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  1. Neurogenic Hippocampal Targets of Deep Brain Stimulation

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    Encinas, Juan M.; Hamani, Clement; Lozano, Andres M.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is being used to treat movement, neurological, and psychiatric disorders; it has been recently successfully applied to patients with treatment-resistant depression or in minimally conscious state. In addition to its clinical importance, DBS presents a powerful approach to target specific neural circuits and determine the functional relationship between the components of these circuits. We examined the effect of high frequency stimulation of a crucial component of ...

  2. Characterization of multiciliated ependymal cells that emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain.

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    Ogino, Takashi; Sawada, Masato; Takase, Hiroshi; Nakai, Chiemi; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Kaneko, Naoko; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-10-15

    In mammals, ventricular walls of the developing brain maintain a neurogenic niche, in which radial glial cells act as neural stem cells (NSCs) and generate new neurons in the embryo. In the adult brain, the neurogenic niche is maintained in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral wall of lateral ventricles and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the neonatal V-SVZ, radial glial cells transform into astrocytic postnatal NSCs and multiciliated ependymal cells. On the other hand, in zebrafish, radial glial cells continue to cover the surface of the adult telencephalic ventricle and maintain a higher neurogenic potential in the adult brain. However, the cell composition of the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain has not been investigated. Here we show that multiciliated ependymal cells emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish telencephalon. These multiciliated cells appear predominantly in the dorsal part of the ventral telencephalic ventricular zone, which also contains clusters of migrating new neurons. Scanning electron microscopy and live imaging analyses indicated that these multiple cilia beat coordinately and generate constant fluid flow within the ventral telencephalic ventricle. Analysis of the cell composition by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the neurogenic niche in the aged zebrafish contains different types of cells, with ultrastructures similar to those of ependymal cells, transit-amplifying cells, and migrating new neurons in postnatal mice. These data suggest that the transformation capacity of radial glial cells is conserved but that its timing is different between fish and mice. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2982-2992, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991819

  3. Exendin-4 attenuates brain death-induced liver damage in the rat.

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    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Lemos, Natalia E; Dias, Ana L; Brondani, Leticia A; Oliveira, Jarbas R; Bauer, Andrea C; Leitão, Cristiane B; Crispim, Daisy

    2015-11-01

    The majority of liver grafts destined for transplantation originate from brain dead donors. However, significantly better posttransplantation outcomes are achieved when organs from living donors are used, suggesting that brain death (BD) causes irreversible damage to the liver tissue. Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) analogues were shown to possess interesting hepatic protection effects in different liver disease models. We hypothesized that donor treatment with the GLP1 analogue exendin-4 (Ex-4) could alleviate BD-induced liver damage. A rat model of BD was employed in order to estimate BD-induced liver damage and Ex-4's potential protective effects. Liver damage was assessed by biochemical determination of circulating hepatic markers. Apoptosis in the hepatic tissue was assessed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry using an antibody that only recognizes the active form of caspase-3. Gene expression changes in inflammation and stress response genes were monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Here, we show that Ex-4 administration to the brain dead liver donors significantly reduces levels of circulating aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase. This was accompanied by a remarkable reduction in hepatocyte apoptosis. In this model, BD caused up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor and stress-related genes, confirming previous findings in clinical and animal studies. In conclusion, treatment of brain dead rats with Ex-4 reduced BD-induced liver damage. Further investigation is needed to determine the molecular basis of the observed liver protection. After testing in a randomized clinical trial, the inclusion of GLP1 analogues in organ donor management might help to improve organ quality, maximize organ donation, and possibly increase liver transplantation success rates. PMID:26334443

  4. Endogenous neurogenic cell response in the mature mammalian brain following traumatic injury.

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    Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In the mature mammalian brain, new neurons are generated throughout life in the neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. Over the past two decades, extensive studies have examined the extent of adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and DG, the role of the adult generated new neurons in normal brain function and the underlying mechanisms regulating the process of adult neurogenesis. The extent and the function of adult neurogenesis under neuropathological conditions have also been explored in varying types of disease models in animals. Increasing evidence has indicated that these endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells may play regenerative and reparative roles in response to CNS injuries or diseases. This review will discuss the potential functions of adult neurogenesis in the injured brain and will describe the recent development of strategies aimed at harnessing this neurogenic capacity in order to repopulate and repair the injured brain following trauma. PMID:25936874

  5. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

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    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  6. From blood to brain: the neurogenic niche of the crayfish brain.

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    Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-08-11

    Adult neurogenic niches are present in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Where do stem cells populating these niches originate, and what are the mechanisms maintaining their self-renewal? In this issue of Developmental Cell, Benton et al. (2014) show that in crayfish, hemolymph-derived cells enter a neurogenic niche to replenish neural progenitors. PMID:25117680

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

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    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  8. Differential vascular permeability along the forebrain ventricular neurogenic niche in the adult murine brain.

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    Colín-Castelán, Dannia; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis is influenced by blood-borne factors. In this context, greater or lesser vascular permeability along neurogenic niches would expose differentially neural stem cells (NSCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and neuroblasts to such factors. Here we evaluate endothelial cell morphology and vascular permeability along the forebrain neurogenic niche in the adult brain. Our results confirm that the subventricular zone (SVZ) contains highly permeable, discontinuous blood vessels, some of which allow the extravasation of molecules larger than those previously reported. In contrast, the rostral migratory stream (RMS) and the olfactory bulb core (OBc) display mostly impermeable, continuous blood vessels. These results imply that NSCs, TACs, and neuroblasts located within the SVZ are exposed more readily to blood-borne molecules, including those with very high molecular weights, than those positioned along the RMS and the OBc, subregions in which every stage of neurogenesis also takes place. These observations suggest that the existence of specialized vascular niches is not a precondition for neurogenesis to occur; specialized vascular beds might be essential for keeping high rates of proliferation and/or differential differentiation of neural precursors located at distinct domains. PMID:26492830

  9. Neurogenic plasticity of mesenchymal stem cell, an alluring cellular replacement for traumatic brain injury.

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    Pati, Soumya; Muthuraju, Sangu; Hadi, Raisah Ab; Huat, Tee Jong; Singh, Shailja; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Jaafar, Hasnan

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) imposes horrendous neurophysiological alterations leading to most devastating forms of neuro-disability. Which includes impaired cognition, distorted locomotors activity and psychosomatic disability in both youths and adults. Emerging evidence from recent studies has identified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as one of the promising category of stem cells having excellent neuroregenerative capability in TBI victims. Some of the clinical and animal studies reported that MSCs transplantation could cure neuronal damage as well as improve cognitive and locomotors behaviors in TBI. However, mechanism behind their broad spectrum neuroregenerative potential in TBI has not been reviewed yet. Therefore, in the present article, we present a comprehensive data on the important attributes of MSCs, such as neurotransdifferentiation, neuroprotection, axonal repair and plasticity, maintenance of blood-brain integrity, reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and immunomodulation. We have reviewed in detail the crucial neurogenic capabilities of MSCs in vivo and provided consolidated knowledge regarding their cellular remodeling in TBI for future therapeutic implications. PMID:26763886

  10. Neurogenic effect of VEGF is related to increase of astrocytes transdifferentiation into new mature neurons in rat brains after stroke.

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    Shen, Shu-Wen; Duan, Chun-Ling; Chen, Xian-Hua; Wang, Yong-Quan; Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Qiu-Wan; Cui, Hui-Ru; Sun, Feng-Yan

    2016-09-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-enhanced neurogenesis in ischemic brain injury, we used middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model to induce transient focal ischemic brain injury. The results showed that ischemic injury significantly increased glial fibrillary acidic protein immunopositive (GFAP(+)) and nestin(+) cells in ipsilateral striatum 3 days following MCAO. Most GFAP(+) cells colocalized with nestin (GFAP(+)-nestin(+)), Pax6 (GFAP(+)-Pax6(+)), or Olig2 (GFAP(+)-Olig2(+)). VEGF further increased GFAP(+)-nestin(+) and GFAP(+)-Pax6(+) cells, and decreased GFAP(+)-Olig2(+) cells. We used striatal injection of GFAP targeted enhanced green fluorescence protein (pGfa2-EGFP) vectors combined with multiple immunofluorescent staining to trace the neural fates of EGFP-expressing (GFP(+)) reactive astrocytes. The results showed that MCAO-induced striatal reactive astrocytes differentiated into neural stem cells (GFP(+)-nestin(+) cells) at 3 days after MCAO, immature (GFP(+)-Tuj-1(+) cells) at 1 week and mature neurons (GFP(+)-MAP-2(+) or GFP(+)-NeuN(+) cells) at 2 weeks. VEGF increased GFP(+)-NeuN(+) and BrdU(+)-MAP-2(+) newborn neurons after MCAO. Fluorocitrate, an astrocytic inhibitor, significantly decreased GFAP and nestin expression in ischemic brains, and also reduced VEGF-enhanced neurogenic effects. This study is the first time to report that VEGF-mediated increase of newly generated neurons is dependent on the presence of reactive astrocytes. The results also illustrate cellular mechanism of VEGF-enhanced neural repair and functional plasticity in the brains after ischemic injury. We concluded that neurogenic effect of VEGF is related to increase of striatal astrocytes transdifferentiation into new mature neurons, which should be very important for the reconstruction of neurovascular units/networks in non-neurogenic regions of the mammalian brain. PMID:26603138

  11. [Neurogenic erectile dysfunction].

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    Ramos, Antonio Sánchez; Durán, Juan Antonio Godino; Oliviero, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction is a consequence of alterations in neural pathways, autonomic, somatic, the combination of both or brain components that induce erection. This review aims to explain the physiopathological mechanisms of the most frequent neurological alterations causing erectile dysfunction and sexual disorders. PMID:20978292

  12. Neurogenic Bladder

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    Peter T. Dorsher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented.

  13. Netrin-5 is highly expressed in neurogenic regions of the adult brain.

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    Satoru eYamagishi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian netrin family proteins are involved in targeting of axons, neuronal migration, and angiogenesis and act as repulsive and attractive guidance molecules. Netrin-5 is a new member of the netrin family with homology to the C345C domain of netrin-1. Unlike other netrin proteins, murine netrin-5 consists of two EGF motifs of the laminin V domain (LE and the C345C domain, but lacks the N-terminal laminin VI domain and one of the three LE motifs. We generated a specific antibody against netrin-5 to investigate its expression pattern in the rodent adult brain. Strong netrin-5 expression was observed in the olfactory bulb, rostral migrate stream (RMS, the subventricular zone (SVZ, and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, where neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain. In the SVZ and RMS, netrin-5 expression was observed in Mash1-positive transit-amplifying cells and in Doublecortin (DCX-positive neuroblasts, but not in GFAP-positive astrocytes. In the olfactory bulb, netrin-5 expression was maintained in neuroblasts, but its level was decreased in NeuN-positive mature neurons. In the hippocampal SGZ, netrin-5 was observed in Mash1-positive cells and in DCX-positive neuroblasts, but not in GFAP-positive astrocytes, suggesting that netrin-5 expression occurs from type 2a to type 3 cells. These data suggest that netrin-5 is produced by both transit-amplifying cells and neuroblasts to control neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  14. The Effect of Pro-Neurogenic Gene Expression on Adult Subventricular Zone Precursor Cell Recruitment and Fate Determination After Excitotoxic Brain Injury

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    Jones, Kathryn S; Connor, Bronwen J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of on-going neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain, neurons are generally not replaced after injury. Using a rodent model of excitotoxic cell loss and retroviral (RV) lineage tracing, we previously demonstrated transient recruitment of precursor cells from the subventricular zone (SVZ) into the lesioned striatum. In the current study we determined that these cells included migratory neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC), with the predominant response from glial cells. We attempted to override this glial response by ectopic expression of the pro-neurogenic genes Pax6 or Dlx2 in the adult rat SVZ following quinolinic acid lesioning. RV-Dlx2 over-expression stimulated repair at a previously non-neurogenic time point by enhancing neuroblast recruitment and the percentage of cells that retained a neuronal fate within the lesioned area, compared to RV-GFP controls. RV-Pax6 expression was unsuccessful at inhibiting glial fate and intriguingly, increased OPC cell numbers with no change in neuronal recruitment. These findings suggest that gene choice is important when attempting to augment endogenous repair as the lesioned environment can overcome pro-neurogenic gene expression. Dlx2 over-expression however was able to partially overcome an anti-neuronal environment and therefore is a promising candidate for further study of striatal regeneration.

  15. A novel neuron-enriched protein SDIM1 is down regulated in Alzheimer's brains and attenuates cell death induced by DNAJB4 over-expression in neuro-progenitor cells

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    Lei Joy X

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular changes in multiple biological processes contribute to the development of chronic neurodegeneration such as late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD. To discover how these changes are reflected at the level of gene expression, we used a subtractive transcription-based amplification of mRNA procedure to identify novel genes that have altered expression levels in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients. Among the genes altered in expression level in AD brains was a transcript encoding a novel protein, SDIM1, that contains 146 amino acids, including a typical signal peptide and two transmembrane domains. Here we examined its biochemical properties and putative roles in neuroprotection/neurodegeneration. Results QRT-PCR analysis of additional AD and control post-mortem human brains showed that the SDIM1 transcript was indeed significantly down regulated in all AD brains. SDIM1 is more abundant in NT2 neurons than astrocytes and present throughout the cytoplasm and neural processes, but not in the nuclei. In NT2 neurons, it is highly responsive to stress conditions mimicking insults that may cause neurodegeneration in AD brains. For example, SDIM1 was significantly down regulated 2 h after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, though had recovered 16 h later, and also appeared significantly up regulated compared to untreated NT2 neurons. Overexpression of SDIM1 in neuro-progenitor cells improved cells' ability to survive after injurious insults and its downregulation accelerated cell death induced by OGD. Yeast two-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation approaches revealed, both in vitro and in vivo, an interaction between SDIM1 and DNAJB4, a heat shock protein hsp40 homolog, recently known as an enhancer of apoptosis that also interacts with the mu opioid receptor in human brain. Overexpression of DNAJB4 alone significantly reduced cell viability and SDIM1 co-overexpression was capable of attenuating the cell death

  16. TGF-β superfamily gene expression and induction of the Runx1 transcription factor in adult neurogenic regions after brain injury.

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    Trevor T Logan

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI increases neurogenesis in the forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ and the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily cytokines are important regulators of adult neurogenesis, but their involvement in the regulation of this process after brain injury is unclear. We subjected adult mice to controlled cortical impact (CCI injury, and isolated RNA from the SVZ and DG at different post-injury time points. qPCR array analysis showed that cortical injury caused significant alterations in the mRNA expression of components and targets of the TGF-β, BMP, and activin signaling pathways in the SVZ and DG after injury, suggesting that these pathways could regulate post-injury neurogenesis. In both neurogenic regions, the injury also induced expression of Runt-related transcription factor-1 (Runx1, which can interact with intracellular TGF-β Smad signaling pathways. CCI injury strongly induced Runx1 expression in activated and proliferating microglial cells throughout the neurogenic regions. Runx1 protein was also expressed in a subset of Nestin- and GFAP-expressing putative neural stem or progenitor cells in the DG and SVZ after injury. In the DG only, these Runx1+ progenitors proliferated. Our data suggest potential roles for Runx1 in the processes of microglial cell activation and proliferation and in neural stem cell proliferation after TBI.

  17. The Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in the Development of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity (NDO)

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    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrop...

  18. Neurogenic and non neurogenic functions of endogenous neural stem cells.

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    Erica eButti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a lifelong process that occurs in two main neurogenic niches of the brain, namely in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus. In the 1960s, studies on adult neurogenesis have been hampered by the lack of established phenotypic markers. The precise tracing of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs was therefore, not properly feasible. After the (partial identification of those markers, it was the lack of specific tools that hindered a proper experimental elimination and tracing of those cells to demonstrate their terminal fate and commitment. Nowadays, irradia-tion, cytotoxic drugs as well as genetic tracing/ablation procedures have moved the field forward and increased our understanding of neurogenesis processes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Newly formed NPC progeny from the SVZ can replace granule cells in the olfactory bulbs of rodents, thus contributing to orchestrate sophisticated odour behaviour. SGZ-derived new granule cells, instead, integrate within the DG where they play an essential role in memory functions. Furthermore, converging evidence claim that endogenous NPCs not only exert neurogenic functions, but might also have non-neurogenic homeostatic functions by the release of different types of neuroprotective molecules. Remarkably, these non-neurogenic homeostatic functions seem to be necessary, both in healthy and diseased conditions, for example for preventing or limiting tissue damage. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic and the non-neurogenic functions of adult NPCs both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  19. Neurogenesis in the central olfactory pathway of adult decapod crustaceans: development of the neurogenic niche in the brains of procambarid crayfish

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    Sintoni Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the decapod crustacean brain, neurogenesis persists throughout the animal's life. After embryogenesis, the central olfactory pathway integrates newborn olfactory local and projection interneurons that replace old neurons or expand the existing population. In crayfish, these neurons are the descendants of precursor cells residing in a neurogenic niche. In this paper, the development of the niche was documented by monitoring proliferating cells with S-phase-specific markers combined with immunohistochemical, dye-injection and pulse-chase experiments. Results Between the end of embryogenesis and throughout the first post-embryonic stage (POI, a defined transverse band of mitotically active cells (which we will term 'the deutocerebral proliferative system' (DPS appears. Just prior to hatching and in parallel with the formation of the DPS, the anlagen of the niche appears, closely associated with the vasculature. When the hatchling molts to the second post-embryonic stage (POII, the DPS differentiates into the lateral (LPZ and medial (MPZ proliferative zones. The LPZ and MPZ are characterized by a high number of mitotically active cells from the beginning of post-embryonic life; in contrast, the developing niche contains only very few dividing cells, a characteristic that persists in the adult organism. Conclusions Our data suggest that the LPZ and MPZ are largely responsible for the production of new neurons in the early post-embryonic stages, and that the neurogenic niche in the beginning plays a subordinate role. However, as the neuroblasts in the proliferation zones disappear during early post-embryonic life, the neuronal precursors in the niche gradually become the dominant and only mechanism for the generation of new neurons in the adult brain.

  20. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

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    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients. PMID:25653370

  1. An interneuron progenitor maintains neurogenic potential in vivo and differentiates into GABAergic interneurons after transplantation in the postnatal rat brain.

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    Wang, Qi; Hong, Peiwei; Gao, Hui; Chen, Yuntian; Yang, Qi; Jiang, Mei; Li, Hedong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of cortical GABAergic interneurons are involved in numerous neurological disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism; and replenishment of these cells by transplantation strategy has proven to be a feasible and effective method to help revert the symptoms in several animal models. To develop methodology of generating transplantable GABAergic interneurons for therapy, we previously reported the isolation of a v-myc-induced GABAergic interneuron progenitor clone GE6 from embryonic ganglionic eminence (GE). These cells can proliferate and form functional inhibitory synapses in culture. Here, we tested their differentiation behavior in vivo by transplanting them into the postnatal rat forebrain. We found that GE6 cells migrate extensively in the neonatal forebrain and differentiate into both neurons and glia, but preferentially into neurons when compared with a sister progenitor clone CTX8. The neurogenic potential of GE6 cells is also maintained after transplantation into a non-permissive environment such as adult cortex or when treated with inflammatory cytokine in culture. The GE6-derived neurons were able to mature in vivo as GABAergic interneurons expressing GABAergic, not glutamatergic, presynaptic puncta. Finally, we propose that v-myc-induced human interneuron progenitor clones could be an alternative cell source of transplantable GABAergic interneurons for treating related neurological diseases in future clinic. PMID:26750620

  2. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

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    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  3. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification.

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    Jensen, L L; Halar, E; Little, J W; Brooke, M M

    1987-12-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification is a potential sequela of neurological disorders, especially spinal cord injury and head injury. The etiology is unknown. Clinical, radiologic, and bone scan findings are typical. Complications may threaten function. The differential diagnosis is crucial in its early stages. Treatment options include diphosphonates, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and surgery. This article has reviewed the literature on neurogenic heterotopic ossification (HO), soft tissue ossification of neurologic disease, including pathogenesis, histology, presentation, diagnosis, natural history, complications, and current treatments. PMID:3124630

  4. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

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    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment. PMID:25673127

  5. Neurogenic Bladder and Multiple Sclerosis

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    Krupin V.N.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been presented general information of neurogenic bladder and the data on pathophysiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis. The characteristics of clinical presentations of neurogenic bladder in multiple sclerosis have been stated. There have been considered diagnosis and treatment problems of urinary disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  6. Brain death induces apoptosis in donor liver of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, JAB; Moshage, H; Schuurs, T; Nijboer, M; van Schilfgaarde, R; Ploeg, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Background. A difference in short- and long-term function between living-related and cadaveric donor organs is consistently shown in kidney- and liver-transplant studies. We hypothesize that this is caused by induction of apoptosis and inflammation of the potential graft because of the phase of brai

  7. Etiopathogenesis of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 160, 5-6 (2010), s. 152-154. ISSN 0043-5341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : neurogenic pulmonary edema * intracranial pressure * sympathetic system Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  8. Neurogenic tumors of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general and radiologic features of neurogenic tumors of the stomach are reviewed in connection with 18 cases (16 benign and 2 maglignant tumors). Such neurogenic tumors are rare in the stomach, representing less than 0.5% of all tumors. Solitary neurogenic tumors must be differentiated from those encountered during von Recklinghausen's disease. Radiological or endoscopic examination can generally determine the benign or malignant nature of solitary neurogenic tumors, which are essentially represented by schwannomas. Since these tumors are submucosal, a deep biopsy is imperative; furthermore, since such tumors are subject to hemorrhage, prior investigation by CT appears advisable to detect possible hypervascularization after injection of contrast material. For patients with von Recklinghausen's disease, a neurofibroma is usually diagnosed when faced with a digestive hemorrhage. Radiological exploration of the entire digestive tract appears essential to confirm the solitary nature of the gastric lesion and to be sure it is responsible for the clinical symptoms. (orig.)

  9. Cough responsiveness in neurogenic dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    SMITH, P.; Wiles, C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—In neurogenic dysphagia a good cough is important for airway protection. If triggering of cough, or its effectiveness, is impaired this might result in an increased aspiration risk. Capsaicin, an agent which induces cough through sensory nerve stimulation, was used to test cough sensitivity in groups of patients with and without neurogenic dysphagia.
METHODS—On the basis of swallowing speed (ml/s) in a validated water test 28 alert neurological inpatients (16 wome...

  10. Adult Neurogenesis: Ultrastructure of a Neurogenic Niche and Neurovascular Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Grazielle Chaves da Silva; Jeanne L Benton; Beltz, Barbara S.; Silvana Allodi

    2012-01-01

    The first-generation precursors producing adult-born neurons in the crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) brain reside in a specialized niche located on the ventral surface of the brain. In the present work, we have explored the organization and ultrastructure of this neurogenic niche, using light-level, confocal and electron microscopic approaches. Our goals were to define characteristics of the niche microenvironment, examine the morphological relationships between the niche and the vasculature an...

  11. Sarcopenia, a Neurogenic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is an aging-associated condition, which is currently characterized by the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. However, there is no consensus regarding its characterization hitherto. As the world older adult population is on the rise, the impact of sarcopenia becomes greater. Due to the lack of effective treatments, sarcopenia is still a persisting problem among the global older adults and should not be overlooked. As a result, it is vital to investigate deeper into the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of sarcopenia in order to develop more effective therapeutic interventions and to inscribe a more uniform characterization. The etiology of sarcopenia is currently found to be multifactorial, and most of the pharmacological researches are focused on the muscular factors in aging. Although the complete mechanism underlying the development of sarcopenia is still waiting to be elucidated, we propose in this article that the primary trigger of sarcopenia may be neurogenic in origin based on the intimate relationship between the nervous and muscular system, namely, the motor neuron and its underlying muscle fibers. Both of them are affected by the cellular environment and their physiological activity.

  12. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells....

  13. Neurogenic dysphagia resulting from Chiari malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, I F; Pang, D; Kocoshis, S; Putnam, P

    1992-05-01

    Between 1980 and 1989, 15 of 46 patients (11 children, 4 adults) who underwent suboccipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for symptomatic Chiari malformations presented with manifestations of neurogenic dysphagia. Each of these patients had normal swallowing function before the development of dysphagic symptoms. Dysphagia was progressive in all 15 and, in most cases, preceded the onset of other severe brain stem signs. The rate of symptom progression varied depending on the age of the patient. Whereas the six infants (all Chiari II) deteriorated rapidly after the onset of initial symptoms, the five older children (two Chiari I, three Chiari II) and four adults (all Chiari I) showed a more gradual deterioration. In 11 patients with severe dysphagia, barium video esophagograms, pharyngoesophageal motility studies, continuous esophageal pH monitoring, and appropriate scintigraphic studies were useful in defining the scope of the swallowing impairment and determining whether perioperative nasogastric or gastrostomy feedings, gastric fundoplication, and/or tracheostomy were needed to maintain adequate nutrition and avoid aspiration. These patients all had widespread dysfunction of the swallowing mechanism, with a combination of diffuse pharyngoesophageal dysmotility, cricopharyngeal achalasia, nasal regurgitation, tracheal aspiration, and gastroesophageal reflux. The pathophysiology of these swallowing impairments and their relation to the hindbrain malformation is discussed. Postoperative outcome with regard to swallowing function correlated with the severity of preoperative symptoms. The four patients with mild dysphagia showed rapid improvement in swallowing function after surgery. Seven patients with more severe impairment but without other signs of severe brain stem compromise, such as central apnea or complete bilateral vocal cord paralysis, also improved, albeit more slowly. In contrast, the outcome in the four patients who developed other signs of severe

  14. Neurogenic stunned myocardium following hemorrhagic cerebral contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium NSM is a well-known complication of subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but has been reported rarely in association with other central nervous system disorders. A case of NSM is described in a patient with hemorrhagic brain contusion associated with cerebral edema. An 18-year-old man was admitted with severe cranial trauma following a car roll-over. Six days after admission, he developed findings suggestive for NSM. The troponin T and creatine kinase-MB level were elevated and echocardiogram showed apical and inferoposterior hypokinesis and diffuse left ventricular akinesis with severely reduced ejection fraction 18%. Invasive measurements confirmed low cardiac output. His cardiac function resolved completely within 6 days after decompressive craniotomy. This case supports the presumed unifying role of the increased intracranial pressure, probably triggering a vigorous sympathetic outflow hyperactivity leading to NSM. (author)

  15. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    J. Worsøe; Rasmussen, M.; Christensen, P.; Krogh, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD). It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NB...

  16. Morphologic categorization of cell death induced by mild hyperthermia and comparison with death induced by ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of the morphological categorization of cell death, results of two in vivo studies on the cell death induced by mild hyperthermia in rat small intestine and mouse mastocytoma, and a comparison of the cell death induced by hyperthermia, radiation and cytotoxic drugs. Two distinct forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis, can be recognized on morphologic grounds. Apoptosis appears to be a process of active cellular self-destruction to which a biologically meaningful role can usually be attributed, whereas necrosis is a passive degenerative phenomenon that results from irreversible cellular injury. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies showed that lower body hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 30 min) induced only apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, and of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. In the mastocytoma, hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 15 min) produced widespread tumor necrosis and also enhanced apoptosis of tumor cells. Ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs are also known to induce apoptosis in a variety of tissues. It is attractive to speculate that DNA damage by each agent is the common event which triggers the same process of active cellular self-destruction that characteristically effects selective cell deletion in normal tissue homeostasis

  17. Discerning neurogenic vs. non-neurogenic postnatal lateral ventricular astrocytes via activity-dependent input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena W. Adlaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Throughout development, neural stem cells (NSCs give rise to differentiated neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes which together modulate perception, memory, and behavior in the adult nervous system. To understand how NSCs contribute to postnatal/adult brain remodeling and repair after injury, the lateral ventricular (LV neurogenic niche in the rodent postnatal brain serves as an excellent model system. It is a specialized area containing self-renewing GFAP+ astrocytes functioning as NSCs generating new neurons throughout life. In addition to this now well-studied regenerative process, the LV niche also generates astrocytes, playing an important role for glial scar formation after cortical injury. While LV NSCs can be clearly distinguished from their neuroblast and oligodendrocyte progeny via molecular markers, the astrocytic identity of NSCs has complicated their distinction from terminally-differentiated astrocytes in the niche. Our current models of postnatal/adult LV neurogenesis do not take into account local astrogenesis, or the possibility that cellular markers may be similar between non-dividing GFAP+ NSCs and their differentiated astrocyte daughters. Postnatal LV neurogenesis is regulated by NSC-intrinsic mechanisms interacting with extracellular/niche-driven cues. It is generally believed that these local effects are responsible for sustaining neurogenesis, though behavioral paradigms and disease states have suggested possibilities for neural circuit-level modulation. With recent experimental findings that neuronal stimulation can directly evoke responses in LV NSCs, it is possible that this exciting property will add a new dimension to identifying postnatal/adult NSCs. Here, we put forth a notion that neural circuit-level input can be a distinct characteristic defining postnatal/adult NSCs from non-neurogenic astroglia.

  18. Regional Comparison of the Neurogenic Effects of CNTF-Derived Peptides and Cerebrolysin in AβPP Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rockenstein, Edward; Ubhi, Kiren; Doppler, Edith; Novak, Philipp; Moessler, Herbert; Bin LI; Blanchard, Julie; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Crews, Leslie; Masliah, Eliezer

    2011-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the production of new neurons in certain brain regions, is known to decrease with age and the loss of neurogenic potential has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a leading cause of dementia in the elderly. Cerebrolysin (CBL) has been shown to increase neurogenesis in models of stroke and AD. CBL is composed of small peptides with activity similar to neurotrophic factors including ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which may mediate its neurogenic effects. This s...

  19. Exosomes as novel regulators of adult neurogenic niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Federico Batiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles. SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb. The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs, which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as neurogenic niche. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs. EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles in adult

  20. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  1. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, substance P (SP, and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers. These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic

  2. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  3. A Clinician Survey of Speech and Non-Speech Characteristics of Neurogenic Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, Catherine; van Wieringen, Astrid; De Nil, Luc F.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents survey data on 58 Dutch-speaking patients with neurogenic stuttering following various neurological injuries. Stroke was the most prevalent cause of stuttering in our patients, followed by traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and other causes. Speech and non-speech characteristics were analyzed separately for…

  4. The role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, A. C.; Fantozzi, R

    2013-01-01

    The term ‘neurogenic inflammation’ has been adopted to describe the local release of inflammatory mediators, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from neurons. Once released, these neuropeptides induce the release of histamine from adjacent mast cells. In turn, histamine evokes the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide; thus, a bidirectional link between histamine and neuropeptides in neurogenic inflammation is established. The aim of this review is to...

  5. Central Neurogenic Respiratory Failure: A Challenging Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Flávio A.; Bernardino, Tenille; Maciel, Ricardo O.H.; Felizola, Sérgio F.A.; Costa, Eduardo L.V.; Silva, Gisele S

    2011-01-01

    Background Central nervous system lesions are rare causes of respiratory failure. Simple observation of the breathing pattern can help localize the lesion, but the examiner needs to be aware of potential pitfalls such as metabolic or pulmonary alterations. Methods We describe 3 cases in which central neurogenic respiratory failure occurred simultaneously with other alterations or in an unusual presentation. Results All patients were diagnosed with central neurogenic respiratory failure and tr...

  6. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Worsøe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD. It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NBD treated by sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS, sacral nerve stimulation (SNS, peripheral nerve stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and nerve re-routing was made in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library. Results. SARS improves bowel function in some patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI. Nerve re-routing is claimed to facilitate defecation through mechanical stimulation of dermatomes in patients with complete or incomplete SCI or myelomeningocele. SNS can reduce NBD in selected patients with a variety of incomplete neurological lesions. Peripheral stimulation using electrical stimulation or magnetic stimulation may represent non-invasive alternatives. Conclusion. Numerous methods of neurostimulation to treat NBD have been investigated in pilot studies or retrospective studies. Therefore, larger controlled trials with well-defined inclusion criteria and endpoints are recommended before widespread clinical use of neurostimulation against NBD.

  7. Pathogenetic Mechanisms of Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 15 (2015), s. 1135-1145. ISSN 0897-7151 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : baroreflex-induced bradycardia * blood pressure rise * blood volume redistribution * neurogenic pulmonary edema * spinal cord injury * sympathetic nervous system Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.714, year: 2014

  8. Interleukin-3 prevents neuronal death induced by amyloid peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otth Carola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is an important glycoprotein involved in regulating biological responses such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Its effects are mediated via interaction with cell surface receptors. Several studies have demonstrated the expression of IL-3 in neurons and astrocytes of the hippocampus and cortices in normal mouse brain, suggesting a physiological role of IL-3 in the central nervous system. Although there is evidence indicating that IL-3 is expressed in some neuronal populations, its physiological role in these cells is poorly known. Results In this study, we demonstrated the expression of IL-3 receptor in cortical neurons, and analyzed its influence on amyloid β (Aβ-treated cells. In these cells, IL-3 can activate at least three classical signalling pathways, Jak/STAT, Ras/MAP kinase and the PI 3-kinase. Viability assays indicated that IL-3 might play a neuroprotective role in cells treated with Aβ fibrils. It is of interest to note that our results suggest that cell survival induced by IL-3 required PI 3-kinase and Jak/STAT pathway activation, but not MAP kinase. In addition, IL-3 induced an increase of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Conclusion Altogether these data strongly suggest that IL-3 neuroprotects neuronal cells against neurodegenerative agents like Aβ.

  9. Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    McMaster Marianne E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). In this paper, a neurogenic hypothesis is formulated to explain how toxins produced by chlorine in such pools may act deleteriously on the infant's immature central nervous system, comprising brain and spinal cord, to produce the deformity of AIS. Presentation of the hy...

  10. *604440 CELL DEATH-INDUCING DFFA-LIKE EFFECTOR A; CIDEA [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 604440 FIELD TI 604440 CELL DEATH-INDUCING DFFA-LIKE EFFECTOR A; CIDEA FIELD TX DESCRIP ... tion of CIDEA and CIDEC (612120), and treatment of lean ... or obese mice with the PPARG agonist rosiglitazone ... d to cold treatment. Notably, Cidea-null mice were lean ... and resistant to diet-induced obesity and diabetes ...

  11. Microglia from neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions display differential proliferative potential and neuroblast support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Paul Marshall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia isolated from the neurogenic subependymal zone (SEZ and hippocampus (HC are capable of massive in vitro population expansion that is not possible with microglia isolated from non-neurogenic regions. We asked if this regional heterogeneity in microglial proliferative capacity is cell intrinsic, or is conferred by interaction with respective neurogenic or non-neurogenic niches. By combining SEZ and cerebral cortex (CTX primary tissue dissociates to generate heterospatial cultures, we find that exposure to the SEZ environment does not enhance CTX microglia expansion; however, the CTX environment exerts a suppressive effect on SEZ microglia expansion. Furthermore, addition of purified donor SEZ microglia to either CTX- or SEZ-derived cultures suppresses the expansion of host microglia, while the addition of donor CTX microglia enhances the over-all microglia yield. These data suggest that SEZ and CTX microglia possess intrinsic, spatially restricted characteristics that are independent of their in vitro environment, and that they represent unique and functionally distinct populations. Finally, we determined that the repeated supplementation of neurogenic SEZ cultures with expanded SEZ microglia allows for sustained levels of inducible neurogenesis, provided that the ratio of microglia to total cells remains within a fairly narrow range.

  12. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema Developing After Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Güleç, Handan; Babayigit, Münire; Kurtay, Aysun; Tutal, Zehra; Dereli, Necla; Sahin, Saziye; Horasanli, Eyup

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a pathogenesis of pulmonary edema which occurs often in the early period following the acute neurologic changes affecting the central nervous system and proceeds with respiratory failure. It causes respiratory problems requiring intubation in the patient. When evaluated in general terms, the pathophysiology of NPE includes cardiopulmonary dysfunction caused by catecholamines that are secreted rapidly and abundantly. This case study will examine the respirat...

  13. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripher...

  14. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  15. Preoperative neurogenic pulmonary edema: A dilemma for decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Siva Kumar Reddy Lakkireddigari; Padmaja Durga; Madhukar Nayak; Gopinath Ramchandran

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema may be a less-recognized consequence of obstructive hydrocephalus. The authors report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to cerebellar metastatic lesion, who presented with neurogenic pulmonary edema. The edema resolved on placement of the ventriculoperitonial shunt. This report addresses the importance of recognition of neurogenic pulmonary edema as a possible perioperative complication resulting from an increase in intracranial pressure and the iss...

  16. The Neurogenic Potential of Astrocytes Is Regulated by Inflammatory Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Bithell, Angela; Burney, Matthew J; Johnston, Caroline E; Wong, Kee-Yew; Teng, Siaw-Wei; Desai, Jyaysi; Gumbleton, Nigel; Anderson, Gregory; Stanton, Lawrence W; Williams, Brenda P; Buckley, Noel J

    2016-08-01

    Although the adult brain contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons throughout life, these astrocyte-like populations are restricted to two discrete niches. Despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, adult parenchymal astrocytes can re-acquire NSC-like characteristics following injury, and as such, these 'reactive' astrocytes offer an alternative source of cells for central nervous system (CNS) repair following injury or disease. At present, the mechanisms that regulate the potential of different types of astrocytes are poorly understood. We used in vitro and ex vivo astrocytes to identify candidate pathways important for regulation of astrocyte potential. Using in vitro neural progenitor cell (NPC)-derived astrocytes, we found that exposure of more lineage-restricted astrocytes to either tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (via nuclear factor-κB (NFκB)) or the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor, noggin, led to re-acquisition of NPC properties accompanied by transcriptomic and epigenetic changes consistent with a more neurogenic, NPC-like state. Comparative analyses of microarray data from in vitro-derived and ex vivo postnatal parenchymal astrocytes identified several common pathways and upstream regulators associated with inflammation (including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ)) and cell cycle control (including TP53) as candidate regulators of astrocyte phenotype and potential. We propose that inflammatory signalling may control the normal, progressive restriction in potential of differentiating astrocytes as well as under reactive conditions and represent future targets for therapies to harness the latent neurogenic capacity of parenchymal astrocytes. PMID:26138449

  17. Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Considerations for Non-Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Kita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Masaki; Wada, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) in children is very common in clinical practice and is important as an underlying cause of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in affected children. LUTD in children is caused by multiple factors and might be related with a delay in functional maturation of the lower urinary tract. Behavioral and psychological problems often co-exist in children with LUTD and bowel dysfunction. Recent findings in functional brain imaging suggest that bladder bowel dysfunction and behavioral and psychiatric disorders in children might share common pathophysiological factors in the brain. Children with suspected LUTD should be evaluated properly by detailed history taking, validated questionnaire on voiding and defecation, voiding and bowel diary, urinalysis, screening ultrasound, uroflowmetry and post-void residual measurement. Invasive urodynamic study such as videourodynamics should be reserved for children in whom standard treatment fails. Initial treatment of non-neurogenic LUTD is standard urotherapy comprising education of the child and family, regular optimal voiding regimens and bowel programs. Pelvic floor muscle awareness, biofeedback and neuromodulation can be used as a supplementary purpose. Antimuscarinics and α-blockers are safely used for overactive bladder and dysfunctional voiding, respectively. For refractory cases, botulinum toxin A injection is a viable treatment option. Prudent use of urotherapy and pharmacotherapy for non-neurogenic LUTD should have a better chance to cure various problems and improve self-esteem and quality of life in affected children. PMID:27111618

  18. CD133 is not present on neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone, but on embryonic neural stem cells, ependymal cells, and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenninger, Cosima V; Roschupkina, Teona; Hertwig, Falk; Kottwitz, Denise; Englund, Elisabet; Bengzon, Johan; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2007-06-15

    Human brain tumor stem cells have been enriched using antibodies against the surface protein CD133. An antibody recognizing CD133 also served to isolate normal neural stem cells from fetal human brain, suggesting a possible lineage relationship between normal neural and brain tumor stem cells. Whether CD133-positive brain tumor stem cells can be derived from CD133-positive neural stem or progenitor cells still requires direct experimental evidence, and an important step toward such investigations is the identification and characterization of normal CD133-presenting cells in neurogenic regions of the embryonic and adult brain. Here, we present evidence that CD133 is a marker for embryonic neural stem cells, an intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type in the early postnatal stage, and for ependymal cells in the adult brain, but not for neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone. Our findings suggest two principal possibilities for the origin of brain tumor stem cells: a derivation from CD133-expressing cells, which are normally not present in the adult brain (embryonic neural stem cells and an early postnatal intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type), or from CD133-positive ependymal cells in the adult brain, which are, however, generally regarded as postmitotic. Alternatively, brain tumor stem cells could be derived from proliferative but CD133-negative neurogenic astrocytes in the adult brain. In the latter case, brain tumor development would involve the production of CD133. PMID:17575139

  19. SPOT14-Positive Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Hippocampus Respond Dynamically to Neurogenic Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Knobloch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs in the adult brain is tightly controlled to prevent exhaustion and to ensure proper neurogenesis. Several extrinsic stimuli affect NSPC regulation. However, the lack of unique markers led to controversial results regarding the in vivo behavior of NSPCs to different stimuli. We recently identified SPOT14, which controls NSPC proliferation through regulation of de novo lipogenesis, selectively in low-proliferating NSPCs. Whether SPOT14-expressing (SPOT14+ NSPCs react in vivo to neurogenic regulators is not known. We show that aging is accompanied by a marked disappearance of SPOT14+ NSPCs, whereas running, a positive neurogenic stimulus, increases proliferation of SPOT14+ NSPCs. Furthermore, transient depletion of highly proliferative cells recruits SPOT14+ NSPCs into the proliferative pool. Additionally, we have established endogenous SPOT14 protein staining, reflecting transgenic SPOT14-GFP expression. Thus, our data identify SPOT14 as a potent marker for adult NSPCs that react dynamically to positive and negative neurogenic regulators.

  20. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα(-/-) mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα(-/-) mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα(-/-)-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα(-/-) mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  1. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα−/− mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα−/− mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα−/−-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα−/− mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  2. Ureteral reimplantation in children with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloli, G P; Musi, L; Campobasso, P; Cattaneo, A

    1979-04-01

    The treatment of urologic complications from myelomeningocele and especially of vesico-renal reflux is a controversial problem. A series of 26 reimplanted ureters in 17 children, with good results in more than 85%, is reported. Ureteroneocystostomy, carried out with a few technical innovation, may represent a useful method for the treatment of vesico-renal reflux and obstruction of the uretero-vesical junction in neurogenic bladder associated with myelomeningocele. This surgical approach leads to the disappearance of the reflux, decrease of dilatation of the upper urinary tract and preservation of renal function in most cases; moreover, infection can be more easily controlled. Ureteral reimplantation should be preceded by periodic urethral dilatation, external transurethral sphincterotomy, and pharmacologic regulation in order to attempt to decrease urethral resistance. After successful surgery, it is possible to try to reeducate the bladder. Reimplantation should be preferred to permanent urinary diversion even if there is gross reflux. PMID:458534

  3. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  4. Cocaine and MDMA Induce Cellular and Molecular Changes in Adult Neurogenic Systems: Functional Implications

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    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the brain to generate new adult neurons is a recent discovery that challenges the old theory of an immutable adult brain. A new and fascinating field of research now focuses on this regenerative process. The two brain systems that constantly produce new adult neurons, known as the adult neurogenic systems, are the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the lateral ventricules/olfactory bulb system. Both systems are involved in memory and learning processes. Different drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and MDMA, have been shown to produce cellular and molecular changes that affect adult neurogenesis. This review summarizes the effects that these drugs have on the adult neurogenic systems. The functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is obscured by the functions of the systems that integrate adult neurons. Therefore, we explore the effects that cocaine and MDMA produce not only on adult neurogenesis, but also on the DG and olfactory bulbs. Finally, we discuss the possible role of new adult neurons in cocaine- and MDMA-induced impairments. We conclude that, although harmful drug effects are produced at multiple physiological and anatomical levels, the specific consequences of reduced hippocampus neurogenesis are unclear and require further exploration.

  5. Survey of spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies using the Web of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Benjing; Zhang, Yongli; Li, Yucheng; WANG, ZANTAO; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiyin; Wang, Bingdong; Long, Zhixin; Wang, Feng; SONG, GUO; Yan WANG

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global trends in research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder, through a bibliometric analysis using the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder using the Web of Science. Data retrieval was performed using key words “spinal cord injury”, “spinal injury”, “neurogenic bladder”, “neuropathic bladder”, “neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction”, “neurogenic voiding dysfun...

  6. Increase of p25 associated with cortical neuronal death induced by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianwen; Fang, Lijun; Lin, Zhiying; Huang, En; Ye, Qinyong

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal damage in hypoxic cerebral cortex are complicated. Recent studies indicated that deregulation of Cdk5 was involved in neuronal death induced by hypoxia (1% O2). However, the pathological effect of Cdk5 is not fully elucidated. Therefore, in order to decipher the effect of Cdk5 on cellular death in hypoxic condition, the Cdk5 and its activator p35/p25 were investigated in cortical neurons at 10 DIV (Days In Vitro). Upon exposure to hypoxia, the cortical neurons showed a time-dependent increase of neuronal death compared to normoxia-treated control neurons. In correlation to the increase of neuronal death under hypoxia, the level of p25, a truncated form of p35, also increased in a time-dependent manner. Importantly, inhibition of Cdk5 kinase activity by roscovitine protected neurons from death under hypoxic stress. In contrast, ectopic upregulation of Cdk5 kinase activity in neurons expressing p25 led to an increase of neuronal death in comparison to control neurons expressing GFP. It suggests that ectopic increase of Cdk5 kinase activity through conversion of p35 to p25 is involved in the process of neuronal death induced by hypoxia. PMID:27402274

  7. The anti-cell death FNK protein protects cells from death induced by freezing and thawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FNK protein, constructed from anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL with enhanced activity, was fused with the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV/Tat protein to mediate the delivery of FNK into cells. The fusion protein PTD-FNK was introduced into chondrocytes in isolated articular cartilage-bone sections, cultured neurons, and isolated bone marrow mononuclear cells to evaluate its ability to prevent cell death induced by freezing and thawing. PTD-FNK protected the cells from freeze-thaw damage in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of PTD-FNK with conventional cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide and hydroxyethyl starch) increased surviving cell numbers around 2-fold compared with controls treated only with the cryoprotectants. Notably, PTD-FNK allowed CD34+ cells among bone marrow mononuclear cells to survive more efficiently (12-fold more than the control cells) from two successive freeze-thaw cycles. Thus, PTD-FNK prevented cell death induced by freezing and thawing, suggesting that it provides for the successful cryopreservation of biological materials

  8. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  9. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  10. Capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammation in the skin in patients with symptoms induced by odorous chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger; Serup, Jørgen; Elberling, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal injection of capsaicin induces the axonal release of neuropeptides, vasodilatation and flare, e.g. neurogenic inflammation. The spatial profile of neurogenic inflammation in the skin has been studied in various experimental models. Polarization spectroscopy imaging introduced recently...

  11. p73 is required for ependymal cell maturation and neurogenic SVZ cytoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cano, L; Fuertes-Alvarez, S; Robledinos-Anton, N; Bizy, A; Villena-Cortes, A; Fariñas, I; Marques, M M; Marin, Maria C

    2016-07-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is a highly organized microenvironment established during the first postnatal days when radial glia cells begin to transform into type B-cells and ependymal cells, all of which will form regenerative units, pinwheels, along the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle. Here, we identify p73, a p53 homologue, as a critical factor controlling both cell-type specification and structural organization of the developing mouse SVZ. We describe that p73 deficiency halts the transition of the radial glia into ependymal cells, leading to the emergence of immature cells with abnormal identities in the ventricle and resulting in loss of the ventricular integrity. p73-deficient ependymal cells have noticeably impaired ciliogenesis and they fail to organize into pinwheels, disrupting SVZ niche structure and function. Therefore, p73 is essential for appropriate ependymal cell maturation and the establishment of the neurogenic niche architecture. Accordingly, lack of p73 results in impaired neurogenesis. Moreover, p73 is required for translational planar cell polarity establishment, since p73 deficiency results in profound defects in cilia organization in individual cells and in intercellular patch orientation. Thus, our data reveal a completely new function of p73, independent of p53, in the neurogenic architecture of the SVZ of rodent brain and in the establishment of ependymal planar cell polarity with important implications in neurogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 730-747, 2016. PMID:26482843

  12. Recent Advances in Neurogenic Small Molecules as Innovative Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Martí-Marí, Olaia; Estrada, Martín; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system of adult mammals has long been considered as a complex static structure unable to undergo any regenerative process to refurbish its dead nodes. This dogma was challenged by Altman in the 1960s and neuron self-renewal has been demonstrated ever since in many species, including humans. Aging, neurodegenerative, and some mental diseases are associated with an exponential decrease in brain neurogenesis. Therefore, the controlled pharmacological stimulation of the endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) niches might counteract the neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathologies, opening an exciting new therapeutic avenue. In the last years, druggable molecular targets and signalling pathways involved in neurogenic processes have been identified, and as a consequence, different drug types have been developed and tested in neuronal plasticity. This review focuses on recent advances in neurogenic agents acting at serotonin and/or melatonin systems, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). PMID:27598108

  13. The expression of Death Inducer-Obliterator (DIDO) variants in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzoti-Coelho, Maria Gabriela; Ferreira, Aline Fernanda; de Souza Nunes, Natalia; Pinto, Mariana Tomazini; Júnior, Maurício Cristiano Rocha; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Martínez-A, Carlos; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Kashima, Simone; Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML), Polycythemia Vera (PV), Essential Thrombocythemia (ET) and Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF) are Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) characterized by clonal myeloproliferation without cell maturation impairment. CML pathogenesis is associated with the Ph chromosome leading to BCR-ABL tyrosine-kinase constitutive expression. The Ph negative MPN (PV, ET and PMF) are characterized by the mutation JAK2(V617F) of the JAK2 protein in the auto-inhibitory JH2 domain, which is found in most PV patients and in approximately half of ET and PMF patients. Considerable effort is being made to understand the role of JAK2(V617F) at the MPN initiation and to clarify the pathogenesis and apoptosis resistance in CML, PV, ET and PMF patients. In the present investigation, we evaluated the Death Inducer-Obliterator (DIDO) (variants DIDO 1, 2 and 3) levels in CML, PV, ET and PMF patients. Our data reported the DIDO 1, 2 and 3 differential expressions in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms. PMID:27282563

  14. Bimodal cell death induced by high radiation doses in the radioresistant sf9 insect cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study was conducted to investigate the mode(s) of cell death induced by high radiation doses in the highly radioresistant Sf9 insect ovarian cell line. Methods: Cells were exposed to γ-radiation doses 200Gy and 500Gy, harvested at various time intervals (6h-72h) following irradiation, and subjected to cell morphology assay, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay) and Annexin-V labeling for the detection of membrane phosphatidylserine externalization. Cell morphology was assessed in cells entrapped and fixed in agarose gel directly from the cell suspension, thus preventing the possible loss of fragments/ apoptotic bodies. Surviving fraction of Sf9 cells was 0.01 at 200Gy and 98%) undergoing extensive DNA fragmentation at 500Gy, whereas the frequency of cells with DNA fragmentation was considerably less (∼12%) at 200Gy. Conclusions: While the mode of cell death at 200Gy seems to be different from typical apoptosis, a dose of 500Gy induced bimodal cell death, with typical apoptotic as well as the atypical cell death observed at 200Gy

  15. Arabidopsis Bax Inhibitor-1 inhibits cell death induced by pokeweed antiviral protein in Saccharomyces cerevisae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsen Çakır

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an active form of programmed cell death (PCD that plays critical roles in the development, differentiation and resistance to pathogens in multicellular organisms. Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs are able to induce apoptotic cell death in mammalian cells. In this study, using yeast as a model system, we showed that yeast cells expressing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP, a single-chain ribosome-inactivating protein, exhibit apoptotic-like features, such as nuclear fragmentation and ROS production. We studied the interaction between PAP and AtBI-1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Bax Inhibitor-1, a plant anti-apoptotic protein, which inhibits Bax induced cell death. Cells expressing PAP and AtBI-1 were able to survive on galactose media compared to PAP alone, indicating a reduction in the cytotoxicity of PAP in yeast. However, PAP was able to depurinate the ribosomes and to inhibit total translation in the presence of AtBI-1. A C-terminally deleted AtBI-1 was able to reduce the cytotoxicity of PAP. Since anti-apoptotic proteins form heterodimers to inhibit the biological activity of their partners, we used a co-immunoprecipitation assay to examine the binding of AtBI-1 to PAP. Both full length and C-terminal deleted AtBI-1 were capable of binding to PAP. These findings indicate that PAP induces cell death in yeast and AtBI-1 inhibits cell death induced by PAP without affecting ribosome depurination and translation inhibition.

  16. Prototypical antipsychotic drugs protect hippocampal neuronal cultures against cell death induced by growth medium deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Sylvain

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical studies suggested that antipsychotic-based medications could ameliorate cognitive functions impaired in certain schizophrenic patients. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of various dopaminergic receptor antagonists – including atypical antipsychotics that are prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia – in a model of toxicity using cultured hippocampal neurons, the hippocampus being a region of particular relevance to cognition. Results Hippocampal cell death induced by deprivation of growth medium constituents was strongly blocked by drugs including antipsychotics (10-10-10-6 M that display nM affinities for D2 and/or D4 receptors (clozapine, haloperidol, (±-sulpiride, domperidone, clozapine, risperidone, chlorpromazine, (+-butaclamol and L-741,742. These effects were shared by some caspases inhibitors and were not accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, (--raclopride and remoxipride, two drugs that preferentially bind D2 over D4 receptors were ineffective, as well as the selective D3 receptor antagonist U 99194. Interestingly, (--raclopride (10-6 M was able to block the neuroprotective effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (10-6 M. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that D2-like receptors, particularly the D4 subtype, mediate the neuroprotective effects of antipsychotic drugs possibly through a ROS-independent, caspase-dependent mechanism.

  17. The multifaceted subventricular zone astrocyte: From a metabolic and pro-neurogenic role to acting as a neural stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platel, J C; Bordey, A

    2016-05-26

    A few decades ago it was discovered that two regions of the adult brain retain the ability to generate new neurons. These regions include the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) located at the border of the lateral ventricle. In the V-SVZ, it was discovered that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) share many features of mature astrocytes and are often referred as V-SVZ astrocytes. We will first describe the markers, the morphology, and the neurophysiological characteristics of the mouse V-SVZ astrocytes. We will then discuss the fact that V-SVZ astrocytes constitute a mixed population with respect to their neurogenic properties, e.g., quiescent versus activated state, neurogenic fate, and transcription factors expression. Finally, we will describe two functions of V-SVZ astrocytes, their metabolic coupling to blood vessels and their neurogenic-supportive role consisting of providing guidance and survival cues to migrating newborn neurons. PMID:26546469

  18. Two malignant peripheral nerve lesions of non-neurogenic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging features and histology of two cases of non-neurogenic intraneural malignancy – an epithelioid sarcoma and myeloma – are described. These cases are important reminders that not all nerve tumours are of neural origin and also show the crucial importance of a robust multidisciplinary approach to achieve the correct diagnosis and management.

  19. Neurogen dysfagi ses hyppigt hos patienter på intensivafdelinger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Barbre; Kjærsgaard, Annette; Larsen, Jens Kjærgaard Rolighed;

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD) is a frequent condition in neurological patients admitted to the ICU, particularly in patients with brainstem lesions. The CNS damage itself can predispose to dysphagia, but also the treatment and preventive measures may predispose to and exacerbate the...... rehabilitation is important....

  20. Mapping of potential neurogenic niche in the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Barreto Nogueira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ are known neurogenic niches in adult mammals. Nonetheless, the existence of neurogenic niches in adult humans is controversial. We hypothesized that mapping neurogenic niches in the human temporal lobe could clarify this issue. Neurogenic niches and neurogenesis were investigated in 28 temporal lobes via immunostaining for nestin and doublecortin (DCX, respectively. Nestin was observed in a continuous layer formed by the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ, terminating in the subiculum. In the subiculum, remarkable DCX expression was observed through the principal efferent pathway of the hippocampus to the fimbria. A possible explanation for the results is that the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ form a unit containing neural stem cells that differentiate into neurons in the subiculum. Curiously, the area previously identified as the human rostral migratory stream may in truth be the fornix, which contains axons that originate in the subiculum. This study suggests that neurogenesis may occur in an orchestrated manner in a broad area of the human temporal lobe.

  1. Sympathoadrenal dysfunction in rats with chronic neurogenic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Dominiak, P; Kees, Frieder K.; Grobecker, H

    1985-01-01

    Compared to sham-operated controls 5 weeks after surgery neurogenic hypertensive rats with sino-aortic baroreceptor deafferentation had higher blood pressure, higher plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels, lower heart noradrenaline concentrations, higher adrenomedullary adrenaline levels and increased cardiac intraventricular pressure (dp/dtmax).

  2. Protective effect of aqueous extract from Spirulina platensis against cell death induced by free radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Ammu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina is a commercial alga well known to contain various antioxidants, especially phycocyanin. Apart from being sold as a nutraceutical, Spirulina is incorporated as a functional ingredient in food products and beverages. Most of the previous reports on antioxidant activity of Spirulina were based on chemical rather than cell-based assays. The primary objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant activity of aqueous extract from Spirulina based on its protective effect against cell death induced by free radicals. Methods The antioxidant activity of the cold water extract from food-grade Spirulina platensis was assessed using both chemical and cell-based assays. In the cell-based assay, mouse fibroblast cells (3T3 cells were incubated for 1 h in medium containing aqueous extract of Spirulina or vitamin C (positive control at 25, 125 and 250 μg/mL before the addition of 50 μM 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH or 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS. The cells were incubated for another 24 h before being assessed for cell death due to apoptosis using the Cell Death Detection ELISA Kit. Spectrophotometric assays based on DPPH and ABTS were also used to assess the antioxidant activity of the extract compared to vitamin C and vitamin E (positive controls. Results Spirulina extract did not cause cytotoxic effect on 3T3 cells within the range of concentrations tested (0 - 250 μg/mL. The extract reduced significantly (p Conclusions The results showed that aqueous extract of Spirulina has a protective effect against apoptotic cell death due to free radicals. The potential application of incorporating Spirulina into food products and beverages to enhance their antioxidant capacity is worth exploring.

  3. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Campos, I.; Asín, L.; Torres, T. E.; Marquina, C.; Tres, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Goya, G. F.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2 + ) or negative (COOH - ) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  4. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2+) or negative (COOH-) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  5. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos-Campos, I; AsIn, L; Torres, T E; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Mariano Esquillor s/n, CP 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Marquina, C, E-mail: goya@unizar.es [Condensed Matter Department, Sciences Faculty, University of Zaragoza, 50009 (Spain)

    2011-05-20

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH{sub 2}{sup +}) or negative (COOH{sup -}) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  6. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Anand N; Brant, William O

    2016-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  7. CLINICAL AND BIOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF NEUROGENIC TUMOR AFTER PREOPERATIVE CHEMOTHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jiechun; Dong Kuiran; Jing Baixiang

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To study the significance of preoperative chemotherapy for the treatment of neurogenic tumor in children. Methods: VMA, MYCN gene and DNA content of 21 cases of neuroblastoma treated with preoperative chemotherapy were studied with a control group. Results: Resection rate was 95.5%. Mean survival time was 28.1±10.2 months, which was significantly higher than the control group (8.8±6.8 months, P<0.01).Post chemotherapeutic VMA was lower. DNA index was also reduced and the percentage of cells in G0+G1 phases was elevated. The MYCN expression was suppressed.Conclusion: Preoperative chemotherapy can induce the apoptosis of neurogenic tumor cells and inhibit its proliferative activity.

  8. Surgical management of the neurogenic bladder and bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingin Gerald C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spina bifida and myelodysplasia are associated with neurogenic abnormalities of the bladder and bowel function. All children with myelodysplasia require an evaluation of their urinary tract with ultrasound and urodynamics to confirm normal bladder and kidney function. Patients with anatomical and functional abnormalities require treatment, the mainstay being intermittent catheterization and anticholinergic medication. The treatment goals for patients with a neurogenic bladder are the preservation of the upper urinary tract, bladder and bowel continence, independence, autonomy, and facilitation of self-esteem. A minority of children will not respond to conservative therapy and will ultimately require surgical intervention. This review will discuss the surgical options for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and closure, as well as the methods for the creation of continent catheterizable stomas. The timing, indications, and description for each procedure will be addressed. Finally, the antegrade continence enema procedure will be described for the management of refractory fecal incontinence.

  9. Preventing Kidney Injury in Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Faezeh Javadi Larijani; Mastaneh Moghtaderi; Nilofar Hajizadeh; Farahnak Assadi

    2013-01-01

    The most common cause of neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) in newborn infants is myelomeningocele. The pathophysiology almost always involves the bladder detrusor sphincter dyssynergy (DSD), which if untreated can cause severe and irreversible damage to the upper and lower urinary tracts. Early diagnosis and adequate management of NBD is critical to prevent both renal damage and bladder dysfunction and to reduce chances for the future surgeries. Initial investigation of the affected newbor...

  10. Peripheral tumor and tumor-like neurogenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Evandro [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Aubert, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.aubert@chru-lille.fr [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie-Pathologie, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Wavreille, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.wavreille@chru-lille.fr [Service d’Orthopédie B, Hôpital R Salengro, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Gheno, Ramon; Canella, Clarissa [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Cotten, Anne, E-mail: anne.cotten@chru-lille.fr [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neoplasms of neurogenic origin account for about 12% of all benign and 8% of all malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Traumatic neuroma, Morton neuroma, lipomatosis of a nerve, nerve sheath ganglion, perineurioma, benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are included in this group of pathologies. Clinical and radiologic evaluation of patients with neurogenic tumors and pseudotumors often reveals distinctive features. In this context, advanced imaging techniques, especially ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) play an important role in the characterization of these lesions. Imaging findings such as location of a soft tissue mass in the region of a major nerve, nerve entering or exiting the mass, fusiform shape, abnormalities of the muscle supplied by the nerve, split-fat sign, target sign and fascicular appearance should always evoke a peripheric nerve sheath neoplasm. Although no single imaging finding or combination of findings allows definitive differentiation between benign from malign peripheric neurogenic tumors, both US and MR imaging may show useful features that can lead us to a correct diagnosis and improve patient treatment. Traumatic neuromas and Morton neuromas are commonly associated to an amputation stump or are located in the intermetatarsal space. Lipomatosis of a nerve usually appears as a nerve enlargement, with thickened nerve fascicles, embedded in evenly distributed fat. Nerve sheath ganglion has a cystic appearance and commonly occurs at the level of the knee. Intraneural perineuroma usually affects young people and manifests as a focal and fusiform nerve enlargement. In this article, we review clinical characteristics and radiologic appearances of these neurogenic lesions, observing pathologic correlation, when possible.

  11. In silico Therapeutics for Neurogenic Hypertension and Vasovagal Syncope

    OpenAIRE

    Bojić, Tijana; Perović, Vladimir R.; Glišić, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular diseases (NCVD) are the leading cause of death in the developed world and will remain so till 2020. In these diseases the pathologically changed nervous control of cardiovascular system has the central role. The actual NCV syndromes are neurogenic hypertension, representing the sympathetically mediated disorder, and vasovagal syncope, which is the vagally mediated disorders. Vasovagal syncope, the disease far from its etiological treatment, could benefit from recruiting an...

  12. Peripheral tumor and tumor-like neurogenic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoplasms of neurogenic origin account for about 12% of all benign and 8% of all malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Traumatic neuroma, Morton neuroma, lipomatosis of a nerve, nerve sheath ganglion, perineurioma, benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are included in this group of pathologies. Clinical and radiologic evaluation of patients with neurogenic tumors and pseudotumors often reveals distinctive features. In this context, advanced imaging techniques, especially ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) play an important role in the characterization of these lesions. Imaging findings such as location of a soft tissue mass in the region of a major nerve, nerve entering or exiting the mass, fusiform shape, abnormalities of the muscle supplied by the nerve, split-fat sign, target sign and fascicular appearance should always evoke a peripheric nerve sheath neoplasm. Although no single imaging finding or combination of findings allows definitive differentiation between benign from malign peripheric neurogenic tumors, both US and MR imaging may show useful features that can lead us to a correct diagnosis and improve patient treatment. Traumatic neuromas and Morton neuromas are commonly associated to an amputation stump or are located in the intermetatarsal space. Lipomatosis of a nerve usually appears as a nerve enlargement, with thickened nerve fascicles, embedded in evenly distributed fat. Nerve sheath ganglion has a cystic appearance and commonly occurs at the level of the knee. Intraneural perineuroma usually affects young people and manifests as a focal and fusiform nerve enlargement. In this article, we review clinical characteristics and radiologic appearances of these neurogenic lesions, observing pathologic correlation, when possible

  13. Neurogenic pulmonary edema due to delayed radiation necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic pulmonary edema is oftten missed in the ICU setting as it is mistaken for pneumonia or ARDS. The case presented here illustrates how a high index of suspicion in the appropriate setting can lead to the diagnosis. The patient in this report developed acute-on-chronic cerebral edema due to radiation necrosis following gamma-knife radiation therapy for cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

  14. Neurogenic Inflammation Involves in Systemic Spread of Oral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Haryono Utomo

    2014-01-01

    Focal infection theory proposed in early 1900’s stated that dental infection caused systemic disorders. Nevertheless, the theory was abandoned since large number of teeth were extracted with no satisfying result. Recent reports revealed that oral infections were able to spread systemically. However, there is no rationalization available to explain how assisted drainage therapy (ADT), a periodontal therapy that could relief migraine and asthma within minutes. Oral neurogenic and immunogenic in...

  15. Role of Neurogenic Inflammation in Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis; Karin N Westlund

    2005-01-01

    Pain arising from pancreatic diseases can become chronic and difficult to treat. There is a paucity of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that sensitize neural pathways that transmit noxious information from visceral organs. In this review, neurogenic inflammation is presented as a possible amplifier of the noxious signal from peripheral organs including the pancreas. The nerve pathways that transmit pancreatic pain are also reviewed as a conduit of the amplified signals. It is likely that co...

  16. Circulating and tissue catecholamines in rats with chronic neurogenic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Dominiak, P; Kees, Frieder K.; Grobecker, H

    1986-01-01

    To study the role of peripheral catecholamines in plasma and different tissues in neurogenic hypertension we measured directly blood pressure, maximum rate of left ventricular pressure rise (dp/dtmax) and heart rate through an aortic catheter 5 weeks after total sino-aortic baroreceptor deafferentation in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood samples were collected through the same catheter to determine plasma catecholamine concentrations. Blood pressure and dp/dtmax were significantly higher in ne...

  17. The role of botulinum toxin A in treating neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Weckx, Filip; Tutolo, Manuela; De Ridder, Dirk; Van der Aa, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can result in lower and upper urinary tract complications and eventually even in end-stage kidney failure. Since the driving force of this clinical cascade is high bladder pressure, controlling intravesical pressure in NDO patients improves both quality of life and life-expectancy in these patients. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) has proven its efficacy in reducing intravesical pressure and in reducing incontinence episodes. BTX-A also improves quality of lif...

  18. Neurogenic Tumors of the Mediastinum: A Report of 60 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Topçu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze retrospectively 60 patients (13 infants and children, 47 adults - 21 men and 39 women with mediastinal neurogenic tumours admitted to Atatürk Centre for Chest Disease and Chest Surgery, Ankara, Turkey between 1988 and 1999. This comprised 21.2% of 283 patients who had surgical operations for all mediastinal masses during the same period.

  19. Imaging diagnosis of neurogenic tumors of the brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyse the imaging characteristics of neurogenic tumors in the brachial plexus, six cases of neurogenic tumors of the brachial plexus were reported pathologically proved as schwannoma in 4 and neurofibroma in 2 cases. The plain films demonstrated the mass at the apex of lung in 3 cases, enlargement of cervical intervertebral foremen in 1. CT scan revealed that the average diameter of the masses was 4 cm, with spindle shape in 4, dumb-bell shape in 2 cases. The averaged CT value was similar to that of muscle on plain scan. The density of the tumor was higher than that of muscle and lower than that of vessels after contrast enhancement. On MRI T1W image, the masses were all hyperintense. Three schwannoma presented high signal intensity similar to CSF. The lesion demonstrated moderate enhancement after contrast administration in 1 case. Based on the location of the mass and its imaging features, diagnosis of neurogenic tumor of the brachial plexus could possibly be established before operation. MRI imaging is the imaging modality of choice in displaying the anatomy and the lesion of brachial plexus

  20. In silico Therapeutics for Neurogenic Hypertension and Vasovagal Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojić, Tijana; Perović, Vladimir R; Glišić, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular diseases (NCVD) are the leading cause of death in the developed world and will remain so till 2020. In these diseases the pathologically changed nervous control of cardiovascular system has the central role. The actual NCV syndromes are neurogenic hypertension, representing the sympathetically mediated disorder, and vasovagal syncope, which is the vagally mediated disorders. Vasovagal syncope, the disease far from its etiological treatment, could benefit from recruiting and application of antimuscarinic drugs used in other parasympathetic disorders. The informational spectrum method (ISM), a method widely applied for the characterization of protein-protein interactions in the field of immunology, endocrinology and anti HIV drug discovery, was applied for the first time in the analysis of neurogenic hypertension and vasovagal syncope therapeutic targets. In silico analysis revealed the potential involvement of apelin in neurogenic hypertension. Applying the EIIP/ISM bioinformatics concept in investigation of drugs for treatment of vasovagal syncope suggests that 78% of tested antimuscarinic drugs could have anti vasovagal syncope effect. The presented results confirm that ISM is a promissing method for investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying pathophysiological proceses of NCV syndromes and discovery of therapeutics targets for their treatment. PMID:26834545

  1. Neurogenic Niche Microglia Undergo Positional Remodeling and Progressive Activation Contributing to Age-Associated Reductions in Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Fonseca, Rene; Mahesula, Swetha; Apple, Deana M; Raghunathan, Rekha; Dugan, Allison; Cardona, Astrid; O'Connor, Jason; Kokovay, Erzsebet

    2016-04-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) exist throughout life in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the mammalian forebrain. During aging NSC function is diminished through an unclear mechanism. In this study, we establish microglia, the immune cells of the brain, as integral niche cells within the V-SVZ that undergo age-associated repositioning in the V-SVZ. Microglia become activated early before NSC deficits during aging resulting in an antineurogenic microenvironment due to increased inflammatory cytokine secretion. These age-associated changes were not observed in non-neurogenic brain regions, suggesting V-SVZ microglia are specialized. Using a sustained inflammatory model in young adult mice, we induced microglia activation and inflammation that was accompanied by reduced NSC proliferation in the V-SVZ. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed secreted factors from activated microglia reduced proliferation and neuron production compared to secreted factors from resting microglia. Our results suggest that age-associated chronic inflammation contributes to declines in NSC function within the aging neurogenic niche. PMID:26857912

  2. Effects of electrotherapy in treatment of neurogenic bladder in children with occult spinal dysraphism

    OpenAIRE

    Ćirović Dragana; Petronić Ivana; Nikolić Dejan; Brdar Radivoj; Pavićević Polina; Knežević Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Neurogenic bladder can develop as a result of various degrees of neurogenic lesion in spina bifida. The degree of bladder dysfunction depends on the level and type of spina bifida. Due to results upon complete diagnostic protocols, treatment options are applied. Objective Comparison of therapy results of patients with occult spinal dysraphism with neurogenic bladder that under-went medicamentous therapy and medicamentous with electrotherapy treatment. Methods We had 49 patients w...

  3. Neurogenic vision loss: Causes and outcome. An experience from a tertiary center in Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vision loss can be a consequence of numerous disorders of eye and neural pathway conveying visual input to brain. A variety of conditions can affect visual pathway producing neurogenic vision loss. The presentation and course of vision loss depends on the site of involvement and underlying etiology. We conducted this unprecedented study to evaluate the characteristics and outcome of various diseases of the visual pathway. Materials and Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 64 patients with neurogenic visual impairment. Ophthalmological causes were excluded in all of them. Their presentation, ophthalmological characteristics and investigation findings were recorded. These patients were followed up till 6 months. Results: Out of 69 patients evaluated, 5 were excluded as they had ophthalmological abnormalities. The remaining 64 cases (113 eyes were enrolled. 54 cases were due to diseases of anterior visual pathway and rest 10 had cortical vision loss. The etiologic distribution is as follows: Isolated optic neuritis- 12 (19%, multiple sclerosis- 4 (6.3%, neuromyelitis optica- 5 (7.9%, tubercular meningitis- 15 (23.8%, non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, ischemic optic neuropathy complicating cavernous sinus thrombosis, cryptococcal meningitis, malignant infiltration of optic nerve, Crouzon′s syndrome, calvarial thickening and traumatic occipital gliosis- 1 (1.6% case each, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pituitary adenoma, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy- 3 (4.8% cases each, cortical venous thrombosis 5 (7.9%, subacute scleroing panencephalitis- 4 (6.3% cases. Conclusions: The diseases of anterior visual pathway were much more common than cortical vision loss. A majority of our patients had severe impairment of vision at presentation.

  4. Neurogenic and neuroendocrine effects of goldfish pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Rees, Christopher Benjamin; Bryan, Mara Beth; Li, Weiming

    2008-12-31

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) use reproductive hormones as endocrine signals to synchronize sexual behavior with gamete maturation and as exogenous signals (pheromones) to mediate spawning interactions between conspecifics. We examined the differential effects of two hormonal pheromones, prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and 17alpha,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta-P) on neurogenesis, neurotransmission, and neuronal activities, and on plasma androstenedione (AD) levels. Exposure to waterborne PGF(2alpha) induced a multitude of changes in male goldfish brain. Histological examination indicated an increase in the number of dividing cells in male diencephalon (p GnRH) in the male telencephalon and cerebellum (p chicken-II GnRH) in the female cerebellum (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA). PGF(2alpha) and 17,20beta-P thereby seemed to act through distinct pathways to elicit different responses in the neuroendocrine system. This is the first finding that links a specific pheromone molecule (PGF(2alpha)) to neurogenesis in a vertebrate animal. PMID:19118184

  5. Evaluation of the contribution of multiple DAMPs and DAMP receptors in cell death-induced sterile inflammatory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kataoka

    Full Text Available When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3, ATP (and its receptor P2X7, antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e, and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2. We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models.

  6. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)-the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality-is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  7. Clinical and Treatment Features of Orbital Neurogenic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Bingöl Kızıltunç

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and treatment features of orbital neurogenic tumors. Material and Method: The records of 35 patients with orbital neurogenic tumors who were diagnosed and treated at Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, between 1998 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Orbitotomy via a cutaneous approach was performed in 21 (60% cases and orbitotomy via a transconjunctival approach was performed in 7 (20% cases. Three (8% cases had been operated at different centers. Four (12% cases were diagnosed clinically. Total excisional biopsy was performed in 11 (31.4% cases, subtotal excisional biopsy was performed in 7 (20%, and incisional biopsy was performed in 10 (28.6% cases. 14 (40% 35 cases were diagnosed as meningioma, 12 (34% as peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and 9 (26% cases were diagnosed as optic nerve glioma. Six (43% meningioma cases were optic nerve sheath meningioma, 5 (36% were sphenoid wing meningioma, 2 (14% were ectopic meningioma, and 1 (7% was perisellar meningioma. Six (50% of peripheral nerve sheath tumors were schwannoma, 2 (16% were solitary neurofibroma, 4 (34% were plexiform neurofibroma. External beam radiotherapy was performed in 15 (42.8% cases, cyberknife radiosurgery in 1 (2.8% , chemotherapy in 1 (2.8%, and enucleation ( because of neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage was performed in 1 (2.8% case. Discussion: The most common orbital neurogenic tumors are meningioma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and optic nerve glioma. For meningioma and glioma, external beam radiotherapy is required; for schwannoma and solitary neurofibroma, total excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment. The success of visual and anatomic results are high after treatment. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 335-9

  8. Renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Previdi Olandoski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Preservation of renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder is an important goal of treatment for the disease. This study analyzed the evolution of renal function in patients with congenital neurogenic bladder. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 58 pediatric patients with respect to the following attributes: gender, age, etiology of neurogenic bladder, reason for referral, medical/surgical management, episodes of treated urinary tract infections, urodynamics, DMSA scintigraphy, weight, height, blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis. Statistical analysis was performed, adopting the 5% significance level. RESULTS: The mean age at presentation was 4.2 ± 3.5 years. Myelomeningocele was the most frequent etiology (71.4%. Recurrent urinary tract infection was the reason for referral in 82.8% of the patients. Recurrent urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 84.5% of the patients initially; 83.7% of those patients experienced improvement during follow-up. The initial mean glomerular filtration rate was 146.7 ± 70.1 mL/1.73 m²/min, and the final mean was 193.6 ± 93.6 mL/1.73 m²/min, p = 0.0004. Microalbuminuria was diagnosed in 54.1% of the patients initially and in 69% in the final evaluation. Metabolic acidosis was present in 19% of the patients initially and in 32.8% in the final assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Patient referral to a pediatric nephrologist was late. A reduction in the number of urinary tract infections was observed with adequate treatment, but microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis occurred frequently despite adequate management.

  9. Posterior mediastinal hemangioma mimicking neurogenic tumor: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Han Byeoul; Park, Jong Chun [Dept. of Radiology, Daegu Catholic University Medical Center, Catholic University of Daegu College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Mediastinal hemangioma is a benign vascular tumor and is located most frequently in the anterior mediastinum. Computed tomography showed a well-marginated central enhancing mass with extension into the adjacent foramen. The mass was relatively hyperintense to the skeletal muscle on T2-weighted image and on fat-saturated T1-weighted image with gadolinium enhancement. The tumor was confirmed to be a cavernous hemangioma by pathologic examination after surgery. The authors recently experienced a cavernous hemangioma in the posterior mediastinum. Thus, we report a case of a posterior mediastinal mass which was difficult to differentiate from a neurogenic tumor.

  10. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking. PMID:27156505

  11. Adult neurogenesis in the short-lived teleost Nothobranchius furzeri: localization of neurogenic niches, molecular characterization and effects of aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Eva Terzibasi; Baumgart, Mario; Battistoni, Giorgia; Cellerino, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We studied adult neurogenesis in the short-lived annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri and quantified the effects of aging on the mitotic activity of the neuronal progenitors and the expression of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) in the radial glia. The distribution of neurogenic niches is substantially similar to that of zebrafish and adult stem cells generate neurons, which persist in the adult brain. As opposed to zebrafish, however, the N. furzeri genome contains a doublecortin (DCX) gene. Doublecortin is transiently expressed by newly generated neurons in the telencephalon and optic tectum (OT). We also analyzed the expression of the microRNA miR-9 and miR-124 and found that they have complementary expression domains: miR-9 is expressed in the neurogenic niches of the telencephalon and the radial glia of the OT, while miR-124 is expressed in differentiated neurons. The main finding of this paper is the demonstration of an age-dependent decay in adult neurogenesis. Using unbiased stereological estimates of cell numbers, we detected an almost fivefold decrease in the number of mitotically active cells in the OT between young and old age. This reduced mitotic activity is paralleled by a reduction in DCX labeling. Finally, we detected a dramatic up-regulation of GFAP in the radial glia of the aged brain. This up-regulation is not paralleled by a similar up-regulation of S100B and Musashi-1, two other markers of the radial glia. In summary, the brain of N. furzeri replicates two typical hallmarks of mammalian aging: gliosis and reduced adult neurogenesis. PMID:22171971

  12. Brain-lung crosstalk: Implications for neurocritical care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mrozek, Ségolène; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Major pulmonary disorders may occur after brain injuries as ventilator-associated pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome or neurogenic pulmonary edema. They are key points for the management of brain-injured patients because respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation seem to be a risk factor for increased mortality, poor neurological outcome and longer intensive care unit or hospital length of stay. Brain and lung strongly interact via complex pathways from the brain to the lung b...

  13. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuhal Ozisler; Kurtulus Koklu; Sumru Ozel; Sibel Unsal-Delialioglu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efifcacy of bowel program on gas-trointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-ifve spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysrelfexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral med-ication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identiifed in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were signiifcantly decreased and constipation, dififcult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were signiifcantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  14. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Ozisler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80% of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55 and incontinence (42%, 23/55 were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55 and after (73%, 40/55 bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury.

  15. Bibliometric profile of neurogenic bladder in the literature: a 20-year bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder is a dysfunction of the lower urinary tract caused by nervous system disorder. We investigated the trends in publication of articles under the topic "neurogenic bladder" using bibliometric analysis. Articles on neurogenic bladder, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the ISI Web of Science citation database. We analyzed the search results for authors, countries, institutions, journals, and top-cited papers. A total of 1,904 articles were retrieved. There was a small increase in the number of articles on neurogenic bladder from 1995 (n = 43 to 2014 (n = 117. The USA was the leading country in the total number of articles (n = 598. However, the number of publications from China has rapidly increased, and China was ranked second in 2014. Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler (n = 65 was the most productive author, and University of Paris VI (Paris 6 (n = 61 was the most productive institution. The Journal of Urology published the greatest number of articles on this topic (n = 285. Articles on neurogenic bladder were often published in a professional journal under the category Urology & Nephrology, Neurosciences & Neurology, or Rehabilitation. Visualization analysis based on co-citation networks was conducted using CiteSpace III. Visualization analysis revealed that the hot spots in neurogenic bladder were botulinum toxin-A, prazosin, bethanechol, and afferent pathways. These findings provide new insight into the publication trends and hot spots in neurogenic bladder.

  16. [Posttraumatic stress disorder in patients with neurogenic amnesia for the traumatic event].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoll, K; Kunert, H J; Sass, H

    2000-10-01

    The development of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with neurogenic amnesia for the traumatic event is recorded in 2 own patients and in 19 cases from the clinical literature. With a single exception, all patients were accident victims with closed head injuries. Only about three quarters of the patients completely fulfilled DSM-III-R criteria of PTSD. Nineteen patients displayed involuntary conscious memories of aspects of the traumatic event (presenting as recurrent intrusive thoughts, images or dreams) co-existent with a complete or partial lack of voluntary conscious memories of the trauma, suggesting that different memory systems and distinct brain mechanisms subserve these phenomena. The said clinical observations are discussed against the background of current neuropsychological models of multiple memory systems. The recorded cases demonstrate that declarative episodic memory is not necessary for symptoms of PTSD to emerge, whereas preserved functions of non-declarative memory systems represent a sufficient condition for the development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:11103682

  17. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

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    Alejandro Luarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future.

  18. CIT, a gene involved in neurogenic cytokinesis, is mutated in human primary microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Sulman; Al-Harbi, Khalid M; Alhijji, Sabri A M; Albalawi, Alia M; Alharby, Essa; Eldardear, Amr; Samman, Mohammed I

    2016-10-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a static neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by congenital small head circumference and non-progressive intellectual disability without additional severe brain malformations. MCPH is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Sixteen genes (MCPH1-MCPH16) have been discovered so far, mutations thereof lead to autosomal recessive primary microcephaly. In a family, segregating MCPH in an autosomal recessive manner, genome-wide homozygosity mapping mapped a disease locus to 16.9-Mb region on chromosome 12q24.11-q24.32. Following this, exome sequencing in three affected individuals of the family discovered a splice site variant (c.753+3A>T) in citron kinase (CIT) gene, segregating with the disorder in the family. CIT co-localizes to the midbody ring during cytokinesis, and its loss of expression results in defects in neurogenic cytokinesis in both humans and mice. Splice site variant in CIT, identified in this study, is predicted to abolish splice donor site. cDNA sequence of an affected individual showed retention of an intron next to the splice donor site. The study, presented here, revealed the first variant in the CIT causing MCPH in the family. PMID:27519304

  19. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future. PMID:27195011

  20. Discriminating neurogenic from myopathic disease via measurement of muscle anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmirian, Lindsay P; Chin, Anne B; Rutkove, Seward B

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is electrically anisotropic, with a tendency for applied electrical current to flow more readily along muscle fibers than across them. In this study, we assessed a method for non-invasive measurement of anisotropy to determine its potential to serve as a new technique for distinguishing neurogenic from myopathic disease. Measurements were made on the biceps brachii and tibialis anterior muscles in 15 normal subjects and 12 patients with neuromuscular disease (6 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 6 with various myopathies) using 50 kHZ applied current. Consistent multi-angle anisotropic patterns were found for reactance and phase in both muscles in normal subjects. Normalized anisotropy differences for each subject were defined, and group average values identified. The amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients demonstrated increased and distorted anisotropy patterns, whereas myopathic patients demonstrated normal or reduced anisotropy. These results suggest that non-invasive measurement of muscle anisotropy has potential for diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:19058193

  1. Lumbosacral perineural cysts as a cause for neurogenic muscular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoiridis, G; Wöhrle, J; Heye, N; Przuntek, H

    1997-08-01

    We report the case of a 40 year-old man with a severe lesion of the anterior rami of the left spinal nerves L5 and S1 who showed hypertrophy of the leg and atrophy of the intrinsic foot and gluteal muscles. In the biopsy of the hypertrophied gastrocnemius muscle, perivascular inflammatory infiltrates were observed, apart from atrophied and hypertrophied muscle fibres. Electromyography revealed no pathologic spontaneous activity but chronic neurogenic changes. The precise site of the lesion was predicted by electrophysiologic investigations. The lesion was caused by two perineural cysts in the region of the upper sacral plexus, as demonstrated by MRI and CT of the small pelvis and confirmed at operation. Three years earlier, when almost only L5 muscles were affected, an intervertebral disc prolapse L5/S1 had been suspected on myelography and CT but could not have been confirmed at operation. PMID:9298339

  2. Atropine may prevent the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2009), s. 42-44. ISSN 0306-9877 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/06/1246; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; EC FP6 RESCUE(FR) LSHB-CT-2005-518233; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0021620803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : central nervous system * neurogenic pulmonary edema Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.393, year: 2009

  3. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique. The sacrum was osteoporosis, and this fracture may be based on osteoporosis. We performed laminectomy to decompress sacral nerve roots. One month after surgery, the patient was able to urinate. Three months after surgery, his bladder function recovered normally. One year after surgery, he returned to a normal daily life and had no complaints regarding urination. One-year postoperative CT showed the decompressed third sacrum without displacement.

  4. Neurogenic Inflammation Involves in Systemic Spread of Oral Infection

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    Haryono Utomo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Focal infection theory proposed in early 1900’s stated that dental infection caused systemic disorders. Nevertheless, the theory was abandoned since large number of teeth were extracted with no satisfying result. Recent reports revealed that oral infections were able to spread systemically. However, there is no rationalization available to explain how assisted drainage therapy (ADT, a periodontal therapy that could relief migraine and asthma within minutes. Oral neurogenic and immunogenic inflammation interaction involving pro-inflammatory markers such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, TNF-α; and antiinflammatory vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP was still under investigation. Objective: To verify the spread of oral inflammation to distant organ after performing ADT by analysing CGRP, VIP and TNF-α expressions. Methods: Two different concentration of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS1435/1450 was injected intragingivally into two groups of 12 Wistar rats. After four days, 12 rats were given ADT and all samples were subsequently sacrificed 40 mins after ADT. Immunohistochemistry analysis using CGRP, VIP and TNF-α on the nasal and bronchus tissue was performed. ANOVA was used for statistical analyisis of the difference between CGRP, VIP and TNF-α expression between experimental groups. Results: PgLPS injections slightly increased CGRP, VIP and TNF-α expressions in the control group. Rats undergone ADT had lower CGRP and TNF-α but higher VIP expressions. Conclusion: Neurogenic inflammation involved in systemic spread of oral infection. ADT was able to downregulate inflammation in distant organ posibly by stimulating VIP.

  5. Differential regulation of cell proliferation in neurogenic zones in mice lacking cystine transport by xCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) supplies intracellular cyst(e)ine for the production of glutathione, a major cellular anti-oxidant. xCT is enriched in brain regions associated with neurogenesis. Previous studies have shown that the malfunction of this protein greatly attenuates cell proliferation in vitro and is associated with brain atrophy in vivo. Using mice that are homozygous for a function-blocking deletion in xCT (Sut mice), we examined in vivo the role of xCT in cell proliferation in neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and denate gyrus (DG) in the adult brain. Our results indicate that a high level of cellular proliferation in the adult brain persists even in the absence of functional xCT. Furthermore, in both young adult and middle-aged mice (3 and 11 months old), rates of SVZ cell proliferation were comparable between Sut and wild-type controls, although there was trend towards reduced proliferation in Sut mice (12% and 9% reduction, respectively). To our surprise, rates of cell proliferation in the DG were elevated in both 3- and 11-month-old Sut mice relative to controls (22% and 28% increase, respectively). These results demonstrate that xCT expression plays a role in regulating cellular proliferation in the DG, but not the SVZ of adult mice. Furthermore, unlike previous in vitro studies, our in vivo observations clearly indicate that xCT is not essential for ongoing cellular proliferation

  6. Respiratory mechanics in brain injury: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Katsiari, Maria; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Daganou, Maria; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G.; Rovina, Nikoletta

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that lung injury occurs shortly after brain damage. The responsible mechanisms involve neurogenic pulmonary edema, inflammation, the harmful action of neurotransmitters, or autonomic system dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation, an essential component of life support in brain-damaged patients (BD), may be an additional traumatic factor to the already injured or susceptible to injury lungs of these patients thus worsening lung injury, in case ...

  7. Minocycline treatment ameliorates interferon-alpha-induced neurogenic defects and depression-like behaviors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Shun eZheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-alpha (IFN-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that is widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis and malignancy, because of its immune-activating, antiviral, and antiproliferative properties. However, long-term IFN-α treatment frequently causes depression, which limits its clinical utility. The precise molecular and cellular mechanisms of IFN-α-induced depression are not currently understood. Neural stem cells (NSCs in the hippocampus continuously generate new neurons, and some evidence suggests that decreased neurogenesis plays a role in the neuropathology of depression. We previously reported that IFN-α treatment suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis and induced depression-like behaviors via its receptors in the brain in adult mice. However, it is unclear how systemic IFN-α administration induces IFN-α signaling in the hippocampus. In this study, we analyzed the role of microglia, immune cells in the brain, in mediating the IFN-α-induced neurogenic defects and depressive behaviors. In vitro studies demonstrated that IFN-α treatment induced the secretion of endogenous IFN-α from microglia, which suppressed NSC proliferation. In vivo treatment of adult mice with IFN-α for five weeks increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IFN-α, and reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Both effects were prevented by simultaneous treatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation. Furthermore, minocycline treatment significantly suppressed IFN-α-induced depressive behaviors in mice. These results suggest that microglial activation plays a critical role in the development of IFN-α-induced depression, and that minocycline is a promising drug for the treatment of IFN-α-induced depression in patients, especially those who are low responders to conventional antidepressant treatments.

  8. Ruptured spinal arteriovenous malformation: Presenting as stunned myocardium and neurogenic shock

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    Tasneem H Mehesry

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Spinal AVM rupture can present as neurogenic shock, stunned myocardium, and pulmonary edema. Early recognition of AVM rupture and prompt surgical intervention, as well as aggressive treatment of shock, may enhance recovery and decrease the long-term morbidity.

  9. Neurogenic overactive bladder in spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis: role of onabotulinumtoxinA

    OpenAIRE

    Ethans, Karen

    2014-01-01

    KD Ethans,1,2 AR Casey,1,2 RJ Bard,1,3 MP Namaka1 1University of Manitoba, 2Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Health Sciences Centre, 3Section of Urology, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Abstract: People with neurogenic overactive bladder from either multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury often suffer significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. Here we review the pathophysiology of neurogenic overactive bladder and the impact it can have on people...

  10. A Case of Hypokalemic Paralysis in a Patient With Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Frederic N.; Kar, Jitesh K.; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after dev...

  11. Drinking to near death--acute water intoxication leading to neurogenic stunned myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losonczy, Lia I; Lovallo, Emily; Schnorr, C Daniel; Mantuani, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a rare disease entity that has been typically described as a consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and, less commonly, seizures. Here we describe a case of a healthy young woman who drank excessive free water causing acute hyponatremia complicated by cerebral edema and seizure, leading to cardiogenic shock from neurogenic stunned myocardium. Two days later, she had complete return of her normal cardiac function. PMID:26238098

  12. Cell death induced on cell cultures and nude mouse skin by non-thermal, nanosecond-pulsed generated plasma.

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    Arnaud Duval

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. Non-thermal plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm(2 for the epidermis, 281 J/cm(2 for the dermis, and 394 J/cm(2 for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions.

  13. Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Resveratrol Is Partially Mediated by the Autophagy Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

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    Fangfang Lang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (trans-3,4,5'-trihydroxystilbene is an active compound in food, such as red grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol exhibits an anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. However, the mechanism of resveratrol-induced anti-cancer effect at the molecular level remains to be elucidated. In this study, the mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and Caov-3 was investigated using various molecular biology techniques, such as flow cytometry, western blotting, and RNA interference, with a major focus on the potential role of autophagy in resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. We demonstrated that resveratrol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, which triggers autophagy and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol induced ATG5 expression and promoted LC3 cleavage. The apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol was attenuated by both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which functions at the late stage of autophagy, significantly reduced resveratrol-induced cell death and caspase 3 activity in human ovarian cancer cells. We also demonstrated that targeting ATG5 by siRNA also suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, we concluded that a common pathway between autophagy and apoptosis exists in resveratrol-induced cell death in OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells.

  14. Effects of electrotherapy in treatment of neurogenic bladder in children with occult spinal dysraphism

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    Ćirović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurogenic bladder can develop as a result of various degrees of neurogenic lesion in spina bifida. The degree of bladder dysfunction depends on the level and type of spina bifida. Due to results upon complete diagnostic protocols, treatment options are applied. Objective Comparison of therapy results of patients with occult spinal dysraphism with neurogenic bladder that under-went medicamentous therapy and medicamentous with electrotherapy treatment. Methods We had 49 patients with neurogenic bladder that were treated at the University Children's Hospital in Belgrade in the period 2003-2008. The first group of children received medicamentous therapy and the second group received medicamentous therapy with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. In both groups we evaluated 4 symptoms: daily enuresis, enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency and 4 urodynamic parameters: lower bladder capacity, unstable contractions and residual urine and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia. Follow-up urodynamic evaluation was done after 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results Our findings pointed out a high statistical significance of improvement in all evaluated urodynamic parameters of neurogenic bladder (predominantly in bladder capacity in the group of children with combined therapy as well in resolution of symptoms (predominantly enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency. Conclusion Combined therapy is more efficient in treatment of children with neurogenic bladder. Electrotherapy is non-invasive, easily applicable and has had a significant place in treatment of children with dysfunctional voiding.

  15. Synostosis Between Pubic Bones due to Neurogenic, Heterotopic Ossification

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    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic, heterotopic ossification is characterised by the formation of new, extraosseous (ectopic bone in soft tissue in patients with neurological disorders. A 33-year-old female, who was born with spina bifida, paraplegia, and diastasis of symphysis pubis, had indwelling urethral catheter drainage and was using oxybutynin bladder instillations. She was prescribed diuretic for swelling of feet, which aggravated bypassing of catheter. Hence, suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Despite anticholinergic therapy, there was chronic urine leak around the suprapubic catheter and per urethra. Therefore, the urethra was mobilised and closed. After closure of the urethra, there was no urine leak from the urethra, but urine leak persisted around the suprapubic catheter. Cystogram confirmed the presence of a Foley balloon inside the bladder; there was no urinary fistula. The Foley balloon ruptured frequently, leading to extrusion of the Foley catheter. X-ray of abdomen showed heterotopic bone formation bridging the gap across diastasis of symphysis pubis. CT of pelvis revealed heterotopic bone lying in close proximity to the balloon of the Foley catheter; the sharp edge of heterotopic bone probably acted like a saw and led to frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter. Unique features of this case are: (1 temporal relationship of heterotopic bone formation to suprapubic cystostomy and chronic urine leak; (2 occurrence of heterotopic ossification in pubic region; (3 complications of heterotopic bone formation viz. frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter by the irregular margin of heterotopic bone and difficulty in insertion of suprapubic catheter because the heterotopic bone encroached on the suprapubic track; (4 synostosis between pubic bones as a result of heterotopic ossification..Common aetiological factors for neurogenic, heterotopic ossification, such as forceful manipulation, trauma, or spasticity, were absent in this

  16. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Klempin

    Full Text Available The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise, also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  17. Preventing kidney injury in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Faezeh Javadi; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Hajizadeh, Nilofar; Assadi, Farahnak

    2013-12-01

    The most common cause of neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) in newborn infants is myelomeningocele. The pathophysiology almost always involves the bladder detrusor sphincter dyssynergy (DSD), which if untreated can cause severe and irreversible damage to the upper and lower urinary tracts. Early diagnosis and adequate management of NBD is critical to prevent both renal damage and bladder dysfunction and to reduce chances for the future surgeries. Initial investigation of the affected newborn infant includes a renal and bladder ultrasound, measurement of urine residual, determination of serum creatinine level, and urodynamics study. Voiding cystogram is indicated when either hydronephrosis or DSD is present. The main goal of treatment is prevention of urinary tract deterioration and achievement of continuance at an appropriate age. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) in combination with anticholinergic (oxybutynin) and antibiotics are instituted in those with high filling and voiding pressures, DSD and/or high grade reflux immediately after the myelomeningocele is repaired. Botulium toxin-A injection into detrusor is a safe alternative in patients with insufficient response or significant side effects to anticholinergic (oral or intravesical instillation) therapy. Surgery is an effective alternative in patients with persistent detrusor hyperactivity and/or dyssynergic detrusor sphincter despites of the CIC and maximum dosage of anticholinergic therapy. Children with NBD require care from a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of pediatricians, neurosurgeon, urologist, nephrologists, orthopedic surgeon, and other allied medical specialists. PMID:24498490

  18. Preventing kidney injury in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Javadi Larijani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD in newborn infants is myelomeningocele. The pathophysiology almost always involves the bladder detrusor sphincter dyssynergy (DSD, which if untreated can cause severe and irreversible damage to the upper and lower urinary tracts. Early diagnosis and adequate management of NBD is critical to prevent both renal damage and bladder dysfunction and to reduce chances for the future surgeries. Initial investigation of the affected newborn infant includes a renal and bladder ultrasound, measurement of urine residual, determination of serum creatinine level, and urodynamics study. Voiding cystogram is indicated when either hydronephrosis or DSD is present. The main goal of treatment is prevention of urinary tract deterioration and achievement of continuance at an appropriate age. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC in combination with anticholinergic (oxybutynin and antibiotics are instituted in those with high filling and voiding pressures, DSD and/or high grade reflux immediately after the myelomeningocele is repaired. Botulium toxin-A injection into detrusor is a safe alternative in patients with insufficient response or significant side effects to anticholinergic (oral or intravesical instillation therapy. Surgery is an effective alternative in patients with persistent detrusor hyperactivity and/or dyssynergic detrusor sphincter despites of the CIC and maximum dosage of anticholinergic therapy. Children with NBD require care from a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of pediatricians, neurosurgeon, urologist, nephrologists, orthopedic surgeon, and other allied medical specialists.

  19. Thoraco-retroperitoneal neurogenic tumors. Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E. Roată

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneal and posterior thoracic neurogenic tumors are rare tumors and may have different origins: ganglion cell (ganglioneuromas, ganglioneuroblastomas, neuroblastomas, paraganglionic system (paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas and nerve sheath (schwannomas, neurofibromas, malignant nerve sheath tumors. Nerve sheath tumors are mostly benign tumors. These tumors usually present late and cause symptoms or become palpable once they have reached a significant size. Good quality cross-sectional imaging is necessary to evaluate these types of tumors and the diagnosis may be suggested by the imaging appearance of the lesion, including its location, shape, and internal structure. Distinguish between benign and malignant tumors is difficult to make preoperatively unless distant metastases are present. A core needle biopsy may be helpful but tumor location and its frequently encountered close relations with vascular structures preclude it. Surgery remains the mainstay of curative therapy for these tumors. We present two cases, a retroperitoneal benign schwannoma and a posterior thoracic malignant nerve sheath tumor with retroperitoneal extension, which were successfully resected through an abdominal approach and phrenotomy. Preoperative imaging, surgical approach and intraoperative strategy are emphasized

  20. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification : a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in neurorehabilitation.

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    Taly A

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic ossification (HO is an important cause of restriction in range of movements and secondary motor disability following neurotrauma, orthopaedic interventions and burns. It has not received focussed attention in non-traumatic neurological disorders. In a prospective study of 377 patients, on medical problems in neurological rehabilitation setting, 15 subjects (3.97% had neurogenic heterotopic ossification. Their clinical diagnosis was: transverse myelitis (7, neurotuberculosis (4, traumatic myelopathy (2 and stroke (2. Hip (10, knee (4 and elbow joints (1 were involved. The risk factors included urinary tract infection (15, spasticity (6, pressure sores (13 and deep venous thrombosis (DVT (6. The initial diagnosis was often other than HO and included DVT (3, haematoma (2 and arthritis (2. ESR and serum alkaline phosphatase levels were elevated in all but one subject. The diagnosis of HO was established using X-rays, CT Scan and three-phase bone scan. Following treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the range of motion improved in only four patients. HO resulted in significant loss of therapy time during rehabilitation. High index of suspicion about this complication is necessary for early diagnosis and prompt intervention.

  1. The role of botulinum toxin A in treating neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckx, Filip; Tutolo, Manuela; De Ridder, Dirk; Van der Aa, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can result in lower and upper urinary tract complications and eventually even in end-stage kidney failure. Since the driving force of this clinical cascade is high bladder pressure, controlling intravesical pressure in NDO patients improves both quality of life and life-expectancy in these patients. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) has proven its efficacy in reducing intravesical pressure and in reducing incontinence episodes. BTX-A also improves quality of life in patients with NDO. Both onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®), Allergan, Irvine, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®), Ipsen, Paris, France) have a level A recommendation for NDO-treatment. The recommended dose for intradetrusor injections in NDO patients is 200 U of onabotulinumtoxinA or 500 U of abobotulinumtoxinA. The drug is generally administered extratrigonal in the detrusor muscle, via cystoscopic guided injection at 20 sites in 1 mL injections. Intradetrusor BTX-A injections are safe, with mostly local complications such as urinary tract infection and high post-void residual or retention. The effect of the toxin lasts for approximately 9 months. Repeat injections can be performed without loss of efficacy. Different injection techniques, novel ways of BTX-A administration, eliminating the need for injection or new BTX-A types with better/longer response rates could change the field in the future. PMID:26904413

  2. Hepatitis C virus-induced degradation of cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B leads to hepatic lipid dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Emily M.; Alsagheir, Ali; Wu, Xianfang; Hammack, Christy; McLauchlan, John; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Wakita, Takaji; Kneteman, Norman M; Douglas, Donna N.; Tang, Hengli

    2016-01-01

    Chronically infected hepatitis C individuals commonly exhibit hepatic intracellular lipid accumulation, termed steatosis. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection perturbs host lipid metabolism through both cellular and viral-induced mechanisms, with the viral core protein playing an important role in steatosis development. We have recently identified a liver protein, the cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB), as a HCV entry host dependence factor that is downregulated by HCV infection in...

  3. Inosine Improves Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity following Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Yeun Goo Chung

    Full Text Available Neurogenic detrusor overactivity and the associated loss of bladder control are among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI. Anticholinergic agents are the mainstay for medical treatment of detrusor overactivity. However, their use is limited by significant side effects such that a search for new treatments is warranted. Inosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside with neuroprotective, neurotrophic and antioxidant effects that is known to improve motor function in preclinical models of SCI. However, its effect on lower urinary tract function has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of systemic administration of inosine on voiding function following SCI and to delineate potential mechanisms of action. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection, or cord compression by application of an aneurysm clip at T8 for 30 sec. Inosine (225 mg/kg or vehicle was administered daily via intraperitoneal injection either immediately after injury or after a delay of 8 wk. At the end of treatment, voiding behavior was assessed by cystometry. Levels of synaptophysin (SYP, neurofilament 200 (NF200 and TRPV1 in bladder tissues were measured by immunofluorescence imaging. Inosine administration decreased overactivity in both SCI models, with a significant decrease in the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions during filling, compared to vehicle-treated SCI rats (p<0.05, including under conditions of delayed treatment. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated increased levels of the pan-neuronal marker SYP and the Adelta fiber marker NF200, but decreased staining for the C-fiber marker, TRPV1 in bladder tissues from inosine-treated rats compared to those from vehicle-treated animals, including after delayed treatment. These findings demonstrate that inosine prevents the development of detrusor overactivity and attenuates existing overactivity following SCI, and may

  4. Reawakening the sleeping beauty in the adult brain: neurogenesis from parenchymal glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Sophie; Berninger, Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Life-long neurogenesis is highly restricted to specialized niches in the adult mammalian brain and therefore the brain's capacity for spontaneous regeneration is extremely limited. However, recent work has demonstrated that under certain circumstances parenchymal astrocytes and NG2 glia can generate neuronal progeny. In the striatum, stroke or excitotoxic lesions can reawaken in astrocytes a latent neurogenic program resulting in the genesis of new neurons. By contrast, in brain areas that fail to mount a neurogenic response following injury, such as the cerebral cortex, forced expression of neurogenic reprogramming factors can lineage convert local glia into induced neurons. Yet, injury-induced and reprogramming-induced neurogenesis exhibit intriguing commonalities, suggesting that they may converge on similar mechanisms. PMID:26296150

  5. Neurogenic overactive bladder in spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis: role of onabotulinumtoxinA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethans KD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available KD Ethans,1,2 AR Casey,1,2 RJ Bard,1,3 MP Namaka1 1University of Manitoba, 2Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Health Sciences Centre, 3Section of Urology, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Abstract: People with neurogenic overactive bladder from either multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury often suffer significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. Here we review the pathophysiology of neurogenic overactive bladder and the impact it can have on people with multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury. We also address the various traditional treatment options and focus on the use of botulinum toxin A (specifically onabotulinumtoxinA for this condition. Keywords: neurogenic detrusor overactivity, overactive bladder, onabotulinumtoxinA, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury

  6. The effect of penile vibratory stimulation on male fertility potential, spasticity and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Læssøe, Line; Sønksen, J;

    2005-01-01

    Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS).......Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS)....

  7. Neurogenic differentiation from adipose-derived stem cells and application for autologous transplantation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Xin-wei; Chen, Jian-Ting; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue have the capacity to differentiate into endodermal, mesoderm and ectodermal cell lineages in vitro, which are an ideal engraft in tissue-engineered repair. In this study, mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were isolated from subcutaneous fat. The markers of ADSCs, CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were detected by immunofluorescence assays. The ADSCs were cultured in cocktail factors (including ATRA, GGF-2, bFGF, PDGF and forskolin) for neurogenic differentiation. The neurogenic cells markers, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were analyzed using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR after dramatic changes in morphology. Neurogenic cells from ADSCs were autologous transplanted into the mouse of spinal cord injury for observation neurogenic cells colonization in spinal cord. The result demonstrated that the mouse ADSCs were positive for the CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105 and CD166 but negative for neurogenic cell markers, MAP-2, GFAP and Nestin. After neurogenic differentiation, the neurogenic cells were positive for neurogenic cell special markers, gene expression level showed a time-lapse increase, and the cells were successful colonized into spinal cord. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of neuronal cells can be specifically generated from ADSCs and that induced cells may allow for participation in tissue-repair. PMID:25330756

  8. Intravesical prostatic protrusion correlates well with storage symptoms in elderly male patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

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    Shih-Yen Lu

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: In elderly male patients with non-neurogenic OAB, more severe storage symptoms are associated with a lower maximum flow rate and a more prominent IPP, indicating that a significant cause of male non-neurogenic OAB is prostate associated.

  9. Botulinum toxin A for treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity and incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs).......To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs)....

  10. The conceptualization and development of a patient-reported neurogenic bladder symptom score

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    Welk B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blayne Welk,1 Sarah A Morrow,2 Wendy Madarasz,3 Patrick Potter,4 Keith Sequeira41Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada; 3St Joseph's Health Care, London Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Western University, London, ON, CanadaBackground: There is no single patient-reported instrument that was developed specifically to assess symptoms and bladder-related consequences for neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify and consolidate items for a novel measurement tool for this population.Methods: Item generation was based on a literature review of existing instruments, open-ended semistructured interviews with patients, and expert opinion. Judgment-based item reduction was performed by a multidisciplinary expert group. The proposed questionnaire was sent to external experts for review.Results: Eight neurogenic quality of life measures and 29 urinary symptom-specific instruments were identified. From these, 266 relevant items were extracted and used in the creation of the new neurogenic symptom score. Qualitative interviews with 16 adult patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction as a result of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or spina bifida were completed. Dominant themes included urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, urgency, and bladder spasms. Using the literature review and interview data, 25 proposed items were reviewed by 12 external experts, and the questions evaluated based on importance on a scale of 1 (not important to 5 (very important. Retained question domains had high mean importance ratings of 3.1 to 4.3 and good agreement with answer hierarchy.Conclusion: The proposed neurogenic bladder symptom score is a novel patient-reported outcome measure. Further work is underway to perform a data-based item reduction and to assess the validity and reliability of this instrument

  11. Molecular Targets of Chromatin Repressive Mark H3K9me3 in Primate Progenitor Cells within Adult Neurogenic Niches

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    Michael R Foret

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Histone 3 Lysine 9 (H3K9 methylation is known to be associated with pericentric heterochromatin and important in genomic stability. In this study, we show that trimethylation at H3K9 (H3K9me3 is enriched in an adult neural stem cell niche- the subventricular zone (SVZ on the walls of the lateral ventricle in both rodent and non-human primate baboon brain. Previous studies have shown that there is significant correlation between baboon and human regarding genomic similarity and brain structure, suggesting that findings in baboon are relevant to human. To understand the function of H3K9me3 in this adult neurogenic niche, we performed genome-wide analyses using ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep-sequencing and RNA-Seq for in vivo SVZ cells purified from baboon brain. Through integrated analyses of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq, we found that H3K9me3-enriched genes associated with cellular maintenance, post-transcriptional and translational modifications, signaling pathways, and DNA replication are expressed, while genes involved in axon/neuron, hepatic stellate cell, or immune-response activation are not expressed. As neurogenesis progresses in the adult SVZ, cell fate restriction is essential to direct proper lineage commitment. Our findings highlight that H3K9me3 repression in undifferentiated SVZ cells is engaged in the maintenance of cell type integrity, implicating a role for H3K9me3 as an epigenetic mechanism to control cell fate transition within this adult germinal niche.

  12. Leiomyosarcoma of the Oropharynx and Neurogenic Tumors in a YoungPatient With Turner's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Annamaria Borghese; Vito Ninfo; Vincenzo De Rosa; Francesco Ionna; Gerardo Botti; Simona Losito; Giustino Silvestro; Gaetano Apice; Annarosaria De Chiara

    2001-01-01

    Patient: A case of Turner's syndrome developing a leiomyosarcoma of the oropharynx and metachronous neurogenic tumors (mediastinal ‘ganglioneuroblastoma intermixed’, subcutaneous neurilemoma) is described. Discussion: To our knowledge, this case is the second reported leiomyosarcoma in a patient with Turner's syndrome. Also the site of involvement (palate and oropharynx) is particularly unusual for the already rare leiomyosarcomas in the young age.

  13. Neurogenic pulmonary edema due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction: a case report

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    Ana Sofia Cruz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary edema is caused by the accumulation of fluid within the air spaces and the interstitium of the lung. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. It may be a less-recognized consequence of raised intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus by blocked ventricular shunts. It usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. CASE REPORT: We report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction, proposed to urgent surgery for placement of external ventricular drainage, who presented with neurogenic pulmonary edema preoperatively. She was anesthetized and supportive treatment was instituted. At the end of the procedure the patient showed no clinical signs of respiratory distress, as prompt reduction in intracranial pressure facilitated the regression of the pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: This report addresses the importance of recognition of neurogenic pulmonary edema as a possible perioperative complication resulting from an increase in intracranial pressure. If not recognized and treated appropriately, neurogenic pulmonary edema can lead to acute cardiopulmonary failure with global hypoperfusion and hypoxia. Therefore, awareness of and knowledge about the occurrence, clinical presentation and treatment are essential.

  14. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla contribute to neurogenic hypertension induced by systemic inflammation

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    Wu Kay LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to systemic inflammation, neuroinflammation in the brain, which enhances sympathetic drive, plays a significant role in cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM that augments sympathetic outflow to blood vessels is involved in neural mechanism of hypertension. We investigated whether neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in RVLM contribute to hypertension following chronic systemic inflammation. Methods In normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats, systemic inflammation was induced by infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the peritoneal cavity via an osmotic minipump. Systemic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured under conscious conditions by the non-invasive tail-cuff method. The level of the inflammatory markers in plasma or RVLM was analyzed by ELISA. Protein expression was evaluated by Western blot or immunohistochemistry. Tissue level of superoxide anion (O2·- in RVLM was determined using the oxidation-sensitive fluorescent probe dihydroethidium. Pharmacological agents were delivered either via infusion into the cisterna magna with an osmotic minipump or microinjection bilaterally into RVLM. Results Intraperitoneal infusion of LPS (1.2 mg/kg/day for 14 days promoted sustained hypertension and induced a significant increase in plasma level of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, or interleukin-1β (IL-1β. This LPS-induced systemic inflammation was accompanied by activation of microglia, augmentation of IL-1β, IL-6, or TNF-α protein expression, and O2·- production in RVLM, all of which were blunted by intracisternal infusion of a cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, NS398; an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline; or a cytokine synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline. Neuroinflammation in RVLM was also associated with a COX-2-dependent downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and an

  15. Neurogenética en el Perú, ejemplo de investigación traslacional

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    Pilar Mazzetti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available La neurogenética es una disciplina emergente en el Perú que vincula la investigación básica con la práctica clínica. El Centro de Investigación Básica en Neurogenética, es el único centro en el Perú dedicado a la atención especializada de enfermedades neurogenéticas. La investigación en esta área está estrechamente ligada a la enfermedad de Huntington, desde la genotipificación del gen HTT por PCR, hasta los actuales estudios de haplogrupos en esta enfermedad. La investigación en otras enfermedades monogénicas permitió la implementación de metodologías alternativas para la genotipificación del síndrome X frágil y distrofia miotónica tipo 1. Esfuerzos colaborativos nacionales e internacionales han permitido conocer nuevas variantes genéticas en enfermedades complejas, como la enfermedad de Parkinson y Alzheimer. El entrenamiento multidisciplinario y la mentoría fomentan la formación de nuevos especialistas en neurogenética, permitiendo el crecimiento sostenido de esta disciplina en el país. El impulso de la investigación en el Perú ha impulsado el crecimiento de la investigación en neurogenética; sin embargo, las limitaciones en infraestructura, tecnología y capacitación aún son un reto para el crecimiento de investigación en esta disciplina

  16. Brain micro-ecologies: neural stem cell niches in the adult mammalian brain

    OpenAIRE

    Riquelme, Patricio A; Drapeau, Elodie; Doetsch, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists in two germinal regions in the adult mammalian brain, the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the hippocampal formation. Within these two neurogenic niches, specialized astrocytes are neural stem cells, capable of self-renewing and generating neurons and glia. Cues within the niche, from cell–cell interactions to diffusible factors, are spatially and temporally coordinated to regulate proliferation and neurogenesis, ultimately affect...

  17. Neurogenically mediated leakage of plasma protein occurs from blood vessels in dura mater but not brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing 125I-BSA administered intravenously, a simple, reliable, and sensitive method was established for the detection of plasma protein extravasation in the dura of rats and guinea pigs following chemical, electrical, or immunological stimulation. Extravasated 125I-BSA or Evans blue was noted in the dura and conjunctiva but not in the temporalis muscle of saline-perfused rats following intravenous capsaicin, 1 mumol/kg. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was mediated by unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers since leakage did not develop in adult animals in whom these fibers were destroyed by capsaicin pretreatment (50 mg/kg) as neonates. An ipsilateral increase in Evans blue and 125I-BSA was found in the dura, eyelids, lips and gingival mucosa, and snout following electrical stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion. This increase was also C-fiber dependent. Among those peptides contained in perivascular afferent fibers and administered intravenously, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, caused a dose-dependent extravasation in the dura and conjunctiva of rats. Neonatal capsaicin pretreatment did not attenuate SP- nor NKA-induced effects in the dura and actually increased extravasation in the conjunctiva. Intravenous administration of 5-HT or bradykinin to normal adult rats or adult rats pretreated as neonates with capsaicin increased levels of 125I-BSA in both the dura and the conjunctiva. Histamine and prostaglandin E2, on the other hand, caused protein leakage in the conjunctiva but not in the dura of rats; however, histamine did induce extravasation in the dura of guinea pigs

  18. Neurogenically mediated leakage of plasma protein occurs from blood vessels in dura mater but not brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, S.; Saito, K.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    Utilizing /sup 125/I-BSA administered intravenously, a simple, reliable, and sensitive method was established for the detection of plasma protein extravasation in the dura of rats and guinea pigs following chemical, electrical, or immunological stimulation. Extravasated /sup 125/I-BSA or Evans blue was noted in the dura and conjunctiva but not in the temporalis muscle of saline-perfused rats following intravenous capsaicin, 1 mumol/kg. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was mediated by unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers since leakage did not develop in adult animals in whom these fibers were destroyed by capsaicin pretreatment (50 mg/kg) as neonates. An ipsilateral increase in Evans blue and /sup 125/I-BSA was found in the dura, eyelids, lips and gingival mucosa, and snout following electrical stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion. This increase was also C-fiber dependent. Among those peptides contained in perivascular afferent fibers and administered intravenously, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, caused a dose-dependent extravasation in the dura and conjunctiva of rats. Neonatal capsaicin pretreatment did not attenuate SP- nor NKA-induced effects in the dura and actually increased extravasation in the conjunctiva. Intravenous administration of 5-HT or bradykinin to normal adult rats or adult rats pretreated as neonates with capsaicin increased levels of /sup 125/I-BSA in both the dura and the conjunctiva. Histamine and prostaglandin E2, on the other hand, caused protein leakage in the conjunctiva but not in the dura of rats; however, histamine did induce extravasation in the dura of guinea pigs.

  19. Brain tumor stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  20. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    OpenAIRE

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural ste...

  1. Coronavirus-induced demyelination of neural pathways triggers neurogenic bladder overactivity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    McMillan, Matthew T; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Smith, Ariana L.; Newman, Diane K.; Weiss, Susan R.; Ruggieri, Michael R.; Malykhina, Anna P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mice with coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis (CIE) develop neurogenic bladder dysfunction that is comparable with the neurogenic detrusor overactivity observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Adult mice (C57BL/6J, 8 wk of age, n = 146) were inoculated with a neurotropic strain of mouse hepatitis virus (A59 strain) and followed for 4 wk. Inoculation with the virus caused a significant neural deficit in mice with an average clinical sy...

  2. Tat-NOL3 protects against hippocampal neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress through the regulation of apoptotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Shin, Min Jea; Eum, Won Sik; Kim, Dae Won; Yong, Ji In; Ryu, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hwan; Cho, Su Bin; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Im, Seung Kwon; Kweon, Hae Young; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Meeyoung; Park, Jinseu; Cho, Yong-Jun; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is associated with neuronal cell death and ischemia. The NOL3 [nucleolar protein 3 (apoptosis repressor with CARD domain)] protein protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, the protective mechanism responsible for this effect as well as the effects of NOL3 against oxidative stress in ischemia remain unclear. Thus, we examined the protective effects of NOL3 protein on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and the mechanism responsible for these effects in hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells and in an animal model of forebrain ischemia using Tat-fused NOL3 protein (Tat-NOL3). Purified Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the H2O2-exposed HT22 cells and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In addition, Tat-NOL3 prevented neuronal cell death through the regulation of apoptotic signaling pathways including Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-2, -3 and -8, PARP and p53. In addition, Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the animal brains and significantly protected against neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus by regulating the activation of microglia and astrocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Tat-NOL3 protein protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death by regulating oxidative stress and by acting as an anti-apoptotic protein. Thus, we suggest that Tat-NOL3 represents a potential therapeutic agent for protection against ischemic brain injury. PMID:27221790

  3. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Liao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder (NB or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD, a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease.

  4. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NB) or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD), a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease. PMID:26266405

  5. Early revealing of neurogenic disorders of urination in patients with anorectal anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makedonsky I.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 148 patients with anorectal malformations (ARM were examined. Using clinical, X-ray, ultrasound and urodynamical methods of detections, factors which can cause bladder dysfunction in anorectal malformations are revealed. It was noted that patients with high and low forms of this defect have significant percentage of neurogenec disorders of urination. Absence of anomalies of spinal column development does not exclude these children from the group of scheduled profound urologic investigation. We propose ultrasound measurement of bladder wall thickness and 4-hour monitoring of voiding, urodynamic examination as early diagnostic methods of neurogenic bladder dysfunctions. For timely revealing and treatment of neurogenic disorders of urination we recommend urologic inves¬tigation to all ARM patients. Improvement of diagnostic methods and development of algorithm of revealing mentioned pathologies against ARM with the aim to prevent com¬plications in the urinary system, being perspective in decreasing lethality and disability.

  6. Acute intraoperative neurogenic myocardial stunning during intracranial endoscopic fenestration and shunt revision in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Kristen Elizabeth; Patten, William D; Elzamzamy, Osama M; Attaallah, Ahmed Fikry

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium (NSM) is syndrome of myocardial dysfunction following an acute neurological insult. We report a case of NSM that occurred intraoperatively in a pediatric patient undergoing endoscopic fenestration and shunt revision. Accidental outflow occlusion of irrigation fluid and ventricular distension resulted in an acute increase in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. Subsequently, the patient developed stunned myocardium with global myocardial hypokinesia and pulmonary edema. She was promptly treated intraoperatively then admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with resolution of her symptoms within 12 h. She was later discharged to home on the fourth postoperative day. In the current endoscopic era, this report highlights the possibility of intraoperative NSM and neurogenic pulmonary edema in the pediatric population. Early detection and treatment with a team approach help to achieve optimal control of this life-threatening condition and improve the outcome. PMID:26314948

  7. Precocious puberty: clinical and endocrine profile and factors indicating neurogenic precocity in Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Anurag; Sharma, Jyoti; Kabra, Madhulika; Kumar Gupta, Arun; Menon, P S N

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and endocrine profile of patients with precocious puberty followed up in a tertiary care hospital. Records of 140 patients (114 girls, 26 boys) with precocious puberty were reviewed. Clinical features including age of onset, stage of pubertal development, presenting symptoms, features suggestive of CNS involvement and family history were analyzed. Endocrine investigations included basal and GnRH-stimulated levels of LH and FSH as well as 17OHP, DHEA, hCG and thyroid profile. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasonography and CNS imaging were correlated with clinical features. Girls outnumbered boys in this series (4.4:1). Neurogenic central isosexual precocious puberty (CIPP) was more common in boys (10 out of 18, 55.6%) than girls (16 out of 77, 20.8%). The most common cause of neurogenic CIPP was hypothalamic hamartoma present in five girls and four boys. Other causes of neurogenic CIPP included neurotuberculosis, pituitary adenoma, hydrocephalus, post radiotherapy, CNS tumors and malformations. Peripheral precocious puberty (PPP) was secondary to adrenal causes in boys and ovarian cysts in girls. Benign variants of precocious puberty, such as premature thelarche and premature adrenarche, were present in 23 and six girls, respectively. Hypothyroidism was present in four girls and McCune-Albright syndrome in one girl. Girls with neurogenic CIPP had a lower age of onset as compared to idiopathic CIPP (3.6 +/- 2.7 years vs 5.4 +/- 2.5 years, p = 0.014). The lowest age of onset was seen in girls with hypothalamic hamartoma (1.6 +/- 0.9 years). Forty-seven girls with CIPP (seven neurogenic and 40 idiopathic) presented after the age of 6 years. Features of CNS involvement, in the form of seizures, mental retardation, raised intracranial tension or focal neurological deficits, were present in seven girls (43.8%) and four boys (40%), and gelastic seizures were present in three children. Girls with CIPP had greater bone age

  8. Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient

  9. Hypertonic saline increases vascular permeability in the rat trachea by producing neurogenic inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Umeno, E; McDonald, D M; Nadel, J A

    1990-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether inhalation of hypertonic saline aerosols increases vascular permeability in the rat trachea, and we examined the role of neurogenic inflammation in this response. Stereological point counting was performed to measure the percent area occupied by Monastral blue-labeled blood vessels as a means of quantifying the increase in vascular permeability in tracheal whole mounts. Hypertonic saline aerosols (3.6-14.4% NaCl) increased vascular permeability in a dose-dep...

  10. Urodynamic profile of patients with neurogenic bladder following non-traumatic myelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the urodynamic profile of the patients following non-traumatic myelopathies (NTMs with neurogenic bladder. Setting: Neurological rehabilitation department of university tertiary research hospital. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine patients (44 men with monophasic NTM, with the age range 8-65 years (31.0 ± 16.0 years, were admitted for inpatients′ rehabilitation. Length of stay in rehabilitation ranged from 6 to 120 days (32.0 ± 24.8 days. Fifty-six patients (70.9% had spinal lesion above D10, 17 had lesion between D10 and L2 (21.5%, and 6 (7.6% had cauda equina syndrome. All patients had neurogenic bladder with urinary complaints. Urodynamic study (UDS was performed in all patients. Results: UDS showed 71.4% patients (40/56 had neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO with or without sphincter dyssynergy (DSD with lesion above D10; only 52.9% patients (9/17 had NDO with or without DSD detrusor with lesion between D10 and L2; and majority (5/6 patients had underactive detrusor in the cauda equina group. Bladder management was based on the UDS findings. No significant correlation was found (P > 0.05 between detrusor behavior and the level, severity (ASIA Impairment Scale of spinal injury, or gender using chi-square test. Conclusions: Neurogenic bladder following NTM was observed in all patients. UDS suggested predominantly NDO in lesions above D10 and mixed pattern in between D10 and L2 lesions. No significant correlation was found between detrusor behavior and the level or severity of NTM in the study.

  11. Neurogenic pulmonary edema induced by spinal cord injury in spontaneously hypertensive and Dahl salt hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2011), s. 975-979. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0336; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypertension * neurogenic pulmonary edema * Dahl salt-sensitive rats * SHR Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.555, year: 2011

  12. Neurogenic Inflammation – The Peripheral Nervous System’s Role in Host Defense and Immunopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Isaac M.; von Hehn, Christian A.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral nervous and immune systems are traditionally thought of as serving separate functions. This line is, however, becoming increasingly blurred by new insights into neurogenic inflammation. Nociceptor neurons possess many of the same molecular recognition pathways for danger as immune cells and in response to danger, the peripheral nervous system directly communicates with the immune system, forming an integrated protective mechanism. The dense innervation network of sensory and au...

  13. Neurogenic pulmonary edema due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Sofia Cruz; Sónia Menezes; Maria Silva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary edema is caused by the accumulation of fluid within the air spaces and the interstitium of the lung. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. It may be a less-recognized consequence of raised intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus by blocked ventricular shunts. It usually appears within minutes to hours after the in...

  14. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification: epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs in an early neurological rehabilitation population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively evaluate neurogenic heterotopic ossification in an early neurological rehabilitation population (phases B and C) with respect to epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs. Over a 4-year period, 1,463 patients treated at a clinic for early neurological rehabilitation were evaluated for clinical symptoms of neurogenic heterotopic ossification. In case of clinical suspicion, plain radiographs of the expected sites were obtained. If heterotopic ossification was detected, the initial and subsequent radiographs were retrospectively analyzed for sites, size, and morphology. Immature lesions were categorized as small (<10 mm) or large (10-100 mm). The prevalence rate of neurogenic heterotopic ossification was 2.05%. The condition was most common in young male adults. The hip was the most common site accounting for more than half of the cases. Two or more ossifications were seen in 56.7% of the affected patients with approximately two-thirds showing bilateral symmetric involvement of corresponding joint regions. The size of ossifications strongly varied interindividually. Small immature lesions demonstrated less progression in size than large lesions during maturation (P < 0.05). Standard radiographs, as a fast and inexpensive technique, allow the expected size progression of heterotopic ossifications during maturation to be estimated, which is relevant in terms of therapeutic decisions, patient mobilization, and neurological rehabilitation. (orig.)

  15. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification: epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs in an early neurological rehabilitation population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seipel, R.; Langner, S.; Lippa, M.; Kuehn, J.P.; Hosten, N. [Ernst Moritz Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Greifswald (Germany); Platz, T. [An-Institut der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, BDH-Klinik Greifswald GmbH, Neurologisches Rehabilitationszentrum und Querschnittgelaehmtenzentrum, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate neurogenic heterotopic ossification in an early neurological rehabilitation population (phases B and C) with respect to epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs. Over a 4-year period, 1,463 patients treated at a clinic for early neurological rehabilitation were evaluated for clinical symptoms of neurogenic heterotopic ossification. In case of clinical suspicion, plain radiographs of the expected sites were obtained. If heterotopic ossification was detected, the initial and subsequent radiographs were retrospectively analyzed for sites, size, and morphology. Immature lesions were categorized as small (<10 mm) or large (10-100 mm). The prevalence rate of neurogenic heterotopic ossification was 2.05%. The condition was most common in young male adults. The hip was the most common site accounting for more than half of the cases. Two or more ossifications were seen in 56.7% of the affected patients with approximately two-thirds showing bilateral symmetric involvement of corresponding joint regions. The size of ossifications strongly varied interindividually. Small immature lesions demonstrated less progression in size than large lesions during maturation (P < 0.05). Standard radiographs, as a fast and inexpensive technique, allow the expected size progression of heterotopic ossifications during maturation to be estimated, which is relevant in terms of therapeutic decisions, patient mobilization, and neurological rehabilitation. (orig.)

  16. Neurogenic pruritus: an unrecognised problem? A retrospective case series of treatment by acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellon, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    Intractable localised segmental pruritus without a rash has been reported over the years under various titles depending on the area of the body affected. Notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritus are the two terms used for what is believed to be a form of neuropathy. The clinical observations reported here suggest that other localised cases of pruritus exist that share common clinical features, and the term neurogenic pruritus is suggested to encompass these under one clinical condition. Acupuncture has been used to treat skin conditions, of which pruritus is one symptom. This retrospective study looked at the symptomatic relief of neurogenic pruritus in 16 patients using acupuncture. In 12 cases the affected dermatomes of the body were innervated by cervical spinal nerves, seven innervated by dorsal spinal nerves and four innervated by the lumbar spinal nerves. Seven patients had areas affected by two different regions of the spine. Restricted neck or back movements were noted in patients as were areas of paravertebral spasm or tenderness of the muscles. Total resolution of symptoms as judged by VAS occurred in 75% of patients. Relapse occurred in 37% of patients within 1-12 months following treatment. Acupuncture appeared to be effective in alleviating the distressing symptom of itching in patients presenting with neurogenic pruritus. PMID:12512793

  17. Complications of untreated and ineffectively treated neurogenic bladder dysfunctions in children: our own practical classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, P; Zachwieja, J

    2016-04-01

    The neurogenic dysfunctions of the detrusor and the sphincter are caused by either a known congenital defect of the nervous system or by acquired damage to the nervous system. In patients with idiopathic bladder dysfunctions neurological examinations fail to reveal any pathology in the nervous system. The treatment strategy for the patient with detrusor-sphincter dysfunction should be based on a comprehensive functional and morphological evaluation. Clean Intermittent Catheterization is mandatory if voiding is ineffective. Reduced bladder capacity related to detrusor overactivity and decreased bladder walls compliance is successfully managed conservatively with oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment prevents complications in the majority of patients. However, despite proper conservative treatment, some patients still develop complications. We propose our own practical classification of complications characteristic for the bladder and sphincter dysfunctions: 1. Urinary tract infections; 2. Urolithiasis; 3. Anatomic changes in the lower urinary tract; 4. Anatomic changes in the upper urinary tract; 5. Functional disturbances of kidneys parenchyma; 6. Urinary incontinence. Proposed practical classification of complications of bladder and sphincter dysfunctions is clear and simple. This classification can be used both in children with neurogenic and non-neurogenic dysfunctions. It is helpful in planning follow-up procedures and evaluation of treatment results. PMID:27097940

  18. Botulinumtoxin-A in the treatment for neurogenic bladder dysfunctions in children and adolescents in consideration of Botulinumtoxin-a antibidies in therapie failures

    OpenAIRE

    Herholz, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    The standard treatment for neurogenic bladder dysfunctions in children is administration of anticholinergic medication in combination with a intermittend catheteriziation. However, not all patients can be sufficiently stabilized with this established therapy. Botulinum toxins are gaining increasing importance in treating neurogenic and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunctions in children. For my doctoral thesis I studied the efficiency side effects, and causes for failures of this new treatmen...

  19. Loss of capsaicin-induced meningeal neurogenic sensory vasodilatation in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dux, M; Rosta, J; Pintér, S; Sántha, P; Jancsó, G

    2007-11-30

    Neuropathic alterations of sensory nerves involved in the mediation of neurogenic inflammation of the meninges may contribute to the increased incidence of headaches in diabetics. In the rat, activation of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors, which express the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor, induces meningeal vasodilatation, a significant component of neurogenic inflammation, through the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). This study examines the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on TRPV1 receptor-mediated neurogenic sensory vasodilatation, CGRP release and nerve fiber density in the rat dura mater. In a cranial window preparation, epidural application of capsaicin (10(-7) M) produced distinct vasodilatory responses in control animals as measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. In diabetic rats, capsaicin-induced vasodilatation was reduced or even abolished 6, but not 2 or 4 weeks after diabetes induction. In contrast, vasoconstriction, a non-neurogenic response to capsaicin at a higher concentration (10(-5) M), was not altered in diabetic rats. The vasodilatory effects of histamine (10(-5) M), acetylcholine (10(-4) M) and CGRP (10(-5) M) were similar in control, diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic animals. In diabetic rats, a significant decrease in the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP and reduction in the density of TRPV1-immunoreactive (IR) nerves were demonstrated. Treatment of the diabetic rats with insulin restored both the vasodilatory response and the capsaicin-induced CGRP release toward control values. In conclusion, this study revealed a marked impairment of meningeal TRPV1-IR nerves in streptozotocin diabetic rats by showing reduced neurogenic sensory vasodilatation, decreased capsaicin-evoked CGRP release and reduction in the number of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers of the dura mater. The findings suggest that capsaicin-sensitive afferents may play an important role in meningeal nociceptor function and their

  20. Has our brain grown too big to think effectively?

    OpenAIRE

    Fialkowski, Konrad R.

    2013-01-01

    A variant of microcephalin, MCPH1 gene, was introgressed about 37,000 years ago into Homo sapiens genetic pool from an archaic (Homo erectus) lineage and rose to exceptionally high frequency of around 70 percent worldwide today. It is involved in regulating neuroblast proliferation and its changes alter the rate of division and/or differentiation of neuroblasts during the neurogenic phase of embriogenesis, which could alter the size and structure of the resulting brain. At the time of introgr...

  1. The potential of endogenous neurogenesis for brain repair and regeneration following traumatic brain injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Sun

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability of persons under 45 years old in the United States, affecting over 1.5 million individuals each year. It had been th ought that recovery from such injuries is severely limited due to the inability of the adult bra in to replace damaged neurons. However, recent studies indicate that the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS) has the potential to replenish damaged neurons by proliferation and neuronal differentiation of adult neural stem/progenitor cells residing in the neurogenic regions in the brain. Furthermore, increasing evidence indicates that these endogenous stem/progenitor cells may play regenerative and reparative roles in response to CNS injuries or diseases. In support of this notion, heightened levels of cell proliferation and neurogenesis have been ob-served in response to brain trauma or insults suggesting that the brain has the inherent potential to restore populations of damaged or destroyed neurons. This review will discuss the potential functions of adult neurogenesis and recent development of strategies aiming at harnessing this neurogenic capacity in order to repopulate and repair the injured brain.

  2. Furosemide modifies heart hypertrophy and glycosaminoglycan myocardium content in a rat model of neurogenic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Tsaousi, Georgia; Manthou, Maria Eleni; Karakiulakis, Georgios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios; Papakonstantinou, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for atherogenesis and heart hypertrophy, both of which are associated with specific morphological and functional changes of the myocardium. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are complex molecules involved both in tissue morphology and function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neurogenic hypertension and subsequent antihypertensive treatment with furosemide, on heart hypertrophy and the content of GAGs in the myocardium. Neurogenic hypertension was achieved in male Wistar rats by bilateral aortic denervation (bAD). At days 2, 7 and 15 after surgery, animals were sacrificed and the hearts were dissected away, weighted, and homogenized. Total GAGs were assessed by measuring the uronic acid content colorimetrically and individual GAGs were isolated and characterized by enzymatic treatment, with GAG-degrading enzymes, using electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gradient gels and cellulose acetate membranes. In bAD-animals blood pressure, blood pressure lability, heart rate and heart weight were significantly increased 15 days postoperatively. These effects were prevented by treatment with furosemide. Major GAGs identified in the heart were chondroitin sulphates, heparin (H), heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronic acid. The content of uronic and the relative content of H and HS in the heart in bAD animals significantly decreased from day 2 to day 15 postoperatively. Furosemide prevented the bAD induced decrease in GAG content. Considering that H and HS are potent inhibitors of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, our results indicate that heart hypertrophy induced by neurogenic hypertension may be associated with decreases in the relative content of heparin and heparan sulphate in the heart. PMID:27221775

  3. Bioimpedance based monitoring system for people with neurogenic dysfunction of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Alessandro; Rossi, Stefano; Fanucci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with impaired bladder volume sensation have the necessity to monitor bladder level in order to avoid urinary tract infections and urinary reflux that can lead to renal failure. In this paper the the effectiveness of an embedded and wearable solution for bladder volume monitoring using the bioimpedance measurement is tested. Data are streamed real-time using Bluetooth wireless technology. The bioimpedance measurements on a healthy subject prove the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In the future the system will be evaluated in real world scenarios with patients affected by spinal paralysis and bladder neurogenic dysfunction. PMID:26294580

  4. [The treatment of neurogenic hyperreflexic bladder dysfunctions in girls with low-intensity laser radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosilov, K V; Itskovich, A I; Orekhov, V R

    1995-01-01

    120 girls were investigated for the efficacy of three methods of treatment: conventional, infrared laser radiation on the projection of the bladder plus He-Ne laser radiation on biologically active points (BAP), red He-Ne laser BAP radiation. All the patients suffered from neurogenic hyperreflexic dysfunctions of the bladder, 99.8% had the diagnosis of vegetovascular dystonia, 94.9% had sympathetic-tonic or mixed patterns. The combined laser exposure brought about the greatest response rate-90.0%. PMID:7785111

  5. A step-wise approach to sperm retrieval in men with neurogenic anejaculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Normal fertility is dependent on intravaginal delivery of semen through ejaculation. This process is highly dependent on an intact ejaculatory reflex arc, which can be disrupted through any type of trauma or disease causing damage to the CNS and/or peripheral nerves. Neurogenic anejaculation is m...... reasonable options. In such cases the most inexpensive and least invasive methods should be considered first. The obtained semen can be used for intravaginal or intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection....

  6. Cell-death-inducing DFFA-like Effector B Contributes to the Assembly of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Particles and Interacts with HCV NS5A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua; Yao, Wenxia; Li, Leike; Li, Xinlei; Hu, Longbo; Mai, Runming; Peng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uses components of the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) pathway for assembly/release. We previously reported that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) participates in HCV assembly/release through downstream factors those participate in VLDL assembly/secretion. Cell-death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB) is an important regulator of the VLDL pathway. CIDEB is required for entry of HCV particles from cell culture (HCVcc), but the effects of CIDEB on the post-entry steps of the HCV lifecycle are unclear. In the present study, we determined that CIDEB is required for HCV assembly in addition to HCVcc entry. Furthermore, CIDEB interacts with the HCV NS5A protein, and the N terminus of CIDEB and the domain I of NS5A are involved in this interaction. Moreover, CIDEB silencing impairs the association of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) with HCV particles. Interestingly, CIDEB is also required for the post-entry stages of the dengue virus (DENV) life cycle. Collectively, these results indicate that CIDEB is a new host factor that is involved in HCV assembly, presumably by interacting with viral protein, providing new insight into the exploitation of the VLDL regulator CIDEB by HCV. PMID:27282740

  7. Cerebral cortical neurons with activity linked to central neurogenic spontaneous and evoked elevations in cerebral blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golanov, E. V.; Reis, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We recorded neurons in rat cerebral cortex with activity relating to the neurogenic elevations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) coupled to stereotyped bursts of EEG activity, burst-cerebrovascular wave complexes, appearing spontaneously or evoked by electrical stimulation of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) or fastigial nucleus (FN). Of 333 spontaneously active neurons only 15 (5%), in layers 5-6, consistently (P neurons in deep cortical laminae whose activity correlates with neurogenic elevations of rCBF. These neurons may function to transduce afferent neuronal signals into vasodilation.

  8. Electrically evoked neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation differ between rat and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerstein, K; Klede, M; Hilliges, M; Schmelz, M

    2000-12-15

    Protein extravasation and vasodilatation can be induced by neuropeptides released from nociceptive afferents (neurogenic inflammation). We measured electrically evoked neuropeptide release and concomitant protein extravasation in human and rat skin using intradermal microdialysis. Plasmapheresis capillaries were inserted intradermally at a length of 1.5 cm in the volar forearm of human subjects or abdominal skin of rats. Capillaries were perfused with Ringer solution at a flow rate of 2.5 or 1.6 microl min(-1). After a baseline period of 60 min capillaries were stimulated electrically (1 Hz, 80 mA, 0.5 ms or 4 Hz, 30 mA, 0.5 ms) for 30 min using a surface electrode directly above the capillaries and a stainless-steel wire inserted in the capillaries. Total protein concentration was assessed photometrically and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In rat skin, electrical stimulation increased CGRP and total protein concentration in the dialysate. SP measurements showed a larger variance but only for the 1 Hz stimulation was the increased release significant. In human skin, electrical stimulation provoked a large flare reaction and at a frequency of 4 Hz both CGRP and SP concentrations increased significantly. In spite of the large flare reactions no protein extravasation was induced, which suggests major species differences. It will be of interest to investigate whether the lack of neurogenic protein extravasation is also valid under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11118507

  9. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Neirinckx

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  10. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  11. Microneedle Electrode Array for Electrical Impedance Myography to Characterize Neurogenic Myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao; Li, Yi; Liu, Mingsheng; Cui, Liying; Yu, Yude

    2016-05-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a noninvasive technique for neuromuscular assessment, wherein a low-intensity alternating current is applied to a muscle, and the consequent surface voltage patterns are evaluated. Commercial wet electrodes are most commonly used for EIM. However, these electrodes are not suitable for use on small muscles, as they do not effectively solve the problem of high electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI) that negatively influences the quality of recorded biopotentials. To address this problem, we fabricated a novel microneedle electrode array (MEA) that consists of 124-µm-long microneedles. Compared to wet electrodes, the MEA could pierce through the outer skin surface in a painless and micro-invasive manner, and could thus effectively reduce ESCI. The MEA has excellent test-retest reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.920. When used in combination with EIM, the MEA differentiated the affected muscles from the unaffected muscles in patients with neurogenic myopathy, by using EIM parameters of reactance and phase (p = 0.023 and 0.008, respectively). Thus, the novel MEA is a practical and reusable device for EIM assessment in cases of neurogenic myopathy. However, further refinement of the electrode is needed to enhance the clinical application of the system. PMID:26407702

  12. A case of hypokalemic paralysis in a patient with neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Frederic N; Kar, Jitesh K; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  13. Sphingosine Kinase 1 urothelial expression is increased in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Ballouhey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the expression of sphingosine kinase 1 (SPK1 in the bladder wall in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and its association with clinical, urodynamic and pathological features. Materials and Methods: The expression of SPK1 was studied in bladder wall specimens obtained from cystectomy using immunohistochemistry in ten patients with spinal cord injury (n=8 or multiple sclerosis (n=2 with urodynamically proven neuropathic bladder dysfunction, and in controls (n=5. Inflammation and fibrosis were analysed with histological criteria and SPK1 expression was determined by individual immunohistochemical staining. Results: Significant increased SPK1 urothelial immunoreactivity was shown in patients compared to control group (p=0.03. By contrast, SPK1 immunoreactivity in patients was significantly decreased in the sub-urothelium, muscles and nerves, p=0.02; 0.01 and 0.003, respectively. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO had higher SPK1 urothelium expression than those without any DO (p=0.04. Conclusions: SPK1 is expressed in the human bladder wall, specifically the urothelium, in bladder specimens from patients with NDO. The role of SPK1 in the pathophysiology of NDO needs further elucidation.

  14. Noncanonical Sites of Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, David M; Bordey, Angélique; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) populate some regions of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), deep knowledge has been accumulated on their capacity to generate new neurons in the adult brain. This constitutive adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life primarily within remnants of the embryonic germinal layers known as "neurogenic sites." Nevertheless, some processes of neurogliogenesis also occur in the CNS parenchyma commonly considered as "nonneurogenic." This "noncanonical" cell genesis has been the object of many claims, some of which turned out to be not true. Indeed, it is often an "incomplete" process as to its final outcome, heterogeneous by several measures, including regional location, progenitor identity, and fate of the progeny. These aspects also strictly depend on the animal species, suggesting that persistent neurogenic processes have uniquely adapted to the brain anatomy of different mammals. Whereas some examples of noncanonical neurogenesis are strictly parenchymal, others also show stem cell niche-like features and a strong link with the ventricular cavities. This work will review results obtained in a research field that expanded from classic neurogenesis studies involving a variety of areas of the CNS outside of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ). It will be highlighted how knowledge concerning noncanonical neurogenic areas is still incomplete owing to its regional and species-specific heterogeneity, and to objective difficulties still hampering its full identification and characterization. PMID:26384869

  15. Neurogenic Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... show awareness, and possibly express anxiety and even depression about the difficulty they encounter in speaking. This may be accompanied by other behaviors, which may include: Secondary or associated behaviors, such as obvious tension and struggle in speech production; movements of ...

  16. Movement impairment: Focus on the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Raffaella; Bottai, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The saying "mens sana in corpore sano" has a particular resonance these days because, for the majority who have a very sedentary occupation, the everyday rhythms of life do not compel us to do much physical exercise. Recently published data indicate that exercise can counteract the effects of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and have prompted research on the beneficial effects of movement on the brain and brain neurogenesis. This might lead us to hypothesize that the absence or reduction of movements, especially those with antigravity effects, could induce a deterioration of the brain. This Review discusses current knowledge of the relationship between neurogenic capacity and the lack of motor activity in human and animal models. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26762181

  17. Effectiveness of interspinous implant surgery in patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, Wouter A.; Arts, Mark P.; Bartels, Ronald H. M. A.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite an increasing implantation rate of interspinous process distraction (IPD) devices in the treatment of intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC), definitive evidence on the clinical effectiveness of implants is lacking. The main objective of this review was to perform a meta-analysis of all

  18. Effectiveness of interspinous implant surgery in patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, W.A.; Arts, M.P.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Jacobs, W.C.; Peul, W.C.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite an increasing implantation rate of interspinous process distraction (IPD) devices in the treatment of intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC), definitive evidence on the clinical effectiveness of implants is lacking. The main objective of this review was to perform a meta-an

  19. Dynamic Pax6 expression during the neurogenic cell cycle influences proliferation and cell fate choices of retinal progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xian-Jie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paired homeobox protein Pax6 is essential for proliferation and pluripotency of retinal progenitors. However, temporal changes in Pax6 protein expression associated with the generation of various retinal neurons have not been characterized with regard to the cell cycle. Here, we examine the dynamic changes of Pax6 expression among chicken retinal progenitors as they progress through the neurogenic cell cycle, and determine the effects of altered Pax6 levels on retinogenesis. Results We provide evidence that during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition, Pax6 protein levels in proliferating progenitor cells are down-regulated. Neurogenic retinal progenitors retain a relatively low level of Pax6 protein, whereas postmitotic neurons either elevate or extinguish Pax6 expression in a cell type-specific manner. Cell imaging and cell cycle analyses show that neurogenic progenitors in the S phase of the cell cycle contain low levels of Pax6 protein, whereas a subset of progenitors exhibits divergent levels of Pax6 protein upon entering the G2 phase of the cell cycle. We also show that M phase cells contain varied levels of Pax6, and some correlate with the onset of early neuronal marker expression, forecasting cell cycle exit and cell fate commitment. Furthermore, either elevating or knocking down Pax6 attenuates cell proliferation and results in increased cell death. Reducing Pax6 decreases retinal ganglion cell genesis and enhances cone photoreceptor and amacrine interneuron production, whereas elevating Pax6 suppresses cone photoreceptor and amacrine cell fates. Conclusion These studies demonstrate for the first time quantitative changes in Pax6 protein expression during the preneurogenic to neurogenic transition and during the neurogenic cell cycle. The results indicate that Pax6 protein levels are stringently controlled in proliferating progenitors. Maintaining a relatively low Pax6 protein level is necessary for S phase

  20. Neurogenesis in the adult brain: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Veronica; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-10-01

    The function of neurogenesis in the adult brain is still unknown. Interventions such as environmental enrichment and exercise impinge on neurogenesis, suggesting that the process is regulated by experience. Conversely, a role for neurogenesis in learning has been proposed through 'cellular plasticity', a process akin to synaptic plasticity but operating at the network level. Although neurogenesis is stimulated by acute injury, and possibly by neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it does not suffice to restore function. While the role and direction of change in the neurogenic response at different stages of AD is still a matter of debate, it is possible that a deficit in neurogenesis may contribute to AD pathogenesis since at least one of the two regions ostensibly neurogenic in the adult human brain (the subgranular zone of the dentage gyrus and the ventriculo-olfactory neurogenic system) support high-level functions affected in early AD (associative memory and olfaction respectively). The age of onset and the rate of progression of sporadic forms of AD are highly variable. Sporadic AD may have a component of insufficient neurogenic replacement or insufficient neurogenic stimulation that is correlated with traits of personal history; the rate of neurogenesis and the survival of replicating progenitors is strongly modified by behavioral interventions known to impinge on the rate of neurogenesis and the probability of survival of newly born neurons--exercise, enriched experience, and learning. This view is consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that higher education and increased participation in intellectual, social and physical aspects of daily life are associated with slower cognitive decline in healthy elderly ("cognitive reserve") and may reduce the risk of AD. Although neurogenesis can be modulated exogenously by growth factors, stimulation of neurogenesis as a mean to treat neurodegeneration is still for the most part

  1. Paravertebral Neurogenic Tumors with Intraspinal Extension: Preoperative Evaluation and Surgical Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of Work: To achieve adequate excision of paravertebral neurogenic tumors with intra spinal extension, safe decompression of spinal cord and preservation of spine stability. Patients and Methods: From Nov. 2000 till July 2009 sixteen patients of paravertebral neurogenic tumors with intraspinal extension (dumbbell tumors) were operated upon by combined team work of surgical oncology and neurosurgery at the National Cancer Institute and at Kasr-Al Einy Hospitals, Cairo University. All patients had C-T with guided biopsy and MRI to evaluate extent of tumor bone invasion, intraspinal component, to decide surgical approach and the need for spine fixation. Patients were referred postoperatively to I.C.U for stabilization of general condition. Follow-up with radiology was done for a period from 3-36 month. Results: The group of patients were 9 males and 7 females with age range 1.5-47 year, 8 patients had tumors in post. Mediastinum, 7 in the retroperitoneal space and one in the cervicothoracic inlet. Benign schwannoma were diagnosed in 5 cases, malignant schwannoma in 3, neu-ro fibromatosis in one case, neuroblastoma in 3 cases, ganglioneuroblastoma in 2 cases and ganglioneuroma in 2 cases. Anterior transthoracic resection through posterolateral thoracotomy was used in 6 cases, anterior transabdominal resection was done in 6 cases through midline or transverse incisions. Combined anterior and posterior approach was used in 3 cases while Posterior approach was done in one case using medial para scapular incision. Delivery of the tumor was done in 8 cases, widening of the intervertebral foramina in 3 cases, costotransversectomy with lateral laminectomy in 3 cases while posterior laminectomy and total vertebrectomy was done in one case. We fixed the spine in 3 cases using Z-plate and screws, lateral plates and screws with either iliac crest or isobone graft. All cord compression manifestations improved postoperatively with perfect spine stability. Morbidity was detected

  2. Development of the adult neurogenic niche in the hippocampus of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeina eNicola

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available When does adult hippocampal neurogenesis begin? We describe the development of the neurogenic niche in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We did so from the perspective of the situation in the adult.Ontogeny of the dentate gyrus is complex and results in an ectopic neurogenic niche that lifelong generates new granule cells. Neurogenesis during the fetal and early postnatal periods builds the dentate gyrus and gives way to activity-dependent adult neurogenesis. We used markers most relevant to adult neurogenesis research to describe this transition: Nestin, Sox2, BLBP, GFAP, Tbr2, Doublecortin (DCX, NeuroD1 and Prox1. We found that massive changes and a local condensation of proliferating precursor cells occurs between postnatal day 7 (P7, near the peak in proliferation, and P14. Before and around P7, the spatial distribution of cells and the co-localization of markers were distinct from the situation in the adult. Unlike the adult SGZ, the marker pair Nestin/Sox2 and the radial glial marker BLBP were not overlapping during embryonic development, presumably indicating different types of radial glia-like cells. Before P7 GFAP-positive cells in the hilus lacked the radial orientation that is characteristic of the adult type-1 cells. DCX, which is concentrated in type-2b and type-3 progenitor cells and early postmitotic neurons in the adult, showed diffuse expression before P7. Intermediate progenitor cell marker Tbr2 became restricted to the SGZ but was found in the granule cell layer and hilus before. Lineage markers NeuroD1 and Prox1 confirmed this pattern.We conclude that the neurogenic niche of adult neurogenesis is in place well before true adulthood. This might indicate that consistent with the hypothesized function of adult neurogenesis in activity-dependent plasticity, the early transition from postnatal neurogenesis to adult neurogenesis coincides with the time, when the young mice start to become active themselves.

  3. Neuropeptide Y2 receptors are involved in enhanced neurogenic vasoconstriction in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradin, Kathryn A; Buus, Carsten L; Li, Jia-Yi; Frøbert, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    The present study addressed the role of neuropeptide (NPY) Y2 receptors in neurogenic contraction of mesenteric resistance arteries from female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arteries were suspended in microvascular myographs, electrical field stimulation (EFS) was performed, and protein evaluated by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In vasopressin-activated endothelium-intact arteries, NPY and fragments with selectivity for Y1 receptors, [Leu31,Pro34]NPY, Y2 receptors, NPY(13–36), and rat pancreatic polypeptide evoked more pronounced contractions in segments from SHR than in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) arteries, even in the presence of the Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBP3226 (0.3 μM, (R)-N(2)-(diphenacetyl)-N-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]D-arginineamide). In the presence of prazosin and during vasopressin activation, EFS-evoked contractions were larger in arteries from SHR compared to WKY. EFS contractions were enhanced by the Y2 receptor selective antagonist BIIE0246TF (0.5 μM, (S)-N2-[[1-[2-[4-[(R,S)-5,11-dihydro-6(6h)-oxodibenz[b,e]azepin-11-y1]-1-piperazinyl]-2-oxoethyl]cyclo-pentyl-N-[2-[1,2-dihydro-3,5 (4H)-dioxo-1,2-diphenyl-3H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl]ethyl]-argininamide), reduced by BIBP3226, and abolished by the combination of BIBP3226 and BIIE0246TF. Immunoblotting showed NPY Y1 and Y2 receptor expression to be similar in arteries from WKY and SHR, although a specific Y2 receptor band at 80 kDa was detected only in arteries from WKY. Immunoreaction for NPY was enhanced in arteries from SHR. In contrast to arteries from WKY, BIIE0246TF increased NPY immunoreactivity in EFS-stimulated arteries from SHR. The present results suggest that postjunctional neuropeptide Y1 and Y2 receptors contribute to neurogenic contraction of mesenteric small arteries. Moreover, both enhanced NPY content and altered neuropeptide Y1 and Y2 receptor activation apparently contribute to the enhanced neurogenic contraction of arteries from SHR. PMID:16715120

  4. Inducible and targeted deletion of the ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions impairs adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and several forms of olfactory behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Wei Pan

    Full Text Available Although adult-born neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB have been extensively characterized at the cellular level, their functional impact on olfactory behavior is still highly controversial with many conflicting results reported in the literature. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms regulating adult SVZ/OB neurogenesis are not well defined. Here we report that inducible and targeted deletion of erk5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the adult neurogenic regions of the adult brain, impairs adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and OB of transgenic mice. Although erk5 deletion had no effect on olfactory discrimination among discrete odorants in the habituation/dishabituation assay, it reduced short-term olfactory memory as well as detection sensitivity to odorants and pheromones including those evoking aggression and fear. Furthermore, these mice show impaired acquisition of odor-cued associative olfactory learning, a novel phenotype that had not been previously linked to adult neurogenesis. These data suggest that ERK5 MAP kinase is a critical kinase signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and provide strong evidence supporting a functional role for adult neurogenesis in several distinct forms of olfactory behavior.

  5. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  6. Slow negative evoked potentials in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta): myogenic versus neurogenic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fria, T J; Saad, M M; Doyle, W J; Cantekin, E I

    1984-02-01

    The influence of myogenic activity on the generation of slow negative evoked potentials (SN10) to octave, toneburst stimuli (0.5-2 Hz) was investigated in 5 rhesus monkeys (M. mulatta) by comparing responses obtained prior to and during total paralysis induced with curare. The SN10 could be easily elicited during paralysis, regardless of stimulus intensity, rate, or frequency. During paralysis, there were no systematic changes in either response latency or amplitude; variability in latency was less than 10% and changes in response amplitude were within 30%. These findings suggest that the myogenic contribution to the SN10 response is negligible and that this response is of neurogenic origin in the rhesus monkey. PMID:6198169

  7. 神经源性肺水肿%Neurogenic pulmonary edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙若鹏; 赵翠芬

    2008-01-01

    @@ Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a type of pulmonary edema that occurs secondary to central nervous sytem (CNS) damage, namely centrogenic pulmonary edema or cerebrogenic pulmonary edema[1,2] NPE is clinically characterized by acute dyspnea and progressive hypoxemia, while tachycardia, hypertension and tachypnea are only nonspecific symptoms in early phase. Early diagnosis of NPE is difficult since chest X-ray shows no remarkable sign or only increased hazy lung markings in early stage[3]. Diagnosis can be made definitely in the late stage of NPE according to the following manifestation : paleness, clamminess, feeling of impending death, rales, frothy pink sputum, hypoxemia and bilateral widespread infiltration on chest roentgenography. However, successful rescue rate is very low and mortality rate could reach as high as 90% at this stage[4-6].

  8. Rapid but not slow spinal cord compression elicits neurogenic pulmonary edema in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2009), s. 269-277. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA309/06/1246 Grant ostatní: EC FP6 projekt RESCUE(FR) LSHB-CT-2005-518233; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MZd(CZ) NR8339; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neurogenic pulmonary edema * rat * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  9. Onabotulinum toxin a (botox®) in the treatment of neurogenic bladder overactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrsted, Malene; Nordsten, Cecilie Bagi; Bagi, Per

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) is a potent presynaptic neuromuscular blocking agent which induces selective, reversible muscle weakness for months when injected intramuscularly. During recent years BT has revolutionized the treatment of previously intractable symptoms of detrusor overactivity. Based on a...... systematic search of the PubMed database, a review of the current literature on the use of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox®) in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity is presented. Onabotulinum toxin A proved to be highly effective in the majority of studies, even though a wide range of injection...... intermittent self/helper catheterization (CIC) may become necessary. Only a few side effects were described, and intravesical onabotulinum toxin A injection seems to be well tolerated. However, details on injection technique, dose interval between injections, etc. are still under debate and only a few...

  10. Neurogenic nitric oxide facilitates the central nociceptive transmission of migraine attacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hebo Wang; Huijun Qi; Shengyuan Yu; Sumian Yang; Ruozhuo Liu

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) can induce migraine attacks at three possible sites of action: nitroxidergic nerves, the vascular endothelium, and the central nervous system. Most previous studies have focused on the former two sites of action. Several experiments using exogenic NO donors have suggested that nitroglycerin may induce migraine via central mechanisms. However, few studies have investigated the source of the NO involved in the central mechanisms of migraine. The present study used a cat model of migraine to represent migraine attacks in humans. We performed immunochemical staining of successive frozen sections of the brainstem and upper cervical spinal cord, and then used c-Fos protein expression to label nerve cell activation. We observed the effects of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, and 7-nitroindozole (7-NI), a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor, on c-Fos and nNOS expression, which were induced by electrical stimulation to the dura mater near the superior sagittal sinus. The results demonstrated that c-Fos or nNOS immunoreactive cells was concentrated in the superficial layers (laminae I and II) of the spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve. L-NAME and 7-NI pre-treatment significantly decreased c-Fos and neurogenic NOS expression; and there was a significant linear correlation between c-Fos and NOS expression (r= 0.858 2, P< 0.01). These findings suggest that neurogenic NO could facilitate migraine nociceptive transmission to second-order neurons of the trigeminal nerve. However, L-NAME and 7-NI may block the activation of neurons in the spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve by inhibiting NO synthesis, and thereby attenuate acute migraine attacks.

  11. Anatomical variations in the brachial plexus roots: implications for diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhard, Vanessa; Smith, Riley; Caldwell, Gregory; Smith, Heather F

    2016-07-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is the most common type of TOS. Typically it results from impingement of the neurovasculature as it passes between the anterior and middle scalene muscles; this classic anatomical relationship being the foundation of clinical diagnosis. Positional testing relies on vascular compromise occurring when the subclavian artery is compressed in this space. This study describes several anatomical variations observed in this relationship. Sixty-five cadavers (35m/30f) were assessed to determine the frequency and extent of brachial plexus branching variants. A total of thirty-one variations from "classic" anatomy were observed (47.7%). In two specimens (3.1%), the entire superior trunk coursed completely anterior to the anterior scalene in a position of relative vulnerability. In 27 instances, a portion of or the entire superior trunk pierced the anterior scalene muscle, and in two, the middle trunk also pierced the muscle belly. Interestingly, while two bilateral branching variations were observed, the majority occurred unilaterally, and almost exclusively on the left side. There were no sex differences in frequency. The high frequency of these variations and their potential to predispose patients to neurogenic TOS suggest that current diagnostic methods may be insufficient in clinical diagnosis. Due to lack of vascular compromise, patients with the piercing variant would not display positive signs on the traditional positional tests. The use of ultrasound to determine the route of the brachial plexus could determine whether this variation is present in patients who suffer from TOS symptoms but lack a diagnosis based on traditional positional testing. PMID:27133185

  12. Stroke increases neural stem cells and angiogenesis in the neurogenic niche of the adult mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Lan Zhang

    Full Text Available The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction.

  13. Sonic hedgehog and notch signaling can cooperate to regulate neurogenic divisions of neocortical progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa K Dave

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hedgehog (Hh signaling is crucial for the generation and maintenance of both embryonic and adult stem cells, thereby regulating development and tissue homeostasis. In the developing neocortex, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh regulates neural progenitor cell proliferation. During neurogenesis, radial glial cells of the ventricular zone (VZ are the predominant neocortical progenitors that generate neurons through both symmetric and asymmetric divisions. Despite its importance, relatively little is known of the molecular pathways that control the switch from symmetric proliferative to differentiative/neurogenic divisions in neural progenitors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that conditional inactivation of Patched1, a negative regulator of the Shh pathway, in Nestin positive neural progenitors of the neocortex leads to lamination defects due to improper corticogenesis and an increase in the number of symmetric proliferative divisions of the radial glial cells. Hedgehog-activated VZ progenitor cells demonstrated a concomitant upregulation of Hes1 and Blbp, downstream targets of Notch signaling. The Notch signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of stem/progenitor cells and the regulation of glial versus neuronal identity. To study the effect of Notch signaling on Hh-activated neural progenitors, we inactivated both Patched1 and Rbpj, a transcriptional mediator of Notch signaling, in Nestin positive cells of the neocortex. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that by mid neurogenesis (embryonic day 14.5, attenuation of Notch signaling reverses the effect of Patched1 deletion on neurogenesis by restoring the balance between symmetric proliferative and neurogenic divisions. Hence, our results demonstrate that correct corticogenesis is an outcome of the interplay between the Hh and Notch signaling pathways.

  14. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard A Awad

    2011-01-01

    Exciting new features have been described concerning neurogenic bowel dysfunction, including interactions between the central nervous system, the enteric nervous system, axonal injury, neuronal loss, neurotransmission of noxious and non-noxious stimuli, and the fields of gastroenterology and neurology. Patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease present with serious upper and lower bowel dysfunctions characterized by constipation, incontinence, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction and altered visceral sensitivity. Spinal cord injury is associated with severe autonomic dysfunction, and bowel dysfunction is a major physical and psychological burden for these patients. An adult myelomeningocele patient commonly has multiple problems reflecting the multisystemic nature of the disease. Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder in which axonal injury, neuronal loss, and atrophy of the central nervous system can lead to permanent neurological damage and clinical disability. Parkinson's disease is a multisystem disorder involving dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems, characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. Recent reports have shown that the lesions in the enteric nervous system occur in very early stages of the disease, even before the involvement of the central nervous system. This has led to the postulation that the enteric nervous system could be critical in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, as it could represent the point of entry for a putative environmental factor to initiate the pathological process. This review covers the data related to the etiology, epidemiology, clinical expression, pathophysiology, genetic aspects, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction, visceral sensitivity, management, prevention and prognosis of neurogenic bowel

  15. Radiological consideration of neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Han; Yu, Yun Jeong; Shin, Hyun Ja [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    We evaluated 104 patients of neurogenic bladder secondary to traumatic spinal cord injury. Those were diagnosed by I. V. P. and V. C. U. at Korea Veterans Hospital during 9 years from January, 1978 to May, 1987. The type of neurogenic bladder, complications and urethral configuration, according to the level of spinal cord injury were discusses. The result were as follows: 1. The incidence of patient according to the level of spinal cord injury was 49 out of 104 in those with vertebral level T7 or above, 15 out of 104 in those with T8-T10 level, and 40 in those with vertebral level T11 or below. The incidence of UMNB was 67.3% in those with vertebral T7 or above, 53.3% in T8-T10. The incidence of LMNB was 62.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 2. Overall incidence of urinary tract calculus was 32.7%. Highest incidence of calculus was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T8-T10. 3. Overall incidence of vesicoureteral reflux was 23.1%. Highest incidence of reflux was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 4. Overall incidence of pyelonephritis was 26.9%. 5. Overall incidence of hydronephrosis was 20.2%. Highest incidence of hydronephrosis was 27.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 6. Almost entire urethra was shown funnel type in 66 out of 73 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra was 7 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra with LMNB was 4 cases, which were occurred only in those with vertebral level T11 or below.

  16. Estimated clinical benefit of protecting neurogenesis in the developing brain during radiation therapy for pediatric medulloblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstrand, M.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin;

    2012-01-01

    We sought to assess the feasibility and estimate the benefit of sparing the neurogenic niches when irradiating the brain of pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) based on clinical outcome data. Pediatric MB survivors experience a high risk of neurocognitive adverse effects, often attributed.......6%-51.2%) with IMAT, IMRT, and IMPT, respectively, while maintaining at least 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the whole-brain target volume. Estimated risks for developing memory impairment after a prescribed dose of 23.4 Gy were 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21%-69%), 44% (95% CI, 21%-65%), 41% (95% CI, 22......%-60%), and 33% (95% CI, 23%-44%) with opposing fields, IMAT, IMRT, and IMPT, respectively. Neurogenic niche sparing during cranial irradiation of pediatric patients with MB is feasible and is estimated to lower the risks of long-term neurocognitive sequelae. Greatest sparing is achieved with intensity...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  20. Short-Term Effect of Percutaneous Bipolar Continuous Radiofrequency on Sacral Nerves in Patients Treated for Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity After Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Ahn, Sang Ho; Cho, Yun Woo; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Kim, Hyo Sung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the short-term effects of bipolar radiofrequency applied to sacral nerves to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods Ten patients with spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were recruited. These subjects were randomized to two groups: intervention (n=5) and control (n=5), members of which received conventional treatment. Voiding diary, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) and the...

  1. Cytoarchitecture and Ultrastructure of Neural Stem Cell Niches and Neurogenic Complexes Maintaining Adult Neurogenesis in the Olfactory Midbrain of Spiny Lobsters, Panulirus argus

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Manfred; Derby, Charles D.

    2011-01-01

    New interneurons are continuously generated in small proliferation zones within neuronal somata clusters in the olfactory deutocerebrum of adult decapod crustaceans. Each proliferation zone is connected to a clump of cells containing one neural stem cell (i.e., adult neuroblast), thus forming a “neurogenic complex.” Here we provide a detailed analysis of the cytoarchitecture of neurogenic complexes in adult spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, based on transmission electron microscopy and labelin...

  2. Differences between the neurogenic and proliferative abilities of Müller glia with stem cell characteristics and the ciliary epithelium from the adult human eye

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Bhairavi; Jayaram, Hari; Singhal, Shweta; Jones, Megan F; Limb, G. Astrid

    2011-01-01

    Much controversy has arisen on the nature and sources of stem cells in the adult human retina. Whilst ciliary epithelium has been thought to constitute a source of neural stem cells, a population of Müller glia in the neural retina has also been shown to exhibit neurogenic characteristics. This study aimed to compare the neurogenic and proliferative abilities between these two major cell populations. It also examined whether differences exist between the pigmented and non-pigmented ciliary ep...

  3. The sythetic endomorphin-1 analog, CYT-1010, inhibits sensory neuropeptide release, acute neurogenic inflammation and heat injury-induced thermal hyperalgesia in rodent models

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Helyes; J. Szolcsanyi; T. Maione

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P released from capsaicin-sensitive afferents induce neurogenic inflammatory and nociceptive actions. Since we have shown that the m opioid receptor agonist endomorphin-1 inhibits sensory neuropeptide outflow, the effects of its synthetic, peptidase-resistant analog, CYT-1010, was studied on CGRP release, acute neurogenic inflammation and thermal hyperalgesia. CGRP release from sensory fibres of isolated rat tracheae was evoked by electrica...

  4. STEM CELL-PAVED BIOBRIDGE FACILITATES NEURAL REPAIR IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Yankee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs display a unique mechanism of action during the repair phase of traumatic brain injury by exhibiting the ability to build a biobridge between the neurogenic niche and the site of injury. Immunohistochemistry and laser capture assay have visualized this biobridge in the area between the neurogenic subventricular zone and the injured cortex. This biobridge expresses high levels of extracellular matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs, which are initially co-localized with a stream of transplanted MSCs, but later this region contains only few to non-detectable grafts and becomes overgrown by newly recruited host cells. We have reported that long-distance migration of host cells from the neurogenic niche to the injured brain site can be attained via these transplanted stem cell-paved biobridges, which serve as a key regenerative process for the initiation of endogenous repair mechanisms. Thus far the two major schools of discipline in stem cell repair mechanisms support the idea of “cell replacement” and the bystander effects of “trophic factor secretion.” Our novel observation of stem cell-paved biobridges as pathways for directed migration of host cells from neurogenic niche towards the injured brain site adds another mode of action underlying stem cell therapy. More in-depth investigations on graft-host interaction will likely aid translational research focused on advancing this stem cell-paved biobridge from its current place, as an equally potent repair mechanism as cell replacement and trophic factor secretion, into a new treatment strategy for traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders.

  5. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain: same regulators, different roles

    OpenAIRE

    Urbán, Noelia; Guillemot, François

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists in adult mammals in specific brain areas, known as neurogenic niches. Adult neurogenesis is highly dynamic and is modulated by multiple physiological stimuli and pathological states. There is a strong interest in understanding how this process is regulated, particularly since active neuronal production has been demonstrated in both the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult humans. The molecular mechanisms that control neurogenesis have been extensively s...

  6. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain: same regulators, different roles.

    OpenAIRE

    Noelia eUrban; François eGuillemot

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists in adult mammals in specific brain areas, known as neurogenic niches. Adult neurogenesis is highly dynamic and is modulated by multiple physiological stimuli and pathological states. There is a strong interest in understanding how this process is regulated, particularly since active neuronal production has been demonstrated in both the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of adult humans.The molecular mechanisms that control neurogenesis have been extensively studied ...

  7. Evidence for Fungal Infection in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Brain Tissue from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, we...

  8. Neurogenic bladder evaluation and management after spinal cord injury: Current practice among urologists working in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Al Taweel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the current trends in the management and surveillance of the NB population secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI or myelomeningocele by certified urologist working in Saudi Arabia and to compare it to the current guidelines. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a 12-points questionnaire distributed to urologists working in Saudi Arabia and registered at the Saudi medical association. The assessment and follow-up of upper and lower urinary tract function in neurogenic bladder patients, their optimal frequency and management of related infections were the topics of inquiry. Results: Of the 272 urologists surveyed, 105 responded, yielding a response rate of 38%. Eighty-nine percent of respondents said that ultrasound was their diagnostic tool of choice for upper tract evaluation. Sixty-one percent of respondents said that they would follow their patients with a multichannel urodynamic study. Forty percent of urologists stated that they would treat asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC was the most common modality chosen for the management of neurogenic bladder in patients with emptying difficulties. Conclusion: This study confirms that most urologists in Saudi Arabia involved with neurogenic bladder management. However, more than one third of the urologists do not have urodynamic machine and only two of the reporting practitioners has a videourodynamic machine. The results emphasize the need for clear guidelines in this field of urology in Saudi Arabia. Highly specialized rehabilitation centers for neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI are required for optimal care and urologist teaching.

  9. The role of sympathetic nervous system in the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema in spinal cord-injured rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Nedvídková, J.; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 1 (2012), s. 1-8. ISSN 8750-7587 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0139; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neurogenic pulmonary edema * sympathetic nervous system * baroreflex Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.484, year: 2012

  10. New grading system for upper urinary tract dilation using magnetic resonance urography in patients with Neurogenic Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Limin; Zhang, Fan; CHEN, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with neurogenic bladder (NB), elevated intravesical pressures can be transmitted to the upper urinary tract, causing hydronephrosis (HN) and ureteral dilation (UD), which are referred to as upper urinary tract dilation (UUTD). Ureteral obstruction at the bladder wall is another cause for UUTD, but is less of a concern. UUTD can lead to chronic renal failure. Therefore, evaluation and protection of UUT function is extremely important in the management for NB. Currently, ...

  11. Harnableitung bei Kindern und Jugendlichen mit neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörung: auch langfristig eine sichere Therapieoption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Einleitung: Pharmakotherapie, der saubere Einmalkatheterismus (clean intermittent catheterization = CIC und die Infektionsprophylaxe sind die drei Säulen der konservativen Therapie bei Patienten mit neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörung. Während der Pubertät werden die Patienten zunehmend unabhängiger vom Elternhaus. Gleichzeitig nimmt jedoch die Compliance der Medikamenteneinnahme und der Durchführung des regelmäßigen CIC ab. Der orthopädische und/oder neurologische Status kann sich ebenfalls verändern. Dies kann letztlich zum Fehlschlagen der konservativen Therapie (Inkontinenz, Restharn, Verschlechterung der Funktion des oberen Harntraktes führen. In einem multidisziplinären Team wird diese Problematik der Kinder und Jugendlichen unter Berücksichtigung der Wünsche des Patienten als auch der medizinischen Ziele (z. B. Schutz der Nierenfunktion in unserer Klinik diskutiert. Die Harnableitung wurde hierbei in einigen Fällen als notwendige Kompromißlösung angesehen. In der vorliegenden retrospektiven Studie untersuchten wir, ob die Harnableitung auch langfristig ein sicheres Verfahren darstellt. Material und Methode: Zwischen 1967 und 1997 erfolgte bei 149 Kindern und Heranwachsenden die Anlage einer Harnableitung. 129 Patienten konnten durchschnittlich 11,8 Jahre (0,8-28,5 nachbeobachtet werden. Das durchschnittliche Alter bei der Operation betrug 12,1 Jahre (0,8-20. Ein Colon-Conduit wurde bei 59 Patienten (in der Mehrzahl der Fälle vor der Ära des CIC und der kontinenten Harnableitung angelegt, eine orthotope Blasensubstitution erfolgte bei 12, eine kontinente kutane Harnableitung bei 58 Patienten (50 % Rollstuhlfahrer. Ergebnisse: Der obere Harntrakt blieb bei 95-97 % der renoureteralen Einheiten (RUE stabil, bzw. verbesserte sich. Alle Patienten mit einer orthotopen Blasensubstitution sind tagsüber kontinent; eine Patientin benötigt zur Sicherheit zeitweise eine Vorlage während der Nacht. 7 der 12 Patienten führen einen

  12. The various types of neurogenic bladder dysfunction: an update of current therapeutic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madersbacher, H

    1990-05-01

    weak reflex detrusor contractions are present. (3) With the combination of an areflexive or hyporeflexive detrusor and a flaccid pelvic floor, passive voiding by abdominal straining or by the Credé manoeuvre is usually recommended, but should be replaced by CIC if this mechanism of bladder emptying creates unphysiological high and dangerous intravesical pressures, or if vesico-uretero-renal reflux is present. Neurogenic urinary stress incontinence is usually associated with this type of lesion and can be successfully treated by the implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter (Scott). However in two thirds of the patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction, additional, usually operative treatment is necessary to meet the criteria for implantation. Moreover, a 30% rate of repair operations must be accepted by patients, but is becoming less frequently required with an improved design of the device.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2235029

  13. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  14. Distribution of PSA-NCAM in normal, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Helen C; Low, Victoria F; Swanson, Molly E V; Dieriks, Birger V; Turner, Clinton; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A

    2016-08-25

    Polysialated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is a membrane bound glycoprotein widely expressed during nervous system development. While commonly described in the neurogenic niches of the adult human brain, there is limited evidence of its distribution in other brain regions. PSA-NCAM is an important regulator of cell-cell interactions and facilitates cell migration and plasticity. Recent evidence suggests these functions may be altered in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). This study provides a detailed description of the PSA-NCAM distribution throughout the human brain and quantitatively compares the staining load in cortical regions and sub-cortical structures between the control, AD and PD brain. Our results provide evidence of widespread, yet specific, PSA-NCAM expression throughout the human brain including regions devoid of PSA-NCAM in the rodent brain such as the caudate nucleus (CN) and cerebellum (CB). We also detected a significant reduction in PSA-NCAM load in the entorhinal cortex (EC) of cases that was inversely correlated with hyperphosphorylated tau load. These results demonstrate that PSA-NCAM-mediated structural plasticity may not be limited to neurogenic niches and is conserved in the aged brain. We also provide evidence that PSA-NCAM is reduced in the EC, a region severely affected by AD pathology. PMID:27282086

  15. NTPDase2 and Purinergic Signaling Control Progenitor Cell Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches of the Adult Mouse Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gampe, Kristine; Stefani, Jennifer; Hammer, Klaus; Brendel, Peter; Pötzsch, Alexandra; Enikolopov, Grigori; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Robson, Simon C.; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Nerve cells are continuously generated from stem cells in the adult mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) and hippocampal dentate gyrus. We have previously noted that stem/progenitor cells in the SVZ and the subgranular layer (SGL) of the dentate gyrus express high levels of plasma membrane-bound nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 (NTPDase2), an ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleoside di- and triphosphates. We inferred that deletion of NTPDase2 would increase local extrace...

  16. Neurogenic bladder: Highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets maybe a better choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Genying; Zhou, Mouwang; Wang, Wenting; Zeng, Fanshuo

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury results not only in motor and sensory dysfunctions, but also in loss of normal urinary bladder functions. A number of clinical studies were focused on the strategies for improvement of functions of the bladder. Completely dorsal root rhizotomy or selective specific S2-4 dorsal root rhizotomy suppress autonomic hyper-reflexia but have the same defects: it could cause detrusor and sphincter over-relaxation and loss of reflexive erection in males. So precise operation needs to be considered. We designed an experimental trail to test the possibility on the basis of previous study. We found that different dorsal rootlets which conduct impulses from the detrusor or sphincter can be distinguished by electro-stimulation in SD rats. Highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets could change the intravesical pressure and urethral perfusion pressure respectively. We hypothese that for neurogenic bladder following spinal cord injury, highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets maybe improve the bladder capacity and the detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, and at the same time, the function of other pelvic organ could be maximize retainment. PMID:26643667

  17. Osteogenic and neurogenic stem cells in their own place: unraveling differences and similarities between niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Lattanzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although therapeutic use of stem cells is already available in some tissues (cornea, blood, skin, in most organs we are far from reaching the translational goal of regenerative medicine. In the nervous system, due to intrinsic features which make it refractory to regeneration/repair,it is very hard to obtainfunctionally-integrated regenerative outcomes, evenstarting from its own stem cells(the neural stem cells; NSCs. Besides NSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have also been proposed for therapeutic purposes in neurological diseases. Yet, direct (regenerative and indirect (bystander effects are often confused, as are MSCs and bone marrow-derived (stromal, osteogenic stem cells (BMSCs, whoseplasticity isactually overestimated (i.e. trans-differentiation along non-mesodermal lineages, including neural fates.In order to better understand failure in the "regenerative" use of stem cells for neurological disorders,it could be helpful to understand how NSCs and BMSCs have adapted to their respective organ niches. In this perspective, here the adult osteogenic and neurogenic niches are considered and compared within their in vivo environment.

  18. Potential neurogenic and vascular roles of nitric oxide in migraine headache and aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, D E

    1999-02-01

    It has long been known that nitrate and nitrite medications consistently cause significant headache as a side effect. Classical research has shown that cerebral vasodilation accompanies the use of these medications. More modern studies suggest that these vasodilators exert their action on blood vessels via nitric oxide and its second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate. This paper reviews research studies and theoretical articles which address the concept that nitric oxide plays a major role in the vasodilation associated with the headache phase of migraine with aura. A brief discussion of nitric oxide biochemistry and pharmacology follows. In addition, there is a review of evidence examining the possible contributions of nitric oxide to the neurogenic and vascular events associated with spreading cortical depression, an animal model of migraine aura. The paradoxical hypotheses that nitric oxide may contribute to both the propagation of spreading cortical depression and its limitation are presented. Finally, a rationale for the experimental use of nitric oxide agonists and antagonists in the abortion of migraine aura is introduced. PMID:15613204

  19. A step-wise approach to sperm retrieval in men with neurogenic anejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Normal fertility is dependent on intravaginal delivery of semen through ejaculation. This process is highly dependent on an intact ejaculatory reflex arc, which can be disrupted through any type of trauma or disease causing damage to the CNS and/or peripheral nerves. Neurogenic anejaculation is most commonly associated with spinal cord injury. This aetiology is especially relevant because most men with spinal cord injuries are injured at reproductive age. Assisted ejaculation in the form of penile vibratory stimulation is the first choice for sperm retrieval in such patients because it is noninvasive and inexpensive. In patients in whom vibratory stimulation fails, electroejaculation is almost always successful. When both methods of assisted ejaculation are unsuccessful, sperm retrieval by aspiration from either the vas deferens or the epididymis, or by testicular biopsy or surgery are reasonable options. In such cases the most inexpensive and least invasive methods should be considered first. The obtained semen can be used for intravaginal or intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26481575

  20. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  1. The anatomical basis and prevention of neurogenic voiding dysfunction following radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X K; Huo, R J

    1991-01-01

    The disorder of neurogenic dysfunction is one of the most important complications of radical hysterectomy. In order to prevent this potential complication, the authors have studied the composition and layers of the pelvic paravisceral structures. The nerve branching and distribution of the pelvic plexus of 12 adult female cadavers were analyzed. From lateral to medial the pelvic paravisceral structure is made up of three layers. The lateral layer is the pelvic visceral fascia, the middle, a vascular layer, and the medial one, a nervous one which consists of the pelvic plexus and subsidiary plexuses. The pelvic plexus and subsidiary plexuses are laid closely to the lateral walls of pelvic organs. The ischial spine was taken as the central point and two perpendicular lines penetrating through the ischial spine were used as the longitudinal axis and transverse axis. According to these landmarks, the pelvic plexus could be divided into three parts: behind the longitudinal axis are the roots of the pelvic plexus, near the longitudinal axis is the uterovaginal plexus, and in front of the longitudinal axis are the branches distributed to bladder and urethra. The pelvic plexus and the uterosacral and cardinal ligaments are closely related. The pelvic and subsidiary plexuses can be damaged in radical hysterectomy and voiding dysfunction may then develop. Some anatomic bases are provided to explain and hopefully prevent this from happening. PMID:1925917

  2. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  3. The blocking effect of iontophoretic administration of lidocaine on neurogenic vascular reactions in rat dental pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostouros, G D; Olgart, L; Edwall, L

    1996-01-01

    The blocking effect of lidocaine on nerve-induced vascular reactions was investigated in lower incisor teeth of anaesthetized rats. Pulpal blood flow was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry. Monopolar electrical stimulation of the rat incisor evoked a biphasic vascular response: an initial vasoconstriction was followed by a long-lasting vasodilation. Iontophoresis of lidocaine on a superficially exposed dentin surface with 60 microA of anodal direct current for 20 min blocked almost completely the stimulus-induced blood flow increase for about 25 min without any systemic effects. Iontophoresis of lidocaine with 40 microA for 20 min was almost without effect. Topical application of a mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (25 + 25 mg/ml) in deep dentinal cavities was also without effect on the neurogenic reactions. Intravenous administration of lidocaine at 5 and 10 mg/kg in rats pretreated with phenoxybenzamine reduced the stimulus-induced increase in blood flow by an average of 29% and 54%, respectively, whereas the remaining alpha-adrenoceptor resistant vasoconstriction was not influenced. The present results show that iontophoresis of lidocaine on exposed dentin blocks nerve-induced vascular responses without causing systemic effects. PMID:9021328

  4. MDM2 inhibition rescues neurogenic and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Stockton, Michael E; Bhuiyan, Ismat; Eisinger, Brian E; Gao, Yu; Miller, Jessica L; Bhattacharyya, Anita; Zhao, Xinyu

    2016-04-27

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). However, the mechanism remains unclear, and effective treatment is lacking. We show that loss of FMRP leads to activation of adult mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) and a subsequent reduction in the production of neurons. We identified the ubiquitin ligase mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) as a target of FMRP. FMRP regulates Mdm2 mRNA stability, and loss of FMRP resulted in elevated MDM2 mRNA and protein. Further, we found that increased MDM2 expression led to reduced P53 expression in adult mouse NSCs, leading to alterations in NSC proliferation and differentiation. Treatment with Nutlin-3, a small molecule undergoing clinical trials for treating cancer, specifically inhibited the interaction of MDM2 with P53, and rescued neurogenic and cognitive deficits in FMRP-deficient mice. Our data reveal a potential regulatory role for FMRP in the balance between adult NSC activation and quiescence, and identify a potential new treatment for fragile X syndrome. PMID:27122614

  5. Compilation of a preliminary checklist for the differential diagnosis of neurogenic stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska Lundie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurogenic stuttering (NS is the most frequently occurring acquired form of stuttering in children and adults. This form of stuttering is primarily caused by neurological incidents. Owing to controversies with regard to similarities between developmental stuttering (DS and NS symptomatology, differential diagnosis is problematic. Differential diagnosis will guide the appropriate management of persons who stutter (PWS.Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and highlight the characteristics of NS in order to compile a preliminary checklist for accurate diagnosis and intervention.Method: An explorative, applied mixed method, multiple case study research design was followed. Purposive sampling was used to select four participants. A comprehensive assessment battery was compiled for data collection.Results: The results revealed a distinct pattern of core stuttering behaviours in NS, although discrepancies existed regarding stuttering severity and frequency. It was also found that DS and NS can co-occur. The case history and the core stuttering pattern are important considerations during differential diagnosis, as these are the only consistent characteristics in people with NS.Conclusion: It is unlikely that all the symptoms of NS are present in an individual. The researchers scrutinised the findings of this study and the findings of previous literature to compile a potentially workable checklist.

  6. Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase–Monoamine Oxidase B-Mediated Cell Death-Induced by Ethanol is Prevented by Rasagiline and 1-R-Aminoindan

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Deyin; Johnson, Chandra; Chen, Kevin; Moussa B. H. Youdim; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Shih, Jean C.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) are effectively used as therapeutic drugs for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, their mechanism of action is not clear, since the neuroprotective effect of MAO B inhibitors is associated with the blockage of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-death cascade, rather than the inhibition of MAO B. Here, we provide evidence that GAPDH potentiates the ethanol-induced activity of MAO B and brain cell toxicity. The le...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism ...

  8. Sensory and other neurogenic effects of exposures to airborne office dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølhave, L.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Attermann, J.

    This Danish Office Dust Experiment investigated the response of 24 healthy non-sensitive adult subjects to exposure to normal office dust in the air (7 μg m -3 clean air, 136 and 390 μg m -3 TSP). The dust had no major identifiable specific reactive components. The exposure duration was 5 1/4 h and was arranged in a climate chamber in controlled atmospheric conditions. Measurements were made acutely at exposure onset, subacutely at exposure end and next day (late). As secondary aims the time course and threshold of any observed effect of the exposures, and the characteristics of any hyperresponding subgroup were investigated. In a questionnaire with 36 questions the dust exposures caused increased acute, subacute and late perceptions of reduced air quality, acute and subacute increased odor intensity, acute eye irritation, acute and late heavy head, subacute feeling of perspiration, and subacute general irritation. Cough increased subacutely during exposures. In addition, a performance test showed effects of dust exposures which also affected "Mood Scale" ratings. No effect was seen on an addition test for distraction, and objective measurements of skin humidity. The overall conclusion of the study is that healthy subjects without hypersensitivity reactions seem to respond to airborne house dust. The responses are both subjective sensory reactions and other neurogenic effects even at exposure levels within the range found in normal buildings. Some of the effects appeared acutely and decreased through adaptation while others increased during prolonged exposure and remained for more than 17 h after the exposure ended. The findings may indicate for this type of dust a threshold level for the dose-response relationships below 140 μg m -3.

  9. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  10. Benign and malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin on FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiation between benign and malignant nerve sheath tumors is difficult based on conventional radiological imaging. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of FDG PET in distinguishing benign from malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin. We performed a retrospective review of the medical record to select patients with nerve sheath tumors who had underdone FDG PET imaging. Fifteen patients (7F: 8M) with benign or malignant nerve sheath tumors were included in this study. Of the 15 patients, 9 were diagnosed with the known neurofibromatosis type I. A total of 19 nerve sheath tumors were included from the 15 patients. All patients had undergone FDG PET to evaluate for malignant potential of the known lesions. Images of FDG PET were semi-quantitatively analyzed and a region of interest (ROI) was placed over the area of the maximum FDG uptake and an average standardized uptake value was taken for final analysis. There were 5 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 5 schwannomas, and 9 neurofibromas. The mean SUV was 2 (ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) for schwannomas, 1.3 (0.7 to 2.5) for neurofibromas, and 8.4 (4.6 to 12.2) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of 14 benign tumors, all except one schwannoma showed a SUV less than 3. When a cutoff SUV of 4 was used to differentiate the nerve sheath tumors, all tumors were correctly classified as benign or malignant, respectively. Among the 9 patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type I. 4 had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and FDG PET accurately detected all the 4 lesions with malignant transformation. According to our results, FDG PET seems to have a great potential for accurately characterizing benign versus malignant nerve sheath tumors. It appears to be extremely useful for patients with neurofibromatosis to localize the lesion with malignant transformation

  11. Benign and malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin on FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, M. J.; Go, D. H.; Yoo, Y. H.; Shin, K. H.; Lee, J. D [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The differentiation between benign and malignant nerve sheath tumors is difficult based on conventional radiological imaging. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of FDG PET in distinguishing benign from malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin. We performed a retrospective review of the medical record to select patients with nerve sheath tumors who had underdone FDG PET imaging. Fifteen patients (7F: 8M) with benign or malignant nerve sheath tumors were included in this study. Of the 15 patients, 9 were diagnosed with the known neurofibromatosis type I. A total of 19 nerve sheath tumors were included from the 15 patients. All patients had undergone FDG PET to evaluate for malignant potential of the known lesions. Images of FDG PET were semi-quantitatively analyzed and a region of interest (ROI) was placed over the area of the maximum FDG uptake and an average standardized uptake value was taken for final analysis. There were 5 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 5 schwannomas, and 9 neurofibromas. The mean SUV was 2 (ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) for schwannomas, 1.3 (0.7 to 2.5) for neurofibromas, and 8.4 (4.6 to 12.2) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of 14 benign tumors, all except one schwannoma showed a SUV less than 3. When a cutoff SUV of 4 was used to differentiate the nerve sheath tumors, all tumors were correctly classified as benign or malignant, respectively. Among the 9 patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type I. 4 had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and FDG PET accurately detected all the 4 lesions with malignant transformation. According to our results, FDG PET seems to have a great potential for accurately characterizing benign versus malignant nerve sheath tumors. It appears to be extremely useful for patients with neurofibromatosis to localize the lesion with malignant transformation.

  12. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salga, Marjorie [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Jourdan, Claire [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Handi-Resp, (EA4047), Versailles (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Neurophysiology, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Medical Imaging, Garches (France); Denormandie, Philippe [Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Garches (France); Genet, Francois [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Military Medical Service, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clamart (France)

    2014-09-14

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  13. Taiwanese Continence Society clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hann-Chorng Kuo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the current evidence and expert opinions on diagnosis and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD in Taiwan. The main problems of NLUTD are failure to store, failure to empty, and combined failure to store and empty. The priority of management of NLUTD should follow the order of: (1 preservation of renal function; (2 freedom from urinary tract infection (UTI; (3 efficient bladder emptying; and (4 freedom from indwelling catheter, and patients' expectation of management should be respected. Management of the urinary tract in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI or multiple sclerosis (MS must be based on urodynamic findings, rather than inferences from the neurologic evaluation. Selecting high risk patients is important to prevent renal function impairment in patients with chronic NLUTD. Patients with NLUTD should be regularly followed up for their lower urinary tract dysfunction by urodynamic study and any urological complication should be adequately treated. Avoiding a chronic indwelling catheter can reduce the incidence of developing a low compliant bladder. Antimuscarinic agents with clean intermittent catheterization (CIC may reduce urological complications and improve quality of life (QoL in patients with NLUTD. Intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A provides an alternative treatment for refractory detrusor overactivity (DO or low compliant bladder and can replace the need for bladder augmentation. When surgical intervention is necessary, we should consider the least invasive type of surgery and reversible procedure first and avoid any unnecessary surgery of the lower urinary tract. Keeping the bladder and urethra in a good condition without interference of the neuromuscular continuity provides patients with NLUTD a chance for future new technologies. It is most important to never give up on improving the QoL in patients with NLUTD.

  14. Botulinum toxin A in the treatment of spinal cord injury patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo A. Alvares

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injections in the detrusor muscle in patients with spinal cord injury and urinary incontinence due to detrusor overactivity and refractory to anticholinergic agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 22 patients with spinal cord injuries, whose bladders were emptied by intermittent catheterization. All patients had detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence that proved difficult to treat, despite using high doses of two different anticholinergics. The pre-treatment assessment included a complete urodynamic study and ultrasonography of the kidneys and urinary tract. A one-month follow-up was completed with urodynamic evaluation and the clinical response was evaluated through outpatient consultations and telephone contact. RESULTS: After the procedure, the maximum cystometric capacity and the bladder reflex volume increased, whereas the maximum detrusor pressure and compliance decreased. The mean duration of continence was 7 ± 7 months. In 18 patients (81.8%, it was necessary to administer anticholinergics to achieve continence. Five patients (22.7% had indication of reinjection, and augmentation cystoplasty was indicated in 9 patients (40.9%. CONCLUSION: The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity refractory to anticholinergics is an option before more invasive treatments, such as augmentation cystoplasty, are attempted. In our study as well as in the literature, there was improvement in most urodynamic parameters. Overall, 40.9% of patients underwent augmentation cystoplasty and 81.8% of patients needed anticholinergic agents to reach urinary continence. Further studies are necessary to improve the procedure and to achieve better clinical results.

  15. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin. PMID:26184852

  16. Co-effects of matrix low elasticity and aligned topography on stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Xi; Yu, Shukui; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Shuming; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Xiaodan; Mao, Haiquan

    2016-05-01

    The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to direct stem cell fate for nerve regeneration is the focus of current intensive research efforts. In this study, a hierarchically aligned fibrillar fibrin hydrogel (AFG) that was fabricated through electrospinning and the concurrent molecular self-assembly process mimics both the soft and oriented features of nerve tissue, thus providing hybrid biophysical cues to instruct cell behavior in vitro and in vivo. The electrospun hydrogels were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing a hierarchically linear-ordered structure from the nanoscale to the macroscale with a soft elastic character (elasticity ~1 kPa). We found that this low elasticity and aligned topography of AFG exhibit co-effects on promoting the neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUMSCs) in comparison to random fibrin hydrogel (RFG) and tissue culture plate (TCP) control after two week cell culture in growth medium lacking supplementation with soluble neurogenic induction factors. In addition, AFG also induces dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to rapidly project numerous long neurite outgrowths longitudinally along the AFG fibers for a total neurite extension distance of 1.96 mm in three days in the absence of neurotrophic factor supplementation. Moreover, the AFG implanted in a rat T9 dorsal hemisection spinal cord injury model was found to promote endogenous neural cell fast migration and axonal invasion along AFG fibers, resulting in aligned tissue cables in vivo. Our results suggest that matrix stiffness and aligned topography may instruct stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth, providing great promise for biomaterial design for applications in nerve regeneration.The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to

  17. Co-effects of matrix low elasticity and aligned topography on stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Xi; Yu, Shukui; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Shuming; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Xiaodan; Mao, Haiquan

    2016-05-21

    The development of novel biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to direct stem cell fate for nerve regeneration is the focus of current intensive research efforts. In this study, a hierarchically aligned fibrillar fibrin hydrogel (AFG) that was fabricated through electrospinning and the concurrent molecular self-assembly process mimics both the soft and oriented features of nerve tissue, thus providing hybrid biophysical cues to instruct cell behavior in vitro and in vivo. The electrospun hydrogels were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy, small angle X-ray scattering assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing a hierarchically linear-ordered structure from the nanoscale to the macroscale with a soft elastic character (elasticity ∼1 kPa). We found that this low elasticity and aligned topography of AFG exhibit co-effects on promoting the neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUMSCs) in comparison to random fibrin hydrogel (RFG) and tissue culture plate (TCP) control after two week cell culture in growth medium lacking supplementation with soluble neurogenic induction factors. In addition, AFG also induces dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to rapidly project numerous long neurite outgrowths longitudinally along the AFG fibers for a total neurite extension distance of 1.96 mm in three days in the absence of neurotrophic factor supplementation. Moreover, the AFG implanted in a rat T9 dorsal hemisection spinal cord injury model was found to promote endogenous neural cell fast migration and axonal invasion along AFG fibers, resulting in aligned tissue cables in vivo. Our results suggest that matrix stiffness and aligned topography may instruct stem cell neurogenic differentiation and rapid neurite outgrowth, providing great promise for biomaterial design for applications in nerve regeneration. PMID:27124547

  18. Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Mechanical Percussion Trauma in Cultured Neurons is not Preceded by Alterations in Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A R; Bak, L K; Rama Rao, K V; Waagepetersen, H S; Schousboe, A; Norenberg, M D

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating neurological disorder that usually presents in acute and chronic forms. Brain edema and associated increased intracranial pressure in the early phase following TBI are major consequences of acute trauma. On the other hand, neuronal injury, leading to neurobehavioral and cognitive impairments, that usually develop months to years after single or repetitive episodes of head trauma, are major consequences of chronic TBI. The molecular mechanisms responsible for TBI-induced injury, however, are unclear. Recent studies have suggested that early mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent energy failure play a role in the pathogenesis of TBI. We therefore examined whether oxidative metabolism of (13)C-labeled glucose, lactate or glutamine is altered early following in vitro mechanical percussion-induced trauma (5 atm) to neurons (4-24 h), and whether such events contribute to the development of neuronal injury. Cell viability was assayed using the release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), together with fluorescence-based cell staining (calcein and ethidium homodimer-1 for live and dead cells, respectively). Trauma had no effect on the LDH release in neurons from 1 to 18 h. However, a significant increase in LDH release was detected at 24 h after trauma. Similar findings were identified when traumatized neurons were stained with fluorescent markers. Additionally (13)C-labeling of glutamate showed a small, but statistically significant decrease at 14 h after trauma. However, trauma had no effect on the cycling ratio of the TCA cycle at any time-period examined. These findings indicate that trauma does not cause a disturbance in oxidative metabolism of any of the substrates used for neurons. Accordingly, such metabolic disturbance does not appear to contribute to the neuronal death in the early stages following trauma. PMID:26729365

  19. Metformin therapy to reduce weight gain and visceral adiposity in children and adolescents with neurogenic or myogenic motor deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Casteels, Kristina; Fieuws, Steffen; van Helvoirt, Maria; Verpoorten, Carla; Goemans, Nathalie; Coudyzer, Walter; Loeckx, Dirk; de Zegher, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this randomized, placebo-controlled study was to explore the effect of metformin in children with a neurogenic or myogenic motor deficit, who are therefore prone to develop overweight, adiposity, and insulin resistance. Study participants (n = 42) had a mean age of 15.5 yr, a short stature (height -2.4 SD), a relatively high BMI (+1.7 SD), and a high body fat fraction (41.9% or +2.8 SD). Abdominal CT confirmed the high fat mass and disclosed a high fraction of visceral fat. As expe...

  20. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  2. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  3. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  4. Long-term follow-up after botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection into the detrusor for treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity in children

    OpenAIRE

    Zeino, Mazen; Becker, Tanja; Koen, Mark; Berger, Christoph; Riccabona, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To prove the long-term efficacy of BTX-A injection in the management of children with neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity. Materials and methods 28 out of 145 children with neurogenic bladder (15 male and 13 female, mean age 10.7 years) who were treated between 2002 and 2010 and became non-responders to conservative treatment were included into the retrospective study. We injected 10-12 U/kg of BTX-A (Botox®) into the detrusor at 20-30 sites, sparing the trigone. The mean follow-up was ...

  5. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  6. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the ... distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ... the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  13. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  18. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  19. Brain mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-01-01

    Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping") aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1) acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2) transformation of data into a common reference, (3) visualization and interpretation of results, and (4) databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prere...

  20. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve measurements to diagnose neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machanic, Bennett I; Sanders, Richard J

    2008-03-01

    A reliable objective test is still needed to confirm the diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS). Over the past 20 years, it has been suggested that responses to medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MAC) and C8 nerve root stimulation could be used for this purpose. Herein, we explore this thesis. A clinical diagnosis of NTOS was established in 41 patients, all of whom underwent surgical decompression. Preoperatively, all patients were studied with MAC sensory neural action potential (SNAP) determinations and C8 nerve root stimulation. Controls were 19 asymptomatic, healthy volunteers. MAC sensory latency on 79 control sides was 1.5-2.4 msec, while latency in 41 symptomatic patients ranged 2.2-2.8 msec. Latency of 2.5 or greater was noted in 30 patients (specificity 99%, sensitivity 73%), confirming a diagnosis of NTOS, while the remaining 11 (27%) fell into the borderline zone of 2.2-2.4 msec. The latency difference between right and left sides in controls was 0-0.2 msec in 17 (89%), while in NTOS patients 31 had a difference of 0.3 msec or more (sensitivity 89%, specificity 63%). Amplitudes of 10 muV or more occurred in 77 of 79 control sides, whereas the amplitude was under 10 muV in 28 patients (specificity 97%, sensitivity 68%). Amplitude ratios between right and left sides in controls were 1.7 or less. Ratios of 2.0 or more were measured in 25 patients (specificity 100%, sensitivity 61%). Using the four diagnostic criteria (latency over 2.4 msec, latency difference between sides of 0.3 or more, amplitude under 10 muV, and amplitude ratios of 2.0 or more), 40 of the 41 patients had at least one of the four diagnostic criteria, 23 patients (56%) had three or four positive criteria, and 12 (29%) had two. C8 nerve root stimulation responses were below normal (56 M/sec) in 54%. MAC measurement is a fairly reliable technique for confirming the diagnosis of NTOS. Latency determination appeared to be a slightly more consistent measurement in this study

  1. A new treatment for neurogenic inflammation caused by EV71 with CR2-targeted complement inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Shaofu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71, one of the most important neurotropic EVs, has caused death and long-term neurological sequelae in hundreds of thousands of young children in the Asia-Pacific region in the past decade. The neurological diseases are attributed to infection by EV71 inducing an extensive peripheral and central nervous system (CNS inflammatory response with abnormal cytokine production and lymphocyte depletion induced by EV71 infection. In the absence of specific antiviral agents or vaccines, an effective immunosuppressive strategy would be valuable to alleviate the severity of the local inflammation induced by EV71 infection. Presentation of the hypothesis The complement system plays a pivotal role in the inflammatory response. Inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system results in a severe inflammatory reaction or numerous pathological injuries. Previous studies have revealed that EV71 infection can induce complement activation and an inflammatory response of the CNS. CR2-targeted complement inhibition has been proved to be a potential therapeutic strategy for many diseases, such as influenza virus-induced lung tissue injury, postischemic cerebral injury and spinal cord injury. In this paper, a mouse model is proposed to test whether a recombinant fusion protein consisting of CR2 and a region of Crry (CR2-Crry is able to specifically inhibit the local complement activation induced by EV71 infection, and to observe whether this treatment strategy can alleviate or even cure the neurogenic inflammation. Testing the hypothesis CR2-Crry is expressed in CHO cells, and its biological activity is determined by complement inhibition assays. 7-day-old ICR mice are inoculated intracranially with EV71 to duplicate the neurological symptoms. The mice are then divided into two groups, in one of which the mice are treated with CR2-Crry targeted complement inhibitor, and in the other with phosphate-buffered saline. A

  2. PET-Scan Shows Peripherally Increased Neurokinin 1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow: Visualizing Neurogenic Inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Magnus; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Appel, Lieuwe; Engler, Henry; Aarnio, Mikko; Gordh, Torsten; Långström, Bengt; Sörensen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In response to pain, neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor availability is altered in the central nervous system. The NK1 receptor and its primary agonist, substance P, also play a crucial role in peripheral tissue in response to pain, as part of neurogenic inflammation. However, little is known about alterations in NK1 receptor availability in peripheral tissue in chronic pain conditions and very few studies have been performed on human beings. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow were therefore examined by positron emission tomography (PET) with the NK1 specific radioligand [11C]GR205171 before and after treatment with graded exercise. The radioligand signal intensity was higher in the affected arm as compared with the unaffected arm, measured as differences between the arms in volume of voxels and signal intensity of this volume above a reference threshold set as 2.5 SD above mean signal intensity of the unaffected arm before treatment. In the eight subjects examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in all subjects but signal intensity decreased in five and increased in three. In conclusion, NK1 receptors may be activated, or up-regulated in the peripheral, painful tissue of a chronic pain condition. This up-regulation does, however, have moderate correlation to pain ratings. The increased NK1 receptor availability is interpreted as part of ongoing neurogenic inflammation and may have correlation to the pathogenesis of chronic tennis elbow. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00888225 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ PMID:24155873

  3. Msxb is a core component of the genetic circuitry specifying the dorsal and ventral neurogenic midlines in the ascidian embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roure, Agnès; Darras, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The tail ascidian larval peripheral nervous system is made up of epidermal sensory neurons distributed more or less regularly in ventral and dorsal midlines. Their formation occurs in two-steps: the ventral and dorsal midlines are induced as neurogenic territories by Fgf9/16/20 and Admp respectively. The Delta2/Notch interaction then controls the number of neurons that form. The genetic machinery acting between the inductive processes taking place before gastrulation and neuron specification at tailbud stages are largely unknown. The analysis of seven transcription factors expressed in the forming midlines revealed an unexpected complexity and dynamic of gene expression. Their systematic overexpression confirmed that these genes do not interact following a linear cascade of activation. However, the integration of our data revealed the distinct key roles of the two upstream factors Msxb and Nkx-C that are the earliest expressed genes and the only ones able to induce neurogenic midline and ESN formation. Our data suggest that Msxb would be the primary midline gene integrating inputs from the ventral and dorsal inducers and launching a pan-midline transcriptional program. Nkx-C would be involved in tail tip specification, in maintenance of the pan-midline network and in a posterior to anterior wave controlling differentiation. PMID:26592100

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  8. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, P.J.; Blok, B.F.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Heerings, M.; Lemmens, W.A.J.G.; Donders, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with

  9. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis : a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F.; Heesakkers, John P.; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A.; Donders, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with

  10. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selective Alpha-Blockers in the Treatment of Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction—Preliminary Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kroll

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of selective α1-blockers in children with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions and increased leak point pressure (LPP. 14 children from age 6 to 16 years with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions (neurogenic bladder and LPP > 40 cm H2O were enrolled in the study. All patients received a selective α1-blocker (doxazosin for 6–8 weeks with an initial dosage of 0.03 mg/kg. During the observation period the continuation of oral anticholinergics, Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC, observation of “urinary dryness” and urinary incontinence periods were recommended. Patients were scheduled for a follow-up visit and urodynamic investigation after 6–8 weeks after the doxazosin therapy was started. In 4 patients, urine leakage occurred at lower pressures; in 9 patients, no significant changes in urine leak point pressures were detected; in 3 patients, there was a significant increase in the bladder capacity; in one patient, deterioration in continence was noted. The differences both in LPP and LPV before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. Our observations are consistent with the conclusions from other studies and showed no evident efficacy of doxazosin in children with neurogenic bladder.

  11. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selective Alpha-Blockers in the Treatment of Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction-Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Paweł; Gajewska, Ewa; Zachwieja, Jacek; Sobieska, Magdalena; Mańkowski, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of selective α1-blockers in children with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions and increased leak point pressure (LPP). 14 children from age 6 to 16 years with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions (neurogenic bladder) and LPP > 40 cm H₂O were enrolled in the study. All patients received a selective α1-blocker (doxazosin) for 6-8 weeks with an initial dosage of 0.03 mg/kg. During the observation period the continuation of oral anticholinergics, Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC), observation of "urinary dryness" and urinary incontinence periods were recommended. Patients were scheduled for a follow-up visit and urodynamic investigation after 6-8 weeks after the doxazosin therapy was started. In 4 patients, urine leakage occurred at lower pressures; in 9 patients, no significant changes in urine leak point pressures were detected; in 3 patients, there was a significant increase in the bladder capacity; in one patient, deterioration in continence was noted. The differences both in LPP and LPV before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. Our observations are consistent with the conclusions from other studies and showed no evident efficacy of doxazosin in children with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26999168

  12. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selective Alpha-Blockers in the Treatment of Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction—Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Paweł; Gajewska, Ewa; Zachwieja, Jacek; Sobieska, Magdalena; Mańkowski, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of selective α1-blockers in children with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions and increased leak point pressure (LPP). 14 children from age 6 to 16 years with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions (neurogenic bladder) and LPP > 40 cm H2O were enrolled in the study. All patients received a selective α1-blocker (doxazosin) for 6–8 weeks with an initial dosage of 0.03 mg/kg. During the observation period the continuation of oral anticholinergics, Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC), observation of “urinary dryness” and urinary incontinence periods were recommended. Patients were scheduled for a follow-up visit and urodynamic investigation after 6–8 weeks after the doxazosin therapy was started. In 4 patients, urine leakage occurred at lower pressures; in 9 patients, no significant changes in urine leak point pressures were detected; in 3 patients, there was a significant increase in the bladder capacity; in one patient, deterioration in continence was noted. The differences both in LPP and LPV before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. Our observations are consistent with the conclusions from other studies and showed no evident efficacy of doxazosin in children with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26999168

  13. Brain mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping" aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1 acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2 transformation of data into a common reference, (3 visualization and interpretation of results, and (4 databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prerequisite for multisubject, multidimensional and multimodal mapping is transformation of individual images to match a standard brain template. To produce brain maps, color, contours, and other visual cues are used to differentiate metabolic rates, electrical field potentials, receptor densities, and other attributes of structure or function. Databases are used to organize and archive data records. By relating the maps to cognitive functions and psychological models, brain mapping offers a prerequisite for the understanding of organizational principles of the human brain.

  14. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain: same regulators, different roles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia eUrban

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis persists in adult mammals in specific brain areas, known as neurogenic niches. Adult neurogenesis is highly dynamic and is modulated by multiple physiological stimuli and pathological states. There is a strong interest in understanding how this process is regulated, particularly since active neuronal production has been demonstrated in both the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of adult humans.The molecular mechanisms that control neurogenesis have been extensively studied during embryonic development. Therefore, we have a broad knowledge of the intrinsic factors and extracellular signalling pathways driving proliferation and differentiation of embryonic neural precursors. Many of these factors also play important roles during adult neurogenesis, but essential differences exist in the biological responses of neural precursors in the embryonic and adult contexts. Because adult neural stem cells are normally found in a quiescent state, regulatory pathways can affect adult neurogenesis in ways that have no clear counterpart during embryogenesis. BMP signalling, for instance, regulates neural stem cell behaviour both during embryonic and adult neurogenesis. However, this pathway maintains stem cell proliferation in the embryo, while it promotes quiescence to prevent stem cell exhaustion in the adult brain. In this review, we will compare and contrast the functions of transcription factors and other regulatory molecules in the embryonic brain and in adult neurogenic regions of the adult brain in the mouse, with a special focus on the hippocampal niche and on the regulation of the balance between quiescence and activation of adult neural stem cells in this region.

  15. Primary Neuronal Precursors in Adult Crayfish Brain: Replenishment from a Non-neuronal Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeman David C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis, the production and integration of new neurons into circuits in the brains of adult animals, is a common feature of a variety of organisms, ranging from insects and crustaceans to birds and mammals. In the mammalian brain the 1st-generation neuronal precursors, the astrocytic stem cells, reside in neurogenic niches and are reported to undergo self-renewing divisions, thereby providing a source of new neurons throughout an animal's life. In contrast, our work shows that the 1st-generation neuronal precursors in the crayfish (Procambarus clarkii brain, which also have glial properties and lie in a neurogenic niche resembling that of vertebrates, undergo geometrically symmetrical divisions and both daughters appear to migrate away from the niche. However, in spite of this continuous efflux of cells, the number of neuronal precursors in the crayfish niche continues to expand as the animals grow and age. Based on these observations we have hypothesized that (1 the neuronal stem cells in the crayfish brain are not self-renewing, and (2 a source external to the neurogenic niche must provide cells that replenish the stem cell pool. Results In the present study, we tested the first hypothesis using sequential double nucleoside labeling to track the fate of 1st- and 2nd-generation neuronal precursors, as well as testing the size of the labeled stem cell pool following increasing incubation times in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Our results indicate that the 1st-generation precursor cells in the crayfish brain, which are functionally analogous to neural stem cells in vertebrates, are not a self-renewing population. In addition, these studies establish the cycle time of these cells. In vitro studies examining the second hypothesis show that Cell Tracker™ Green-labeled cells extracted from the hemolymph, but not other tissues, are attracted to and incorporated into the neurogenic niche, a phenomenon that appears to

  16. Inhibitory effect of mitragynine, an analgesic alkaloid from Thai herbal medicine, on neurogenic contraction of the vas deferens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Yamamoto, Leonardo T; Watanabe, Kazuo; Yano, Shingo; Shan, Jie; Pang, Peter K T; Ponglux, Dhavadee; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Horie, Syunji

    2005-11-26

    The effect of an indole-alkaloid mitragynine isolated from the Thai medicinal herb kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) on neurogenic contraction of smooth muscle was studied in guinea-pig vas deferens. Mitragynine inhibited the contraction of the vas deferens produced by electrical transmural stimulation. On the other hand, mitragynine failed to affect the responses to norepinephrine and ATP. Mitragynine did not reduce KCl-induced contraction in the presence of tetrodotoxin, prazosin and alpha,beta-methylene ATP. Mitragynine inhibited nicotine- or tyramine-induced contraction. By using the patch-clamp technique, mitragynine was found to block T- and L-type Ca2+ channel currents in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. In the Ca2+ measurement by a fluorescent dye method, mitragynine reduced KCl-induced Ca2+ influx in neuroblastoma cells. The present results suggest that mitragynine inhibits the vas deferens contraction elicited by nerve stimulation, probably through its blockade of neuronal Ca2+ channels. PMID:16107269

  17. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel localized to non-neuronal airway cells promotes non-neurogenic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassini, Romina; Pedretti, Pamela; Moretto, Nadia;

    2012-01-01

    inflammation in asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease raises an alternative possibility that airway inflammation is promoted by non-neuronal TRPA1.By using Real-Time PCR and calcium imaging, we found that cultured human airway cells, including fibroblasts, epithelial and smooth muscle cells express...... functional TRPA1 channels. By using immunohistochemistry, TRPA1 staining was observed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells in sections taken from human airways and lung, and from airways and lung of wild-type, but not TRPA1-deficient mice. In cultured human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells...... (BAL) fluid of wild-type mice. This effect of TRPA1 agonists was attenuated by TRPA1 antagonism or in TRPA1-deficient mice, but not by pharmacological ablation of sensory nerves.Our results demonstrate that, although either TRPV1 or TRPA1 activation causes airway neurogenic inflammation, solely TRPA1...

  18. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Channel Localized to Non-Neuronal Airway Cells Promotes Non-Neurogenic Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassini, Romina; Pedretti, Pamela; Moretto, Nadia;

    2012-01-01

    inflammation in asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease raises an alternative possibility that airway inflammation is promoted by non-neuronal TRPA1.By using Real-Time PCR and calcium imaging, we found that cultured human airway cells, including fibroblasts, epithelial and smooth muscle cells express...... functional TRPA1 channels. By using immunohistochemistry, TRPA1 staining was observed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells in sections taken from human airways and lung, and from airways and lung of wild-type, but not TRPA1-deficient mice. In cultured human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells...... (BAL) fluid of wild-type mice. This effect of TRPA1 agonists was attenuated by TRPA1 antagonism or in TRPA1-deficient mice, but not by pharmacological ablation of sensory nerves.Our results demonstrate that, although either TRPV1 or TRPA1 activation causes airway neurogenic inflammation, solely TRPA1...

  19. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors can antagonize neurogenic and calcitonin gene-related peptide induced dilation of dural meningeal vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, S; Williamson, D J; Kaube, H; Goadsby, P J

    2002-01-01

    The detailed pathophysiology of migraine is beginning to be understood and is likely to involve activation of trigeminovascular afferents. Clinically effective anti-migraine compounds are believed to have actions that include peripheral inhibition of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from trigeminal neurones, or preventing dural vessel dilation, or both. CGRP antagonists can block both neurogenic and CGRP-induced dural vessel dilation. Nitric oxide (NO) can induce headache in migraine patients and often triggers a delayed migraine. The initial headache is thought to be caused via a direct action of the NO–cGMP pathway that causes vasodilation by vascular smooth muscle relaxation, while the delayed headache is likely to be a result of triggering trigeminovascular activation. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors are effective in the treatment of acute migraine. The present studies used intravital microscopy to examine the effects of specific NOS inhibitors on neurogenic dural vasodilation (NDV) and CGRP-induced dilation. The non-specific and neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitors were able to partially inhibit NDV, while the non-specific and endothelial NOS (eNOS) inhibitors were able to partially inhibit the CGRP induced dilation. There was no effect of the inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor. The data suggest that the delayed headache response triggered by NO donors in humans may be due, in part, to increased nNOS activity in the trigeminal system that causes CGRP release and dural vessel dilation. Further, eNOS activity in the endothelium causes NO production and smooth muscle relaxation by direct activation of the NO–cGMP pathway, and may be involved in the initial headache response. PMID:12183331

  20. Aging differentially affects male and female neural stem cell neurogenic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Waldron; Althea McCourty; Laurent Lecanu

    2010-01-01

    Jay Waldron1, Althea McCourty1, Laurent Lecanu1,21The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaPurpose: Neural stem cell transplantation as a brain repair strategy is a very promising technology. However, despite many attempts, the clinical success remains very deceiving. Despite clear evidence that sexual dimorphism rules many aspects of human biology, the occurrence of a sex difference in...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

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    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

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    Full Text Available ... medical professionals who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah ... important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ...

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    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

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    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

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    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ...

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    Full Text Available ... problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in ... obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form a ...

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    Full Text Available ... medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration that many people with depression experience ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How ... cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with ...

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... However, recent research points to a possible new class of antidepressants that can relieve symptoms of the ...

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  18. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of ... nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep ...

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    Full Text Available ... mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, ... the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and ...

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    Full Text Available ... speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the brain is wired ... in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can capture split-second changes in the brain. Using MEG, ... The study of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

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  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ... new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body ... stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons ...

  15. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other and with distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues ...

  17. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  18. Aging differentially affects male and female neural stem cell neurogenic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Waldron

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Jay Waldron1, Althea McCourty1, Laurent Lecanu1,21The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada; 2Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, CanadaPurpose: Neural stem cell transplantation as a brain repair strategy is a very promising technology. However, despite many attempts, the clinical success remains very deceiving. Despite clear evidence that sexual dimorphism rules many aspects of human biology, the occurrence of a sex difference in neural stem cell biology is largely understudied. Herein, we propose to determine whether gender is a dimension that drives the fate of neural stem cells through aging. Should it occur, we believe that neural stem cell sexual dimorphism and its variation during aging should be taken into account to refine clinical approaches of brain repair strategies.Methods: Neural stem cells were isolated from the subventricular zone of three- and 20-month-old male and female Long-Evans rats. Expression of the estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, and glucocorticoid receptor was analyzed and quantified by Western blotting on undifferentiated neural stem cells. A second set of neural stem cells was treated with retinoic acid to trigger differentiation, and the expression of neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial markers was determined using Western blotting.Conclusion: We provided in vitro evidence that the fate of neural stem cells is affected by sex and aging. Indeed, young male neural stem cells mainly expressed markers of neuronal and oligodendroglial fate, whereas young female neural stem cells underwent differentiation towards an astroglial phenotype. Aging resulted in a lessened capacity to express neuron and astrocyte markers. Undifferentiated neural stem cells displayed sexual dimorphism in the expression of steroid receptors, in particular ERα and ERβ, and the expression level of several steroid receptors increased

  19. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, Jeppe; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2007-01-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds......), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the...... three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the...

  20. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicker, Jeppe S; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Brunak, Søren

    2007-11-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds, three toxins (ANIT, DMN and NMF) and three non-toxins (Caeruelein, Dinitrophenol and Rosiglitazone). We identified three gene transcripts with exceptional predictive performance towards liver toxicity and/or changes in histopathology. The three genes were: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the literature and the novel finding represents a putative hepatotoxicity biomarker. PMID:17503021

  1. High-concentration L-menthol exhibits counter-irritancy to neurogenic inflammation, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia caused by TRPA1-agonist trans-cinnamaldehyde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hjalte Holm; Gazerani, Parisa; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    volunteers. In one of two sessions, 1) 10% CA alone, 2) 40% L-menthol + 10% CA applied simultaneously were administered for 20min throughout which the subjects rated the pain intensity on a VAS0-10. Extensive quantitative sensory testing was conducted and superficial blood flow (neurogenic inflammation) was......<0.05), secondary mechanical hyperalgesia (P<0.05), and heat hyperalgesia (P<0.05), but not cold hyperalgesia. L-menthol exhibited inhibitory effects on simultaneously established pain, hypersensitivity, and neurogenic inflammation in a human TRPA1-induced pain model. Potent TRPM8-agonists could be...... useful as topical anti-hyperalgesics. The study and the trial protocol is registered and approved by the local research ethics committee under the jurisdiction of the Danish Medicines Agency no.: N-20130005. The protocol also is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov under the no.: NCT02653703. PERSPECTIVE...

  2. Variation in eligibility criteria from studies of radiculopathy due to a herniated disc and of neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis: a structured literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Genevay, Stéphane; Atlas, Steve J.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A structured literature review. SUMMARY OF THE BACKGROUND DATA: Widely recognized classification criteria for rheumatologic disorders have resulted in well-defined patient populations for clinical investigation. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether similar criteria were needed for back pain disorders by examining variability in eligibility criteria in published studies. METHODS: Studies involving radiculopathy due to lumbar herniated disc (HD) and for neurogenic claudicatio...

  3. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) for neurogenic dysphagia: training curriculum of the German Society of Neurology and the German stroke society

    OpenAIRE

    Dziewas, Rainer; Glahn, Jörg; Helfer, Christine; Ickenstein, Guntram; Keller, Jochen; Ledl, Christian; Lindner-Pfleghar, Beate; G. Nabavi, Darius; Prosiegel, Mario; Riecker, Axel; Lapa, Sriramya; Stanschus, Sönke; Warnecke, Tobias; Busse, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurogenic dysphagia is one of the most frequent and prognostically relevant neurological deficits in a variety of disorders, such as stroke, parkinsonism and advanced neuromuscular diseases. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now probably the most frequently used tool for objective dysphagia assessment in Germany. It allows evaluation of the efficacy and safety of swallowing, determination of appropriate feeding strategies and assessment of the efficacy of diff...

  4. Roles of Wnt Signaling in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse Ventricular-Subventricular Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawada, Masato; Huang, Shih-Hui; Ogino, Takashi; Ohata, Shinya; Kubo, Akiharu; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-02-01

    In many animal species, the production of new neurons (neurogenesis) occurs throughout life, in a specialized germinal region called the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ). In this region, neural stem cells undergo self-renewal and generate neural progenitor cells and new neurons. In the olfactory system, the new neurons migrate rostrally toward the olfactory bulb, where they differentiate into mature interneurons. V-SVZ-derived new neurons can also migrate toward sites of brain injury, where they contribute to neural regeneration. Recent studies indicate that two major branches of the Wnt signaling pathway, the Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/planar cell polarity pathways, play essential roles in various facets of adult neurogenesis. Here, we review the Wnt signaling-mediated regulation of adult neurogenesis in the V-SVZ under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26572545

  5. Current Neurogenic and Neuroprotective Strategies to Prevent and Treat Neurodegenerative and Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, I M; Coelho, P B; Costa, P C; Marques, C S; Oliveira, R S; Ferreira, D C

    2015-12-01

    The adult central nervous system is commonly known to have a very limited regenerative capacity. The presence of functional stem cells in the brain can therefore be seen as a paradox, since in other organs these are known to counterbalance cell loss derived from pathological conditions. This fact has therefore raised the possibility to stimulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation or survival by either stem cell replacement therapy or direct administration of neurotrophic factors or other proneurogenic molecules, which in turn has also originated regenerative medicine for the treatment of otherwise incurable neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders that take a huge toll on society. This may be facilitated by the fact that many of these disorders converge on similar pathophysiological pathways: excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, mitochondrial failure, excessive intracellular calcium and apoptosis. This review will therefore focus on the most promising achievements in promoting neuroprotection and neuroregeneration reported to date. PMID:26374113

  6. Onabotulinumtoxin A for Treating Overactive/Poor Compliant Bladders in Children and Adolescents with Neurogenic Bladder Secondary to Myelomeningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was performed to verify the efficacy and safety of Onabotulinumtoxin A (BTX-A in treating children with neurogenic bladder (NB secondary to myelomeningocele (MMC with detrusor overactivity/low compliance. From January 2002 to June 2011, 47 patients out of 68 with neuropathic bladder were selected (22 females, 25 males, age range 5–17 years; mean age 10.7 years at first injection. They presented overactive/poor compliant neurogenic bladders on clean intermittent catheterization, and were resistant or non compliant to pharmacological therapy. Ten patients presented second to fourth grade concomitant monolateral/bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. All patients were incontinent despite catheterization. In the majority of patients Botulinum-A toxin was administered under general/local anesthesia by the injection of 200 IU of toxin, without exceeding the dosage of 12IU/kg body weight, diluted in 20 cc of saline solution in 20 sites, except in the periureteral areas. Follow-up included clinical and ultrasound examination, urodynamics performed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks, and annually thereafter. Seven patients remained stable, 21 patients required a second injection after 6–9 months and 19 a third injection. VUR was corrected, when necessary, in the same session after the BT-A injection, by 1–3 cc of subureteral Deflux®. Urodynamic parameters considered were leak point pressure (LPP, leak point volume (LPV and specific volume at 20 cm H2O pressure. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. All patients experienced a significant 66.45% average increase of LPV (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 7169 × 10 −10 and a significant 118.57% average increase of SC 20 (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 2.466 × 10 −12. The difference between preoperative and postoperative LPP resulted not significant (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 0.8858 No patient presented severe systemic complications; 38/47 patients presented slight hematuria for

  7. Onabotulinumtoxin A for treating overactive/poor compliant bladders in children and adolescents with neurogenic bladder secondary to myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marte, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective study was performed to verify the efficacy and safety of Onabotulinumtoxin A (BTX-A) in treating children with neurogenic bladder (NB) secondary to myelomeningocele (MMC) with detrusor overactivity/low compliance. From January 2002 to June 2011, 47 patients out of 68 with neuropathic bladder were selected (22 females, 25 males, age range 5-17 years; mean age 10.7 years at first injection). They presented overactive/poor compliant neurogenic bladders on clean intermittent catheterization, and were resistant or non compliant to pharmacological therapy. Ten patients presented second to fourth grade concomitant monolateral/bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). All patients were incontinent despite catheterization. In the majority of patients Botulinum-A toxin was administered under general/local anesthesia by the injection of 200 IU of toxin, without exceeding the dosage of 12 IU/kg body weight, diluted in 20 cc of saline solution in 20 sites, except in the periureteral areas. Follow-up included clinical and ultrasound examination, urodynamics performed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks, and annually thereafter. Seven patients remained stable, 21 patients required a second injection after 6-9 months and 19 a third injection. VUR was corrected, when necessary, in the same session after the BT-A injection, by 1-3 cc of subureteral Deflux®. Urodynamic parameters considered were leak point pressure (LPP), leak point volume (LPV) and specific volume at 20 cm H(2)O pressure. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. All patients experienced a significant 66.45% average increase of LPV (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 7169 × 10(-10)) and a significant 118.57% average increase of SC 20 (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 2.466 × 10(-12)). The difference between preoperative and postoperative LPP resulted not significant (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 0.8858) No patient presented severe systemic complications; 38/47 patients presented slight hematuria for 2-3 days. Two

  8. Botulinumtoxin-A in der Behandlung neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörungen bei Kindern: Funktionelle und histomorphologische Langzeitergebnisse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulte-Baukloh H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Die etablierte Therapie der neurogenen Detrusorhyperaktivität bei Kindern besteht in der Gabe von Anticholinergika und begleitendem intermittierendem Einmalkatheterismus. Eine hohe Nebenwirkungsrate der Anticholinergika oder eine nicht ausreichende Dämpfung der Detrusoraktivität limitiert jedoch die Anwendung und zwingt nicht selten zu einem operativen Vorgehen. Wir untersuchten deshalb die Wirksamkeit von Botulinumtoxin-A (BTX-A auf die neurogene Detrusorhyperaktivität bei Kindern mit neurogener Blasenfunktionsstörung. Hierzu wurden 24 Kinder (11 Mädchen, 13 Jungen; 2,5–20 (Ø 11,9 Jahre mit maximalem Detrusordruck 40 cm H2O trotz anticholinerger Medikation in die Studie eingeschlossen. Nach urodynamischer Evaluierung wurden gewichtsadaptiert 85–300 U BTX-A (Botox(R zystoskopisch an 30–40 Stellen in den M. detrusor injiziert. Urodynamische Kontrollen erfolgten nach 1, 3 und 6 Monaten. Urodynamisch fand sich ein erhöhtes Reflexvolumen nach 1 Monat um +84 %, nach 3 Monaten um +68 % und nach 6 Monaten um +23 %. Entsprechend verhielten sich die Maximalkapazitäten: +35 % (nach 1 Monat, +23 % (nach 3 Monaten und +36 % (nach 6 Monaten. Die Maximaldrücke veränderten sich im o.g. Zeitraum um –41 %, –22 % bzw. +4 %. Die korrespondierenden Veränderungen der Inkontinenzrate betrug –46 %, –15 % bzw. –13 %. Bei 5 Kindern konnte jedoch auch mit dieser Therapie keine zufriedenstellende Drucksituation sichergestellt werden; nach der daraufhin durchgeführten Blasenaugmentation fanden sich in den Blasenresektaten histomorphologisch typische BTX-A bedingte Veränderungen, die jedoch in ihrer Ausprägung keinen signifikanten Gradienten aufwiesen. Zusammenfassend läßt sich festhalten, daß es nach Botulinumtoxin-A-Injektion in den Detrusormuskel bei der Mehrzahl der Patienten zu einer ausgeprägten und therapeutisch relevanten Verbesserung sämtlicher urodynamischer Parameter bei sehr guter Verträglichkeit des Medikamentes kommt

  9. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides 'proof of principle' for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  10. Respiratory mechanics in brain injury: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Katsiari, Maria; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Daganou, Maria; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G; Rovina, Nikoletta

    2016-02-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that lung injury occurs shortly after brain damage. The responsible mechanisms involve neurogenic pulmonary edema, inflammation, the harmful action of neurotransmitters, or autonomic system dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation, an essential component of life support in brain-damaged patients (BD), may be an additional traumatic factor to the already injured or susceptible to injury lungs of these patients thus worsening lung injury, in case that non lung protective ventilator settings are applied. Measurement of respiratory mechanics in BD patients, as well as assessment of their evolution during mechanical ventilation, may lead to preclinical lung injury detection early enough, allowing thus the selection of the appropriate ventilator settings to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury. The aim of this review is to explore the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in BD patients along with the underlying mechanisms, and to translate the evidence of animal and clinical studies into therapeutic implications regarding the mechanical ventilation of these critically ill patients. PMID:26855895

  11. Radiographical investigations of organic lesions of the hypothalamus in patients suffering from neurogenic pulmonary edema due to serious intracranial diseases. Relationship between radiographical findings and outcome of patients suffering from neurogenic pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographical investigations of the hypothalamus by computerized tomography (CT) have rarely been performed despite the fact that the damage to the hypothalamus owing to serious intracranial organic diseases may cause neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). We presented 22 consecutive cases of patients suffering from NPE caused by serious intracranial organic diseases and investigated the relationship between NPE and abnormal radiographical findings of the hypothalamus. In 11 cases, organic lesions were noted in the hypothalami and 10 of these patients died of NPE (91.0%). In contrast, of the remaining 11 cases without significant radiographical findings of organic lesions in the hypothalami, only 2 patients were lost (18.2%). In general, various factors including systemic ones are considered to contribute to the prognosis of the patients suffering NPEs caused by serious intracranial diseases. It was concluded that hypothalamic damage was not always found by radiograph in patients with NPE due to critical intracranial diseases, but once abnormal findings in their hypothalamus of these patients were noted, their prognosis would become significantly poor (p<0.05). (author)

  12. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  13. Inhibitory action of antioxidants (ascorbic acid or α-tocopherol) on seizures and brain damage induced by pilocarpine in rats Ação inibitória de antioxidantes (ácido ascórbico e α-tocoferol) nas convulsões e dano cerebral em ratos induzidos pela pilocarpina

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana da Rocha Tomé; Paulo Michel Pinheiro Ferreira; Rivelilson Mendes de Freitas

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of epilepsy in humans. Oxidative stress is a mechanism of cell death induced by seizures. Antioxidant compounds have neuroprotective effects due to their ability to inhibit free radical production. The objectives of this work were to comparatively study the inhibitory action of antioxidants (ascorbic acid or α-tocopherol) on behavioral changes and brain damage induced by high doses of pilocarpine, aiming to further clarify the mechanism of a...

  14. Neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on aligned electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofibers with electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junfeng; Cheng, Liang; Sun, Xiaodan; Wang, Xiumei; Jin, Shouhong; Li, Junxiang; Wu, Qiong

    2016-09-01

    Adult central nervous system (CNS) tissue has a limited capacity to recover after trauma or disease. Recent medical cell therapy using polymeric biomaterialloaded stem cells with the capability of differentiation to specific neural population has directed focuses toward the recovery of CNS. Fibers that can provide topographical, biochemical and electrical cues would be attractive for directing the differentiation of stem cells into electro-responsive cells such as neuronal cells. Here we report on the fabrication of an electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofiber film that direct or determine the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), via combination of aligned surface topography, and electrical stimulation (ES). The surface morphology, mechanical properties and electric properties of the film were characterized. Comparing with that on random surface film, expression of neurofilament-lowest and nestin of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stemcells (huMSCs) cultured on film with aligned surface topography and ES were obviously enhanced. These results suggest that aligned topography combining with ES facilitates the neurogenic differentiation of huMSCs and the aligned conductive film can act as a potential nerve scaffold.

  15. Effectiveness of manipulative physiotherapy for the treatment of a neurogenic cervicobrachial pain syndrome: a single case study -- experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, I M; Phillips, D R

    2002-02-01

    A single case study ABC design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of manipulative physiotherapy in a 44-year-old woman with an 8-month history of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain. Clinical examination demonstrated significant signs of upper quadrant neural tissue mechanosensitivity indicating that neural tissue was the dominant tissue of origin for the subject's complaint of pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed correlating discal pathology at the C5/6 intersegmental level. The study involved a 4-week pre-assessment phase, a 4-week treatment phase and a 2-week home exercise phase. Functional disability was measured using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire and pain was assessed using the McGill Short Form Pain Questionnaire. Cervical motion was measured by a cervical range of motion device (CROM) and the range of shoulder abduction with a mediclino inclinometer. Manipulative physiotherapy treatment involved a cervical lateral glide mobilization technique. Following treatment, visual analysis revealed beneficial effects on pain, functional disability as well as cervical and shoulder mobility. These improvements were maintained over the home exercise phase and at 1-month follow-up. The single case limits generalization of the findings, but the results support previous studies in this area and gives further impetus to controlled clinical trials. PMID:11884154

  16. CROATIAN UROLOGISTS' CLINICAL PRACTICE AND COMPLIANCE WITH GUIDELINES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NON-NEUROGENIC MALE LOWER URINARY TRACT SYMPTOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasković, Igor; Tomić, Miroslav; Nikles, Sven; Neretljak, Ivan; Milicić, Valerija

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Croatian urologists' management of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and their compliance with the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. A cross-sectional survey included 51/179 Croatian urologists. We developed a questionnaire with questions addressing compliance with EAU guidelines. The rate of performing recommended evaluations on the initial assessment of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)/LUTS varied from 8.0% (serum creatinine and voiding diary) to 100.0% (physical examination, prostate specific antigen and ultrasound). The international prostate symptom score was performed by 31%, analysis of urine sediment by 83%, urine culture by 53%, and serum creatinine by 8% of surveyed urologists. Only 8% of urologists regularly used bladder diary in patients with symptoms of nocturia. Our results indicated that 97% of urologists preferred alpha blockers as the first choice of treatment; 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARI) were mostly prescribed (84%) in combination with an alpha-blocker, preferably as a continuous treatment, whilst 29% of urologists used to discontinue 5ARI after 1-2 years. Half of the Croatian urologists used antimuscarinics in the treatment of BPH/LUTS and recommended phytotherapeutic drugs in their practice. In conclusion, Croatian urologists do not completely comply with the guidelines available. PMID:27017719

  17. Neurogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells on aligned electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofibers with electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junfeng; Cheng, Liang; Sun, Xiaodan; Wang, Xiumei; Jin, Shouhong; Li, Junxiang; Wu, Qiong

    2016-07-01

    Adult central nervous system (CNS) tissue has a limited capacity to recover after trauma or disease. Recent medical cell therapy using polymeric biomaterialloaded stem cells with the capability of differentiation to specific neural population has directed focuses toward the recovery of CNS. Fibers that can provide topographical, biochemical and electrical cues would be attractive for directing the differentiation of stem cells into electro-responsive cells such as neuronal cells. Here we report on the fabrication of an electrospun polypyrrole/polylactide composite nanofiber film that direct or determine the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), via combination of aligned surface topography, and electrical stimulation (ES). The surface morphology, mechanical properties and electric properties of the film were characterized. Comparing with that on random surface film, expression of neurofilament-lowest and nestin of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stemcells (huMSCs) cultured on film with aligned surface topography and ES were obviously enhanced. These results suggest that aligned topography combining with ES facilitates the neurogenic differentiation of huMSCs and the aligned conductive film can act as a potential nerve scaffold.

  18. Loss of neurogenesis in Hydra leads to compensatory regulation of neurogenic and neurotransmission genes in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Y; Buzgariu, W; Galliot, B

    2016-01-01

    Hydra continuously differentiates a sophisticated nervous system made of mechanosensory cells (nematocytes) and sensory-motor and ganglionic neurons from interstitial stem cells. However, this dynamic adult neurogenesis is dispensable for morphogenesis. Indeed animals depleted of their interstitial stem cells and interstitial progenitors lose their active behaviours but maintain their developmental fitness, and regenerate and bud when force-fed. To characterize the impact of the loss of neurogenesis in Hydra, we first performed transcriptomic profiling at five positions along the body axis. We found neurogenic genes predominantly expressed along the central body column, which contains stem cells and progenitors, and neurotransmission genes predominantly expressed at the extremities, where the nervous system is dense. Next, we performed transcriptomics on animals depleted of their interstitial cells by hydroxyurea, colchicine or heat-shock treatment. By crossing these results with cell-type-specific transcriptomics, we identified epithelial genes up-regulated upon loss of neurogenesis: transcription factors (Dlx, Dlx1, DMBX1/Manacle, Ets1, Gli3, KLF11, LMX1A, ZNF436, Shox1), epitheliopeptides (Arminins, PW peptide), neurosignalling components (CAMK1D, DDCl2, Inx1), ligand-ion channel receptors (CHRNA1, NaC7), G-Protein Coupled Receptors and FMRFRL. Hence epitheliomuscular cells seemingly enhance their sensing ability when neurogenesis is compromised. This unsuspected plasticity might reflect the extended multifunctionality of epithelial-like cells in early eumetazoan evolution. PMID:26598723

  19. cis-Regulatory control of the initial neurogenic pattern of onecut gene expression in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julius C; Davidson, Eric H

    2016-01-01

    Specification of the ciliated band (CB) of echinoid embryos executes three spatial functions essential for postgastrular organization. These are establishment of a band about 5 cells wide which delimits and bounds other embryonic territories; definition of a neurogenic domain within this band; and generation within it of arrays of ciliary cells that bear the special long cilia from which the structure derives its name. In Strongylocentrotus purpuratus the spatial coordinates of the future ciliated band are initially and exactly determined by the disposition of a ring of cells that transcriptionally activate the onecut homeodomain regulatory gene, beginning in blastula stage, long before the appearance of the CB per se. Thus the cis-regulatory apparatus that governs onecut expression in the blastula directly reveals the genomic sequence code by which these aspects of the spatial organization of the embryo are initially determined. We screened the entire onecut locus and its flanking region for transcriptionally active cis-regulatory elements, and by means of BAC recombineered deletions identified three separated and required cis-regulatory modules that execute different functions. The operating logic of the crucial spatial control module accounting for the spectacularly precise and beautiful early onecut expression domain depends on spatial repression. Previously predicted oral ectoderm and aboral ectoderm repressors were identified by cis-regulatory mutation as the products of goosecoid and irxa genes respectively, while the pan-ectodermal activator SoxB1 supplies a transcriptional driver function. PMID:26522848

  20. Hypothalamic tanycytes - masters and servants of metabolic, neuroendocrine and neurogenic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy eGoodman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a resurgent interest in tanycytes, a radial glial-like cell population occupying the floor and ventro-lateral walls of the third ventricle (3V. Tanycytes reside in close proximity to hypothalamic neuronal nuclei that regulate appetite and energy expenditure, with a subset sending projection into these nuclei. Moreover, tanycytes are exposed to 3V cerebrospinal fluid and have privileged access to plasma metabolites and hormones, through fenestrated capillaries. Indeed, some tanycytes act as conduits for trafficking of these molecules into the brain parenchyma. Tanycytes can also act as neural stem/ progenitor cells, supplying the postnatal and adult hypothalamus with new neurons. Collectively, these findings suggest that tanycytes regulate and integrate important trophic and metabolic processes and possibly endow functional malleability to neuronal circuits of the hypothalamus. Hence, manipulation of tanycyte biology could provide a valuable tool for modulating hypothalamic functions such as energy uptake and expenditure in order to tackle prevalent eating disorders such as obesity and anorexia.

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  8. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  10. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... piece of tumor for a biopsy Remove abnormal brain tissue Drain blood or an infection Free a nerve The bone flap is usually replaced after surgery, using small metal ... or if the brain was swollen. (This is called a craniectomy.) The ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ... In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ... a person responds to a certain medication. This information may someday ... is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that could change the ...

  16. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  17. Brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT in the past was not widely accepted because of poor usability of a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. Recently, technical advancements in the accelerator field have made accelerator-based BNCT feasible. Consequently, clinical trials of intractable brain tumors have started using it since 2012. In this review, our clinical results obtained from conventional reactor-based BNCT for treatment of brain tumors are introduced. It is strong hope that accelerator-based BNCT becomes a standard therapy for current intractable brain tumors. (author)

  18. A study of brain MRI findings and clinical response of bladder empting failure in brain bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoda, Keiichi (Yamashina Aiseikai Hospital, Kyoto (Japan)); Watanabe, Kousuke

    1993-02-01

    In 45 patients (38 males and 7 females; average age:78 years) with brain bladder, who did not have any peripheral neuropathies and spinal disturbance, cerebral findings of MRI (1.5 T) T[sub 2] enhanced image were analyzed in comparison with those of 7 control patients with normal urination after BPH operations. Patients with neurogenic bladder were divided into three groups as follows: 33 patients with a chief complaint of urinary disturbance (Group I), 9 patients with urinary incontinence (Group II) and 3 patients with balanced bladder (Group III). High frequency of lacune (24%) of the globus pallidus and low signalling of the corpus striatum (30%) was found in Group I patients, but low frequency in other Group patients and control patients. Furthermore, pathologic changes with various grades in the globus pallidus were observed in 91% of Group I patients. In the treatment of urinary disturbance, a high improvement rate of micturition disorder (77%) was obtained in patients treated with a combination of dantrolene and TURp (TUIbn for females). However, patients who had clear lacune of the globus pallidus showed the low improvement rate. It should be possible that the globus pallidus contributes to control the movement of the external sphincter and the pelvic base muscles as well as other striated muscles. Moreover, lacune was rarely found in the urination center of the brain-stem on MRI. (author).

  19. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Lebl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Results: Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%, urgency incontinence (56.0%, urinary retention (8.0%, nocturnal enuresis (70.0%, urinary tract infections (62.0%, constipation (62.0%, and fecal incontinence (16.0% were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. Conclusions: This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment.

  20. Diminished neurogenic femoral artery vasoconstrictor response in a Zucker obese rat model: differential regulation of NOS and COX derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Martínez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Peripheral arterial disease is one of the macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study addresses femoral artery regulation in a prediabetic model of obese Zucker rats (OZR by examining cross-talk between endothelial and neural factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial preparations from lean (LZR and OZR were subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS on basal tone. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX isoform expression patterns were determined by immunohistochemical labelling and Western blotting. Results indicate significantly reduced noradrenergic contractions in preparations from OZR compared with those of LZR. Functional inhibition of endothelial NOS (eNOS indicated a predominant role of this isoform in LZR and its modified activity in OZR. Neural (nNOS and inducible NOS (iNOS were activated and their expression was higher in femoral arteries from OZR. Neurotransmission modulated by large-conductance Ca2+-activated (BKCa or voltage-dependent (KV K+ channels did not seem compromised in the obese animals. Endothelial COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed in LZR and an additional adventitial location of COX-2 was also observed in OZR, explaining the higher COX-2 protein levels detected in this group. Prostanoids derived from both isoforms helped maintain vasoconstriction in LZR while in OZR only COX-2 was active. Superoxide anion inhibition reduced contractions in endothelium-intact arteries from OZR. CONCLUSIONS: Endothelial dysfunction led to reduced neurogenic vasoconstriction in femoral arteries from OZR. In a setting of obesity, NO-dependent nNOS and iNOS dilation activity could be an alternative mechanism to offset COX-2- and reactive oxygen species-mediated vasoconstriction, along with impaired endothelial NO relaxation.

  1. Brain and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens / Drug Facts / Brain and Addiction Brain and Addiction Print Your Brain Your brain is who you ... is taken over and over. What Is Drug Addiction? Addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes ...

  2. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ... normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in controlling movement, managing the release of various hormones, and aiding the flow of information to the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... or serious and cause severe disability. Through research, we know that mental disorders are brain disorders. Evidence ... many different types of cells in the body. We say that cells differentiate as the embryo develops, ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the ... reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Outreach Home Public Involvement Outreach Partners Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... to another. Share Science News Connectome Re-Maps Human Cortex ECT Lifts Depression, Sustains Remission in Older ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons ... depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the ... disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous system. ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... he saw, Sarah's husband took her to the doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms ... a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want ... the brain. The hippocampus may be involved in mood disorders through its control of a major mood circuit ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... NIMH Strategic Plan in 2016 August 31, 2016, 2:00-3:00 PM ET General Health Information ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... sends impulses and extends from cell bodies to meet and deliver impulses to another nerve cell. Axons ... in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Alliance for Research Progress Coalition for Research Progress Legislative Activities Research Priorities Research Priorities Home Research Areas ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing ... understanding of genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for ...

  5. Brain Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Love Your Brain Stay Physically Active Adopt a Healthy Diet Stay Mentally and Socially Active We Can Help ... of any wellness plan. Learn More Adopt a Healthy Diet > Eat a heart-healthy diet that benefits both ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting to NIMH National Institutes of ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses, such as depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in the code for a gene, which may be harmless or even helpful, but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the ... as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... mental disorder, or perhaps you have experienced one yourself at some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her husband ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a friend, colleague, or relative with a mental disorder, or ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These factors may act alone or together in complex ways, to change the way a gene is ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ... Severe Irritability, 12-1:00 PM ET National Prevention Week May 15-21, 2016 General Health Information ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Director’s Blog Budget Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Health & Education Mental Health Information Publications Educational Resources Clinical Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction ...

  9. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  10. Using an Integrated -Omics Approach to Identify Key Cellular Processes That Are Disturbed in the Kidney After Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M Z; Huang, H; Kaisar, M; Lo Faro, M L; Rebolledo, R; Morten, K; Heather, L C; Dona, A; Leuvenink, H G; Fuggle, S V; Kessler, B M; Pugh, C W; Ploeg, R J

    2016-05-01

    In an era where we are becoming more reliant on vulnerable kidneys for transplantation from older donors, there is an urgent need to understand how brain death leads to kidney dysfunction and, hence, how this can be prevented. Using a rodent model of hemorrhagic stroke and next-generation proteomic and metabolomic technologies, we aimed to delineate which key cellular processes are perturbed in the kidney after brain death. Pathway analysis of the proteomic signature of kidneys from brain-dead donors revealed large-scale changes in mitochondrial proteins that were associated with altered mitochondrial activity and morphological evidence of mitochondrial injury. We identified an increase in a number of glycolytic proteins and lactate production, suggesting a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. Higher amounts of succinate were found in the brain death group, in conjunction with increased markers of oxidative stress. We characterized the responsiveness of hypoxia inducible factors and found this correlated with post-brain death mean arterial pressures. Brain death leads to metabolic disturbances in the kidney and alterations in mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species generation. This metabolic disturbance and alteration in mitochondrial function may lead to further cellular injury. Conditioning the brain-dead organ donor by altering metabolism could be a novel approach to ameliorate this brain death-induced kidney injury. PMID:26602379

  11. Roles of TRPV1 and neuropeptidergic receptors in dorsal root reflex-mediated neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Xiaoju

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute cutaneous neurogenic inflammation initiated by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 receptors following intradermal injection of capsaicin is mediated mainly by dorsal root reflexes (DRRs. Inflammatory neuropeptides are suggested to be released from primary afferent nociceptors participating in inflammation. However, no direct evidence demonstrates that the release of inflammatory substances is due to the triggering of DRRs and how activation of TRPV1 receptors initiates neurogenic inflammation via triggering DRRs. Results Here we used pharmacological manipulations to analyze the roles of TRPV1 and neuropeptidergic receptors in the DRR-mediated neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin. The degree of cutaneous inflammation in the hindpaw that followed capsaicin injection was assessed by measurements of local blood flow (vasodilation and paw-thickness (edema of the foot skin in anesthetized rats. Local injection of capsaicin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP or substance P (SP resulted in cutaneous vasodilation and edema. Removal of DRRs by either spinal dorsal rhizotomy or intrathecal administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, reduced dramatically the capsaicin-induced vasodilation and edema. In contrast, CGRP- or SP-induced inflammation was not significantly affected after DRR removal. Dose-response analysis of the antagonistic effect of the TRPV1 receptor antagonist, capsazepine administered peripherally, shows that the capsaicin-evoked inflammation was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner, and nearly completely abolished by capsazepine at doses between 30–150 μg. In contrast, pretreatment of the periphery with different doses of CGRP8–37 (a CGRP receptor antagonist or spantide I (a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist only reduced the inflammation. If both CGRP and NK1 receptors were blocked by co-administration of CGRP8–37 and spantide I

  12. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG)

  13. Adult neurogenesis in the crayfish brain: proliferation, migration, and possible origin of precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Allodi, Silvana; Sandeman, David C; Beltz, Barbara S

    2009-06-01

    The birth of new neurons and their incorporation into functional circuits in the adult brain is a characteristic of many vertebrate and invertebrate organisms, including decapod crustaceans. Precursor cells maintaining life-long proliferation in the brains of crayfish (Procambarus clarkii, Cherax destructor) and clawed lobsters (Homarus americanus) reside within a specialized niche on the ventral surface of the brain; their daughters migrate to two proliferation zones along a stream formed by processes of the niche precursors. Here they divide again, finally producing interneurons in the olfactory pathway. The present studies in P. clarkii explore (1) differential proliferative activity among the niche precursor cells with growth and aging, (2) morphological characteristics of cells in the niche and migratory streams, and (3) aspects of the cell cycle in this lineage. Morphologically symmetrical divisions of neuronal precursor cells were observed in the niche near where the migratory streams emerge, as well as in the streams and proliferation zones. The nuclei of migrating cells elongate and undergo shape changes consistent with nucleokinetic movement. LIS1, a highly conserved dynein-binding protein, is expressed in cells in the migratory stream and neurogenic niche, implicating this protein in the translocation of crustacean brain neuronal precursor cells. Symmetrical divisions of the niche precursors and migration of both daughters raised the question of how the niche precursor pool is replenished. We present here preliminary evidence for an association between vascular cells and the niche precursors, which may relate to the life-long growth and maintenance of the crustacean neurogenic niche. PMID:19294644

  14. Neurogenic Responses to Amyloid-Beta Plaques in the Brain of Alzheimer's Disease-Like Transgenic (pPDGF-APPSw,Ind) Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Li; Qiao, Shuhong; Lan, Xun; Chi, Liying; Luo, Chun; Lien, Lindsey; Liu, Qing Yan; Liu, Rugao

    2007-01-01

    Formation and accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques are associated with declined memory and other neurocognitive function in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. However, the effects of Aβ plaques on neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurogenesis from NPCs remain largely unknown. The existing data on neurogenesis in AD patients and AD-like animal models remain controversial. For this reason, we utilized the nestin second-intron enhancer controlled LacZ (pNes-LacZ) reporter transgenic mice ...

  15. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBS; Organic mental disorder (OMS); Chronic organic brain syndrome ... Listed below are disorders associated with OBS. Brain injury caused by ... the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage ) Blood clot inside the ...

  16. Electrophysiological monitoring and identification of neural roots during somatic-autonomic reflex pathway procedure for neurogenic bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Cheng-fu; XIAO Chuan-guo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To identify and separate the ventral root from dorsal root, which is the key for success of the artificial somatic-autonomic reflex pathway procedure for neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here we report the results of intra-operating room monitoring with 10 paralyzed patients.Methods: Ten male volunteers with complete suprasacral SCI underwent the artificial somatic-autonomic procedure under general anesthesia. Vastus medialis, tibialis anticus and gastrocnemius medialis of the left lower limb were monitored for electromyogram (EMG) activities resulted from L4, L5, and S1 stimulation respectively to differentiate the ventral root from dorsal root. A Laborie Urodynamics system was connected with a three channel urodynamic catheter inserted into the bladder. The L2 and L3 roots were stimulated separately while the intravesical pressure was monitored to evaluate the function of each root.Results: The thresholds of stimulation on ventral root were 0.02 ms duration, 0.2-0.4 mA, (mean 0.3 mA±0.07 mA), compared with 0.2-0.4 ms duration, 1.5-3 mA (mean 2.3 mA±0.5 mA)for dorsal root (P<0.01) to cause revoked potentials and EMG. Electrical stimulation on L4 roots resulted in the EMG being recorded mainly on vastus medialis, while stimulation on L5 or S1 roots caused electrical activities of tibialis anticus or gastrocnemius medialis respectively. The continuous stimulation for about 3-5 seconds on S2 or S3 ventral root (0.02 ms, 20 Hz, and 0.4 mA) could resulted in bladder detrusor contraction, but the strongest bladder contraction over 50 cm H2O was usually caused by stimulation on S3 ventral root in 7 of the 10 patients.Conclusions: Intra-operating room electrophysiological monitoring is of great help to identify and separate ventral root from dorsal root, and to select the appropriate sacral ventral root for best bladder reinnervation. Different parameters and thresholds on different roots are the most important factors to keep in mind to

  17. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant peripheral nerve-sheath tumors and non-neurogenic malignant soft-tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the sensitivity and specificity of MRI criteria in the differentiation between malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) and non-neurogenic malignant soft-tissue tumors (MSTT). MRI examinations of 105 patients with pathologically proven malignant soft-tissue lesions (35 MPNST and 70 MSTT) were retrospectively reviewed, the reviewers being unaware of the pathological diagnosis. Using a standardized protocol, the tumors were evaluated for multiple parameters regarding morphology and appearance on different sequences before and after gadolinium contrast administration (location, distribution, delineation, homogeneity, size, shape, relationship to bone and neurovascular bundle, intralesional hemorrhage, necrosis, perilesional edema, lymphangitis and signal intensities). Results were compared using a chi-square or Fisher's exact test. MRI findings suggestive of MPNST (p<0,05) were intermuscular distribution, location on the course of a large nerve, nodular morphology, and overall non-homogeneity on T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images after gadolinium contrast injection. MRI findings in favor of MSTT were intramuscular distribution, ill-delineated appearance of more than 20% of the lesion's circumference, and presence of intralesional blood vessels, perilesional edema and lymphangitis. There is no significant difference for degree and pattern of enhancement after gadolinium contrast injection, nor for presence of bone involvement or cystic or necrotic areas. MRI provides several features that contribute to the differentiation between MPNST and non-neurogenic malignant soft-tissue tumors. MRI findings suggestive of MPNST should be helpful to pathologists in the strategy for further examination. (orig.)

  18. DYRK1A-mediated Cyclin D1 Degradation in Neural Stem Cells Contributes to the Neurogenic Cortical Defects in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sònia Najas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cerebral cortex connectivity lead to intellectual disability and in Down syndrome, this is associated with a deficit in cortical neurons that arises during prenatal development. However, the pathogenic mechanisms that cause this deficit have not yet been defined. Here we show that the human DYRK1A kinase on chromosome 21 tightly regulates the nuclear levels of Cyclin D1 in embryonic cortical stem (radial glia cells, and that a modest increase in DYRK1A protein in transgenic embryos lengthens the G1 phase in these progenitors. These alterations promote asymmetric proliferative divisions at the expense of neurogenic divisions, producing a deficit in cortical projection neurons that persists in postnatal stages. Moreover, radial glial progenitors in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome have less Cyclin D1, and Dyrk1a is the triplicated gene that causes both early cortical neurogenic defects and decreased nuclear Cyclin D1 levels in this model. These data provide insights into the mechanisms that couple cell cycle regulation and neuron production in cortical neural stem cells, emphasizing that the deleterious effect of DYRK1A triplication in the formation of the cerebral cortex begins at the onset of neurogenesis, which is relevant to the search for early therapeutic interventions in Down syndrome.

  19. Quick note on tissue engineering-based surgical measures to treat patients with neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/sphincter dyssynergia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Contardo

    2015-01-01

    To treat the neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/urethral rhabdosphincter dyssynergia, early combined clean intermittent catheterization/ pharmacotherapy (anticholinergic-, β3-adrenoceptor agonist drugs) management may be at times crowned with success of preserving an adequate bladder compliance and renal safe conditions.The persistence, instead, of elevated bladder filling pressure levels with high voiding pressure/uroflow values, together with aberrant urethral rhabdosphincter electromyographic findings, make necessary the resort to surgery strategies, among which - a part from rhabdosphincterotomy or alternatively intrasphincteric botulinum A toxin injection or urethral stent insertion - the bladder augmentation cystoplasty, with either reconfigurated bowel- or gastric segment, is today the most efficacious surgical measure to increase the bladder urinary storage meanwhile lowering bladder filling pressure. Given the enterocistoplasty-dependent both potential systemic metabolic imbalances - such as hyperchloremic acidosis/hypokaliemia, hyperoxaluria, bone demineralization, chologenic diarrhoea/steatorrhoea, vit B12 deficiency - together with bowel prosthetic mucus overproduction-due recurrent stone formation, and, sometimes, malignant complications particularly at the intestinal-urinary tract suture line, tissue engineering techniques have been taken into consideration, more than twenty years ago, as alternative measure for bladder augmentation cystoplasty, until to reach successful clinical validation just in patients suffering from either congenital dysraphism- or acquired spinal cord injury-dependent neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, also the tissue engineering-made augmentation cistoplasty, as well as that bowel-based one, unfortunately remains influenced by spinal cord neuropathydue dysfunctional effects, hence the tissue engineering research could be today directed to suitably overcome such disadvantageous conditions. PMID:26042661

  20. Exercise as a pro-cognitive, pro-neurogenic and anti-inflammatory intervention in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sinéad M; Kelly, Áine M

    2016-05-01

    It is now well established, at least in animal models, that exercise elicits potent pro-cognitive and pro-neurogenic effects. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the leading causes of dementia and represents one of the greatest burdens on healthcare systems worldwide, with no effective treatment for the disease to date. Exercise presents a promising non-pharmacological option to potentially delay the onset of or slow down the progression of AD. Exercise interventions in mouse models of AD have been explored and have been found to reduce amyloid pathology and improve cognitive function. More recent studies have expanded the research question by investigating potential pro-neurogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of exercise. In this review we summarise studies that have examined exercise-mediated effects on AD pathology, cognitive function, hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroinflammation in transgenic mouse models of AD. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the optimum exercise conditions required to elicit the greatest benefits, taking into account age and pathology of the model, as well as type and duration of exercise. PMID:27039886

  1. Predators inhibit brain cell proliferation in natural populations of electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Kent D; Tran, Alex; Ragazzi, Michael A; Krahe, Rüdiger; Salazar, Vielka L

    2016-02-10

    Compared with laboratory environments, complex natural environments promote brain cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Predators are one important feature of many natural environments, but, in the laboratory, predatory stimuli tend to inhibit brain cell proliferation. Often, laboratory predatory stimuli also elevate plasma glucocorticoids, which can then reduce brain cell proliferation. However, it is unknown how natural predators affect cell proliferation or whether glucocorticoids mediate the neurogenic response to natural predators. We examined brain cell proliferation in six populations of the electric fish, Brachyhypopomus occidentalis, exposed to three forms of predator stimuli: (i) natural variation in the density of predatory catfish; (ii) tail injury, presumably from predation attempts; and (iii) the acute stress of capture. Populations with higher predation pressure had lower density of proliferating (PCNA+) cells, and fish with injured tails had lower proliferating cell density than those with intact tails. However, plasma cortisol did not vary at the population level according to predation pressure or at the individual level according to tail injury. Capture stress significantly increased cortisol, but only marginally decreased cell proliferation. Thus, it appears that the presence of natural predators inhibits brain cell proliferation, but not via mechanisms that depend on changes in basal cortisol levels. This study is the first demonstration of predator-induced alteration of brain cell proliferation in a free-living vertebrate. PMID:26842566

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain area has been linked to ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social ... —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research ... magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in the code for a ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as ... making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC are involved in using short-term or "working" ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  7. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of cap

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive ... events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin — ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry ... MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government agencies and health-related organizations, available in both English and Spanish ( Español ) ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ... decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter that regulates ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked ... we see, and help us to solve a problem. Some of the regions most commonly ... also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... ADHD , schizophrenia , and depression . Hippocampus —Helps create and file new memories. When the hippocampus is damaged, a ... portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A ...

  15. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

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    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  16. Brain tumor - children

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    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  17. Unruptured Brain Aneurysms

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    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  18. Brain Aneurysm: Treatment Options

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    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  19. Diabetic Ulcer (Neurogenic Ulcer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... commonly occur on the pressure points of the foot: the ball, heel, and side of the foot if a person's shoes are too tight. However, ... streaking up the leg, drainage of the area, pain, foul odor, rising blood glucose, ... of the top of the foot. Your doctor may have you wear a special ...

  20. Sarcopenia, a Neurogenic Syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia is an aging-associated condition, which is currently characterized by the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. However, there is no consensus regarding its characterization hitherto. As the world older adult population is on the rise, the impact of sarcopenia becomes greater. Due to the lack of effective treatments, sarcopenia is still a persisting problem among the global older adults and should not be overlooked. As a result, it is vital to investigate deeper into the mechani...

  1. Influence of post-traumatic stress disorder on neuroinflammation and cell proliferation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Acosta

    Full Text Available Long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI are closely associated with the development of severe psychiatric disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, yet preclinical studies on pathological changes after combined TBI with PTSD are lacking. In the present in vivo study, we assessed chronic neuroinflammation, neuronal cell loss, cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in specific brain regions of adult Sprague-Dawley male rats following controlled cortical impact model of moderate TBI with or without exposure to PTSD. Eight weeks post-TBI, stereology-based histological analyses revealed no significant differences between sham and PTSD alone treatment across all brain regions examined, whereas significant exacerbation of OX6-positive activated microglial cells in the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle, but not cerebellum, in animals that received TBI alone and combined TBI-PTSD compared with PTSD alone and sham treatment. Additional immunohistochemical results revealed a significant loss of CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of TBI alone and TBI-PTSD compared to PTSD alone and sham treatment. Further examination of neurogenic niches revealed a significant downregulation of Ki67-positive proliferating cells, but not DCX-positive neuronally migrating cells in the neurogenic subgranular zone and subventricular zone for both TBI alone and TBI-PTSD compared to PTSD alone and sham treatment. Comparisons of levels of neuroinflammation and neurogenesis between TBI alone and TBI+PTSD revealed that PTSD did not exacerbate the neuropathological hallmarks of TBI. These results indicate a progressive deterioration of the TBI brain, which, under the conditions of the present approach, was not intensified by PTSD, at least within our time window and within the examined areas of the brain. Although the PTSD manipulation employed here did not exacerbate the pathological effects of TBI, the observed long

  2. Vascular-derived TGF-β increases in the stem cell niche and perturbs neuro-genesis during aging and following irradiation in the adult mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuro-genesis decreases during aging and following cranial radiotherapy, causing a progressive cognitive decline that is currently untreatable. However, functional neural stem cells remained present in the sub-ventricular zone of high dose irradiated and aged mouse brains. We therefore investigated whether alterations in the neurogenic niches are perhaps responsible for the neuro-genesis decline. This hypothesis was supported by the absence of proliferation of neural stem cells that were engrafted into the vascular niches of irradiated host brains. Moreover, we observed a marked increase in TGF-β1 production by endothelial cells in the stem cell niche in both middle-aged and irradiated mice. In co-cultures, irradiated brain endothelial cells induced the apoptosis of neural stem/progenitor cells via TGF-β/Smad3 signalling. Strikingly, the blockade of TGF-β signalling in vivo using a neutralizing antibody or the selective inhibitor SB-505124 significantly improved neuro-genesis in aged and irradiated mice, prevented apoptosis and increased the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells. These findings suggest that anti-TGF-β-based therapy may be used for future interventions to prevent neurogenic collapse following radiotherapy or during aging. (authors)

  3. 肠道病毒71型致神经源性肺水肿机制研究进展%Research Progress in the Pathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 Induced Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟涛(综述); 郑伟华; 李雄(审校)

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 ( EV71 ) , a-highly-neurotropic, positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus, belongs to the Enterovirus genus of Picornaviridae family.In recent decades,EV71 spreads mainly in main-land China,Taiwan,Malaysia and other Asia-pacific regions.EV71 infections mainly cause hand, foot, and mouth disease and herpangina in young children ,though it may also cause brain stem encephalitis ,and circu-lation problems,among which neurogenic pulmonary edema ( NPE) is one of the most serious complications and main causes of death.How EV71 infection causes NPE and its exact pathogenesis is still unclear .Here is make an elaboration focusing on the pathogenesis of EV71 infection combined with NPE from the aspects of abnormal secretion of catecholamine, cytokine abnormalities, immune disorder, respiratory myoparalysis, age, and gene etc.%肠道病毒71型(EV71)是有高度嗜神经性的正链RNA病毒,属于小RNA病毒科肠道病毒属,近几十年来,EV71在中国大陆、中国台湾、马来西亚等亚太地区流行。 EV71主要引起青少年手足口病和疱疹性咽峡炎,也可引起脑干脑炎等严重并发症,其中神经源性肺水肿( NPE)是最严重的并发症及主要死亡原因之一。 EV71感染引起NPE的确切发病机制仍不清楚。该文从儿茶酚胺分泌异常、细胞因子异常、免疫紊乱、呼吸肌麻痹、年龄及基因等方面对 EV71感染并发 NPE 的机制进行阐述。

  4. Stimulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibits neurogenic contraction of human bladder from patients with urinary symptoms and reverses acetic acid-induced bladder hyperactivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fuente, José M; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Chen, Mao Xiang; Angulo, Javier

    2014-07-15

    We have analysed the effects of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) stimulation on neurogenic and myogenic contraction of human bladder from healthy subjects and patients with urinary symptoms and evaluated the efficacy of activating BK to relief bladder hyperactivity in rats. Bladder specimens were obtained from organ donors and from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol (CCh) were evaluated in isolated bladder strips. in vivo cystometric recordings were obtained in anesthetized rats under control and acetic acid-induced hyperactive conditions. Neurogenic contractions of human bladder were potentiated by blockade of BK and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK) but were unaffected by the blockade of intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels (IK). EFS-induced contractions were inhibited by BK stimulation with NS-8 or NS1619 or by SK/IK stimulation with NS309 (3µM). CCh-induced contractions were not modified by blockade or stimulation of BK, IK or SK. The anti-cholinergic agent, oxybutynin (0.3µM) inhibited either neurogenic or CCh-induced contractions. Neurogenic contractions of bladders from BPH patients were less sensitive to BK inhibition and more sensitive to BK activation than healthy bladders. The BK activator, NS-8 (5mg/kg; i.v.), reversed bladder hyperactivity induced by acetic acid in rats, while oxybutynin was ineffective. NS-8 did not significantly impact blood pressure or heart rate. BK stimulation specifically inhibits neurogenic contractions in patients with urinary symptoms and relieves bladder hyperactivity in vivo without compromising bladder contractile capacity or cardiovascular safety, supporting its potential therapeutic use for relieving bladder overactivity. PMID:24747752

  5. NONINVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Demirtas-Tatlidede, Asli; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew M.; Bernabeu, Montserrat; Tormos, Jose M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Brain stimulation techniques have evolved in the last few decades with more novel methods capable of painless, noninvasive brain stimulation. While the number of clinical trials employing noninvasive brain stimulation continues to increase in a variety of medication-resistant neurological and psychiatric diseases, studies evaluating their diagnostic and therapeutic potential in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are largely lacking. This review introduces different techniques of noninvasive brain s...

  6. Long-term upregulation of inflammation and suppression of cell proliferation in the brain of adult rats exposed to traumatic brain injury using the controlled cortical impact model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Acosta

    Full Text Available The long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI, specifically the detrimental effects of inflammation on the neurogenic niches, are not very well understood. In the present in vivo study, we examined the prolonged pathological outcomes of experimental TBI in different parts of the rat brain with special emphasis on inflammation and neurogenesis. Sixty days after moderate controlled cortical impact injury, adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were euthanized and brain tissues harvested. Antibodies against the activated microglial marker, OX6, the cell cycle-regulating protein marker, Ki67, and the immature neuronal marker, doublecortin, DCX, were used to estimate microglial activation, cell proliferation, and neuronal differentiation, respectively, in the subventricular zone (SVZ, subgranular zone (SGZ, striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. Stereology-based analyses revealed significant exacerbation of OX6-positive activated microglial cells in the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. In parallel, significant decrements in Ki67-positive proliferating cells in SVZ and SGZ, but only trends of reduced DCX-positive immature neuronal cells in SVZ and SGZ were detected relative to sham control group. These results indicate a progressive deterioration of the TBI brain over time characterized by elevated inflammation and suppressed neurogenesis. Therapeutic intervention at the chronic stage of TBI may confer abrogation of these deleterious cell death processes.

  7. Psychogenic seizures in brain injury: diagnosis, treatment and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, R L; Zasler, N D

    1990-01-01

    Psychogenic seizures are a functional phenomena in which a person experiences a paroxysmal event that may be interpreted as epileptiform in nature. By definition, psychogenic seizures imply a sudden episode of change in behaviour or psychic state that is not associated with an identifiable process, either vasculogenic or neurogenic, and during which there is an absence of characteristic epileptiform changes on the electroencephalogram. Prevalence rates range from 5% to 50% in outpatient populations seen in epilepsy clinics. However, approximately 20% of true seizure patients also have psychogenic seizures. As psychogenic seizures are not a pathophysiological phenomena, pharmacological interventions do not alter their aetiology and can cloud the cognitive skills necessary to ameliorate the psychogenic seizure behaviour. In non-aphasic true seizure patients, as well as psychogenic seizure patients, self-control relaxation paradigms have been successful where pharmacological intervention has failed. This case involved an aphasic brain-injured patient who had both psychogenic and true seizures. For this patient, the self-control paradigm was modified to include use of gesture and prosody to achieve similar psychotherapeutic effects. Additionally, family therapy was instituted to provide a constructive means for the patient's family to participate in the reduction of psychogenic seizures. As seizures are a common sequelae of brain injury, the differential diagnosis of seizures and knowledge of standard and alternative treatment is essential for rehabilitation professionals. PMID:1701326

  8. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant peripheral nerve-sheath tumors and non-neurogenic malignant soft-tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herendael, B.H. van; Heyman, S.R.G.; Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Parizel, P.M.; Schepper, A.M. de [University Hospital of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Temmerman, G. de; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-10-15

    To assess the sensitivity and specificity of MRI criteria in the differentiation between malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) and non-neurogenic malignant soft-tissue tumors (MSTT). MRI examinations of 105 patients with pathologically proven malignant soft-tissue lesions (35 MPNST and 70 MSTT) were retrospectively reviewed, the reviewers being unaware of the pathological diagnosis. Using a standardized protocol, the tumors were evaluated for multiple parameters regarding morphology and appearance on different sequences before and after gadolinium contrast administration (location, distribution, delineation, homogeneity, size, shape, relationship to bone and neurovascular bundle, intralesional hemorrhage, necrosis, perilesional edema, lymphangitis and signal intensities). Results were compared using a chi-square or Fisher's exact test. MRI findings suggestive of MPNST (p<0,05) were intermuscular distribution, location on the course of a large nerve, nodular morphology, and overall non-homogeneity on T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images after gadolinium contrast injection. MRI findings in favor of MSTT were intramuscular distribution, ill-delineated appearance of more than 20% of the lesion's circumference, and presence of intralesional blood vessels, perilesional edema and lymphangitis. There is no significant difference for degree and pattern of enhancement after gadolinium contrast injection, nor for presence of bone involvement or cystic or necrotic areas. MRI provides several features that contribute to the differentiation between MPNST and non-neurogenic malignant soft-tissue tumors. MRI findings suggestive of MPNST should be helpful to pathologists in the strategy for further examination. (orig.)

  9. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

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    ... abta.org Donate Now Menu Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ... or Complete our contact form Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ...

  10. American Brain Tumor Association

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    ... For Health Care Professionals About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor ...

  11. Brain Tumor Surgery

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    ... Pediatric Caregiver Resource Center About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor ...

  12. Anatomy of the Brain

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    ... Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Tumor Grade Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics ABTA Publications Brain Tumor ...

  13. Brain and Nervous System

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    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain and Nervous System KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain and Nervous System Print ... is quite the juggler. Anatomy of the Nervous System If you think of the brain as a ...

  14. Brain tumor (image)

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    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  16. Genetic Brain Disorders

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    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form of a ... is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the brain. ...

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that people ...

  18. Psychogenic or neurogenic origin of agrammatism and foreign accent syndrome in a bipolar patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossard Marion

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foreign accent syndrome (FAS is a rare speech disorder characterized by the appearance of a new accent, different from the speaker's native language and perceived as foreign by the speaker and the listener. In most of the reported cases, FAS follows stroke but has also been found following traumatic brain injury, cerebral haemorrhage and multiple sclerosis. In very few cases, FAS was reported in patients presenting with psychiatric disorders but the link between this condition and FAS was confirmed in only one case. Case presentation In this report, we present the case of FG, a bipolar patient presenting with language disorders characterized by a foreign accent and agrammatism, initially categorized as being of psychogenic origin. The patient had an extensive neuropsychological and language evaluation as well as brain imaging exams. In addition to FAS and agrammatism, FG also showed a working memory deficit and executive dysfunction. Moreover, these clinical signs were related to altered cerebral activity on an FDG-PET scan that showed diffuse hypometabolism in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes bilaterally as well as a focal deficit in the area of the anterior left temporal lobe. When compared to the MRI, these deficits were related to asymmetric atrophy, which was retrospectively seen in the left temporal and frontal opercular/insular region without a focal lesion. Discussion To our knowledge, FG is the first case of FAS imaged with an 18F-FDG-PET scan. The nature and type of neuropsychological and linguistic deficits, supported by neuroimaging data, exclude a neurotoxic or neurodegenerative origin for this patient's clinical manifestations. For similar reasons, a psychogenic etiology is also highly improbable. Conclusion To account for the FAS and agrammatism in FG, various explanations have been ruled out. Because of the focal deficit seen on the brain imaging, involving the left insular and anterior temporal cortex

  19. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caghan Kizil

    Full Text Available Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI, RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  20. Left Brain, Right Brain: Facts and Fantasies

    OpenAIRE

    Corballis, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Summary Handedness and brain asymmetry are widely regarded as unique to humans, and associated with complementary functions such as a left-brain specialization for language and logic and a right-brain specialization for creativity and intuition. In fact, asymmetries are widespread among animals, and support the gradual evolution of asymmetrical functions such as language and tool use. Handedness and brain asymmetry are inborn and under partial genetic control, although the gene or genes respo...

  1. FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN NETWORKING

    OpenAIRE

    Irina BONCEA

    2015-01-01

    Scientific networking is the most accessible way a country can turn the brain drain into brain gain. Diaspora’s members offer valuable information, advice or financial support from the destination country, without being necessary to return. This article aims to investigate Romania’s potential of turning brain drain into brain networking, using evidence from the medical sector. The main factors influencing the collaboration with the country of origin are investigated. The co...

  2. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel ...

  3. 脊髓损伤病人神经源性膀胱功能评估及分类研究进展%Research progress on classification and functional evaluation of neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊帆; 汤爱玲; 叶文琴

    2015-01-01

    It summarized the research status quo of functional evaluation and classification method of neurogenic bladder of spinal cord inj ury patients.According to the inspection results,only the neurogenic bladder function of spinal cord inj ury patients was classified by nursing personnel,targeted individualized rehabilitation care was carried out for bladder function of spinal cord inj ury patients.%对脊髓损伤病人神经源性膀胱功能评估及分类方法研究现状进行综述,护理人员根据检查结果对脊髓损伤神经源性膀胱功能进行分类,才能对脊髓损伤病人膀胱功能进行针对性个性化的康复护理。

  4. Neurogenic Bladder in Lumbosacral Myelomeningocele%腰骶部脊髓脊膜膨出并发神经源性膀胱的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑百俊; 李恭才; 张宪生; 徐泉; 高亚

    1997-01-01

    目的:随访、复查腰骶部囊性脊柱裂术后患儿,观察神经源性膀胱发病情况.方法:对38例行尿流动力学、排尿性膀胱尿道造影、B超及(或)静脉尿路造影检查.结果:①脊髓脊膜膨出占囊性脊柱裂的62%,脊髓脊膜膨出并发神经源性膀胱发病率为96%;②骨质缺损≥1.5 cm×1.5 cm者多为脊髓脊膜膨出(P<0.005);③共有8例上尿路功能受损者,残余尿量均≥60 ml,其中4例充盈期膀胱内压力≥1.96 kPa(20 cm H_2O),而3例膀胱逼尿肌-尿道括约肌协同失调者伞部出现膀胱输尿管返流.结论:①腰骶部囊性脊柱裂骨质缺损≥1.5 cm×1.5 cm者易并发神经源性膀胱;②允盈期膀胱内压力增高、膀胱逼尿肌-尿道括约肌协同失调、残余尿量明显增多是上尿路功能受损的危险因素.%Dept.of Pediat.Surgery,The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Xian Medical University,Xian,710004Abstract Objective:To determine the incidence of neurogenic bladder among patients with spina bifida cystica in lumbosacral region.Methods:Urodyanmic studies,voiding cystourethrogram,B-uhrasonogram and/or intravenous urography were performed on 38 cases of spina bifida cystica.Results:1.Myeiomeningocele accounted for 62%of the lumbosacral spina bifida cystica and the incidence of neurogenic bladder in myelomeningocele was 96%;2.Spinal defect more than 1.5 cm×1.5 cm was indicative of myelomeningocele(P<0.005);and 3.Eight patients with upper urinary tract deterioration had residual urine more than 60ml.Four had filling intravesical pressure over 1.96 kPa(20 cm H_2O),3 had detrusor urinae disorder with vesicoureteral reflux.Conclusions:1.The diameter of spinal defect in cases of lumbosacral spina bifida cystica more than 1.5 cm are liable to have neurogenic bladder.2.Elevated filling intravesical pressure,detrusorsphincter dyssynergia and high residual urine are harmful factors of upper urinary tract deterioration.

  5. True neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome in a competitive swimmer: a case report of this rare association Síndrome do desfiladeiro torácico verdadeiro em um nadador competitivo: relato de caso desta rara associação

    OpenAIRE

    Diogo Fraxino de Almeida; Meyer, Richard D.; Oh, Shin J.

    2007-01-01

    True neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is an uncommon disorder despite of be a frequent reason for referral to the EMG laboratories. We describe the second case in the literature of true TOS in a competitive swimmer with progressive weakness and severe atrophy of the left thenar eminence. EMG showed lower trunk plexopathy. X-ray and MRI of the cervical spine and brachial plexus were normal. Surgical exploration evidenced the lower trunk retracted and pulled by a fibrous band. It was e...

  6. Berberine protects against neuronal damage via suppression of glia-mediated inflammation in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Cheng Chen

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI triggers a series of neuroinflammatory processes that contribute to evolution of neuronal injury. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects and anti-inflammatory actions of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, in both in vitro and in vivo TBI models. Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury were injected with berberine (10 mg·kg(-1 or vehicle 10 min after injury. In addition to behavioral studies and histology analysis, blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and brain water content were determined. Expression of PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling and inflammatory mediators were also analyzed. The protective effect of berberine was also investigated in cultured neurons either subjected to stretch injury or exposed to conditioned media with activated microglia. Berberine significantly attenuated functional deficits and brain damage associated with TBI up to day 28 post-injury. Berberine also reduced neuronal death, apoptosis, BBB permeability, and brain edema at day 1 post-injury. These changes coincided with a marked reduction in leukocyte infiltration, microglial activation, matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity, and expression of inflammatory mediators. Berberine had no effect on Akt or Erk 1/2 phosphorylation. In mixed glial cultures, berberine reduced TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling. Berberine also attenuated neuronal death induced by microglial conditioned media; however, it did not directly protect cultured neurons subjected to stretch injury. Moreover, administration of berberine at 3 h post-injury also reduced TBI-induced neuronal damage, apoptosis and inflammation in vivo. Berberine reduces TBI-induced brain damage by limiting the production of inflammatory mediators by glial cells, rather than by a direct neuroprotective effect.

  7. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  8. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-01-01

    Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial s...

  9. Brain Drain Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Borta, Oxana

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the widely acknowledged so-called brain drain controversy. More concretely on developments in the traditional brain drain literature towards a new shift, claiming the brain gain effect, as an alternative to the brain drain effect, that emigration may bring to a source country. The research investigates not only the obvious direct loss effects – the so called brain drain – but also the possibility of more subtle indirect beneficial effects.

  10. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-12-19

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  11. The neurogenic basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor NeuroD6 concomitantly increases mitochondrial mass and regulates cytoskeletal organization in the early stages of neuronal differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kathleen Baxter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a central role during neurogenesis by providing energy in the form of ATP for cytoskeletal remodelling, outgrowth of neuronal processes, growth cone activity and synaptic activity. However, the fundamental question of how differentiating neurons control mitochondrial biogenesis remains vastly unexplored. Since our previous studies have shown that the neurogenic bHLH (basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor NeuroD6 is sufficient to induce differentiation of the neuronal progenitor-like PC12 cells and that it triggers expression of mitochondrial-related genes, we investigated whether NeuroD6 could modulate the mitochondrial biomass using our PC12-ND6 cellular paradigm. Using a combination of flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and mitochondrial fractionation, we demonstrate that NeuroD6 stimulates maximal mitochondrial mass at the lamellipodia stage, thus preceding axonal growth. NeuroD6 triggers remodelling of the actin and microtubule networks in conjunction with increased expression of the motor protein KIF5B, thus promoting mitochondrial movement in developing neurites with accumulation in growth cones. Maintenance of the NeuroD6-induced mitochondrial mass requires an intact cytoskeletal network, as its disruption severely reduces mitochondrial mass. The present study provides the first evidence that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in co-ordinating increase in mitochondrial mass with cytoskeletal remodelling, suggestive of a role of this transcription factor as a co-regulator of neuronal differentiation and energy metabolism.

  12. Progress on rehabilitation nursing of neurogenic dysphagia WANG%神经性吞咽困难康复护理的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王若婧; 黄燕梅; 许红璐

    2008-01-01

    Dysphagia is a commonly documented morbidity in neurology patients. Dysphasia can cause complications such as malnutrition, suffocation, pneumonia and death. Complications can not only influence the patients' quality of life, but also increase the overall healthcare expenditures. So it is highly needed to pay more attention to the assessment and rehabilitation of these patients. This review aims at systematically capturing current published literature about the methods for assessment and rehabilitation of neurogenic dysphagia.%吞咽困难在神经性失调患者中是一种常见的临床症状,神经性吞咽困难可引起多种并发症,降低患者生活质量,加重经济负担.为此,需重视该类患者的吞咽困难评估和康复.本文概述了神经性吞咽困难评估和康复护理的新进展.

  13. Cadmium inhibits neurogenesis in zebrafish embryonic brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Elly Suk Hen [Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 1200 California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hui, Michelle Nga Yu; Lin Chunchi [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Cheng Shukhan [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: bhcheng@cityu.edu.hk

    2008-05-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal found abundantly in the environment. Children of women exposed to cadmium during pregnancy display lower motor and perceptual abilities. High cadmium body burden in children is also related to impaired intelligence and lowered school achievement. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of developmental neurotoxicity in the sensitive early life stages of animals. In this study, we explore neurological deficits caused by cadmium during early embryonic stages in zebrafish by examining regionalization of the neural tube, pattern formation and cell fate determination, commitment of proneural genes and induction of neurogenesis. We show that cadmium-treated embryos developed a smaller head with unclear boundaries between the brain subdivisions, particularly in the mid-hindbrain region. Embryos display normal anterior to posterior regionalization; however, the commitment of neural progenitor cells was affected by cadmium. We observe prominent reductions in the expression of several proneuronal genes including ngn1 in cell clusters, zash1a in the developing optic tectum, and zash1b in the telencephalon and tectum. Cadmium-treated embryos also have fewer differentiated neurons and glia in the facial sensory ganglia as indicated by decreased zn-12 expression. Also, a lower transcription level of neurogenic genes, ngn1 and neuroD, is observed in neurons. Our data suggest that cadmium-induced neurotoxicity can be caused by impaired neurogenesis, resulting in markedly reduced neuronal differentiation and axonogenesis.

  14. Cadmium inhibits neurogenesis in zebrafish embryonic brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal found abundantly in the environment. Children of women exposed to cadmium during pregnancy display lower motor and perceptual abilities. High cadmium body burden in children is also related to impaired intelligence and lowered school achievement. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of developmental neurotoxicity in the sensitive early life stages of animals. In this study, we explore neurological deficits caused by cadmium during early embryonic stages in zebrafish by examining regionalization of the neural tube, pattern formation and cell fate determination, commitment of proneural genes and induction of neurogenesis. We show that cadmium-treated embryos developed a smaller head with unclear boundaries between the brain subdivisions, particularly in the mid-hindbrain region. Embryos display normal anterior to posterior regionalization; however, the commitment of neural progenitor cells was affected by cadmium. We observe prominent reductions in the expression of several proneuronal genes including ngn1 in cell clusters, zash1a in the developing optic tectum, and zash1b in the telencephalon and tectum. Cadmium-treated embryos also have fewer differentiated neurons and glia in the facial sensory ganglia as indicated by decreased zn-12 expression. Also, a lower transcription level of neurogenic genes, ngn1 and neuroD, is observed in neurons. Our data suggest that cadmium-induced neurotoxicity can be caused by impaired neurogenesis, resulting in markedly reduced neuronal differentiation and axonogenesis

  15. 肌电生物反馈治疗慢性神经源性吞咽障碍的临床观察%Electromyographic biofeedback therapy for treating chronic neurogenic dysphagia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭钢花; 宋垒垒; 李哲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of electromyographic biofeedback therapy (EMG-BFT) on patients with dysphagia more than one month after stroke or traumatic brain injury.Methods Sixty-four patients with dysphagia were randomly divided into treatment group and control group.Both groups were given dysphagia training,while those in the treatment group were given EMGBFT and dysphagia training.VFSS and sEMG was conducted before and after treatment to assess swallowing function.Results Both groups demonstrated statistically and clinically significant improvements in swallowing function.The effective rate was 84.85% in treatment group and 55.56% in control group,with statistically significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05).The improvement of swallowing function in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in control group (P < 0.05).Conclusions EMGBFT combined with swallowing behavior therapy can obviously improve swallowing function in patients with neurogenic dysphagia,and it is a effective therapy.%目的 观察肌电生物反馈对病程超过1个月的脑卒中或脑外伤患者吞咽障碍的影响.方法 选择64例慢性神经源性吞咽障碍患者,随机分为观察组和对照组,两组均给予吞咽训练,观察组在吞咽训练的基础上给予肌电生物反馈治疗,两组于治疗前及治疗4周后进行电视透视吞咽检查(VFSS)和表面肌电图检查.结果 两组患者治疗后吞咽功能均较治疗前改善,观察组的治疗有效率为84.85%,对照组为55.56%,两组患者在治疗前、后疗效比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);观察组吞咽功能改善较显著,优于对照组,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 在吞咽训练的基础上使用肌电生物反馈辅助性治疗慢性神经源性吞咽障碍患者,能明显提高患者的吞咽功能,是一种有效的治疗方法.

  16. FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN NETWORKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina BONCEA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific networking is the most accessible way a country can turn the brain drain into brain gain. Diaspora’s members offer valuable information, advice or financial support from the destination country, without being necessary to return. This article aims to investigate Romania’s potential of turning brain drain into brain networking, using evidence from the medical sector. The main factors influencing the collaboration with the country of origin are investigated. The conclusions suggest that Romania could benefit from the diaspora option, through an active implication at institutional level and the implementation of a strategy in this area.

  17. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells. PMID:27259217

  18. MicroRNA-124 loaded nanoparticles enhance brain repair in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, C; Paiva, J; Santos, T; Ferreira, L; Bernardino, L

    2016-08-10

    Modulation of the subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenic niche can enhance brain repair in several disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD). Herein, we used biocompatible and traceable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) containing perfluoro-1,5-crown ether (PFCE) and coated with protamine sulfate to complex microRNA-124 (miR-124), a neuronal fate determinant. The ability of NPs to efficiently deliver miR-124 and prompt SVZ neurogenesis and brain repair in PD was evaluated. In vitro, miR-124 NPs were efficiently internalized by neural stem/progenitors cells and neuroblasts and promoted their neuronal commitment and maturation. The expression of Sox9 and Jagged1, two miR-124 targets and stemness-related genes, were also decreased upon miR-124 NP treatment. In vivo, the intracerebral administration of miR-124 NPs increased the number of migrating neuroblasts that reached the granule cell layer of the olfactory bulb, both in healthy and in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mouse model for PD. MiR-124 NPs were also able to induce migration of neurons into the lesioned striatum of 6-OHDA-treated mice. Most importantly, miR-124 NPs proved to ameliorate motor symptoms of 6-OHDA mice, monitored by the apomorphine-induced rotation test. Altogether, we provide clear evidences to support the use of miR-124 NPs as a new therapeutic approach to boost endogenous brain repair mechanisms in a setting of neurodegeneration. PMID:27269730

  19. The Brain Never Stops

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    Your brain is doing a lot of work when you are engaged in activities such as sports, playing a game, or watching a movie. Your brain is also a master of associating one thought with another and making your mind wander. But what does your brain do when you are not engaged in particular thoughts or actions? Interestingly, similar to the heart that always keeps beating, the brain never stops its activity. For example, your brain is highly active even when you are fast asleep. In fact, brain cell...

  20. Left Brain, Right Brain: Who's on First?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Terence

    1985-01-01

    The author states that none of the left-brain/right brain "mythology" is supported by the actual research on the differences between the left and right human cerebral hemispheres. In fact, he states, the research literature flatly contradicts most of the mythology. (CT)