnormalities induced by brain-disease-related genetic risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haziza, Simon; Mohan, Nitin; Loe-Mie, Yann; Lepagnol-Bestel, Aude-Marie; Massou, Sophie; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Le, Xuan Loc; Viard, Julia; Plancon, Christine; Daudin, Rachel; Koebel, Pascale; Dorard, Emilie; Rose, Christiane; Hsieh, Feng-Jen; Wu, Chih-Che; Potier, Brigitte; Herault, Yann; Sala, Carlo; Corvin, Aiden; Allinquant, Bernadette; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Simonneau, Michel

    2017-05-01

    Brain diseases such as autism and Alzheimer's disease (each inflicting >1% of the world population) involve a large network of genes displaying subtle changes in their expression. Abnormalities in intraneuronal transport have been linked to genetic risk factors found in patients, suggesting the relevance of measuring this key biological process. However, current techniques are not sensitive enough to detect minor abnormalities. Here we report a sensitive method to measure the changes in intraneuronal transport induced by brain-disease-related genetic risk factors using fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs). We show that the high brightness, photostability and absence of cytotoxicity allow FNDs to be tracked inside the branches of dissociated neurons with a spatial resolution of 12 nm and a temporal resolution of 50 ms. As proof of principle, we applied the FND tracking assay on two transgenic mouse lines that mimic the slight changes in protein concentration (∼30%) found in the brains of patients. In both cases, we show that the FND assay is sufficiently sensitive to detect these changes.

  20. Tight junctions at the blood brain barrier: physiological architecture and disease-associated dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luissint Anny-Claude

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Blood–brain barrier (BBB, present at the level of the endothelium of cerebral blood vessels, selectively restricts the blood-to-brain paracellular diffusion of compounds; it is mandatory for cerebral homeostasis and proper neuronal function. The barrier properties of these specialized endothelial cells notably depend on tight junctions (TJs between adjacent cells: TJs are dynamic structures consisting of a number of transmembrane and membrane-associated cytoplasmic proteins, which are assembled in a multimolecular complex and acting as a platform for intracellular signaling. Although the structural composition of these complexes has been well described in the recent years, our knowledge about their functional regulation still remains fragmentary. Importantly, pericytes, embedded in the vascular basement membrane, and perivascular microglial cells, astrocytes and neurons contribute to the regulation of endothelial TJs and BBB function, altogether constituting the so-called neurovascular unit. The present review summarizes our current understanding of the structure and functional regulation of endothelial TJs at the BBB. Accumulating evidence points to a correlation between BBB dysfunction, alteration of TJ complexes and progression of a variety of CNS diseases, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and brain tumors, as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. Understanding how TJ integrity is controlled may thus help improve drug delivery across the BBB and the design of therapeutic strategies for neurological disorders.

  1. Brain mitochondria as a primary target in the development of treatment strategies for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Palacios, Hector H; Walrafen, Brianna; Lipsitt, Amanda E; Obrenovich, Mark E; Morales, Ludis

    2009-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular accidents are two leading causes of age-related dementia. Increasing evidence supports the idea that chronic hypoperfusion is primarily responsible for the pathogenesis that underlies both disease processes. In this regard, hypoperfusion appears to induce oxidative stress (OS), which is largely due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), and over time initiates mitochondrial failure which is known as an initiating factor of AD. Recent evidence indicates that chronic injury stimulus induces hypoperfusion seen in vulnerable brain regions. This reduced regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) then leads to energy failure within the vascular endothelium and associated brain parenchyma, manifested by damaged mitochondrial ultrastructure (the formation of large number of immature, electron-dense "hypoxic" mitochondria) and by overproduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Additionally, these mitochondrial abnormalities co-exist with increased redox metal activity, lipid peroxidation, and RNA oxidation. Interestingly, vulnerable neurons and glial cells show mtDNA deletions and oxidative stress markers only in the regions that are closely associated with damaged vessels, and, moreover, brain vascular wall lesions linearly correlate with the degree of neuronal and glial cell damage. We summarize the large body of evidence which indicates that sporadic, late-onset AD results from a vascular etiology by briefly reviewing mitochondrial damage and vascular risk factors associated with the disease and then we discuss the cerebral microvascular changes reason for the energy failure that occurs in normal aging and, to a much greater extent, AD.

  2. Recent advances in basic neurosciences and brain disease: from synapses to behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salter Michael W

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding basic neuronal mechanisms hold the hope for future treatment of brain disease. The 1st international conference on synapse, memory, drug addiction and pain was held in beautiful downtown Toronto, Canada on August 21–23, 2006. Unlike other traditional conferences, this new meeting focused on three major aims: (1 to promote new and cutting edge research in neuroscience; (2 to encourage international information exchange and scientific collaborations; and (3 to provide a platform for active scientists to discuss new findings. Up to 64 investigators presented their recent discoveries, from basic synaptic mechanisms to genes related to human brain disease. This meeting was in part sponsored by Molecular Pain, together with University of Toronto (Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physiology as well as Center for the Study of Pain. Our goal for this meeting is to promote future active scientific collaborations and improve human health through fundamental basic neuroscience researches. The second international meeting on Neurons and Brain Disease will be held in Toronto (August 29–31, 2007.

  3. Burr hole aspiration of brain abscess in children with cyanotic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.; Ahmed, S; Hussain, M.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of burr hole aspiration of brain abscess in children with cyanotic heart disease in terms of number of aspirations and residual abscess. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery at The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Multan, from July 2010 to June 2014. Methodology: Pediatric patients of cyanotic heart disease with brain abscess were admitted. After taking history, clinical examination and necessary investigation, spiration of abscess through a burr hole was performed. Data was collected through pre-designed proforma. Analysis of results was performed and comparison was made through statistical package for social sciences (SPSS-20). Results: Total number of patients were 50 with 31 (62%) male and 19 (38%) female children. Patients' age ranged from 5-10 years with mean age of 7.44 +-1.11 years. Single abscess in supra tentorial was commonly found in 44 (88%) patients. Multiple abscesses were present in 4 (8%) patients. Cerebellum was involved in 2 (4%) patients. Abscess was completely aspirated in single attempt in 37 (74%) patients, two attempts in 9 (18%) patients, and three attempts in 4 (8%) patients. No bacterial growth on culture was reported in 32 (64%) patients. Culture was positive in 18 (36%) patients. Postoperative hematoma developed in 2 (4%) patients. No mortality was reported in early postoperative period. Conclusion: Aspiration of brain abscess in children with cyanotic heart disease through a burr hole is safe and successful. (author)

  4. Amino Acid Catabolism in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeddidiah W. D. Griffin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a dire need to discover new targets for Alzheimer’s disease (AD drug development. Decreased neuronal glucose metabolism that occurs in AD brain could play a central role in disease progression. Little is known about the compensatory neuronal changes that occur to attempt to maintain energy homeostasis. In this review using the PubMed literature database, we summarize evidence that amino acid oxidation can temporarily compensate for the decreased glucose metabolism, but eventually altered amino acid and amino acid catabolite levels likely lead to toxicities contributing to AD progression. Because amino acids are involved in so many cellular metabolic and signaling pathways, the effects of altered amino acid metabolism in AD brain are far-reaching. Possible pathological results from changes in the levels of several important amino acids are discussed. Urea cycle function may be induced in endothelial cells of AD patient brains, possibly to remove excess ammonia produced from increased amino acid catabolism. Studying AD from a metabolic perspective provides new insights into AD pathogenesis and may lead to the discovery of dietary metabolite supplements that can partially compensate for alterations of enzymatic function to delay AD or alleviate some of the suffering caused by the disease.

  5. Glaucoma and Alzheimer Disease: A Single Age-Related Neurodegenerative Disease of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, Raffaele; Martucci, Alessio; Cesareo, Massimo; Giannini, Clarissa; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Nucci, Carlo

    2017-12-06

    Open Angle Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide. Elevated intraocular pressure is considered an important risk factor for glaucoma, however a subset of patients experience disease progression even in presence of normal intraocular pressure values. This implies that risk factors other than intraocular pressure are involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A possible relationship between glaucoma and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer Disease has been suggested. In this regard, we have recently described a high prevalence of alterations typical of glaucoma, using Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph-3 (HRT-3), in a group of patients with Alzheimer Disease. Interestingly, these alterations were not associated with elevated intraocular pressure or abnormal Central Corneal Thickness values. Alzheimer Disease is the most common form of dementia associated with progressive deterioration of memory and cognition. Complaints related to vision are common among Alzheimer Disease patients. Features common to both diseases, including risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms, gleaned from the recent literature do suggest that Alzheimer Disease and glaucoma can be considered age-related neurodegenerative diseases that may co-exist in the elderly. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Drug Delivery to the Brain in Alzheimer’s Disease: Consideration of the Blood-brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The successful treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) will require drugs that can negotiate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the BBB is not simply a physical barrier, but a complex interface that is in intimate communication with the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) and influenced by peripheral tissues. This review examines three aspects of the BBB in AD. First, it considers how the BBB may be contributing to the onset and progression of AD. In this regard, the BBB itself is a therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. Second, it examines how the BBB restricts drugs that might otherwise be useful in the treatment of AD and examines strategies being developed to deliver drugs to the CNS for the treatment of AD. Third, it considers how drug penetration across the AD BBB may differ from the BBB of normal aging. In this case, those differences can complicate the treatment of CNS diseases such as depression, delirium, psychoses, and pain control in the AD population. PMID:22202501

  7. Diagnostic usefulness of 3 tesla MRI of the brain for cushing disease in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Erina; Ozawa, Ayako; Matoba, Kaori; Motoki, Takanori; Tajima, Asako; Miyata, Ichiro; Ito, Junko; Inoshita, Naoko; Yamada, Syozo; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    It is sometimes difficult to confirm the location of a microadenoma in Cushing disease. Recently, we experienced an 11-yr-old female case of Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. She was referred to our hospital because of decrease of height velocity with body weight gain. On admission, she had typical symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Although no pituitary microadenomas were detected on 1.5 Tesla MRI of the brain, endocrinological examinations including IPS and CS sampling were consistent with Cushing disease with hyperprolactinemia. Oral administration of methyrapone instead of neurosurgery was started after discharge, but subsequent 3 Tesla MRI of the brain clearly demonstrated a 3-mm less-enhanced lesion in the left side of the pituitary gland. Finally, transsphenoidal surgery was performed, and a 3.5-mm left-sided microadenoma was resected. Compared with 1.5 Tesla MRI, 3 Tesla MRI offers the advantage of a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR), which provides higher resolution and proper image quality. Therefore, 3 Tesla MRI is a very useful tool to localize microadenomas in Cushing disease in children as well as in adults. It will be the first choice of radiological examinations in suspected cases of Cushing disease.

  8. Characteristics of Brain Perfusion in Patients of Parkinson's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Jae Woo; Kang, Young Kang [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    It was well known that cerebral blood perfusion is normal or diffusely decreased in the majority of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Actually we interpreted brain perfusion SPECT images of PD patients in the clinical situation, we observed various cerebral perfusion patterns in patients with PD. So we performed brain perfusion SPECT to know the brain perfusion patterns of PD patients and the difference of perfusion patterns according to the sex and the age. Also we classified PD patients into small groups based on the brain perfusion pattern. Two hundred nineteen patients (M: 70, F: 149, mean age: 62.9{+-}6.9 y/o) who were diagnosed as PD without dementia clinically and 55 patients (M: 15, F: 40, mean age: 61.4{+-}9.2 y/o) as normal controls who had no past illness history were performed {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT and neuropsychological test. At first, we compared all patients with PD and normal controls. Brain perfusion in left inferior frontal gyrus, left insula, left transverse temporal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left superior parietal lobule, right precuneus, right caudate tail were lower in patients with PD than normal controls. Secondly, we compared male and female patients with PD and normal controls, respectively. Brain perfusion SPECT showed more decreased cerebral perfusion in left hemisphere than right side in both male and female patients compared to normal controls. And there was larger hypoperfusion area in female patients compared with male. Thirdly, we classified patients with PD and normal controls into 4 groups according to the age and compared brain perfusion respectively. In patient below fifties, brain perfusion in both occipitoparietal and left temporal lobe were lower in PD group. As the patients with PD grew older, hypoperfusion area were shown in both frontal, temporal and limbic lobes. Fourthly, We were able to divide patients into small groups based on cerebral perfusion pattern. There was normal

  9. Patients' expectations in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Harutomo; Samuel, Michael; Douiri, Abdel; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2014-12-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson disease. However, some patients feel less satisfied with the outcome of surgery. We sought to study the relationship between expectations, satisfaction, and outcome in STN DBS for Parkinson disease. Twenty-two consecutive patients undergoing STN DBS completed a modified 39-item Parkinson disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. A satisfaction questionnaire accompanied the postoperative questionnaire. Patients expected a significant improvement from surgery preoperatively: preoperative score (median PDQ-39 summary score [interquartile range]): 37.0 (9.5), expected postoperative score: 13.0 (8.0), P Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these)

  11. Microglial dystrophy in the aged and Alzheimer's disease brain is associated with ferritin immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Kryslaine O; Sparks, D Larry; Streit, Wolfgang J

    2008-08-01

    Degeneration of microglial cells may be important for understanding the pathogenesis of aging-related neurodegeneration and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we analyzed the morphological characteristics of microglial cells in the nondemented and Alzheimer's disease (AD) human brain using ferritin immunohistochemistry. The central hypothesis was that expression of the iron storage protein ferritin increases the susceptibility of microglia to degeneration, particularly in the aged brain since senescent microglia might become less efficient in maintaining iron homeostasis and free iron can promote oxidative damage. In a primary set of 24 subjects (age range 34-97 years) examined, microglial cells immunoreactive for ferritin were found to constitute a subpopulation of the larger microglial pool labeled with an antibody for HLA-DR antigens. The majority of these ferritin-positive microglia exhibited aberrant morphological (dystrophic) changes in the aged and particularly in the AD brain. No spatial correlation was found between ferritin-positive dystrophic microglia and senile plaques in AD tissues. Analysis of a secondary set of human postmortem brain tissues with a wide range of postmortem intervals (PMI, average 10.94 +/- 5.69 h) showed that the occurrence of microglial dystrophy was independent of PMI and consequently not a product of tissue autolysis. Collectively, these results suggest that microglial involvement in iron storage and metabolism contributes to their degeneration, possibly through increased exposure of the cells to oxidative stress. We conclude that ferritin immunohistochemistry may be a useful method for detecting degenerating microglia in the human brain. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Brain infarction and the clinical expression of Alzheimer disease. The Nun Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, D A; Greiner, L H; Mortimer, J A; Riley, K P; Greiner, P A; Markesbery, W R

    1997-03-12

    To determine the relationship of brain infarction to the clinical expression of Alzheimer disease (AD). Cognitive function and the prevalence of dementia were determined for participants in the Nun Study who later died. At autopsy, lacunar and larger brain infarcts were identified, and senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the neocortex were quantitated. Participants with abundant senile plaques and some neurofibrillary tangles in the neocortex were classified as having met the neuropathologic criteria for AD. Convents in the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southern United States. A total of 102 college-educated women aged 76 to 100 years. Cognitive function assessed by standard tests and dementia and AD assessed by clinical and neuropathologic criteria. Among 61 participants who met the neuropathologic criteria for AD, those with brain infarcts had poorer cognitive function and a higher prevalence of dementia than those without infarcts. Participants with lacunar infarcts in the basal ganglia, thalamus, or deep white matter had an especially high prevalence of dementia, compared with those without infarcts (the odds ratio [OR] for dementia was 20.7, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.5-288.0). Fewer neuropathologic lesions of AD appeared to result in dementia in those with lacunar infarcts in the basal ganglia, thalamus, or deep white matter than in those without infarcts. In contrast, among 41 participants who did not meet the neuropathologic criteria for AD, brain infarcts were only weakly associated with poor cognitive function and dementia. Among all 102 participants, atherosclerosis of the circle of Willis was strongly associated with lacunar and large brain infarcts. These findings suggest that cerebrovascular disease may play an important role in determining the presence and severity of the clinical symptoms of AD.

  13. Patient-derived stem cells: pathways to drug discovery for brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eMackay-Sim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of drug discovery through stem cell biology is based on technological developments whose genesis is now coincident. The first is automated cell microscopy with concurrent advances in image acquisition and analysis, known as high content screening (HCS. The second is patient-derived stem cells for modelling the cell biology of brain diseases. HCS has developed from the requirements of the pharmaceutical industry for high throughput assays to screen thousands of chemical compounds in the search for new drugs. HCS combines new fluorescent probes with automated microscopy and computational power to quantify the effects of compounds on cell functions. Stem cell biology has advanced greatly since the discovery of genetic reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. There is now a rush of papers describing their generation from patients with various diseases of the nervous system. Although the majority of these have been genetic diseases, iPSCs have been generated from patients with complex diseases (schizophrenia and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. Some genetic diseases are also modelled in embryonic stem cells generated from blastocysts rejected during in vitro fertilisation. Neural stem cells have been isolated from post-mortem brain of Alzheimer’s patients and neural stem cells generated from biopsies of the olfactory organ of patients is another approach. These olfactory neurosphere-derived cells demonstrate robust disease-specific phenotypes in patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. High content screening is already in use to find small molecules for the generation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges for using stem cells for drug discovery are to develop robust stem cell culture methods that meet the rigorous requirements for repeatable, consistent quantities of defined cell types at the industrial scale necessary for high

  14. Wilson's disease: two treatment modalities. Correlations to pretreatment and posttreatment brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiros da Costa, Maria do Desterro [Federal University of Paraiba, Movement Disorders Unit, Paraiba (Brazil); Spitz, Mariana; Bacheschi, Luiz Alberto; Barbosa, Egberto Reis [University of Sao Paulo, Movement Disorders Unit, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Leite, Claudia Costa; Lucato, Leandro Tavares [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on Wilson's disease (WD) show lack of correlations between neurological and neuroimaging features. Long-term follow-up reports with sequential brain MRI in patients with neurological WD comparing different modalities of treatment are scarce. Eighteen patients with neurological WD underwent pretreatment and posttreatment brain MRI scans to evaluate the range of abnormalities and the evolution along these different periods. All patients underwent at least two MRI scans at different intervals, up to 11 years after the beginning of treatment. MRI findings were correlated with clinical picture, clinical severity, duration of neurological symptoms, and treatment with two different drugs. Patients were divided into two groups according to treatment: d-penicillamine (D-P), zinc (Zn), and Zn after the onset of severe intolerance to D-P. MRI scans before treatment showed, in all patients, hypersignal intensity lesions on T2- and proton-density-weighted images bilaterally and symmetrically at basal nuclei, thalamus, brain stem, cerebellum, brain cortex, and brain white matter. The most common neurological symptoms were: dysarthria, parkinsonism, dystonia, tremor, psychiatric disturbances, dysphagia, risus sardonicus, ataxia, chorea, and athetosis. From the neurological point of view, there was no difference on the evolution between the group treated exclusively with D-P and the one treated with Zn. Analysis of MRI scans with longer intervals after the beginning of treatment depicted a trend for neuroimaging worsening, without neurological correspondence, among patients treated with Zn. Neuroimaging pattern of evolution was more favorable for the group that received exclusively D-P. (orig.)

  15. Brain MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of early neurological involvement in Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piga, Mario; Satta, Loredana; Serra, Alessandra; Loi, Gianluigi; Murru, Alessandra; Demelia, Luigi; Sias, Alessandro; Marrosu, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in early detection of central nervous system abnormalities in patients affected by Wilson's disease (WD) with or without neurological involvement. Out of 25 consecutive WD patients, 13 showed hepatic involvement, ten hepatic and neurological manifestations, and twp hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms, including mainly movement disorders, major depression, and psychosis. Twenty-four healthy, age-gender matched subjects served as controls. All patients underwent brain MRI and 99m Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT before starting specific therapy. Voxel-by-voxel analyses were performed using statistical parametric mapping to compare differences in 99m Tc-ECD brain uptake between the two groups. Brain MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in seven patients (28%), six of whom were affected by hepatic and neurological forms. Brain perfusion SPECT showed pathological data in 19 patients (76%), revealing diffuse or focal hypoperfusion in superior frontal (Brodmann area (BA) 6), prefrontal (BA 9), parietal (BA 40), and occipital (BA 18, BA 39) cortices in temporal gyri (BA 37, BA 21) and in caudatus and putamen. Moreover, hepatic involvement was detected in nine subjects; eight presented both hepatic and neurological signs, while two exhibited WD-correlated hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric alterations. All but one patient with abnormal MRI matched with abnormal ECD SPECT. Pathologic MRI findings were obtained in six out of ten patients with hepatic and neurological involvement while abnormal ECD SPECT was revealed in eight patients. Both patients with hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric involvement displayed abnormal ECD SPECT and one displayed an altered MRI. These findings suggest that ECD SPECT might be useful in detecting early brain damage in WD, not only in the perspective of assessing and treating motor impairment but also in evaluating better the

  16. Wilson's disease: two treatment modalities. Correlations to pretreatment and posttreatment brain MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiros da Costa, Maria do Desterro; Spitz, Mariana; Bacheschi, Luiz Alberto; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Leite, Claudia Costa; Lucato, Leandro Tavares

    2009-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on Wilson's disease (WD) show lack of correlations between neurological and neuroimaging features. Long-term follow-up reports with sequential brain MRI in patients with neurological WD comparing different modalities of treatment are scarce. Eighteen patients with neurological WD underwent pretreatment and posttreatment brain MRI scans to evaluate the range of abnormalities and the evolution along these different periods. All patients underwent at least two MRI scans at different intervals, up to 11 years after the beginning of treatment. MRI findings were correlated with clinical picture, clinical severity, duration of neurological symptoms, and treatment with two different drugs. Patients were divided into two groups according to treatment: d-penicillamine (D-P), zinc (Zn), and Zn after the onset of severe intolerance to D-P. MRI scans before treatment showed, in all patients, hypersignal intensity lesions on T2- and proton-density-weighted images bilaterally and symmetrically at basal nuclei, thalamus, brain stem, cerebellum, brain cortex, and brain white matter. The most common neurological symptoms were: dysarthria, parkinsonism, dystonia, tremor, psychiatric disturbances, dysphagia, risus sardonicus, ataxia, chorea, and athetosis. From the neurological point of view, there was no difference on the evolution between the group treated exclusively with D-P and the one treated with Zn. Analysis of MRI scans with longer intervals after the beginning of treatment depicted a trend for neuroimaging worsening, without neurological correspondence, among patients treated with Zn. Neuroimaging pattern of evolution was more favorable for the group that received exclusively D-P. (orig.)

  17. The influence of general anesthesia on the brain in aged patients with previous ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Yasuaki; Kayama, Takamasa; Kondo, Rei; Oki, Masato; Takaoka, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    Whenever we discuss the overall results of surgical treatment for unruptured cerebral aneurysms, especially in aged patients, we tend to consider advanced age or general anesthesia as causes for unfavorable results. There are no reports concerning ischemic stroke events following general anesthesia in aged patients with a prior history of cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study is to clarify the influence of general anesthesia on the brats in aged patients with a previous history of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The subjects were 30 consecutive patients over 70 years of age with previous ischemic cerebrovascular disease who underwent various surgeries except brain and cardiac surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were 70 to 85 years old, with a mean age of 76. Twenty-three were men and 7 were women. Surgical procedures were 12 gastrointestinal, 6 orthopedic and 4 urogenital and others. The type of cerebrovascular disease evaluated by neuroradiologist and anesthesiologist based on MR imaging was devided as follows: 16 patients had minor stroke, 7 had transient ischemic attack/reversible ischemic neurological deficit (TIA/RIND) and 7 had asymptomatic cerebral infarction. MR angiography was also assessed to evaluate the main artery in the brain. Blood pressure and arterial blood gas (PaCO 2 ) during general anesthesia were analyzed, and the rate of systemic and neurological complications following general anesthesia were evaluated. MR angiography revealed no occlusion or severe stenosis of the main artery in the brain of any of the patients. The minimum systolic blood pressure showed less than 100 mmHg transiently for 5-20 minutes in 28 of 30 patients during general anesthesia. The minimum value was 65 mmHg maintained for 5 minutes. The minimum PaCO 2 during general anesthesia was as follows: 1 case 36 mmHg. There were no neurological complications following general anesthesia in this study. One of 30 patients (3.3%) had suffered from pneumonia

  18. Evaluation of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease by using FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y.H.; Zuo, C.T.; Zhao, J.; Lin, X.T.; Sun, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Patients are effectively treated with medication in their initial phases of Parkinson's disease. However, the drugs become less effective and the adverse effects revealed. Recent years, the chronic deep brain stimulation is becoming an important treatment for patients with patients with Parkinson's disease. It has shown that the Parkinson's state is characterized by pathological neural activity in the motor system including the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The chronic deep brain stimulation can make benefits in the patients by intermediate the pathological neural activity. It needs an external method to evaluate the mechanism of therapy and to monitor the effect of treatment. The objective of our study is to observe the regional glucose metabolism changes in the motor loops and demonstrate the mechanism of therapy and how to monitor the treatment. Patients and Methods: Employing FDG PET, we had studied 7 patients who suffered from Parkinson's disease all the patients were failing medical therapy.the electrodes were implanted in the brain by the direction of MRI.The target of DBS is STN. Resting FDG PET were performed on and off STN stimulation. Metabolic changes with DBS were correlated with clinical improvement as measured by changes in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor ratings off medication. PET imaging was read by visual interpretation in blind method and calculated by semi-quantitative analysis. The statistic data was analysis after FDG PET imaging. Results: Through the research, regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes with DBS on and off were correlated with clinical improvement as measured by changes in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor ratings. STN DBS improved UPDRS motor ratings (33%, P<0.001) and significantly increased regional glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, Parietal lobe cortex ipsilateral to stimulation. The heighten

  19. R6/2 Huntington's disease mice develop early and progressive abnormal brain metabolism and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda-Prado, Efrain; Popp, Susanna; Khan, Usman; Stefanov, Dimitre; Rodríguez, Jorge; Menalled, Liliana B; Dow-Edwards, Diana; Small, Scott A; Moreno, Herman

    2012-05-09

    A hallmark feature of Huntington's disease pathology is the atrophy of brain regions including, but not limited to, the striatum. Though MRI studies have identified structural CNS changes in several Huntington's disease (HD) mouse models, the functional consequences of HD pathology during the progression of the disease have yet to be investigated using in vivo functional MRI (fMRI). To address this issue, we first established the structural and functional MRI phenotype of juvenile HD mouse model R6/2 at early and advanced stages of disease. Significantly higher fMRI signals [relative cerebral blood volumes (rCBVs)] and atrophy were observed in both age groups in specific brain regions. Next, fMRI results were correlated with electrophysiological analysis, which showed abnormal increases in neuronal activity in affected brain regions, thus identifying a mechanism accounting for the abnormal fMRI findings. [(14)C] 2-deoxyglucose maps to investigate patterns of glucose utilization were also generated. An interesting mismatch between increases in rCBV and decreases in glucose uptake was observed. Finally, we evaluated the sensitivity of this mouse line to audiogenic seizures early in the disease course. We found that R6/2 mice had an increased susceptibility to develop seizures. Together, these findings identified seizure activity in R6/2 mice and show that neuroimaging measures sensitive to oxygen metabolism can be used as in vivo biomarkers, preceding the onset of an overt behavioral phenotype. Since fMRI-rCBV can also be obtained in patients, we propose that it may serve as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic responses in humans and HD mouse models.

  20. Predicting Alzheimer's disease by classifying 3D-Brain MRI images using SVM and other well-defined classifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoug, S; Abdel-Dayem, A; Passi, K; Gross, W; Alqarni, M

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting seniors age 65 and over. When AD is suspected, the diagnosis is usually confirmed with behavioural assessments and cognitive tests, often followed by a brain scan. Advanced medical imaging and pattern recognition techniques are good tools to create a learning database in the first step and to predict the class label of incoming data in order to assess the development of the disease, i.e., the conversion from prodromal stages (mild cognitive impairment) to Alzheimer's disease, which is the most critical brain disease for the senior population. Advanced medical imaging such as the volumetric MRI can detect changes in the size of brain regions due to the loss of the brain tissues. Measuring regions that atrophy during the progress of Alzheimer's disease can help neurologists in detecting and staging the disease. In the present investigation, we present a pseudo-automatic scheme that reads volumetric MRI, extracts the middle slices of the brain region, performs segmentation in order to detect the region of brain's ventricle, generates a feature vector that characterizes this region, creates an SQL database that contains the generated data, and finally classifies the images based on the extracted features. For our results, we have used the MRI data sets from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database.

  1. Altered brain mechanisms of emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marianne J U; Warren, Jason D; Henley, Susie M D; Draganski, Bogdan; Frackowiak, Richard S; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2012-04-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that causes motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairment, including an early decline in ability to recognize emotional states in others. The pathophysiology underlying the earliest manifestations of the disease is not fully understood; the objective of our study was to clarify this. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate changes in brain mechanisms of emotion recognition in pre-manifest carriers of the abnormal Huntington's disease gene (subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease): 16 subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease and 14 control subjects underwent 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanning while viewing pictures of facial expressions from the Ekman and Friesen series. Disgust, anger and happiness were chosen as emotions of interest. Disgust is the emotion in which recognition deficits have most commonly been detected in Huntington's disease; anger is the emotion in which impaired recognition was detected in the largest behavioural study of emotion recognition in pre-manifest Huntington's disease to date; and happiness is a positive emotion to contrast with disgust and anger. Ekman facial expressions were also used to quantify emotion recognition accuracy outside the scanner and structural magnetic resonance imaging with voxel-based morphometry was used to assess the relationship between emotion recognition accuracy and regional grey matter volume. Emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease was associated with reduced neural activity for all three emotions in partially separable functional networks. Furthermore, the Huntington's disease-associated modulation of disgust and happiness processing was negatively correlated with genetic markers of pre-manifest disease progression in distributed, largely extrastriatal networks. The modulated disgust network included insulae, cingulate cortices, pre- and postcentral gyri, precunei, cunei, bilateral putamena

  2. The Effect of Souvenaid on Functional Brain Network Organisation in Patients with Mild Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomised Controlled Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, H.; Stam, C.J.; Lansbergen, M.M.; Wieggers, R.L.; Kamphuis, P.J.G.H.; Scheltens, P.; Maestu, F.; van Straaten, E.C.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Synaptic loss is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Disturbed organisation of large-scale functional brain networks in AD might reflect synaptic loss and disrupted neuronal communication. The medical food Souvenaid, containing the specific nutrient combination Fortasyn

  3. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: effectiveness in advanced Parkinson's disease patients previously reliant on apomorphine

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, T; Fox, S; Eldridge, P; Littlechild, P; Byrne, P; Forster, A; Marshall, A; Cameron, H; McIver, K; Fletcher, N; Steiger, M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the efficacy of bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease previously reliant on apomorphine as their main antiparkinsonian medication.

  4. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes through Integrated Study of Alzheimer's Disease Affected Brain Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Puthiyedth

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in older adults that damages the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behaviour. The identification of differentially expressed genes and related pathways among affected brain regions can provide more information on the mechanisms of AD. In the past decade, several studies have reported many genes that are associated with AD. This wealth of information has become difficult to follow and interpret as most of the results are conflicting. In that case, it is worth doing an integrated study of multiple datasets that helps to increase the total number of samples and the statistical power in detecting biomarkers. In this study, we present an integrated analysis of five different brain region datasets and introduce new genes that warrant further investigation.The aim of our study is to apply a novel combinatorial optimisation based meta-analysis approach to identify differentially expressed genes that are associated to AD across brain regions. In this study, microarray gene expression data from 161 samples (74 non-demented controls, 87 AD from the Entorhinal Cortex (EC, Hippocampus (HIP, Middle temporal gyrus (MTG, Posterior cingulate cortex (PC, Superior frontal gyrus (SFG and visual cortex (VCX brain regions were integrated and analysed using our method. The results are then compared to two popular meta-analysis methods, RankProd and GeneMeta, and to what can be obtained by analysing the individual datasets.We find genes related with AD that are consistent with existing studies, and new candidate genes not previously related with AD. Our study confirms the up-regualtion of INFAR2 and PTMA along with the down regulation of GPHN, RAB2A, PSMD14 and FGF. Novel genes PSMB2, WNK1, RPL15, SEMA4C, RWDD2A and LARGE are found to be differentially expressed across all brain regions. Further investigation on these genes may provide new insights into the development of AD. In addition, we

  5. Association of Perivascular Localization of Aquaporin-4 With Cognition and Alzheimer Disease in Aging Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppenfeld, Douglas M; Simon, Matthew; Haswell, J Douglas; D'Abreo, Daryl; Murchison, Charles; Quinn, Joseph F; Grafe, Marjorie R; Woltjer, Randall L; Kaye, Jeffrey; Iliff, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD), are common within the aging population, yet the factors that render the aging brain vulnerable to these processes are unknown. Perivascular localization of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) facilitates the clearance of interstitial solutes, including amyloid-β, through the brainwide network of perivascular pathways termed the glymphatic system, which may be compromised in the aging brain. To determine whether alterations in AQP4 expression or loss of perivascular AQP4 localization are features of the aging human brain and to define their association with AD pathology. Expression of AQP4 was analyzed in postmortem frontal cortex of cognitively healthy and histopathologically confirmed individuals with AD by Western blot or immunofluorescence for AQP4, amyloid-β 1-42, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Postmortem tissue and clinical data were provided by the Oregon Health and Science University Layton Aging and Alzheimer Disease Center and Oregon Brain Bank. Postmortem tissue from 79 individuals was evaluated, including cognitively intact "young" individuals aged younger than 60 years (range, 33-57 years), cognitively intact "aged" individuals aged older than 60 years (range, 61-96 years) with no known neurological disease, and individuals older than 60 years (range, 61-105 years) of age with a clinical history of AD confirmed by histopathological evaluation. Forty-eight patient samples (10 young, 20 aged, and 18 with AD) underwent histological analysis. Sixty patient samples underwent Western blot analysis (15 young, 24 aged, and 21 with AD). Expression of AQP4 protein, AQP4 immunoreactivity, and perivascular AQP4 localization in the frontal cortex were evaluated. Expression of AQP4 was associated with advancing age among all individuals (R2 = 0.17; P = .003). Perivascular AQP4 localization was significantly associated with AD status independent of age (OR, 11.7 per 10% increase in localization; z

  6. Alterations of whole-brain cortical area and thickness in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanming; Wang, Jian; Gui, Li; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Chen; Du, Hanjian

    2011-01-01

    Gray matter volume and density of several brain regions, determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are decreased in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Animal studies have indicated that changes in cortical area size is relevant to thinking and behavior, but alterations of cortical area and thickness in the brains of individuals with AD or its likely precursor, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), have not been reported. In this study, 25 MCI subjects, 30 AD subjects, and 30 age-matched normal controls were recruited for brain MRI scans and Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) assessments. Based on the model using FreeSurfer software, two brain lobes were divided into various regions according to the Desikan-Killiany atlas and the cortical area and thickness of every region was compared and analyzed. We found a significant increase in cortical area of several regions in the frontal and temporal cortices, which correlated negatively with MMSE scores, and a significant decrease in cortical area of several regions in the parietal cortex and the cingulate gyrus in AD subjects. Increased cortical area was also seen in some regions of the frontal and temporal cortices in MCI subjects, whereas the cortical thickness of the same regions was decreased. Our observations suggest characteristic differences of the cortical area and thickness in MCI, AD, and normal control subjects, and these changes may help diagnose both MCI and AD.

  7. The Implication of the Brain Insulin Receptor in Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Folch

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain accumulation of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ, which form senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT and, eventually, neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Interestingly, epidemiological studies have described a relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and this pathology, being one of the risk factors for the development of AD pathogenesis. Information as it is, it would point out that, impairment in insulin signalling and glucose metabolism, in central as well as peripheral systems, would be one of the reasons for the cognitive decline. Brain insulin resistance, also known as Type 3 diabetes, leads to the increase of Aβ production and TAU phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and cognitive impairment, which are all hallmarks of AD. Moreover, given the complexity of interlocking mechanisms found in late onset AD (LOAD pathogenesis, more data is being obtained. Recent evidence showed that Aβ42 generated in the brain would impact negatively on the hypothalamus, accelerating the “peripheral” symptomatology of AD. In this situation, Aβ42 production would induce hypothalamic dysfunction that would favour peripheral hyperglycaemia due to down regulation of the liver insulin receptor. The objective of this review is to discuss the existing evidence supporting the concept that brain insulin resistance and altered glucose metabolism play an important role in pathogenesis of LOAD. Furthermore, we discuss AD treatment approaches targeting insulin signalling using anti-diabetic drugs and mTOR inhibitors.

  8. Voxel-based comparison of brain glucose metabolism between patients with Cushing's disease and healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms are common in patients with Cushing's disease (CD owing to elevated levels of glucocorticoids. Molecular neuroimaging methods may help to detect changes in the brain of patients with CD. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of brain metabolism and its association with serum cortisol level in CD. We compared brain metabolism, as measured using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET, between 92 patients with CD and 118 normal subjects on a voxel-wise basis. Pearson correlation was performed to evaluate the association between cerebral FDG uptake and serum cortisol level in patients with CD. We demonstrated that certain brain regions in patients with CD showed significantly increased FDG uptake, including the basal ganglia, anteromedial temporal lobe, thalamus, precentral cortex, and cerebellum. The clusters that demonstrated significantly decreased uptake were mainly located in the medial and lateral frontal cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule, medial occipital cortex, and insular cortex. The metabolic rate of the majority of these regions was found to be significantly correlated with the serum cortisol level. Our findings may help to explain the underlying mechanisms of cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms in patients exposed to excessive glucocorticoids and evaluate the efficacy of treatments during follow-up.

  9. The nuclear receptor PPARγ as a therapeutic target for cerebrovascular and brain dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektaria Nicolakakis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that regulate peripheral lipid and glucose metabolism. Three subtypes make up the PPAR family (α, γ, β/δ, and synthetic ligands for PPARα (fibrates and PPARγ (Thiazolidinediones, TZDs are currently prescribed for the respective management of dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. In contrast to the well characterized action of PPARs in the periphery, little was known about the presence or function of these receptors in the brain and cerebral vasculature, until fairly recently. Indeed, research in the last decade has uncovered these receptors in most brain cell types, and has shown that their activation, particularly that of PPARγ, is implicated in normal brain and cerebrovascular physiology, and confers protection under pathological conditions. Notably, accumulating evidence has highlighted the therapeutic potential of PPARγ ligands in the treatment of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, leading to the testing of the TZDs pioglitazone and rosiglitazone in AD clinical trials. This review will focus on the benefits of PPARγ agonists for vascular, neuronal and glial networks, and assess the value of these compounds as future AD therapeutics in light of evidence from transgenic mouse models and recent clinical trials.

  10. Computation of an MRI brain atlas from a population of Parkinson’s disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidakis, L.; Papageorgiou, I. E.; Damianou, C.; Psychogios, M. N.; Lingor, P.; von Eckardstein, K.; Hadjidemetriou, S.

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the brain. This study presents an MRI-based brain atlas of PD to characterize associated alterations for diagnostic and interventional purposes. The atlas standardizes primarily the implicated subcortical regions such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra (SN), subthalamic nucleus (STN), caudate nucleus (CN), thalamus (TH), putamen (PUT), and red nucleus (RN). The data were 3.0 T MRI brain images from 16 PD patients and 10 matched controls. The images used were T1-weighted (T 1 w), T2-weighted (T 2 w) images, and Susceptibility Weighted Images (SWI). The T1w images were the reference for the inter-subject non-rigid registration available from 3DSlicer. Anatomic labeling was achieved with BrainSuite and regions were refined with the level sets segmentation of ITK-Snap. The subcortical centers were analyzed for their volume and signal intensity. Comparison with an age-matched control group unravels a significant PD-related T1w signal loss in the striatum (CN and PUT) centers, but approximately a constant volume. The results in this study improve MRI based PD localization and can lead to the development of novel biomarkers.

  11. Brain perfusion SPECT correlates with CSF biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habert, Marie-Odile [UMR-S 678, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, INSERM, Paris (France); CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Souza, Leonardo Cruz de; Dubois, Bruno; Sarazin, Marie [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Research and Resource Memory Centre and INSERM U610, Paris (France); Lamari, Foudil; Jardel, Claude [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Department of Metabolic Biochemistry, Paris (France); Daragon, Nelle; Desarnaud, Serge [CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, AP-HP, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France)

    2010-03-15

    Our aim was to study the correlations between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker levels such as {beta}-amyloid 42 (A{beta}{sub 42}), total and phosphorylated tau protein (T-tau and P-tau) and brain perfusion SPECT in Alzheimer's disease (AD) using a voxel-based methodology. Patients (n = 31) with clinical features of AD (n = 25) or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) (n = 6) were retrospectively included. All subjects underwent the same clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging tests. They had a lumbar puncture and a brain perfusion ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) SPECT within a time interval of 10 ({+-}26) days. Correlations between CSF biomarker concentrations and perfusion were studied using SPM2 software. Individual normalised regional activity values were extracted from the eligible clusters for calculation of correlation coefficients. No significant correlation was found between A{beta}{sub 42} concentrations and brain perfusion. A significant correlation (p < 0.01, corrected) was found between T-tau or P-tau concentrations and perfusion in the left parietal cortex. Our results suggest a strong correlation between T-tau and P-tau levels and decreased brain perfusion in regions typically affected by neuropathological changes in AD. (orig.)

  12. An image-based model of brain volume biomarker changes in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Peter A; Young, Alexandra L; Oxtoby, Neil P; Marinescu, Razvan V; Firth, Nicholas C; Johnson, Eileanoir B; Mohan, Amrita; Sampaio, Cristina; Scahill, Rachael I; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Alexander, Daniel C

    2018-05-01

    Determining the sequence in which Huntington's disease biomarkers become abnormal can provide important insights into the disease progression and a quantitative tool for patient stratification. Here, we construct and present a uniquely fine-grained model of temporal progression of Huntington's disease from premanifest through to manifest stages. We employ a probabilistic event-based model to determine the sequence of appearance of atrophy in brain volumes, learned from structural MRI in the Track-HD study, as well as to estimate the uncertainty in the ordering. We use longitudinal and phenotypic data to demonstrate the utility of the patient staging system that the resulting model provides. The model recovers the following order of detectable changes in brain region volumes: putamen, caudate, pallidum, insula white matter, nonventricular cerebrospinal fluid, amygdala, optic chiasm, third ventricle, posterior insula, and basal forebrain. This ordering is mostly preserved even under cross-validation of the uncertainty in the event sequence. Longitudinal analysis performed using 6 years of follow-up data from baseline confirms efficacy of the model, as subjects consistently move to later stages with time, and significant correlations are observed between the estimated stages and nonimaging phenotypic markers. We used a data-driven method to provide new insight into Huntington's disease progression as well as new power to stage and predict conversion. Our results highlight the potential of disease progression models, such as the event-based model, to provide new insight into Huntington's disease progression and to support fine-grained patient stratification for future precision medicine in Huntington's disease.

  13. Discriminative analysis of Parkinson's disease based on whole-brain functional connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Chen

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been an increasing emphasis on applications of pattern recognition and neuroimaging techniques in the effective and accurate diagnosis of psychiatric or neurological disorders. In the present study, we investigated the whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity patterns of Parkinson's disease (PD, which are expected to provide additional information for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of this disease. First, we computed the functional connectivity between each pair of 116 regions of interest derived from a prior atlas. The most discriminative features based on Kendall tau correlation coefficient were then selected. A support vector machine classifier was employed to classify 21 PD patients with 26 demographically matched healthy controls. This method achieved a classification accuracy of 93.62% using leave-one-out cross-validation, with a sensitivity of 90.47% and a specificity of 96.15%. The majority of the most discriminative functional connections were located within or across the default mode, cingulo-opercular and frontal-parietal networks and the cerebellum. These disease-related resting-state network alterations might play important roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. Our results suggest that analyses of whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity patterns have the potential to improve the clinical diagnosis and treatment evaluation of PD.

  14. Beer and bread to brains and beyond: can yeast cells teach us about neurodegenerative disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitler, Aaron D

    2008-01-01

    For millennia, humans have harnessed the astonishing power of yeast, producing such culinary masterpieces as bread, beer and wine. Therefore, in this new millennium, is it very farfetched to ask if we can also use yeast to unlock some of the modern day mysteries of human disease? Remarkably, these seemingly simple cells possess most of the same basic cellular machinery as the neurons in the brain. We and others have been using the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model system to study the mechanisms of devastating neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. While very different in their pathophysiology, they are collectively referred to as protein-misfolding disorders because of the presence of misfolded and aggregated forms of various proteins in the brains of affected individuals. Using yeast genetics and the latest high-throughput screening technologies, we have identified some of the potential causes underpinning these disorders and discovered conserved genes that have proven effective in preventing neuron loss in animal models. Thus, these genes represent new potential drug targets. In this review, I highlight recent work investigating mechanisms of cellular toxicity in a yeast Parkinson's disease model and discuss how similar approaches are being applied to additional neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Abnormal metabolic brain networks in Parkinson's disease from blackboard to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic imaging in the rest state has provided valuable information concerning the abnormalities of regional brain function that underlie idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, network modeling procedures, such as spatial covariance analysis, have further allowed for the quantification of these changes at the systems level. In recent years, we have utilized this strategy to identify and validate three discrete metabolic networks in PD associated with the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disease. In this chapter, we will review and compare the specific functional topographies underlying parkinsonian akinesia/rigidity, tremor, and cognitive disturbance. While network activity progressed over time, the rate of change for each pattern was distinctive and paralleled the development of the corresponding clinical symptoms in early-stage patients. This approach is already showing great promise in identifying individuals with prodromal manifestations of PD and in assessing the rate of progression before clinical onset. Network modulation was found to correlate with the clinical effects of dopaminergic treatment and surgical interventions, such as subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) and gene therapy. Abnormal metabolic networks have also been identified for atypical parkinsonian syndromes, such as multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Using multiple disease-related networks for PD, MSA, and PSP, we have developed a novel, fully automated algorithm for accurate classification at the single-patient level, even at early disease stages. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deep brain two-photon NIR fluorescence imaging for study of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Congping; Liang, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Biao; Ip, Nancy Y.; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2018-02-01

    Amyloid depositions in the brain represent the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. The abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) and resulting toxic amyloid plaques are considered to be responsible for the clinical deficits including cognitive decline and memory loss. In vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of amyloid plaques in live AD mouse model through a chronic imaging window (thinned skull or craniotomy) provides a mean to greatly facilitate the study of the pathological mechanism of AD owing to its high spatial resolution and long-term continuous monitoring. However, the imaging depth for amyloid plaques is largely limited to upper cortical layers due to the short-wavelength fluorescence emission of commonly used amyloid probes. In this work, we reported that CRANAD-3, a near-infrared (NIR) probe for amyloid species with excitation wavelength at 900 nm and emission wavelength around 650 nm, has great advantages over conventionally used probes and is well suited for twophoton deep imaging of amyloid plaques in AD mouse brain. Compared with a commonly used MeO-X04 probe, the imaging depth of CRANAD-3 is largely extended for open skull cranial window. Furthermore, by using two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopic imaging, we characterized the intrinsic fluorescence of the "aging pigment" lipofuscin in vivo, which has distinct spectra from CRANAD-3 labeled plaques. This study reveals the unique potential of NIR probes for in vivo, high-resolution and deep imaging of brain amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Astrocytic modulation of Blood Brain Barrier: Perspectives on Parkinson´s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eCabezas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available TThe blood–brain barrier (BBB is a tightly regulated interface in the Central Nervous System that regulates the exchange of molecules in and out from the brain thus maintaining the CNS homeostasis. It is mainly composed of endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes that create a neurovascular unit with the adjacent neurons. Astrocytes are essential for the formation and maintenance of the BBB by providing secreted factors that lead to the adequate association between the cells of the BBB and the formation of strong tight junctions. Under neurological disorders, such as chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, Epilepsy, Alzheimer and Parkinson´s Diseases, a disruption of the BBB takes place, involving a lost in the permeability of the barrier and phenotypical changes in both the endothelial cells and astrocytes. In this aspect, it has been established that the process of reactive gliosis is a common feature of astrocytes during BBB disruption, which has a detrimental effect on the barrier function and a subsequent damage in neuronal survival. In this review we discuss the implications of astrocyte functions in the protection of the BBB, and in the development of Parkinson´s disease and related disorders. Additionally, we highlight the current and future strategies in astrocyte protection aimed at the development of restorative therapies for the BBB in pathological conditions.

  18. Modeling cognitive deficits following neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injuries with deep convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, Bethany; Weholt, Jake; Maia, Pedro D; Kutz, J Nathan

    2018-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis and assessment of neurodegenerative disease and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) remain open challenges. Both cause cognitive and functional deficits due to focal axonal swellings (FAS), but it is difficult to deliver a prognosis due to our limited ability to assess damaged neurons at a cellular level in vivo. We simulate the effects of neurodegenerative disease and TBI using convolutional neural networks (CNNs) as our model of cognition. We utilize biophysically relevant statistical data on FAS to damage the connections in CNNs in a functionally relevant way. We incorporate energy constraints on the brain by pruning the CNNs to be less over-engineered. Qualitatively, we demonstrate that damage leads to human-like mistakes. Our experiments also provide quantitative assessments of how accuracy is affected by various types and levels of damage. The deficit resulting from a fixed amount of damage greatly depends on which connections are randomly injured, providing intuition for why it is difficult to predict impairments. There is a large degree of subjectivity when it comes to interpreting cognitive deficits from complex systems such as the human brain. However, we provide important insight and a quantitative framework for disorders in which FAS are implicated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Association Between Motor Symptoms and Brain Metabolism in Early Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Véronique; Lavisse, Sonia; Payoux, Pierre; Goldman, Serge; Verny, Christophe; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Damier, Philippe; Supiot, Frédéric; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Remy, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Brain hypometabolism is associated with the clinical consequences of the degenerative process, but little is known about regional hypermetabolism, sometimes observed in the brain of patients with clinically manifest Huntington disease (HD). Studying the role of regional hypermetabolism is needed to better understand its interaction with the motor symptoms of the disease. To investigate the association between brain hypometabolism and hypermetabolism with motor scores of patients with early HD. This study started in 2001, and analysis was completed in 2016. Sixty symptomatic patients with HD and 15 healthy age-matched control individuals underwent positron emission tomography to measure cerebral metabolism in this cross-sectional study. They also underwent the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale motor test, and 2 subscores were extracted: (1) a hyperkinetic score, combining dystonia and chorea, and (2) a hypokinetic score, combining bradykinesia and rigidity. Statistical parametric mapping software (SPM5) was used to identify all hypo- and hypermetabolic regions in patients with HD relative to control individuals. Correlation analyses (P motor subscores and brain metabolic values were performed for regions with significant hypometabolism and hypermetabolism. Among 60 patients with HD, 22 were women (36.7%), and the mean (SD) age was 44.6 (7.6) years. Of the 15 control individuals, 7 were women (46.7%), and the mean (SD) age was 42.2 (7.3) years. In statistical parametric mapping, striatal hypometabolism was significantly correlated with the severity of all motor scores. Hypermetabolism was negatively correlated only with hypokinetic scores in the cuneus (z score = 3.95, P motor scores were associated with higher metabolic values in the inferior parietal lobule, anterior cingulate, inferior temporal lobule, the dentate nucleus, and the cerebellar lobules IV/V, VI, and VIII bilaterally corresponding to the motor regions of the cerebellum (z score = 3

  20. Brain Insulin Resistance and Deficiency as Therapeutic Targets in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease [AD] is the most common cause of dementia in North America. Despite 30+ years of intense investigation, the field lacks consensus regarding the etiology and pathogenesis of sporadic AD, and therefore we still do not know the best strategies for treating and preventing this debilitating and costly disease. However, growing evidence supports the concept that AD is fundamentally a metabolic disease with substantial and progressive derangements in brain glucose utilization and responsiveness to insulin and insulin-like growth factor [IGF] stimulation. Moreover, AD is now recognized to be heterogeneous in nature, and not solely the end-product of aberrantly processed, misfolded, and aggregated oligomeric amyloid-beta peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau. Other factors, including impairments in energy metabolism, increased oxidative stress, inflammation, insulin and IGF resistance, and insulin/IGF deficiency in the brain should be incorporated into all equations used to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to AD. Herein, the contributions of impaired insulin and IGF signaling to AD-associated neuronal loss, synaptic disconnection, tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and impaired energy metabolism are reviewed. In addition, we discuss current therapeutic strategies and suggest additional approaches based on the hypothesis that AD is principally a metabolic disease similar to diabetes mellitus. Ultimately, our ability to effectively detect, monitor, treat, and prevent AD will require more efficient, accurate and integrative diagnostic tools that utilize clinical, neuroimaging, biochemical, and molecular biomarker data. Finally, it is imperative that future therapeutic strategies for AD abandon the concept of uni-modal therapy in favor of multi-modal treatments that target distinct impairments at different levels within the brain insulin/IGF signaling cascades. PMID:22329651

  1. Marchiafava-Bignami disease: a case studied with brain magnetic resonance and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo Oliver, J.; Casas Parera, Ignacio; Libere, G.; Malagold, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To show the correlation between brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) and single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) in a patient with Marchiafava-Bignami (MB) disease. Background: MB disease is a rare disorder associated with chronic alcoholism. It is characterized by symmetric demyelination of corpus callosum (CC) and adjacent white matter. These lesions can be demonstrated both by computed tomography or/and MRI. Scarce information is available about MRI and SPECT according to the research done. Design/methods: A 79-year-old white man with a history of excessive alcohol consumption (predominantly wine) was admitted to our Institute. A decrease in his physical activity was evidenced in the two years prior to admission and in the last twelve months progressive dementia with hallucinations and severe apathy developed. On admission neurologic examination showed papillae pale in both eyes, left hearing loss, action tremor of upper limbs and proximal hyporeflexia with distal arreflexia of all four limbs was observed. Affectation of higher cortical functions was evident. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal and serology for syphilis and HIV were negative. Both renal and hepatic functions were normal. Brain MRI and SPECT were performed. The patient died 70 days after diagnosis of MB disease. Results: MRI scans of the brain showed multiple hyperintense T2-weighted lesions in white matter and basal ganglia. Cortical atrophy, especially in the fronto-temporal areas, and a CC thickness reduction were also observed. Sagittal view showed an irregular cavitation in the genu of the CC, hypointense and hyperintense on T1 and T2-weighted images respectively. The SPECT showed an abnormal low perfusion on both frontal lobes, left temporo-parietal lobes and right basal ganglia. Conclusion: The clinical features and MRI were consistent with the diagnosis of MB disease. MRI and SPECT studies showed the connection between the lesion in the CC and bilateral cortical

  2. Regional brain stem atrophy in idiopathic Parkinson's disease detected by anatomical MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jubault

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the dysfunction of dopaminergic dependent cortico-basal ganglia loops and diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms (tremors and/or rigidity and bradykinesia. Post-mortem studies tend to show that the destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra constitutes an intermediate step in a broader neurodegenerative process rather than a unique feature of Parkinson's disease, as a consistent pattern of progression would exist, originating from the medulla oblongata/pontine tegmentum. To date, neuroimaging techniques have been unable to characterize the pre-symptomatic stages of PD. However, if such a regular neurodegenerative pattern were to exist, consistent damages would be found in the brain stem, even at early stages of the disease. We recruited 23 PD patients at Hoenn and Yahr stages I to II of the disease and 18 healthy controls (HC matched for age. T1-weighted anatomical scans were acquired (MPRAGE, 1 mm3 resolution and analyzed using an optimized VBM protocol to detect white and grey matter volume reduction without spatial a priori. When the HC group was compared to the PD group, a single cluster exhibited statistical difference (p<0.05 corrected for false detection rate, 4287 mm3 in the brain stem, between the pons and the medulla oblongata. The present study provides in-vivo evidence that brain stem damage may be the first identifiable stage of PD neuropathology, and that the identification of this consistent damage along with other factors could help with earlier diagnosis in the future. This damage could also explain some non-motor symptoms in PD that often precede diagnosis, such as autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders.

  3. Changes in brain oxysterols at different stages of Alzheimer's disease: Their involvement in neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Testa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a gradually debilitating disease that leads to dementia. The molecular mechanisms underlying AD are still not clear, and at present no reliable biomarkers are available for the early diagnosis. In the last several years, together with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain has become increasingly implicated in AD progression. A significant body of evidence indicates that oxidized cholesterol, in the form of oxysterols, is one of the main triggers of AD. The oxysterols potentially most closely involved in the pathogenesis of AD are 24-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, respectively deriving from cholesterol oxidation by the enzymes CYP46A1 and CYP27A1. However, the possible involvement of oxysterols resulting from cholesterol autooxidation, including 7-ketocholesterol and 7β-hydroxycholesterol, is now emerging. In a systematic analysis of oxysterols in post-mortem human AD brains, classified by the Braak staging system of neurofibrillary pathology, alongside the two oxysterols of enzymatic origin, a variety of oxysterols deriving from cholesterol autoxidation were identified; these included 7-ketocholesterol, 7α-hydroxycholesterol, 4β-hydroxycholesterol, 5α,6α-epoxycholesterol, and 5β,6β-epoxycholesterol. Their levels were quantified and compared across the disease stages. Some inflammatory mediators, and the proteolytic enzyme matrix metalloprotease-9, were also found to be enhanced in the brains, depending on disease progression. This highlights the pathogenic association between the trends of inflammatory molecules and oxysterol levels during the evolution of AD. Conversely, sirtuin 1, an enzyme that regulates several pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory response, was reduced markedly with the progression of AD, supporting the hypothesis that the loss of sirtuin 1 might play a key role in AD. Taken together, these results strongly support the

  4. Proteomic Profiling in the Brain of CLN1 Disease Model Reveals Affected Functional Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikka, Saara; Monogioudi, Evanthia; Gotsopoulos, Athanasios; Soliymani, Rabah; Pezzini, Francesco; Scifo, Enzo; Uusi-Rauva, Kristiina; Tyynelä, Jaana; Baumann, Marc; Jalanko, Anu; Simonati, Alessandro; Lalowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are the most commonly inherited progressive encephalopathies of childhood. Pathologically, they are characterized by endolysosomal storage with different ultrastructural features and biochemical compositions. The molecular mechanisms causing progressive neurodegeneration and common molecular pathways linking expression of different NCL genes are largely unknown. We analyzed proteome alterations in the brains of a mouse model of human infantile CLN1 disease-palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (Ppt1) gene knockout and its wild-type age-matched counterpart at different stages: pre-symptomatic, symptomatic and advanced. For this purpose, we utilized a combination of laser capture microdissection-based quantitative liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS imaging to quantify/visualize the changes in protein expression in disease-affected brain thalamus and cerebral cortex tissue slices, respectively. Proteomic profiling of the pre-symptomatic stage thalamus revealed alterations mostly in metabolic processes and inhibition of various neuronal functions, i.e., neuritogenesis. Down-regulation in dynamics associated with growth of plasma projections and cellular protrusions was further corroborated by findings from RNA sequencing of CLN1 patients' fibroblasts. Changes detected at the symptomatic stage included: mitochondrial functions, synaptic vesicle transport, myelin proteome and signaling cascades, such as RhoA signaling. Considerable dysregulation of processes related to mitochondrial cell death, RhoA/Huntington's disease signaling and myelin sheath breakdown were observed at the advanced stage of the disease. The identified changes in protein levels were further substantiated by bioinformatics and network approaches, immunohistochemistry on brain tissues and literature knowledge, thus identifying various functional modules affected in the CLN1 childhood

  5. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves pain in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellaprat, Jean; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Canivet, Cindy; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Radji, Fatai; Arbus, Christophe; Gerdelat, Angélique; Chaynes, Patrick; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2014-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), chronic pain is a common symptom which markedly affects the quality of life. Some physiological arguments proposed that Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN-DBS) could improve pain in PD. We investigated in 58 PD patients the effect of STN-DBS on pain using the short McGill Pain Questionnaire and other pain parameters such as the Bodily discomfort subscore of the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire 39 and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale section II (UPDRS II) item 17. All pain scores were significantly improved 12 months after STN-DBS. This improvement was not correlated with motor improvement, depression scores or L-Dopa reduction. STN-DBS induced a substantial beneficial effect on pain in PD, independently of its motor effects and mood status of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Alzheimer disease and dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxton, Adrian W; Lozano, Andres M

    2013-01-01

    To review the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treatment of dementia. A PubMed literature search was conducted to identify all studies that have investigated the use of DBS for treatment of dementia. Three studies examined the use of DBS for dementia. One study involved fornix DBS for Alzheimer disease (AD), and two studies involved DBS of the nucleus basalis of Meynert, one to treat AD and one to treat Parkinson disease dementia. Evidence for the use of DBS to treat dementia is preliminary and limited. Fornix and nucleus basalis of Meynert DBS can influence activity in the pathologic neural circuits that underlie AD and Parkinson disease dementia. Further investigation into the potential clinical effects of DBS for dementia is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Oscillations in Pedunculopontine Nucleus in Parkinson's disease and its relationship with deep brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of deep brain stimulation (DBS of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN for the treatment of parkinsonian patients, particularly those in advanced stages with axial symptoms, has ignited interest into the study of this brain nucleus. In contrast to the extensively studied alterations of neural activity that occur in the basal ganglia in Parkinson’s disease (PD, our understanding of the activity of the PPN remains insufficient. In recent years, however, a series of studies recording oscillatory activity in the PPN of parkinsonian patients have made important findings. Here, we briefly review recent studies that explore the different kinds of oscillations observed in the PPN of parkinsonian patients, and how they underlie the pathophysiology of PD and the efficacy of PPN DBS in these disorders.

  8. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  9. Anaesthetic management of shoulder arthroscopic repair in Parkinson′s disease with deep brain stimulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranju Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the anaesthetic management of arthroscopic repair for complete rotator cuff tear of shoulder in a 59-year-old female with Parkinson′s disease (PD with deep brain stimulator (DBS using a combination of general anaesthesia with interscalene approach to brachial plexus block. The DBS consists of implanted electrodes in the brain connected to the implantable pulse generator (IPG normally placed in the anterior chest wall subcutaneously. It can be programmed externally from a hand-held device placed directly over the battery stimulator unit. In our patient, IPG with its leads was located in close vicinity of the operative site with potential for DBS malfunction. Implications of DBS in a patient with PD for shoulder arthroscopy for anaesthesiologist are discussed along with a brief review of DBS.

  10. Role of Sex Hormones on Brain Mitochondrial Function, with Special Reference to Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Gaignard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondria have a fundamental role in both cellular energy supply and oxidative stress regulation and are target of the effects of sex steroids, particularly the neuroprotective ones. Aging is associated with a decline in the levels of different steroid hormones, and this decrease may underline some neural dysfunctions. Besides, modifications in mitochondrial functions associated with aging processes are also well documented. In this review, we will discuss studies that describe the modifications of brain mitochondrial function and of steroid levels associated with physiological aging and with neurodegenerative diseases. A special emphasis will be placed on describing and discussing our recent findings concerning the concomitant study of mitochondrial function (oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative stress and brain steroid levels in both young (3-month-old and aged (20-month-old male and female mice.

  11. Early brain connectivity alterations and cognitive impairment in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Tudela, Raúl; López-Gil, Xavier; Soria, Guadalupe

    2018-02-07

    Animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are essential to understanding the disease progression and to development of early biomarkers. Because AD has been described as a disconnection syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based connectomics provides a highly translational approach to characterizing the disruption in connectivity associated with the disease. In this study, a transgenic rat model of AD (TgF344-AD) was analyzed to describe both cognitive performance and brain connectivity at an early stage (5 months of age) before a significant concentration of β-amyloid plaques is present. Cognitive abilities were assessed by a delayed nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) task preceded by a training phase where the animals learned the task. The number of training sessions required to achieve a learning criterion was recorded and evaluated. After DNMS, MRI acquisition was performed, including diffusion-weighted MRI and resting-state functional MRI, which were processed to obtain the structural and functional connectomes, respectively. Global and regional graph metrics were computed to evaluate network organization in both transgenic and control rats. The results pointed to a delay in learning the working memory-related task in the AD rats, which also completed a lower number of trials in the DNMS task. Regarding connectivity properties, less efficient organization of the structural brain networks of the transgenic rats with respect to controls was observed. Specific regional differences in connectivity were identified in both structural and functional networks. In addition, a strong correlation was observed between cognitive performance and brain networks, including whole-brain structural connectivity as well as functional and structural network metrics of regions related to memory and reward processes. In this study, connectivity and neurocognitive impairments were identified in TgF344-AD rats at a very early stage of the disease when most of the pathological hallmarks

  12. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus enhances emotional processing in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute; Volkmann, Jens; Regel, Sabine; Kornischka, Jürgen; Sturm, Volker; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2003-03-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is a new and highly effective therapy for complications of long-term levodopa therapy and motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson disease (PD). Clinical observations indicate additional influence on emotional behavior. Electrical stimulation of deep brain nuclei with pulse rates above 100 Hz provokes a reversible, lesioning-like effect. Here, the effect of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on emotional, cognitive, and motor performance in patients with PD (n = 12) was examined. The results were compared with the effects of a suprathreshold dose of levodopa intended to transiently restore striatal dopamine deficiency. Patients were tested during medication off/stimulation off (STIM OFF), medication off/stimulation on (STIM ON), and during the best motor state after taking levodopa without deep brain stimulation (MED). More positive self-reported mood and an enhanced mood induction effect as well as improvement in emotional memory during STIM ON were observed, while during STIM OFF, patients revealed reduced emotional performance. Comparable effects were revealed by STIM ON and MED. Cognitive performance was not affected by the different conditions and treatments. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus selectively enhanced affective processing and subjective well-being and seemed to be antidepressive. Levodopa and deep brain stimulation had similar effects on emotion. This finding may provide new clues about the neurobiologic bases of emotion and mood disorders, and it illustrates the important role of the basal ganglia and the dopaminergic system in emotional processing in addition to the well-known motor and cognitive functions.

  13. Multifactorial causal model of brain (dis)organization and therapeutic intervention: Application to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Carbonell, Félix M; Sotero, Roberto C; Chouinard-Decorte, Francois; Evans, Alan C

    2017-05-15

    Generative models focused on multifactorial causal mechanisms in brain disorders are scarce and generally based on limited data. Despite the biological importance of the multiple interacting processes, their effects remain poorly characterized from an integrative analytic perspective. Here, we propose a spatiotemporal multifactorial causal model (MCM) of brain (dis)organization and therapeutic intervention that accounts for local causal interactions, effects propagation via physical brain networks, cognitive alterations, and identification of optimum therapeutic interventions. In this article, we focus on describing the model and applying it at the population-based level for studying late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). By interrelating six different neuroimaging modalities and cognitive measurements, this model accurately predicts spatiotemporal alterations in brain amyloid-β (Aβ) burden, glucose metabolism, vascular flow, resting state functional activity, structural properties, and cognitive integrity. The results suggest that a vascular dysregulation may be the most-likely initial pathologic event leading to LOAD. Nevertheless, they also suggest that LOAD it is not caused by a unique dominant biological factor (e.g. vascular or Aβ) but by the complex interplay among multiple relevant direct interactions. Furthermore, using theoretical control analysis of the identified population-based multifactorial causal network, we show the crucial advantage of using combinatorial over single-target treatments, explain why one-target Aβ based therapies might fail to improve clinical outcomes, and propose an efficiency ranking of possible LOAD interventions. Although still requiring further validation at the individual level, this work presents the first analytic framework for dynamic multifactorial brain (dis)organization that may explain both the pathologic evolution of progressive neurological disorders and operationalize the influence of multiple interventional

  14. A neuroprotective brain-penetrating endopeptidase fusion protein ameliorates Alzheimer disease pathology and restores neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brian; Verma, Inder; Desplats, Paula; Morvinski, Dinorah; Rockenstein, Ed; Adame, Anthony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-06-20

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by widespread neurodegeneration throughout the association cortex and limbic system, deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the neuropil and around the blood vessels, and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. The endopeptidase neprilysin has been successfully used to reduce the accumulation of Aβ following intracranial viral vector delivery or ex vivo manipulated intracranial delivery. These therapies have relied on direct injections into the brain, whereas a clinically desirable therapy would involve i.v. infusion of a recombinant enzyme. We previously characterized a recombinant neprilysin that contained a 38-amino acid brain-targeting domain. Recombinant cell lines have been generated expressing this brain-targeted enzyme (ASN12). In this report, we characterize the ASN12 recombinant protein for pharmacology in a mouse as well as efficacy in two APPtg mouse models of AD. The recombinant ASN12 transited to the brain with a t½ of 24 h and accumulated to 1.7% of injected dose at 24 h following i.v. delivery. We examined pharmacodynamics in the tg2576 APPtg mouse with the prion promoter APP695 SWE mutation and in the Line41 mThy1 APP751 mutation mouse. Treatment of either APPtg mouse resulted in reduced Aβ, increased neuronal synapses, and improved learning and memory. In addition, the Line41 APPtg mice showed increased levels of C-terminal neuropeptide Y fragments and increased neurogenesis. These results suggest that the recombinant brain-targeted neprilysin, ASN12, may be an effective treatment for AD and warrant further investigation in clinical trials. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Deficient brain insulin signalling pathway in Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Fei; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Brain glucose metabolism is impaired in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is reported to increase the risk for dementia, including AD, but the underlying mechanism is not understood. Here, we investigated the brain insulin–PI3K–AKT signalling pathway in the autopsied frontal cortices from nine AD, 10 T2DM, eight T2DM–AD and seven control cases. We found decreases in the levels and activities of several components of the insulin–PI3K–AKT signalling pathway in AD and T2DM cases. The deficiency of insulin–PI3K–AKT signalling was more severe in individuals with both T2DM and AD (T2DM–AD). This decrease in insulin–PI3K–AKT signalling could lead to activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, the major tau kinase. The levels and the activation of the insulin–PI3K–AKT signalling components correlated negatively with the level of tau phosphorylation and positively with protein O-GlcNAcylation, suggesting that impaired insulin–PI3K–AKT signalling might contribute to neurodegeneration in AD through down-regulation of O-GlcNAcylation and the consequent promotion of abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration. The decrease in brain insulin–PI3K–AKT signalling also correlated with the activation of calpain I in the brain, suggesting that the decrease might be caused by calpain over-activation. Our findings provide novel insight into the molecular mechanism by which type 2 diabetes mellitus increases the risk for developing cognitive impairment and dementia in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:21598254

  16. Mast Cell Activation in Brain Injury, Stress, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Kempuraj

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are localized throughout the body and mediate allergic, immune, and inflammatory reactions. They are heterogeneous, tissue-resident, long-lived, and granulated cells. Mast cells increase their numbers in specific site in the body by proliferation, increased recruitment, increased survival, and increased rate of maturation from its progenitors. Mast cells are implicated in brain injuries, neuropsychiatric disorders, stress, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Brain mast cells are the first responders before microglia in the brain injuries since mast cells can release prestored mediators. Mast cells also can detect amyloid plaque formation during Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis. Stress conditions activate mast cells to release prestored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators and induce increased blood-brain barrier permeability, recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells into the brain and neuroinflammation. Stress induces the release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH from paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus and mast cells. CRH activates glial cells and mast cells through CRH receptors and releases neuroinflammatory mediators. Stress also increases proinflammatory mediator release in the peripheral systems that can induce and augment neuroinflammation. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a traumatic-chronic stress related mental dysfunction. Currently there is no specific therapy to treat PTSD since its disease mechanisms are not yet clearly understood. Moreover, recent reports indicate that PTSD could induce and augment neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Mast cells play a crucial role in the peripheral inflammation as well as in neuroinflammation due to brain injuries, stress, depression, and PTSD. Therefore, mast cells activation in brain injury, stress, and PTSD may accelerate the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases

  17. Mast Cell Activation in Brain Injury, Stress, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Selvakumar, Govindhasamy P; Thangavel, Ramasamy; Ahmed, Mohammad E; Zaheer, Smita; Raikwar, Sudhanshu P; Iyer, Shankar S; Bhagavan, Sachin M; Beladakere-Ramaswamy, Swathi; Zaheer, Asgar

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are localized throughout the body and mediate allergic, immune, and inflammatory reactions. They are heterogeneous, tissue-resident, long-lived, and granulated cells. Mast cells increase their numbers in specific site in the body by proliferation, increased recruitment, increased survival, and increased rate of maturation from its progenitors. Mast cells are implicated in brain injuries, neuropsychiatric disorders, stress, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Brain mast cells are the first responders before microglia in the brain injuries since mast cells can release prestored mediators. Mast cells also can detect amyloid plaque formation during Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Stress conditions activate mast cells to release prestored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators and induce increased blood-brain barrier permeability, recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells into the brain and neuroinflammation. Stress induces the release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus and mast cells. CRH activates glial cells and mast cells through CRH receptors and releases neuroinflammatory mediators. Stress also increases proinflammatory mediator release in the peripheral systems that can induce and augment neuroinflammation. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a traumatic-chronic stress related mental dysfunction. Currently there is no specific therapy to treat PTSD since its disease mechanisms are not yet clearly understood. Moreover, recent reports indicate that PTSD could induce and augment neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Mast cells play a crucial role in the peripheral inflammation as well as in neuroinflammation due to brain injuries, stress, depression, and PTSD. Therefore, mast cells activation in brain injury, stress, and PTSD may accelerate the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases including AD. This

  18. Changes of brain structure in Parkinson's disease patients with mild cognitive impairment analyzed via VBM technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuyuan; Nie, Kun; Huang, Biao; Mei, Mingjin; Guo, Manli; Xie, Sifen; Huang, Zhiheng; Wang, Limin; Zhao, Jiehao; Zhang, Yuhu; Wang, Lijuan

    2017-09-29

    To analyze changes in cerebral grey matter volume and white matter density in non-dementia Parkinson's disease patients using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) technology; to investigate features of brain structure changes in Parkinson's disease patients with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), and reveal their intrinsic pathological changes. Based on the diagnostic criteria of PD-MCI, 23 PD-MCI patients, 23 Parkinson's disease patients with normal cognition (PD-NC), and 21 age- and gender-matched healthy people were recruited for the study. Scans were performed on all subjects on a 3.0T MR scanner to obtain brain structural magnetic resonance images. Images were preprocessed using the VBM8 tool from SPM8 software package on the Matlab R2008a platform, and data were then analyzed using the SPM statistical software package to compare the differences of grey matter volume and white matter density between groups, and to evaluate the brain structural changes corresponding to the overall cognitive function. Compared to the control group, the PD-NC group suffered from grey matter atrophy, mainly found in the prefrontal lobe, limbic lobe and left temporal gyrus. The PD-MCI group suffered from grey matter atrophy found in the frontal lobe, limbic lobe, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Compared to the PD-NC group, the PD-MCI group suffered from grey matter atrophy found in the left-side middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus and frontal lobe. The grey matter regions correlated with MMSE score (mainly memory related) including the right cingulate gyrus and the limbic lobe. The grey matter regions correlated with MoCA score (mainly non-memory related) including the frontal lobe, basal ganglia, parahippocampal gyrus, occipital lobe and the cerebellum. Additionally, overall cognitive function in non-dementia PD was mainly located in the frontal and limbic system, and was dominated by subcortical atrophy. Structural changes in PD-MCI patients are associated with overall

  19. Imaging dopamine and opiate receptors in the human brain in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Dannals, R.F.; Frost, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical activity accompanies mental activity, but only recently has it been possible to begin to examine its nature. In 1983 the first imaging of a neuroreceptor in the human brain was accomplished with carbon-11 methyl spipeone, a ligand that binds preferentially to dopamine-2 receptors, 80% of which are located in the caudate nucleus and putamen. Quantitative imaging of serotonin-2, opiate, benzodiazapine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors has subsequently been accomplished. In studies of normal men and women, it has been found that dopamine and serotonin receptor activity decreases dramatically with age, such a decrease being more pronounced in men than in women and greater in the case of dopamine receptors than serotonin-2 receptors. Preliminary studies in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders suggests that dopamine-2 receptor activity is diminished in the caudate nucleus of patients with Huntington's disease. Positron tomography permits quantitative assay of picomolar quantities of neuroreceptors within the living human brain. Studies of patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, acute and chronic pain states and drug addiction are now in progress

  20. Programming Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease: The Toronto Western Hospital Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picillo, Marina; Lozano, Andres M; Kou, Nancy; Puppi Munhoz, Renato; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established and effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). After surgery, a number of extensive programming sessions are performed to define the most optimal stimulation parameters. Programming sessions mainly rely only on neurologist's experience. As a result, patients often undergo inconsistent and inefficient stimulation changes, as well as unnecessary visits. We reviewed the literature on initial and follow-up DBS programming procedures and integrated our current practice at Toronto Western Hospital (TWH) to develop standardized DBS programming protocols. We propose four algorithms including the initial programming and specific algorithms tailored to symptoms experienced by patients following DBS: speech disturbances, stimulation-induced dyskinesia and gait impairment. We conducted a literature search of PubMed from inception to July 2014 with the keywords "deep brain stimulation", "festination", "freezing", "initial programming", "Parkinson's disease", "postural instability", "speech disturbances", and "stimulation induced dyskinesia". Seventy papers were considered for this review. Based on the literature review and our experience at TWH, we refined four algorithms for: (1) the initial programming stage, and management of symptoms following DBS, particularly addressing (2) speech disturbances, (3) stimulation-induced dyskinesia, and (4) gait impairment. We propose four algorithms tailored to an individualized approach to managing symptoms associated with DBS and disease progression in patients with PD. We encourage established as well as new DBS centers to test the clinical usefulness of these algorithms in supplementing the current standards of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Systematic Investigation into Aging Related Genes in Brain and Their Relationship with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guofeng; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Mei, Hongkang

    2016-01-01

    Aging, as a complex biological process, is accompanied by the accumulation of functional loses at different levels, which makes age to be the biggest risk factor to many neurological diseases. Even following decades of investigation, the process of aging is still far from being fully understood, especially at a systematic level. In this study, we identified aging related genes in brain by collecting the ones with sustained and consistent gene expression or DNA methylation changes in the aging process. Functional analysis with Gene Ontology to these genes suggested transcriptional regulators to be the most affected genes in the aging process. Transcription regulation analysis found some transcription factors, especially Specificity Protein 1 (SP1), to play important roles in regulating aging related gene expression. Module-based functional analysis indicated these genes to be associated with many well-known aging related pathways, supporting the validity of our approach to select aging related genes. Finally, we investigated the roles of aging related genes on Alzheimer's Disease (AD). We found that aging and AD related genes both involved some common pathways, which provided a possible explanation why aging made the brain more vulnerable to Alzheimer's Disease.

  2. IGF-1: an endogenous link between traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ping; Tong, Wusong

    2017-08-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is dynamically involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and glucose regulation. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is considered to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). As alterations of IGF-1 have been implicated in both TBI and AD and the IGF-1 signaling also mediates the neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in both diseases, we propose that IGF-1 may act as the endogenous connection between TBI and AD. Growing evidence suggests that dysfunction of this pathway contributes to the progressive loss of neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD), one of the most frequent neurodegenerative disorders. These findings have led to numerous studies in preclinical models of neurodegenerative disorders targeting IGF-1 signaling with currently available antidiabetics. These studies have shown that exogenous administration of IGF-1 reverses signaling abnormalities and has neuroprotective effects. In the first part of this review, we discuss physiological functions of IGF-1 signaling pathway including its distribution within the brain and its relationship with TBI and AD. In the second part, we undertake a comprehensive overview of IGF-1 signaling in TBI and AD, respectively. We then detail targeted IGF-1 in preclinical models of neurodegeneration and the design of clinical trials that have used anti-diabetics for treating AD patients. We close with future considerations that treat relevant issues for successful translation of these encouraging preclinical results into clinical sessions.

  3. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; de Pandis, Maria Francesca; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest. Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281.

  4. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Methods Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Results Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Conclusions Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281 PMID:26469868

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy for inflammatory brain diseases; Magnetresonanzspektroskopie bei entzuendlichen Hirnerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Grunwald, I.Q.; Hartmann, K.M.; Politi, M.; Roth, C.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Farmakis, G. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive method for investigation of cerebral metabolite concentrations in various pathologic conditions. The clinical use of MRS for intracranial disorders is well established. In this review the characteristic MRS findings for the most important inflammatory brain diseases will be discussed. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanzspektroskopie (MRS) ist eine nichtinvasive Methode, die die Messung der Konzentration zerebraler Metaboliten erlaubt. Die Verwendung der MRS bei verschiedenen intrakraniellen Erkrankungen ist gut etabliert. In diesem Review werden die MRS-Charakteristiken der wichtigsten entzuendlichen Hirnerkrankungen diskutiert. (orig.)

  6. In Alzheimer's disease, 6-month treatment with GLP-1 analog prevents decline of brain glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients...... with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [11C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [18F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe...

  7. Olfactory Functioning in Parkinson's Disease: The Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hartevelt, Tim Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The sense of smell is vital for species survival in terms of food selection and detection as well as procreation. Disorders of the sense of smell are not uncommon and can have a significant effect on general health and well-being including quality of life. In Parkinson's disease (PD), the loss...... of sense of smell is one of the most common and earliest symptoms, appearing approximately 5 years prior to any motor symptoms. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has proven remarkably effective in alleviating the symptoms of PD including olfactory dysfunction. This remains a difficult area to research with many...

  8. GLP-1 analog raises glucose transport capacity of blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, M.; Brock, B.; Egefjord, L.

    2017-01-01

    transport capacity (Tmax) with [18F]FDG (FDG) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). Results: In both groups, the Tmax estimates declined in proportion to the duration of AD. The GLP-1 analog treatment very significantly (P cerebral cortex as a whole compared...... and degeneration. Hypothesis: The incretin hormone GLP-1 prevents the decline of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution in AD, and GLP-1 may directly activate GLUT1 transport in brain capillary endothelium. For this reason, we here...

  9. Anti-Amyloid-?-Mediated Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Brains

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Daniel; Cooke, Michael J.; Wang, Yuanfei; Green, David; Fraser, Paul E.; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated imaging of amyloid β (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) offers a promising strategy to detect and monitor specific Aβ species, such as oligomers, that have important pathological and therapeutic relevance. The major current limitation of antibodies as a diagnostic and imaging device is poor blood-brain-barrier permeability. A classical anti-Aβ antibody, 6E10, is modified with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a positron emitting isotope, Copper-64 (t(½) = 12.7 h), and intra...

  10. Laterality Influences Brain Atrophy in Parkinson's Disease - a Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Arci Santos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several neuroimaging studies revealed widespread neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease but only few considered the asymmetrical clinical presentation. Objective: To investigate gray matter (GM atrophy in Parkinson Disease considering the side of motor symptom onset. Methods: Sixty patients (57.87± 10.27 years diagnosed according to the Brain Bank criteria, 26 with right-sided disease onset (RDO and 34 with left-sided disease onset (LDO, were compared to 80 healthy controls (HC (57.1± 9.47 years. T1-weighted images were acquired on a 3T scanner. VBM8 (SPM8/Dartel on Matlab R2012b platform processed and analyzed the images. Statistics included a two-sample test (FWE p<0.05 with extent threshold of 20 voxels. In a secondary analysis, we used MRIcro software to flip the images right/left of 25 patients, which had a RDO, so that all images had the contralateral side of disease onset at the right hemisphere. Thirty-five HC images were flipped, as the hemispheres are not completely equivalent. Results: Compared to HC, GM atrophy in LDO was identified in the insula, putamen, anterior cingulate, frontotemporal cortex and right caudate. For the RDO group, anterior cingulate, insula, frontotemporal and occipital cortex. VBM of total brain-flipped images showed GM loss mainly in the left putamen, left olfactory cortex, amygdala, parahipocampal gyrus and in the rectus gyrus, insula, frontotemporal cortex, cuneus, precuneus and calcarine fissure bilaterally. (p<0.05 FWE corrected. Conclusions: The study revealed widespread GM atrophy in PD, predominantly in the left hemisphere. Future investigations should also consider handedness and side of onset to better characterize cerebral involvement and its progression in PD.

  11. Neurodevelopmental Abnormalities and Congenital Heart Disease: Insights into Altered Brain Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Paul D.; Ishibashi, Nobuyuki; Jonas, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    In the past two decades it has become evident that individuals born with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at risk of developing life-long neurological deficits. Multifactorial risk factors contributing to neurodevelopmental abnormalities associated with CHD have been identified; however the underlying etiologies remain largely unknown and efforts to address this issue have only recently begun. There has been a dramatic shift in focus from newly acquired brain injuries associated with corrective and palliative heart surgery to antenatal and preoperative factors governing altered brain maturation in CHD. In this review, we describe key time windows of development during which the immature brain is vulnerable to injury. Special emphasis is placed on the dynamic nature of cellular events and how CHD may adversely impact the cellular units and networks necessary for proper cognitive and motor function. In addition, we describe current gaps in knowledge and offer perspectives about what can be done to improve our understanding of neurological deficits in CHD. Ultimately, a multidisciplinary approach will be essential in order to prevent or improve adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in individuals surviving CHD. PMID:28302742

  12. Relating Education, Brain Structure, and Cognition: The Role of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyra E. Mortby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of education on cognitive and brain health is well established. While the direct effects of individual cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and obesity on cerebral structure have been investigated, little is understood about the possible interaction between the protective effect of education and the deleterious effects of CVD risk factors in predicting brain ageing and cognition. Using data from the PATH Through Life study (N=266, we investigated the protective effect of education on cerebral structure and function and tested a possible mediating role of CVD risk factors. Higher education was associated with larger regional grey/white matter volumes in the prefrontal cortex in men only. The association between education and cognition was mediated by brain volumes but only for grey matter and only in relation to information processing speed. CVD risk factors did not mediate the association between regional volumes and cognition. This study provides additional evidence in support for a protective effect of education on cerebral structures and cognition. However, it does not provide support for a mediating role of CVD risk factors in these associations.

  13. Lateralization of brain activity pattern during unilateral movement in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Hou, Yanan; Hallett, Mark; Zhang, Jiarong; Chan, Piu

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the lateralization of brain activity pattern during performance of unilateral movement in drug-naïve Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with only right hemiparkinsonian symptoms. Functional MRI was obtained when the subjects performed strictly unilateral right hand movement. A laterality index was calculated to examine the lateralization. Patients had decreased activity in the left putamen and left supplementary motor area, but had increased activity in the right primary motor cortex, right premotor cortex, left postcentral gyrus, and bilateral cerebellum. The laterality index was significantly decreased in PD patients compared with controls (0.41 ± 0.14 vs. 0.84 ± 0.09). The connectivity from the left putamen to cortical motor regions and cerebellum was decreased, while the interactions between the cortical motor regions, cerebellum, and right putamen were increased. Our study demonstrates that in early PD, the lateralization of brain activity during unilateral movement is significantly reduced. The dysfunction of the striatum-cortical circuit, decreased transcallosal inhibition, and compensatory efforts from cortical motor regions, cerebellum, and the less affected striatum are likely reasons contributing to the reduced motor lateralization. The disruption of the lateralized brain activity pattern might be a reason underlying some motor deficits in PD, like mirror movements or impaired bilateral motor coordination. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Excessive early-life dietary exposure: a potential source of elevated brain iron and a risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Dominic J; Cardoso, Bárbara Rita; Raven, Erika P; Double, Kay L; Finkelstein, David I; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Iron accumulates gradually in the ageing brain. In Parkinson's disease, iron deposition within the substantia nigra is further increased, contributing to a heightened pro-oxidant environment in dopaminergic neurons. We hypothesise that individuals in high-income countries, where cereals and infant formulae have historically been fortified with iron, experience increased early-life iron exposure that predisposes them to age-related iron accumulation in the brain. Combined with genetic factors that limit iron regulatory capacity and/or dopamine metabolism, this may increase the risk of Parkinson's diseases. We propose to (a) validate a retrospective biomarker of iron exposure in children; (b) translate this biomarker to adults; (c) integrate it with in vivo brain iron in Parkinson's disease; and (d) longitudinally examine the relationships between early-life iron exposure and metabolism, brain iron deposition and Parkinson's disease risk. This approach will provide empirical evidence to support therapeutically addressing brain iron deposition in Parkinson's diseases and produce a potential biomarker of Parkinson's disease risk in preclinical individuals.

  15. Decreased Complexity in Alzheimer's Disease: Resting-State fMRI Evidence of Brain Entropy Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a frequently observed, irreversible brain function disorder among elderly individuals. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI has been introduced as an alternative approach to assessing brain functional abnormalities in AD patients. However, alterations in the brain rs-fMRI signal complexities in mild cognitive impairment (MCI and AD patients remain unclear. Here, we described the novel application of permutation entropy (PE to investigate the abnormal complexity of rs-fMRI signals in MCI and AD patients. The rs-fMRI signals of 30 normal controls (NCs, 33 early MCI (EMCI, 32 late MCI (LMCI, and 29 AD patients were obtained from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI database. After preprocessing, whole-brain entropy maps of the four groups were extracted and subjected to Gaussian smoothing. We performed a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA on the brain entropy maps of the four groups. The results after adjusting for age and sex differences together revealed that the patients with AD exhibited lower complexity than did the MCI and NC controls. We found five clusters that exhibited significant differences and were distributed primarily in the occipital, frontal, and temporal lobes. The average PE of the five clusters exhibited a decreasing trend from MCI to AD. The AD group exhibited the least complexity. Additionally, the average PE of the five clusters was significantly positively correlated with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores and significantly negatively correlated with Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ scores and global Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR scores in the patient groups. Significant correlations were also found between the PE and regional homogeneity (ReHo in the patient groups. These results indicated that declines in PE might be related to changes in regional functional homogeneity in AD. These findings suggested that complexity analyses using PE

  16. Atopic diseases and inflammation of the brain in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theoharides, T C; Tsilioni, I; Patel, A B; Doyle, R

    2016-06-28

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect as many as 1 in 45 children and are characterized by deficits in sociability and communication, as well as stereotypic movements. Many children also show severe anxiety. The lack of distinct pathogenesis and reliable biomarkers hampers the development of effective treatments. As a result, most children with ASD are prescribed psychopharmacologic agents that do not address the core symptoms of ASD. Autoantibodies against brain epitopes in mothers of children with ASD and many such children strongly correlate with allergic symptoms and indicate an aberrant immune response, as well as disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent epidemiological studies have shown a strong statistical correlation between risk for ASD and either maternal or infantile atopic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, food allergies and food intolerance, all of which involve activation of mast cells (MCs). These unique tissue immune cells are located perivascularly in all tissues, including the thalamus and hypothalamus, which regulate emotions. MC-derived inflammatory and vasoactive mediators increase BBB permeability. Expression of the inflammatory molecules interleukin (IL-1β), IL-6, 1 L-17 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is increased in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid and serum of some patients with ASD, while NF-kB is activated in brain samples and stimulated peripheral blood immune cells of other patients; however, these molecules are not specific. Instead the peptide neurotensin is uniquely elevated in the serum of children with ASD, as is corticotropin-releasing hormone, secreted from the hypothalamus under stress. Both peptides trigger MC to release IL-6 and TNF, which in turn, stimulate microglia proliferation and activation, leading to disruption of neuronal connectivity. MC-derived IL-6 and TGFβ induce maturation of Th17 cells and MCs also secrete IL-17, which is increased in ASD. Serum IL-6 and TNF may define an ASD subgroup that

  17. Brain-specific fatty acid-binding protein is elevated in serum of patients with dementia-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.; de Vente, J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Vreeling, F.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Glatz, J.F.C.; Pelsers, M.A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a need for biomarkers in accessible matrices, such as blood, for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of brain-type fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) and heart-type FABP in patients with dementia-involving diseases.

  18. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in v

  19. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nemecek

    Full Text Available Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrP(TSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrP(TSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA. Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV, a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrP(TSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N. We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrP(TSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrP(TSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrP(TSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrP(TSE was more permissive than human PrP(TSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrP(TSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrP(TSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10⁻¹² of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrP(TSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect Pr

  20. Brain Aggregates: An Effective In Vitro Cell Culture System Modeling Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Misol; Kalume, Franck; Pitstick, Rose; Oehler, Abby; Carlson, George; DeArmond, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Drug discovery for neurodegenerative diseases is particularly challenging because of the discrepancies in drug effects between in vitro and in vivo studies. These discrepancies occur in part because current cell culture systems used for drug screening have many limitations. First, few cell culture systems accurately model human aging or neurodegenerative diseases. Second, drug efficacy may differ between dividing and stationary cells, the latter resembling nondividing neurons in the CNS. Brain aggregates (BrnAggs) derived from embryonic day 15 gestation mouse embryos may represent neuropathogenic processes in prion disease and reflect in vivo drug efficacy. Here, we report a new method for the production of BrnAggs suitable for drug screening and suggest that BrnAggs can model additional neurological diseases such as tauopathies. We also report a functional assay with BrnAggs by measuring electrophysiological activities. Our data suggest that BrnAggs could serve as an effective in vitro cell culture system for drug discovery for neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural and functional brain signatures of C9orf72 in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Ferraro, Pilar M; Riva, Nilo; Spinelli, Edoardo Gioele; Domi, Teuta; Carrera, Paola; Copetti, Massimiliano; Falzone, Yuri; Ferrari, Maurizio; Lunetta, Christian; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Quattrini, Angelo; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) motor neuron disease (MND) relative to disease severity-matched sporadic MND cases. We enrolled 19 C9orf72 and 67 disease severity-matched sporadic MND patients, and 22 controls. Sporadic cases were grouped in patients with: no cognitive/behavioral deficits (sporadic-motor); same patterns of cognitive/behavioral impairment as C9orf72 cases (sporadic-cognitive); shorter disease duration versus other sporadic groups (sporadic-early). C9orf72 patients showed cerebellar and thalamic atrophy versus all sporadic cases. All MND patients showed motor, frontal, and temporoparietal cortical thinning and motor and extramotor white matter damage versus controls, independent of genotype and presence of cognitive impairment. Compared with sporadic-early, C9orf72 patients revealed an occipital cortical thinning. C9orf72 patients had enhanced visual network functional connectivity versus sporadic-motor and sporadic-early cases. Structural cerebellar and thalamic damage and posterior cortical alterations are the brain magnetic resonance imaging signatures of C9orf72 MND. Frontotemporal cortical and widespread white matter involvement are likely to be an effect of the disease evolution rather than a C9orf72 marker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Disease progression in AIDS on PET fluorodeoxyglucose, CT and MR brain images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, R.C.; Bennett, L.; Gan, M.; Kloumehr, F.; Mathisen, G.; Jones, F.D.; Wasterlain, C.; Mandelkern, M.; Ropchan, J.; Blahd, W.; Yaghmal, I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper correlates changes in the brain demonstrated on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomographic (PET) scans and CT or MR images with disease severity in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Data from 30 patients who tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who were at various stages of AIDS, and who had undergone FDG PET, CT, and/or MR imaging were reviewed retrospectively. The average CD4 lymphocyte counts, an indicator of disease severity in AIDS, in 25 symptomatic (group I) and five healthy seropositive (group II) subjects were 300 and 694 cells/mm 3 , respectively. Cortical atrophy was present on CT and/or MR imaging in 92% in group I and only 20% in group II. Of the 17 patients in group I who underwent PET scans 11 demonstrated an elevated basal ganglia to frontal cortex (BG/FC) ratio of FDG uptake; only one of the four in group II had this finding

  3. Increased brain connectivity and activation after cognitive rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Cirarda, María; Ojeda, Natalia; Peña, Javier; Cabrera-Zubizarreta, Alberto; Lucas-Jiménez, Olaia; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos; Gómez-Beldarrain, Maria Ángeles; Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa

    2017-12-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated efficacy in improving cognitive functions in Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known about cerebral changes associated with an integrative cognitive rehabilitation in PD. To assess structural and functional cerebral changes in PD patients, after attending a three-month integrative cognitive rehabilitation program (REHACOP). Forty-four PD patients were randomly divided into REHACOP group (cognitive rehabilitation) and a control group (occupational therapy). T1-weighted, diffusion weighted and functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) during resting-state and during a memory paradigm (with learning and recognition tasks) were acquired at pre-treatment and post-treatment. Cerebral changes were assessed with repeated measures ANOVA 2 × 2 for group x time interaction. During resting-state fMRI, the REHACOP group showed significantly increased brain connectivity between the left inferior temporal lobe and the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared to the control group. Moreover, during the recognition fMRI task, the REHACOP group showed significantly increased brain activation in the left middle temporal area compared to the control group. During the learning fMRI task, the REHACOP group showed increased brain activation in the left inferior frontal lobe at post-treatment compared to pre-treatment. No significant structural changes were found between pre- and post-treatment. Finally, the REHACOP group showed significant and positive correlations between the brain connectivity and activation and the cognitive performance at post-treatment. This randomized controlled trial suggests that an integrative cognitive rehabilitation program can produce significant functional cerebral changes in PD patients and adds evidence to the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation programs in the therapeutic approach for PD.

  4. Structural Brain Abnormalities in Successfully Treated HIV Infection: Associations With Disease and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zoest, Rosan A; Underwood, Jonathan; De Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A; Cole, James H; Wit, Ferdinand W; Caan, Matthan W A; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Fuchs, Dietmar; Zetterberg, Henrik; Majoie, Charles B L M; Portegies, Peter; Winston, Alan; Sharp, David J; Gisslén, Magnus; Reiss, Peter

    2017-12-27

    Brain structural abnormalities have been reported in persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PLWH) who are receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but their pathophysiology remains unclear. We investigated factors associated with brain tissue volumes and white matter microstructure (fractional anisotropy) in 134 PLWH receiving suppressive cART and 79 comparable HIV-negative controls, aged ≥45 years, from the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS cohort, using multimodal neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Compared with controls, PLWH had lower gray matter volumes (-13.7 mL; 95% confidence interval, -25.1 to -2.2) and fractional anisotropy (-0.0073; 95% confidence interval, -.012 to -.0024), with the largest differences observed in those with prior clinical AIDS. Hypertension and the soluble CD14 concentration in cerebrospinal fluid were associated with lower fractional anisotropy. These associations were independent of HIV serostatus (Pinteraction = .32 and Pinteraction = .59, respectively) and did not explain the greater abnormalities in brain structure in relation to HIV infection. The presence of lower gray matter volumes and more white matter microstructural abnormalities in well-treated PLWH partly reflect a combination of historical effects of AIDS, as well as the more general influence of systemic factors, such as hypertension and ongoing neuroinflammation. Additional mechanisms explaining the accentuation of brain structure abnormalities in treated HIV infection remain to be identified. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Brain Connectivity Alterations Are Associated with the Development of Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Josie-Anne; McIntosh, Anthony R; Postuma, Ronald B; Kovacevic, Natasha; Latreille, Véronique; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Dementia affects a high proportion of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and poses a burden on caregivers and healthcare services. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a common nonevasive and nonexpensive technique that can easily be used in clinical settings to identify brain functional abnormalities. Only few studies had identified EEG abnormalities that can predict PD patients at higher risk for dementia. Brain connectivity EEG measures, such as multiscale entropy (MSE) and phase-locking value (PLV) analyses, may be more informative and sensitive to brain alterations leading to dementia than previously used methods. This study followed 62 dementia-free PD patients for a mean of 3.4 years to identify cerebral alterations that are associated with dementia. Baseline resting state EEG of patients who developed dementia (N = 18) was compared to those of patients who remained dementia-free (N = 44) and of 37 healthy subjects. MSE and PLV analyses were performed. Partial least squares statistical analysis revealed group differences associated with the development of dementia. Patients who developed dementia showed higher signal complexity and lower PLVs in low frequencies (mainly in delta frequency) than patients who remained dementia-free and controls. Conversely, both patient groups showed lower signal variability and higher PLVs in high frequencies (mainly in gamma frequency) compared to controls, with the strongest effect in patients who developed dementia. These findings suggest that specific disruptions of brain communication can be measured before PD patients develop dementia, providing a new potential marker to identify patients at highest risk of developing dementia and who are the best candidates for neuroprotective trials.

  6. Multifunctional roles of enolase in Alzheimer's disease brain: beyond altered glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Lange, Miranda L Bader

    2009-11-01

    Enolase enzymes are abundantly expressed, cytosolic carbon-oxygen lyases known for their role in glucose metabolism. Recently, enolase has been shown to possess a variety of different regulatory functions, beyond glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, associated with hypoxia, ischemia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by elevated oxidative stress and subsequent damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques, and loss of synapse and neuronal cells. It is unclear if development of a hypometabolic environment is a consequence of or contributes to AD pathology, as there is not only a significant decline in brain glucose levels in AD, but also there is an increase in proteomics identified oxidatively modified glycolytic enzymes that are rendered inactive, including enolase. Previously, our laboratory identified alpha-enolase as one the most frequently up-regulated and oxidatively modified proteins in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), early-onset AD, and AD. However, the glycolytic conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate catalyzed by enolase does not directly produce ATP or NADH; therefore it is surprising that, among all glycolytic enzymes, alpha-enolase was one of only two glycolytic enzymes consistently up-regulated from MCI to AD. These findings suggest enolase is involved with more than glucose metabolism in AD brain, but may possess other functions, normally necessary to preserve brain function. This review examines potential altered function(s) of brain enolase in MCI, early-onset AD, and AD, alterations that may contribute to the biochemical, pathological, clinical characteristics, and progression of this dementing disorder.

  7. Hippocampal sclerosis of aging, a prevalent and high-morbidity brain disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles D.; Abner, Erin L.; Wilfred, Bernard J.; Wang, Wang-Xia; Neltner, Janna H.; Baker, Michael; Fardo, David W.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jellinger, Kurt A.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Schmitt, Frederick A.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is a causative factor in a large proportion of elderly dementia cases. The current definition of HS-Aging rests on pathologic criteria: neuronal loss and gliosis in the hippocampal formation that is out of proportion to AD-type pathology. HS-Aging is also strongly associated with TDP-43 pathology. HS-Aging pathology appears to be most prevalent in the oldest-old: autopsy series indicate that 5–30 % of nonagenarians have HS-Aging pathology. Among prior studies, differences in study design have contributed to the study-to-study variability in reported disease prevalence. The presence of HS-Aging pathology correlates with significant cognitive impairment which is often misdiagnosed as AD clinically. The antemortem diagnosis is further confounded by other diseases linked to hippocampal atrophy including frontotemporal lobar degeneration and cerebrovascular pathologies. Recent advances characterizing the neurocognitive profile of HS-Aging patients have begun to provide clues that may help identify living individuals with HS-Aging pathology. Structural brain imaging studies of research subjects followed to autopsy reveal hippocampal atrophy that is substantially greater in people with eventual HS-Aging pathology, compared to those with AD pathology alone. Data are presented from individuals who were followed with neurocognitive and neuroradiologic measurements, followed by neuropathologic evaluation at the University of Kentucky. Finally, we discuss factors that are hypothesized to cause or modify the disease. We conclude that the published literature on HS-Aging provides strong evidence of an important and under-appreciated brain disease of aging. Unfortunately, there is no therapy or preventive strategy currently available. PMID:23864344

  8. Sleep facilitates clearance of metabolites from the brain: glymphatic function in aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2013-12-01

    Decline of cognition and increasing risk of neurodegenerative diseases are major problems associated with aging in humans. Of particular importance is how the brain removes potentially toxic biomolecules that accumulate with normal neuronal function. Recently, a biomolecule clearance system using convective flow between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) to remove toxic metabolites in the brain was described. Xie and colleagues now report that in mice the clearance activity of this so-called "glymphatic system" is strongly stimulated by sleep and is associated with an increase in interstitial volume, possibly by shrinkage of astroglial cells. Moreover, anesthesia and attenuation of adrenergic signaling can activate the glymphatic system to clear potentially toxic proteins known to contribute to the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) such as beta-amyloid (Abeta). Clearance during sleep is as much as two-fold faster than during waking hours. These results support a new hypothesis to answer the age-old question of why sleep is necessary. Glymphatic dysfunction may pay a hitherto unsuspected role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases as well as maintenance of cognition. Furthermore, clinical studies suggest that quality and duration of sleep may be predictive of the onset of AD, and that quality sleep may significantly reduce the risk of AD for apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ɛ4 carriers, who have significantly greater chances of developing AD. Further characterization of the glymphatic system in humans may lead to new therapies and methods of prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. A public health initiative to ensure adequate sleep among middle-aged and older people may prove useful in preventing AD, especially in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ɛ4 carriers.

  9. Disrupted nodal and hub organization account for brain network abnormalities in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Koshimori

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent application of graph theory to brain networks promises to shed light on complex diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. This study aimed to investigate functional changes in sensorimotor and cognitive networks in parkinsonian patients, with a focus on inter- and intra-connectivity organization in the disease-associated nodal and hub regions using the graph theoretical analyses. Resting-state functional MRI data of a total of 65 participants, including 23 healthy controls and 42 patients, were investigated in 120 nodes for local efficiency, betweenness centrality, and degree. Hub regions were identified in the healthy control and patient groups. We found nodal and hub changes in patients compared with healthy controls, including the right pre-supplementary motor area, left anterior insula, bilateral mid-insula, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and right caudate nucleus. In general, nodal regions within the sensorimotor network (i.e. right pre-supplementary motor area and right mid-insula displayed weakened connectivity, with the former node associated with more severe bradykinesia, and impaired integration with default mode network regions. The left mid-insula also lost its hub properties in patients. Within the executive networks, the left anterior insular cortex lost its hub properties in patients, while a new hub region was identified in the right caudate nucleus, paralleled by an increased level of inter- and intra-connectivity in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex possibly representing compensatory mechanisms. These findings highlight the diffuse changes in nodal organization and regional hub disruption accounting for the distributed abnormalities across brain networks and the clinical manifestations of Parkinson’s disease.

  10. Non-invasive brain stimulation for the treatment of brain diseases in childhood and adolescence: state of the art, current limits and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Mario Vicario

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades interest in application of non-invasive brain stimulation for enhancing neural functions is growing continuously. However, the use of such techniques in pediatric populations remains rather limited and mainly confined to the treatment of severe neurological and psychiatric diseases. In this article we provide a complete review of non-invasive brain stimulation studies conducted in pediatric populations. We also provide a brief discussion about the current limitations and future directions in a field of research still very young and full of issues to be explored.

  11. Speech disorders in Parkinson's disease: early diagnostics and effects of medication and brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabenec, L; Mekyska, J; Galaz, Z; Rektorova, Irena

    2017-03-01

    Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) occurs in 90% of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. It manifests specifically in the areas of articulation, phonation, prosody, speech fluency, and faciokinesis. We aimed to systematically review papers on HD in PD with a special focus on (1) early PD diagnosis and monitoring of the disease progression using acoustic voice and speech analysis, and (2) functional imaging studies exploring neural correlates of HD in PD, and (3) clinical studies using acoustic analysis to evaluate effects of dopaminergic medication and brain stimulation. A systematic literature search of articles written in English before March 2016 was conducted in the Web of Science, PubMed, SpringerLink, and IEEE Xplore databases using and combining specific relevant keywords. Articles were categorized into three groups: (1) articles focused on neural correlates of HD in PD using functional imaging (n = 13); (2) articles dealing with the acoustic analysis of HD in PD (n = 52); and (3) articles concerning specifically dopaminergic and brain stimulation-related effects as assessed by acoustic analysis (n = 31); the groups were then reviewed. We identified 14 combinations of speech tasks and acoustic features that can be recommended for use in describing the main features of HD in PD. While only a few acoustic parameters correlate with limb motor symptoms and can be partially relieved by dopaminergic medication, HD in PD seems to be mainly related to non-dopaminergic deficits and associated particularly with non-motor symptoms. Future studies should combine non-invasive brain stimulation with voice behavior approaches to achieve the best treatment effects by enhancing auditory-motor integration.

  12. Morphological and pathological evolution of the brain microcirculation in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Hunter

    Full Text Available Key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD, including amyloid plaques, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA and neurofibrillary tangles do not completely account for cognitive impairment, therefore other factors such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathologies, may contribute to AD. In order to elucidate the microvascular changes that contribute to aging and disease, direct neuropathological staining and immunohistochemistry, were used to quantify the structural integrity of the microvasculature and its innervation in three oldest-old cohorts: 1 nonagenarians with AD and a high amyloid plaque load; 2 nonagenarians with no dementia and a high amyloid plaque load; 3 nonagenarians without dementia or amyloid plaques. In addition, a non-demented (ND group (average age 71 years with no amyloid plaques was included for comparison. While gray matter thickness and overall brain mass were reduced in AD compared to ND control groups, overall capillary density was not different. However, degenerated string capillaries were elevated in AD, potentially suggesting greater microvascular "dysfunction" compared to ND groups. Intriguingly, apolipoprotein ε4 carriers had significantly higher string vessel counts relative to non-ε4 carriers. Taken together, these data suggest a concomitant loss of functional capillaries and brain volume in AD subjects. We also demonstrated a trend of decreasing vesicular acetylcholine transporter staining, a marker of cortical cholinergic afferents that contribute to arteriolar vasoregulation, in AD compared to ND control groups, suggesting impaired control of vasodilation in AD subjects. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase, a marker of noradrenergic vascular innervation, was reduced which may also contribute to a loss of control of vasoconstriction. The data highlight the importance of the brain microcirculation in the pathogenesis and evolution of AD.

  13. Motor outcome and electrode location in deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivu, Maija; Huotarinen, Antti; Scheperjans, Filip; Laakso, Aki; Kivisaari, Riku; Pekkonen, Eero

    2018-05-30

    To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and the possible correlation between electrode location and clinical outcome. We retrospectively reviewed 87 PD-related STN-DBS operations at Helsinki University Hospital (HUH) from 2007 to 2014. The changes of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III score, Hoehn & Yahr stage, antiparkinson medication, and adverse effects were studied. We estimated the active electrode location in three different coordinate systems: direct visual analysis of MRI correlated to brain atlas, location in relation to the nucleus borders and location in relation to the midcommisural point. At 6 months after operation, both levodopa equivalent doses (LEDs; 35%, Wilcoxon signed-rank test = 0.000) and UPDRS part III scores significantly decreased (38%, Wilcoxon signed-rank test = 0.000). Four patients (5%) suffered from moderate DBS-related dysarthria. The generator and electrodes had to be removed in one patient due to infection (1%). Electrode coordinates in the three coordinate systems correlated well with each other. On the left side, more ventral location of the active contact was associated with greater LED decrease. STN-DBS improves motor function and enables the reduction in antiparkinson medication with an acceptable adverse effect profile. More ventral location of the active contact may allow stronger LED reduction. Further research on the correlation between contact location, clinical outcome, and LED reduction is warranted. © 2018 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clinical research on alterations of brain MRI and 1H-MRS in chronic hepatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Liling; Li Xiangrong; Hong Zhongkui

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the abnormal findings and metabolic alterations of the brain in chronic hepatic disease with MRI and 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) for better understanding the clinical significance of pallidal hyperintensity and the role in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Methods: Brain MRI and 1 H-MRS examination were performed in 50 patients with chronic hepatic disease and 20 healthy volunteers. The pallidus index (PI) was calculated and the height of resonance peaks of Glx was measured. The correlation between PI and Child/Pugh classification, and the association between blood ammonia and the spectroscopic alterations were studied. Pre-and post-therapeutic comparative study was also conducted in 5 cases with chronic HE. Results: PI was gradually increased from healthy volunteers to patients with chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis (1.01± 0.04, 1.06±0.09, and 1.18±0.09), and the differences in PI value among them were significant (F=22.294, P 1 -weighted MRI disappeared and the abnormal metabolic alterations returned to normal range 5 to 6 months after successful liver transplantation. However, the normalization of 1 H-MRS alterations preceded the disappearance of pallidal hyperintensities. Conclusion: PI can be an index of reference for liver dysfunction. Glx is more sensitive than blood ammonia in detecting the brain dysfunction. MRI and 1 H-MRS are reliable techniques in the diagnosis and evaluation of therapy for hepatic encephalopathy. (authors)

  15. Posterolateral Trajectories Favor a Longer Motor Domain in Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Idit; Marmor-Levin, Odeya; Eitan, Renana; Bergman, Hagai; Israel, Zvi

    2017-10-01

    The clinical outcome of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who undergo subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is, in part, determined by the length of the electrode trajectory through the motor STN domain, the dorsolateral oscillatory region (DLOR). Trajectory length has been found to correlate with the stimulation-related improvement in patients' motor function (estimated by part III of the United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]). Therefore, it seems that ideally trajectories should have maximal DLOR length. We retrospectively studied the influence of various anatomic aspects of the brains of patients with PD and the geometry of trajectories planned on the length of the DLOR and STN recorded during DBS surgery. We examined 212 trajectories and 424 microelectrode recording tracks in 115 patients operated on in our center between 2010 and 2015. We found a strong correlation between the length of the recorded DLOR and STN. Trajectories that were more lateral and/or posterior in orientation had a longer STN and DLOR pass, although the DLOR/STN fraction length remained constant. The STN target was more lateral when the third ventricle was wider, and the latter correlated with older age and male gender. Trajectory angles correlate with the recorded STN and DLOR lengths, and should be altered toward a more posterolateral angle in older patients and atrophied brains to compensate for the changes in STN location and geometry. These fine adjustments should yield a longer motor domain pass, thereby improving the patient's predicted outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease presenting as a severe infantile hypotonic parkinsonian disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Wilson, Callum; Cunningham, Vicki; Glamuzina, Emma; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R; Burgess, Trent; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Hill, Rosamund; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two male siblings from a consanguineous union presented in early infancy with marked truncal hypotonia, a general paucity of movement, extrapyramidal signs and cognitive delay. By mid-childhood they had made little developmental progress and remained severely hypotonic and bradykinetic. They developed epilepsy and had problems with autonomic dysfunction and oculogyric crises. They had a number of orthopaedic problems secondary to their hypotonia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitters were initially normal, apart from mildly elevated 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and the children did not respond favourably to a trial of levodopa-carbidopa. The youngest died from respiratory complications at 10 years of age. Repeat CSF neurotransmitters in the older sibling at eight years of age showed slightly low homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel mutation homozygous in both children in the monoamine transporter gene SLC18A2 (p.Pro237His), resulting in brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease. This is the second family to be described with a mutation in this gene. Treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexole in the surviving child resulted in mild improvements in alertness, communication, and eye movements. This case supports the identification of the causal mutation in the original case, expands the clinical phenotype of brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease and confirms that pramipexole treatment may lead to symptomatic improvement in affected individuals.

  17. Can Electrical Vestibular Noise Be Used for the Treatment of Brain Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Soma, Rika; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Kwak, Shin

    2005-11-01

    The therapy currently available for the treatment of degenerative neurological diseases is far from satisfactory, and a novel therapeutic strategy, especially for pharmacologically unresponsive patients, would be welcomed. The vestibular nerves are known to influence neuronal circuits in the medullary cardiovascular areas and, through the cerebellar vermis, the basal ganglia and the limbic system. By means of noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), it may now be possible to ameliorate blunted responsiveness of degenerated neuronal circuits in the brains of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and/or Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, through a mechanism known as stochastic resonance. We evaluate the effect of 24-hour noisy GVS on long-term heart rate dynamics in seven MSA patients, and on daytime locomotor activity dynamics in twelve patients with either PD or levodopa unresponsive parkinsonism. Short-range heart rate variability and long-range anti-correlation of trunk activity are significantly increased by the noisy GVS compared with sham stimulation, suggestive of improved autonomic and motor responsiveness. The noisy GVS is effective in boosting the neuro-degenerative brains of MSA and/or PD patients, including those unresponsive to standard levodopa therapy.

  18. High Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation and Neural Rhythms in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Zack; Brontë-Stewart, Helen

    2015-12-01

    High frequency (HF) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). It effectively treats the cardinal motor signs of PD, including tremor, bradykinesia, and rigidity. The most common neural target is the subthalamic nucleus, located within the basal ganglia, the region most acutely affected by PD pathology. Using chronically-implanted DBS electrodes, researchers have been able to record underlying neural rhythms from several nodes in the PD network as well as perturb it using DBS to measure the ensuing neural and behavioral effects, both acutely and over time. In this review, we provide an overview of the PD neural network, focusing on the pathophysiological signals that have been recorded from PD patients as well as the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic benefits of HF DBS. We then discuss evidence for the relationship between specific neural oscillations and symptoms of PD, including the aberrant relationships potentially underlying functional connectivity in PD as well as the use of different frequencies of stimulation to more specifically target certain symptoms. Finally, we briefly describe several current areas of investigation and how the ability to record neural data in ecologically-valid settings may allow researchers to explore the relationship between brain and behavior in an unprecedented manner, culminating in the future automation of neurostimulation therapy for the treatment of a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases.

  19. Comparative Lipidomic Analysis of Mouse and Human Brain with Alzheimer Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Robin B.; Oliveira, Tiago G.; Cortes, Etty P.; Honig, Lawrence S.; Duff, Karen E.; Small, Scott A.; Wenk, Markus R.; Shui, Guanghou; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Lipids are key regulators of brain function and have been increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, a systems-based approach was employed to determine the lipidome of brain tissues affected by AD. Specifically, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to profile extracts from the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and cerebellum of late-onset AD (LOAD) patients, as well as the forebrain of three transgenic familial AD (FAD) mouse models. Although the cerebellum lacked major alterations in lipid composition, we found an elevation of a signaling pool of diacylglycerol as well as sphingolipids in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, the diseased entorhinal cortex showed specific enrichment of lysobisphosphatidic acid, sphingomyelin, the ganglioside GM3, and cholesterol esters, all of which suggest common pathogenic mechanisms associated with endolysosomal storage disorders. Importantly, a significant increase in cholesterol esters and GM3 was recapitulated in the transgenic FAD models, suggesting that these mice are relevant tools to study aberrant lipid metabolism of endolysosomal dysfunction associated with AD. Finally, genetic ablation of phospholipase D2, which rescues the synaptic and behavioral deficits of an FAD mouse model, fully normalizes GM3 levels. These data thus unmask a cross-talk between the metabolism of phosphatidic acid, the product of phospholipase D2, and gangliosides, and point to a central role of ganglioside anomalies in AD pathogenesis. Overall, our study highlights the hypothesis generating potential of lipidomics and identifies novel region-specific lipid anomalies potentially linked to AD pathogenesis. PMID:22134919

  20. Anti-amyloid-β-mediated positron emission tomography imaging in Alzheimer's disease mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel McLean

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated imaging of amyloid β (Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD offers a promising strategy to detect and monitor specific Aβ species, such as oligomers, that have important pathological and therapeutic relevance. The major current limitation of antibodies as a diagnostic and imaging device is poor blood-brain-barrier permeability. A classical anti-Aβ antibody, 6E10, is modified with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG and a positron emitting isotope, Copper-64 (t(½ = 12.7 h, and intravenously delivered to the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Modification of 6E10 with PEG (6E10-PEG increases accumulation of 6E10 in brain tissue in both TgCRND8 and wild type control animals. 6E10-PEG differentiates TgCRND8 animals from wild type controls using positron emission tomography (PET and provides a framework for using antibodies to detect pathology using non-invasive medical imaging techniques.

  1. Characterizing brain patterns in conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva R., Santiago S.; Giraldo, Diana L.; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Structural Magnetic Resonance (MR) brain images should provide quantitative information about the stage and progression of Alzheimer's disease. However, the use of MRI is limited and practically reduced to corroborate a diagnosis already performed with neuropsychological tools. This paper presents an automated strategy for extraction of relevant anatomic patterns related with the conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) using T1-weighted MR images. The process starts by representing each of the possible classes with models generated from a linear combination of volumes. The difference between models allows us to establish which are the regions where relevant patterns might be located. The approach searches patterns in a space of brain sulci, herein approximated by the most representative gradients found in regions of interest defined by the difference between the linear models. This hypothesis is assessed by training a conventional SVM model with the found relevant patterns under a leave-one-out scheme. The resultant AUC was 0.86 for the group of women and 0.61 for the group of men.

  2. The APOE ε4 Allele Is Associated with Lower Selenium Levels in the Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Cardoso, Bárbara; Hare, Dominic J; Lind, Monica; McLean, Catriona A; Volitakis, Irene; Laws, Simon M; Masters, Colin L; Bush, Ashley I; Roberts, Blaine R

    2017-07-19

    The antioxidant activity of selenium, which is mainly conferred by its incorporation into dedicated selenoproteins, has been suggested as a possible neuroprotective approach for mitigating neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease. However, there is inconsistent information with respect to selenium levels in the Alzheimer's disease brain. We examined the concentration and cellular compartmentalization of selenium in the temporal cortex of Alzheimer's disease and control brain tissue. We found that Alzheimer's disease was associated with decreased selenium concentration in both soluble (i.e., cytosolic) and insoluble (i.e., plaques and tangles) fractions of brain homogenates. The presence of the APOE ε4 allele correlated with lower total selenium levels in the temporal cortex and a higher concentration of soluble selenium. Additionally, we found that age significantly contributed to lower selenium concentrations in the peripheral membrane-bound and vesicular fractions. Our findings suggest a relevant interaction between APOE ε4 and selenium delivery into brain, and show changes in cellular selenium distribution in the Alzheimer's disease brain.

  3. Recent Advances on the Role of Neurogenesis in the Adult Brain: Therapeutic Potential in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radad, Khaled; Moldzio, Rudolf; Al-Shraim, Mubarak; Kranner, Barbara; Krewenka, Christopher; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Generation of nascent functional neurons from neural stem cells in the adult brain has recently become largely accepted by the neuroscience community. In adult mammals including humans, the process of neurogenesis has been well documented in two brain regions; the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Some evidence has indicated neurogenesis in other regions of the adult mammalian brain such as the neocortex, cerebellum, striatum, amygdala and hypothalamus. These discoveries question a long standing dogma on nervous system regeneration and provide medical science with potential new strategies to harness the process of neurogenesis for treating neurological disabilities and neurodegenerative diseases. In this current review, we address the most recent advances on the role of neurogenesis in the adult brain and therapeutic potential in the two most common neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Two-dimensional ultrasonography of the brain: its diagnostic usefullness in herpes simplex encephalitis and cytomegalic inclusion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, N; Yano, S; Miyao, M; Kamoshita, S; Itoh, K

    1983-01-01

    We have used brain ultrasonography in diagnosing and following up two infants, one with herpes simplex encephalitis and the other with cytomegalic inclusion disease. It was found that this technique was very useful to observe the changes of the brain parenchyma such as cystic degeneration and periventricular calcification. Also because it is non-invasive and an easy procedure, ultrasonography can be applied even for infants in critical condition when needed.

  5. Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Moyamoya Disease: Correlation with Clinical Severity and Old Brain Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Ji Hwa; Ahn, Sung Jun; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leptomeningeal collateral, in moyamoya disease (MMD), appears as an ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. There has been little investigation into the relationship between presentation of ivy signs and old brain lesions. We aimed to evaluate clinical significance of ivy signs and whether they correlate with old brain lesions and the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with MMD. Materials and Methods FLAIR images of 83 patients were reviewed. Each cerebr...

  6. Increasing N-acetylaspartate in the Brain during Postnatal Myelination Does Not Cause the CNS Pathologies of Canavan Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash P. Appu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Canavan disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding aspartoacylase (ASPA, a deacetylase that catabolizes N-acetylaspartate (NAA. The precise involvement of elevated NAA in the pathogenesis of Canavan disease is an ongoing debate. In the present study, we tested the effects of elevated NAA in the brain during postnatal development. Mice were administered high doses of the hydrophobic methyl ester of NAA (M-NAA twice daily starting on day 7 after birth. This treatment increased NAA levels in the brain to those observed in the brains of Nur7 mice, an established model of Canavan disease. We evaluated various serological parameters, oxidative stress, inflammatory and neurodegeneration markers and the results showed that there were no pathological alterations in any measure with increased brain NAA levels. We examined oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde content (indicator of lipid peroxidation, expression of NADPH oxidase and nuclear translocation of the stress-responsive transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF-2 in brain. We also examined additional pathological markers by immunohistochemistry and the expression of activated caspase-3 and interleukin-6 by Western blot. None of the markers were increased in the brains of M-NAA treated mice, and no vacuoles were observed in any brain region. These results show that ASPA expression prevents the pathologies associated with excessive NAA concentrations in the brain during postnatal myelination. We hypothesize that the pathogenesis of Canavan disease involves not only disrupted NAA metabolism, but also excessive NAA related signaling processes in oligodendrocytes that have not been fully determined and we discuss some of the potential mechanisms.

  7. Neuropsychological profile of Parkinson's disease patients selected for deep brain stimulation surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Amaral Machado

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Parkinson's disease (PD shows symptoms involving motor and non-motor complications, including cognitive and behavioral changes, such changes might to contraindicate deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS. Objective: The aim of study was to investigate the neuropsychological profile of patients with PD in a waiting list for DBS. Methods: The neuropsychological evaluation was held in 30 patients of the ISCMPA Movement Disorders Clinic, with surgical indication based on the criteria of the responsible neurologists, in the period of 12 months. Instruments used: MMSE, FAB, MoCA, BDI, Semantic Verbal Fluency, PDQ-39, PDSS; and the UPDRS and Hoehn-Yahr scale. Results: The patients were mostly male (66.7% with a mean age of 59.37 (SD 10.60 and disease duration 9.33 (SD 4.08. There was cognitive impairment in 56.7% of patients by FAB and 76.7% by MoCA. Conclusion: Even in the earliest stages of the disease, there is the incidence of non-motor symptoms, especially in those subjects who had an early onset of the disease.

  8. Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms: Emerging Brain Food for the Mitigation of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2017-01-01

    There is an exponential increase in dementia in old age at a global level because of increasing life expectancy. The prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) will continue to rise steadily, and is expected to reach 42 million cases worldwide in 2020. Despite the advancement of medication, the management of these diseases remains largely ineffective. Therefore, it is vital to explore novel nature-based nutraceuticals to mitigate AD and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Mushrooms and their extracts appear to hold many health benefits, including immune-modulating effects. A number of edible mushrooms have been shown to contain rare and exotic compounds that exhibit positive effects on brain cells both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we summarize the scientific information on edible and culinary mushrooms with regard to their antidementia/AD active compounds and/or pharmacological test results. The bioactive components in these mushrooms and the underlying mechanism of their activities are discussed. In short, these mushrooms may be regarded as functional foods for the mitigation of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using brain SPECT with three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Asano, Tetsuichi; Kogure, Daiji; Abe, Shine; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru

    2001-01-01

    We compared the diagnostic usefulness of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) with that of standard transaxial images in brain SPECT in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The subjects consisted of 69 patients with AD and 60 patients with non-AD, including vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease with dementia, frontotemporal dementia, other dementing diseases and neuropsychiatric diseases. Standard transaxial section and 3D-SSP SPECT images with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine were blindly interpreted by three examiners and were classified into the following three patterns: typical AD, atypical AD, and not indicative AD patterns. The 3D-SSP images demonstrated reductions of cerebral blood flow in the parieto-temporal association cortex and posterior cingulate gyrus more clearly and easily than the standard transaxial images. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 85% with 3D-SSP and 83% and 82% with standard transaxial section respectively. 3D-SSP was especially useful for early or atypical AD which showed no characteristic perfusion abnormalities on standard transaxial images. These results suggest that SPECT with 3D-SSP provides an sensitive as well as accurate tool for the diagnosis of AD. (author)

  10. Observation of the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and brain functional changes in the patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Yihui; Lin Xiangtong; Liu Yongchang

    1994-01-01

    The brain perfusion SPECT imaging and functional changes in 27 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases and 20 controls were investigated. Correlated with the clinical findings and MRI study, we discovered the lowered perfusion of Broca and Wernicke area is closely related with the aphasia caused by left basal ganglia infarction. In hemianopia group, as the visual function improved after the light stimulation treatment, the blood perfusion increased in occipital lobe. The lowered perfusion in vestibular center can be observed in vertigo group. From these studies, we concluded that 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT imaging can partly reflect the brain functions

  11. microRNA in Cerebral Spinal Fluid as Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk After Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0318 TITLE: microRNA in Cerebral Spinal Fluid as Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk After Brain Injury...After Brain Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER AZ14046 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) J 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...responses to brain injury that precede, and likely drive, changes in protein expression that lead to the development of AD. We have additional preliminary

  12. Can ketones compensate for deteriorating brain glucose uptake during aging? Implications for the risk and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; St-Pierre, Valérie; Vandenberghe, Camille; Pierotti, Tyler; Fortier, Mélanie; Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    Brain glucose uptake is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A key question is whether cognitive decline can be delayed if this brain energy defect is at least partly corrected or bypassed early in the disease. The principal ketones (also called ketone bodies), β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, are the brain's main physiological alternative fuel to glucose. Three studies in mild-to-moderate AD have shown that, unlike with glucose, brain ketone uptake is not different from that in healthy age-matched controls. Published clinical trials demonstrate that increasing ketone availability to the brain via moderate nutritional ketosis has a modest beneficial effect on cognitive outcomes in mild-to-moderate AD and in mild cognitive impairment. Nutritional ketosis can be safely achieved by a high-fat ketogenic diet, by supplements providing 20-70 g/day of medium-chain triglycerides containing the eight- and ten-carbon fatty acids octanoate and decanoate, or by ketone esters. Given the acute dependence of the brain on its energy supply, it seems reasonable that the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at AD mandates consideration of how the underlying problem of deteriorating brain fuel supply can be corrected or delayed. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. 99mTc-ECD brain SPECT in patients with Moyamoya disease: a reflection of cerebral perfusion status at tissue level in the disease process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashyap, Raghava; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Sunil, Hejjaji Venkataramarao; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Baljinder; Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare, progressive cerebrovascular disorder caused by intracranial stenosis of the circle of Willis, resulting in successive ischemic events. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play a major role in diagnosis. The aim of the study was to describe the spectrum of findings on brain SPECT in patients with Moyamoya disease and to compare the findings with other investigations. 99m Tc-ECD SPECT scans of seventeen patients (7 children and 10 adults) were analysed to study the brain perfusion. Features of Moyamoya disease were detected on DSA in 11 patients, CTA in one, MR angiography in one patient. Brain perfusion SPECT analysis showed unilateral perfusion defects in 11 patients, normal perfusion in 2 and bilateral defects in 4 patients. No perfusion defects despite bilateral vascular changes were noted in one patient. Cerebral infarcts were detected on MRI unilaterally in three subjects while multiple infarcts were identified in one. 99m Tc-ECD Brain SPECT showed perfusion defects that were more extensive compared to those detected on MRI. Post acetazolamide studies for assessment of cerebrovascular reserve were done in three patients. Two of them showed good cerebrovascular reserve (>1). Follow-up studies post-surgical procedures (Myo-dura synangiosis) done in two patients showed partial resolution of perfusion defects in the involved areas. Brain perfusion scintigraphy is an important adjunct in evaluation of patients with Moyamoya disease yielding information about the direct end results of the pathology in the vessels and also prognostic information. (author)

  14. Alteration of brain insulin and leptin signaling promotes energy homeostasis impairment and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taouis Mohammed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS controls vital functions, by efficiently coordinating peripheral and central cascades of signals and networks in a coordinated manner. Historically, the brain was considered to be an insulin-insensitive tissue. But, new findings demonstrating that insulin is present in different regions of themammalian brain, in particular the hypothalamus and the hippocampus. Insulin acts through specific receptors and dialogues with numerous peptides, neurotransmitters and adipokines such as leptin. The cross-talk between leptin and insulin signaling pathways at the hypothalamic level is clearly involved in the control of energy homeostasis. Both hormones are anorexigenic through their action on hypothalamic arcuate nucleus by inducing the expression of anorexigenic neuropetides such as POMC (pro-opiomelanocortin, the precursor of aMSH and reducing the expression of orexigenic neuropeptide such as NPY (Neuropeptide Y. Central defect of insulin and leptin signaling predispose to obesity (leptin-resistant state and type-2 diabetes (insulin resistant state. Obesity and type-2 diabetes are associated to deep alterations in energy homeostasis control but also to other alterations of CNS functions as the predisposition to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by distinct hallmarks within the brain. Postmortem observation of AD brains showed the presence of parenchymal plaques due to the accumulation of the amyloid beta (AB peptide and neurofibrillary tangles. These accumulations result from the hyperphosphorylation of tau (a mictrotubule-interacting protein. Both insulin and leptin have been described to modulate tau phosphorylation and therefore in leptin and insulin resistant states may contribute to AD. The concentrations of leptin and insulin cerebrospinal fluid are decreased type2 diabetes and obese patients. In addition, the concentration of insulin in the

  15. Failure of delayed feedback deep brain stimulation for intermittent pathological synchronization in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Dovzhenok

    Full Text Available Suppression of excessively synchronous beta-band oscillatory activity in the brain is believed to suppress hypokinetic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Recently, a lot of interest has been devoted to desynchronizing delayed feedback deep brain stimulation (DBS. This type of synchrony control was shown to destabilize the synchronized state in networks of simple model oscillators as well as in networks of coupled model neurons. However, the dynamics of the neural activity in Parkinson's disease exhibits complex intermittent synchronous patterns, far from the idealized synchronous dynamics used to study the delayed feedback stimulation. This study explores the action of delayed feedback stimulation on partially synchronized oscillatory dynamics, similar to what one observes experimentally in parkinsonian patients. We employ a computational model of the basal ganglia networks which reproduces experimentally observed fine temporal structure of the synchronous dynamics. When the parameters of our model are such that the synchrony is unphysiologically strong, the feedback exerts a desynchronizing action. However, when the network is tuned to reproduce the highly variable temporal patterns observed experimentally, the same kind of delayed feedback may actually increase the synchrony. As network parameters are changed from the range which produces complete synchrony to those favoring less synchronous dynamics, desynchronizing delayed feedback may gradually turn into synchronizing stimulation. This suggests that delayed feedback DBS in Parkinson's disease may boost rather than suppress synchronization and is unlikely to be clinically successful. The study also indicates that delayed feedback stimulation may not necessarily exhibit a desynchronization effect when acting on a physiologically realistic partially synchronous dynamics, and provides an example of how to estimate the stimulation effect.

  16. Effect of aging and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology on brain monoamines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Linstow, C U; Severino, M; Metaxas, A; Waider, J; Babcock, A A; Lesch, K P; Gramsbergen, J B; Finsen, B

    2017-09-01

    Aging is the greatest single risk factor of the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD). The monoaminergic system, including serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) modulates cognition, which is affected in AD. Changes in monoamine levels have been observed in AD, but these can both be age- and/or disease-related. We examined whether brain monoamine levels change as part of physiological aging and/or AD-like disease in APP SWE /PS1 ΔE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice. The neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, brainstem and cerebellum of 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month-old B6C3 wild-type (WT) mice and of 18-month old APP/PS1 and WT mice were analysed for 5-HT, DA and NA contents by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), along with neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 and WT mice. While, we observed no aging effect in WT mice, we detected region-specific changes in the levels of all monoamines in 18-month-old transgenic compared with WT mice. This included reductions in 5-HT (-30%), DA (-47%) and NA (-32%) levels in the neocortex and increases of 5-HT in the brainstem (+18%). No changes were observed in any of the monoamines in the neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 mice. In combination, these findings indicate that aging alone is not sufficient to affect brain monoamine levels, unlike the APP SWE /PS1 ΔE9 genotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The preliminary study of 18F-FDG brain PET in diagnosis of alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yunchuan; Zhang Xinqing; Li Depeng; Shang Jianwen; Su Yusheng; Zhang Linying; Peng Cheng; Pan Zhongyun

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging characteristics and diagnostic criteria of 18 F-FDG brain PET in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: The sutdy included 12 normal subjects, 12 patients with AD and 11 patients with non-AD dementia. 40 min after intravenous administration of 18 F-FDG, brain scan was performed using Siemens ECAT47 scanner. The transaxial, coronal and sagittal images were then reconstructed by computer. At the same time, semiquantitative analysis was also applied to help evaluation using the ratio of mean radioactivity of cerebral lobe to cerebellum (R cl/cb ). Results: In normal subjects PET scan showed clear images of cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum with symmetrical distribution of radioactivity. PET images from Alzheimer's disease patients were classified into 3 patterns: bilateral parietal hypometabolism in 5 cases, bilateral temporo-parietal hypometabolism in 4 cases and unilateral temporo-parietal hypometabolism in 3 cases. The R cl/cb of AD patients in parietal and temporal lobe was significantly decreased than normal subjects (P cl/cb was also reflecting thedementia degree. Compared with MRI imaging , 12 patients with AD had cerebral hypometabolism but only 10 had hippocampus atrophy. 10 patients with non-AD dementia had local structural foci seen in MRI, including old hemorrhage, infarction and encephalomalacia, but these lesions were not found in AD. Conclusions: Based on excluding cerebral structural lesions which are better detected by MRI, bilateral or unilateral parietal or temporo-parietal hypometabolism found in FDG PET can be considered indicative of Alzheimer's disease. Semiquantitative analysis of the images yielded can help to evaluate the dementia degree

  18. Disrupted Nodal and Hub Organization Account for Brain Network Abnormalities in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimori, Yuko; Cho, Sang-Soo; Criaud, Marion; Christopher, Leigh; Jacobs, Mark; Ghadery, Christine; Coakeley, Sarah; Harris, Madeleine; Mizrahi, Romina; Hamani, Clement; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2016-01-01

    The recent application of graph theory to brain networks promises to shed light on complex diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to investigate functional changes in sensorimotor and cognitive networks in Parkinsonian patients, with a focus on inter- and intra-connectivity organization in the disease-associated nodal and hub regions using the graph theoretical analyses. Resting-state functional MRI data of a total of 65 participants, including 23 healthy controls (HCs) and 42 patients, were investigated in 120 nodes for local efficiency, betweenness centrality, and degree. Hub regions were identified in the HC and patient groups. We found nodal and hub changes in patients compared with HCs, including the right pre-supplementary motor area (SMA), left anterior insula, bilateral mid-insula, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and right caudate nucleus. In general, nodal regions within the sensorimotor network (i.e., right pre-SMA and right mid-insula) displayed weakened connectivity, with the former node associated with more severe bradykinesia, and impaired integration with default mode network regions. The left mid-insula also lost its hub properties in patients. Within the executive networks, the left anterior insular cortex lost its hub properties in patients, while a new hub region was identified in the right caudate nucleus, paralleled by an increased level of inter- and intra-connectivity in the bilateral DLPFC possibly representing compensatory mechanisms. These findings highlight the diffuse changes in nodal organization and regional hub disruption accounting for the distributed abnormalities across brain networks and the clinical manifestations of PD.

  19. The hunt for brain Aβ oligomers by peripherally circulating multi-functional nanoparticles: Potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Simona; Minniti, Stefania; Gregori, Maria; Sancini, Giulio; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Salmona, Mario; Re, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and an ApoE-derived peptide (mApoE-PA-LIP) to reduce brain Aβ in transgenic Alzheimer mice. Herein we investigated the efficacy of mApoE-PA-LIP to withdraw Aβ peptide in different aggregation forms from the brain, using a transwell cellular model of the blood-brain barrier and APP/PS1 mice. The spontaneous efflux of Aβ oligomers (Aβo), but not of Aβ fibrils, from the 'brain' side of the transwell was strongly enhanced (5-fold) in presence of mApoE-PA-LIP in the 'blood' compartment. This effect is due to a withdrawal of Aβo exerted by peripheral mApoE-PA-LIP by sink effect, because, when present in the brain side, they did not act as Aβo carrier and limit the oligomer efflux. In vivo peripheral administration of mApoE-PA-LIP significantly increased the plasma Aβ level, suggesting that Aβ-binding particles exploiting the sink effect can be used as a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer disease. From the Clinical Editor: Alzheimer disease (AD) at present is an incurable disease, which is thought to be caused by an accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Many strategies in combating this disease have been focused on either the prevention or dissolving these peptides. In this article, the authors showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and with an ApoE- derived peptide to withdraw amyloid peptides from the brain. The data would help the future design of more novel treatment for Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier transport and CNS drug metabolism in diseased and control brain after intravenous L-DOPA in a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease

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    Ravenstijn Paulien GM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB functionality have been implicated in Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to investigate BBB transport of L-DOPA transport in conjunction with its intra-brain conversion, in both control and diseased cerebral hemispheres in the unilateral rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease. Methods In Lewis rats, at 14 days after unilateral infusion of rotenone into the medial forebrain bundle, L-DOPA was administered intravenously (10, 25 or 50 mg/kg. Serial blood samples and brain striatal microdialysates were analysed for L-DOPA, and the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA. Ex-vivo brain tissue was analyzed for changes in tyrosine hydroxylase staining as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease severity. Data were analysed by population pharmacokinetic analysis (NONMEM to compare BBB transport of L-DOPA in conjunction with the conversion of L-DOPA into DOPAC and HVA, in control and diseased cerebral hemisphere. Results Plasma pharmacokinetics of L-DOPA could be described by a 3-compartmental model. In rotenone responders (71%, no difference in L-DOPA BBB transport was found between diseased and control cerebral hemisphere. However, in the diseased compared with the control side, basal microdialysate levels of DOPAC and HVA were substantially lower, whereas following L-DOPA administration their elimination rates were higher. Conclusions Parkinson's disease-like pathology, indicated by a huge reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase as well as by substantially reduced levels and higher elimination rates of DOPAC and HVA, does not result in changes in BBB transport of L-DOPA. Taking the results of this study and that of previous ones, it can be concluded that changes in BBB functionality are not a specific characteristic of Parkinson's disease, and cannot account for the decreased benefit of L-DOPA at later stages of Parkinson's disease.

  1. Brain and blood metabolite signatures of pathology and progression in Alzheimer disease: A targeted metabolomics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay R Varma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD is poorly understood, and the relationships between systemic abnormalities in metabolism and AD pathogenesis are unclear. Understanding how global perturbations in metabolism are related to severity of AD neuropathology and the eventual expression of AD symptoms in at-risk individuals is critical to developing effective disease-modifying treatments. In this study, we undertook parallel metabolomics analyses in both the brain and blood to identify systemic correlates of neuropathology and their associations with prodromal and preclinical measures of AD progression.Quantitative and targeted metabolomics (Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ [identification and quantification] p180 assays were performed on brain tissue samples from the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA (N = 44, mean age = 81.33, % female = 36.36 from AD (N = 15, control (CN; N = 14, and "asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease" (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD pathology but no cognitive impairment during life; N = 15 participants. Using machine-learning methods, we identified a panel of 26 metabolites from two main classes-sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids-that discriminated AD and CN samples with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 83.33%, 86.67%, and 80%, respectively. We then assayed these 26 metabolites in serum samples from two well-characterized longitudinal cohorts representing prodromal (Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [ADNI], N = 767, mean age = 75.19, % female = 42.63 and preclinical (BLSA (N = 207, mean age = 78.68, % female = 42.63 AD, in which we tested their associations with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI measures of AD-related brain atrophy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers of AD pathology, risk of conversion to incident AD, and trajectories of cognitive performance. We developed an integrated blood and brain endophenotype score that summarized the relative importance of

  2. Voluntary exercise confers protection against age-related deficits in brain oxygenation in awake mice model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Lu, Xuecong; Moeini, Mohammad; Li, Baoqiang; Sakadžić, Sava; Lesage, Frédéric

    2018-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by short-term memory loss and cognitive inabilities. This work seeks to study the effects of voluntary exercise on the change in oxygen delivery in awake mice models of Alzheimer's disease by monitoring brain tissue oxygenation. Experiments were performed on Young (AD_Y, 3-4 months, n=8), Old (AD_O, 6-7 months, n=8), and Old with exercise (AD_OEX, 6-7 months, n=8) transgenic APPPS1 mice and their controls. Brain tissue oxygenation was measured by two photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy on the left sensory motor cortex. We found that the average tissue PO2 decreased with age but were regulated by exercise. The results suggest a potential for exercise to improve brain function with age and AD.

  3. The Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Controls

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    Choi, Hee Seok; Kim, Kwang Ki; Yoon, Yup Yoon [Dongguk University Medical Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    To compare the corpus callosum (CC) area and brain volume among individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HC). To evaluate the relationship of CC area and brain volume in 111 subjects (M:F = 48:63; mean age, 56.9 years) without memory disturbance and 28 subjects (11:17; 66.7years) with memory disturbance. The 11 AD (3:8; 75.7 years), 17 MCI (8:9; 60.9 years) and 28 selected HC (11:17; 66.4 years) patients were investigated for comparison of their CC area and brain volume. A good positive linear correlation was found between CC area and brain volume in subjects without and with memory disturbance (r = 0.64 and 0.66, respectively, p < 0.01). The CC area and brain volume in AD patients (498.7 +- 72 mm{sup 2}, 715.4 +- 107 cm3) were significantly smaller than in MCI patients (595.9 +- 108, 844.1 +- 85) and the HCs (563.2 +- 75, 818.9 +- 109) (p < 0.05). The CC area and brain volume were not significantly different between MCI patients and the HCs. The CC area was significantly correlated with brain volume. Both CC area and brain volume were significantly smaller in the AD patients

  4. [Emotion and basal ganglia (II): what can we learn from subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, J; Dondaine, T

    2012-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation Parkinson's disease patient model seems to represent a unique opportunity for studying the functional role of the basal ganglia and notably the subthalamic nucleus in human emotional processing. Indeed, in addition to constituting a therapeutic advance for severely disabled Parkinson's disease patients, deep brain stimulation is a technique, which selectively modulates the activity of focal structures targeted by surgery. There is growing evidence of a link between emotional impairments and deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. In this context, according to the definition of emotional processing exposed in the companion paper available in this issue, the aim of the present review will consist in providing a synopsis of the studies that investigated the emotional disturbances observed in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation Parkinson's disease patients. This review leads to the conclusion that several emotional components would be disrupted after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: subjective feeling, neurophysiological activation, and motor expression. Finally, after a description of the limitations of this study model, we discuss the functional role of the subthalamic nucleus (and the striato-thalamo-cortical circuits in which it is involved) in emotional processing. It seems reasonable to conclude that the striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are indeed involved in emotional processing and that the subthalamic nucleus plays a central in role the human emotional architecture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on Alzheimer's disease in veterans, using the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

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    Weiner, Michael W; Veitch, Dallas P; Hayes, Jacqueline; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Harvey, Danielle; Toga, Arthur W; Friedl, Karl E; Pacifico, Anthony; Sheline, Yvette; Yaffe, Kristine; Mohlenoff, Brian

    2014-06-01

    Both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common problems resulting from military service, and both have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other causes. This study aims to use imaging techniques and biomarker analysis to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or PTSD resulting from combat or other traumas increase the risk for AD and decrease cognitive reserve in Veteran subjects, after accounting for age. Using military and Department of Veterans Affairs records, 65 Vietnam War veterans with a history of moderate or severe TBI with or without PTSD, 65 with ongoing PTSD without TBI, and 65 control subjects are being enrolled in this study at 19 sites. The study aims to select subject groups that are comparable in age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia are being excluded. However, a new study just beginning, and similar in size, will study subjects with TBI, subjects with PTSD, and control subjects with MCI. Baseline measurements of cognition, function, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; magnetic resonance images (structural, diffusion tensor, and resting state blood-level oxygen dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging); and amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images with florbetapir are being obtained. One-year follow-up measurements will be collected for most of the baseline procedures, with the exception of the lumbar puncture, the PET imaging, and apolipoprotein E genotyping. To date, 19 subjects with TBI only, 46 with PTSD only, and 15 with TBI and PTSD have been recruited and referred to 13 clinics to undergo the study protocol. It is expected that cohorts will be fully recruited by October 2014. This study is a first step toward the design and statistical powering of an AD prevention trial using at-risk veterans as subjects, and provides the

  6. Brain and blood metabolite signatures of pathology and progression in Alzheimer disease: A targeted metabolomics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Anup M.; Varma, Sudhir; Casanova, Ramon; An, Yang; O’Brien, Richard; Pletnikova, Olga; Kastenmueller, Gabi; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2018-01-01

    Background The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is poorly understood, and the relationships between systemic abnormalities in metabolism and AD pathogenesis are unclear. Understanding how global perturbations in metabolism are related to severity of AD neuropathology and the eventual expression of AD symptoms in at-risk individuals is critical to developing effective disease-modifying treatments. In this study, we undertook parallel metabolomics analyses in both the brain and blood to identify systemic correlates of neuropathology and their associations with prodromal and preclinical measures of AD progression. Methods and findings Quantitative and targeted metabolomics (Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ [identification and quantification] p180) assays were performed on brain tissue samples from the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) (N = 44, mean age = 81.33, % female = 36.36) from AD (N = 15), control (CN; N = 14), and “asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease” (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD pathology but no cognitive impairment during life; N = 15) participants. Using machine-learning methods, we identified a panel of 26 metabolites from two main classes—sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids—that discriminated AD and CN samples with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 83.33%, 86.67%, and 80%, respectively. We then assayed these 26 metabolites in serum samples from two well-characterized longitudinal cohorts representing prodromal (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [ADNI], N = 767, mean age = 75.19, % female = 42.63) and preclinical (BLSA) (N = 207, mean age = 78.68, % female = 42.63) AD, in which we tested their associations with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of AD-related brain atrophy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology, risk of conversion to incident AD, and trajectories of cognitive performance. We developed an integrated blood and brain endophenotype score that

  7. Brain perfusion correlates of cognitive and nigrostriatal functions in de novo Parkinson's disease

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    Nobili, Flavio; Arnaldi, Dario; Campus, Claudio; Ferrara, Michela; Brugnolo, Andrea; Dessi, Barbara; Girtler, Nicola; Rodriguez, Guido [University of Genoa, Clinical Neurophysiology, Department of Neurosciences, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Genoa (Italy); De Carli, Fabrizio [National Research Council, Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, Genoa (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Abruzzese, Giovanni [University Hospital San. Martino, Clinical Neurology, Department of Neurosciences, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Genoa (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Subtle cognitive impairment is recognized in the first stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), including executive, memory and visuospatial dysfunction, but its pathophysiological basis is still debated. Twenty-six consecutive, drug-naive, de novo PD patients underwent an extended neuropsychological battery, dopamine transporter (DAT) and brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We previously reported that nigrocaudate impairment correlates with executive functions, and nigroputaminal impairment with visuospatial abilities. Here perfusion SPECT was first compared between the PD group and age-matched controls (CTR). Then, perfusion SPECT was correlated with both DAT SPECT and four neuropsychological factors by means of voxel-based analysis (SPM8) with a height threshold of p < 0.005 at peak level and p < 0.05 false discovery rate-corrected at cluster level. Both perfusion and DAT SPECT images were flipped in order to have the more affected hemisphere (MAH), defined clinically, on the same side. Significant hypoperfusion was found in an occipital area of the MAH in PD patients as compared to CTR. Executive functions directly correlated with brain perfusion in bilateral posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus in the less affected hemisphere (LAH), while verbal memory directly correlated with perfusion in the precuneus, inferior parietal lobule and superior temporal gyrus in the LAH. Furthermore, positive correlation was highlighted between nigrocaudate and nigroputaminal impairment and brain perfusion in the precuneus, posterior cingulate and parahippocampal gyri of the LAH. These data support the evidence showing an early involvement of the cholinergic system in the early cognitive dysfunction and point to a more relevant role of parietal lobes and posterior cingulate in executive functions in PD. (orig.)

  8. Brain perfusion correlates of cognitive and nigrostriatal functions in de novo Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobili, Flavio; Arnaldi, Dario; Campus, Claudio; Ferrara, Michela; Brugnolo, Andrea; Dessi, Barbara; Girtler, Nicola; Rodriguez, Guido; De Carli, Fabrizio; Morbelli, Silvia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Abruzzese, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Subtle cognitive impairment is recognized in the first stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), including executive, memory and visuospatial dysfunction, but its pathophysiological basis is still debated. Twenty-six consecutive, drug-naive, de novo PD patients underwent an extended neuropsychological battery, dopamine transporter (DAT) and brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We previously reported that nigrocaudate impairment correlates with executive functions, and nigroputaminal impairment with visuospatial abilities. Here perfusion SPECT was first compared between the PD group and age-matched controls (CTR). Then, perfusion SPECT was correlated with both DAT SPECT and four neuropsychological factors by means of voxel-based analysis (SPM8) with a height threshold of p < 0.005 at peak level and p < 0.05 false discovery rate-corrected at cluster level. Both perfusion and DAT SPECT images were flipped in order to have the more affected hemisphere (MAH), defined clinically, on the same side. Significant hypoperfusion was found in an occipital area of the MAH in PD patients as compared to CTR. Executive functions directly correlated with brain perfusion in bilateral posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus in the less affected hemisphere (LAH), while verbal memory directly correlated with perfusion in the precuneus, inferior parietal lobule and superior temporal gyrus in the LAH. Furthermore, positive correlation was highlighted between nigrocaudate and nigroputaminal impairment and brain perfusion in the precuneus, posterior cingulate and parahippocampal gyri of the LAH. These data support the evidence showing an early involvement of the cholinergic system in the early cognitive dysfunction and point to a more relevant role of parietal lobes and posterior cingulate in executive functions in PD. (orig.)

  9. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation modulates small fiber-dependent sensory thresholds in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Galhardoni, Ricardo; Ferreira, Karine S L; Brandão Paiva, Anderson Rodrigues; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Alvarenga, Luciana; Myczkowski, Martin L; Marcolin, Marco Antonio; de Siqueira, Silvia R D T; Fonoff, Erich; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2012-05-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) rarely have been investigated. Among these, sensory disturbances, including chronic pain (CP), are frequent in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes induced by deep brain stimulation in the perception of sensory stimuli, either noxious or innocuous, mediated by small or large nerve fibers. Sensory detection and pain thresholds were assessed in 25 PD patients all in the off-medication condition with the stimulator turned on or off (on- and off-stimulation conditions, respectively). The relationship between the changes induced by surgery on quantitative sensory testing, spontaneous CP, and motor abilities were studied. Quantitative sensory test results obtained in PD patients were compared with those of age-matched healthy subjects. Chronic pain was present in 72% of patients before vs 36% after surgery (P=.019). Compared with healthy subjects, PD patients had an increased sensitivity to innocuous thermal stimuli and mechanical pain, but a reduced sensitivity to innocuous mechanical stimuli. In addition, they had an increased pain rating when painful thermal stimuli were applied, particularly in the off-stimulation condition. In the on-stimulation condition, there was an increased sensitivity to innocuous thermal stimuli but a reduced sensitivity to mechanical or thermal pain. Pain provoked by thermal stimuli was reduced when the stimulator was turned on. Motor improvement positively correlated with changes in warm detection and heat pain thresholds. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation contributes to relieve pain associated with PD and specifically modulates small fiber-mediated sensations. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TNF signaling inhibition in the CNS: implications for normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansey Malú G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF as an immune mediator has long been appreciated but its function in the brain is still unclear. TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 is expressed in most cell types, and can be activated by binding of either soluble TNF (solTNF or transmembrane TNF (tmTNF, with a preference for solTNF; whereas TNFR2 is expressed primarily by microglia and endothelial cells and is preferentially activated by tmTNF. Elevation of solTNF is a hallmark of acute and chronic neuroinflammation as well as a number of neurodegenerative conditions including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's (AD, Parkinson's (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and multiple sclerosis (MS. The presence of this potent inflammatory factor at sites of injury implicates it as a mediator of neuronal damage and disease pathogenesis, making TNF an attractive target for therapeutic development to treat acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. However, new and old observations from animal models and clinical trials reviewed here suggest solTNF and tmTNF exert different functions under normal and pathological conditions in the CNS. A potential role for TNF in synaptic scaling and hippocampal neurogenesis demonstrated by recent studies suggest additional in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted to delineate the distinct functions of the two TNF ligands in different parts of the brain prior to large-scale development of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS. If inactivation of TNF-dependent inflammation in the brain is warranted by additional pre-clinical studies, selective targeting of TNFR1-mediated signaling while sparing TNFR2 activation may lessen adverse effects of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS.

  11. Disease-Related Microstructural Differences in the Brain in Women With Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arpana; Woodworth, Davis C; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Rapkin, Andrea J; Naliboff, Bruce; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Stains, Jean; Masghati, Salome; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A; Labus, Jennifer S

    2018-05-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a chronic pelvic pain disorder affecting 16% of the female population. Neuroimaging studies have highlighted central abnormalities in PVD, similar to other chronic pelvic pain disorders, including brain regions involved in sensory processing and modulation of pain. The aim of the study was to determine alterations in the subvoxel, microstructural organization within tissues in PVD compared with healthy control participants (HCs) and a disease control group (irritable bowel syndrome [IBS]). Diffusion tensor imaging magnetic resonance imaging was conducted in 87 age-matched premenopausal women (29 PVD, 29 HCs, 29 IBS). Statistical parameter mapping of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps were used to identify microstructural difference in the brain specific to PVD or shared with IBS. PVD alterations in microstructural organization of the brain were predominantly observed in fibers associated with sensorimotor integration and pain processing that relay information between the thalamus, basal ganglia, sensorimotor, and insular cortex. PVD, compared with HCs, showed extensive increases in the FA of somatosensory and basal ganglia regions. In contrast, PVD and IBS subjects did not show any FA-related group differences. PVD subjects showed greater MD in the basal ganglia compared with HCs (higher MD in the internal capsule and pallidum) and IBS (higher MD in the putamen and pallidum). Increases in MD were associated with increased vaginal muscle tenderness and vulvar pain. The current findings highlight possible shared mechanisms between 2 different pelvic pain disorders, but also highlight the widespread alterations observed specifically in PVD compared with HCs. Alterations in microstructure in PVD were observed in fibers associated with sensorimotor integration and pain processing, which were also associated with increased vaginal muscle tenderness and vulvar pain. These alterations may be contributing to increased

  12. Aberrant brain-stem morphometry associated with sleep disturbance in drug-naïve subjects with Alzheimer's disease

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    Lee JH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ji Han Lee,1 Won Sang Jung,2 Woo Hee Choi,3 Hyun Kook Lim4 1Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, 4Department of Psychiatry, Saint Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, South Korea Objective: Among patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, sleep disturbances are common and serious noncognitive symptoms. Previous studies of AD patients have identified deformations in the brain stem, which may play an important role in the regulation of sleep. The aim of this study was to further investigate the relationship between sleep disturbances and alterations in brain stem morphology in AD.Materials and methods: In 44 patients with AD and 40 healthy elderly controls, sleep disturbances were measured using the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep subscale. We employed magnetic resonance imaging-based automated segmentation tools to examine the relationship between sleep disturbances and changes in brain stem morphology.Results: Analyses of the data from AD subjects revealed significant correlations between the Neuropsychiatry Inventory sleep-subscale scores and structural alterations in the left posterior lateral region of the brain stem, as well as normalized brain stem volumes. In addition, significant group differences in posterior brain stem morphology were observed between the AD group and the control group.Conclusion: This study is the first to analyze an association between sleep disturbances and brain stem morphology in AD. In line with previous findings, this study lends support to the possibility that brain stem structural abnormalities might be important neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep disturbances associated with AD. Further longitudinal research is needed to confirm these findings. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, sleep, brain stem, MRI, shape analysis

  13. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a risk factor for subsequent development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Abnormal tau...Special Reporting Requirements……………………………………10 9. Appendices……………………………………………………………10 1. INTRODUCTION Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a risk factor for... risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 36(5), 1376-81. Teague SJ, Davis AM, Leeson PD, Oprea T (1999) The Design of Leadlike

  14. Stress and brain functional changes in patients with Crohn's disease: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, A; Ballotta, D; Righi, S; Moretti, M; Bertani, A; Scarcelli, A; Sartini, A; Ercolani, M; Nichelli, P; Campieri, M; Benuzzi, F

    2017-10-01

    In Crohn's disease (CD) patients, stress is believed to influence symptoms generation. Stress may act via central nervous system pathways to affect visceral sensitivity and motility thus exacerbating gastrointestinal symptoms. The neural substrate underpinning these mechanisms needs to be investigated in CD. We conducted an explorative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in order to investigate potential differences in the brain stress response in CD patients compared to controls. 17 CD patients and 17 healthy controls underwent a fMRI scan while performing a stressful task consisting in a Stroop color-word interference task designed to induce mental stress in the fMRI environment. Compared to controls, in CD patients the stress task elicited greater blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in the midcingulate cortex (MCC). The MCC integrate "high" emotional processes with afferent sensory information ascending from the gut. In light of these integrative functions, the stress-evoked MCC hyperactivity in CD patients might represent a plausible neural substrate for the association between stress and symptomatic disease. The MCC dysfunction might be involved in mechanisms of central disinhibition of nociceptive inputs leading to amplify the visceral sensitivity. Finally, the stress-evoked MCC hyperactivity might affect the regulation of intestinal motility resulting in exacerbation of disease symptoms and the autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation of inflammation resulting in enhanced inflammatory activity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Distinct brain metabolic patterns separately associated with cognition, motor function, and aging in Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji Hyun; Katako, Audrey; Aljuaid, Maram; Goertzen, Andrew L; Borys, Andrew; Hobson, Douglas E; Kim, Seok Min; Lee, Chong Sik

    2017-12-01

    We explored whether patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) show a distinct spatial metabolic pattern that characterizes cognitive deficits in addition to motor dysfunction. Eighteen patients with PDD underwent 3 separate positron emission tomography sessions with [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (for glucose metabolism), fluorinated N-3-fluoropropyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (for dopamine transporter density) and Pittsburgh compound-B (for beta-amyloid load). We confirmed in PDD versus normal controls, overall hypometabolism in the posterior and prefrontal brain regions accompanied with hypermetabolism in subcortical structures and the cerebellar vermis. A multivariate network analysis then revealed 3 metabolic patterns that are separately associated with cognitive performance (p = 0.042), age (p = 0.042), and motor symptom severity (p = 0.039). The age-related pattern's association with aging was replicated in healthy controls (p = 0.047) and patients with Alzheimer's disease (p = 0.002). The cognition-related pattern's association with cognitive performance was observed, with a trend-level of correlation, in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (p = 0.084) but not in patients with Alzheimer's disease (p = 0.974). We found no association with fluorinated N-3-fluoropropyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane and Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography with patients' cognitive performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Syncope Associated with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in a Patient with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dursun Aygun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD, deep brain stimulation (DBS may be an alternative option for the treatment of motor symptoms. Side effects associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS in patients with PD are emerging as the most frequent sensory and motor symptoms. DBS-related syncope is reported as extremely rare. We wanted to discuss the mechanisms of syncope associated with STN DBS in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Case report. Sixty-three-year-old female patient is followed up with diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease for 6 years in our clinic. The patient has undergone STN DBS due to painful dystonia and drug resistant tremor. During the operation, when the left STN was stimulated at 5 milliampere (mAmp, the patient developed presyncopal symptoms. However, when the stimulation was stopped symptoms improved. During the early period after the operation, when the right STN was stimulated at 1.3 millivolts (mV, she developed the pre-yncopal symptoms and then syncope. Our case shows that STN DBS may lead to directly autonomic symptoms resulting in syncope during stimulation-on (stim-on.

  17. The impact of Parkinson's disease and subthalamic deep brain stimulation on reward processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Ricarda; Stankevich, Yuliya; Dshemuchadse, Maja; Storch, Alexander; Wolz, Martin; Reichmann, Heinz; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Goschke, Thomas; Lueken, Ulrike

    2015-08-01

    Due to its position in cortico-subthalamic and cortico-striatal pathways, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is considered to play a crucial role not only in motor, but also in cognitive and motivational functions. In the present study we aimed to characterize how different aspects of reward processing are affected by disease and deep brain stimulation of the STN (DBS-STN) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). We compared 33 PD patients treated with DBS-STN under best medical treatment (DBS-on, medication-on) to 33 PD patients without DBS, but optimized pharmacological treatment and 34 age-matched healthy controls. We then investigated DBS-STN effects using a postoperative stimulation-on/ -off design. The task set included a delay discounting task, a task to assess changes in incentive salience attribution, and the Iowa Gambling Task. The presence of PD was associated with increased incentive salience attribution and devaluation of delayed rewards. Acute DBS-STN increased risky choices in the Iowa Gambling Task under DBS-on condition, but did not further affect incentive salience attribution or the evaluation of delayed rewards. Findings indicate that acute DBS-STN affects specific aspects of reward processing, including the weighting of gains and losses, while larger-scale effects of disease or medication are predominant in others reward-related functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nose-to-Brain delivery of insulin for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Stützle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transport of small molecules, peptides and proteins via the olfactory epithelium and along olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathways from the nasal cavity to the brain is very well known and clinically established for central nervous system (CNS active drugs like oxytocin, sumatriptan or insulin. Insulin is a clinically well-established biopharmaceutical with a validated function in cognition. Central supply with insulin via intranasal administration improves cognition in animal models and in human, making insulin a so-called cognitive enhancer. Furthermore, dysregulation of insulin is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, which is associated with lower levels of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid and is involved in amyloid-beta (Ab regulation. Clinical trials with intranasal insulin implicate positive effects on learning and memory, but a massive lack of pharmacokinetic and efficacy data hamper a pharmacokinetic – pharmcodynamic relation and a possible clinical development as cognition enhancer. A lack of such data also prevents resolving the mechanisms involved in directing insulin to the central or to the peripheral compartment. Here we discuss the basic mechanism of Nose-to-Brain delivery, evidences for intranasal insulin as cognition enhancer, medical devices for intranasal delivery and safety aspects.

  19. Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Astarita

    Full Text Available The molecular bases of Alzheimer's disease (AD remain unclear. We used a lipidomic approach to identify lipid abnormalities in the brains of subjects with AD (N = 37 compared to age-matched controls (N = 17. The analyses revealed statistically detectable elevations in levels of non-esterified monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs and mead acid (20:3n-9 in mid-frontal cortex, temporal cortex and hippocampus of AD patients. Further studies showed that brain mRNAs encoding for isoforms of the rate-limiting enzyme in MUFAs biosynthesis, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD-1, SCD-5a and SCD-5b, were elevated in subjects with AD. The monounsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio ('desaturation index'--displayed a strong negative correlation with measures of cognition: the Mini Mental State Examination test (r = -0.80; P = 0.0001 and the Boston Naming test (r = -0.57; P = 0.0071. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized role for the lipogenic enzyme SCD in AD.

  20. Ethical safety of deep brain stimulation: A study on moral decision-making in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Picascia, Marta; Barbieri, Sergio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Pacchetti, Claudio; Priori, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    The possibility that deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) alters patients' decisions and actions, even temporarily, raises important clinical, ethical and legal questions. Abnormal moral decision-making can lead to ethical rules violations. Previous experiments demonstrated the subthalamic (STN) activation during moral decision-making. Here we aim to study whether STN DBS can affect moral decision-making in PD patients. Eleven patients with PD and bilateral STN DBS implant performed a computerized moral task in ON and OFF stimulation conditions. A control group of PD patients without DBS implant performed the same experimental protocol. All patients underwent motor, cognitive and psychological assessments. STN stimulation was not able to modify neither reaction times nor responses to moral task both when we compared the ON and the OFF state in the same patient (reaction times, p = .416) and when we compared DBS patients with those treated only with the best medical treatment (reaction times: p = .408, responses: p = .776). Moral judgment is the result of a complex process, requiring cognitive executive functions, problem-solving, anticipations of consequences of an action, conflict processing, emotional evaluation of context and of possible outcomes, and involving different brain areas and neural circuits. Our data show that STN DBS leaves unaffected moral decisions thus implying relevant clinical and ethical implications for DBS consequences on patients' behavior, on decision-making and on judgment ability. In conclusion, the technique can be considered safe on moral behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. FLOW-BASED NETWORK MEASURES OF BRAIN CONNECTIVITY IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Gautam; Joshi, Shantanu H; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new flow-based method for modeling brain structural connectivity. The method uses a modified maximum-flow algorithm that is robust to noise in the diffusion data and guided by biologically viable pathways and structure of the brain. A flow network is first created using a lattice graph by connecting all lattice points (voxel centers) to all their neighbors by edges. Edge weights are based on the orientation distribution function (ODF) value in the direction of the edge. The maximum-flow is computed based on this flow graph using the flow or the capacity between each region of interest (ROI) pair by following the connected tractography fibers projected onto the flow graph edges. Network measures such as global efficiency, transitivity, path length, mean degree, density, modularity, small world, and assortativity are computed from the flow connectivity matrix. We applied our method to diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) from 110 subjects (28 normal elderly, 56 with early and 11 with late mild cognitive impairment, and 15 with AD) and segmented co-registered anatomical MRIs into cortical regions. Experimental results showed better performance compared to the standard fiber-counting methods when distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from normal aging.

  2. Trail Making Test Part A and Brain Perfusion Imaging in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Shindo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The Trail Making Test (TMT has long been used to investigate deficits in cognitive processing speed and executive function in humans. However, there are few studies that elucidate the neural substrates of the TMT. The aim of the present study was to identify the regional perfusion patterns of the brain associated with performance on the TMT part A (TMT-A in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods: Eighteen AD patients with poor performance on the TMT-A and 36 age- and sex-matched AD patients with good performance were selected. All subjects underwent brain single photon emission computed tomography. Results: No significant differences between the good and poor performance groups were found with respect to years of education and revised Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination scores. However, higher z-scores for hypoperfusion in the bilateral superior parietal lobule were observed in the group that scored poorly on the TMT-A compared with the good performance group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that functional activity of the bilateral superior parietal lobules is closely related to performance time on the TMT-A. Thus, the performance time on the TMT-A might be a promising index of dysfunction of the superior parietal area among mild AD patients.

  3. Specific transfection of inflamed brain by macrophages: a new therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Haney

    Full Text Available The ability to precisely upregulate genes in inflamed brain holds great therapeutic promise. Here we report a novel class of vectors, genetically modified macrophages that carry reporter and therapeutic genes to neural cells. Systemic administration of macrophages transfected ex vivo with a plasmid DNA (pDNA encoding a potent antioxidant enzyme, catalase, produced month-long expression levels of catalase in the brain resulting in three-fold reductions in inflammation and complete neuroprotection in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD. This resulted in significant improvements in motor functions in PD mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that transfected macrophages secreted extracellular vesicles, exosomes, packed with catalase genetic material, pDNA and mRNA, active catalase, and NF-κb, a transcription factor involved in the encoded gene expression. Exosomes efficiently transfer their contents to contiguous neurons resulting in de novo protein synthesis in target cells. Thus, genetically modified macrophages serve as a highly efficient system for reproduction, packaging, and targeted gene and drug delivery to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. siRNA as a tool to improve the treatment of brain diseases: Mechanism, targets and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Maria João; Martins, Susana; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    As the population ages, brain pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancer increase their incidence, being the need to find successful treatments of upmost importance. Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is required in order to reach diseases causes and treat them. However, biological barriers, mainly blood-brain barrier (BBB), are the key obstacles that prevent the effectiveness of possible treatments due to their ability to strongly limit the perfusion of compounds into the brain. Over the past decades, new approaches towards overcoming BBB and its efflux transporters had been proposed. One of these approaches here reviewed is through small interfering RNA (siRNA), which is capable to specifically target one gene and silence it in a post-transcriptional way. There are different possible functional proteins at the BBB, as the ones responsible for transport or just for its tightness, which could be a siRNA target. As important as the effective silence is the way to delivery siRNA to its anatomical site of action. This is where nanotechnology-based systems may help, by protecting siRNA circulation and providing cell/tissue-targeting and intracellular siRNA delivery. After an initial overview on incidence of brain diseases and basic features of the CNS, BBB and its efflux pumps, this review focuses on recent strategies to reach brain based on siRNA, and how to specifically target these approaches in order to treat brain diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. From miracle to reconciliation: a hermeneutic phenomenological study exploring the experience of living with Parkinson's disease following deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Anita; Kirkevold, Marit; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Ostergaard, Karen

    2010-10-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's disease is a promising treatment for patients who can no longer be treated satisfactorily with L-dopa. Deep Brain Stimulation is known to relieve motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease and improve quality of life. Focusing on how patients experience life when treated with Deep Brain Stimulation can provide essential information on the process patients go through when receiving a treatment that alters the body and changes the illness trajectory. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experience of living with Parkinson's disease when treated with Deep Brain Stimulation. The study was designed as a longitudinal study and data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews three times during the first year of treatment. Nine patients participated in the study. They were included when they had accepted treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's disease. Data collection and data analysis were inspired by the hermeneutic phenomenological methodology of Van Manen. The treatment had a major impact on the body. Participants experienced great bodily changes and went through a process of adjustment in three phases during the first year of treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation. These stages were; being liberated: a kind of miracle, changes as a challenge: decline or opportunity and reconciliation: re-defining life with Parkinson's disease. The course of the process was unique for each participant, but dominant was that difficulties during the adjustment of stimulation and medication did affect the re-defining process. Patients go through a dramatic process of change following Deep Brain Stimulation. A changing body affects their entire lifeworld. Some adjust smoothly to changes while others are affected by loss of control, uncertainty and loss of everyday life as they knew it. These experiences affect the process of adjusting to life with Deep Brain Stimulation and re-define life with Parkinson's disease

  6. A Preliminary Report on Disordered Speech with Deep Brain Stimulation in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dromey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN has proven effective in treating the major motor symptoms of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD. The aim of this study was to learn which laryngeal and articulatory acoustic features changed in patients who were reported to have worse speech with stimulation. Six volunteers with PD who had bilateral STN electrodes were recorded with DBS turned on or off. Perceptual ratings reflected poorer speech performance with DBS on. Acoustic measures of articulation (corner vowel formants, diphthong slopes, and a spirantization index and phonation (perturbation, long-term average spectrum as well as verbal fluency scores showed mixed results with DBS. Some speakers improved while others became worse on individual measures. The magnitude of DBS effects was not predictable based on the patients' demographic characteristics. Future research involving adjustments to stimulator settings or electrode placement may be beneficial in limiting the negative effects of DBS on speech.

  7. [The role of neurologists in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease: a neurosurgical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been accepted as an effective treatment for medically refractory Parkinson disease (PD). Appropriate patient selection, safe and precise surgery, and proper postoperative adjustment of stimulation and medication, are essential for the success of DBS. Patient selection is the most important role for the neurologist in DBS treatment. Neurologists treating PD should understand the correct indications and contraindications for DBS, and introduce it in a timely manner to patients who can be expected to benefit substantially from it. For long term treatment of PD, ideally the neurologist in charge of the patient should adjust both the stimulation parameters and medication. Neurologists engaged in this treatment should also have a comprehensive understanding of the probable complications and how to avoid them.

  8. Neuropsychological correlates of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkstein, S.E.; Brandt, J.; Bylsma, F.; Peyser, C.; Folstein, M.; Folstein, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive cognitive evaluation were carried out in a series of 29 patients with mild to moderate Huntington's disease (HD). A factor analysis of the neuropsychological test scores provided three factors: A memory/speed-of-processing factor, a 'frontal' factor, and a response inhibition factor. The memory/speed factor correlated significantly with measures of caudate atrophy, frontal atrophy, and atrophy of the left (but not the right) sylvian cistern. There were no significant correlations between the 'frontal' or response inhibition factors and measures of cortical or subcortical brain atrophy. Our findings confirm that subcortical atrophy is significantly correlated with specific cognitive deficits in HD, and demonstrate that cortical atrophy also has important association with the cognitive deficits of patients with HD. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of brain reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in neurodegenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydbirk, Rasmus; Folke, Jonas; Winge, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of gene expression levels by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) has for many years been the favourite approach for discovering disease-associated alterations. Normalization of results to stably expressed reference genes (RGs) is pivotal to obtain reliable results......, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy patients. Using RefFinder, a web-based tool for evaluating RG stability, we identified the most stable RGs to be UBE2D2, CYC1, and RPL13 which we recommend for future RT-qPCR studies on human brain tissue from these patients. None of the investigated genes were affected...... by experimental variables such as RIN, PMI, or age. Findings were further validated by expression analyses of a target gene GSK3B, known to be affected by AD and PD. We obtained high variations in GSK3B levels when contrasting the results using different sets of common RG underlining the importance of a priori...

  10. Magnetic resonance tomography and computed tomography of the brain for diagnosing Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Straube, A.; Beyer, H.K.; Leopold, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on two woman patients with confirmed Wilson's desease (hepatolenticular degeneration) who had neurological deficits and showed typical changes evident from laboratory data. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance tomography revealed degenerative changes in the basal ganglia, especially of the lenticular nucleus, MR showing these defects more clearly than CT. There was a noticeable symmetrical enhancement of signals in the lenticular nucleus which was particularly evident on the image basing on the T 2 (spin-spin relaxation time constant) values. MR could be superior to CT with regard to showing up pathological changes in the basal ganglia. The future indication of MR could be the establishment of an exact correlation between clinical signs and symptoms on the one hand, and morphological findings on the other. Over and above this, it should be explored to what extent MR can already detect degenerative changes in the brain in primarily hepatic types of the disease even without prior neurological examination. (orig.) [de

  11. ERP-based detection of brain pathology in rat models for preclinical Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouriziabari, Seyed Berdia

    Early pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (HP-tau) in the entorhinal cortex and progressive loss of basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons. These pathologies are known to remain asymptomatic for many years before AD is clinically diagnosed; however, they may induce aberrant brain processing which can be captured as an abnormality in event-related potentials (ERPs). Here, we examined cortical ERPs while a differential associative learning paradigm was applied to adult male rats with entorhinal HP-tau, pharmacological blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, or both conditions. Despite no impairment in differential associative and reversal learning, each pathological feature induced distinct abnormality in cortical ERPs to an extent that was sufficient for machine classifiers to accurately detect a specific type of pathology based on these ERP features. These results highlight a potential use of ERPs during differential associative learning as a biomarker for asymptomatic AD pathology.

  12. Brain energy metabolism and dopaminergic function in Huntington's disease measured in vivo using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Quinn, N.; Marsden, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with typical Huntington's disease was investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography. Regional cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction, oxygen and glucose utilization, L-Dopa uptake, and dopamine (D2) receptor binding were measured using several positron-labelled tracers. CT showed slight atrophy of the head of caudate but no cortical atrophy, although distinct frontal lobe dysfunction was present on psychometric testing. Oxygen and glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow were decreased in the striata and to a lesser extent in frontal cortex. Cerebral blood flow was in the low normal range throughout the remainder of the brain. A normal metabolic ratio was found in all regions, since the changes in glucose utilization paralleled those in oxygen consumption. The capacity of the striatum to store dopamine as assessed by L-[ 18 F]-fluorodopa uptake was normal, but dopamine (D2) receptor binding was decreased when compared to normal subjects

  13. Therapeutic deep brain stimulation worsening dysprosody in Parkinson’s disease – an unexplored entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib M

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria Shoaib,1 Muhammad Taimoor Khan2 1Department of Medicine, Dow Medical College, Karachi, Pakistan; 2Department of Neurology, Charleston Area Medical Center/West Virginia University, Charleston, WV, USA  We read this article, “Altered emotional recognition and expression in patients with Parkinson’s disease” by Jin et al1 with great interest and appreciate the novel information provided on altered emotional processing in pre-deep brain stimulation (DBS Parkinson’s disease (PD patients and we would like to add our feedback on the role of DBS on nonmotor and emotional components of PD.View the original paper by Jin and colleagues. 

  14. Resting state cortical oscillations of patients with Parkinson disease and with and without subthalamic deep brain stimulation: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chunyan; Li, Dianyou; Jiang, Tianxiao; Ince, Nuri Firat; Zhan, Shikun; Zhang, Jing; Sha, Zhiyi; Sun, Bomin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the modification to cortical oscillations of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) by subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). Spontaneous cortical oscillations of patients with PD were recorded with magnetoencephalography during on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation states. Several features such as average frequency, average power, and relative subband power in regions of interest were extracted in the frequency domain, and these features were correlated with Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III evaluation. The same features were also investigated in patients with PD without surgery and healthy controls. Patients with Parkinson disease without surgery compared with healthy controls had a significantly lower average frequency and an increased average power in 1 to 48 Hz range in whole cortex. Higher relative power in theta and simultaneous decrease in beta and gamma over temporal and occipital were also observed in patients with PD. The Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III rigidity score correlated with the average frequency and with the relative power of beta and gamma in frontal areas. During subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, the average frequency increased significantly when stimulation was on compared with off state. In addition, the relative power dropped in delta, whereas it rose in beta over the whole cortex. Through the course of stimulation, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III rigidity and tremor scores correlated with the relative power of alpha over left parietal. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves the symptoms of PD by suppressing the synchronization of alpha rhythm in somatomotor region.

  15. Brain SPECT analysis by 3D-SSP and clinical features of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, Yasunori; Yoshida, Kazuto; Makino, Kenichi; Yabe, Ichiro; Kikuchi, Seiji; Sasaki, Hidenao; Tashiro, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the association of symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) with cerebral perfusion on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The clinical features of PD were compared with SPECT images of the brain obtained by three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) analysis. Thirty-eight patients who had PD without dementia (17 men and 21 women with a mean age of 68.6±4.7 years) were enrolled in this study. Their symptoms were rated using the unified parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS). Within a week, all patients were examined by SPECT with I-123, and reconstructed images were analyzed with 3D-SSP using an image-analysis software, iSSP ver. 3.5. Data on brain surface perfusion extracted by 3D-SSP analysis were compared between the PD patients and the normal control group. The same comparisons were made for subgroups of PD patients with severe symptoms, such as tremor, gait disturbance, bradykinesia, and the UPDRS motor score. Cerebral perfusion was decreased at the anterior cingulate cortex and occipital lobe of the PD patients compared with the normal controls. In the subgroups with severe gait disturbance and severe bradykinesia, additional hypoperfusion was seen at the lateral frontal association and lateral temporal association and the medial frontal gyrus, and by the pixel-by-pixel comparison, perfusion was significantly decreased (p<0.05) at the medial frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex compared with the normal control group. In PD patients, severe gait disturbance and bradykinesia may be correlated with hypoperfusion of the medial aspect of the frontal lobe. This suggests that functional disturbance of the supplementary motor area and other parts of the frontal lobe are involved in the development of gait disturbance and bradykinesia in PD. (author)

  16. Combining cell transplants or gene therapy with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Nathan C; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S; Ostrem, Jill L; Marks, William J; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy each show promise to enhance the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, because cell transplantation and gene therapy generally require direct delivery to the central nervous system, clinical trial design involves unique scientific, ethical, and financial concerns related to the invasive nature of the procedure. Typically, such biologics have been tested in PD patients who have not received any neurosurgical intervention. Here, we suggest that PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) device implantation are an ideal patient population for the clinical evaluation of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Randomizing subjects to an experimental group that receives the biologic concurrently with the DBS implantation-or to a control group that receives the DBS treatment alone-has several compelling advantages. First, this study design enables the participation of patients likely to benefit from DBS, many of whom simultaneously meet the inclusion criteria of biologic studies. Second, the need for a sham neurosurgical procedure is eliminated, which may reduce ethical concerns, promote patient recruitment, and enhance the blinding of surgical trials. Third, testing the biologic by "piggybacking" onto an established, reimbursable procedure should reduce the cost of clinical trials, which may allow a greater number of biologics to reach this critical stage of research translation. Finally, this clinical trial design may lead to combinatorial treatment strategies that provide PD patients with more durable control over disabling motor symptoms. By combining neuromodulation with biologics, we may also reveal important treatment paradigms relevant to other diseases of the brain. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder S; Gill, Tejkaran S; Kamath, Ashwini; Whisnant, Billy

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms) are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving health care-related literature and, in turn, promoting health literacy. Based on the comprehensive literature review and assessment of the 40 documents associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury, recommendations have been made for improving the readability, suitability, and usability of health care-related documents. The recommendations are

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Brain Perfusion SPECT with Brodmann Areas Mapping in Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valotassiou, Varvara; Papatriantafyllou, John; Sifakis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Chara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Psimadas, Dimitrios; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Hadjigeorgiou, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on clinical criteria alone may be problematic, while current and future treatments should be administered earlier in order to be more effective. Thus, various disease biomarkers could be used for early detection of AD. We evaluated brain perfusion with 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Brodmann areas (BAs) mapping in mild AD using an automated software (NeuroGam) for the semi-quantitative evaluation of perfusion in BAs and the comparison with the software's normal database. We studied 34 consecutive patients with mild AD: 9 men, 25 women, mean age 70.9 ± 8.1 years, mean Mini-Mental State Examination 22.6 ± 2.5. BAs 25L, 25R, 38L, 38R, 28L, 28R, 36L, and 36R had the lower mean perfusion values, while BAs 31L, 31R, 19R, 18L, 18R, 17L, and 17R had the higher mean values. Compared with healthy subjects of the same age, perfusion values in BAs 25L, 25R, 28R, 28L, 36L, and 36R had the greatest deviations from the healthy sample, while the lowest deviations were found in BAs 32L, 32R, 19R, 24L, 17L, 17R, 18L, and 18R. A percentage of ≥94% of patients had perfusion values more than -2SDs below the mean of healthy subjects in BAs 38R, 38L, 36L, 36R, 23L, 23R, 22L, 44L, 28L, 28R, 25L, and 25R. The corresponding proportion was less than 38% for BAs 11L, 19R, 32L, 32R, 18L, 18R, 24L, and 17R. In conclusion, brain SPECT studies with automated perfusion mapping could be useful as an ancillary tool in daily practice, revealing perfusion impairments in early AD.

  19. Deep ensemble learning of sparse regression models for brain disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies on brain imaging analysis witnessed the core roles of machine learning techniques in computer-assisted intervention for brain disease diagnosis. Of various machine-learning techniques, sparse regression models have proved their effectiveness in handling high-dimensional data but with a small number of training samples, especially in medical problems. In the meantime, deep learning methods have been making great successes by outperforming the state-of-the-art performances in various applications. In this paper, we propose a novel framework that combines the two conceptually different methods of sparse regression and deep learning for Alzheimer's disease/mild cognitive impairment diagnosis and prognosis. Specifically, we first train multiple sparse regression models, each of which is trained with different values of a regularization control parameter. Thus, our multiple sparse regression models potentially select different feature subsets from the original feature set; thereby they have different powers to predict the response values, i.e., clinical label and clinical scores in our work. By regarding the response values from our sparse regression models as target-level representations, we then build a deep convolutional neural network for clinical decision making, which thus we call 'Deep Ensemble Sparse Regression Network.' To our best knowledge, this is the first work that combines sparse regression models with deep neural network. In our experiments with the ADNI cohort, we validated the effectiveness of the proposed method by achieving the highest diagnostic accuracies in three classification tasks. We also rigorously analyzed our results and compared with the previous studies on the ADNI cohort in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain plasticity in Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait induced by action observation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Gatti, Roberto; Sarasso, Elisabetta; Volonté, Maria Antonietta; Canu, Elisa; Meani, Alessandro; Sarro, Lidia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Cattrysse, Erik; Kerckhofs, Eric; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Gait disorders represent a therapeutic challenge in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study investigated the efficacy of 4-week action observation training (AOT) on disease severity, freezing of gait and motor abilities in PD, and evaluated treatment-related brain functional changes. 25 PD patients with freezing of gait were randomized into two groups: AOT (action observation combined with practicing the observed actions) and "Landscape" (same physical training combined with landscape-videos observation). At baseline and 4-week, patients underwent clinical evaluation and fMRI. Clinical assessment was repeated at 8-week. At 4-week, both groups showed reduced freezing of gait severity, improved walking speed and quality of life. Moreover, AOT was associated with reduced motor disability and improved balance. AOT group showed a sustained positive effect on motor disability, walking speed, balance and quality of life at 8-week, with a trend toward a persisting reduced freezing of gait severity. At 4-week vs. baseline, AOT group showed increased recruitment of fronto-parietal areas during fMRI tasks, while the Landscape group showed a reduced fMRI activity of the left postcentral and inferior parietal gyri and right rolandic operculum and supramarginal gyrus. In AOT group, functional brain changes were associated with clinical improvements at 4-week and predicted clinical evolution at 8-week. AOT has a more lasting effect in improving motor function, gait and quality of life in PD patients relative to physical therapy alone. AOT-related performance gains are associated with an increased recruitment of motor regions and fronto-parietal mirror neuron and attentional control areas.

  1. [Local brain activity in different motor subtypes of Parkinson's disease with fMRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya'nan; Zhang, Jiarong; Chen, Biao; Wu, Tao

    2015-02-17

    To explore the changes of local brain activity in motor subtypes of Parkinson's disease (PD) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A total of 60 idiopathic PD and 30 age- and gender-matched normal controls were examined with resting-state fMRI from January 2013 to March 2014. All subjects gave their written informed consent for the study. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was calculated to measure local brain activity. The PD patients were divided into two groups of tremor dominant (TD) and postural instability/gait difficulty (PIGD) (n = 30 each). All subjects gave their written in formed consent for the study.One-way ANOVA and post-hoc t-test were performed to detect the differences of local brain activity between PD and normal subjects. And the correlations were examined between ALFF, scores and levodopa dose. Compared with normal subjects, the TD group showed increased activity in bilateral cerebellums (-37, -47, -38), thalamus (-18, -17,0), pons (-3, -23, -37) and left precentral gyrus (-41, -30, 46) versus decreased activity in bilateral frontal lobes (-13, 69, 6), temporal lobes (-42, 18, -21), left insula (-32, 22, 2) and left anterior cingulated (-7, 32, -5). The PIGD group showed increased activity in right postcentral gyrus (63, -18, 39) and decreased activity in bilateral putamens (-24, 12, 3), pre-supplementary motor area (10, 10, 58), frontal lobes (15, -15, 57), temporal lobes (-39, 18, -3) and left insula (-29, 20, 11). Compared with PIGD, the TD group showed increased activity in temporal lobes, but decreased activity in frontal lobes. Additionally, ALFF in bilateral cerebellums and frontal lobes was positively correlated with TD scores while ALFF in left precentral gyrus, bilateral putamens and temporal lobes negatively correlated with TD scores. ALFF in bilateral frontal lobes and left temporal lobe was positively correlated with PIGD scores.However, in right postcentral gyrus and bilateral putamens, ALFF was

  2. Classical maple syrup urine disease and brain development: principles of management and formula design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Kevin A; Wardley, Bridget; Robinson, Donna; Hendrickson, Christine; Rider, Nicholas L; Puffenberger, Erik G; Shellmer, Diana; Shelmer, Diana; Moser, Ann B; Morton, D Holmes

    2010-04-01

    Branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase deficiency results in complex and volatile metabolic derangements that threaten brain development. Treatment for classical maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) should address this underlying physiology while also protecting children from nutrient deficiencies. Based on a 20-year experience managing 79 patients, we designed a study formula to (1) optimize transport of seven amino acids (Tyr, Trp, His, Met, Thr, Gln, Phe) that compete with branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) for entry into the brain via a common transporter (LAT1), (2) compensate for episodic depletions of glutamine, glutamate, and alanine caused by reverse transamination, and (3) correct deficiencies of omega-3 essential fatty acids, zinc, and selenium widespread among MSUD patients. The formula was enriched with LAT1 amino acid substrates, glutamine, alanine, zinc, selenium, and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3). Fifteen Old Order Mennonite children were started on study formula between birth and 34 months of age and seen at least monthly in the office. Amino acid levels were checked once weekly and more often during illnesses. All children grew and developed normally over a period of 14-33 months. Energy demand, leucine tolerance, and protein accretion were tightly linked during periods of normal growth. Rapid shifts to net protein degradation occurred during illnesses. At baseline, most LAT1 substrates varied inversely with plasma leucine, and their calculated rates of brain uptake were 20-68% below normal. Treatment with study formula increased plasma concentrations of LAT1 substrates and normalized their calculated uptakes into the nervous system. Red cell membrane omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and serum zinc and selenium levels increased on study formula. However, selenium and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) levels remained below normal. During the study period, hospitalizations decreased from 0.35 to 0.14 per patient per year. There were 28 hospitalizations

  3. Stress and the psyche-brain-immune network in psychiatric diseases based on psychoneuroendocrineimmunology: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottaccioli, Anna Giulia; Bottaccioli, Francesco; Minelli, Andrea

    2018-05-15

    In the last decades, psychoneuroendocrineimmunology research has made relevant contributions to the fields of neuroscience, psychobiology, epigenetics, molecular biology, and clinical research by studying the effect of stress on human health and highlighting the close interrelations between psyche, brain, and bodily systems. It is now well recognized that chronic stress can alter the physiological cross-talk between brain and biological systems, leading to long-lasting maladaptive effects (allostatic overload) on the nervous, immune, endocrine, and metabolic systems, which compromises stress resiliency and health. Stressful conditions in early life have been associated with profound alterations in cortical and subcortical brain regions involved in emotion regulation and the salience network, showing relevant overlap with different psychiatric conditions. This paper provides a summary of the available literature concerning the notable effects of stress on the brain and immune system. We highlight the role of epigenetics as a mechanistic pathway mediating the influences of the social and physical environment on brain structure and connectivity, the immune system, and psycho-physical health in psychiatric diseases. We also summarize the evidence regarding the effects of stress management techniques (mainly psychotherapy and meditation practice) on clinical outcomes, brain neurocircuitry, and immune-inflammatory network in major psychiatric diseases. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. How to Recover from a Brain Disease: Is Addiction a Disease, or Is there a Disease-like Stage in Addiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Anke

    2017-01-01

    People struggling with addiction are neither powerless over their addiction, nor are they fully in control. Lewis vigorously objects to the brain disease model of addiction (BDMA), because it makes people lose belief in their self-efficacy, and hence hinders their recovery. Although he acknowledges that there is a compulsive state in addiction, he objects to the claim that this compulsion is carved in stone. Lewis argues that the BDMA underestimates the agency of addicted people, and hence hinder their recovery. Lewis's work offers us a very much to be welcomed neurobiology of recovery. It offers addicted people a hopeful and respectful narrative for their recovery that treats them as agents rather than as damaged brains. However, I argue that overestimating people's agency can also result in people losing belief in their self-efficacy. Lewis's strong focus on the agency of addicted people might not match their experiences of struggle, hence reinforcing their feelings of guilt when they fail to control their use. I propose to replace the notion of addiction as a disease with a notion of a disease-like stage in addiction. I call this stage the duress stage in addiction, in which the addictive behaviour is largely impervious to the agent's values and to available techniques of self-control. However, the agent can overcome this stage by developing new techniques of self-control, by building on their self-concept and belief in self-efficacy, by changing their environments and habits, and by engaging in projects that are meaningful to the agent.

  5. Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Higher Control of the Oculomotor System in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniades, Chrystalina A; Rebelo, Pedro; Kennard, Christopher; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; FitzGerald, James J

    2015-09-23

    The frontal cortex and basal ganglia form a set of parallel but mostly segregated circuits called cortico-basal ganglia loops. The oculomotor loop controls eye movements and can direct relatively simple movements, such as reflexive prosaccades, without external help but needs input from "higher" loops for more complex behaviors. The antisaccade task requires the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is part of the prefrontal loop. Information flows from prefrontal to oculomotor circuits in the striatum, and directional errors in this task can be considered a measure of failure of prefrontal control over the oculomotor loop. The antisaccadic error rate (AER) is increased in Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has no effect on the AER, but a previous case suggested that DBS of the globus pallidus interna (GPi) might. Our aim was to compare the effects of STN DBS and GPi DBS on the AER. We tested eye movements in 14 human DBS patients and 10 controls. GPi DBS substantially reduced the AER, restoring lost higher control over oculomotor function. Interloop information flow involves striatal neurons that receive cortical input and project to pallidum. They are normally silent when quiescent, but in PD they fire randomly, creating noise that may account for the degradation in interloop control. The reduced AER with GPi DBS could be explained by retrograde stimulation of striatopallidal axons with consequent activation of inhibitory collaterals and reduction in background striatal firing rates. This study may help explain aspects of PD pathophysiology and the mechanism of action of GPi DBS. Significance statement: Parkinson's disease causes symptoms including stiffness, slowness of movement, and tremor. Electrical stimulation of specific areas deep in the brain can effectively treat these symptoms, but exactly how is not fully understood. Part of the cause of such symptoms may be impairments in the way information flows

  6. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder S Gill,1 Tejkaran S Gill,2 Ashwini Kamath,3 Billy Whisnant41College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI; 2College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3School of Information, University of Texas, Austin, TX; 4College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USAAbstract: Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving

  7. Cation shifts as markers in neurodegenerative diseases : correlations with transmitter deficts in Alzheimer and Huntington disease and imaging of excitoxic brain damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramsbergen, Jan Bert Paul

    1988-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of dementia is best defined as an - usually at advanced age - acquired global impairment of intellect, memory and personality, but without impairment of consciousness, prominent causes of dementia are certain intrinsic degenerative diseases of the brain. The most common of

  8. Skin complications in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: frequency, time course, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kappus, Christoph; Hellwig, Dieter

    2010-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been recognized as an efficacious treatment for movement disorders. Its beneficial effects however may be lost due to skin complications such as erosions or infections over the implanted foreign material. We sought to document skin complications in the entire Parkinson's disease patient population who received a DBS system at the Marburg/Kassel implantation centre since the start of our DBS program in January 2002 to analyze frequency, time course, and possible risk factors. We investigated 85 consecutive patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) from a single center/single surgeon DBS series for the occurrence of skin complications and analyzed localization, time course, and possible risk factors. Mean follow-up was 3 years (range 1-7 years). In total, 21/85 patients (24.7%) suffered a total of 30 single skin complications. Sixty percent of all incidents occurred within the first post-operative year. Forty percent of all incidents occurred later than the first year following primary implantation. Complications involved the burr hole cap in 37%, the course of the cables in 33%, and the impulse generator (IPG) site in 30%. Six of 21 patients suffered recurring skin complications. Eight patients permanently lost their DBS system. Factor analysis for age, gender, disease duration, disease severity, the incidence of hypertension or diabetes as well as a 2-day period with externalized electrodes for continuous test stimulation did not have any statistically significant impact on skin complications. We conclude that (1) PD patients have a risk for skin complications after DBS as long as the system remains in situ and (2) there are at present no identifiable risk factors for skin complications after DBS, other than PD itself.

  9. Usefulness of preoperative coronary angiography and brain computed tomography in cases of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease undergoing revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tall; Shibata, Yoshiki

    2003-01-01

    Coronary angiography and brain computed tomography were preoperatively performed to evaluate the clinical condition of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease in 101 patients (mean age, 68.4 years) with revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans. Eighty patients had hypertension, 12 had diabetes, and 26 had hyperlipidemia. Seventy-one patients (70.3%) had coronary stenosis. Significant stenoses in major coronary artery branches were confirmed in 35 patients, including 13 patients with old myocardial infarction. Coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary angioplasty were performed in 2 and 7 patients with critical stenosis, respectively. Of 57 patients, who underwent brain computed tomography, abnormalities were found in 52 patients (91.2%), including cortical infarction in 9, lacunar infarction in 35, and leukoaraiosis in 27 patients. During the follow-up period 13 patients died (including 3 cases of myocardial infarction and 3 cases of stroke). Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 80.4%. The influence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease on early and late mortality after surgical reconstruction for peripheral occlusive vascular disease is significant. Using visual diagnostic techniques, such as coronary angiography and brain computed tomography, long term survivor should be closely observed for multiple arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. (author)

  10. Usefulness of preoperative coronary angiography and brain computed tomography in cases of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease undergoing revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurada, Tall; Shibata, Yoshiki [Southern Tohoku Fukushima Hospital (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Coronary angiography and brain computed tomography were preoperatively performed to evaluate the clinical condition of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease in 101 patients (mean age, 68.4 years) with revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans. Eighty patients had hypertension, 12 had diabetes, and 26 had hyperlipidemia. Seventy-one patients (70.3%) had coronary stenosis. Significant stenoses in major coronary artery branches were confirmed in 35 patients, including 13 patients with old myocardial infarction. Coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary angioplasty were performed in 2 and 7 patients with critical stenosis, respectively. Of 57 patients, who underwent brain computed tomography, abnormalities were found in 52 patients (91.2%), including cortical infarction in 9, lacunar infarction in 35, and leukoaraiosis in 27 patients. During the follow-up period 13 patients died (including 3 cases of myocardial infarction and 3 cases of stroke). Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 80.4%. The influence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease on early and late mortality after surgical reconstruction for peripheral occlusive vascular disease is significant. Using visual diagnostic techniques, such as coronary angiography and brain computed tomography, long term survivor should be closely observed for multiple arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. (author)

  11. Recent advancements in liposomes targeting strategies to cross blood-brain barrier (BBB) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mukta; Ajazuddin; Tripathi, Dulal K; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, Shailendra; Antimisiaris, Sophia G; Mourtas, Spyridon; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Alexander, Amit

    2017-08-28

    In this modern era, with the help of various advanced technologies, medical science has overcome most of the health-related issues successfully. Though, some diseases still remain unresolved due to various physiological barriers. One such condition is Alzheimer; a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory impairment, behavioral abnormalities, mood swing and disturbed routine activities of the person suffering from. It is well known to all that the brain is entirely covered by a protective layer commonly known as blood brain barrier (BBB) which is responsible to maintain the homeostasis of brain by restricting the entry of toxic substances, drug molecules, various proteins and peptides, small hydrophilic molecules, large lipophilic substances and so many other peripheral components to protect the brain from any harmful stimuli. This functionally essential structure creates a major hurdle for delivery of any drug into the brain. Still, there are some provisions on BBB which facilitate the entry of useful substances in the brain via specific mechanisms like passive diffusion, receptor-mediated transcytosis, carrier-mediated transcytosis etc. Another important factor for drug transport is the selection of a suitable drug delivery systems like, liposome, which is a novel drug carrier system offering a potential approach to resolving this problem. Its unique phospholipid bilayer structure (similar to physiological membrane) had made it more compatible with the lipoidal layer of BBB and helps the drug to enter the brain. The present review work focused on various surface modifications with functional ligand (like lactoferrin, transferrin etc.) and carrier molecules (such as glutathione, glucose etc.) on the liposomal structure to enhance its brain targeting ability towards the successful treatment of Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain transcriptomes of harbor seals demonstrate gene expression patterns of animals undergoing a metabolic disease and a viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Rosales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of marine mammals can be difficult to diagnose because of their life history and protected status. Stranded marine mammals have been a particularly useful resource to discover and comprehend the diseases that plague these top predators. Additionally, advancements in high-throughput sequencing (HTS has contributed to the discovery of novel pathogens in marine mammals. In this study, we use a combination of HTS and stranded harbor seals (Phoca vitulina to better understand a known and unknown brain disease. To do this, we used transcriptomics to evaluate brain tissues from seven neonatal harbor seals that expired from an unknown cause of death (UCD and compared them to four neonatal harbor seals that had confirmed phocine herpesvirus (PhV-1 infections in the brain. Comparing the two disease states we found that UCD animals showed a significant abundance of fatty acid metabolic transcripts in their brain tissue, thus we speculate that a fatty acid metabolic dysregulation contributed to the death of these animals. Furthermore, we were able to describe the response of four young harbor seals with PhV-1 infections in the brain. PhV-1 infected animals showed a significant ability to mount an innate and adaptive immune response, especially to combat viral infections. Our data also suggests that PhV-1 can hijack host pathways for DNA packaging and exocytosis. This is the first study to use transcriptomics in marine mammals to understand host and viral interactions and assess the death of stranded marine mammals with an unknown disease. Furthermore, we show the value of applying transcriptomics on stranded marine mammals for disease characterization.

  13. Histamine Induces Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Sedeyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses—a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin—were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD.

  14. Transgenic Rat Model of Huntington's Disease: A Histopathological Study and Correlations with Neurodegenerative Process in the Brain of HD Patients.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazurová, Y.; Anděrová, Miroslava; Němečková, I.; Bezrouk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, Aug 03 (2014), s. 291531 ISSN 2314-6133 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) Prvouk P37 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Huntington's Disease * neurodegenerative process in the brain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.579, year: 2014

  15. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  16. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  17. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves reward-based decision-learning in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wouwe, N.C.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Band, G.P.H.; Abisogun, A.; Elias, W.J.; Frysinger, R.; Wylie, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be critically involved in decision-making, action selection, and motor control. Here we investigate the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN on reward-based decision-learning in patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD).

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves reward-based decision-learning in Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouwe, N.C. van; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Wildenberg, W.P.M. van den; Band, G.P.H.; Abisogun, A.; Elias, W.J.; Frysinger, R.; Wylie, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be critically involved in decision-making, action selection, and motor control. Here we investigate the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN on reward-based decision-learning in patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD).

  19. TNF-Overexpression in Borna Disease Virus-Infected Mouse Brains Triggers Inflammatory Reaction and Epileptic Seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Katharina; Schaudien, Dirk; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Herzog, Sibylle; Richt, Juergen A.; Baumgaertner, Wolfgang; Herden, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Proinflammatory state of the brain increases the risk for seizure development. Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV)-infection of mice with neuronal overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) was used to investigate the complex relationship between enhanced cytokine levels, neurotropic virus

  20. Cerebrovascular disease in newborn infants: report of three cases with clinical follow-up and brain SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura-Ribeiro, Maria Valeriana L. de; Ciasca, Sylvia Maria; Vale-Cavalcanti, Mariza; Etchebehere, Elba C.S.C.; Camargo, Edwaldo E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    1999-07-01

    The clinical and neurological findings of three neonates with the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease are reported. The neuropsychological evaluation disclosed impairment of fine motor function, coordination, language, perception and behavioral disturbances. Brain SPECT imaging revealed perfusional deficits in the three cases. (author)

  1. Long-term effects of pallidal or subthalamic deep brain stimulation on quality of life in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkmann, Jens; Albanese, Alberto; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Tornqvist, Aana-Lena; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Pidoux, Bernard; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Mendes, Alexandre; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Fraix, Valerie; van Blercom, Nadege; Xie, Jing; Obeso, José; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria Cruz; Guridi, Jurge; Schnitzler, Alfons; Timmermann, Lars; Gironell, Alexandre A.; Molet, Juan; Pascual-Sedano, Benta; Rehncrona, Stig; Moro, Elena; Lang, Anthony C.; Lozano, Andres M.; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Scerrati, Massimo; Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Romito, Luigi; Janssens, Marc; Agid, Yves

    2009-01-01

    We assessed the effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) or internal pallidum (GPi-DBS) on health-related quality of life (HrQoL) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease participating in a previously reported multicenter trial. Sickness Impact Profile (SIP)

  2. Cerebrovascular disease in newborn infants: report of three cases with clinical follow-up and brain SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura-Ribeiro, Maria Valeriana L. de; Ciasca, Sylvia Maria; Vale-Cavalcanti, Mariza; Etchebehere, Elba C.S.C.; Camargo, Edwaldo E.

    1999-01-01

    The clinical and neurological findings of three neonates with the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease are reported. The neuropsychological evaluation disclosed impairment of fine motor function, coordination, language, perception and behavioral disturbances. Brain SPECT imaging revealed perfusional deficits in the three cases. (author)

  3. Effects of deep brain stimulation on rest tremor progression in early stage Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mallory L; DeLong, Mahlon R; Turchan, Maxim; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Ostrem, Jill L; Molinari, Anna L; Currie, Amanda D; Konrad, Peter E; Davis, Thomas L; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Cannard, Kevin R; Drye, Lea T; Sternberg, Alice L; Shade, David M; Tonascia, James; Charles, David

    2018-06-29

    To evaluate whether the progression of individual motor features was influenced by early deep brain stimulation (DBS), a post hoc analysis of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III (UPDRS-III) score (after a 7-day washout) was conducted from the 2-year DBS in early Parkinson disease (PD) pilot trial dataset. The prospective pilot trial enrolled patients with PD aged 50-75 years, treated with PD medications for 6 months-4 years, and no history of dyskinesia or other motor fluctuations, who were randomized to receive optimal drug therapy (ODT) or DBS plus ODT (DBS + ODT). At baseline and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, all patients stopped all PD therapy for 1 week (medication and stimulation, if applicable). UPDRS-III "off" item scores were compared between the ODT and DBS + ODT groups (n = 28); items with significant between-group differences were analyzed further. UPDRS-III "off" rest tremor score change from baseline to 24 months was worse in patients receiving ODT vs DBS + ODT ( p = 0.002). Rest tremor slopes from baseline to 24 months favored DBS + ODT both "off" and "on" therapy ( p will be tested in the Food and Drug Administration-approved, phase III, pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating DBS in early PD. This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with early PD, DBS may slow the progression of rest tremor. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Analysis of Oscillatory Neural Activity in Series Network Models of Parkinson's Disease During Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Clare M; de Paor, Annraoi M; Cagnan, Hayriye; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by hallmark motor symptoms. It is associated with pathological, oscillatory neural activity in the basal ganglia. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is often successfully used to treat medically refractive Parkinson's disease. However, the selection of stimulation parameters is based on qualitative assessment of the patient, which can result in a lengthy tuning period and a suboptimal choice of parameters. This study explores fourth-order, control theory-based models of oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia. Describing function analysis is applied to examine possible mechanisms for the generation of oscillations in interacting nuclei and to investigate the suppression of oscillations with high-frequency stimulation. The theoretical results for the suppression of the oscillatory activity obtained using both the fourth-order model, and a previously described second-order model, are optimized to fit clinically recorded local field potential data obtained from Parkinsonian patients with implanted DBS. Close agreement between the power of oscillations recorded for a range of stimulation amplitudes is observed ( R(2)=0.69-0.99 ). The results suggest that the behavior of the system and the suppression of pathological neural oscillations with DBS is well described by the macroscopic models presented. The results also demonstrate that in this instance, a second-order model is sufficient to model the clinical data, without the need for added complexity. Describing the system behavior with computationally efficient models could aid in the identification of optimal stimulation parameters for patients in a clinical environment.

  5. Lipid composition of microdomains is altered in neuronopathic Gaucher disease sheep brain and spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Leanne K; Rozaklis, Tina; Adams, Melissa K; Hopwood, John J; Karageorgos, Litsa

    2017-07-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity that leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine. Membrane raft microdomains are discrete, highly organized microdomains with a unique lipid composition that provide the necessary environment for specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions to take place. In this study we purified detergent resistant membranes (DRM; membrane rafts) from the occipital cortex and spleen from sheep affected with acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease and wild-type controls. We observed significant increases in the concentrations of glucosylceramide, hexosylsphingosine, BMP and gangliosides and decreases in the percentage of cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine leading to an altered DRM composition. Altered sphingolipid/cholesterol homeostasis would dramatically disrupt DRM architecture making them less ordered and more fluid. In addition, significant changes in the length and degree of lipid saturation within the DRM microdomains in the Gaucher brain were also observed. As these DRM microdomains are involved in many cellular events, an imbalance or disruption of the cell membrane homeostasis may impair normal cell function. This disruption of membrane raft microdomains and imbalance within the environment of cellular membranes of neuronal cells may be a key factor in initiating a cascade process leading to neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tensor-based Multi-view Feature Selection with Applications to Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bokai; He, Lifang; Kong, Xiangnan; Yu, Philip S.; Hao, Zhifeng; Ragin, Ann B.

    2015-01-01

    In the era of big data, we can easily access information from multiple views which may be obtained from different sources or feature subsets. Generally, different views provide complementary information for learning tasks. Thus, multi-view learning can facilitate the learning process and is prevalent in a wide range of application domains. For example, in medical science, measurements from a series of medical examinations are documented for each subject, including clinical, imaging, immunologic, serologic and cognitive measures which are obtained from multiple sources. Specifically, for brain diagnosis, we can have different quantitative analysis which can be seen as different feature subsets of a subject. It is desirable to combine all these features in an effective way for disease diagnosis. However, some measurements from less relevant medical examinations can introduce irrelevant information which can even be exaggerated after view combinations. Feature selection should therefore be incorporated in the process of multi-view learning. In this paper, we explore tensor product to bring different views together in a joint space, and present a dual method of tensor-based multi-view feature selection (dual-Tmfs) based on the idea of support vector machine recursive feature elimination. Experiments conducted on datasets derived from neurological disorder demonstrate the features selected by our proposed method yield better classification performance and are relevant to disease diagnosis. PMID:25937823

  7. Deep brain stimulation and responsiveness of the Persian version of Parkinson's disease questionnaire with 39-items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Ghaempanah, Zeinab; Khalili, Yasaman; Nojomi, Marzieh

    2014-10-06

    Assessment of quality-of-life (QOF) as an outcome measure after deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) need a valid, reliable and responsive instrument. The aim of the current study was to determine responsiveness of validated Persian version of PD questionnaire with 39-items (PDQ-39) after DBS surgery in patients with PD. Eleven patients with PD, who were candidate for DBS operation between May 2012 and June 2013 were assessed. PDQ-39 and short-form questionnaire with 36-items (SF-36) were used. To assess responsiveness of PDQ-39 standardized response mean (SRM) was used. Mean age was 51.8 (8.8) and all of the patients, but just one were male (10 patients). Mean duration of the disease was 8.7 (2.1) years. Eight patients were categorized as moderate using Hoehn and Yahr (H and Y) classification. All patients had a better H and Y score compared with the baseline evaluation (3.09 vs. 0.79). The amount of SRM was above 0.70 for all domains means a large responsiveness for PDQ-39. Persian version of PDQ-39 has an acceptable responsiveness and could be used to assess as an outcome measure to evaluate the effect of therapies on PD.

  8. Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on Speech Performance in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Skodda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS has been reported to be successful in relieving the core motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD and motor fluctuations in the more advanced stages of the disease. However, data on the effects of DBS on speech performance are inconsistent. While there are some series of patients documenting that speech function was relatively unaffected by DBS of the nucleus subthalamicus (STN, other investigators reported on improvements of distinct parameters of oral control and voice. Though, these ameliorations of single speech modalities were not always accompanied by an improvement of overall speech intelligibility. On the other hand, there are also indications for an induction of dysarthria as an adverse effect of STN-DBS occurring at least in some patients with PD. Since a deterioration of speech function has more often been observed under high stimulation amplitudes, this phenomenon has been ascribed to a spread of current-to-adjacent pathways which might also be the reason for the sporadic observation of an onset of dysarthria under DBS of other basal ganglia targets (e.g., globus pallidus internus/GPi or thalamus/Vim. The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate reports in the literature on the effects of DBS on speech function in PD.

  9. Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Different Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariacarla Ventriglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent evidence indicates the involvement of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD. In the present study, we compared serum BDNF in 624 subjects: 266 patients affected by AD, 28 by frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 40 by Lewy body dementia (LBD, 91 by vascular dementia (VAD, 30 by PD, and 169 controls. Our results evidenced lower BDNF serum levels in AD, FTD, LBD, and VAD patients (P<0.001 and a higher BDNF concentration in patients affected by PD (P=0.045. Analyses of effects of pharmacological treatments suggested significantly higher BDNF serum levels in patients taking mood stabilizers/antiepileptics (P=0.009 and L-DOPA (P<0.001 and significant reductions in patients taking benzodiazepines (P=0.020. In conclusion, our results support the role of BDNF alterations in neurodegenerative mechanisms common to different forms of neurological disorders and underline the importance of including drug treatment in the analyses to avoid confounding effects.

  10. Effects of coffee/caffeine on brain health and disease: What should I tell my patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade, Food Regulation Authorities have concluded that coffee/caffeine consumption is not harmful if consumed at levels of 200 mg in one sitting (around 2½ cups of coffee) or 400 mg daily (around 5 cups of coffee). In addition, caffeine has many positive actions on the brain. It can increase alertness and well-being, help concentration, improve mood and limit depression. Caffeine may disturb sleep, but only in sensitive individuals. It may raise anxiety in a small subset of particularly sensitive people. Caffeine does not seem to lead to dependence, although a minority of people experience withdrawal symptoms. Caffeine can potentiate the effect of regular analgesic drugs in headache and migraine. Lifelong coffee/caffeine consumption has been associated with prevention of cognitive decline, and reduced risk of developing stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Its consumption does not seem to influence seizure occurrence. Thus, daily coffee and caffeine intake can be part of a healthy balanced diet; its consumption does not need to be stopped in elderly people. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Cortical and Subcortical Regions in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The present study aimed to explore the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF at rest in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods. Twenty-four PD patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls participated in the study. ALFF was measured on the whole brain of all participants. A two-sample t-test was then performed to detect the group differences with age, gender, education level, head motion, and gray matter volume as covariates. Results. It was showed that PD patients had significantly decreased ALFF in the left thalamus/caudate and right insula/inferior prefrontal gyrus, whereas they had increased ALFF in the right medial prefrontal cortex (BA 8/6 and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9/10. Conclusions. Our results indicated that significant alterations of ALFF in the subcortical regions and prefrontal cortex have been detected in PD patients, independent of age, gender, education, head motion, and structural atrophy. The current findings further provide insights into the biological mechanism of the disease.

  12. A Feature-Free 30-Disease Pathological Brain Detection System by Linear Regression Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Shao, Ying; Yan, Jie; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Qu, Yanwen; Lee, Elizabeth; Wang, Shuihua

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease patients are increasing rapidly every year. Scholars tend to use computer vision methods to develop automatic diagnosis system. (Background) In 2015, Gorji et al. proposed a novel method using pseudo Zernike moment. They tested four classifiers: learning vector quantization neural network, pattern recognition neural network trained by Levenberg-Marquardt, by resilient backpropagation, and by scaled conjugate gradient. This study presents an improved method by introducing a relatively new classifier-linear regression classification. Our method selects one axial slice from 3D brain image, and employed pseudo Zernike moment with maximum order of 15 to extract 256 features from each image. Finally, linear regression classification was harnessed as the classifier. The proposed approach obtains an accuracy of 97.51%, a sensitivity of 96.71%, and a specificity of 97.73%. Our method performs better than Gorji's approach and five other state-of-the-art approaches. Therefore, it can be used to detect Alzheimer's disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Towards an Understanding of Energy Impairment in Huntington’s Disease Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    This review systematically examines the evidence for shifts in flux through energy generating biochemical pathways in Huntington’s disease (HD) brains from humans and model systems. Compromise of the electron transport chain (ETC) appears not to be the primary or earliest metabolic change in HD pathogenesis. Rather, compromise of glucose uptake facilitates glucose flux through glycolysis and may possibly decrease flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), limiting subsequent NADPH and GSH production needed for antioxidant protection. As a result, oxidative damage to key glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes further restricts energy production so that while basal needs may be met through oxidative phosphorylation, those of excessive stimulation cannot. Energy production may also be compromised by deficits in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics or trafficking. Restrictions on energy production may be compensated for by glutamate oxidation and/or stimulation of fatty acid oxidation. Transcriptional dysregulation generated by mutant huntingtin also contributes to energetic disruption at specific enzymatic steps. Many of the alterations in metabolic substrates and enzymes may derive from normal regulatory feedback mechanisms and appear oscillatory. Fine temporal sequencing of the shifts in metabolic flux and transcriptional and expression changes associated with mutant huntingtin expression remain largely unexplored and may be model dependent. Differences in disease progression among HD model systems at the time of experimentation and their varying states of metabolic compensation may explain conflicting reports in the literature. Progressive shifts in metabolic flux represent homeostatic compensatory mechanisms that maintain the model organism through presymptomatic and symptomatic stages. PMID:29125492

  14. Brain rust: recent discoveries on the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Diêgo Madureira; Ferreira Lima, Rute Maria; El-Bachá, Ramon Santos

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and damages due to excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common causes of injuries to cells and organisms. The prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (ND) increases with aging and much of the research involving ROS and OS has emerged from works in this field. This text reviews some recent published articles about the role of OS in ND. Since there are many reviews in this field, the focus was centered in articles published recently. The Scientific Journals Directory supported by the Brazilian Ministry of Education Office for the Coordination of Higher Educational Personnel Improvement (CAPES) was used to search, download, and review articles. The search engine looked for the terms 'oxidative stress AND neurodegenerative diseases AND nutrition' in 10 different scientific collections. Biochemical markers for ND lack sensitivity or specificity for diagnosis or for tracking response to therapy today. OS has an intimate connection with ND, albeit low levels of ROS seem to protect the brain. Deleterious changes in mitochondria, OS, calcium, glucocorticoids, inflammation, trace metals, insulin, cell cycle, protein aggregation, and hundreds to thousands of genes occur in ND. The interaction of genes with their environment, may explain ND. Although OS has received much attention over the years, which increased the number of scientific works on antioxidant interventions, no one knows how to stop or delay ND at present. Interventions in vitro, in vivo, and in humans will continue to contribute for a better understanding of these pathologies.

  15. Interactions of iron, dopamine and neuromelanin pathways in brain aging and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Fabio A; Segura-Aguilar, Juan; Ferrari, Emanuele; Muñoz, Patricia; Paris, Irmgard; Sulzer, David; Sarna, Tadeusz; Casella, Luigi; Zecca, Luigi

    2017-08-01

    There are several interrelated mechanisms involving iron, dopamine, and neuromelanin in neurons. Neuromelanin accumulates during aging and is the catecholamine-derived pigment of the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and norepinephrine neurons of the locus coeruleus, the two neuronal populations most targeted in Parkinson's disease. Many cellular redox reactions rely on iron, however an altered distribution of reactive iron is cytotoxic. In fact, increased levels of iron in the brain of Parkinson's disease patients are present. Dopamine accumulation can induce neuronal death; however, excess dopamine can be removed by converting it into a stable compound like neuromelanin, and this process rescues the cell. Interestingly, the main iron compound in dopamine and norepinephrine neurons is the neuromelanin-iron complex, since neuromelanin is an effective metal chelator. Neuromelanin serves to trap iron and provide neuronal protection from oxidative stress. This equilibrium between iron, dopamine, and neuromelanin is crucial for cell homeostasis and in some cellular circumstances can be disrupted. Indeed, when neuromelanin-containing organelles accumulate high load of toxins and iron during aging a neurodegenerative process can be triggered. In addition, neuromelanin released by degenerating neurons activates microglia and the latter cause neurons death with further release of neuromelanin, then starting a self-propelling mechanism of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Considering the above issues, age-related accumulation of neuromelanin in dopamine neurons shows an interesting link between aging and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of aging and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology on brain monoamines in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von Linstow, C. U.; Severino, Maurizio; Metaxas, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    , but these can both be age- and/or disease-related. We examined whether brain monoamine levels change as part of physiological aging and/or AD-like disease in APPSWE/PS1δE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice. The neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, brainstem and cerebellum of 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month-old B6C3 wild......-type (WT) mice and of 18-month old APP/PS1 and WT mice were analysed for 5-HT, DA and NA contents by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), along with neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 and WT mice. While, we observed no aging effect in WT mice, we detected region-specific changes in the levels...... of all monoamines in 18-month-old transgenic compared with WT mice. This included reductions in 5-HT (-30%), DA (-47%) and NA (-32%) levels in the neocortex and increases of 5-HT in the brainstem (+18%). No changes were observed in any of the monoamines in the neocortex from 14-month-old APP/PS1 mice...

  17. Mental Health-Related Healthcare Use Following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation For Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbay, Lauren C; Cao, Lishan; Burnett-Zeigler, Inger; Reizine, Natalie; Barton, Brandon; Ippolito, Dolores; Weaver, Frances M; Stroupe, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus internus (GPi) are both effective targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS) to relieve motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, studies have reported varied effects on mental health-related adverse events and depressed mood following DBS. The current observational study sought to compare mental health healthcare utilization and costs for three years following STN or GPi DBS. For a cohort of Veterans (n = 161) with Parkinson's disease who participated in a larger multi-site randomized trial, we compared mental health outpatient visits, medication use, inpatient admissions, and associated costs by DBS target site (STN vs. GPi). Neither group nor time differences were significant for mental health outpatient or inpatient utilization following DBS. Overall costs associated with mental health visits and medications did not differ by time or by group. However, the percentage of patients with mental health medication use increased in the 6-month and 6 to 12 month periods post-surgery. The STN group had significantly greater increase in medication use at 6 to 12 months post-surgery compared to the GPi group (p use following surgery, this study suggests that mental health healthcare use and costs are stable over time and similar between DBS targets. Prior research findings of mental health-related adverse events and mood following DBS did not translate to greater mental health service utilization in our cohort. The changes seen in the year following surgery may reflect temporary adjustments with stabilization over time.

  18. Potential roles of cell-derived microparticles in ischemic brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Lawrence L; Jy, Wenche; Bidot, Carlos J; Nordberg, Mary L; Minagar, Alireza; Alexander, J Steven; Kelley, Roger E; Ahn, Yeon S

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study is to review the role of cell-derived microparticles in ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. An extensive PubMed search of literature pertaining to this study was performed in April 2009 using specific keyword search terms related to cell-derived microparticles and ischemic stroke. Some references are not cited here as it is not possible to be all inclusive or due to space limitation. Cell-derived microparticles are small membranous vesicles released from the plasma membranes of platelets, leukocytes, red cells and endothelial cells in response to diverse biochemical agents or mechanical stresses. They are the main carriers of circulating tissue factor, the principal initiator of intravascular thrombosis, and are implicated in a variety of thrombotic and inflammatory disorders. This review outlines evidence suggesting that cell-derived microparticles are involved predominantly with microvascular, as opposed to macrovascular, thrombosis. More specifically, cell-derived microparticles may substantially contribute to ischemic brain disease in several settings, as well as to neuroinflammatory conditions. If further work confirms this hypothesis, novel therapeutic strategies for minimizing cell-derived microparticles-mediated ischemia are available or can be developed, as discussed.

  19. Autonomic Function Impairment and Brain Perfusion Deficit in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Che Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAutonomic disorders have been recognized as important Parkinson’s disease (PD components. Some vulnerable structures are related to the central autonomic network and have also been linked to autonomic function alterations. The aims of the study are to evaluate the severity of the autonomic dysfunction and the cortical hypoperfusion using arterial spin labeling (ASL MRI. And then, possible relationships of significant between-group differences in perfusion pattern to clinical variables and autonomic functions were examined to determine the pharmaceutical effects of dopaminergic treatment on cerebral blood flow (CBF in patients with PD.MethodsBrain ASL MRI was carried out in 20 patients with PD (6 men and 14 women, mean age: 63.3 ± 6.4 years and 22 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers to assess whole-brain CBF and the effects of dopaminergic therapy on perfusion. All subjects underwent a standardized evaluation of cardiovagal and adrenergic function including a deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, and 5-min head-up tilt test. Perfusion MRI data were acquired on a 3.0 T scanner with a pulsed continuous ASL technique. The CBF, autonomic parameters, and clinical data were analyzed after adjusting for age and sex.ResultsPatients exhibited a decline in autonomic function (rapid heart rate in response to deep breathing, low baroreflex sensitivity, high systolic and diastolic pressure, and altered tilting test response, widespread low CBF, and robust response to dopaminergic therapy. Lower perfusion in the middle frontal gyrus was associated with increased clinical disease severity (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale I score, P < 0.001. Lower perfusion in autonomic control areas, such as the frontal lobe and insula, were significantly associated with autonomic impairment (P < 0.001.ConclusionsOur study indicates that PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that changes the perfusion of central nervous system

  20. Structural Brain Abnormalities in Successfully Treated HIV Infection: Associations With Disease and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zoest, Rosan A.; Underwood, Jonathan; de Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Cole, James H.; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Zetterberg, Henrik; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Portegies, Peter; Winston, Alan; Sharp, David J.; Gisslén, Magnus; Reiss, Peter; Winston, A.; Prins, M.; Schim van der Loeff, M. F.; Schouten, J.; Schmand, B.; Geurtsen, G. J.; Sharp, D. J.; Villaudy, J.; Berkhout, B.; Gisslén, M.; Pasternak, A.; Sabin, C. A.; Guaraldi, G.; Bürkle, A.; Libert, C.; Franceschi, C.; Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, E.; Hoeijmakers, J.; Pothof, J.; van der Valk, M.; Bisschop, P. H.; Zaheri, S.; Burger, D.; Cole, J. H.; Zikkenheiner, W.; Janssen, F. R.; Underwood, J.; Kooij, K. W.; Doyle, N.; Verbraak, F.; Demirkaya, N.; Weijer, K.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.

    2018-01-01

    Background. Brain structural abnormalities have been reported in persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PLWH) who are receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Methods. We investigated factors associated with brain

  1. Deep brain stimulation for patients with Parkinson's disease: Effect on caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Burillo, J A; Rivero-Celada, D; Saenz-de Cabezón, A; Casado-Pellejero, J; Alberdi-Viñas, J; Alarcia-Alejos, R

    2018-04-01

    Our aim is to assess the burden on caregivers of patients with Parkinson's disease treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) compared to those caring for patients at advanced stages and undergoing other treatments. We have also assessed the variables associated with presence of caregiver overload. We included consecutive patients with Parkinson's disease treated with DBS. Our control group included patients in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease undergoing other treatments. Patients were assessed with the following scales: UPDRS-II, UPDRS-III, UPDRS-IV, Hoehn and Yahr, Schwab & England, Barthel, PDQ-39, MoCA, Apathy Evaluation Scale, HADS, and the abbreviated QUIP. Caregiver burden was evaluated with the Zarit caregiver burden interview and their moods were assessed with the HADS scale. We included 11 patients treated with DBS and 11 with other treatments. For patients treated with DBS, we observed a better quality of life according to the PDQ-39 questionnaire (P=.028), and a lower score on the HADS anxiety subscale (P=.010). Caregiver overload was observed in 54.5% of the caregivers of patients in both groups (P=1.000); Zarit scores were similar (P=.835). Caregiver overload was associated with higher scores on the caregiver's Apathy Evaluation Scale (P=.048) and on the HADS anxiety subscale (P=.006). According to our results, treatment with DBS is not associated with lower caregiver burden. Apathy in patients and anxiety in caregivers are factors associated with the appearance of overload. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Resting-state brain networks in patients with Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, Alessandro; Santangelo, Gabriella; De Micco, Rosa; Giordano, Alfonso; Raimo, Simona; Amboni, Marianna; Esposito, Fabrizio; Barone, Paolo; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Vitale, Carmine