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Sample records for brain death induce

  1. Acute liver failure-induced death of rats is delayed or prevented by blocking NMDA receptors in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Omar; Rodrigo, Regina; Boix, Jordi; Piedrafita, Blanca; Agusti, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2008-09-01

    Developing procedures to delay the mechanisms of acute liver failure-induced death would increase patients' survival by allowing time for liver regeneration or to receive a liver for transplantation. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to brain herniation and mortality in acute liver failure (ALF). Acute ammonia intoxication in rats leads to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in brain. Blocking these receptors prevents ammonia-induced death. Ammonia-induced activation of NMDA receptors could contribute to ALF-induced death. If this were the case, blocking NMDA receptors could prevent or delay ALF-induced death. The aim of this work was to assess 1) whether ALF leads to NMDA receptors activation in brain in vivo and 2) whether blocking NMDA receptors prevents or delays ALF-induced death of rats. It is shown, by in vivo brain microdialysis, that galactosamine-induced ALF leads to NMDA receptors activation in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors by continuous administration of MK-801 or memantine through miniosmotic pumps affords significant protection against ALF-induced death, increasing the survival time approximately twofold. Also, when liver injury is not 100% lethal (1.5 g/kg galactosamine), blocking NMDA receptors increases the survival rate from 23 to 62%. This supports that blocking NMDA receptors could have therapeutic utility to improve survival of patients with ALF. PMID:18599589

  2. Exendin-4 attenuates brain death-induced liver damage in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Lemos, Natalia E; Dias, Ana L; Brondani, Leticia A; Oliveira, Jarbas R; Bauer, Andrea C; Leitão, Cristiane B; Crispim, Daisy

    2015-11-01

    The majority of liver grafts destined for transplantation originate from brain dead donors. However, significantly better posttransplantation outcomes are achieved when organs from living donors are used, suggesting that brain death (BD) causes irreversible damage to the liver tissue. Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) analogues were shown to possess interesting hepatic protection effects in different liver disease models. We hypothesized that donor treatment with the GLP1 analogue exendin-4 (Ex-4) could alleviate BD-induced liver damage. A rat model of BD was employed in order to estimate BD-induced liver damage and Ex-4's potential protective effects. Liver damage was assessed by biochemical determination of circulating hepatic markers. Apoptosis in the hepatic tissue was assessed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry using an antibody that only recognizes the active form of caspase-3. Gene expression changes in inflammation and stress response genes were monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Here, we show that Ex-4 administration to the brain dead liver donors significantly reduces levels of circulating aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase. This was accompanied by a remarkable reduction in hepatocyte apoptosis. In this model, BD caused up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor and stress-related genes, confirming previous findings in clinical and animal studies. In conclusion, treatment of brain dead rats with Ex-4 reduced BD-induced liver damage. Further investigation is needed to determine the molecular basis of the observed liver protection. After testing in a randomized clinical trial, the inclusion of GLP1 analogues in organ donor management might help to improve organ quality, maximize organ donation, and possibly increase liver transplantation success rates. PMID:26334443

  3. Diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calixto Machado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain death (BD should be understood as the ultimate clinical expression of a brain catastrophe characterized by a complete and irreversible neurological stoppage, recognized by irreversible coma, absent brainstem reflexes, and apnea. The most common pattern is manifested by an elevation of intracranial pressure to a point beyond the mean arterial pressure, and hence cerebral perfusion pressure falls and, as a result, no net cerebral blood flow is present, in due course leading to permanent cytotoxic injury of the intracranial neuronal tissue. A second mechanism is an intrinsic injury affecting the nervous tissue at a cellular level which, if extensive and unremitting, can also lead to BD. We review here the methodology of diagnosing death, based on finding any of the signs of death. The irreversible loss of cardio-circulatory and respiratory functions can cause death only when ischemia and anoxia are prolonged enough to produce an irreversible destruction of the brain. The sign of such loss of brain functions, that is to say BD diagnosis, is fully reviewed.

  4. Whole-brain death reconsidered.

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, A.

    1983-01-01

    The author, a philosopher, suggests that the concept of death should be left as it is 'in its present indeterminate state', and that we ought to reject attempts to define death in terms of whole-brain death or any other type of brain death, including cerebral death and 'irreversible coma'. Instead of 'fiddling with the definition of death' clear rules should be established specifying 'what can be appropriately done to whom when'.

  5. Systemic LPS administration induces brain inflammation but not dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Hey-Kyeong; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-hye

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that brain inflammation is important in aggravation of brain damage and/or that inflammation causes neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, systemic inflammation has also emerged as a risk factor for PD. In the present study, we evaluated how systemic inflammation induced by intravenous (iv) lipopolysaccharides (LPS) injection affected brain inflammation and neuronal damage in the rat. Interestingly, almost all brain inflammatory response...

  6. miR-711 upregulation induces neuronal cell death after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirzhanov, B; Stoica, B A; Zhao, Z; Loane, D J; Wu, J; Dorsey, S G; Faden, A I

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and disability. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level and may be key modulators of neuronal apoptosis, yet their role in secondary injury after TBI remains largely unexplored. Changes in miRs after controlled cortical impact (CCI) in mice were examined during the first 72 h using miR arrays and qPCR. One selected miR (711) was examined with regard to its regulation and relation to cell death; effects of miR-711 modulation were evaluated after CCI and using in vitro cell death models of primary cortical neurons. Levels of miR-711 were increased in the cortex early after TBI and in vitro models through rapid upregulation of miR-711 transcription (pri-miR-711) rather than catabolism. Increases coincided with downregulation of the pro-survival protein Akt, a predicted target of miR-711, with sequential activation of forkhead box O3 (FoxO3)a/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3)α/β, pro-apoptotic BH3-only molecules PUMA (Bcl2-binding component 3) and Bim (Bcl2-like 11 (apoptosis facilitator)), and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and AIF. miR-711 and Akt (mRNA) co-immunoprecipitated with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). A miR-711 hairpin inhibitor attenuated the apoptotic mechanisms and decreased neuronal death in an Akt-dependent manner. Conversely, a miR-711 mimic enhanced neuronal apoptosis. Central administration of the miR-711 hairpin inhibitor after TBI increased Akt expression and attenuated apoptotic pathways. Treatment reduced cortical lesion volume, neuronal cell loss in cortex and hippocampus, and long-term neurological dysfunction. miR-711 changes contribute to neuronal cell death after TBI, in part by inhibiting Akt, and may serve as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26470728

  7. The diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goila Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians, health care workers, members of the clergy, and laypeople throughout the world have accepted fully that a person is dead when his or her brain is dead. Although the widespread use of mechanical ventilators and other advanced critical care services have transformed the course of terminal neurologic disorders. Vital functions can now be maintained artificially for a long period of time after the brain has ceased to function. There is a need to diagnose brain death with utmost accuracy and urgency because of an increased awareness amongst the masses for an early diagnosis of brain death and the requirements of organ retrieval for transplantation. Physicians need not be, or consult with, a neurologist or neurosurgeon in order to determine brain death. The purpose of this review article is to provide health care providers in India with requirements for determining brain death, increase knowledge amongst health care practitioners about the clinical evaluation of brain death, and reduce the potential for variations in brain death determination policies and practices amongst facilities and practitioners. Process for brain death certification has been discussed under the following: 1. Identification of history or physical examination findings that provide a clear etiology of brain dysfunction. 2. Exclusion of any condition that might confound the subsequent examination of cortical or brain stem function. 3. Performance of a complete neurological examination including the standard apnea test and 10 minute apnea test. 4. Assessment of brainstem reflexes. 5. Clinical observations compatible with the diagnosis of brain death. 6. Responsibilities of physicians. 7. Notify next of kin. 8. Interval observation period. 9. Repeat clinical assessment of brain stem reflexes. 10. Confirmatory testing as indicated. 11. Certification and brain death documentation.

  8. Dexamethasone-induced acute excitotoxic cell death in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanshakov, Dmitriy A; Sukhareva, Ekaterina V; Kalinina, Tatjana S; Dygalo, Nikolay N

    2016-07-01

    There is substantial evidence that the use of glucocorticoids in neonates is associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, it remains unclear how treatment with low doses of dexamethasone (DEX) may result in behavioral abnormalities without evident signs of immediate neurotoxicity in the neonatal brain. It is possible that cells vulnerable to the pro-apoptotic effects of low doses of DEX escaped detection due to their small number in the developing brain. In agreement with this suggestion, low-dose DEX treatment (0.2mg/kg) failed to induce apoptosis in the cortex or hippocampus proper of neonatal rats. However, this treatment was capable of inducing apoptosis specifically in the dorsal subiculum via a two-step mechanism that involves glutamate excitotoxicity. Application of DEX leads to increased activity of CA1/CA3 hippocampal MAP2-positive neurons, as determined by c-Fos expression at 0.5-1h after DEX injection. Five hours later, the apoptotic markers (fragmented nuclei, active caspase-3 and TUNEL labeling) increased in the dorsal subiculum, which receives massive glutamatergic input from CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with memantine, an antagonist of glutamate NMDA receptors, dose dependently blocked the DEX-induced expression of apoptotic markers in the subicular neurons and astrocytes. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of DEX-induced neurotoxicity as well as on the mechanism of therapeutic action of antagonists of NMDA receptors against neurobehavioral disorders caused by neonatal exposure to glucocorticoids. PMID:26873551

  9. Region-specific vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal death in rat brain after status epilepticus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Chen; Hu Guo; Guo Zheng; Zhong-Nan Shi

    2013-12-01

    We sought to clarify the involvement and the intra-cerebral distribution variability of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a representative molecule related to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death signalling pathways, in neuronal death resulting from status epilepticus in rats. The expression patterns of CHOP and glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78, a good marker of ER stress, were assessed by Western blotting, real-time PCR, Hoechst and immunohistochemistry in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum on a status epilepticus (SE) model. Double-fluorescent staining of CHOP and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated DNA nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method were performed to clarify the involvement of CHOP in cell death. SE resulted in a time-dependent increase in the expression of GRP78 and CHOP. The expression of GRP78 protein was increased at 3, 6 and 12 h after SE and no brain region variability was found. The expression of CHOP protein was also increased, reached its peak at 24 h and remained high at 48 h. CHOP protein expression, however, showed brain region variability with highest expression noted in the hippocampus followed by the striatum, and lowest in the cortex. The up-regulation of CHOP occurring at the transcriptional level was demonstrated by real-time PCR. Double fluorescence showed that CHOP expression strongly correlated with neurons undergoing apoptosis. The results indicated that SE compromises the function of the ER and that the hippocampus is more vulnerable than the cortex and the striatum.

  10. Radionuclide evaluation of brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria employed for clinical determination of death have evolved in response to advances in life support and other medical technology. The technical feasibility of organ transplantation has amplified the need for a definition of brain death that can be applied in the shortest possible time in the presence of artificial maintenance of vegetative functions, including circulation. Radionuclide cerebral angiography is one of a group of diagnostic procedures that can be employed to confirm the clinical diagnosis of brain death through demonstration of absence of cerebral blood flow. The focus of this work is to assess its use as a confirmatory test for determination of brain death in the context of currently available alternative technologies

  11. Brain Death,Concept and Criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The concept of brain death originated in France. In 1959, the French scholars P. Mollaret and M. Goulon proposed the concept of "coma de- passe" or "brain death" for the first time and reported 23 cases with such symptoms. The first guidelines (the Harvard criteria) for diagnosing brain death was established in 1968, defining brain death

  12. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  13. Protective efficacy of mitochondrial targeted antioxidant MitoQ against dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and cell death in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Gudup, Satish; Sunkaria, Aditya; Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Sharma, Deep Raj; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-12-01

    Dichlorvos is a synthetic insecticide that belongs to the family of chemically related organophosphate (OP) pesticides. It can be released into the environment as a major degradation product of other OPs, such as trichlorfon, naled, and metrifonate. Dichlorvos exerts its toxic effects in humans and animals by inhibiting neural acetylcholinesterase. Chronic low-level exposure to dichlorvos has been shown to result in inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I and cytochrome oxidase in rat brain, resulting in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. MitoQ is an antioxidant, selectively targeted to mitochondria and protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in dichlorvos induced neurodegeneration, then MitoQ should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of MitoQ (100 μmol/kg body wt/day) reduced dichlorvos (6 mg/kg body wt/day) induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased MnSOD activity and glutathione levels) with decreased lipid peroxidation, protein and DNA oxidation. In addition, MitoQ also suppressed DNA fragmentation, cyt c release and caspase-3 activity in dichlorvos treated rats compared to the control group. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that MitoQ attenuates dichlorvos induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that MitoQ may be beneficial against OP (dichlorvos) induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21784090

  14. The problematic symmetry between brain birth and brain death.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    The possible symmetry between the concepts of brain death and brain birth (life) is explored. Since the symmetry argument has tended to overlook the most appropriate definition of brain death, the fundamental concepts of whole brain death and higher brain death are assessed. In this way, a context is provided for a discussion of brain birth. Different writers have placed brain birth at numerous points: 25-40 days, eight weeks, 22-24 weeks, and 32-36 weeks gestation. For others, the concept it...

  15. Clinical and ethical perspectives on brain death

    OpenAIRE

    Nair-Collins, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Michael Nair-Collins Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, FL, USA Abstract: Death determined by neurological criteria, or brain death, is an accepted legal standard for death throughout much of the world. However, brain death has also been a source of controversy ever since its inception, and recently it has been subjected to increased scrutiny, both in academia and in the public domain. The purpose of this paper is to provide an...

  16. [Brain death: biological and ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roczeń, R; Bohatyrewicz, R

    2001-01-01

    The article presents briefly historical development of death criteria from the modern times to the present. The criteria which are used for identification and diagnosing death on the base of respiratory and circulatory death definition are described. This work underlines the inadequacy of the definition of the brain death in relation to patients with persistent vegetative state and in relation to anencephalic newborns. The author describes the pathology and clinical and laboratory evidence of the brain stem death, which gave the possibility to justify the thesis that in case of the brain stem death ontological arguments are sufficient for diagnosing the death of a human being. The attention of the ethic of the life sanctity (on the base of halachic's law) and its opposing influence on the evolution of the medical definition of death has been paid. The recognition of the brain as the death of an individual is a cultural shock, which from scientific point of view changed the ways of thinking, almost immediately but did not in the awareness of the society. The work also underlies the fact that utilitarian argumentation can not be a criterion for making a decision concerning the life of an individual. PMID:12094808

  17. Notification of brain death in the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Soares de Jesus Souza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identifying brain death in the hospital. Methods: it is a cross sectional and quantitative study which analyzed secondary data extracted from the notified brain death registers and from the medical records of the eligible patients. The data were processed and analyzed through descriptive statistics and comparisons. Results: of the 64 cases of notifications, the male gender predominated (67.2% within the age range from 40 to 59 years (64.1%. There was a greater proportion (71.8% of causes of death related to Hemorrhagic Cerebral Vascular Accident and Traumatic Brain Injury caused by motorcycle accident, showing statistically significant difference (p<0.05 regarding the gender, age and location. Conclusion: the Hemorrhagic Cerebral Vascular Accident was the most prevalent cause of notification of brain death and the Intensive Therapy Unit was the most notified venue.

  18. Notification of brain death in the hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Soares de Jesus Souza; Gerlene Grudka Lira; Rachel Mola

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identifying brain death in the hospital. Methods: it is a cross sectional and quantitative study which analyzed secondary data extracted from the notified brain death registers and from the medical records of the eligible patients. The data were processed and analyzed through descriptive statistics and comparisons. Results: of the 64 cases of notifications, the male gender predominated (67.2%) within the age range from 40 to 59 years (64.1%). There was a greater proportion (71.8...

  19. Brain stem death and organ donation.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Organs for donation are in short supply in the United Kingdom, resulting in allegations that relatives of potential donors are not being asked for consent. Legislation on "required request" has been proposed to overcome this. The incidence, causes, complications, and patterns of organ donation in brain stem dead patients in one referral centre were studied over 12 months. Data were collected on all patients fulfilling criteria for brain stem death or considered suitable for donating organs af...

  20. Excitotoxic brain damage in the rat induces interleukin-1beta protein in microglia and astrocytes: correlation with the progression of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, V L; Rothwell, N J; Toulmond, S

    1999-02-15

    Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) has been proposed as a mediator of several forms of brain damage, including that induced by excitotoxins. In vitro studies suggest that glial cells are the effector cells of IL-1beta-mediated neurodegeneration. We have investigated the expression of IL-1beta protein by glial cells in vivo in response to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in the rat parietal cortex and striatum. Expression of IL-1beta by glial cells was investigated using immunocytochemistry 30 min to 7 days after infusion of the NMDA agonist cis-2,4-methanoglutamate (MGlu; 10 nmol) into the cortex. Early expression (1-4 h) of IL-1beta by microglia was directly related to lesion development. Later expression by microglia (up to 24 h), and by astrocytes (2-7 days), was widespread compared to the area involved in excitotoxic cell death and co-localised with areas of reactive gliosis. Infusion of MGlu into the striatum induced a similar temporal pattern of IL-1beta expression by microglia and astrocytes. However, IL-1beta-expressing glial cells were localised strictly to the area of striatal cell death. Infusion of PBS or a subtoxic dose of MGlu into the cortex or striatum induced only limited neuronal death and negligible glial IL-1beta expression. These studies reveal that IL-1beta is expressed specifically by microglia during the early response to excitotoxicity in the adult rat cortex and striatum. However, the widespread and delayed IL-1beta expression by astrocytes suggests diverse roles for IL-1beta in response to excitotoxicity. PMID:10028914

  1. A Response to the Legitimacy of Brain Death in Islam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Brain death is a novel construct of death for the procurement of transplantable organs. Many authoritative Islamic organizations and governments have endorsed brain death as true death for organ donation. Many commentators have reiterated the misconception that the Quranic text does not define death. We respond by clarifying: (1) the Quran does define death as biologic disintegration and clearly distinguishes it from the dying process, (2) brain death belongs scientifically within the spectrum of neurologic disorders of consciousness and should not be confused with death, and (3) religious and legal discord about brain death has grown in jurisdictions worldwide. We urge for public transparency and truthfulness about brain death and the accommodation and respect of religious objection to the determination of death by neurologic criteria. PMID:27010462

  2. Paradoxical effects of brain death and associated trauma on rat mesenteric microcirculation: an intravital microscopic study

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Simas; Paulina Sannomiya; José Walber M. C Cruz; Cristiano de Jesus Correia; Fernando Luiz Zanoni; Maurício Kase; Laura Menegat; Isaac Azevedo Silva; Moreira, Luiz Felipe P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental findings support clinical evidence that brain death impairs the viability of organs for transplantation, triggering hemodynamic, hormonal, and inflammatory responses. However, several of these events could be consequences of brain death–associated trauma. This study investigated microcirculatory alterations and systemic inflammatory markers in brain-dead rats and the influence of the associated trauma. METHOD: Brain death was induced using intracranial balloon inflatio...

  3. Approach of Complex Networks for the Determination of Brain Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei-Gang; CAO Jian-Ting; WANG Ru-Bin

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination. Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis are derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated. Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state. Our Sndings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.%@@ In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity.Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination.Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis axe derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated.Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state.Our findings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.

  4. Respiratory induced heart rate and blood pressure variability during mechanical ventilation in critically ill and brain death patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurák, Pavel; Zvoníček, V.; Leinveber, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Vondra, Vlastimil

    Piscataway: IEEE, 2012, s. 3821-3824. ISBN 978-1-4244-4119-8. [EMBC 2012. Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society /34./. San Diego (US), 28.08.2012-01.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk ME09050; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MZd NS10105 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : blood pressure measurement * brain * electrocardiography * neurophysiology * pneumodynamics * ventilation Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  5. mGluR5 antagonist MPEP does not induce neuronal death in immature brain in contrast to NMDA antagonist MK-801

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojková, Denisa; Otáhal, Jakub; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    Praha, 2005. s. 5-5. [Český a slovenský epileptologický sjezd /18./. 23.09.2005-24.09.2005, Průhonice u Prahy] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : mGluR5 * neuronal death * immature brain Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  6. Is Neuronal Death Necessary for Acquired Epileptogenesis in the Immature Brain?

    OpenAIRE

    Dudek, F. Edward; Ekstrand, Jeffrey J.; Staley, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    A central question concerning acquired epileptogenesis in the immature brain is whether neuronal death is required for the development of epilepsy after a brain insult. Results from three different animal models of brain injury during early development have been used to develop the hypothesis that status epilepticus, prolonged febrile seizures, or hypoxia-induced seizures can lead to chronic epilepsy without the occurrence of neuronal death. This brief review will summarize the evidence suppo...

  7. Temperature and brain death determination: need for updated criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Meyer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For an excellent review on the diagnosis of brain death, the interested reader is directed to the review of Machado appearing in this journal; the author reviews all aspects of brain death and cites nine different references where the minimum temperature for brain death exams appear to have been at least 32°C. Given the new data listed above, it is clearly time for a reconsideration of the how we approach the exam for diagnosis of brain death – normal or near normal temperatures of 36°C and above are very reasonable starting points.

  8. Assessment of brain death in the neurocritical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David Y; Gilmore, Emily J; Greer, David M

    2013-07-01

    This article reviews current guidelines for death by neurologic criteria and addresses topics relevant to the determination of brain death in the intensive care unit. The history of brain death as a concept leads into a discussion of the evolution of practice parameters, focusing on the most recent 2010 update from the American Academy of Neurology and the practice variability that exists worldwide. Proper transition from brain death determination to possible organ donation is reviewed. This review concludes with a discussion regarding ethical and religious concerns and suggestions on how families of patients who may be brain dead might be optimally approached. PMID:23809039

  9. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  10. Confounding factors in diagnosing brain death: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Login Ivan S

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain death is strictly defined medically and legally. This diagnosis depends on three cardinal neurological features: coma, absent brainstem reflexes, and apnea. The diagnosis can only be made, however, in the absence of intoxication, hypothermia, or certain medical illnesses. Case presentation A patient with severe hypoxic-ischemic brain injury met the three cardinal neurological features of brain death but concurrent profound hypothyroidism precluded the diagnosis. Our clinical and ethical decisions were further challenged by another facet of this complex case. Although her brain damage indicated a hopeless prognosis, we could not discontinue care based on futility because the only known surrogate was mentally retarded and unable to participate in medical planning. Conclusion The presence of certain medical conditions prohibits a diagnosis of brain death, which is a medicolegal diagnosis of death, not a prediction or forecast of future outcome. While prognostication is important in deciding to withdraw care, it is not a component in diagnosing brain death.

  11. Transcranial amelioration of inflammation and cell death after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Theodore L.; Nayak, Debasis; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Koretsky, Alan P.; Latour, Lawrence L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly appreciated to be highly prevalent and deleterious to neurological function. At present, no effective treatment options are available, and little is known about the complex cellular response to TBI during its acute phase. To gain insights into TBI pathogenesis, we developed a novel murine closed-skull brain injury model that mirrors some pathological features associated with mild TBI in humans and used long-term intravital microscopy to study the dynamics of the injury response from its inception. Here we demonstrate that acute brain injury induces vascular damage, meningeal cell death, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately breach the glial limitans and promote spread of the injury into the parenchyma. In response, the brain elicits a neuroprotective, purinergic-receptor-dependent inflammatory response characterized by meningeal neutrophil swarming and microglial reconstitution of the damaged glial limitans. We also show that the skull bone is permeable to small-molecular-weight compounds, and use this delivery route to modulate inflammation and therapeutically ameliorate brain injury through transcranial administration of the ROS scavenger, glutathione. Our results shed light on the acute cellular response to TBI and provide a means to locally deliver therapeutic compounds to the site of injury.

  12. Brain death diagnosis in misleading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tourtchaninoff, M; Hantson, P; Mahieu, P; Guérit, J M

    1999-07-01

    The necessity of defining brain death (BD) arose from technological development in medical science. The definition of this concept had practical consequences and opened the way to organ donation from BD patients. Nowadays, the imbalance between the number of organs available for transplantation and the size of the demand is becoming critical. In most laboratories, a BD diagnosis is made according to precise criteria and in a well-defined process. BD diagnosis should be improved, not only to assure the safety and to preserve the human dignity of the patient, but also in order to increase the rate of organ donation. By analysing some epidemiological parameters in BD diagnosis and organ donation, it appears that BD diagnoses can be made more often and more rapidly if one has a reliable, accurate, and safe confirmatory test, especially under misleading conditions (hypothermia, drugs, metabolic disturbances). In our experience, the use of multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) to confirm a BD diagnosis has many advantages: MEPs can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside, assess the brain stem as well as the cerebral cortex, and are innocuous for the patient. Moreover, their insensitivity to the aforementioned misleading factors is sufficient to distinguish BD from clinical and EEG states that mimic BD. They give an immediate diagnosis, and no delay is required in BD confirmation if there is sufficient cause to account for BD. MEPs are a safe, accurate, and reliable tool for confirming a BD diagnosis, and their use can improve the organ donation rate while preserving the safety of the patient. PMID:10627891

  13. Brain death and care of the organ donor

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Brain death has specific implications for organ donation with the potential for saving several lives. Awareness on maintenance of the brain dead has increased over the last decade with the progress in the field of transplant. The diagnosis of brain death is clinical and can be confirmed by apnea testing. Ancillary tests can be considered when the apnea test cannot be completed or is inconclusive. Reflexes of spinal origin may be present and should not be confused against the diagnosis of brai...

  14. Brain death and organ transplant legislation:analysis of 969 respondents by classroom questionnaire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Liang Song; Xiao-Hua Cui; Zhan Gao; Shao-Lin Deng; You-Ping Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: China has the largest potential market for organ transplants in the world, but it has not yet established brain death and organ transplant laws. We aimed to investigate the attitudes and suggestions of doctors, pharmacists, and civil servants concerning brain death, organ transplantation, and their respective legislation. METHODS: A questionnaire with 10 sections and 44 questions was designed and distributed. The effective questionnaire data were then recorded and checked for descriptive analysis. RESULTS: In 1400 questionnaires distributed, 1063 were responded and 969 of them were valid and analyzed. The respondents showed an incomplete understanding of brain death and organ transplantation laws. Seventy-four percent of the respondents recognized and accepted the standard of brain death. They agreed that legislation should be involved in the removal of organs for transplantation, the future use of organs, and insurance and compensation for the donor for possible health risks induced by organ removal. Of the 969 respondents, 92%considered it necessary to have legislation in brain death and organ transplantation, and 61% thought that it is time to legislate. CONCLUSIONS: Legislation for brain death and organ transplantation is urgent and timely in China. The laws must include the respective rights and obligations of patients, close relatives, and medical institutions. Educating the public about brain death and organ transplantation should also be encouraged in a variety of ways.

  15. Paradoxical effects of brain death and associated trauma on rat mesenteric microcirculation: an intravital microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Simas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Experimental findings support clinical evidence that brain death impairs the viability of organs for transplantation, triggering hemodynamic, hormonal, and inflammatory responses. However, several of these events could be consequences of brain death-associated trauma. This study investigated microcirculatory alterations and systemic inflammatory markers in brain-dead rats and the influence of the associated trauma. METHOD: Brain death was induced using intracranial balloon inflation; sham-operated rats were trepanned only. After 30 or 180 min, the mesenteric microcirculation was observed using intravital microscopy. The expression of Pselectin and ICAM-1 on the endothelium was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The serum cytokine, chemokine, and corticosterone levels were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. White blood cell counts were also determined. RESULTS: Brain death resulted in a decrease in the mesenteric perfusion to 30%, a 2.6-fold increase in the expression of ICAM-1 and leukocyte migration at the mesentery, a 70% reduction in the serum corticosterone level and pronounced leukopenia. Similar increases in the cytokine and chemokine levels were seen in the both the experimental and control animals. CONCLUSION: The data presented in this study suggest that brain death itself induces hypoperfusion in the mesenteric microcirculation that is associated with a pronounced reduction in the endogenous corticosterone level, thereby leading to increased local inflammation and organ dysfunction. These events are paradoxically associated with induced leukopenia after brain damage

  16. Effect of Transient Maternal Hypotension on Apoptotic Cell Death in Foetal Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Özyürek, Hamit; Bayrak, Sibel; Pehlivanoğlu, Bilge; Atilla, Pergin; Balkancı, Zeynep Dicle; Çakar, Nur; Anlar, Banu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intrauterine perfusion insufficiency induced by transient maternal hypotension has been reported to be associated with foetal brain malformations. However, the effects of maternal hypotension on apoptotic processes in the foetal brain have not been investigated experimentally during the intrauterine period. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transient maternal hypotension on apoptotic cell death in the intrauterine foetal brain. Study...

  17. An empirical EEG analysis in brain death diagnosis for adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhe; Cao, Jianting; Cao, Yang; Zhang, Yue; Gu, Fanji; Zhu, Guoxian; Zhen HONG; Wang, Bin; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is often used in the confirmatory test for brain death diagnosis in clinical practice. Because EEG recording and monitoring is relatively safe for the patients in deep coma, it is believed to be valuable for either reducing the risk of brain death diagnosis (while comparing other tests such as the apnea) or preventing mistaken diagnosis. The objective of this paper is to study several statistical methods for quantitative EEG analysis in order to help bedside or ambu...

  18. Diagnosis of brain death: confirmatory tests after clinical test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Yingying; Yang Qinglin; Liu Gang; Zhang Yan; Ye Hong; Gao Daiquan; Zhang Yunzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background The brain death confirmation tests occupy a different position in each country's diagnostic criteria (or guideline); the choices of tests are also different.China brain death criteria include clinical judgment and confirmation tests.This study aimed to confirm the preferred confirmatory test and complementary confirmatory tests.Methods We did a clinical brain death determination on deep coma patients,and then divided them into brain death group and non-brain death group.According to the Chinese standards for determining brain death,both the groups accepted confirmatory tests including electroencephalograph (EEG),somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP),and transcranial Doppler (TCD).The sensitivity,specificity,false positive rate,and false negative rate were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the confirmatory tests.Results Among the 131 cases of patients,103 patients met the clinical criteria of brain death.Respiratory arrest provocation test was performed on 44 cases and 32 cases (73%) successfully completed and confirmed that they have no spontaneous breathing.Of the three confirmation tests,EEG had the highest completion rate (98%) and good sensitivity (83%) and specificity (97%); TCD had followed completion rate (54%) and not good sensitivity (73%) and specificity (75%); SEP had the lowest completion rate (49%),good sensitivity (100%),and not good specificity (78%).After the combination of SEP or TCD with EEG,the specificity can increase to 100%.Conclusions The completion rate of respiratory arrest provocation test remains a problem in the clinical diagnosis of brain death.If the test cannot be completed,whether to increase a confirmatory test is debatable.SEP had an ideal sensitivity,and the specificity will reach 100% after combining with TCD or EEG.When a confirmed test was uncertain,we suggest increasing another confirmatory test.

  19. Outcome of kidney transplantation between controlled cardiac death and brain death donors: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yingzi; Shao Mingjie; Tian Tingting; She Xingguo; Liu Hong; Ye Shaojun; Ye Qifa

    2014-01-01

    Background Our goal was to evaluate the outcomes of kidney transplants from controlled cardiac death donors compared with brain death donors by conducting a meta-analysis of cohort studies.Methods The PubMed database and EMBASE were searched from January 1980 to July 2013 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria.Reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed.Two authors independently extracted information on the designs of the studies,the characteristics of the study participants,and outcome assessments.Results Nine cohort studies involving 84 398 participants were included in this meta-analysis; 3 014 received kidneys from controlled cardiac death donors and 80 684 from brain death donors.Warm ischemia time was significantly longer for the controlled cardiac death donor group.The incidence of delayed graft function was 2.74 times (P <0.001) greater in the controlled cardiac death donor group.The results are in favor of the brain death donor group on short-term patient and graft survival while this difference became nonsignificant at mid-term and long term.Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results.No evidence of publication bias was observed.Conclusion This meta-analysis of retrospective cohort studies suggests that the outcome after controlled cardiac death donors is comparable with that obtained using kidneys from brain death donors.

  20. A novel neuron-enriched protein SDIM1 is down regulated in Alzheimer's brains and attenuates cell death induced by DNAJB4 over-expression in neuro-progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Joy X

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular changes in multiple biological processes contribute to the development of chronic neurodegeneration such as late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD. To discover how these changes are reflected at the level of gene expression, we used a subtractive transcription-based amplification of mRNA procedure to identify novel genes that have altered expression levels in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients. Among the genes altered in expression level in AD brains was a transcript encoding a novel protein, SDIM1, that contains 146 amino acids, including a typical signal peptide and two transmembrane domains. Here we examined its biochemical properties and putative roles in neuroprotection/neurodegeneration. Results QRT-PCR analysis of additional AD and control post-mortem human brains showed that the SDIM1 transcript was indeed significantly down regulated in all AD brains. SDIM1 is more abundant in NT2 neurons than astrocytes and present throughout the cytoplasm and neural processes, but not in the nuclei. In NT2 neurons, it is highly responsive to stress conditions mimicking insults that may cause neurodegeneration in AD brains. For example, SDIM1 was significantly down regulated 2 h after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, though had recovered 16 h later, and also appeared significantly up regulated compared to untreated NT2 neurons. Overexpression of SDIM1 in neuro-progenitor cells improved cells' ability to survive after injurious insults and its downregulation accelerated cell death induced by OGD. Yeast two-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation approaches revealed, both in vitro and in vivo, an interaction between SDIM1 and DNAJB4, a heat shock protein hsp40 homolog, recently known as an enhancer of apoptosis that also interacts with the mu opioid receptor in human brain. Overexpression of DNAJB4 alone significantly reduced cell viability and SDIM1 co-overexpression was capable of attenuating the cell death

  1. Brain death and care of the organ donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Brain death has specific implications for organ donation with the potential for saving several lives. Awareness on maintenance of the brain dead has increased over the last decade with the progress in the field of transplant. The diagnosis of brain death is clinical and can be confirmed by apnea testing. Ancillary tests can be considered when the apnea test cannot be completed or is inconclusive. Reflexes of spinal origin may be present and should not be confused against the diagnosis of brain death. Adequate care for the donor targeting hemodynamic indices and lung protective ventilator strategies can improve graft quality for donation. Hormone supplementation using thyroxine, antidiuretic hormone, corticosteroid and insulin has shown to improve outcomes following transplant. India still ranks low compared to the rest of the world in deceased donation. The formation of organ sharing networks supported by state governments has shown a substantial increase in the numbers of deceased donors primarily by creating awareness and ensuring protocols in caring for the donor. This review describes the steps in the establishment of brain death and the management of the organ donor. Material for the review was collected through a Medline search, and the search terms included were brain death and organ donation. PMID:27275040

  2. CT Angiography in the Diagnosis of Brain Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary Brain death is defined as the irreversible cessation of functioning of the entire brain, including the brainstem. Brain death is principally established using clinical criteria including coma, absence of brainstem reflexes and loss of central drive to breathe assessed with apnea test. In situations in which clinical testing cannot be performed or when uncertainty exists about the reliability of its parts due to confounding conditions ancillary tests (i.a. imaging studies) may be useful. The objective of ancillary tests in the diagnosis of brain death is to demonstrate the absence of cerebral electrical activity (EEG and evoked potentials) or cerebral circulatory arrest. In clinical practice catheter cerebral angiography, perfusion scintigraphy, transcranial Doppler sonography, CT angiography and MR angiography are used. Other methods, like perfusion CT, xenon CT, MR spectroscopy, diffusion weighted MRI and functional MRI are being studied as potentially useful in the diagnosis of brain death. CT angiography has recently attracted attention as a promising alternative to catheter angiography – a reference test in the diagnosis of brain death. Since 1998 several major studies were published and national guidelines were introduced in several countries (e.g. in France, Austria, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Canada). This paper reviews technique, characteristic findings and criteria for the diagnosis of cerebral circulatory arrest in CT angiography

  3. Imaging Findings of Brain Death on 3-Tesla MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the usefulness of 3-tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo (GRE), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in diagnosing brain death. Magnetic resonance imaging findings for 10 patients with clinically verified brain death (group I) and seven patients with comatose or stuporous mentality who did not meet the clinical criteria of brain death (group II) were retrospectively reviewed. Tonsilar herniation and loss of intraarterial flow signal voids (LIFSV) on T2WI were highly sensitive and specific findings for the diagnosis of brain death (p < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). DWI, TOF-MRA, and GRE findings were statistically different between the two groups (p = 0.015, 0.029, and 0.003, respectively). However, cortical high signal intensities in T2WI and SWI findings were not statistically different between the two group (p = 0.412 and 1.0, respectively). T2-weighted imaging, DWI, and MRA using 3T MRI may be useful for diagnosing brain death. However, SWI findings are not specific due to high false positive findings.

  4. Pitfalls in brain death diagnosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Daniel; Rieger, Bernhard; Goldbrunner, Roland; Schlacke, Hans-Peter

    2013-05-01

    Although there are distinct guidelines in nearly all countries, a reliable secure assessment of brain death in cases with open head injury can be challenging. We present a case of a 32-year-old man with severe head injury after intracranial penetration of a grindstone fragment. As the injury led to destruction of nearly the whole greater wing of the right sphenoid bone and parts of the right orbit, the examination of brainstem reflexes and the confirmation of brain death was unfeasible. On day 2, all clinical criteria of brain death (coma, absence of brainstem reflexes, apnea) were fulfilled. In addition, there was an extinction of brainstem auditory (BAEP) and cerebral (N20) components of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials, while electroencephalogram (EEG) activity was still present. In the following days, a persisting EEG activity was obtained. Thus, an irreversible loss of whole brain functions could not be proved. As the patient had agreed to organ donation in case of brain death several years ago, ancillary methods to test the cessation of cerebral blood flow were mandatory. However, in this patient these methods turned out either to be doubtful or unavailable. For example, values of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography are not reliable in cases with open head injury. Due to a progressive septic state, time was running out to get the radiopharmaceutical agent for a cerebral scintigraphy (delivery time about 7 days, as the radiopharmaceutical agent was not in stock). Referring to the actual German guidelines, we had no legitimating indication for a cerebral angiography. Finally, the patient died of sepsis. We discuss the widening of the German guidelines in assessing brain death with the fast and low-risk method of cerebral computed tomography-angiography (CTA) to confirm diagnosis of brain death. PMID:22899230

  5. Radio-induced brain lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan Mircea Radu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Radiotherapy, an important tool in multimodal oncologic treatment, can cause radio-induced brain lesion development after a long period of time following irradiation.

  6. 99mTc HM-PAO brain perfusion SPECT in brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have easily carried out and interpreted 99mTc HM-PAO SPECT in a consecutive series of 40 comatose patients with brain damage, without discontinuing therapy. Brain death was diagnosed in 7 patients, by recognising absence of brain perfusion, as shown by no intracranial radionuclide uptake. In patients in whom perfusion was seen on brain scans, HM-PAO SPECT improved assessment of the extent of injury, which in general was larger than suggested by CT. (orig.)

  7. Brain death in ICU patients: Clinical significance of endocrine changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have been carried out among patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU having primary endocrine pathology, endocrine manifestations of systemic diseases or post-endocrine tissue surgery. However, minimal literary evidence is available highlighting the endocrine changes occurring during brain death in critically ill patients. A precise and timely diagnosis of brain death is required to convey the relatives about the prognosis and also to possibly plan for organ retrieval for transplantation purposes. The diagnosis of this condition as of today remains largely a clinical one. Brain death is associated with a multitude of endocrinological alterations which are yet to be completely unraveled and understood. Evaluating these endocrinological modifications lends us an added vista to add to the existing clinical parameters which might help us to confirm the diagnosis of brain death with a higher degree of precision. Moreover, since the efficacy of hormone replacement therapy to benefit in organ retrieval remains yet unproven, newer diagnostic modalities and research studies are definitely called for to strategize the optimal dosage and duration of such therapies.

  8. The brain and somatic integration: insights into the standard biological rationale for equating "brain death" with death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmon, A D

    2001-10-01

    The mainstream rationale for equating "brain death" (BD) with death is that the brain confers integrative unity upon the body, transforming it from a mere collection of organs and tissues to an "organism as a whole." In support of this conclusion, the impressive list of the brain's myriad integrative functions is often cited. Upon closer examination, and after operational definition of terms, however, one discovers that most integrative functions of the brain are actually not somatically integrating, and, conversely, most integrative functions of the body are not brain-mediated. With respect to organism-level vitality, the brain's role is more modulatory than constitutive, enhancing the quality and survival potential of a presupposedly living organism. Integrative unity of a complex organism is an inherently nonlocalizable, holistic feature involving the mutual interaction among all the parts, not a top-down coordination imposed by one part upon a passive multiplicity of other parts. Loss of somatic integrative unity is not a physiologically tenable rationale for equating BD with death of the organism as a whole. PMID:11588655

  9. Acanthamoeba castellanii Induces Host Cell Death via a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, James; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Jayasekera, Samantha; Alsam, Selwa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba castellanii is a serious human infection with fatal consequences, but it is not clear how the circulating amoebae interact with the blood-brain barrier and transmigrate into the central nervous system. We studied the effects of an Acanthamoeba encephalitis isolate belonging to the T1 genotype on human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier. Using an apoptosis-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we showed that Acanthamoeba induces programmed cell death in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Next, we observed that Acanthamoeba specifically activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Acanthamoeba-mediated brain endothelial cell death was abolished using LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. These results were further confirmed using brain microvascular endothelial cells expressing dominant negative forms of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. This is the first demonstration that Acanthamoeba-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cell death is dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:15845472

  10. Using an Integrated -Omics Approach to Identify Key Cellular Processes That Are Disturbed in the Kidney After Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M Z; Huang, H; Kaisar, M; Lo Faro, M L; Rebolledo, R; Morten, K; Heather, L C; Dona, A; Leuvenink, H G; Fuggle, S V; Kessler, B M; Pugh, C W; Ploeg, R J

    2016-05-01

    In an era where we are becoming more reliant on vulnerable kidneys for transplantation from older donors, there is an urgent need to understand how brain death leads to kidney dysfunction and, hence, how this can be prevented. Using a rodent model of hemorrhagic stroke and next-generation proteomic and metabolomic technologies, we aimed to delineate which key cellular processes are perturbed in the kidney after brain death. Pathway analysis of the proteomic signature of kidneys from brain-dead donors revealed large-scale changes in mitochondrial proteins that were associated with altered mitochondrial activity and morphological evidence of mitochondrial injury. We identified an increase in a number of glycolytic proteins and lactate production, suggesting a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. Higher amounts of succinate were found in the brain death group, in conjunction with increased markers of oxidative stress. We characterized the responsiveness of hypoxia inducible factors and found this correlated with post-brain death mean arterial pressures. Brain death leads to metabolic disturbances in the kidney and alterations in mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species generation. This metabolic disturbance and alteration in mitochondrial function may lead to further cellular injury. Conditioning the brain-dead organ donor by altering metabolism could be a novel approach to ameliorate this brain death-induced kidney injury. PMID:26602379

  11. Inducible cell death in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Jones, Jonathan D G;

    2006-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) occurs during vegetative and reproductive plant growth, as typified by autumnal leaf senescence and the terminal differentiation of the endosperm of cereals which provide our major source of food. PCD also occurs in response to environmental stress and pathogen attack......, and these inducible PCD forms are intensively studied due their experimental tractability. In general, evidence exists for plant cell death pathways which have similarities to the apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic forms described in yeast and metazoans. Recent research aiming to understand these...... pathways and their molecular components in plants are reviewed here....

  12. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol ...

  13. mGluR5 antagonist MPEP does not induce neuronal death in immature rat brain in contrast to NMDA antagonist MK-801

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojková, Denisa; Otáhal, Jakub; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 25-25. ISSN 0939-4451. [International Congress on Amino Acids and Proteins /9./. 08.08.2005-12.08.2005, Vienna] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : MPEP * MK-801 * rat brain Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  14. Radiological confirmation of brain death: digitised cerebral parenchymography. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of organ procurement from brain dead subjects have fallen substantially in recent years. In France, the legal definition of brain death is based on electroencephalographic criteria in patients with clinical evidence of irreversible coma. However, sedative drugs used in intensive care units usually render the electroencephalogram uninterpretable, and in our medicolegal framework, it is necessary that intracerebral circulatory arrest be demonstrated. We discuss the value of the various available techniques and report our experience with digitised intra-arterial cerebral parenchymography. This simple, fast technique does not alter physiological conditions and provides high-quality images, ensuring prompt diagnosis, which is a prerequisite for optimal organ harvesting. (orig.). With 5 figs

  15. Cell proliferation and cell death are disturbed during prenatal and postnatal brain development after uranium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, M; Elie, C; Stefani, J; N Florès; Culeux, C; Delissen, O; Ibanez, C; Lestaevel, P; Eriksson, P; Dinocourt, C

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is more susceptible to neurotoxic compounds than adult brain. It is also well known that disturbances during brain development cause neurological disorders in adulthood. The brain is known to be a target organ of uranium (U) exposure and previous studies have noted that internal U contamination of adult rats induces behavioral disorders as well as affects neurochemistry and neurophysiological properties. In this study, we investigated whether depleted uranium (DU) exposure affects neurogenesis during prenatal and postnatal brain development. We examined the structural morphology of the brain, cell death and finally cell proliferation in animals exposed to DU during gestation and lactation compared to control animals. Our results showed that DU decreases cell death in the cortical neuroepithelium of gestational day (GD) 13 embryos exposed at 40mg/L and 120mg/L and of GD18 fetuses exposed at 120mg/L without modification of the number of apoptotic cells. Cell proliferation analysis showed an increase of BrdU labeling in the dentate neuroepithelium of fetuses from GD18 at 120mg/L. Postnatally, cell death is increased in the dentate gyrus of postnatal day (PND) 0 and PND5 exposed pups at 120mg/L and is associated with an increase of apoptotic cell number only at PND5. Finally, a decrease in dividing cells is observed in the dentate gyrus of PND21 rats developmentally exposed to 120mg/L DU, but not at PND0 and PND5. These results show that DU exposure during brain development causes opposite effects on cell proliferation and cell death processes between prenatal and postnatal development mainly at the highest dose. Although these modifications do not have a major impact in brain morphology, they could affect the next steps of neurogenesis and thus might disrupt the fine organization of the neuronal network. PMID:26506049

  16. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  17. Cell death in the injured brain: roles of metallothioneins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin; Penkowa, Milena

    2009-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI), the primary, irreversible damage associated with the moment of impact consists of cells dying from necrosis. This contributes to fuelling a chronic central nervous system (CNS) inflammation with increased formation of proinflammatory cytokines, enzymes and reactive...... provides an overview of the TBI pathophysiology leading to cell death and neurological impairment. We also discuss endogenously expressed neuroprotectants and drug candidates, which at this stage may still hold the potential for treating brain injured patients....... oxygen species (ROS). ROS promote oxidative stress, which leads to neurodegeneration and ultimately results in programmed cell death (secondary injury). Since this delayed, secondary tissue loss occurs days to months following the primary injury it provides a therapeutic window where potential...

  18. Enhancing lysosome biogenesis attenuates BNIP3-induced cardiomyocyte death

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiucui; Godar, Rebecca J.; Liu, Haiyan; Diwan, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible pro-death protein BNIP3 (BCL-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3), provokes mitochondrial permeabilization causing cardiomyocyte death in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibition of autophagy accelerates BNIP3-induced cell death, by preventing removal of damaged mitochondria. We tested the hypothesis that stimulating autophagy will attenuate BNIP3-induced cardiomyocyte death. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NRCMs) were adenovirally transduced with BNIP3 (or LacZ as c...

  19. Brain Swelling and Death in Children with Cerebral Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, Karl B.; Kampondeni, Samuel D.; Valim, Clarissa; Potchen, Michael J.; Milner, Danny A.; Muwalo, Francis W.; Birbeck, Gretchen L.; Bradley, William G.; Fox, Lindsay L.; Glover, Simon J.; Hammond, Colleen A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Chilingulo, Cowles A.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Case fatality rates among African children with cerebral malaria remain in the range of 15 to 25%. The key pathogenetic processes and causes of death are unknown, but a combination of clinical observations and pathological findings suggests that increased brain volume leading to raised intracranial pressure may play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available in Malawi in 2009, and we used it to investigate the role of brain swelling in the pathogenesis of fatal cerebral malaria in African children. METHODS We enrolled children who met a stringent definition of cerebral malaria (one that included the presence of retinopathy), characterized them in detail clinically, and obtained MRI scans on admission and daily thereafter while coma persisted. RESULTS Of 348 children admitted with cerebral malaria (as defined by the World Health Organization), 168 met the inclusion criteria, underwent all investigations, and were included in the analysis. A total of 25 children (15%) died, 21 of whom (84%) had evidence of severe brain swelling on MRI at admission. In contrast, evidence of severe brain swelling was seen on MRI in 39 of 143 survivors (27%). Serial MRI scans showed evidence of decreasing brain volume in the survivors who had had brain swelling initially. CONCLUSIONS Increased brain volume was seen in children who died from cerebral malaria but was uncommon in those who did not die from the disease, a finding that suggests that raised intracranial pressure may contribute to a fatal outcome. The natural history indicates that increased intracranial pressure is transient in survivors. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Wellcome Trust U.K.) PMID:25785970

  20. Danish ethics council rejects brain death as the criterion of death -- commentary 1: wanting it both ways.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, David

    1990-01-01

    In this commentary on the recommendations of the Danish Council of Ethics (DCE) concerning criteria for death it is argued that whilst the DCE is correct in stressing the cultural aspects of death, its adoption of cardiac-oriented criteria raises several problems. There are problems with its notion of a 'death process', which purportedly begins with brain death and ends with cessation of cardiac function, and there are serious problems regarding its commitment to a cardiac-oriented definitio...

  1. Brain Death and Human Organismal Integration: A Symposium on the Definition of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Does the ability of some brain dead bodies to maintain homeostasis with the help of artificial life support actually imply that those bodies are living human organisms? Or might it be possible that a brain dead body on life support is a mere collection of still-living cells, organs and tissues which can coordinate with one another, but which lack the genuine integration that is the hallmark of a unified human organism as a whole? To foster further study of these difficult and timely questions, a Symposium on the Definition of Death was held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. The Symposium brought together scholars from a variety of disciplines-law, medicine, biology, philosophy and theology-who all share a commitment to the dead donor rule and to a biological definition of death, but who have differing opinions regarding the validity of neurological criteria for human death. The papers found in this special issue are among the fruits of this Symposium. PMID:27107428

  2. The time involved for the confirmation of brain death

    OpenAIRE

    Valdir Moreira Cinque, Estela Regina Ferraz Bianchi, Eutália Aparecida Candido de Araújo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: to analyze the time involved for the confirmation of brain death (BD) and compare it with the variables of interest. Methods: a retrospective analysis of charts of 103 patients which had BD from January of 2006 to December of 2007, in the Organ Procurement Organization of Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo - Brazil. Results: the majority, 55,34% was feminine, the main cause of BD was the Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA) with 49,51% of cases. The average age of donors was 41.55 year...

  3. Frustration induced oscillator death on networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Prashant M; Rangarajan, Govindan

    2013-09-01

    An array of identical maps with Ising symmetry, with both positive and negative couplings, is studied. We divide the maps into two groups, with positive intra-group couplings and negative inter-group couplings. This leads to antisynchronization between the two groups which have the same stability properties as the synchronized state. Introducing a certain degree of randomness in signs of these couplings destabilizes the anti-synchronized state. Further increasing the randomness in signs of these couplings leads to oscillator death. This is essentially a frustration induced phenomenon. We explain the observed results using the theory of random matrices with nonzero mean. We briefly discuss applications to coupled differential equations. PMID:24089940

  4. Using the brain criterion in organ donation after the circulatory determination of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ave, Anne L; Bernat, James L

    2016-06-01

    The UK, France, and Switzerland determine death using the brain criterion even in organ donation after the circulatory determination of death (DCDD), in which the United States and Canada use the circulatory-respiratory criterion. In our analysis of the scientific validity of the brain criterion in DCDD, we concluded that although it may be attractive in theory because it conceptualizes death as a unitary phenomenon, its use in practice is invalid. The preconditions (ie, the absence of reversible causes, such as toxic or metabolic disorders) for determining brain death cannot be met in DCDD. Thus, although brain death tests prove the cessation of tested brain functions, they do not prove that their cessation is irreversible. A stand-off period of 5 to 10 minutes is insufficient to achieve the irreversibility requirement of brain death. Because circulatory cessation inevitably leads to cessation of brain functions, first permanently and then irreversibly, the use of brain criterion is unnecessary to determine death in DCDD. Expanding brain death to permit it to be satisfied by permanent cessation of brain functions is controversial but has been considered as a possible means to declare death in uncontrolled DCDD. PMID:26857329

  5. Artesunate induces necrotic cell death in schwannoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Button, R W; Lin, F.; Ercolano, E; Vincent, J H; Hu, B.; Hanemann, C O; Luo, S

    2014-01-01

    Established as a potent anti-malaria medicine, artemisinin-based drugs have been suggested to have anti-tumour activity in some cancers. Although the mechanism is poorly understood, it has been suggested that artemisinin induces apoptotic cell death. Here, we show that the artemisinin analogue artesunate (ART) effectively induces cell death in RT4 schwannoma cells and human primary schwannoma cells. Interestingly, our data indicate for first time that the cell death induced by ART is largely ...

  6. Up-regulation of Kir2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. → The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K+ channel (Kir2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. → The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca2+ entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. → The Kir2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K+ channel (Kir2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of Kir channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration due to Ca2+ influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of Kir2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  7. Lapatinib Induced Suicidal Death of Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Zierle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The human epidermal growth factor receptors tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib has been shown to trigger suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells and is thus used for the treatment of malignancy. Side effects of lapatinib include anemia, which could, at least in theory, result from stimulation of eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes which is characterized by cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the cell membrane leading to phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Mechanisms involved in the triggering of eryptosis include oxidative stress, increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, and ceramide. The present study explored, whether lapatinib induces eryptosis. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, abundance of reactive oxygen species (ROS from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing labelled specific antibodies. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to lapatinib (≥ 1 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, and significantly decreased forward scatter. Lapatinib (7.5 µg/ml did not significantly modify DCFDA fluorescence and ceramide abundance. Lapatinib slightly, but significantly decreased Fluo3-fluorescence (≥ 5 µg/ml. Lapatinib (7.5 µg/ml enhanced the annexin-V-binding in the presence of the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM without significantly modifying Fluo3 fluorescence in the presence of ionomycin. The effect of lapatinib on forward scatter but not on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusion: Lapatinib triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect occurring despite decrease of cytosolic Ca2+ activity.

  8. Clofazimine Induced Suicidal Death of Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbace Officioso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The antimycobacterial riminophenazine clofazimine has previously been shown to up-regulate cellular phospholipase A2 and to induce apoptosis. In erythrocytes phospholipase A2 stimulates eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Phospholipase A2 is in part effective by fostering formation of prostaglandin E2, which triggers Ca2+ entry. Stimulators of Ca2+ entry and eryptosis further include oxidative stress and energy depletion. The present study tested, whether and how clofazimine induces eryptosis. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, reactive oxygen species (ROS from 2′, 7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA fluorescence, and cytosolic ATP level utilizing a luciferin-luciferase assay kit. Results: A 24-48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to clofazimine (≥1.5 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells without appreciably modifying forward scatter. Clofazimine significantly increased [Ca2+]i, significantly decreased cytosolic ATP, but did not significantly modify ROS. The effect of clofazimine on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted, but not fully abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+, and by phospholipase A2 inhibitor quinacrine (25 µM. Clofazimine further augmented the effect of Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (0.1 µM on eryptosis. The clofazimine induced annexin-V-binding was, however, completely abrogated by combined Ca2+ removal and addition of quinacrine. Conclusion: Clofazimine stimulates phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part dependent on entry of extracellular Ca2+, paralleled by cellular energy depletion and sensitive to

  9. Development and validation of the Communicating with Family about Brain Death Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnahan, Mary; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    This study reports development of a scale assessing communication with family about brain-dead organ donation. Two cross-sectional studies demonstrated scale validity. Tests of internal, external, and predictive validity were conducted using confirmatory factor analysis. In both studies, the same 6 items were shown to be unidimensional with acceptable reliability. Parallelism was shown between the Brain Death Scale and a measure of communication with family. Predictive validity was exhibited between participants' donor status and the Brain Death Scale. The scale was associated with knowledge about brain death confirming misconceptions about brain-dead organ donation. PMID:25253626

  10. Determination of Death and the Dead Donor Rule: A Survey of the Current Law on Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikas, Nikolas T; Bordlee, Dorinda C; Moreira, Madeline

    2016-06-01

    Despite seeming uniformity in the law, end-of-life controversies have highlighted variations among state brain death laws and their interpretation by courts. This article provides a survey of the current legal landscape regarding brain death in the United States, for the purpose of assisting professionals who seek to formulate or assess proposals for changes in current law and hospital policy. As we note, the public is increasingly wary of the role of organ transplantation in determinations of death, and of the variability of brain death diagnosing criteria. We urge that any attempt to alter current state statutes or to adopt a national standard must balance the need for medical accuracy with sound ethical principles which reject the utilitarian use of human beings and are consistent with the dignity of the human person. Only in this way can public trust be rebuilt. PMID:27097648

  11. Conditional Processes Induced by Birth and Death Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Iizuka, Masaru; Tomisaki, Matsuyo

    2010-01-01

    For birth and death processes with finite state space, we consider stochastic processes induced by conditioning on hitting the right boundary point before hitting the left boundary point. We call the induced stochastic processes the conditional processes. We show that the conditional processes are again birth and death processes when the right boundary point is absorbing. On the other hand, it is shown that the conditional processes do not have Markov property and they are not birth and death...

  12. Revisiting the Persisting Tension Between Expert and Lay Views About Brain Death and Death Determination: A Proposal Inspired by Pragmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Brain death or determination of death based on the neurological criterion has been an enduring source of controversy in academic and clinical circles. The controversy chiefly concerns how death is defined, and it also bears on the justification of the proposed criteria for death determination and their interpretation. Part of the controversy on brain death and death determination stems from disputed crucial medical facts, but in this paper I formulate another hypothesis about the nature of ongoing controversies. At stake is a misunderstood relationship between, on the one hand, the nature of our lay (or our "manifest image") views about death and, on the other hand, the nature of scientific insights (and related conceptual refinements) into death and its determination (the "scientific image"). The misunderstanding of this relationship has partly anchored the controversy and continues to fuel it. Based on a perspective inspired by pragmatism, which stresses the positive contribution of science to ethical and policy debates but also challenges different forms of scientism in science and philosophy found in foundationalist interpretations, I scrutinize three different stances regarding the relationship between lay and scientific perspectives about the definition of death: (1) foundational lay views, (2) foundational expert views, and (3) co-evolving views. I argue that only the latter is sustainable given recent challenges to foundationalist interpretations. PMID:26626067

  13. Time-dependent changes of cranial computed tomography after brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two children were retrospectively judged as having been in brain death state. Cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained during 109 and 60 days from the judgement of brain death to cardiac arrest. Early CT scans showed noticeable diffuse low density area and lack of ventricular and cisternal compression. Subsequently, the low density area became marked in the deep-seated white matter, brain stem, and basal ganglia. High density area along the cistern and fissures appeared, some of which were considered calcified. Preserved intracranial circulation may be a possible mechanism of these phenomena; however, many questions remain unsolved. This study emphasizes the need for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of brain death, especially the process from brain death to cardiac death. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Guideline of procedures 2003 for the gammagraphic study of brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of brain death is a clinical diagnosis that is sometimes made with the help of cerebral perfusion scintigraphy. It is important that all physicians be knowledgeable about the clinical requirements for the diagnosis of brain death, especially the need to establish irreversible cessation of all function of the cerebrum and brain stem. Institutions performing scintigraphy for the evaluation of possible brain death should develop clinical guidelines and procedures for the clinical diagnosis that incorporate both clinical evaluations and the integration of ancillary tests such as perfusion scintigraphy. (Author)

  15. Early immature neuronal death is partially involved in memory impairment induced by cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jee Hyun; Cho, So Yeon; Jeon, Se Jin; Jung, Ji Wook; Park, Man Seok; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-07-15

    Memory impairment is a common after an ischemic stroke. While delayed neuronal death in the CA1 region is usually linked to cerebral ischemia-induced memory impairment, the role of early immature neuronal death within the DG region in the memory state of an ischemic stroke model has rarely been studied. Here, we show a partial role of immature neuronal death in memory impairment in a global ischemia model. We found early immature neuronal death, which was determined by DCX and NeuN-double-staining. Injection of z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 inhibitor, into the DG region rescued cells from immature neuronal death in the DG region without affecting delayed neuronal death in the CA1 region of an ischemic brain. Moreover, z-DEVD-fmk treatment partially rescued ischemia-induced spatial memory impairment. We also found that ischemia-induced LTP impairment in the perforant pathway was restored by z-DEVD-fmk treatment. These results suggest that early immature neuronal death is partially involved in ischemia-induced spatial memory impairment. PMID:27085588

  16. Brain death: the challenges of translating medical science into Islamic bioethical discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Basser, Taha A

    2012-09-01

    Islamic ethico-legal assessments of brain death are varied and controversial. Some Islamic ethico-legal bodies have concluded that brain death is equivalent to cardiopulmonary death; others regard it as an intermediate state between life and death, and a few opine that it does not meet the standards for legal death according to Islamic law. Yet this translation of the concept of brain death into the Islamic ethico-legal domain has generated multiple ethical complexities that receive insufficient attention within the extant medical and fiqh literature. How do Islamic legists understand brain death as a clinical phenomenon? How does the Islamic ethico-legal system treat medical uncertainty? What Islamic ethico-legal principles should apply to bioethical questions about life and death? In this paper, we analyze the arguments for, and against, the acceptance of brain death within the context of the deliberation of a representative juridical council. In our discussion we focus on areas in which the legists' ethico-legal reasoning hinges upon clinical conceptions of the state of the individual when diagnosed as brain dead. As Islamic ethics continues to engage scientific and technological advancements in these areas, such exploration of internal workings is necessary if we wish to better understand how Islamic ethical principles can contribute to bioethical deliberation. PMID:23248843

  17. Sensitization of radiation-induced cell death by genistein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Kim, In Gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    A number of epidemiological studies as well as biological experiments, showed that genistein, one of the isoflavone, prevents prostate cancer occurrence. In this study, we showed that genistein inhibited the cell proliferation of human promyeoltic leukemia HL-60 cells and induced G2/M phase arrest. In addition, combination of genistein treatment and {gamma}-irradiation displayed synergistic effect in apoptotic cell death of HL-60 cells. This means that the repair of genistein-induced DNA damage was hindered by {gamma}-irradiation and thus cell death was increased. In conclusion, genistein is one of the important chemicals that sensitize radiation-induced cell death.

  18. Protective effects of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunqi Zhu; Yanli Li; Jingyi Liu; Xiaorong Yang; Ce Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Humanin is a 24-amino acid peptide isolated from the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. Several studies have indicated that Humanin can protect cells against cytotoxicity induced by various insults.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective role of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death, and to determine the most appropriate therapeutic concentration of Humanin.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Neuropathophysiological, randomized, controlled experiment, conducted at the Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, Shanxi Medical University, between March 2007 and October 2007.MATERIALS: Newborn Wistar rats, 5,5',6,6' tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl- benzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1, USA), calcein-acetoxymethylester (calcein-AM, USA), and Humanin (Shanghai, China) were used in this study. METHODS: Primary cortical neurons were cultured with dulbecco's modified eagle's medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum. Cultures were divided into three groups: control, hypoxia, and hypoxia + Humanin. Various concentrations of Humanin (1, 10, and 20 μmol/L) were added to the cultures 16 hours prior to hypoxia induction. For hypoxic conditions, cells were maintained at 37 ℃ within an incubator chamber filled with 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 24 hours. Cells in the control group were cultured in normal oxygen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cell viability was determined through the use of the vital dye calcein-AM, and the number of live cells was determined. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was assessed using the fluorescent probe JC-1. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening was determined with calcein-AM in the presence of cobalt chloride.RESULTS: (1) Cell viability: Hypoxia for 24 hours induced death in a large number of neurons. Pretreatment with 10 μmol/L and 20 μmol/L Humanin, 16 hours prior to hypoxia, protected cells against hypoxia. However, 1 μmol/L Humanin provided little protection. (2) ΔΨm: ΔΨm was reduced after 24-hour hypoxia

  19. Danish ethics council rejects brain death as the criterion of death -- commentary 2: return to Elsinore.

    OpenAIRE

    Pallis, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    No discussion of when an individual is dead is meaningful in the absence of a definition of death. If human death is defined as the irreversible loss of the capacity for consciousness combined with the irreversible loss of the capacity to breathe spontaneously (and hence to maintain a spontaneous heart beat) the death of the brainstem will be seen to be the necessary and sufficient condition for the death of the individual. Such a definition of death is not something radically new. It is m...

  20. Mean-field-diffusion-induced chimera death state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2015-06-01

    Recently a novel dynamical state, called the chimera death, has been discovered in a network of nonlocally coupled identical oscillators (Zakharova A., Kapeller M. and Schöll E., Phys. Rev. Lett., 112 (2014) 154101), which is defined as the coexistence of spatially coherent and incoherent oscillation death state. This state arises due to the interplay of nonlocality and symmetry breaking and thus it bridges the gap between two important dynamical states, namely the chimera and oscillation death. In this paper we show that the chimera death can be induced in a network of generic identical oscillators with mean-field diffusive coupling and thus we establish that a nonlocal coupling is not essential to obtain chimera death. We identify a new transition route to the chimera death state, namely the transition from in-phase synchronized oscillation to chimera death via global amplitude death state. We ascribe the occurrence of chimera death to the bifurcation structure of the network in the limiting condition and show that multi-cluster chimera death states can be achieved by a proper choice of initial conditions.

  1. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  2. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway

  3. Blood brain barrier and brain tissue injury by Gd-DTPA in uremia-induced rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study was carried out to evaluate the morphological changes in the blood brain barrier and neighbouring brain tissue caused by Gd-DTPA in uremia-induced rabbits. Bilateral renal arteries and veins of ten rabbits were ligated. Gd-DTPA(0.2mmol/kg) was intravenously injected into seven rabbits immediately after ligation. After MRI, they were sacrificed 2 or 3 days after ligation in order to observe light and electron microscopic changes in the blood brain barrier and brain tissue. MRI findings were normal, except for enhancement of the superior and inferior sagittal sinuses on T1 weighted images in uremia-induced rabbits injected with Gd-DTPA. On light microscopic examination, these rabbits showed perivascular edema and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression: electron microscopic examination showed separation of tight junctions of endothelial cells, duplication/rarefaction of basal lamina, increased lysosomes of neurons with neuronal death, demyelination of myelin, and extravasation of red blood cells. Uremia-induced rabbits injected with Gd-DTPA showed more severe changes than those without Gd-DTPA injection. Injuries to the blood brain barrier and neighbouring brain tissue were aggravated by Gd-DTPA administration in uremia-induced rabbits. These findings appear to be associated with the neurotoxicity of Gd-DTPA

  4. Agmatine Improves Cognitive Dysfunction and Prevents Cell Death in a Streptozotocin-Induced Alzheimer Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Juhyun; Hur, Bo Eun; Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Yang, Wonsuk; Cho, Hyun Jin; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Alzheimer's disease (AD) results in memory impairment and neuronal cell death in the brain. Previous studies demonstrated that intracerebroventricular administration of streptozotocin (STZ) induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in AD. Agmatine (Agm) has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects in central nervous system disorders. In this study, we investigated whether Agm treatment could attenuate apoptosis and improve cognitive decline in a STZ-...

  5. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, Jeppe; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2007-01-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds......), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the...... three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the...

  6. Correlation between heat shock protein 70 expression in the brain stem and sudden death after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lian-xu; XU Xiao-hu; LIU Chao; PAN Su-yue; ZHU Jia-zhen; ZHANG Cheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the patterns of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) biosynthesis following traumatic brain injury, and observe the effect of HSP70 induction on the function of the vital center in the brain stem. Methods: Rat models of sudden death resulted form traumatic brain injury were produced, and HSP70 expression in the rat brain stem was determined by immunohistochemistry, the induction of HSP70 mRNA detected by RT-PCR. Results: The level of HSP70 mRNA was prominently elevated in the brain stem as early as 1 5 min following the impact injury, while HSP70 expression was only observed 3 to 6 h after the injury. It was also observed that the levels of HSP70 mRNA but not the protein were elevated in the brain stem of sudden death rats. Conclusion: The synthesis of HSP70 was significantly enhanced in the brain stem following traumatic injury, and the expression of HSP70 is beneficial to eliminate the stress agents, and to sustain the cellular protein homeostasis. When the injury disturbs the synthesis of HSP70 to disarm the protective mechanism of heat-shock proteins, dysfunction of the vital center in the brain stem, and consequently death may occur. Breach in the synchronization of HSP70 mRNA-protein can be indicative of fatal damage to the nerve cells.

  7. Radiation-induced apoptosis and developmental disturbance of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Minoru [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The developing mammalian brain is highly susceptible to ionizing radiation. A significant increase in small head size and mental retardation has been noted in prenatally exposed survivors of the atomic bombing, with the highest risk in those exposed during 8-15 weeks after fertilization. This stage corresponds to day 13 of pregnancy for mice and day 15 for rats in terms of brain development. The initial damage produced by radiation at this stage is cell death in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain mantle, the radiosensitive germinal cell population. During histogenesis of the cerebellum the external granular layer (EGL) is also radiosensitive. Although extensive cell death results in microcephaly and histological abnormlity, both VZ and EGL have an ability to recover from a considerable cell loss and form the normal structure of the central nervous system. The number of cell deaths to induce tissue abnormalities in adult brain rises in the range of 15-25% of the germinal cell population; and the threshold doses are about 0.3 Gy for cerebral defects and 1 Gy for cerebellar anomalies in both mice and rats. A similar threshold level is suggested in human cases in induction of mental retardation. Radiation-induced cell death in the VZ and EGL has been revealed as apoptosis, by the nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation, transglutaminase activation, required macromolecular synthesis, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage. Apoptosis of the germinal cell is assumed to eliminate acquired genetic damage. Once an abnormality in DNA has been induced and fixed in a germinal cell, it would be greatly amplified during future proliferation. These cells would commit suicide when injured for replacement by healthy cells, rather than undertake DNA repair. In fact they show very slow repair of cellular damage. Thus the high sensitivity of undifferentiated neural cells to the lethal effect of radiation may constitute a biological defense mechanism. (author) 69 refs.

  8. Staurosporine induces different cell death forms in cultured rat astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astroglial cells are frequently involved in malignant transformation. Besides apoptosis, necroptosis, a different form of regulated cell death, seems to be related with glioblastoma genesis, proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion. In the present work we elucidated mechanisms of necroptosis in cultured astrocytes, and compared them with apoptosis, caused by staurosporine. Cultured rat cortical astrocytes were used for a cell death studies. Cell death was induced by different concentrations of staurosporine, and modified by inhibitors of apoptosis (z-vad-fmk) and necroptosis (nec-1). Different forms of a cell death were detected using flow cytometry. We showed that staurosporine, depending on concentration, induces both, apoptosis as well as necroptosis. Treatment with 10−7 M staurosporine increased apoptosis of astrocytes after the regeneration in a staurosporine free medium. When caspases were inhibited, apoptosis was attenuated, while necroptosis was slightly increased. Treatment with 10−6 M staurosporine induced necroptosis that occurred after the regeneration of astrocytes in a staurosporine free medium, as well as without regeneration period. Necroptosis was significantly attenuated by nec-1 which inhibits RIP1 kinase. On the other hand, the inhibition of caspases had no effect on necroptosis. Furthermore, staurosporine activated RIP1 kinase increased the production of reactive oxygen species, while an antioxidant BHA significantly attenuated necroptosis. Staurosporine can induce apoptosis and/or necroptosis in cultured astrocytes via different signalling pathways. Distinction between different forms of cell death is crucial in the studies of therapy-induced necroptosis

  9. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicker, Jeppe S; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Brunak, Søren

    2007-11-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds, three toxins (ANIT, DMN and NMF) and three non-toxins (Caeruelein, Dinitrophenol and Rosiglitazone). We identified three gene transcripts with exceptional predictive performance towards liver toxicity and/or changes in histopathology. The three genes were: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using the three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death in the literature and the novel finding represents a putative hepatotoxicity biomarker. PMID:17503021

  10. Prevention of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by minocycline

    OpenAIRE

    Won Seok; Kim Jin; Yoo Byung; Sohn Min; Kauppinen Tiina M; Park Man-Seong; Kwon Hyung-Joo; Liu Jialing; Suh Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic patients who attempt strict management of blood glucose levels frequently experience hypoglycemia. Severe and prolonged hypoglycemia causes neuronal death and cognitive impairment. There is no effective tool for prevention of these unwanted clinical sequelae. Minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline derivative, has been recognized as an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in several animal models such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. In the present study, w...

  11. Mechanism of heavy ion radiation-induced cancer cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that the carbon beam triggers apoptosis in radio-resistant cancer cell lines via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)- and mitochondrial Bcl-2 family protein-dependant mechanism. Here, we further examined the further apoptosis-inducing mechanism of carbon beam in two glioma cell lines (T98G, U251). ERK1/2 knockdown experiments revealed that ERK regulates this apoptosis-inducing machinery upstream of mitochondria. Furthermore, we also found that both T98G cell and U251 cell stably expressing dominant-negative ERK2 suppress cell death induced by carbon beam irradiation. We also found proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 dynamically chang their expression levels corresponding to ERK activation after CB irradiation in U251 cell, and knockdown of PUMA decreased CB-induced U251 cell death. These data suggest that kinase action of ERK is essential for CB-induced glioma cell death, and proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 might be downstream targets of ERK in CB-induced glioma cell death mechanism. (author)

  12. The process and promotion of radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced cell death is divided into reproductive and interphase death, whose process can be revealed by time-lapse observations. Pedigree analyses of progenies derived from a surviving progenitor cell have shown that moribund cells appear in clusters among cells which are apparently undamaged (lethal sectoring). Sister cell fusion, which likely results from chromosome bridge, is the most frequently observed cell abnormality leading to reproductive death. While interphase death does not occur unless the dose exceeds 10 Gy for low LET radiation such as X-rays, high-LET radiation is very effective at inducing interphase death (RBE: ≅3 at 230 keV/μm). Expression or fixation of potentially lethal damage (PLD) is closely associated with cell cycle events and enhanced by inducing premature chromosome condensation (PCC) at a nonpermissive temperature in tsBN2 cells with a ts-defect in RCC1 protein (a regulator of chromatin condensation) which monitors the completion of DNA replication. Furthermore, higher-order structural changes in nuclear matrix such as induced by leptomycin B, an inhibitor of CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance) protein, also play an important role in the fixation of PLD. (author)

  13. [Determination of irreversibility of clinical brain death. Electroencephalography and evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, H; Ferbert, A

    2016-02-01

    Principally, in the fourth update of the rules for the procedure to finally determine the irreversible cessation of function of the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem, the importance of an electroencephalogram (EEG), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are confirmed. This paper presents the reliability and validity of the electrophysiological diagnosis, discusses the amendments in the fourth version of the guidelines and introduces the practical application, problems and sources of error.An EEG is the best established supplementary diagnostic method for determining the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome. It should be noted that residual brain activity can often persist for many hours after the onset of brain death syndrome, particularly in patients with primary brainstem lesions. The derivation and analysis of an EEG requires a high level of expertise to be able to safely distinguish artefacts from primary brain activity. The registration of EEGs to demonstrate the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome is extremely time consuming.The BAEPs can only be used to confirm the irreversibility of brain death syndrome in serial examinations or in the rare cases of a sustained wave I or sustained waves I and II. Very often, an investigation cannot be reliably performed because of existing sound conduction disturbances or failure of all potentials even before the onset of clinical brain death syndrome. This explains why BAEPs are only used in exceptional cases.The SEPs of the median nerve can be very reliably derived, are technically simple and with few sources of error. A serial investigation is not required and the time needed for examination is short. For these reasons SEPs are given preference over EEGs and BAEPs for establishing the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome. PMID:26785843

  14. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  15. CSR1 induces cell death through inactivation of CPSF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z-H; Yu, Y P; Shi, Y-K; Nelson, J B; Luo, J-H

    2009-01-01

    CSR1 (cellular stress response 1), a newly characterized tumor-suppressor gene, undergoes hypermethylation in over 30% of prostate cancers. Re-expression of CSR1 inhibits cell growth and induces cell death, but the mechanism by which CSR1 suppresses tumor growth is not clear. In this study, we screened a prostate cDNA library using a yeast two-hybrid system and found that the cleavage and polyadenylation-specific factor 3 (CPSF3), an essential component for converting heteronuclear RNA to mRNA, binds with high affinity to the CSR1 C terminus. Further analyses determined that the binding motifs for CPSF3 are located between amino acids 440 and 543. The interaction between CSR1 and CPSF3 induced CPSF3 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, resulting in inhibition of polyadenylation both in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of CPSF3 using small interfering RNA induced cell death in a manner similar to CSR1 expression. A CSR1 mutant unable to bind to CPSF3 did not alter CPSF3 subcellular distribution, did not inhibit its polyadenylation activity and did not induce cell death. In summary, CSR1 appears to induce cell death through a novel mechanism by hijacking a critical RNA processing enzyme. PMID:18806823

  16. Cell Death Mechanisms Induced by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ch(a)vez-Gal(a)n L; Arenas-Del Angel MC; Zenteno E; Ch(a)vez R; Lascurain R

    2009-01-01

    One of the functions of the immune system is to recognize and destroy abnormal or infected cells to maintain homeostasis. This is accomplished by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity is a highly organized multifactor process. Here, we reviewed the apoptosis pathways induced by the two main cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets, natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+T cells. In base to recent experimental evidence, we reviewed NK receptors involved in recognition of target-cell, as well as lytic molecules such as perforin, granzymes-A and -B, and granulysin. In addition, we reviewed the Fas-FasL intercellular linkage mediated pathway, and briefly the cross-linking of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor pathway. We discussed three models of possible molecular interaction between lyric molecules from effector cytotoxic cells and target-cell membrane to induction of apoptosis.

  17. Bax-induced cell death in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Kris; Eberhardt, Ines; Reekmans, Rieka; Contreras, Roland

    2004-12-01

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins involved in the regulation of genetically programmed cell death in mammalian cells. It has been shown that heterologous expression of Bax in several yeast species, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Pichia pastoris, also induces cell death. In this study we investigated the effects of Bax expression in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Cell death inducing expression of Bax required a synthetic BAX gene that was codon-optimized for expression in Candida albicans. Expression of this BAX gene resulted in growth inhibition and cell death. By fusing Bax with the yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein of Aequoria victoria, the cell death-inducing effect of Bax was increased due to reduced proteolytic degradation of Bax. Using this fusion protein we showed that, upon expression in C. albicans, Bax co-localizes with the mitochondria. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that expression of Bax in yeast causes the mitochondria, which are normally distributed throughout the cell, to cluster in the perinuclear region. PMID:15565645

  18. Donor pretreatment with carbamylated erythropoietin in a brain death model reduces inflammation more effectively than erythropoietin while preserving renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Willemijn N.; Ottens, Petra J.; van Dijk, Antony; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that donor treatment of deceased brain dead donors would lead to a decrease in inflammatory responses seen in brain death and lead to a restoration of kidney function. Design: A standardized slow-induction rat brain death model followed by evaluation of kidney function in

  19. Donor pretreatment with carbamylated erythropoietin in a brain death model reduces inflammation more effectively than erythropoietin while preserving renal function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, W.N.; Ottens, P.J.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Goor, H. van; Ploeg, R.J.; Leuvenink, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that donor treatment of deceased brain dead donors would lead to a decrease in inflammatory responses seen in brain death and lead to a restoration of kidney function. DESIGN: A standardized slow-induction rat brain death model followed by evaluation of kidney function in

  20. Minocycline Attenuates Iron-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fan; Xi, Guohua; Liu, Wenqaun; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our previous study found minocycline reduces iron overload after ICH. The present study examined the effects of minocycline on the subacute brain injury induced by iron. Rats had an intracaudate injection of 50 μl of saline, iron, or iron + minocycline. All the animals were euthanized at day 3. Rat brains were used for immunohistochemistry (n = 5-6 per each group) and Western blotting assay (n = 4). Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and iron-handling proteins were measured. We found that intracerebral injection of iron resulted in brain swelling, BBB disruption, and brain iron-handling protein upregulation (p < 0.05). The co-injection of minocycline with iron significantly reduced iron-induced brain swelling (n = 5, p < 0.01). Albumin, a marker of BBB disruption, was measured by Western blot analysis. Minocycline significantly decreased albumin protein levels in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p < 0.01). Iron-handling protein levels in the brain, including ceruloplasmin and transferrin, were reduced in the minocycline co-injected animals. In conclusion, the present study suggests that minocycline attenuates brain swelling and BBB disruption via an iron-chelation mechanism. PMID:26463975

  1. Erythropoietin reduces neuronal cell death and hyperalgesia induced by peripheral inflammatory pain in neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Cane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Painful stimuli during neonatal stage may affect brain development and contribute to abnormal behaviors in adulthood. Very few specific therapies are available for this developmental disorder. A better understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of painful stimuli during the neonatal period is essential for the development of effective therapies. In this study, we examined brain reactions in a neonatal rat model of peripheral inflammatory pain. We focused on the inflammatory insult-induced brain responses and delayed changes in behavior and pain sensation. Postnatal day 3 pups received formalin injections into the paws once a day for 3 days. The insult induced dysregulation of several inflammatory factors in the brain and caused selective neuronal cell death in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. On postnatal day 21, rats that received the inflammatory nociceptive insult exhibited increased local cerebral blood flow in the somatosensory cortex, hyperalgesia, and decreased exploratory behaviors. Based on these observations, we tested recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO as a potential treatment to prevent the inflammatory pain-induced changes. rhEPO treatment (5,000 U/kg/day, i.p., coupled to formalin injections, ameliorated neuronal cell death and normalized the inflammatory response. Rats that received formalin plus rhEPO exhibited normal levels of cerebral blood flow, pain sensitivity and exploratory behavior. Treatment with rhEPO also restored normal brain and body weights that were reduced in the formalin group. These data suggest that severe inflammatory pain has adverse effects on brain development and rhEPO may be a possible therapy for the prevention and treatment of this developmental disorder.

  2. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration. PMID:24338618

  3. East-West differences in perception of brain death. Review of history, current understandings, and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Miller, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to approve of brain death or organ transplant from brain dead donors. Cultural and religious traditions have been referenced to explain this apparent difference. In the West, the status of the brain as home to the soul in Enlightenment philosophy, combined with pragmatism and utilitarianism, supports the concept of brain death. In the East, the integration of body with spirit and nature in Buddhist and folk beliefs, along with the Confucian social structure that builds upon interpersonal relationships, argues against brain death. However, it is unclear whether these reasoning strategies are explicitly used when families and medical providers are faced with acknowledging brain death. Their decisions are more likely to involve a prioritization of values and a rationalization of intuitive responses. Why and whether there might be differences between East and West in the acceptance of the brain death concept requires further empirical testing, which would help inform policy-making and facilitate communication between providers and patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds. PMID:25056149

  4. Moderate Hypothermia Significantly Decreases Hippocampal Cell Death Involving Autophagy Pathway after Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yichao; Lin, Yingying; Feng, Jun-feng; Jia, Feng; Gao, Guo-yi; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-07-15

    Here, we evaluated changes in autophagy after post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) followed by moderate hypothermia in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham injury with normothermia group (37 °C); sham injury with hypothermia group (32 °C); TBI with normothermia group (TNG; 37 °C); and TBI with hypothermia group (THG; 32 °C). Injury was induced by a fluid percussion TBI device. Moderate hypothermia (32 °C) was achieved by partial immersion in a water bath (0 °C) under general anesthesia for 4 h. All rats were killed at 24 h after fluid percussion TBI. The ipsilateral hippocampus in all rats was analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin staining; terminal deoxynucleoitidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining was used to determine cell death in ipsilateral hippocampus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Beclin-1, as well as transmission electron microscopy performed to assess changes in autophagy. At 24 h after TBI, the cell death index was 27.90 ± 2.36% in TNG and 14.90 ± 1.52% in THG. Expression level of LC3 and Beclin-1 were significantly increased after TBI and were further up-regulated after post-TBI hypothermia. Further, ultrastructural observations showed that there was a marked increase of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in ipsilateral hippocampus after post-TBI hypothermia. Our data demonstrated that moderate hypothermia significantly attenuated cell death and increased autophagy in ipsilateral hippocampus after fluid percussion TBI. In conclusion, autophagy pathway may participate in the neuroprotective effect of post-TBI hypothermia. PMID:25942484

  5. IS BRAIN DEATH REVERSAL POSSIBLE IN NEAR FUTURE: INTRATHECAL SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE (SNP SUPERFUSION IN BRAIN DEATH PATIENTS = THE 10,000 FOLD EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary or secondary brain death is accompanied with vasospasm of the perforators & further exaggerating the anoxic damage, in the form of neuropraxia. In normal conditions the excitatory impulse propagates as anterograde neurotransmission (ANT and at the level of synapse, glutamate activates NMDA receptors on postsynaptic membrane. Nitric oxide (NO is produced by Nitric oxide Synthetase (NOS in postsynaptic dendride or cell body and travels backwards across a chemical synapse to bind to the axon terminal of a presynaptic neuron for regulation of ANT this process is called as the retrograde neurotransmission (RNT. Thus the primary function of NO is RNT and the purpose of RNT is regulation of chemical neurotransmission at synapse. For this reason, RNT allows neural circuits to create feedback loops. The haem is the ligand binding site of NO receptor (sGC at presynaptic membrane. The affinity of haem exhibits >10, 000- fold excess for NO than Oxygen (THE 10, 000 FOLD EFFECT. In pathological conditions ANT, normal synaptic activity including RNT is absent. NO donors like sodium nitroprusside (SNP releases NO by activating NOS at the level of postsynaptic area. NO now travels backwards across a chemical synapse to bind to the haem of NO receptor at axon terminal of a presynaptic neuron as in normal condition. NO now acts as impulse generator (at presynaptic membrane thus bypasses the normal ANT. Also the arteriolar perforators are having Nitric Oxide Synthetase (NOS at the adventitial side (outer border on which sodium nitroprusside (SNP acts; causing release of Nitric Oxide (NO which vasodilates the perforators causing gush of blood in brain’s tissue and reversal of brain death. OBJECTIVE: In brain death cases we only think for various transplantations but this study being a pilot study reverses some criteria of brain death by vasodilating the arteriolar perforators. To study the effect of intrathecal sodium nitroprusside (IT SNP in

  6. RTP801 Is Involved in Mutant Huntingtin-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Flores, Núria; Romaní-Aumedes, Joan; Rué, Laura; Canal, Mercè; Sanders, Phil; Straccia, Marco; Allen, Nicholas D; Alberch, Jordi; Canals, Josep M; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Malagelada, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    RTP801 expression is induced by cellular stress and has a pro-apoptotic function in non-proliferating differentiated cells such as neurons. In several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, elevated levels of RTP801 have been observed, which suggests a role for RTP801 in neuronal death. Neuronal death is also a pathological hallmark in Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Currently, the exact mechanisms underlying mutant huntingtin (mhtt)-induced toxicity are still unclear. Here, we investigated whether RTP801 is involved in (mhtt)-induced cell death. Ectopic exon-1 mhtt elevated RTP801 mRNA and protein levels in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells and in rat primary cortical neurons. In neuronal PC12 cells, mhtt also contributed to RTP801 protein elevation by reducing its proteasomal degradation rate, in addition to promoting RTP801 gene expression. Interestingly, silencing RTP801 expression with short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) blocked mhtt-induced cell death in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. However, RTP801 protein levels were not altered in the striatum of Hdh(Q7/Q111) and R6/1 mice, two HD models that display motor deficits but not neuronal death. Importantly, RTP801 protein levels were elevated in both neural telencephalic progenitors differentiated from HD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and in the putamen and cerebellum of human HD postmortem brains. Taken together, our results suggest that RTP801 is a novel downstream effector of mhtt-induced toxicity and that it may be relevant to the human disease. PMID:25876513

  7. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Yamazaki, Daiju [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Biological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  8. Morphologic categorization of cell death induced by mild hyperthermia and comparison with death induced by ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of the morphological categorization of cell death, results of two in vivo studies on the cell death induced by mild hyperthermia in rat small intestine and mouse mastocytoma, and a comparison of the cell death induced by hyperthermia, radiation and cytotoxic drugs. Two distinct forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis, can be recognized on morphologic grounds. Apoptosis appears to be a process of active cellular self-destruction to which a biologically meaningful role can usually be attributed, whereas necrosis is a passive degenerative phenomenon that results from irreversible cellular injury. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies showed that lower body hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 30 min) induced only apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, and of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. In the mastocytoma, hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 15 min) produced widespread tumor necrosis and also enhanced apoptosis of tumor cells. Ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs are also known to induce apoptosis in a variety of tissues. It is attractive to speculate that DNA damage by each agent is the common event which triggers the same process of active cellular self-destruction that characteristically effects selective cell deletion in normal tissue homeostasis

  9. Differentiation and Death of Premyelinating Oligodendrocytes in Developing Rodent Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Trapp, Bruce D.; Nishiyama, Akiko; Cheng, David; Macklin, Wendy

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that newly formed oligodendrocytes are dynamic cells whose production, survival, and differentiation depend upon axonal influences. This study has characterized the appearance and fate of newly formed oligodendrocytes in developing rat brain. Oligodendrocytes appear in predictable locations and radially extend DM-20–positive processes that cover 80-μm domains in the cortex and 40-μm domains in the corpus callosum. These premyelinating oligodendrocytes have one ...

  10. Cloning of murine BRI3 gene and study on its function for inducing cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of TNFα effects, the cDNA of murine BRI3 gene was cloned from the total RNA of murine brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3)treated with hTNFα by using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and the RT-PCR method. The fusion expression vector harbouring BRI3 gene and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) thus obtained were designated as pEGFP/I3. Then pEGFP/I3 was transiently transfected into L929 cells and the fusion protein EGFP/I3 was localized in cytoplasm. It is found that the expression of EGFP/I3 could induce cell death in L929 cells detected by TUNEL method and flow cytometry. And the overexpression of Bci-2 in L929 cells can block cell death induced by EGFP/I3, indicating that murine BRI3 gene might related to the TNFα mediated cytotoxicity.

  11. Principles and concepts of brain death and organ donation: the Jewish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Z H; Rappaport, I T

    1999-01-01

    The harvesting of organs for transplantation is dependent on a stringent definition of brain death. Different societies have had to struggle with their cultural heritage, adapting it to conform to the advances in medical science and the need of the sick. In this article, the development of the concept of brain death as it applies to organ transplantation in Judaism is outlined. The ability of traditional Jewish values to address themselves to the challenges of modern medicine can serve as a basis for cultural cross-fertilization and comparison in modern societies. PMID:10549346

  12. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish Amin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003. The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21–30 years (18.8%, followed by 11–20 years age group (17.8% and 31–40 years (14.3%. The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas. To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients

  13. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharabi Shirley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT and irreversible electroporation (IRE are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This model can be used for individual treatment planning.

  14. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Sharabi Shirley; Kos Bor; Last David; Guez David; Daniels Dianne; Harnof Sagi; Mardor Yael; Miklavcic Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This m...

  15. Computationally Prediction of Candidate Agents for Preventing Organ Dysfunction After Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianwen; Ye, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our aim was to explore the mechanism of post-transplant organ function decrease induced by brain death (BD) and discover a potential candidate drug for improving the survival and organ function after BD. MATERIAL AND METHODS The microarray data developed from the liver tissues after BD were further analyzed by bioinformatics methods. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were computationally predicted and the DEGs that involved biological functions were explored by gene ontology (GO) analysis. The candidate agents that could induce the reverse gene signature were predicted based on the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. RESULTS There were total 1374 DEGs, including 589 up-regulated genes and 785 down-regulated genes. Function analysis showed that DEGs were mainly enriched in biological process-related GO terms, such as regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent, inflammatory response, and regulation of phosphorus metabolic process. The down-regulated genes were significantly enriched in transcription factor activity and transcription regulator activity-related molecular function. The down-regulated GO terms exhibited close interaction with each other. CONCLUSIONS The organ function decrease may be attributed by transcription alteration, inflammation response, and metabolic alteration in liver after BD. Spaglumic acid and halcinonide may be potential drugs for preventing organ damage during the BD process. PMID:27170053

  16. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific

  18. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  19. Prevention of acute/severe hypoglycemia-induced neuron death by lactate administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Seok Joon; Jang, Bong Geom; Yoo, Byung Hoon; Sohn, Min; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2012-06-01

    Hypoglycemia-induced cerebral neuropathy can occur in patients with diabetes who attempt tight control of blood glucose and may lead to cognitive dysfunction. Accumulating evidence from animal models suggests that hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death is not a simple result of glucose deprivation, but is instead the end result of a multifactorial process. In particular, the excessive activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) consumes cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), resulting in energy failure. In this study, we investigate whether lactate administration in the absence of cytosolic NAD(+) affords neuroprotection against hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death. Intraperitoneal injection of sodium L-lactate corrected arterial blood pH and blood lactate concentration after hypoglycemia. Lactate administered without glucose was not sufficient to promote electroencephalogram recovery from an isoelectric state during hypoglycemia. However, supplementation of glucose with lactate reduced neuronal death by ∼80% in the hippocampus. Hypoglycemia-induced superoxide production and microglia activation was also substantially reduced by administration of lactate. Taken together, these results suggest an intriguing possibility: that increasing brain lactate following hypoglycemia offsets the decrease in NAD(+) due to overactivation of PARP-1 by acting as an alternative energy substrate that can effectively bypass glycolysis and be fed directly to the citric acid cycle to maintain cellular ATP levels. PMID:22453629

  20. Beacon signal in transcranial color coded ultrasound: A sign for brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A widely under-recognized brain-death confirming transcranial ultrasonography pattern resembling the red-blue beacon signal was demonstrated. Familiarity to this distinct and characteristic ultrasonic pattern seems to be important in the perspective of point-of-care neurological ultrasound use and knobology.

  1. Beacon signal in transcranial color coded ultrasound: A sign for brain death

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu; Ethem Murat Arsava

    2014-01-01

    A widely under-recognized brain-death confirming transcranial ultrasonography pattern resembling the red-blue beacon signal was demonstrated. Familiarity to this distinct and characteristic ultrasonic pattern seems to be important in the perspective of point-of-care neurological ultrasound use and knobology.

  2. Digital subtraction angiography - a new approach to brain death determination in the newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of brain death in the newborn infants is elusive and often difficult. The lack of cerebral blood flow has become an identified criterion for loss of cerebral function. The diagnosis can be obtained by the technique of digital subtraction angiography, which is presented in two case reports demonstrating the utility of this technique. (orig.)

  3. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  4. Hydrogen peroxide produced by oral Streptococci induces macrophage cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Okahashi

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 human macrophage cell line at multiplicities of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited the cytotoxic effect of S. oralis. S. oralis deletion mutants lacking the spxB gene, which encodes pyruvate oxidase, and are therefore deficient in H2O2 production, showed reduced cytotoxicity toward THP-1 macrophages. Furthermore, H2O2 alone was capable of inducing cell death. The cytotoxic effect seemed to be independent of inflammatory responses, because H2O2 was not a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-α production in macrophages. These results indicate that streptococcal H2O2 plays a role as a cytotoxin, and is implicated in the cell death of infected human macrophages.

  5. The anti-cell death FNK protein protects cells from death induced by freezing and thawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FNK protein, constructed from anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL with enhanced activity, was fused with the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV/Tat protein to mediate the delivery of FNK into cells. The fusion protein PTD-FNK was introduced into chondrocytes in isolated articular cartilage-bone sections, cultured neurons, and isolated bone marrow mononuclear cells to evaluate its ability to prevent cell death induced by freezing and thawing. PTD-FNK protected the cells from freeze-thaw damage in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of PTD-FNK with conventional cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide and hydroxyethyl starch) increased surviving cell numbers around 2-fold compared with controls treated only with the cryoprotectants. Notably, PTD-FNK allowed CD34+ cells among bone marrow mononuclear cells to survive more efficiently (12-fold more than the control cells) from two successive freeze-thaw cycles. Thus, PTD-FNK prevented cell death induced by freezing and thawing, suggesting that it provides for the successful cryopreservation of biological materials

  6. Different Types of Cell Death Induced by Enterotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yuan Hong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection of bacterial organisms generally causes cell death to facilitate microbial invasion and immune escape, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In addition to the intercellular infectious processes, pathogen-produced/secreted enterotoxins (mostly exotoxins are the major weapons that kill host cells and cause diseases by inducing different types of cell death, particularly apoptosis and necrosis. Blocking these enterotoxins with synthetic drugs and vaccines is important for treating patients with infectious diseases. Studies of enterotoxin-induced apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms have helped us to create efficient strategies to use against these well-characterized cytopathic toxins. In this article, we review the induction of the different types of cell death from various bacterial enterotoxins, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, alpha-hemolysin of Escherichia coli, Shiga toxins, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, heat-labile enterotoxins, and the cholera toxin, Vibrio cholerae. In addition, necrosis caused by pore-forming toxins, apoptotic signaling through cross-talk pathways involving mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and lysosomal injury is discussed.

  7. Chemical -induced apoptotic cell death in tomato cells : involvement of caspase-like proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Yakimova, E.T.; Maximova, E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new system to study programmed cell death in plants is described. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were induced to undergo programmed cell death by treatment with known inducers of apoptosis in mammalian cells. This chemical-induced cell death was accompanied by the characte

  8. The distribution of sevoflurane in a sevoflurane induced death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, David L; Nicolaides, Andrea; Stephens, Gretel C; Ferslew, Kenneth E

    2004-03-01

    The distribution of sevoflurane (fluoromethyl 2,2,2,-trifluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl) ethyl ether) in blood, urine, liver, kidney, vitreous humor, and tracheal aspirate is presented from a subject with a sevoflurane induced death. Sevoflurane is a nonflammable general anesthetic administered by inhalation of vaporized liquid. Although general inhalation anesthetics have the potential to be fatal if not properly administered, the incidence of abuse is minute in comparison to other illicit drugs. Currently, there are no citations in the literature defining the body distribution of sevoflurane in a sevoflurane induced death. The decedent was found lying in a bed with an oxygen mask containing a gauze pad secured to his face. Three empty bottles and one partially full bottle of Ultane (sevoflurane) were found with the body in addition to two pill boxes containing a variety of prescription and non-prescription drugs. Serum, urine and gastric contents from the deceased were screened for numerous drugs and metabolites using a combination of thin layer chromatographic, colorimetric and immunoassay techniques. Analysis of biological specimens from the deceased revealed the presence of: amphetamine, caffeine, pseudoephedrine, nicotine, nicotine metabolite, and valproic acid. Sevoflurane concentrations were determined by headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and revealed concentrations of 26.2 microg/mL in the blood, 105 microg/mL in the urine, 31.9 microg/mL in the tracheal aspirate, 86.7 microg/mL in the vitreous humor, 30.8 mg/kg in the liver, and 12.8 mg/kg in the kidney. The decedent had pathologies consistent with respiratory suppression including pulmonary atelectasis, pulmonary edema, and neck vein distention. The official cause of death was respiratory suppression by sevoflurane and the manner of death was unclear. PMID:15027568

  9. Cell death and cytokine production induced by autoimmunogenic hydrocarbon oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Sonja; Kny, Angelika; Schorn, Christine; Pfatschbacher, Jürgen; Niederreiter, Birgit; Herrmann, Martin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Steiner, Günter; Hoffmann, Markus H

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbon oils such as pristane or hexadecane induce arthritis and lupus in rodents sharing clinical and pathological features with the human diseases rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, respectively. In pristane-induced lupus in the mouse induction of apoptosis and augmentation of type-I Interferon signalling by pristane have been suggested to contribute to pathology, whereas in pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in the rat the pathological mechanisms are still elusive. Here we show that pristane induces cell death in rat and human cells. Increased numbers of apoptotic cells were found in draining lymph nodes of pristane-injected rats and increased percentages of apoptotic and necrotic cells were observed in peripheral blood. In addition, neutrophil extracellular trap formation was triggered by pristane and hexadecane in neutrophils. Because levels of interleukin (IL)-1β were elevated in sera of pristane-injected rats, with levels mirroring the course of PIA, we examined the effect of pristane at single cell level in vitro, using rat splenocytes and the human monocytic cell line THP-1. Pristane and other hydrocarbon oils induced IL-1β secretion in THP-1 cells as well as in rat splenocytes. The potassium channel inhibitor glibenclamide partly inhibited IL-1β induction, suggesting involvement of the inflammasome. Elevated levels of IL-1α were also found in supernatants of cells treated with pristane and hexadecane. In conclusion, autoimmunogenic hydrocarbon oils induce various forms of cell death in rat and human cells. The higher serum IL-1β levels in pristane-injected animals might be caused by both inflammasome-dependent and -independent mechanisms, such as passive release from dying-cells and probably extracellular maturation of pro-IL-1β. PMID:22917079

  10. Legal Standards for Brain Death and Undue Influence in Euthanasia Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Okninski, Michaela E

    2016-06-01

    A major appellate court decision from the United States seriously questions the legal sufficiency of prevailing medical criteria for the determination of death by neurological criteria. There may be a mismatch between legal and medical standards for brain death, requiring the amendment of either or both. In South Australia, a Bill seeks to establish a legal right for a defined category of persons suffering unbearably to request voluntary euthanasia. However, an essential criterion of a voluntary decision is that it is not tainted by undue influence, and this Bill falls short of providing adequate guidance to assess for undue influence. PMID:27048423

  11. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Lilibeth Lanceta; Mattingly, Jacob M.; Chi Li; Eaton, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably in...

  12. CSR1 induces cell death through inactivation of CPSF3

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Z-H; Yu, YP; Shi, Y-K; Nelson, JB; Luo, J-H

    2008-01-01

    CSR1 (cellular stress response 1), a newly characterized tumor-suppressor gene, undergoes hypermethylation in over 30% of prostate cancers. Re-expression of CSR1 inhibits cell growth and induces cell death, but the mechanism by which CSR1 suppresses tumor growth is not clear. In this study, we screened a prostate cDNA library using a yeast two-hybrid system and found that the cleavage and polyadenylation-specific factor 3 (CPSF3), an essential component for converting heteronuclear RNA to mRN...

  13. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianZhang; XuemeiXu; YongLiu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  14. Predictors of Inpatient Death and Complications among Postoperative Elderly Patients with Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel; Mukherjee, Debraj; Chang, David C.; Purtell, Michael; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Risks of brain surgery in elderly patients with brain metastases are not well defined. This study was designed to quantify the postoperative risk for these patients after brain surgery for metastatic disease to the brain. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998–2005). Patients aged 65 years or older who underwent tumor resection of brain metastases were identified by ICD-9 coding. Primary outcome was inpatient death. Other outcomes included systemic postoperative complications, length of stay (LOS), and total charges. Results A total of 4,907 patients (53.6% men) were identified. Mean age was 72.1 years. Mean Charlson comorbidity score was 7.8. Inpatient mortality was 4%. The most common adverse events were pulmonary complications (3.4%). Mean length of stay was 9.2 days. Mean total charges were $57,596.39. In multivariate analysis, patients up to age 80 years had no significantly greater odds of inpatient death, relative to their 65- to 69-year-old counterparts. Each 1-point increase in Charlson score was associated with 12% increased odds of death, 0.52 days increased LOS, and $1,710.61 higher hospital charges. Postoperative pulmonary complications, stroke, or thromboembolic events increased LOS and total charges by up to 9.6 days and $57,664.42, respectively. These associations were statistically significant (P brain metastases among the elderly up to the ninth decade of life is feasible. Age older than 80 years and higher Charlson comorbidity scores were found to be important prognostic factors for inpatient outcome. Incorporating these factors into preoperative decision making may help to select appropriately those elderly candidates for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:20809176

  15. Upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 following prenatal cocaine exposure induces apoptosis in fetal rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, DaLiao; Zhang, Lubo

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy has been associated with numerous adverse perinatal outcomes. Aims: The present study was to determine whether prenatal cocaine exposure induced apoptosis and the possible role of Bcl-2 family genes in the programming cell death in fetal rat brain. Main methods: Pregnant rats were treated with cocaine subcutaneously (30 & 60 mg/kg/day) from day 15 to 21 of gestation. Then the fetal and maternal brains were isolated. Key findings: Cocaine produced a dose-dependen...

  16. Upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 following prenatal cocaine exposure induces apoptosis in fetal rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    DaLiao Xiao, Lubo Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy has been associated with numerous adverse perinatal outcomes. Aims: The present study was to determine whether prenatal cocaine exposure induced apoptosis and the possible role of Bcl-2 family genes in the programming cell death in fetal rat brain. Main methods: Pregnant rats were treated with cocaine subcutaneously (30 & 60 mg/kg/day) from day 15 to 21 of gestation. Then the fetal and maternal brains were isolated. Key findings: Cocaine produced a dose-depe...

  17. Melatonin Prevents Chemical-Induced Haemopoietic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Salucci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (MEL, a methoxyindole synthesized by the pineal gland, is a powerful antioxidant in tissues as well as within cells, with a fundamental role in ameliorating homeostasis in a number of specific pathologies. It acts both as a direct radical scavenger and by stimulating production/activity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. In this work, some chemical triggers, with different mechanisms of action, have been chosen to induce cell death in U937 hematopoietic cell line. Cells were pre-treated with 100 µM MEL and then exposed to hydrogen peroxide or staurosporine. Morphological analyses, TUNEL reaction and Orange/PI double staining have been used to recognize ultrastructural apoptotic patterns and to evaluate DNA behavior. Chemical damage and potential MEL anti-apoptotic effects were quantified by means of Tali® Image-Based Cytometer, able to monitor cell viability and apoptotic events. After trigger exposure, chromatin condensation, micronuclei formation and DNA fragmentation have been observed, all suggesting apoptotic cell death. These events underwent a statistically significant decrease in samples pre-treated with MEL. After caspase inhibition and subsequent assessment of cell viability, we demonstrated that apoptosis occurs, at least in part, through the mitochondrial pathway and that MEL interacts at this level to rescue U937 cells from death.

  18. The prolongation of somatic support in a pregnant woman with brain-death: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral Eliana

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical literature has increasingly reported cases of maternal brain death during pregnancy. This is a rare situation which demands the decision and, depending on the gestational age, the implementation of a set of measures to prolong the homeostasis of the human body after brain death for the purpose of maintaining the foetus alive until its viability. Case presentation A 40 year old woman suffered an intracranial haemorrhage during the 25th week of pregnancy. Despite neurosurgical drainage of a gross intraparenchymatous haematoma, the patient developed brain death. Upon confirmation of this diagnosis, she received full ventilatory and nutritional support, vasoactive drugs, maintenance of normothermia, hormone replacement and other supportive measures required to prolong gestation and improve the survival prognosis of her foetus. All decisions regarding the patient's treatment were taken in consensus with her family. She also received corticosteroids to accelerate foetal lung maturity. During the twenty-five days of somatic support, the woman's condition remained stable; however, during the last seven days the foetus developed oligohydramnios and brain-sparring, which led the medical team to take the decision to perform a Caesarean section at that moment. After delivery, the patient's organs were removed for donation. The male infant was born weighing 815 g, with an Apgar score of 9 and 10 at the first and fifth minutes, respectively. The infant was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, but did not require mechanical ventilation and had no major complications. He was discharged at 40 days of life, with no sequelae and weighing 1850 g. Conclusion These results are in accordance with findings from previous studies and case reports suggesting the appropriateness and safety of extended somatic support during pregnancy under certain circumstances. They also suggest the need for prompt diagnosis of brain death before the

  19. Neurotoxin envenomation mimicking brain death in a child: A case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu Dayal; Smita Prakash; Verma, Pradeep K; Mridula Pawar

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of presentation of a victim of neurotoxic snake bite can range from mild ptosis to complete paralysis and ophthalmoplegia. We report a case of snake bite in a 10-year-old child who was comatosed with bilateral fixed dilated pupils and absent doll′s eye movement that was interpreted as brain death. Physicians need to be aware of the likelihood of snakebite presenting as locked in syndrome.

  20. Neurotoxin envenomation mimicking brain death in a child: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Dayal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of presentation of a victim of neurotoxic snake bite can range from mild ptosis to complete paralysis and ophthalmoplegia. We report a case of snake bite in a 10-year-old child who was comatosed with bilateral fixed dilated pupils and absent doll′s eye movement that was interpreted as brain death. Physicians need to be aware of the likelihood of snakebite presenting as locked in syndrome.

  1. Cell death induced by gamma irradiation of developing skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a single dose of 2 Gy gamma rays and killed from 6 h to 5 d later. Increased numbers of dying cells, characterised by their extreme chromatin condensation and often nuclear fragmentation were seen in skeletal muscle 6 h after irradiation. Dying cells decreased to nearly normal values 48 h later. In situ labelling of nuclear DNA fragmentation identified individual cells bearing fragmented DNA. The effects of gamma rays were suppressed following cycloheximide i.p. at a dose of 1 μg/g body weight given at the time of irradiation. Taken together, the present morphological and pharmacological results suggest that gamma ray induced cell death in skeletal muscle is apoptotic, and that the process is associated with protein synthesis. Finally, proliferating cell nuclear antigen-immunoreactive cells, which were abundant in control rats, decreased in number 48 h after irradiation. However, a marked increase significantly above normal age values was observed at the 5th day, thus suggesting that regeneration occurs following irradiation-induced cell death in developing muscle. (author)

  2. Complications associated with the apnea test in the determination of the brain death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-liang; FANG Qiang; LI Li; QIU Yun-qing; LUO Ben-yan

    2008-01-01

    Background An apnea test is essentialin the clinical determination of brain death.This study was conducted to analyse complications associated with the apnea test in the determination of the brain death.Methods On 93 adult patients In coma in Zhejiang Province of China from January 2003 to December 2006,179 apnea tests were performed as a part of the determination of brain death.Potential risk conditions and complications were analysed during apnea tests.Results During apnea,sedous cardiac arrhythmia did not occur in all patients.Complications occurred in 37 of 179 (21%)apnea tests.Hypotension occurred in 30 patients(17%)and it was obsewed in 8/94(9%)tests with baseline value of systolic arterial blood pressure not less than 120 mmHg,and 22/85(26%)lass than 120 mmHg(P<0.05).Severe hypoxaemia occurred in 10 patients(6%)of which 3/138(2%)tests with baseline value of arterial oxygen pressure not less than 200 mmHg,and 7/41(17%)less than 200 mmHg(P<0.05).Conclusions This study demonstrated that complications occurred mostly in patients with inadequate baseline systolic arterial blood pressure and preoxygenation.Adequate precautions during the apnea tests may reduce the risk of cardiovascular and oxygenation complication.

  3. Obesity-Induced Hypertension: Brain Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Fang, Taolin; Aberdein, Nicola; de Lara Rodriguez, Cecilia E P; Hall, John E

    2016-07-01

    Obesity greatly increases the risk for cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal diseases and is one of the most significant and preventable causes of increased blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of central nervous system (CNS) signaling pathways that contribute to the etiology and pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension. We discuss the role of excess adiposity and activation of the brain leptin-melanocortin system in causing increased sympathetic activity in obesity. In addition, we highlight other potential brain mechanisms by which increased weight gain modulates metabolic and cardiovascular functions. Unraveling the CNS mechanisms responsible for increased sympathetic activation and hypertension and how circulating hormones activate brain signaling pathways to control BP offer potentially important therapeutic targets for obesity and hypertension. PMID:27262997

  4. Nitro-Oxidative Stress after Neuronal Ischemia Induces Protein Nitrotyrosination and Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tajes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is an acute vascular event that obstructs blood supply to the brain, producing irreversible damage that affects neurons but also glial and brain vessel cells. Immediately after the stroke, the ischemic tissue produces nitric oxide (NO to recover blood perfusion but also produces superoxide anion. These compounds interact, producing peroxynitrite, which irreversibly nitrates protein tyrosines. The present study measured NO production in a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, a murine glial (BV2, a human endothelial cell line (HUVEC, and in primary cultures of human cerebral myocytes (HC-VSMCs after experimental ischemia in vitro. Neuronal, endothelial, and inducible NO synthase (NOS expression was also studied up to 24 h after ischemia, showing a different time course depending on the NOS type and the cells studied. Finally, we carried out cell viability experiments on SH-SY5Y cells with H2O2, a prooxidant agent, and with a NO donor to mimic ischemic conditions. We found that both compounds were highly toxic when they interacted, producing peroxynitrite. We obtained similar results when all cells were challenged with peroxynitrite. Our data suggest that peroxynitrite induces cell death and is a very harmful agent in brain ischemia.

  5. Contribution of neural cell death to depressive phenotypes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depression disorder (MDD or depression is highly prevalent in individuals with diabetes, and the depressive symptoms are more severe and less responsive to antidepressant therapies in these patients. The underlying mechanism is little understood. We hypothesized that the pathophysiology of comorbid depression was more complex than that proposed for MDD and that neural cell death played a role in the disease severity. To test this hypothesis, we generated streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. These mice had blood glucose levels threefold above controls and exhibited depressive phenotypes as judged by a battery of behavioral tests, thus confirming the comorbidity in mice. Immunohistological studies showed markedly increased TUNEL-positive cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the comorbid mice, indicating apoptosis. This finding was supported by increased caspase-3 and decreased Bcl-2 proteins in these brain regions. In addition, the serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF level of comorbid mice was reduced compared with controls, further supporting the neurodegenerative change. Mechanistic analyses showed an increased expression of mitochondrial fission genes fission protein 1 (Fis1 and dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, and a decreased expression of mitochondrial fusion genes mitofusin 1 (Mfn1, mitofusin 2 (Mfn2 and optical atrophy 1 (Opa1. Representative assessment of the proteins Drp1 and Mfn2 mirrored the mRNA changes. The data demonstrated that neural cell death was associated with the depressive phenotype of comorbid mice and that a fission-dominant expression of genes and proteins mediating mitochondrial dynamics played a role in the hyperglycemia-induced cell death. The study provides new insight into the disease mechanism and could aid the development of novel therapeutics aimed at providing neuroprotection by modulating mitochondrial dynamics to treat comorbid depression with diabetes.

  6. Metallothionein reduces central nervous system inflammation, neurodegeneration, and cell death following kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Florit, Sergi; Giralt, Mercedes;

    2005-01-01

    We examined metallothionein (MT)-induced neuroprotection during kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxicity by studying transgenic mice with MT-I overexpression (TgMT mice). KA induces epileptic seizures and hippocampal excitotoxicity, followed by inflammation and delayed brain damage. We show...... for the first time that even though TgMT mice were more susceptible to KA, the cerebral MT-I overexpression decreases the hippocampal inflammation and delayed neuronal degeneration and cell death as measured 3 days after KA administration. Hence, the proinflammatory responses of microglia...

  7. Motricidade reflexa na morte cerebral The reflex activity in the brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson L. Sanvito

    1972-03-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico de morte cerebral está baseado em critérios clínicos, eletrencefalográficos e angiográficos. Do ponto de vista clínico deve ser evidenciado o seguinte quadro: coma profundo, midríase paralítica bilateral, ausência de reação a qualquer estímulo externo, apnéia, arreflexia superficial e profunda. Do ponto de vista eletrencefalográfico são necessários dois registros, separados por um intervalo de 24 horas, evidenciando traçados iselétricos. No presente trabalho são estudados 15 pacientes com morte cerebral comprovada do ponto de vista clínico e eletrencefalográfico. Em 8 pacientes havia persistência de atividade reflexa durante a fase de morte cerebral (reflexos profundos e/ou superficiais. Fenômenos de automatismos medulares também foram verificados em 3 pacientes.The diagnosis of brain death is based in clinical, electroencephalographic and angiographic data. The criteria for diagnosis of brain death are: deep coma with unreceptivity and unresponsiveness, no movements or breathing (the patient's respiration must be maintained artificially, bilateral dilated and fixed pupils, absence of corneal reflexes, no response to caloric test, absence of deep tendon reflexes and of the superficial abdominal and plantar reflexes, isoelectric EEG maintained for twenty-four hours. The purpose of this study was to observe the natural clinical courses of 15 patients with brain death, specially the data concerning the deep and superficial reflexes. From 15 patients fulfilling the criteria of brain death, 8 maintained spinal reflexes up to the time of cardiac arrest; in five of these patients the superficial abdominal reflexes were present and the reflexes of spinal automatism could be elicited. These results show that the absence of deep and superficial reflexes can't be considered as essencial for the diagnosis of brain death.

  8. An International Comparison of the Effect of Policy Shifts to Organ Donation following Cardiocirculatory Death (DCD) on Donation Rates after Brain Death (DBD) and Transplantation Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Bendorf, Aric; Kelly, Patrick J.; Kerridge, Ian H; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Myerson, Brian; Stewart, Cameron; Pussell, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD) and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000–2010. On average, overa...

  9. [Report of Sata Clinical Fellowship; brain death and organ donation in hospital for sick children, Toronto, Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M

    2000-04-01

    I have experienced two cases of pediatric organ donation from the brain dead patients in Hospital for Sick Children in three months. First case was a 9-year-old boy after a traffic accident. Second case was an 11-year-old boy with intracranial hemorrhage. Brain death is diagnosed by clinical criteria alone in Canada, as in many of developed countries. EEG or brain flow studies are not mandatory. In the first case, brain death was confirmed after additional brain flow study, EEG, and SSEP because of cervical spinal injury. Second case was diagnosed as brain death by clinical criteria alone, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed after brain death diagnosis. MORE (multiple organ receival and exchange program of Ontario), Organ Donation Team (critical care physicians, nurses, organ donation coordinators, social workers and chaplains) in HSC, and volunteers play the important role to help the family and to make the organ transplantation successful. In Canada, pediatric brain death and organ donation are widely accepted, but there remains an imbalance between the demand for transplantation and the number of organs available. PMID:10793535

  10. Effect of post-traumatic mild hypothermia on hippocampal cell death after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Mao, Qing; Liang, Yu-Min; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2009-02-11

    In this investigation, we evaluated the effect of post-traumatic mild hypothermia on cell death in the hippocampus after fluid percussion traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 40/group): TBI with hypothermia treatment (32 degrees C), TBI with normothermia (37 degrees C), and sham injury. The TBI model was induced by a fluid percussion TBI device. Mild hypothermia (32 degrees C) was achieved by partial immersion in a water bath (0 degrees C) under general anesthesia for 4h. All rats were killed at 24 or 72h after TBI. The ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 in all rats were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL), and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining for determining cell death. Caspase-3 expression was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. At 24h, based on TUNEL and DAPI results, the cell death index was 28.80 +/- 2.60% and 32.10 +/- 1.40% in the normothermia TBI group, while reaching only 14.30 +/- 2.70% and 18.40 +/- 2.10% in the hypothermic TBI group (p percussion injury. Taken together with other studies, these observations support the premise that post-traumatic mild hypothermia can provide cerebral protection for patients with TBI. PMID:19236165

  11. [Deaths during asphyxia induced to escalate sexual experience. Case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okłota, Magdalena; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Sackiewicz, Adam; Ptaszyńska-Sarosiek, Iwona; Szeremeta, Michał

    2010-01-01

    The authors present two cases of deaths resulting from asphyxia of one of the partners in the act of intercourse to escalate their experience. The first case involved a heterosexual intercourse, in which a 30-year-old woman was led to state of hypoxia through choking and closing respiratory orifices. The other case represented a homosexual intercourse between two men, in which the victim's hands and legs were tied. Moreover, the partner put an open knot around the victim's neck and was holding it controlling the state of asphyxia, while performing an anal intercourse. Both presented victims practiced such paraphilia-associated behaviors in the past. The fact of sexual intercourse was confirmed in both cases by genetic analysis of the man's anus and the woman's oral cavity and vagina. This resulted in finding the genetic material of their partners. Escalating of sexual experience through inducing asphyxia of the nervous system is extremely dangerous and may result in death of one of the sexual partners, what has been proven by the present investigation. PMID:21863736

  12. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  13. Redefining Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The results of 20 years of research on brain death will be released to the public, the Chinese Ministry of Health reported in early April. A special ministry team has drafted the criteria for brain death in Criteria for the Diagnosis of Brain Death in Adults (Revised Edition) and Technical Specifications for the Diagnosis

  14. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R.; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a life threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including...

  15. Dialysis Disequilibrium Syndrome: Brain death following hemodialysis for metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagshaw Sean M

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS is the clinical phenomenon of acute neurologic symptoms attributed to cerebral edema that occurs during or following intermittent hemodialysis (HD. We describe a case of DDS-induced cerebral edema that resulted in irreversible brain injury and death following acute HD and review the relevant literature of the association of DDS and HD. Case Presentation A 22-year-old male with obstructive uropathy presented to hospital with severe sepsis syndrome secondary to pneumonia. Laboratory investigations included a pH of 6.95, PaCO2 10 mmHg, HCO3 2 mmol/L, serum sodium 132 mmol/L, serum osmolality 330 mosmol/kg, and urea 130 mg/dL (46.7 mmol/L. Diagnostic imaging demonstrated multifocal pneumonia, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder wall thickening. During HD the patient became progressively obtunded. Repeat laboratory investigations showed pH 7.36, HCO3 19 mmol/L, potassium 1.8 mmol/L, and urea 38.4 mg/dL (13.7 mmol/L (urea-reduction-ratio 71%. Following HD, spontaneous movements were absent with no pupillary or brainstem reflexes. Head CT-scan showed diffuse cerebral edema with effacement of basal cisterns and generalized loss of gray-white differentiation. Brain death was declared. Conclusions Death is a rare consequence of DDS in adults following HD. Several features may have predisposed this patient to DDS including: central nervous system adaptations from chronic kidney disease with efficient serum urea removal and correction of serum hyperosmolality; severe cerebral intracellular acidosis; relative hypercapnea; and post-HD hemodynamic instability with compounded cerebral ischemia.

  16. Visfatin induces sickness responses in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byong Seo Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Visfatin, also known as nicotiamide phosphoribosyltransferase or pre-B cell colony enhancing factor, is a pro-inflammatory cytokine whose serum level is increased in sepsis and cancer as well as in obesity. Here we report a pro-inflammatory role of visfatin in the brain, to mediate sickness responses including anorexia, hyperthermia and hypoactivity. METHODOLOGY: Rats were intracerebroventricularly (ICV injected with visfatin, and changes in food intake, body weight, body temperature and locomotor activity were monitored. Real-time PCR was applied to determine the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, proopiomelanocortin (POMC and prostaglandin-synthesizing enzymes in their brain. To determine the roles of cyclooxygenase (COX and melanocortin in the visfatin action, rats were ICV-injected with visfatin with or without SHU9119, a melanocortin receptor antagonist, or indomethacin, a COX inhibitor, and their sickness behaviors were evaluated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Administration of visfatin decreased food intake, body weight and locomotor activity and increased body temperature. Visfatin evoked significant increases in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, prostaglandin-synthesizing enzymes and POMC, an anorexigenic neuropeptide. Indomethacin attenuated the effects of visfatin on hyperthermia and hypoactivity, but not anorexia. Further, SHU9119 blocked visfatin-induced anorexia but did not affect hyperthermia or hypoactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Visfatin induced sickness responses via regulation of COX and the melanocortin pathway in the brain.

  17. Radiation-induced dementia in patients cured of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a patient with cancer develops a brain metastasis, death is usually imminent, but aggressive treatment in some patients with limited or no systemic disease yields long-term survival. In such patients, delayed deleterious effects of therapy are particularly tragic. We report 12 patients who developed delayed complications of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) given as sole treatment (4 patients) or in combination with surgical resection (8 patients). Within 5 to 36 months (median, 14) all patients developed progressive dementia, ataxia, and urinary incontinence causing severe disability in all and leading to death in 7. No patient had tumor recurrence when neurologic symptoms began. Cortical atrophy and hypodense white matter were identified by CT in all. Contrast-enhancing lesions were seen in 3 patients; 2 of the lesions yielded radionecrosis on biopsy. Autopsies on 2 patients revealed diffuse chronic edema of the hemispheric white matter in the absence of tumor recurrence. Corticosteroids and ventriculoperitoneal shunt offered significant but incomplete improvement in some patients. The total dose of WBRT was only 2,500 to 3,900 cGy, but daily fractions of 300 to 600 cGy were employed. We believe that these fractionation schedules, several of which are used commonly, predispose to delayed neurologic toxicity, and that more protracted schedules should be employed for the safe and efficacious treatment of good-risk patients with brain metastases. The incidence of WBRT-induced dementia was only 1.9 to 5.1% in the 2 populations reviewed here; however, this underestimates the incidence because only severely affected patients could be identified from chart review

  18. Hydrocephalus and Pressure on Brain Stem Cause Death in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khazaei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurofibromatosis type 2 is an inherited autosomal dominant syndrome, charac-terized by multiple neoplasms of the central and peripheral nervous system associated with ocular abnormalities. The most common tumor associated with the disease is the vestibulo-cochlear and in later stages are meningioma and other brain tumors. Case Report: The patient was a 35 year old woman admitted to the Farshchian hospital in Hamadan due to unconciousness and respiratory distress She had sensorineural hearing loss and inability to see due to decrease visulal acuity. In addition, due to lower extremity paresis she has been unable to walk and wheelchair-dependent for many years. Brain CT scan and MRI showed multiple tumors in the posterior fossa causing obstructive hydrocephalus even-tually caused the patient's death . Conclusion: Brain tumors, especially in the posterior fossa can cause death in Neurofibroma-tosis type 2. Early surgery can be life saving. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:167-170

  19. Problems associated with the apnea test in the diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saposnik Gustavo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain death is the absence of all cortical functions, including the brainstem. The apnea test (AT is a necessary requisite to complete this diagnosis. Anecdotal reports describing hypotension and acidosis due to apnea test have been reported. However, there are few studies that evaluate complications or difficulties related to this procedure. Objective: To analyze medical problems associated with the apnea test. Methods and Patients: We analyzed clinical features, potential risk conditions, and problems in 129 brain dead patients during the apnea test. The diagnosis of brain death was made according to the American Academy of Neurology recommendations. Results: Clinical problems during the apnea test were detected in more than two thirds of patients, including: arterial hypotension (12%, acidosis (68%, and hypoxemia (23%. Four patients developed major complications, including: pneumothorax, cardiac arrest, bradycardia, atrial fibrillation and myocardial infarction. Conclusion: The apnea test is not an innocuous procedure. Complications during the AT are more common than reported and limit organ procurement for transplantation. Guidelines for performing the AT should be followed in order to avoid clinical complications.

  20. Clusterin: an IR-inducible protein determining life and death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles of ionizing radiation (IR)-inducible genes/proteins are now being elucidated and the research team will focus on the functions of the clusterin (CLU) proteins after low dose IR exposures. With funding from the DOE, we discovered that x-ray-inducible transcript/protein No.8 (xip8) bound to the Ku70 DNA double strand break repair protein using various molecular biology techniques. We showed that translation of the CLU/xip8 transcript was complicated, leading to two classes of proteins separated by their intracellular processing. One set of CLU proteins (a secreted and precursor protein, sCLU and psCLU, respectively) were induced by very low doses of IR (>2.0 cGy) and subsequently secreted from the cell. The functions of sCLU, particularly in bystander effects, are not known; sCLU does not bind Ku70, but can interact with the TGF-? II receptor. Another intracellular class of CLU proteins was targeted to the cytoplasm and existed in a dormant precursor nuclear form (pnCLU). After higher IR doses (>1.0 Gy), pnCLU was activated via post-translational modification, and translocated to the nucleus, where nuclear CLU (nCLU) interacted with Ku70/Ku80, and signaled cell death. The mechanism(s) of how cells die following nCLU accumulation are unknown. Recent data from our lab indicate that CLU gene transcription is also complicated. Thus far, the data suggest that: (a) p53 is a negative regulator of CLU transcription, however, the mechanisms by which it exerts this negative pressure are not known; and (b) IR induces transcription of the CLU promoter, independent of p53, at regulatory elements that lie between -1403 and -325 bps 5'-from the TATAA box. In this renewal, the research team will investigate three separate, but interrelated hypotheses: (1) p53 negatively regulates the CLU promoter via distinct head to tail p53 half sites, and induction is mediated by the combination of retinoblatoma control elements (RCEs) and NF-?B sites; (2) sCLU is cytoprotective and

  1. Brain glycogen supercompensation in the mouse after recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada, Sarah E; Weaver, Staci A; Sharpe, Shannon N; Pederson, Bartholomew A

    2011-04-01

    Brain glycogen is proposed to function under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pharmacological elevation of this glucose polymer in brain is hypothesized to protect neurons against hypoglycemia-induced cell death. Elevation of brain glycogen levels due to prior hypoglycemia is postulated to contribute to the development of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) in insulin-treated diabetic patients. This latter mode of elevating glycogen levels is termed "supercompensation." We tested whether brain glycogen supercompensation occurs in healthy, conscious mice after recovery from insulin-induced acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. Blood glucose levels were lowered to less than 2.2 mmol/liter for 90 min by administration of insulin. Brain glucose levels decreased at least 80% and brain glycogen levels decreased approximately 50% after episodes of either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. After these hypoglycemic episodes, mice were allowed access to food for 6 or 27 hr. After 6 hr, blood and brain glucose levels were restored but brain glycogen levels were elevated by 25% in mice that had been subjected to either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia compared with saline-treated controls. After a 27-hr recovery period, the concentration of brain glycogen had returned to baseline levels in mice previously subjected to either acute or recurrent hypoglycemia. We conclude that brain glycogen supercompensation occurs in healthy mice, but its functional significance remains to be established. PMID:21259334

  2. Cocaine-induced oxidative stress precedes cell death in human neuronal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, H Fai; Abdullah, Laila; Mullan, Myles A; Mullan, Michael J; Crawford, Fiona C

    2007-01-01

    By 2003, an estimated 34 million Americans had used cocaine according to the National Survey on Drug Use & Health. About 5.9 million of those had used in the past 12 months. Chronic cocaine users often develop addiction, dependency and tolerance to the drug. The psychological and physical effects of cocaine are due to the disruption of the limbic system in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased oxidative stress reported in the frontal cortex and the striatum of rats exposed to cocaine suggests that oxidative damage plays a significant role in cocaine-induced disruption of the CNS. Although it is evident that cocaine induces oxidative stress in the CNS, little has been learned about whether such increased oxidative stress is also relevant to apoptosis in cocaine-exposed models. To gain insight into the role of cocaine-induced oxidative stress in apoptosis, we hypothesized that oxidative stress precedes cell death when cocaine is administrated. To test this hypothesis, we have monitored the oxidative stress and apoptotic effects of acute cocaine exposure in human neuronal progenitor cells (HNPC). We found that oxidative stress was significantly increased at 48h after a 30min cocaine exposure compared to control cells, and that this was followed by cell death at 72h. Using the same experimental paradigm we have previously shown that pro-inflammatory genes are up-regulated in cocaine-exposed HNPC at 24h. Therefore, we suggest that the increased oxidative stress (possibly mediated by inflammatory responses) precedes cell death in cocaine-exposed HNPC. This may have implications for the consequences of cocaine abuse in situations where antioxidant capacity is compromised, as in the aging brain. PMID:16956698

  3. Baicalein induces programmed cell death in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bao-Di; Cao, Ying-Ying; Huang, Shan; Xu, Yong-Gang; Gao, Ping-Hui; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of an apoptotic phenotype in Candida albicans that is inducible with environmental stresses such as acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and amphotericin B. In the present study, we found that the Chinese herbal medicine Baicalein (BE), which was one of the skullcapflavones, can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. The apoptotic effects of BE were detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and DAPI, and it was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. After exposure to 4 microg/ml BE for 12 h, about 10% of C. albicans cells were apoptotic. Both the increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulation of some redox-related genes (CAP1, SOD2, TRR1) were observed. Furthermore, we compared the survivals of CAP1 deleted, wild-type, and overexpressed strains and found that Cap1p attenuated BE-initiated cell death, which was coherent with a higher mRNA level of the CAP1 gene. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential of C. albicans cells changed significantly ( palbicans cells, and the apoptosis was associated with the breakdown of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:19734718

  4. Tat-NOL3 protects against hippocampal neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress through the regulation of apoptotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Shin, Min Jea; Eum, Won Sik; Kim, Dae Won; Yong, Ji In; Ryu, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hwan; Cho, Su Bin; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Im, Seung Kwon; Kweon, Hae Young; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Meeyoung; Park, Jinseu; Cho, Yong-Jun; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is associated with neuronal cell death and ischemia. The NOL3 [nucleolar protein 3 (apoptosis repressor with CARD domain)] protein protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, the protective mechanism responsible for this effect as well as the effects of NOL3 against oxidative stress in ischemia remain unclear. Thus, we examined the protective effects of NOL3 protein on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and the mechanism responsible for these effects in hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells and in an animal model of forebrain ischemia using Tat-fused NOL3 protein (Tat-NOL3). Purified Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the H2O2-exposed HT22 cells and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In addition, Tat-NOL3 prevented neuronal cell death through the regulation of apoptotic signaling pathways including Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-2, -3 and -8, PARP and p53. In addition, Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the animal brains and significantly protected against neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus by regulating the activation of microglia and astrocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Tat-NOL3 protein protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death by regulating oxidative stress and by acting as an anti-apoptotic protein. Thus, we suggest that Tat-NOL3 represents a potential therapeutic agent for protection against ischemic brain injury. PMID:27221790

  5. Anencefalia e morte cerebral (neurológica Anencephaly and brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Fernandes Penna

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vem-se discutindo no país a ética da interrupção da gravidez no caso de fetos anencéfalos. Os opositores ao aborto nesses casos apontam, entre outros argumentos, que não se trata de morte cerebral devido à presença de tronco encefálico. Neste artigo discutimos o conceito de morte cerebral e sua aplicação no que tange à anencefalia. Apontamos alguns aspectos históricos do desenvolvimento desse conceito e a importância de ser considerada a diferença entre conceito e critérios. A morte neurológica é a perda definitiva e total da consciência, enquanto a presença do tronco cerebral é apenas um critério a ser usado nos casos de lesão encefálica em encéfalos antes perfeitos. O conceito de morte cerebral se aplica completamente à ausência de córtex dos anencéfalos, o que sem dúvida permite sua retirada do útero materno. Manter juridicamente a criminalização desse procedimento é uma interferência religiosa no Estado laico e democrático, que impede o exercício de escolha pelos indivíduos segundo seu credo.Brazilian society has recently discussed the ethics of interrupting pregnancy in the case of an anencephalic fetus. In such cases, anti-abortionists contend that anencephaly is not the same as brain death, since a brainstem is present. This article discusses the concept of brain death and its application to the issue of anencephaly. We point to key historical aspects in the development of this concept and the importance of considering the difference between concept and criteria. Neurological death is the definitive and complete loss of consciousness, while the presence of a brainstem is merely a criterion to be used in cases of head injury in previously intact brains. The concept of brain death is totally applicable to the absence of cortex in a fetus with anencephaly, which without a doubt allows such a fetus to be removed from the uterus. To maintain the criminalization of this procedure by legal means represents

  6. Vasopressina e morte encefálica Vasopressin and brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIANE DE ARAUJO CINTRA

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A morte encefálica (ME resulta numa perda completa dos mecanismos centrais de regulação da estabilidade hemodinâmica mesmo em pacientes com suporte adequado da ventilação, correção hidroeletrolítica e ácido-básica e suporte farmacológico convencional máximo da circulação. Acredita-se que a diminuição da vasopressina circulante influencia de maneira preponderante a estabilidade cardiocirculatória de pacientes com ME, sendo a sua administração exógena defendida por alguns autores no manuseio do potencial doador de órgãos. O artigo analisa e discute alguns estudos experimentais e clínicos relevantes em relação ao comportamento da vasopressina na ME e seu papel na manutenção da estabilidade cardiocirculatória, bem como sua potencial utilidade no manuseio destes pacientes. Desta análise concluímos que o comportamento da vasopressina na ME e o seu real valor na manutenção do potencial doador ainda não estão totalmente esclarecidos, necessitando de investigações futuras.Brain death results in the breakdown of effective central regulatory mechanisms of cardiocirculatory stability, even in patients with artificial mechanical ventilation, correction of electrolytic and acid-basic disorders and maximal conventional pharmacological support of the circulation. Recent evidences have shown that the fall of vasopressin levels in the blood circulation significantly influences the cardiocirculatory stability of patients with brain death, and its exogenous administration is defended by many authors for the management of multiorgan donor patients. In this brief review we analyse and discuss some experimental and clinical relevant studies about the role of vasopressin in the control of cardiocirculatory stability in brain death, and its potential usefulness in the management of multiorgan donor. We conclude that the role of vasopressin in the pathophysiology of brain death and its usefulness as a pharmacological agent in the

  7. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines. METHODS: MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting. RESULTS: Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug. CONCLUSION: Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  8. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2009-10-06

    Background:Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines.Methods:MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting.Results:Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug.Conclusion:Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 6 October 2009; doi:10.1038\\/sj.bjc.6605308 www.bjcancer.com.

  9. Nicotinamide mononucleotide protects against β-amyloid oligomer-induced cognitive impairment and neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaonan; Hu, Xuejun; Yang, Yang; Takata, Toshihiro; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-07-15

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are recognized as the primary neurotoxic agents in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Impaired brain energy metabolism and oxidative stress are implicated in cognitive decline in AD. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), a coenzyme involved in redox activities in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, has been identified as a key regulator of the lifespan-extending effects, and the activation of NAD(+) expression has been linked with a decrease in Aβ toxicity in AD. One of the key precursors of NAD(+) is nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a product of the nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase reaction. To determine whether improving brain energy metabolism will forestall disease progress in AD, the impact of the NAD(+) precursor NMN on Aβ oligomer-induced neuronal death and cognitive impairment were studied in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) and in a rat model of AD. Treatment of intracerebroventricular Aβ oligomer infusion AD model rats with NMN (500mg/kg, intraperitoneally) sustained improvement in cognitive function as assessed by the Morris water maze. In OHCs, Aβ oligomer-treated culture media with NMN attenuated neuronal cell death. NMN treatment also significantly prevented the Aβ oligomer-induced inhibition of LTP. Furthermore, NMN restored levels of NAD(+) and ATP, eliminated accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the Aβ oligomer-treated hippocampal slices. All these protective effects were reversed by 3-acetylpyridine, which generates inactive NAD(+). The present study indicates that NMN could restore cognition in AD model rats. The beneficial effect of NMN is produced by ameliorating neuron survival, improving energy metabolism and reducing ROS accumulation. These results suggest that NMN may become a promising therapeutic drug for AD. PMID:27130898

  10. DNA damage-induced cell death: lessons from the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena Lobo Borges; Rafael Linden; Jean YJ Wang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage can, but does not always, induce cell death. While several pathways linking DNA damage signals to mitochondria-dependent and -independent death machineries have been elucidated, the connectivity of these pathways is subject to regulation by multiple other factors that are not well understood. We have proposed two conceptual models to explain the delayed and variable cell death response to DNA damage: integrative surveillance versus autonomous pathways. In this review, we discuss how these two models may explain the in vivo regulation of cell death induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in the developing central nervous system, where the death response is regulated by radiation dose, cell cycle status and neuronal development.

  11. Interleukin-3 prevents neuronal death induced by amyloid peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otth Carola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is an important glycoprotein involved in regulating biological responses such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Its effects are mediated via interaction with cell surface receptors. Several studies have demonstrated the expression of IL-3 in neurons and astrocytes of the hippocampus and cortices in normal mouse brain, suggesting a physiological role of IL-3 in the central nervous system. Although there is evidence indicating that IL-3 is expressed in some neuronal populations, its physiological role in these cells is poorly known. Results In this study, we demonstrated the expression of IL-3 receptor in cortical neurons, and analyzed its influence on amyloid β (Aβ-treated cells. In these cells, IL-3 can activate at least three classical signalling pathways, Jak/STAT, Ras/MAP kinase and the PI 3-kinase. Viability assays indicated that IL-3 might play a neuroprotective role in cells treated with Aβ fibrils. It is of interest to note that our results suggest that cell survival induced by IL-3 required PI 3-kinase and Jak/STAT pathway activation, but not MAP kinase. In addition, IL-3 induced an increase of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Conclusion Altogether these data strongly suggest that IL-3 neuroprotects neuronal cells against neurodegenerative agents like Aβ.

  12. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  13. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization

  14. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia, E-mail: rdardari@ucalgary.ca; Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  15. Brain death induces apoptosis in donor liver of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, JAB; Moshage, H; Schuurs, T; Nijboer, M; van Schilfgaarde, R; Ploeg, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Background. A difference in short- and long-term function between living-related and cadaveric donor organs is consistently shown in kidney- and liver-transplant studies. We hypothesize that this is caused by induction of apoptosis and inflammation of the potential graft because of the phase of brai

  16. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  17. Determination of Brain Death by 99mTc DTPA and 99mTc HMPAO Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate availability of cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death, we examined 25 patients with a suspected clinical diagnosis of brain death. 8 patients were studied by Tc-99m-DTPA and 15 patients were by Tc-99m-HMPAO (Hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime). Seven patients with Tc-99M-DTPA studies revealed absence of cerebral blood flow and sagittal sinus activity. All of 15 patients with Tc-99m-HMPAO studies revealed complete absence of cerebral perfusion. The results of the cerebral radionuclide studies of brain death correlated with other clinical conditions, such as intracranial pressure(ICP), EEG, transcranial doppler sono-graphy(TCDS), and neurologic examination. The ICP of 8 patients, who are confirmed by brain death with Tc-99m-HMPAO study are elevated in all cases. In conclusion, cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death is available. Tc-99m-HMPAO imaging is unequivocal, easily interpreted, well reflect the physiologic state of increased ICP, and provides adequate assessment of posterior fossa activity. In addition, the SPECT imaging with Tc-99m-HMPAO produces more accurate results due to it's superiority of image contrast and proper localization of radiopharmaceutical distribution than conventional planar imaging.

  18. Determination of Brain Death by {sup 99m}Tc DTPA and {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Kim, Sung Hoon; Yang, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Yong; Chang, Soo Kyo; Park, Seog Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shinn, Kyung Sub [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-03-15

    To evaluate availability of cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death, we examined 25 patients with a suspected clinical diagnosis of brain death. 8 patients were studied by Tc-99m-DTPA and 15 patients were by Tc-99m-HMPAO (Hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime). Seven patients with Tc-99M-DTPA studies revealed absence of cerebral blood flow and sagittal sinus activity. All of 15 patients with Tc-99m-HMPAO studies revealed complete absence of cerebral perfusion. The results of the cerebral radionuclide studies of brain death correlated with other clinical conditions, such as intracranial pressure(ICP), EEG, transcranial doppler sono-graphy(TCDS), and neurologic examination. The ICP of 8 patients, who are confirmed by brain death with Tc-99m-HMPAO study are elevated in all cases. In conclusion, cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death is available. Tc-99m-HMPAO imaging is unequivocal, easily interpreted, well reflect the physiologic state of increased ICP, and provides adequate assessment of posterior fossa activity. In addition, the SPECT imaging with Tc-99m-HMPAO produces more accurate results due to it's superiority of image contrast and proper localization of radiopharmaceutical distribution than conventional planar imaging.

  19. Myocardial protective effects of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor in rats with brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenzhi; Cao, Shengli; Yan, Bing; Zhang, Gong; Li, Jie; Zhao, Yongfu; Zhang, Shuijun

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway mediates myocardial cell injuries in rats under brain death (BD), and observe the effects and mechanisms of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 on cell death in the heart. Forty healthy male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomized into four groups: sham group (dural external catheter with no BD); BD group (maintain the induced BD state for 6 hrs); BD + SP600125 group (intraperitoneal injection of SP600125 10 mg/kg 1 hr before inducing BD, and maintain BD for 6 hrs); and BD + Dimethyl Sulphoxide (DMSO) group (intraperitoneal injection of DMSO 1 hr before inducing BD, and maintain BD for 6 hrs). Real-time quantitative PCR was used to evaluate mRNA levels of Cyt-c and caspase-3. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the levels of mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins p-JNK, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-c and Caspase-3. TUNEL assay was employed to evaluate myocardial apoptosis. Compared with the sham group, the BD group exhibited increased mitochondrial apoptosis-related gene expression, accompanied by the elevation of p-JNK expression and myocardial apoptosis. As the vehicle control, DMSO had no treatment effects. The BD + SP600125 group had decreased p-JNK expression, and reduced mitochondrial apoptosis-related gene expression. Furthermore, the apoptosis rate of myocardial cells was reduced. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 could protect myocardial cells under BD through the inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis-related pathways. PMID:27072084

  20. Activation-induced and damage-induced cell death in aging human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    In multicellular organisms the proper system functionality is ensured by the balance between cell division, differentiation, senescence and death. This balance is changed during aging. Immunosenescence plays a crucial role in aging and leads to the shrinkage of T cell repertoire and the propensity to apoptosis. The elimination of expanded T cells at the end of immune response is crucial to maintain homeostasis and avoid any uncontrolled inflammation. Resting mature T lymphocytes, when activated via their antigen-specific receptor (TCR) and CD28 co-receptor, start to proliferate and then undergo the so called activation induced cell death (AICD), which mechanistically is triggered by the death receptor and leads to apoptosis. T lymphocytes, like other cells, are also exposed to damage, which can trigger the so called damage-induced cell death (DICD). It was hypothesized that oxidative stress and chronic antigenic load increasing with age reduced lymphocyte susceptibility to DICD and enhanced a proinflamatory status leading to increased AICD. However, data collected so far are inconsistent and does not support this assumption. Systematic and comprehensive studies are still needed for conclusive elucidation of the role of AICD and DICD in human immunosenescence, including the role of autophagy and necroptosis in the processes. PMID:25843236

  1. Kidney ischemic injury genes expressed after donor brain death are predictive for the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D; Kościelska-Kasprzak, K; Drulis-Fajdasz, D; Hałoń, A; Polak, W; Chudoba, P; Jańczak, D; Mazanowska, O; Patrzałek, D; Klinger, M

    2011-10-01

    The results of deceased donor kidney transplantation largely depend on the extent of organ injury induced by brain death and the transplantation procedure. In this study, we analyzed the preprocurement intragraft expression of 29 genes involved in apoptosis, tissue injury, immune cell migration, and activation. We also assessed their influence on allograft function. Before flushing with cold solution we obtained 50 kidney core biopsies of deceased donor kidneys immediately after organ retrieval. The control group included 18 biopsies obtained from living donors. Gene expression was analyzed with low-density arrays (Taqman). LCN2/lipocalin-2 is considered a biomarker of kidney epithelial ischemic injury with a renoprotective function. HAVCR1/KIM-1 is associated with acute tubular injury. Comparison of deceased donor kidneys to control organs revealed a significantly higher expression of LCN2 (8.0-fold P=.0006) and HAVCR1 (4.7-fold, PKidneys displaying delayed graft function and/or an acute rejection episode in the first 6 months after showed higher LCN2 expression compared to event-free ones (1.7-fold, P=.027). A significantly higher increase in expression of TLR2 (5.2-fold), Interleukin (IL) 18 (4.6-fold), HMGB1 (4.1-fold), GUSB (2.4-fold), CASP3 (2.0-fold) FAS (1.8-fold), and TP53 (1.6-fold) was observed among deceased donor kidneys compared with the control group. Their expression levels were not related to clinical outcomes: however, they showed significant correlations with one another (r>.6, Pkidneys after donor brain death were hallmarks of the organ injury process. LCN2 expression level in retrieved kidneys can predict kidney transplantation outcomes. PMID:21996181

  2. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the

  3. Quality of Care of Nursing from Brain Death Patient in ICU Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Toktam Masoumian Hoseini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses play a significant and key role in the care of brain dead patients and their families, therefore their Practice extremely important to the success of organ donation. To assess ICU nurse's practice in relation to nurse's role in the organ donation process from brain dead patients in Iran. Materials and Methods:In a cross-sectional analytical study 90 ICU nurses in Ghaem and Imam Reza Hospitals in Mashhad through stratified random sampling allocation method were selected. Data collection tools included a questionnaire on demographic information, factors influencing nurse's practice during the organ donation process and surveying "nurse's practice in relation to their roles in the organ donation process." Results: 90 nurses participated in this study. (70.0% of the research subjects had spoken with their own families about organ donation, and (20.0% had organ donation cards. Practice scores were calculated on a scale of 100. The mean score of nurses' practice was (6.04± 3.66. 96.7% of nurses’ weak practice in terms of their roles in the organ donation process. Conclusion: As a result, they do not have adequate practice regard nurse's role in organ donation process and in relation to brain death patient and their families. Therefore it is suggested to include nursing courses in the organ donation process and organ transplantation as well as educational programs to acquaint nurses with their roles in the process to improve their practice by different training methods.

  4. Vacuolar processing enzyme is essential for mycotoxin-induced cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Miwa; Yamada, Kenji; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2005-09-23

    Some compatible pathogens secrete toxins to induce host cell death and promote their growth. The toxin-induced cell death is a pathogen strategy for infection. To clarify the executioner of the toxin-induced cell death, we examined a fungal toxin (fumonisin B1 (FB1))-induced cell death of Arabidopsis plants. FB1-induced cell death was accompanied with disruption of vacuolar membrane followed by lesion formation. The features of FB1-induced cell death were completely abolished in the Arabidopsis vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE)-null mutant, which lacks all four VPE genes of the genome. Interestingly, an inhibitor of caspase-1 abolished FB1-induced lesion formation, as did a VPE inhibitor. The VPE-null mutant had no detectable activities of caspase-1 or VPE in the FB1-treated leaves, although wild-type leaves had the caspase-1 and VPE activities, both of which were inhibited by a caspase-1 inhibitor. gammaVPE is the most essential among the four VPE homologues for FB1-induced cell death in Arabidopsis leaves. Recombinant gammaVPE recognized a VPE substrate with Km = 30.3 microm and a caspase-1 substrate with Km = 44.2 microm, which is comparable with the values for mammalian caspase-1. The gammaVPE precursor was self-catalytically converted into the mature form exhibiting caspase-1 activity. These in vivo and in vitro analyses demonstrate that gammaVPE is the proteinase that exhibits a caspase-1 activity. We show that VPE exhibiting a caspase-1 activity is a key molecule in toxin-induced cell death. Our findings suggest that a susceptible response of toxin-induced cell death is caused by the VPE-mediated vacuolar mechanism similar to a resistance response of hypersensitive cell death (Hatsugai, N., Kuroyanagi, M., Yamada, K., Meshi, T., Tsuda, S., Kondo, M., Nishimura, M., and Hara-Nishimura, I. (2004) Science 305, 855-858). PMID:16043487

  5. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress. PMID:27443785

  6. Upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 following prenatal cocaine exposure induces apoptosis in fetal rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DaLiao Xiao, Lubo Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine abuse during pregnancy has been associated with numerous adverse perinatal outcomes. Aims: The present study was to determine whether prenatal cocaine exposure induced apoptosis and the possible role of Bcl-2 family genes in the programming cell death in fetal rat brain. Main methods: Pregnant rats were treated with cocaine subcutaneously (30 & 60 mg/kg/day from day 15 to 21 of gestation. Then the fetal and maternal brains were isolated. Key findings: Cocaine produced a dose-dependent decrease in fetal brain weight and brain/body weight ratio (P<0.05. Apoptotic nuclei in fetal brain were increased from 2.6 ± 0.1 (control to 8.1± 0.6 (low dose and 10.4 ± 0.2% (high dose (P<0.05. In accordance, cocaine dose dependently increased activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 (% of control in the fetal brain by 177%, 155%, 174%, respectively, at 30 mg/kg/day, and by 191%, 176%, 274%, respectively, at 60 mg/kg/day. In contrast, cocaine showed no effect on caspase activities in the maternal brain. Cocaine produced a dose-dependent increase in both Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression in the fetal brain, and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 at dose of 30 mg/kg/day (P<0.05. Significance: Our study has demonstrated that prenatal cocaine exposure induces apoptosis in the fetal brain, and suggested that up-regulating Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression may be involved in cocaine-induced apoptosis. The increased apoptosis of neuronal cells in the fetal brain is likely to play a key role in cocaine-induced neuronal defects during fetal development.

  7. Subacute brain atrophy induced by radiation therapy to the malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to analyze brain atrophy after radiation therapy to the brain tumors, we calculated a CSF-cranial volume ratio on CT scan as an index of brain atrophy, and estimated dementia-score by Hasegawa's method in 91 post-irradiated patients with malignant brain tumors. Radiation-induced brain atrophy was observed in 51 out of 91 patients (56 %) and dementia in 23 out of 47 patients (49 %). These two conditions were closely related, and observed significantly more often in aged and whole-brain-irradiated patients. As radiation-induced brain atrophy accompanied by dementia appeared 2 - 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy, it should be regarded as a subacute brain injury caused by radiation therapy. (author)

  8. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1, GABAAR γ2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. PMID:26086367

  9. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Y W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and

  10. Chimera death induced by the mean-field diffusive coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2014-01-01

    Recently a novel dynamical state, called the {\\it chimera death}, is discovered in a network of non locally coupled identical oscillators [A. Zakharova, M. Kapeller, and E. Sch\\"oll, Phy.Rev.Lett. 112, 154101 (2014)], which is defined as the coexistence of spatially coherent and incoherent oscillation death state. This state arises due to the interplay of non locality and symmetry breaking and thus bridges the gap between two important dynamical states, namely the chimera and oscillation deat...

  11. A model for traumatic brain injury using laser induced shockwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selfridge, A.; Preece, D.; Gomez, V.; Shi, L. Z.; Berns, M. W.

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a major treatment challenge in both civilian and military medicine; on the cellular level, its mechanisms are poorly understood. As a method to study the dysfunctional repair mechanisms following injury, laser induced shock waves (LIS) are a useful way to create highly precise, well characterized mechanical forces. We present a simple model for TBI using laser induced shock waves as a model for damage. Our objective is to develop an understanding of the processes responsible for neuronal death, the ways in which we can manipulate these processes to improve cell survival and repair, and the importance of these processes at different levels of biological organization. The physics of shock wave creation has been modeled and can be used to calculate forces acting on individual neurons. By ensuring that the impulse is in the same regime as that occurring in practical TBI, the LIS model can ensure that in vitro conditions and damage are similar to those experienced in TBI. This model will allow for the study of the biochemical response of neurons to mechanical stresses, and can be combined with microfluidic systems for cell growth in order to better isolate areas of damage.

  12. Potential brain death organ donors - challenges and prospects: A single center retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Al-Maslamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ donation after brain death (BD is a major source for obtaining transplantable organs for patients with end-stage organ disease (ESOD. This retrospective, descriptive study was carried out on all potential BD patients admitted in different intensive care units (ICUs of the Hamad medical Corporation (HMC, Doha, Qatar during a period from January 2011 to April 2012. Our aim was to evaluate various demographic criteria and challenges of organ donation among potential BD organ donors and plan a strategy to improve the rate of organ donation in Qatar. Various aspects of BD patients in the ICUs and their possible effects on organ donation were studied. The time intervals analyzed to determine the possible causes of delay of organ retrieval were: time of diagnosing fixed dilated pupils in the ICU, to performing the first BD test, then to the second BD test, to family approach, to organ retrieval and/or circulatory death (CD without organ retrieval. There were a total of 116 potential BD organ donors of whom 96 (82.75% were males and 20 (17.25% were females. Brain hemorrhage and head injury contributed to 37 (31.9% and 32 (27.6% BD cases, respectively. Time interval between diagnosing fixed dilated pupil and performing the first test of BD was delayed >24 h in 79% of the cases and between the first and second BD tests was >6 h in 70.8% of the cases. This delay is not compatible with the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC policy for BD diagnosis and resulted in a low number of organs retrieved. BD organ donation, a potential source for organs to save patients with ESOD has several pitfalls and every effort should be made to increase the awareness of the public as well as medical personnel to optimize donation efficacy.

  13. Thymoquinone inhibits autophagy and induces cathepsin-mediated, caspase-independent cell death in glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira O Racoma

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and common type of malignant brain tumor in humans, with a median survival of 15 months. There is a great need for more therapies for the treatment of glioblastoma. Naturally occurring phytochemicals have received much scientific attention because many exhibit potent tumor killing action. Thymoquinone (TQ is the bioactive compound of the Nigella sativa seed oil. TQ has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions with selective cytotoxicity for human cancer cells compared to normal cells. Here, we show that TQ selectively inhibits the clonogenicity of glioblastoma cells as compared to normal human astrocytes. Also, glioblastoma cell proliferation could be impaired by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting that glioblastoma cells may be dependent on the autophagic pathway for survival. Exposure to TQ caused an increase in the recruitment and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II. TQ also caused an accumulation of the LC3-associated protein p62, confirming the inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, the levels of Beclin-1 protein expression were unchanged, indicating that TQ interferes with a later stage of autophagy. Finally, treatment with TQ induces lysosome membrane permeabilization, as determined by a specific loss of red acridine orange staining. Lysosome membrane permeabilization resulted in a leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol, which mediates caspase-independent cell death that can be prevented by pre-treatment with a cathepsin B inhibitor. TQ induced apoptosis, as determined by an increase in PI and Annexin V positive cells. However, apoptosis appears to be caspase-independent due to failure of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK to prevent cell death and absence of the typical apoptosis related signature DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of autophagy is an exciting and emerging strategy in cancer therapy. In this vein, our results describe a

  14. Radiation induced mitochondrial biogenesis: limitations of metabolic viability based assays in measuring radiation induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many techniques based on metabolic viability of cells employing MTT and MTS assay are being widely used to measure the radiation and chemotherapeutics induced cell death, because of their high throughput capability. These assays are based on mitochondrial potential of cells to convert the substrate in to measurable products and remain dependent on this notion that all the cells untreated and treated will have equal mitochondrial content and metabolic potential. However, it is increasingly becoming clear that treatment induced changes in both mitochondrial content and metabolism can influence the metabolic viability of cells and radiation is a potential mitochondrial biogenesis inducer. Therefore, we tested if metabolic viability based assays are true measure of radiation induced cell death using the widely used cell lines like RAW264.7, HEK293, NIH3T3, J774.1, BMG-1, MDAMB231, MCF-7, A549 and HeLa. Cells were irradiated with gamma rays (60Co) and enumerated cell numbers (by hemocytometer) and metabolic viability using MTT assay at 24 and 48 hours after exposure. At all the absorbed doses (0-5 Gy), the extent of reduction in cell number was found to be larger than the decrease in formazan formation in all the cell lines tested. Further, this difference in the cell number and formazan formation varied significantly among the cell lines. To test if the increased formazan formation is due to increased mitochondrial content per cell, we analyzed the radiation induced mitochondrial biogenesis using mitochondria specific dye mitotracker red and found a 1.5 to 2 fold increase in mitochondrial content. These findings suggest that radiation induces mitochondrial biogenesis that enhances the metabolic potential leading to increased formazan formation. Therefore, conclusions drawn on radiation induced cytotoxicity based on metabolic viability assays are likely to be erroneous as it may not correlate with growth inhibition and/or loss of clonogenic survival. (author)

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Oral Streptococci Induces Macrophage Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by members of the mitis group of oral streptococci plays important roles in microbial communities such as oral biofilms. Although the cytotoxicity of H2O2 has been widely recognized, the effects of H2O2 produced by oral streptococci on host defense systems remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of H2O2 produced by Streptococcus oralis on human macrophage cell death. Infection by S. oralis was found to stimulate cell death of a THP-1 ...

  16. Inhibition of apoptic cell death induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tabaci and mycotoxin fumonisin B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Batchvorova, R.; Kapchina, V.; Popov, T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of programmed cell death (PCD) inhibitors on lesion formation and biochemical events in transgenic (ttr line) and non-transgenic (Nevrokop 1164) tobacco infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci was tested. Programmed cell death in tomato cell culture was induced by Fumonisin B1 (FUM)

  17. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  18. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Musleh, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%-70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. PMID:26929626

  19. HIV-1 Vpr-induced cell death in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is reminiscent of apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvain Huard; Mingzhong Chen; Kristen E Burdette; Csaba Fenyvuesvolgyi; Min Yu; Robert T Elder; Richard Y Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr induces cell death in mammalian and fission yeast cells,suggesting that Vpr may affect a conserved cellular process. It is unclear,however,whether Vpr-induced yeast cell death mimics Vpr-mediated apoptosis in mammalian cells. We have recently identified a number of Vpr suppressors that not only suppress Vpr-induced cell death in fission yeast,but also block Vpr-induced apoptosis in mammalian cells. These findings suggest that Vpr-induced cell death in yeast may resemble some of the apoptotic processes of mammalian cells.The goal of this study was to develop and validate a fission yeast model system for future studies of apoptosis. Similar to Vpr-induced apoptosis in mammalian cells,we show here that Vpr in fission yeast promotes phosphatidylserine externalization and induces hyperpolarization of mitochondria,leading to changes of mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover,Vpr triggers production of reactive oxygen species (ROS),indicating that the apoptotic-like cell death might be mediated by ROS. Interestingly,Vpr induces unique morphologic changes in mitochondria that may provide a simple marker for measuring the apoptotic-like process in fission yeast. To verify this possibility,we tested two Vpr suppressors (EF2 and Hspl6) that suppress Vpr-induced apoptosis in mammalian cells in addition to a newly identified Vpr suppressor (Skp1). All three proteins abolished cell death mediated by Vpr and restored normal mitochondrialmorphology in the yeast cells. In conclusion,Vpr-induced cell death in fission yeast resembles the mammalian apoptotic process. Fission yeast may thus potentially be used as a simple model organism for the future study of the apoptotic-like process induced by Vpr and other proapoptotic agents.

  20. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2). PMID:25692407

  1. Cell Death Inducing Microbial Protein Phosphatase Inhibitors—Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Kleppe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA and microcystin (MC as well as several other microbial toxins like nodularin and calyculinA are known as tumor promoters as well as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Their intracellular targets are the major serine/threonine protein phosphatases. This review summarizes mechanisms believed to be responsible for the death induction and tumor promotion with focus on the interdependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaM-KII. New data are presented using inhibitors of specific ROS producing enzymes to curb nodularin/MC-induced liver cell (hepatocyte death. They indicate that enzymes of the arachidonic acid pathway, notably phospholipase A2, 5-lipoxygenase, and cyclooxygenases, may be required for nodularin/MC-induced (and presumably OA-induced cell death, suggesting new ways to overcome at least some aspects of OA and MC toxicity.

  2. Expression of Inflammatory and Cell Death Program Genes and Comet DNA Damage Assay Induced by Escherichia coli in Layer Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaisen, Gamal M. K.; Eshak, Mariam G.; El Sabry, M. I.; Abass, Ahmed O.

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of industrial poultry and egg production systems involve stressful practices that stimulate Escherichia coli (E. coli) activity causing endotoxic shock. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death program genes and DNA damage induced by E. coli in the brain and liver tissues of laying hens. A total of two hundred and ten H&N brown layer hens with 20 week age, were used in this research. First, preliminary experiments were designed (60 hens in total) to establish the optimal exposure dose of E. coli and to determine the nearest time of notable response to be used in the remainder studies of this research. At 35-wk of age, 150 hens were randomly assigned into 2 groups with 3 replicates of 25 birds each; the first group was injected in the brachial wing vein with 107 E. coli colony/hen, while the second group was injected with saline and served as a control. The body temperature and plasma corticosterone concentration were measured 3 hr after injection. Specimens of liver and brain were obtained from each group and the gene expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, interlukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bax, and caspase-3 genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. DNA damage in the brain and liver tissues were also measured by comet assay. Hens treated with E. coli showed significant (Phens injected with E. coli showed an increase in DNA damage in the brain and liver cells (P<0.05). These results were synchronized with activating cell death program since our data showed significant high expression of Bax gene by 2.8- and 2.7-fold and caspase-3 gene by 2.5- and 2.7-fold in the brain and liver tissues of infected chickens, respectively (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that E. coli injection induces inflammatory physiological response and triggers cell death program in the brain and liver. Our results provide more understanding to

  3. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xuanbin Wang; Yibin Feng; Ning Wang; Fan Cheung; Hor Yue Tan; Sen Zhong; Charlie Li; Seiichi Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and...

  4. The DNA damage-induced cell death response: a roadmap to kill cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Upon massive DNA damage cells fail to undergo productive DNA repair and trigger the cell death response. Resistance to cell death is linked to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis as well as radio- and chemoresistance, making the underlying signaling pathways a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Diverse DNA damage-induced cell death pathways are operative in mammalian cells and finally culminate in the induction of programmed cell death via activation of apoptosis or necroptosis. These signaling routes affect nuclear, mitochondria- and plasma membrane-associated key molecules to activate the apoptotic or necroptotic response. In this review, we highlight the main signaling pathways, molecular players and mechanisms guiding the DNA damage-induced cell death response. PMID:26791483

  5. Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Death by Fluoroquinolones

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Anis A.; Slifer, Teri R.; Araujo, Fausto G.; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Remington, Jack S.

    2000-01-01

    Because fluoroquinolones have an immunomodulatory effect on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated human monocytes, we examined the effect of fluoroquinolones on the survival of mice injected with a lethal dose of LPS. Trovafloxacin (100 mg/kg), ciprofloxacin (250 mg/kg), and tosufloxacin (100 mg/kg) protected 75% (P = 0.0001), 25% (P = 0.002), and 50% (P = 0.002), respectively, of mice against death. The fluoroquinolones significantly reduced serum levels of interleukin-6 an...

  6. Guideline of procedures 2003 for the gammagraphic study of brain death; Guia de procedimientos 2003 para el estudio gammagrafico de muerte cerebral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora R, R.A. [Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The diagnosis of brain death is a clinical diagnosis that is sometimes made with the help of cerebral perfusion scintigraphy. It is important that all physicians be knowledgeable about the clinical requirements for the diagnosis of brain death, especially the need to establish irreversible cessation of all function of the cerebrum and brain stem. Institutions performing scintigraphy for the evaluation of possible brain death should develop clinical guidelines and procedures for the clinical diagnosis that incorporate both clinical evaluations and the integration of ancillary tests such as perfusion scintigraphy. (Author)

  7. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  8. A Comparison of Brain Death Criteria between China and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Criteria for determining brain death (BD vary between China and the United States. We reported the results of an investigation designed to compare procedures to determine BD in two countries. Methods: The latest criteria in the United states were published in 2010. The latest criteria in China were published in 2009. We used these two types of BD criteria to evaluate patients who were considered to be BD. The time, cost, and accuracy of the diagnosis were compared. Results: From January 1, 2012 to October 8, 2013, there were 37 patients which were applied for BD evaluation in the Neurological Intensive Care Unit of Beijing Tiantan Hospital. The cause of coma were known as subarachnoid hemorrhage (18 patients, 48.6%, intracerebral hemorrhage (8 patients, 21.6%, cerebral ischemia (9 patients, 24.3%, brain stem tumor (1 patient, 2.7%, and intracranial infection (1 patient, 2.7%. The clinical examinations were done for all of the patients except 1 patient who had low blood pressure. Three patients had brainstem reflexes that were excluded from BD. Twenty-five patients had apnea tests, and 20 tests were completed that were all positive. Confirmatory tests were completed differently: Transcranial Doppler (30 patients, positive rate 86.7%, electroencephalogram (25 patients, positive rate 100%, and somatosensory evoked potential (16 patients, positive rate 100%. Thirty-three patients were diagnosed BD by criteria of the United States. Only 9 patients were diagnosed BD by Chinese criteria. The use of time and money in the USA criteria was obviously fewer than those in Chinese criteria (P = 0.000. Conclusion: Compared with BD criteria of the United States, Chinese criteria were stricter, lower positive rate, more cost in money and time, and more reliable by families and doctors.

  9. Brain tumors induced by radiation in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two out of four pubescent rhesus monkeys, which received 1,500 rads of supervoltage X-irradiation, showed malignant brain tumors afer the survival of 52 and 102 weeks each. Since the incidence of spontaneous developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literatures was quite low, the tumors in the present series may have been radiation induced. (author)

  10. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola-Saltzman M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mari Viola-Saltzman, Camelia Musleh Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movement disorder, fatigue

  11. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  12. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  13. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanbin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future.

  14. Potentiation of Methylmercury-Induced Death in Rat Cerebellar Granular Neurons Occurs by Further Decrease of Total Intracellular GSH with BDNF via TrkB in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Motoharu; Maki, Takehiro; Kaneko, Takuya; Hemmi, Natsuko; Sekiguchi, Hitomi; Horio, Tomoyo; Kadowaki, Erina; Ozawa, Aisa; Yamamoto, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a principal factor for neurogenesis, neurodevelopment and neural survival through a BDNF receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) B, while BDNF can also cause a decrease in the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level. We investigated the exacerbation of methylmercury-induced death of rat cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs) by BDNF in vitro. Since methylmercury can decrease intracellular GSH levels, we hypothesized that a further decrease of the intracellular GSH level is involved in the process of the exacerbation of neuronal cell death. In the present study, we established that in CGN culture, a decrease of the intracellular GSH level was further potentiated with BDNF in the process of the methylmercury-induced neuronal death and also in GSH reducer-induced neuronal death. BDNF treatment promoted the decrease in GSH levels induced by methylmercury and also by L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and diethyl maleate (DEM). The promoting effect of BDNF was observed in a TrkB-vector transformant of the rat neuroblastoma B35 cell line but not in the mock-vector transformant. These results indicate that the exacerbating effect of BDNF on methylmercury-induced neuronal death in cultures of CGNs includes a further decrease of intracellular GSH levels, for which TrkB is essential. PMID:27251509

  15. Brain iron accumulation in unexplained fetal and infant death victims with smoker mothers-The possible involvement of maternal methemoglobinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corna Melissa F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is involved in important vital functions as an essential component of the oxygen-transporting heme mechanism. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether oxidative metabolites from maternal cigarette smoke could affect iron homeostasis in the brain of victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death, maybe through the induction of maternal hemoglobin damage, such as in case of methemoglobinemia. Methods Histochemical investigations by Prussian blue reaction were made on brain nonheme ferric iron deposits, gaining detailed data on their localization in the brainstem and cerebellum of victims of sudden death and controls. The Gless and Marsland's modification of Bielschowsky's was used to identify neuronal cell bodies and neurofilaments. Results Our approach highlighted accumulations of blue granulations, indicative of iron positive reactions, in the brainstem and cerebellum of 33% of victims of sudden death and in none of the control group. The modified Bielschowsky's method confirmed that the cells with iron accumulations were neuronal cells. Conclusions We propose that the free iron deposition in the brain of sudden fetal and infant death victims could be a catabolic product of maternal methemoglobinemia, a biomarker of oxidative stress likely due to nicotine absorption.

  16. Effect of Polyphenols on Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neuronal Death and Brain Edema in Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Anderson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are natural substances with variable phenolic structures and are elevated in vegetables, fruits, grains, bark, roots, tea, and wine. There are over 8000 polyphenolic structures identified in plants, but edible plants contain only several hundred polyphenolic structures. In addition to their well-known antioxidant effects, select polyphenols also have insulin-potentiating, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-viral, anti-ulcer, and anti-apoptotic properties. One important consequence of ischemia is neuronal death and oxidative stress plays a key role in neuronal viability. In addition, neuronal death may be initiated by the activation of mitochondria-associated cell death pathways. Another consequence of ischemia that is possibly mediated by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction is glial swelling, a component of cytotoxic brain edema. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death, cell swelling, and brain edema in ischemia. A review of currently known mechanisms underlying neuronal death and edema/cell swelling will be undertaken and the potential of dietary polyphenols to reduce such neural damage will be critically reviewed.

  17. Death by Dynamics: Planetoid-Induced Explosions on White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Guillochon, James; Steiner, James F

    2015-01-01

    At intervals as short as ten thousand years, each white dwarf (WD) passes within a solar radius of a planetoid, i.e., a comet, asteroid, or planet. Gravitational tidal forces tear the planetoid apart; its metal-rich debris falls onto the WD, enriching the atmosphere. A third of WDs exhibit atmospheric "pollution". For roughly every hundred planetoid disruptions, a planetoid collides with a WD. We simulate a small number of collisions, in which "death-by-dynamics" refers to the fate of the planetoid. We also compute the energies and likely durations of a broad sample of collision events, and identify detection strategies at optical and X-ray wavelengths. Collisions with the most massive planetoids can be detected in external galaxies. Some may trigger nuclear burning. If one in $\\sim 10^7-10^8$ of WD-planetoid collisions creates the conditions needed for a Type Ia supernova (SN~Ia), "death-by-dynamics" would also refer to the fate of the WD, and could provide a novel channel for the production of SN~Ia. We con...

  18. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Alborzinia

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago and its clinical introduction in the 1970s an enormous amount of research has gone into elucidating the mechanism of action of cisplatin on tumor cells. With a novel cell biosensor chip system allowing continuous monitoring of respiration, glycolysis, and impedance we followed cisplatin treatment of different cancer cell lines in real-time. Our measurements reveal a first effect on respiration, in all cisplatin treated cell lines, followed with a significant delay by interference with glycolysis in HT-29, HCT-116, HepG2, and MCF-7 cells but not in the cisplatin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231. Most strikingly, cell death started in all cisplatin-sensitive cell lines within 8 to 11 h of treatment, indicating a clear time frame from exposure, first response to cisplatin lesions, to cell fate decision. The time points of most significant changes were selected for more detailed analysis of cisplatin response in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Phosphorylation of selected signal transduction mediators connected with cellular proliferation, as well as changes in gene expression, were analyzed in samples obtained directly from sensor chips at the time points when changes in glycolysis and impedance occurred. Our online cell biosensor measurements reveal for the first time the time scale of metabolic response until onset of cell death under cisplatin treatment, which is in good agreement with models of p53-mediated cell fate decision.

  19. Exendin-4 ameliorates traumatic brain injury-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Katharine; Li, Yazhou; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Hoffer, Barry J; Rosenheim, Hilary; Greig, Nigel H; Miller, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury represents a major public health issue that affects 1.7 million Americans each year and is a primary contributing factor (30.5%) of all injury-related deaths in the United States. The occurrence of traumatic brain injury is likely underestimated and thus has been termed "a silent epidemic". Exendin-4 is a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus that not only effectively induces glucose-dependent insulin secretion to regulate blood glucose levels but also reduces apoptotic cell death of pancreatic β-cells. Accumulating evidence also supports a neurotrophic and neuroprotective role of glucagon-like peptide-1 in an array of cellular and animal neurodegeneration models. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effects of Exendin-4 using a glutamate toxicity model in vitro and fluid percussion injury in vivo. We found neuroprotective effects of Exendin-4 both in vitro, using markers of cell death, and in vivo, using markers of cognitive function, as assessed by Morris Water Maze. In combination with the reported benefits of ex-4 in other TBI models, these data support repositioning of Exendin-4 as a potential treatment for traumatic brain injury. PMID:24312624

  20. Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase–Monoamine Oxidase B-Mediated Cell Death-Induced by Ethanol is Prevented by Rasagiline and 1-R-Aminoindan

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Deyin; Johnson, Chandra; Chen, Kevin; Moussa B. H. Youdim; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Shih, Jean C.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitors of monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) are effectively used as therapeutic drugs for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, their mechanism of action is not clear, since the neuroprotective effect of MAO B inhibitors is associated with the blockage of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-death cascade, rather than the inhibition of MAO B. Here, we provide evidence that GAPDH potentiates the ethanol-induced activity of MAO B and brain cell toxicity. The le...

  1. Exposure to electromagnetic field attenuates oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced microglial cell death by reducing intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Cao Nguyen; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this research was to demonstrate the protective effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on the human microglial cell line, HMO6, against ischemic cell death induced by in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Materials and methods HMO6 cells were cultured for 4 h under OGD with or without exposure to EMF with different combinations of frequencies and intensities (10, 50, or 100 Hz/1 mT and 50 Hz/0.01, 0.1, or 1 mT). Cell survival, intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured. Results OGD caused significant HMO6 cell death as well as elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels. Among different combinations of EMF frequencies and intensities, 50 Hz/1 mT EMF was the most potent to attenuate OGD-induced cell death and intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels. A significant but less potent protective effect was also found at 10 Hz/1 mT, whereas no protective effect was found at other combinations of EMF. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor reversed OGD-induced ROS production and cell death, while NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial respiration chain complex II inhibitors did not affect cell death. Conclusions 50 Hz/1 mT EMF protects human microglial cells from OGD-induced cell death by interfering with OGD-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels, and xanthine oxidase is one of the main mediators involved in OGD-induced HMO6 cell death. Non-invasive treatment of EMF radiation may be clinically useful to attenuate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:26882219

  2. Ammonium accumulation and cell death in a rat 3D brain cell model of glutaric aciduria type I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris Jafari

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type I (glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism that usually manifests in infancy by an acute encephalopathic crisis and often results in permanent motor handicap. Biochemical hallmarks of this disease are elevated levels of glutarate and 3-hydroxyglutarate in blood and urine. The neuropathology of this disease is still poorly understood, as low lysine diet and carnitine supplementation do not always prevent brain damage, even in early-treated patients. We used a 3D in vitro model of rat organotypic brain cell cultures in aggregates to mimic glutaric aciduria type I by repeated administration of 1 mM glutarate or 3-hydroxyglutarate at two time points representing different developmental stages. Both metabolites were deleterious for the developing brain cells, with 3-hydroxyglutarate being the most toxic metabolite in our model. Astrocytes were the cells most strongly affected by metabolite exposure. In culture medium, we observed an up to 11-fold increase of ammonium in the culture medium with a concomitant decrease of glutamine. We further observed an increase in lactate and a concomitant decrease in glucose. Exposure to 3-hydroxyglutarate led to a significantly increased cell death rate. Thus, we propose a three step model for brain damage in glutaric aciduria type I: (i 3-OHGA causes the death of astrocytes, (ii deficiency of the astrocytic enzyme glutamine synthetase leads to intracerebral ammonium accumulation, and (iii high ammonium triggers secondary death of other brain cells. These unexpected findings need to be further investigated and verified in vivo. They suggest that intracerebral ammonium accumulation might be an important target for the development of more effective treatment strategies to prevent brain damage in patients with glutaric aciduria type I.

  3. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yiming; Zhe LIU; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration...

  4. Attenuation of cisplatin-induced acute renal failure is associated with less apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H; Miyaji, T; Kato, A; Fujigaki, Y; Sano, K; Hishida, A

    1999-12-01

    To clarify the pathophysiologic role of apoptosis in acute renal failure (ARF), we examined whether the attenuation of cisplatin-induced ARF is associated with the change in the degree of apoptotic cell death. The administration of cisplatin (CDDP) (6 mg/kg body weight) in rats induced ARF at day 5, as manifested by a significant increase in serum creatinine (Scr) and tubular damage. CDDP-induced apoptotic cell death was confirmed by electron microscopic examination, agarose gel electrophoresis, and increased cells positive for TaT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) in the outer medulla of the kidney. Treatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU)--a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals--or glycine abrogated CDDP-induced increases in Scr, the tubular damage score, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells. Pretreatment with uranyl acetate (UA) induced a significant expression of Bcl-2 in the kidney and ameliorated CDDP-induced increases in Scr, the tubular damage score, and TUNEL-positive cells in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Our findings indicate (1) that the attenuation of CDDP-induced ARF was associated with less apoptotic cell death and (2) that the induction of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 attenuated apoptosis and tubular damage. Our results suggest that apoptotic cell death may play an important role in the development of cisplatin-induced ARF. PMID:10595794

  5. *604440 CELL DEATH-INDUCING DFFA-LIKE EFFECTOR A; CIDEA [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 604440 FIELD TI 604440 CELL DEATH-INDUCING DFFA-LIKE EFFECTOR A; CIDEA FIELD TX DESCRIP ... tion of CIDEA and CIDEC (612120), and treatment of lean ... or obese mice with the PPARG agonist rosiglitazone ... d to cold treatment. Notably, Cidea-null mice were lean ... and resistant to diet-induced obesity and diabetes ...

  6. Stress- and Allostasis-Induced Brain Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    McEwen, Bruce S.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is the key organ of stress processes. It determines what individuals will experience as stressful, it orchestrates how individuals will cope with stressful experiences, and it changes both functionally and structurally as a result of stressful experiences. Within the brain, a distributed, dynamic, and plastic neural circuitry coordinates, monitors, and calibrates behavioral and physiological stress response systems to meet the demands imposed by particular stressors. These allodynam...

  7. Proton spectroscopy of radiation-induced injury to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the role of hydrogen MR spectroscopy (HMRS) in differentiating radiation-injured brain from normal brain and neoplasm, the authors performed HMRS on five cat brains with iatrogenically produced radiation injury. Reductions in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA/choline, and NAA/creatine-phosphocreatine (CR)) resonances were demonstrated in voxels from the five irradiated hemispheres compared with normal hemispheres (P < .01). NAA/CR ratios below 1.21 were always associated with radiation injury; ratios above 1.30 demarcated normal hemispheres. Large unassigned amino acid resonances from 2.0 to 2.5 ppm were also present. Results of autopsy examination confirmed radiation-induced white matter injury. Using NAA/CR ratios, one can separate normal brain from radiation-injured brain. Differentiating residual tumor from radiation-injured and normal brain may be possible with HMRS

  8. Melatonin attenuates 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced PC12 cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-feng BAO; Ren-gang WU; Xiao-ping ZHANG; Yan SONG; Chang-ling LI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of melatonin on PC12 cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Methods: MTT assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)efflux assay, and immunohistochemistry methods were used to measure neurotoxicity of PC 12 cells treated acutely with MPP+ in low glucose and high glucose conditions, and to assess the neuroprotective effect of melatonin on PC 12 cell death induced by MPP+. Results: In a low glucose condition, MPP+ significantly induced PC 12 cell death, which showed time and concentration dependence. In a serum-free low glucose condition, the percentages of viability of cells treated with MPP+ for 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h were 85.1%, 75.4%, 64.9%, 28.15%, and 9%, respectively. The level of LDH in the culture medium increased and tyrosine hydroxylase positive (TH+) cell count decreased. However, in a serum-free high glucose condition, MPP+ did not significantly induce PC12 cell death compared with control at various concentrations and time regimens. When the cells were preincubated with melatonin 250 μmol/L for 48, 72, and 96 h in a serum-free low glucose condition, cell survival rate significantly increased to 78.1%, 58.8%, and 31.6%, respectively. Melatonin abolished the LDH leakage of cells treated with MPP+ and increased TH+ cells count. Conclusion: MPP+ caused concentrationdependent PC12 cell death. The level of glucose was an important factor to MPP+induced dopaminergic PC12 cell death. Low glucose level could potentiate MPP+toxicity, while high glucose level could reduce the toxicity. In addition, melatonin attenuated PC12 cell death induced by MPP+.

  9. Signal transduction pathway of nitric oxide inducing PC12 cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study signal transduction pathway of nitric oxideinducing death of PC12 cells.Methods: Cell survival rate was measured with MTT assay, and caspase-3 activity with caspase-3 assay kits after PC12 cells were incubated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ plus SNP or p38 inhibitor-SB203580 plus SNP.Results: SNP induced death of PC12 cells in dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced caspase-3 activity gradually. Both caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ and SB203580 reduced cell death, but SB203580 reduced caspase-3 activity significantly.Conclusions: NO may induce death of PC12 cells through activation of p38 and caspase-3.

  10. Apoptosis-like death in bacteria induced by HAMLET, a human milk lipid-protein complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders P Hakansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is the primary means for eliminating unwanted cells in multicellular organisms in order to preserve tissue homeostasis and function. It is characterized by distinct changes in the morphology of the dying cell that are orchestrated by a series of discrete biochemical events. Although there is evidence of primitive forms of programmed cell death also in prokaryotes, no information is available to suggest that prokaryotic death displays mechanistic similarities to the highly regulated programmed death of eukaryotic cells. In this study we compared the characteristics of tumor and bacterial cell death induced by HAMLET, a human milk complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that HAMLET-treated bacteria undergo cell death with mechanistic and morphologic similarities to apoptotic death of tumor cells. In Jurkat cells and Streptococcus pneumoniae death was accompanied by apoptosis-like morphology such as cell shrinkage, DNA condensation, and DNA degradation into high molecular weight fragments of similar sizes, detected by field inverse gel electrophoresis. HAMLET was internalized into tumor cells and associated with mitochondria, causing a rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and bound to and induced depolarization of the pneumococcal membrane with similar kinetic and magnitude as in mitochondria. Membrane depolarization in both systems required calcium transport, and both tumor cells and bacteria were found to require serine protease activity (but not caspase activity to execute cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that many of the morphological changes and biochemical responses associated with apoptosis are present in prokaryotes. Identifying the mechanisms of bacterial cell death has the potential to reveal novel targets for future antimicrobial therapy and to further our understanding of core activation mechanisms of cell death in eukaryote cells.

  11. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  12. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  13. Absence of Doppler signal in transcranial color-coded ultrasonography may be confirmatory for brain death: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD is a valuable tool for demonstrating cerebral circulatory arrest (CCA in the setting of brain death. Complete reversal of diastolic flow (to-and-fro flow and systolic spikes in bilateral terminal internal carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar circulation are considered as specific sonogram configurations supporting the diagnosis of CCA. Because of the possibility of sonic bone window impermeability, absence of any waveform in TCD is not confirmatory for CCA unless there is documentation of disappearance of a previously well detected signal by the same recording settings. Transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS with B-mode imaging can reliably detect adequacy of bone windows with clarity contralateral skull and ipsilateral planum temporale visualization. Therefore, absence of detectable intracranial Doppler signal along with available ultrasound window in TCCS can confirm clinical diagnosis of brain death. We herein discuss this entity from the frame of a representative case.

  14. Gadolinium blocks membrane permeabilization induced by nanosecond electric pulses and reduces cell death

    OpenAIRE

    André, Franck M; Rassokhin, Mikhail A.; Bowman, Angela M.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) are distinguished from micro-and millisecond duration pulses by their ability to cause intracellular effects and cell death with reduced effects on the cell plasma membrane. However, we found that nsEP-induced cell death is most likely mediated by the plasma membrane disruption. We showed that nsEP can cause long-lasting (minutes) increase in plasma membrane electrical conductance and disrupt electrolyte balance, followed by w...

  15. Spontaneous and radiation induced cell death in HeLa S3 human carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation biologists have classified radiation-induced cell death based on cell proliferative capacity to either mitotic or interphase death. Cytologists have revealed two morphologically and biochemically diverse forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis. While the knowledge of the former is already well exploited by radiologists, cell susceptibility to apoptosis and necrosis is still under investigation. We studied characteristics of spontaneous cell death, and dose dependence and time course of radiation-induced cell death of human uterine cervix epitheloid carcinoma HeLaS3 in culture. Cells were irradiated with 2-40 Gy of γ-rays. The effect on growth, viability, morphology and genomic DNA structure were followed 24-72 h after irradiation. Cell viability was evaluated by trypan-blue exclusion assay and cell morphology by in situ DNA staining with propidium iodide. Cell genomic DNA fragmentation pattern was determined by electrophoresis on 2% agarose gels. At all cell densities 25-35% cells were PI positive and their DNA was fragmented to a high molecular size (≥20 kbp), but the internucleosomal ladder was not observed. A significant decrease in viability to 33% was observed 72 h post 40 Gy irradiation. It corresponded to 55% of PI positive cells. A smear of smaller DNA fragments (0.1-1 kbp), 24 h after 10-20 Gy irradiation was considered as proof that the dominant form of radiation-induced cell death was necrosis. It was concluded that the dominant form of radiation-induced cell death in HeLaS3 population was necrosis and the radiation dose which caused 50% of cell death after 72 h (termed ND50) was between 30-40 Gy. (author)

  16. Oxidative stress is involved in heat-induced cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, J. F.; Whyte, B.; Bissinger, P H; Schiestl, R H

    1996-01-01

    The cause for death after lethal heat shock is not well understood. A shift from low to intermediate temperature causes the induction of heat-shock proteins in most organisms. However, except for HSP104, a convincing involvement of heat-shock proteins in the development of stress resistance has not been established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This paper shows that oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes play a major role in heat-induced cell death in yeast. Mutants deleted for the antioxida...

  17. Autophagy Induction Protects Against 7-Oxysterol-induced Cell Death via Lysosomal Pathway and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Xi-Ming Yuan; Nargis Sultana; Nabeel Siraj; Ward, Liam J.; Bijar Ghafouri; Wei Li

    2016-01-01

    7-Oxysterols are major toxic components in oxidized low-density lipoprotein and human atheroma lesions, which cause lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death. Autophagy may function as a survival mechanism in this process. Here, we investigated whether 7-oxysterols mixed in an atheroma-relevant proportion induce autophagy, whether autophagy induction influences 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death, and the underlying mechanisms, by focusing on cellular lipid levels, oxidative stress...

  18. Increase of p25 associated with cortical neuronal death induced by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianwen; Fang, Lijun; Lin, Zhiying; Huang, En; Ye, Qinyong

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal damage in hypoxic cerebral cortex are complicated. Recent studies indicated that deregulation of Cdk5 was involved in neuronal death induced by hypoxia (1% O2). However, the pathological effect of Cdk5 is not fully elucidated. Therefore, in order to decipher the effect of Cdk5 on cellular death in hypoxic condition, the Cdk5 and its activator p35/p25 were investigated in cortical neurons at 10 DIV (Days In Vitro). Upon exposure to hypoxia, the cortical neurons showed a time-dependent increase of neuronal death compared to normoxia-treated control neurons. In correlation to the increase of neuronal death under hypoxia, the level of p25, a truncated form of p35, also increased in a time-dependent manner. Importantly, inhibition of Cdk5 kinase activity by roscovitine protected neurons from death under hypoxic stress. In contrast, ectopic upregulation of Cdk5 kinase activity in neurons expressing p25 led to an increase of neuronal death in comparison to control neurons expressing GFP. It suggests that ectopic increase of Cdk5 kinase activity through conversion of p35 to p25 is involved in the process of neuronal death induced by hypoxia. PMID:27402274

  19. comparative study on effective factors on consent to organ donation among families of brain death victims in Isfahan, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshte Zamani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to the previous studies, several social, cultural, and organizational factors are involved in the decision of families of brain death victims for organ donation. The present study was performed to determine the effective factors in the decision of organ donation among families of brain death victims. Methods: In this descriptive-comparative study data were gathered through a self-made questionnaire. The reliability of questionnaire was determined by calculating Cronbach’s alpha (0.81 and the face and content validity were studied and approved by a number of experts. Statistical population included all family members of brain death victims in Isfahan/Iran during 2012-2013. They were divided into two groups of with and without consent to organ donation. The whole population was considered as the study sample. Data analysis were done through SPSS using independent T-test, ANOVA, and Chi-square tests. Results: According to the present study, age and marital status of the victims have no effect on their families’ consent to organ donation (P> 0.05; but sex, duration of hospitalization in the emergency department, having organ donation card ,and personal opinion of the brain death victim showed significant relationship with consent to organ donation (P< 0.05. Conclusion: Since the rate of awareness, knowledge, and attitude of family members are effective in their decision for organ donation, improving cultural backgrounds required for this decision and increasing awareness and knowledge of people can improve the attitude of people in this regard and facilitate the acceptance of family members

  20. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  1. Minocycline attenuates both OGD-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-induced cell death in ischemic neuronal injury in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Department of Neurosurgery, Omuta City General Hospital, 2-19-1 Takarazaka, Omuta-City, Fukuoka 836-8567 (Japan); Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Biswas, Kamal Krishna; Ito, Takashi [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, 6 Yothe Rd., Rajthevee Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Morimoto, Yoko [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Matsuda, Fumiyo [Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8560 (Japan); Oyama, Yoko; Takenouchi, Kazunori [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Miura, Naoki [Laboratory of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Arimura, Noboru; Nawa, Yuko; Meng, Xiaojie; Shrestha, Binita; Arimura, Shinichiro [Division of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Field of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Disorders, Department of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); and others

    2009-07-24

    High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a non-histone DNA-binding protein, is massively released into the extracellular space from neuronal cells after ischemic insult and exacerbates brain tissue damage in rats. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline antibiotic which has recently been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. In this study, we found that minocycline inhibited HMGB1 release in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated PC12 cells and triggered the activation of p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2). The ERK kinase (MEK)1/2 inhibitor U-0126 and p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked HMGB1 release in response to OGD. Furthermore, HMGB1 triggered cell death in a dose-dependent fashion. Minocycline significantly rescued HMGB1-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In light of recent observations as well as the good safety profile of minocycline in humans, we propose that minocycline might play a potent neuroprotective role through the inhibition of HMGB1-induced neuronal cell death in cerebral infarction.

  2. The mechanism of radiation-induced interphase death of lymphoid cells: A new hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interphase death of irradiated rat thymocytes depends on their concentration during postirradiation incubation. The kinetics of pycnosis and cell death determined with the trypan blue exclusion test in the samples with the highest cell concentration (1-2 x 10(7) cells/ml) is consistent with the data available in the literature, whereas the samples with the lowest concentration (2 x 10(5) cells/ml) undergo almost no pycnosis and death after irradiation with doses up to 50 Gy. On the basis of these results, we suggest a new mechanism of interphase death involving an interaction between irradiated thymocytes and the fraction of thymus cells possessing cytocidal activity. The observed correlation between the cytocidal activity and interphase death of thymocytes from animals of different ages favors our mechanism. It was found that the inhibitors which prevent the conjugation of killer cells and their targets do not influence interphase death, while the substances which block the secretion of cytotoxic factors or their action on the target membrane do protect from interphase death. Thus we suggest that the irradiation activates the killer cells to secrete some cytotoxic factors which induce pycnosis and interphase death of thymocytes

  3. Electrical stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus protects rat brain, in vitro, from staurosporine-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Qian, L; Glickstein, S B; Golanov, E V; Pickel, V M; Reis, D J

    2001-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) elicits a prolonged ( approximately 10 days) and substantial (50-80%) protection against ischemic and excitotoxic injuries. The mechanism(s) of protection are unknown. We investigated whether FN stimulation directly protects brain cells against apoptotic cell death in an in vitro rat brain slice culture model. Rats were electrically stimulated in FN or, as control, the cerebellar dentate nucleus (DN). Coronal slices through the forebrain were explanted, exposed to staurosporine, harvested, and analyzed for caspase-3 activity by a fluorescence assay. FN, but not DN, stimulation significantly reduced staurosporine-induced caspase-3 activity by 39 +/- 7% at 3 h, 31 +/- 3% at 6 h and 26 +/- 4% at 10 h of incubation. Immunocytochemistry revealed FN-specific reductions in activated caspase-3 mainly in glial-like cells throughout the forebrain. FN stimulation also results in a 56.5% reduction in cytochrome c release upon staurosporine incubation. We conclude that neuroprotection elicited from FN stimulation can directly modify the sensitivity of brain cells to apoptotic stimuli and thereby suppress staurosporine induced apoptosis in adult rat brain slices. This model indicates that neuroprotection can be studied in vitro and provides new insight into the potential role of glial cells in ischemic protection of neurons induced by FN stimulation. PMID:11677261

  4. Moderately delayed post-insult treatment with normobaric hyperoxia reduces excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration but increases ischemia-induced brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haelewyn Benoit

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use and benefits of normobaric oxygen (NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. Results Here we show for the first time to the best of our knowledge that NBO reduces both NMDA-induced calcium influxes in vitro and NMDA-induced neuronal degeneration in vivo, but increases oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury in vitro and ischemia-induced brain damage produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in vivo. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that NBO reduces excitotoxin-induced calcium influx and subsequent neuronal degeneration but favors ischemia-induced brain damage and neuronal death. These findings highlight the complexity of the mechanisms involved by the use of NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke.

  5. Sulbutiamine counteracts trophic factor deprivation induced apoptotic cell death in transformed retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kui Dong; Majid, Aman Shah Abdul; Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Kyungsu; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Nho, Chu Won; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2010-11-01

    Sulbutiamine is a highly lipid soluble synthetic analogue of vitamin B(1) and is used clinically for the treatment of asthenia. The aim of our study was to demonstrate whether sulbutiamine is able to attenuate trophic factor deprivation induced cell death to transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). Cells were subjected to serum deprivation for defined periods and sulbutiamine at different concentrations was added to the cultures. Various procedures (e.g. cell viability assays, apoptosis assay, reactive oxygen species analysis, Western blot analysis, flow cytometric analysis, glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) measurement) were used to demonstrate the effect of sulbutiamine. Sulbutiamine dose-dependently attenuated apoptotic cell death induced by serum deprivation and stimulated GSH and GST activity. Moreover, sulbutiamine decreased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and AIF. This study demonstrates for the first time that sulbutiamine is able to attenuate trophic factor deprivation induced apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells in culture. PMID:20809085

  6. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy: Protective or death role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lia; Amaral, Cristina; Teixeira, Natércia; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Fonseca, Bruno M

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, the "self-digestion" mechanism of the cells, is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process that targets portions of cytoplasm, damaged organelles and proteins for lysosomal degradation, which plays a crucial role in development and disease. Cannabinoids are active compounds of Cannabis sativa and the most prevalent psychoactive substance is Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabinoid compounds can be divided in three types: the plant-derived natural products (phytocannabinoids), the cannabinoids produced endogenously (endocannabinoids) and the synthesized compounds (synthetic cannabinoids). Various studies reported a cannabinoid-induced autophagy mechanism in cancer and non-cancer cells. In this review we focus on the recent advances in the cannabinoid-induced autophagy and highlight the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. PMID:26732541

  7. Proinflammatory caspase-2-mediated macrophage cell death induced by a rough attenuated Brucella suis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Ding, Xicheng; Ding, Ying; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Li, Xinna; Ghosh, Debashis; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; He, Yongqun

    2011-06-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacteria that cause an infectious disease called brucellosis in humans and many domestic and wildlife animals. B. suis primarily infects pigs and is pathogenic to humans. The macrophage-Brucella interaction is critical for the establishment of a chronic Brucella infection. Our studies showed that smooth virulent B. suis strain 1330 (S1330) prevented programmed cell death of infected macrophages and rough attenuated B. suis strain VTRS1 (a vaccine candidate) induced strong macrophage cell death. To further investigate the mechanism of VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death, microarrays were used to analyze temporal transcriptional responses of murine macrophage-like J774.A1 cells infected with S1330 or VTRS1. In total 17,685 probe sets were significantly regulated based on the effects of strain, time and their interactions. A miniTUBA dynamic Bayesian network analysis predicted that VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death was mediated by a proinflammatory gene (the tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] gene), an NF-κB pathway gene (the IκB-α gene), the caspase-2 gene, and several other genes. VTRS1 induced significantly higher levels of transcription of 40 proinflammatory genes than S1330. A Mann-Whitney U test confirmed the proinflammatory response in VTRS1-infected macrophages. Increased production of TNF-α and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were also detected in the supernatants in VTRS1-infected macrophage cell culture. Hyperphosphorylation of IκB-α was observed in macrophages infected with VTRS1 but not S1330. The important roles of TNF-α and IκB-α in VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death were further confirmed by individual inhibition studies. VTRS1-induced macrophage cell death was significantly inhibited by a caspase-2 inhibitor but not a caspase-1 inhibitor. The role of caspase-2 in regulating the programmed cell death of VTRS1-infected macrophages was confirmed in another study using caspase-2-knockout mice. In summary, VTRS1

  8. Mechanisms underlying 3-bromopyruvate-induced cell death in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiming; Liu, Zhe; Zou, Xue; Lan, Yadong; Sun, Xiaojin; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Surong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is an energy-depleting drug that inhibits Hexokinase II activity by alkylation during glycolysis, thereby suppressing the production of ATP and inducing cell death. As such, 3BP can potentially serve as an anti-tumorigenic agent. Our previous research showed that 3BP can induce apoptosis via AKT /protein Kinase B signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we found that 3BP can also induce colon cancer cell death by necroptosis and apoptosis at the same time and concentration in the SW480 and HT29 cell lines; in the latter, autophagy was also found to be a mechanism of cell death. In HT29 cells, combined treatment with 3BP and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) exacerbated cell death, while viability in 3BP-treated cells was enhanced by concomitant treatment with the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk) and the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin (Nec)-1. Moreover, 3BP inhibited tumor growth in a SW480 xenograft mouse model. These results indicate that 3BP can suppress tumor growth and induce cell death by multiple mechanisms at the same time and concentration in different types of colon cancer cell by depleting cellular energy stores. PMID:26054380

  9. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Mok, Tony S.K. [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Warner, Timothy D. [The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Underwood, Malcolm J. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Chen, George G., E-mail: gchen@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  10. Arabidopsis Bax Inhibitor-1 inhibits cell death induced by pokeweed antiviral protein in Saccharomyces cerevisae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsen Çakır

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an active form of programmed cell death (PCD that plays critical roles in the development, differentiation and resistance to pathogens in multicellular organisms. Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs are able to induce apoptotic cell death in mammalian cells. In this study, using yeast as a model system, we showed that yeast cells expressing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP, a single-chain ribosome-inactivating protein, exhibit apoptotic-like features, such as nuclear fragmentation and ROS production. We studied the interaction between PAP and AtBI-1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Bax Inhibitor-1, a plant anti-apoptotic protein, which inhibits Bax induced cell death. Cells expressing PAP and AtBI-1 were able to survive on galactose media compared to PAP alone, indicating a reduction in the cytotoxicity of PAP in yeast. However, PAP was able to depurinate the ribosomes and to inhibit total translation in the presence of AtBI-1. A C-terminally deleted AtBI-1 was able to reduce the cytotoxicity of PAP. Since anti-apoptotic proteins form heterodimers to inhibit the biological activity of their partners, we used a co-immunoprecipitation assay to examine the binding of AtBI-1 to PAP. Both full length and C-terminal deleted AtBI-1 were capable of binding to PAP. These findings indicate that PAP induces cell death in yeast and AtBI-1 inhibits cell death induced by PAP without affecting ribosome depurination and translation inhibition.

  11. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKCδ in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKCδ in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKCδ, ERK1/2 and p38.

  12. Donor brain death leads to differential immune activation in solid organs but does not accelerate ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschl, Paul Viktor; Ashraf, Muhammad Imtiaz; Oberhuber, Rupert; Mellitzer, Vanessa; Fabritius, Cornelia; Resch, Thomas; Ebner, Susanne; Sauter, Martina; Klingel, Karin; Pratschke, Johann; Kotsch, Katja

    2016-05-01

    A comparative analysis of inflammation between solid organs following donor brain death (BD) is still lacking and the detailed influence of BD accelerating ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) post-transplantation remains to be addressed. Applying a murine model of BD, we demonstrated that 4 h after BD organs were characterized by distinct inflammatory expression patterns. For instance, lipocalin 2 (LCN2), a marker of acute kidney injury, was selectively induced in BD livers but not in kidneys. BD further resulted in significantly reduced frequencies of CD3(+) CD4(+) , CD3(+) CD8(+) T cells and NKp46(+) NK cells in the liver, whereas BD kidneys and hearts were characterized by significantly lower frequencies of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs). Syngeneic models of kidney (KTx) and heart transplantation (HTx) illustrated stronger gene expression in engrafted BD hearts only, but 20 h post-transplantation both organs displayed comparable intragraft lymphocyte frequencies, except for NK cells and graft function. Moreover, the complement factor C3d deposit detected in small vessels and capillaries in cardiac syngrafts did not significantly differ between BD and sham-transplanted groups. Finally, no further influence of donor BD on graft survival was detected in an allogeneic heart transplantation setting (C57BL/6 grafts into BALB/c recipients). We show for the first time that BD organs are characterized by a varying inflammatory profile; however, BD does not accelerate IRI in syngeneic KTx and HTx. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26890577

  13. A plant vacuolar protease, VPE, mediates virus-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Kuroyanagi, Miwa; Yamada, Kenji; Meshi, Tetsuo; Tsuda, Shinya; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2004-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in animals depends on caspase protease activity. Plants also exhibit PCD, for example as a response to pathogens, although a plant caspase remains elusive. Here we show that vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) is a protease essential for a virus-induced hypersensitive response that involves PCD. VPE deficiency prevented virus-induced hypersensitive cell death in tobacco plants. VPE is structurally unrelated to caspases, although VPE has a caspase-1 activity. Thus, plants have evolved a regulated cellular suicide strategy that, unlike PCD of animals, is mediated by VPE and the cellular vacuole. PMID:15297671

  14. Cellular Mechanism of Newly Synthesized Indoledione Derivative-induced Immunological Death of Tumor Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Su-Jin; Ryu, Chung-Kyu; Baek, So-Young; Lee, Hyunah

    2011-01-01

    Background EY-6 is one of the newly synthesized indoledione derivatives to induce tumor cell-specific cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of immunological death induced by EY-6 at mouse colon cancer cell as well as at the normal immune cell represented by dendritic cell. Methods C57BL/6 mouse syngeneic colon cancer cell MC38 was treated with EY-6, and analyzed by MTT for viability test, flow cytometry for confirming surface expressing molecules and ELISA for detection of ...

  15. Phytoplankton cell death induced by solar ultraviolet radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Llabrés Comamala, Maria Moira

    2008-01-01

    En esta tesis se ha demostrado que la radiación ultravioleta induce mortalidad en comunidades de fitoplancton de diferentes áreas del Océano Atlántico, del Mar Mediterráneo y del Océano Antártico. El fitoplancton más pequeño (pico-fitoplancton) muestra mayor sensibilidad a la radiación UV respecto al fitoplancton de mayor tamaño. Este estudio identifica que el crecimiento de las poblaciones del fitoplancton antártico está controlado por la radiación ultravioleta con inhibiciones de biomasas p...

  16. Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas eSpierer; Camille eChavan; Aurelie Lynn Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may fo...

  17. Food-induced brain responses and eating behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Smeets, P.A.M.; CHARBONNIER, L.; Meer, van der, D; Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Spetter, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    The brain governs food intake behaviour by integrating many different internal and external state and trait-related signals. Understanding how the decisions to start and to stop eating are made is crucial to our understanding of (maladaptive patterns of) eating behaviour. Here, we aim to (1) review the current state of the field of 'nutritional neuroscience' with a focus on the interplay between food-induced brain responses and eating behaviour and (2) highlight research needs and techniques ...

  18. Magnaporthe oryzae-Secreted Protein MSP1 Induces Cell Death and Elicits Defense Responses in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Tsuda, Kenichi; Gupta, Ravi; Park, Sook-Young; Kim, Sun Tae; Kang, Kyu Young

    2016-04-01

    The Magnaporthe oryzae snodprot1 homolog (MSP1), secreted by M. oryzae, is a cerato-platanin family protein. msp1-knockout mutants have reduced virulence on barley leaves, indicating that MSP1 is required for the pathogenicity of rice blast fungus. To investigate the functional roles of MSP1 and its downstream signaling in rice, recombinant MSP1 was produced in Escherichia coli and was assayed for its functionality. Application of MSP1 triggered cell death and elicited defense responses in rice. MSP1 also induced H2O2 production and autophagic cell death in both suspension-cultured cells and rice leaves. One or more protein kinases triggered cell death, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid enhanced cell death, while salicylic acid suppressed it. We demonstrated that the secretion of MSP1 into the apoplast is a prerequisite for triggering cell death and activating defense-related gene expression. Furthermore, pretreatment of rice with a sublethal MSP1 concentration potentiated resistance to the pathogen. Taken together, our results showed that MSP1 induces a high degree of cell death in plants, which might be essential for its virulence. Moreover, rice can recognize MSP1, resulting in the induction of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. PMID:26780420

  19. Optical monitoring of shock wave-induced spreading depolarization and concomitant hypoxemia in rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Wataru; Kawauchi, Satoko; Ashida, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2014-03-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury is a growing concern, but its underlying pathophysiology and mechanism are still unknown. Thus, study using an animal model is needed. We have been proposing the use of a laser-induced shock wave (LISW), whose energy is highly controllable and reproducible, to mimic blast-related injury. We previously observed the occurrence of spreading depolarization (SD) and prolonged hypoxemia in the rat brain exposed to an LISW. However, the relationship between these two events is unclear. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal characteristics of hypoxemia and SD to examine their correlation, for which multichannel fiber measurement and multispectral imaging of the diffuse reflectance were performed for the rat brain exposed to an LISW. We also quantified tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in the hypoxemic phase, which is associated with possible neuronal cell death, based on an inverse Monte Carlo simulation. Fiber measurement showed that the region of hypoxemia was expanding from the site of LISW application to the distant region over the brain; the speed of expansion was similar to that of the propagation speed of SD. Simulation showed that oxygen saturation was decreased by ~40%. Multispectral imaging showed that after LISW application, a vasodilatation occurred for ~1 min, which was followed by a long-lasting vasoconstriction. In the phase of vasoconstriction, StO2 declined all over the field of view. These results indicate a strong correlation between SD and hypoxemia; the estimated StO2 seems to be low enough to induce neuronal cell death.

  20. Acid-induced changes of brain protein buffering

    OpenAIRE

    Kraig, Richard P.; Wagner, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Excessive cellular acidosis is thought to enhance destruction of brain from ischemia. Protein denaturation may contribute to such injury although the behavior of brain proteins to acidosis is poorly defined. As a first approach to detect acid-induced changes in brain proteins and to characterize buffer content, homogenates were acidified for 20 min (as low as pH 3.1), returned to baseline pH (6.9), and then titrated. Titration curves show a significant (P < 0.0001) and permanent increase in b...

  1. Down-regulation of protein kinase C protects cerebellar granule neurons in primary culture from glutamate-induced neuronal death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposing primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons to 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for 24 hr decreases the Ca2+/phosphatidylserine/diolein-dependent protein kinase C. Immunoblot analysis of the homogenates with polyclonal antibodies raised against either the β-type PKC peptide or total rat brain PKC reveals a virtual loss of 78-kDa PKC immunoreactivity in the supernatant and marked decrease of PKC immunoreactivity in the pellet. Exposure of the cultures to 50 μM glutamate for 15 min (no Mg2+) induces the translocation of supernatant PKC immunoreactivity to the pellet. PMA-induced down-regulation of PKC decreases glutamate-elicited neurotoxicity. Yet, the culture exposure to 100 nM PMA fails to decrease the high-affinity binding of [3H]glutamate to neuronal membranes and does not reduce glutamate-induced activation of ionotropic or metabolotropic receptors (assayed as total membrane current measured in whole-cell voltage-clamped neurons, 45Ca2+ uptake in intact monolayers, inositolphospholipid hydrolysis, and transcriptional activation and translation of c-fos mRNA). On the other hand, PMA-induced PKC down-regulation reduces any increase in 45Ca2+ uptake or Ca2+-dependent proteolysis after glutamate withdrawal. These results support the view that PKC translocation is operative in glutamate-induced destabilization of cytosolic ionized Ca2+ homeostasis and neuronal death

  2. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Ar [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Sil [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Ho [Department of Pathology, Pochon CHA University, College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jung, E-mail: khj57@yuhs.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Do, E-mail: ydy1130@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  3. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H2O2 treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells

  4. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2α and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  5. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  6. The mechanism of pneumolysin-induced cochlear hair cell death in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurg, Maryline; Hafidi, Aziz; Skinner, Liam; Cowan, Graeme; Hondarrague, Yannick; Mitchell, Tim J; Dulon, Didier

    2005-10-01

    Streptoccocus pneumoniae infection can result in local and systemic diseases such as otitis media, pneumonia and meningitis. Sensorineural hearing loss associated with this infection is mediated by the release of an exotoxin, pneumolysin. The goal of the present study was to characterize the mechanisms of pneumolysin toxicity in cochlear hair cells in vitro. Pneumolysin induced severe damage in cochlear hair cells, ranging from stereocilia disorganization to total cell loss. Surprisingly, pneumolysin-induced cell death preferentially targeted inner hair cells. Pneumolysin triggered in vitro cell death by an influx of calcium. Extracellular calcium appeared to enter the cell through a pore formed by the toxin. Buffering intracellular calcium with BAPTA improved hair cell survival. The mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involved in pneumolysin-induced cell death was demonstrated by the use of bongkrekic acid. Binding of pneumolysin to the hair cell plasma membrane was required to induce cell death. Increasing external calcium reduced cell toxicity by preventing the binding of pneumolysin to hair cell membranes. These results showed the significant role of calcium both in triggering pneumolysin-induced hair cell apoptosis and in preventing the toxin from binding to its cellular target. PMID:16051626

  7. Death from seizures induced by chronic alcohol abuse--does it exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, S

    2007-01-01

    In a forensic setting, deaths due to seizures, either epileptic or other, present a well-known problem. Cause of death is rarely established on the basis of physical evidence, but on circumstantial evidence such as tongue biting or discharge of urine or faeces. Seizures have several different...... may die from these seizures. A literature study was performed of deaths due to alcohol-induced seizures, either during withdrawal or as late-onset seizures where the aetiology was established as long time alcohol abuse and a necropsy had shown no other possible cause of death than a seizure. RESULTS......: It was not possible to find any well-documented cases. It is, however, difficult to compare cases in the literature, as there is no generally accepted classification or nomenclature of seizures related to alcohol abuse....

  8. Methadone-Induced Toxic Brain Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme Corré; Jérôme Pillot; Gilles Hilbert

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with comatose after methadone intoxication. Cerebral tomography only showed cortico-subcortical hypodense signal in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Brain MRI showed a rare imaging of FLAIR and DWI hyperintensities in the two cerebellar hemispheres as well as basal ganglia (globi pallidi), compatible with methadone overdose. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of both cerebellar and basal ganglia involvement in methadone overdose.

  9. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Ma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s. In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death.

  10. (-)-Oleocanthal rapidly and selectively induces cancer cell death via lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGendre, Onica; Breslin, Paul AS; Foster, David A

    2015-01-01

    (-)-Oleocanthal (OC), a phenolic compound present in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), has been implicated in the health benefits associated with diets rich in EVOO. We investigated the effect of OC on human cancer cell lines in culture and found that OC induced cell death in all cancer cells examined as rapidly as 30 minutes after treatment in the absence of serum. OC treatment of non-transformed cells suppressed their proliferation but did not cause cell death. OC induced both primary necrotic and apoptotic cell death via induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). We provide evidence that OC promotes LMP by inhibiting acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity, which destabilizes the interaction between proteins required for lysosomal membrane stability. The data presented here indicate that cancer cells, which tend to have fragile lysosomal membranes compared to non-cancerous cells, are susceptible to cell death induced by lysosomotropic agents. Therefore, targeting lysosomal membrane stability represents a novel approach for the induction of cancer-specific cell death. PMID:26380379

  11. p53 dependent apoptotic cell death induces embryonic malformation in Carassius auratus under chronic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Banerjee Sawant

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a global phenomenon affecting recruitment as well as the embryonic development of aquatic fauna. The present study depicts hypoxia induced disruption of the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death (PCD, leading to embryonic malformation in the goldfish, Carrasius auratus. Constant hypoxia induced the early expression of pro-apoptotic/tumor suppressor p53 and concomitant expression of the cell death molecule, caspase-3, leading to high level of DNA damage and cell death in hypoxic embryos, as compared to normoxic ones. As a result, the former showed delayed 4 and 64 celled stages and a delay in appearance of epiboly stage. Expression of p53 efficiently switched off expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 during the initial 12 hours post fertilization (hpf and caused embryonic cell death. However, after 12 hours, simultaneous downregulation of p53 and Caspase-3 and exponential increase of Bcl-2, caused uncontrolled cell proliferation and prevented essential programmed cell death (PCD, ultimately resulting in significant (p<0.05 embryonic malformation up to 144 hpf. Evidences suggest that uncontrolled cell proliferation after 12 hpf may have been due to downregulation of p53 abundance, which in turn has an influence on upregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Therefore, we have been able to show for the first time and propose that hypoxia induced downregulation of p53 beyond 12 hpf, disrupts PCD and leads to failure in normal differentiation, causing malformation in gold fish embryos.

  12. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Gambhir, Deeksha; Becker, Silke; Kunz, Eric; Liu, Angelina Jingtong; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3) signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV). In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i) significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF) was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11) and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2) in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3 inhibition

  13. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-05-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN. PMID:25946018

  14. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Barquero-Calvo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs, enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  15. An international comparison of the effect of policy shifts to organ donation following cardiocirculatory death (DCD on donation rates after brain death (DBD and transplantation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric Bendorf

    Full Text Available During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000-2010. On average, overall DD, DBD and DCD rates have increased over time, with the proportion of DCD increasing 0.3% per year (p = 0.01. Countries with higher DCD rates have, on average, lower DBD rates. For every one-per million population (pmp increase in the DCD rate, the average DBD rate decreased by 1.02 pmp (95% CI: 0.73, 1.32; p<0.0001. We also found that the number of organs transplanted per donor was significantly lower in DCD when compared to DBD donors with 1.51 less transplants per DCD compared to DBD (95% CI: 1.23, 1.79; p<0.001. Whilst the results do not infer a causal relationship between increased DCD and decreased DBD rates, the significant correlation between higher DCD and lower DBD rates coupled with the reduced number of organs transplanted per DCD donor suggests that a national policy focus on DCD may lead to an overall reduction in the number of transplants performed.

  16. Liver transplant outcomes using ideal donation after circulatory death livers are superior to using older donation after brain death donor livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalea, Joseph R; Redfield, Robert R; Foley, David P

    2016-09-01

    Multiple reports have demonstrated that liver transplantation following donation after circulatory death (DCD) is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with liver transplantation from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. We hypothesized that carefully selected, underutilized DCD livers recovered from younger donors have excellent outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of the United Network for Organ Sharing database to determine graft survivals for patients who received liver transplants from DBD donors of age ≥ 60 years, DBD donors liver transplants were performed in the United States. Of these, 41,181 (78.8%) underwent transplantation with livers from DBD donors of age livers from DCD donors livers of age livers ≥ age 60 years (P livers; of these, 111 (83.4%) were from donors livers (age livers > 60 years old. Careful donor organ and recipient selection can lead to excellent results, despite previous reports suggesting otherwise. Increased acceptance of these DCD livers would lead to shorter wait list times and increased national liver transplant rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1197-1204 2016 AASLD. PMID:27314220

  17. Preprogrammed and programmed cell death mechanisms of apoptosis: UV-induced immediate and delayed apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equitoxic doses (10% clonogenic survival) of UV radiation (UVR) from the three waveband regions, i.e. UVA1 (340-400 nm), UVB (290-320 nm) and UVC (200-290 nm), were shown to induce immediate or delayed apoptosis in L5178Y-R murine lymphoma cells. Membrane and DNA damage were shown to be the most probable initiators of UVA1-induced immediate or UVR-induced delayed apoptosis, respectively. These UV-induced apoptotic processes appeared to utilize two different ''core'' biochemical mechanisms; however, one core mechanism could be initiated at two distinct sites (e.g. membrane or DNA) and result in disparate kinetics. In an attempt to resolve this mechanistic issue, the dependence on macromolecular synthesis of each UV-induced apoptotic mechanism was investigated. In the absence of UVR, inhibition of either transcription (actinomycin D) or translation (cycloheximide) induced apoptosis in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that an apoptotic mechanism exists that does not require macromolecular synthesis postinsult (constitutive). The UVR data demonstrate that UVA-1 induced immediate apoptosis utilizes this constitutive mechanism (preprogrammed), while UVR-induced delayed apoptosis utilizes the well-known inducible mechanism (programmed). Therefore, there are two different core biochemical mechanisms of apoptotic death available to each cell: preprogrammed (constitutive) and programmed (inducible) cell death. (Author)

  18. Radiation-induced apoptosis in undifferentiated cells of the developing brain as a biological defense mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undifferentiated neural (UN) cells of the developing mammalian brain are highly sensitive to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation, transglutaminase activation, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage reveal radiation-induced cell death in the ventricular zone of the cerebral mantle and external granular layer of the cerebellum to be due to apoptosis. A statistically significant increase of cell mortality can be induced by 0.03 Gy X-irradiation, and the mortality increases linearly with increasing doses. It is not changed by split doses, probably because of the very slow repair of cellular damage and a lack of adaptive response. Although extensive apoptosis in the UN cell population results in microcephaly and mental retardation, it possesses the ability to recover from a considerable cell loss and to form the normal structure of the central nervous system. The number of cell deaths needed to induce tissue adnormalities in the adult murine brain rises in the range of 15-25% of the germinal cell population; with the threshold doses at about 0.3 Gy for cerebral anomalies and 1 Gy for cerebellar abnormalities. Threshold level is similarly suggested in prenatally exposed A-bomb survivors. High radiosensitivity of UN cells is assumed to be a manifestation of the ability of the cell to commit suicide when injured. Repeated replication of DNA and extensive gene expression are required in future proliferation and differentiation. Once an abnormality in DNA was induced and fixed in the UN cell, it would be greatly amplified and prove a danger in producing malformations and tumors. These cells would thus commit suicide for the benefit of the individual to eliminate their acquired genetic abnormalities rather than make DNA repair. UN cells in the developing brain are highly radiosensitive and readily involved in apoptosis. Paradoxically, however, this may be to protect individuals against teratogenesis and tumorigenesis. (J.P.N.)

  19. Radiation-induced apoptosis in undifferentiated cells of the developing brain as a biological defense mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Minioru [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine; Tamaru, Masao

    1994-12-31

    Undifferentiated neural (UN) cells of the developing mammalian brain are highly sensitive to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation, transglutaminase activation, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage reveal radiation-induced cell death in the ventricular zone of the cerebral mantle and external granular layer of the cerebellum to be due to apoptosis. A statistically significant increase of cell mortality can be induced by 0.03 Gy X-irradiation, and the mortality increases linearly with increasing doses. It is not changed by split doses, probably because of the very slow repair of cellular damage and a lack of adaptive response. Although extensive apoptosis in the UN cell population results in microcephaly and mental retardation, it possesses the ability to recover from a considerable cell loss and to form the normal structure of the central nervous system. The number of cell deaths needed to induce tissue adnormalities in the adult murine brain rises in the range of 15-25% of the germinal cell population; with the threshold doses at about 0.3 Gy for cerebral anomalies and 1 Gy for cerebellar abnormalities. Threshold level is similarly suggested in prenatally exposed A-bomb survivors. High radiosensitivity of UN cells is assumed to be a manifestation of the ability of the cell to commit suicide when injured. Repeated replication of DNA and extensive gene expression are required in future proliferation and differentiation. Once an abnormality in DNA was induced and fixed in the UN cell, it would be greatly amplified and prove a danger in producing malformations and tumors. These cells would thus commit suicide for the benefit of the individual to eliminate their acquired genetic abnormalities rather than make DNA repair. UN cells in the developing brain are highly radiosensitive and readily involved in apoptosis. Paradoxically, however, this may be to protect individuals against teratogenesis and tumorigenesis. (J.P.N.).

  20. Telithromycin and Quinupristin-Dalfopristin Induce Delayed Death in Plasmodium falciparum▿

    OpenAIRE

    Barthel, Diana; Schlitzer, Martin; Pradel, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    Antibacterial agents are used in malaria therapy due to their effect on two prokaryote organelles, the mitochondrion and the apicoplast. We demonstrate here that the ribosome-blocking antibiotics telithromycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin, but not linezolid, inhibit the growth of Plasmodium falciparum. Both drugs induce delayed death in the parasite, suggesting that their effect involves the impairment of apicoplast translation processes.

  1. CRFR1 activation protects against cytokine-induced beta cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Lykke; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Matsumoto, Masahito; van der Meulen, Talitha; Huising, Mark O; Billestrup, Nils; Vale, Wylie

    2014-01-01

    During diabetes development beta cells are exposed to elevated concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β which in vitro, induce beta cell death. The class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): Corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) and CRFR2 are expressed in pancreat...

  2. Cell death in amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis induced by parthenolide

    OpenAIRE

    Tiuman, Tatiana Shioji; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Alonso, Antonio; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2014-01-01

    Background Leishmania amazonensis infection results in diverse clinical manifestations: cutaneous, mucocutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis. The arsenal of drugs available for treating Leishmania infections is limited. Therefore, new, effective, and less toxic leishmaniasis treatments are still needed. We verified cell death in amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis induced by the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide. Results The tested compound was able to concentration-dependently affect a...

  3. Stress-induced cell death is mediated by ceramide synthesis in Neurospora crassa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesofsky, Nora S; Levery, Steven B; Castle, Sherry A; Brambl, Robert

    2008-01-01

    )-phytoceramide is not made by germinating asexual spores subjected to the same heat and carbon stress. Since these spores, unlike growing cells, do not die from the stresses, this suggests a possible connection between synthesis of the dual-stress-induced ceramide and cell death. This connection is supported by the...

  4. Prevention of acute/severe hypoglycemia-induced neuron death by lactate administration

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Seok Joon; Jang, Bong Geom; Yoo, Byung Hoon; Sohn, Min; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglycemia-induced cerebral neuropathy can occur in patients with diabetes who attempt tight control of blood glucose and may lead to cognitive dysfunction. Accumulating evidence from animal models suggests that hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death is not a simple result of glucose deprivation, but is instead the end result of a multifactorial process. In particular, the excessive activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) consumes cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+...

  5. Salt stress-induced cell death in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata

    OpenAIRE

    Affenzeller, Matthias Josef; Darehshouri, Anza; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; LÜTZ-MEINDL, URSULA

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a key element in normal plant growth and development which may also be induced by various abiotic and biotic stress factors including salt stress. In the present study, morphological, biochemical, and physiological responses of the theoretically immortal unicellular freshwater green alga Micrasterias denticulata were examined after salt (200 mM NaCl or 200 mM KCl) and osmotic stress induced by iso-osmotic sorbitol. KCl caused morphological changes such as cytopl...

  6. Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV induces PC12 apoptotic cell death via JNK activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shepelev, Mikhail V; Chernoff, Jonathan; Korobko, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including apoptosis. Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase which functions are poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of Chp in regulation of cell viability using PC12 cells with inducible expression of Chp as a model. We found that expression of Chp results in apoptosis in PC12 cells. Chp-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of JNK signaling and both death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as justified by...

  7. Stress-Induced Cell Death Is Mediated by Ceramide Synthesis in Neurospora crassa▿

    OpenAIRE

    Plesofsky, Nora S.; Levery, Steven B.; Castle, Sherry A.; Brambl, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The combined stresses of moderate heat shock (45°C) and analog-induced glucose deprivation constitute a lethal stress for Neurospora crassa. We found that this cell death requires fatty acid synthesis and the cofactor biotin. In the absence of the cofactor, the stressed cells are particularly sensitive to exogenous ceramide, which is lethal at low concentrations. When we extracted endogenous sphingolipids, we found that unique ceramides were induced (i) by the inhibitory glucose analog 2-deox...

  8. Differential effect of baicalein on ionizing radiation induced cell death in normal lymphocytes and lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one), a naturally occurring flavone, present in Indian and Chinese medicinal plants has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. Previous reports from our laboratory have elucidated the radical scavenging and radioprotective potential of this compound in cell free system. To investigate potential of baicalein as a radioprotector, we have studied its effect on normal lymphocytes and lymphoma cells (EL-4 cells) in presence of radiation. Baicalein protected murine splenic lymphocytes against radiation (4Gy) induced apoptosis as assessed by propidium iodide staining. It inhibited background cell death in lymphocytes whereas, baicalein induced concentration dependent cell death in EL-4 cells and did not protect against radiation induced apoptosis. Interestingly, baicalein scavenged radiation derived ROS (reactive oxygen species) in both the cell types suggesting that, it is not exhibiting differential antioxidant action. Despite scavenging radiation derived ROS, which are principal mediators of radiation induced cell death, baicalein induced cell death in EL-4 cells. To investigate the reason for this differential behavior, we investigated the effect of baicalein on pro-survival molecules viz. ERK and NF-kB. Baicalein induced phosphorylation of ERK in normal lymphocytes in a time dependent manner, but, it did not alter pERK levels in EL-4 cells. Baicalein treatment per se induced degradation of IkBα and increased nuclear accumulation of NF-kB in normal lymphocytes. Whereas, baicalein pre-treatment reduced basal NF-kB levels in EL-4 cells and it also suppressed TNF-α induced nuclear accumulation of NF-kB. This study suggests that, differential regulation of pro-survival transcription factor NF-kB may be playing a role in differential effect of baicalein in normal lymphocytes and lymphoma cells. (author)

  9. Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, Glen E; Moore, Holly; Spencer, Peter S

    2013-12-01

    Cycads are long-lived tropical and subtropical plants that contain azoxyglycosides (e.g., cycasin, macrozamin) and neurotoxic amino acids (notably β-N-methylamino-l-alanine l-BMAA), toxins that have been implicated in the etiology of a disappearing neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex that has been present in high incidence among three genetically distinct populations in the western Pacific. The neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex includes features suggestive of brain maldevelopment, an experimentally proven property of cycasin attributable to the genotoxic action of its aglycone methylazoxymethanol (MAM). This property of MAM has been exploited by neurobiologists as a tool to study perturbations of brain development. Depending on the neurodevelopmental stage, MAM can induce features in laboratory animals that model certain characteristics of epilepsy, schizophrenia, or ataxia. Studies in DNA repair-deficient mice show that MAM perturbs brain development through a DNA damage-mediated mechanism. The brain DNA lesions produced by systemic MAM appear to modulate the expression of genes that regulate neurodevelopment and contribute to neurodegeneration. Epigenetic changes (histone lysine methylation) have also been detected in the underdeveloped brain after MAM administration. The DNA damage and epigenetic changes produced by MAM and, perhaps by chemically related substances (e.g., nitrosamines, nitrosoureas, hydrazines), might be an important mechanism by which early-life exposure to genotoxicants can induce long-term brain dysfunction. PMID:24339036

  10. Vitamin-C protect ethanol induced apoptotic neuro degeneration in postnatal rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate ethanol effects to induced activation of caspsae-3, and to observe the protective effects of Vitamin C (vit-C) on ethanol-induced apoptotic neuro degeneration in rat cortical area of brain. Methodology: Administration of a single dose of ethanol in 7-d postnatal (P7) rats triggers activation of caspase-3 and widespread apoptotic neuronal death. Western blot analysis, cells counting and Nissl staining were used to elucidate possible protective effect of vit-C against ethanol-induced apoptotic neuro degeneration in brain. Results: The results showed that ethanol significantly increased caspase-3 expression and neuronal apoptosis. Furthermore, the co-treatment of vit-C along with ethanol showed significantly decreased expression of caspase-3 as compare to control group. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that vit-C can prevent some of the deleterious effect of ethanol on developing rat brain when given after ethanol exposure and can be used as an effective protective agent for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). (author)

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  12. MRI-induced heating of deep brain stimulation leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiofrequency (RF) field used in magnetic resonance imaging is scattered by medical implants. The scattered field of a deep brain stimulation lead can be very intense near the electrodes stimulating the brain. The effect is more pronounced if the lead behaves as a resonant antenna. In this paper, we examine the resonant length effect. We also use the finite element method to compute the near field for (i) the lead immersed in inhomogeneous tissue (fat, muscle, and brain tissues) and (ii) the lead connected to an implantable pulse generator. Electric field, specific absorption rate and induced temperature rise distributions have been obtained in the brain tissue surrounding the electrodes. The worst-case scenario has been evaluated by neglecting the effect of blood perfusion. The computed values are in good agreement with in vitro measurements made in the laboratory.

  13. Melatonin alleviates hyperthyroidism induced oxidative stress and neuronal cell death in hippocampus of aged female golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Geeta; Verma, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Arun; Haldar, Chandana; Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is a well known phenomenon under hyperthyroid condition that induces various physiological and neural problems with a higher prevalence in females. We, therefore investigated the antioxidant potential of melatonin (Mel) on hyperthyroidism-induced oxidative stress and neuronal cell death in the hippocampus region of brain (cognition and memory centre) of aged female golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus. Aged female hamsters were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n=7); group-I: control, group-II: Melatonin (5mgkg(-1)day(-1), i.p., for one week), group-III: Hyperthyroid (100μg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., for two weeks) and group-IV- Hyper+Mel. Hormonal profiles (thyroid and melatonin), activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT and GPX), lipid peroxidation level (TBARS) and the specific apoptotic markers (Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Caspase-3) expression were evaluated. A significant increase in the profile of total thyroid hormone (tT3 and tT4) in hyperthyroidic group as compared to control while tT3 significantly decreased in melatonin treated hyperthyroidic group. However, Mel level significantly decreased in hyperthyroidic group but increased in melatonin treated hyperthyroidic group. Further, the number of immune-positive cells for thyroid hormone receptor-alpha (TR-α) decreased in the hippocampus of hyperthyroidic group and increased in melatonin treated hyperthyroidic group. Profiles of antioxidant enzymes showed a significant decrease in hyperthyroidic group with a simultaneous increase in lipid peroxidation (TBARS). Melatonin treatment to hyperthyroidic group lead to decreased TBARS level with a concomitant increase in antioxidant enzyme activity. Moreover, increased expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Caspase-3, in hyperthyroidic group had elevated neuronal cell death in hippocampal area and melatonin treatment reduced its expression in hyperthyroidic group. Our findings thus indicate that melatonin reduced the hyperthyroidism-induced

  14. Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to death ligand-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermet, Julie; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Rochaix, Philippe; Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry; Schally, Andrew V; Pradayrol, Lucien; Buscail, Louis; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) gene expression is lost in 90% of human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. We previously demonstrated that stable sst2 transfection of human pancreatic BxPC-3 cells, which do not endogenously express sst2, inhibits cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis. These sst2 effects occur as a consequence of an autocrine sst2-dependent loop, whereby sst2 induces expression of its own ligand, somatostatin. Here we investigated whether sst2 induces apoptosis in sst2-transfected BxPC-3 cells. Expression of sst2 induced a 4.4- +/- 0.05-fold stimulation of apoptosis in BxPC-3 through the activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. sst2 also sensitized these cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), enhancing it 4.1- +/- 1.5-fold. Apoptosis in BxPC-3 cells mediated by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD95L was likewise increased 2.3- +/- 0.5-fold and 7.4- +/- 2.5-fold, respectively. sst2-dependent activation and cell sensitization to death ligand-induced apoptosis involved activation of the executioner caspases, key factors in both death ligand- or mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. sst2 affected both pathways: first, by up-regulating expression of TRAIL and TNFalpha receptors, DR4 and TNFRI, respectively, and sensitizing the cells to death ligand-induced initiator capase-8 activation, and, second, by down-regulating expression of the antiapoptotic mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein. These results are of interest for the clinical management of chemoresistant pancreatic adenocarcinoma by using a combined gene therapy based on the cotransfer of genes for both the sst2 and a nontoxic death ligand. PMID:12490654

  15. Garcinol potentiates TRAIL-induced apoptosis through modulation of death receptors and antiapoptotic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Ravindran, Jayaraj; Sung, Bokyung; Pandey, Manoj K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-04-01

    Whether garcinol, the active component of Garcinia indica, can modulate the sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL, a cytokine currently in phase II clinical trial, was investigated. We found that garcinol potentiated TRAIL-induced apoptosis of cancer cells as indicated by intracellular esterase activity, DNA strand breaks, accumulation of the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine, mitochondrial activity, and activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3. We found that garcinol, independent of the cell type, induced both of the TRAIL receptors, death receptor 4 (DR4) and DR5. Garcinol neither induced the receptors on normal cells nor sensitized them to TRAIL. Deletion of DR5 or DR4 by small interfering RNA significantly reduced the apoptosis induced by TRAIL and garcinol. In addition, garcinol downregulated various cell survival proteins including survivin, bcl-2, XIAP, and cFLIP, and induced bid cleavage, bax, and cytochrome c release. Induction of death receptors by garcinol was found to be independent of modulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, p53, bax, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, or c-Jun-NH(2)-kinase. The effect of garcinol was mediated through the generation of reactive oxygen species, in as much as induction of both death receptors, modulation of antiapoptotic and proapoptotic proteins, and potentiation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis were abolished by N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. Interestingly, garcinol also converted TRAIL-resistant cells into TRAIL-sensitive cells. Overall, our results indicate that garcinol can potentiate TRAIL-induced apoptosis through upregulation of death receptors and downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(4); 856-68. (c)2010 AACR. PMID:20371723

  16. Regulatory mechanism of radiation-induced cancer cell death by the change of cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Ho; Jang, Ji Yeon [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    In our previous study, we have shown the main cell death pattern induced by irradiation or protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors in K562 human myelogenous leukemic cell line. Death of the cells treated with irradiation alone was characterized by mitotic catastrophe and typical radiation-induced apoptosis was accelerated by herbimycin A (HMA). Both types of cell death were inhibited by genistein. In this study, we investigated the effects of HMA and genistein on cell cycle regulation and its correlation with the alterations of radiation-induced cell death. K562 cells in exponential growth phase were used for this study. The cells were irradiated with 10 Gy using 6 MeV Linac (200-300 cGy/min). Immediately after irradiation, cells were treated with 250 nM of HMA or 25{mu}M of genistein. The distributions of cell cycle, the expressions of cell cycle-related protein, the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase, and the yield of senescence and differentiation were analyzed. X-irradiated cells were arrested in the G2 phase of the cell cycle but unlike the p53-positive cells, they were not able to sustain the cell cycle arrest. An accumulation of cells in G2 phase of first cell-cycle post-treatment and an increase of cyclin B1 were correlated with spontaneous, premature, chromosome condensation and mitotic catastrophe. HMA induced rapid G2 checkpoint abrogation and concomitant p53-independent G1 accumulation HMA-induced cell cycle modifications correlated with the increase of cdc2 kinase activity, the decrease of the expressions of cyclins E and A and of CDK2 kinase activity, and the enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis. Genistein maintained cells that were arrested in the G2-phase, decreased the expressions of cyclin B1 and cdc25C and cdc2 kinase activity, increased the expression of p16, and sustained senescence and megakaryocytic differentiation. The effects of HMA and genistein on the radiation-induced cell death of K562 cells were closely related to the cell

  17. Neuroinflammation induces glial aromatase expression in the uninjured songbird brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saldanha Colin J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogens from peripheral sources as well as central aromatization are neuroprotective in the vertebrate brain. Under normal conditions, aromatase is only expressed in neurons, however following anoxic/ischemic or mechanical brain injury; aromatase is also found in astroglia. This increased glial aromatization and the consequent estrogen synthesis is neuroprotective and may promote neuronal survival and repair. While the effects of estradiol on neuroprotection are well studied, what induces glial aromatase expression remains unknown. Methods Adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata were given a penetrating injury to the entopallium. At several timepoints later, expression of aromatase, IL-1β-like, and IL-6-like were examined using immunohisotchemistry. A second set of zebra birds were exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA, an inflammatory agent, directly on the dorsal surface of the telencephalon without creating a penetrating injury. Expression of aromatase, IL-1β-like, and IL-6-like were examined using both quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to examine mRNA expression and immunohistochemistry to determine cellular expression. Statistical significance was determined using t-test or one-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey Kramers post hoc test. Results Following injury in the zebra finch brain, cytokine expression occurs prior to aromatase expression. This temporal pattern suggests that cytokines may induce aromatase expression in the damaged zebra finch brain. Furthermore, evoking a neuroinflammatory response characterized by an increase in cytokine expression in the uninjured brain is sufficient to induce glial aromatase expression. Conclusions These studies are among the first to examine a neuroinflammatory response in the songbird brain following mechanical brain injury and to describe a novel neuroimmune signal to initiate aromatase expression in glia.

  18. Increased anion channel activity is an unavoidable event in ozone-induced programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kadono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O(3 treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O(3-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O(3, Ca(2+ influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O(3; namely, H(2O(2 generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O(3-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation.

  19. B-Amyloid Precursor Protein Staining of the Brain in Sudden Infant and Early Childhood Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm;

    2013-01-01

    To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children.......To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children....

  20. Lived Experiences of Iranian Nurses Caring for Brain Death Organ Donor Patients: Caring as “Halo of Ambiguity and Doubt”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkaran, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Navab, Elham; Gholamzadeh, Sakineh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain death is a concept in which its criteria have been expressed as documentations in Harvard Committee of Brain Death. The various perceptions of caregiver nurses for brain death patients may have effect on the chance of converting potential donors into actual organ donors. Objective: The present study has been conducted in order to perceive the experiences of nurses in care-giving to the brain death of organ donor patients. Methods: This qualitative study was carried out by means of Heidegger’s hermeneutic phenomenology. Eight nurses who have been working in ICU were interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were recorded by a tape-recorder and the given texts were transcribed and the analyses were done by Van-Mannen methodology and (thematic) analysis. Results: One of the foremost themes extracted from this study included ‘Halo of ambiguity and doubt’ that comprised of two sub-themes of ‘having unreasonable hope’ and ‘Conservative acceptance of brain death’. The unreasonable hope included lack of trust (uncertainty) in diagnosis and verification of brain death, passing through denial wall, and avoidance from explicit and direct disclosure of brain death in patients’ family. In this investigation, the nurses were involved in a type of ambiguity and doubt in care-giving to the potentially brain death of organ donor patients, which were also evident in their interaction with patients’ family and for this reason, they did not definitely announce the brain death and so far they hoped for treatment of the given patient. Such confusion and hesitance both caused annoyance of nurses and strengthening the denial of patients’ family to be exposed to death. Conclusion: The results of this study reveal the fundamental perceived care-giving of brain death in organ donor patients and led to developing some strategies to improve care-giving and achievement in donation of the given organ and necessity for presentation of educational and

  1. p31comet-Induced Cell Death Is Mediated by Binding and Inactivation of Mad2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Shin

    Full Text Available Mad2, a key component of the spindle checkpoint, is closely associated with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis in cancer. p31comet is a Mad2-interacting protein that serves as a spindle checkpoint silencer at mitosis. In this study, we showed that p31comet-induced apoptosis and senescence occur via counteraction of Mad2 activity. Upon retroviral transduction of p31comet, the majority of human cancer cell lines tested lost the ability to form colonies in a low-density seeding assay. Cancer cells with p31comet overexpression underwent distinct apoptosis and/or senescence, irrespective of p53 status, confirming the cytotoxicity of p31comet. Interestingly, both cytotoxic and Mad2 binding activities were eliminated upon deletion of the C-terminal 30 amino acids of p31comet. Point mutation or deletion of the region affecting Mad2 binding additionally abolished cytotoxic activity. Consistently, wild-type Mad2 interacting with p31comet, but not its non-binding mutant, inhibited cell death, indicating that the mechanism of p31comet-induced cell death involves Mad2 inactivation. Our results clearly suggest that the regions of p31comet affecting interactions with Mad2, including the C-terminus, are essential for induction of cell death. The finding that p31comet-induced cell death is mediated by interactions with Mad2 that lead to its inactivation is potentially applicable in anticancer therapy.

  2. AB158. Atorvastatin induces autophagic cell death in prostate cancer cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhenhua; Wang, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although it is well known that apoptosis contributes to cancer cell death, the role of autophagy in cancer cell death has remained in dispute. Atorvastatin has been suggested to exhibit anti-cancer effects. The present study aimed to examine atorvastatin-induced autophagy-associated cell death and the autophagy-associated gene expression profile in the PC3 prostate carcinoma cell line. Methods The atorvastatin-induced process of autophagy in PC3 cells was determined via evaluation of the cellular expression levels of autophagosomal marker light-chain-3 (LC3)-II, using immunoblotting and counting of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3-transfected autophagiccells. Apoptosis was examined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay and an MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability. Total RNA of PC3 cells was isolated for characterization of the gene expression profile following atorvastatin treatment. Results Atorvastatin treatment of PC3 cells for 24 h increased the expression of GFP-LC3-II by >25% and expression continued for >72 h, while apoptosis was not significantly induced within this time period. Four genes associated with the autophagy machinery were also significantly upregulated. Conclusions In the presence of atorvastatin, autophagy may be unable to abrogate cell damage and may therefore contribute to cellular dysfunction, leading to autophagic/type II programmed cell death. In response to atorvastatin treatment, the expression of genes involved in autophagic mediating pathways may have a role in tumor suppression.

  3. Cationic polystyrene nanospheres induce autophagic cell death through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hui-Wen; Xia, Tian; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Wan; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Furthermore, NH2-PS could induce autophagic cell death. NH2-PS increased autophagic flux due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by misfolded protein aggregation. The inhibition of ER stress decreased cytotoxicity and autophagy in the NH2-PS-treated cells. In addition, the Akt/mTOR and AMPK signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of NH2-PS-triggered autophagic cell death. These results suggest an important role of autophagy in cationic NP-induced cell death and provide mechanistic insights into the inhibition of the toxicity and safe material design.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung

  4. Nonlinear fluctuation-induced rate equations for linear birth-death processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fock-space approach to the solution of master equations for the one-step Markov processes is reconsidered. It is shown that in birth-death processes with an absorbing state at the bottom of the occupation-number spectrum and occupation-number independent annihilation probability occupation-number fluctuations give rise to rate equations drastically different from the polynomial form typical of birth-death processes. The fluctuation-induced rate equations with the characteristic exponential terms are derived for Mikhailov's ecological model and Lanchester's model of modern warfare

  5. Connexin 43 Channels Protect Osteocytes against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Werner, Sherry; Jiang, Jean X.

    2013-01-01

    The increased osteocyte death by oxidative stress (OS) during aging is a major cause contributing to the impairment of bone quality and bone loss. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we showed that H2O2 induced cell death of primary osteocytes and osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells, and also caused dose-dependent decrease expression of gap junction and hemichannel-forming connexin 43 (Cx43). The decrease of Cx43 expression was also demonstrated with the treatment of oth...

  6. Glucococorticoid-Induced Death of Pancreatic Beta Cells: An Organized Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselyn Rojas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GC are renowned for their pleiotropic effects in all organ systems, their ubiquitous use in numerous clinical settings, and the abundant adverse effects they may exert, particularly in the endocrine-metabolic sphere. Although hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are well-defined GC-induced diabetogenic phenomena, an added component of direct injury to pancreatic β cells (PBC may also participate in this scenario. Indeed, the apoptotic capacity of GC is widely recognized, and PBC do not escape this situation. No unified pathway has been characterized regarding GC-induced cell death; instead, it appears to depend on the specific machinery of each cell type, determining a great heterogeneity in GC-dependent apoptotic mechanisms among different tissues. In PBC, GC can induce the expression or activation of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, BAD, p38, repress anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, deactivate pro-survival mechanisms (cAMP-PKA signaling and sensitize the cell to death induced by oxidative stress, fatty acids, hyperglycemia and cytokines. Although proliferative pathways (TGF-β, H-ras are activated simultaneously – and an increase in PBC mass may be observed initially – pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative mechanisms appear to eventually overcome their pro-survival counterparts, due to their synergic and aggregative action. Key molecules such as p38 and the cAMP-PKA system may be promising therapeutic targets in the prevention of GC-induced cell death.

  7. Critical role for BIM in T cell receptor restimulation-induced death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleisher Thomas A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon repeated or chronic antigen stimulation, activated T cells undergo a T cell receptor (TCR-triggered propriocidal cell death important for governing the intensity of immune responses. This is thought to be chiefly mediated by an extrinsic signal through the Fas-FasL pathway. However, we observed that TCR restimulation still potently induced apoptosis when this interaction was blocked, or genetically impaired in T cells derived from autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS patients, prompting us to examine Fas-independent, intrinsic signals. Results Upon TCR restimulation, we specifically noted a marked increase in the expression of BIM, a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein known to mediate lymphocyte apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. In fact, T cells from an ALPS type IV patient in which BIM expression is suppressed were more resistant to restimulation-induced death. Strikingly, knockdown of BIM expression rescued normal T cells from TCR-induced death to as great an extent as Fas disruption. Conclusion Our data implicates BIM as a critical mediator of apoptosis induced by restimulation as well as growth cytokine withdrawal. These findings suggest an important role for BIM in eliminating activated T cells even when IL-2 is abundant, working in conjunction with Fas to eliminate chronically stimulated T cells and maintain immune homeostasis. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Wendy Davidson (nominated by Dr. David Scott, Dr. Mark Williams (nominated by Dr. Neil Greenspan, and Dr. Laurence C. Eisenlohr.

  8. Ultraviolet-induced cell death is independent of DNA replication in rat kangeroo cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaji, E.N.; Menck, C.F.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias

    1995-05-01

    Rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylus) cells have an efficient repair system for photoreactivation of lethal lesions induced by 254 nm UV. However, this ability is lost with increasing time after UV, being completely ineffective after 24 h. Critical events leading to UV-induced cell death must occur within this period of time. DNA synthesis was inhibited by the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin and the loss of the capability to photorepair lethal lesions was maintained for replicating cells. Similar data were obtained in synchronized cells UV irradiated immediately before S phase. Under the same conditions, the ability to remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation in these cells remained unchanged 24 h after irradiation. These data indicate that the critical events responsible for UV-induced cell death occur in the absence of DNA replication. (author).

  9. Ultraviolet-induced cell death is independent of DNA replication in rat kangeroo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylus) cells have an efficient repair system for photoreactivation of lethal lesions induced by 254 nm UV. However, this ability is lost with increasing time after UV, being completely ineffective after 24 h. Critical events leading to UV-induced cell death must occur within this period of time. DNA synthesis was inhibited by the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin and the loss of the capability to photorepair lethal lesions was maintained for replicating cells. Similar data were obtained in synchronized cells UV irradiated immediately before S phase. Under the same conditions, the ability to remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation in these cells remained unchanged 24 h after irradiation. These data indicate that the critical events responsible for UV-induced cell death occur in the absence of DNA replication. (author)

  10. Cytochrome P450 2C epoxygenases mediate photochemical stress-induced death of photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Cao, Dingcai; Bogaard, Joseph D; White, Jerry J; Chen, Siquan; Shah, Ravi; Mu, Wenbo; Grantner, Rita; Bettis, Sam; Grassi, Michael A

    2014-03-21

    Degenerative loss of photoreceptors occurs in inherited and age-related retinal degenerative diseases. A chemical screen facilitates development of new testing routes for neuroprotection and mechanistic investigation. Herein, we conducted a mouse-derived photoreceptor (661W cell)-based high throughput screen of the Food and Drug Administration-approved Prestwick drug library to identify putative cytoprotective compounds against light-induced, synthetic visual chromophore-precipitated cell death. Different classes of hit compounds were identified, some of which target known genes or pathways pathologically associated with retinitis pigmentosa. Sulfaphenazole (SFZ), a selective inhibitor of human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 isozyme, was identified as a novel and leading cytoprotective compound. Expression of CYP2C proteins was induced by light. Gene-targeted knockdown of CYP2C55, the homologous gene of CYP2C9, demonstrated viability rescue to light-induced cell death, whereas stable expression of functional CYP2C9-GFP fusion protein further exacerbated light-induced cell death. Mechanistically, SFZ inhibited light-induced necrosis and mitochondrial stress-initiated apoptosis. Light elicited calcium influx, which was mitigated by SFZ. Light provoked the release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and production of non-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites. Administration of SFZ further stimulated the production of non-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites, suggesting a metabolic shift of arachidonic acid under inhibition of the CYP2C pathway. Together, our findings indicate that CYP2C genes play a direct causative role in photochemical stress-induced death of photoreceptors and suggest that the CYP monooxygenase system is a risk factor for retinal photodamage, especially in individuals with Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration that deposit condensation products of retinoids. PMID:24519941

  11. Connexin 43 channels protect osteocytes against oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A; Werner, Sherry; Jiang, Jean X

    2013-07-01

    The increased osteocyte death by oxidative stress (OS) during aging is a major cause contributing to the impairment of bone quality and bone loss. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that H₂O₂ induced cell death of primary osteocytes and osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells, and also caused dose-dependent decreased expression of gap junction and hemichannel-forming connexin 43 (Cx43). The decrease of Cx43 expression was also demonstrated with the treatment of other oxidants, rotenone and menadione. Antioxidant reversed the effects of oxidants on Cx43 expression and osteocyte cell death. Cx43 protein was also much lower in the osteocytes from 20-month-old as opposed to the 5-week-old or 20-week old mice. Dye transfer assay showed that H₂O₂ reduced the gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). In contrast to the effect on GJIC, there was a dose-dependent increase of hemichannel function by H₂O₂, which was correlated with the increased cell surface expression of Cx43. Cx43(E2) antibody, an antibody that specifically blocks Cx43 hemichannel activity but not gap junctions, completely blocked dye uptake induced by H₂O₂ and further exacerbated H₂O₂-induced osteocytic cell death. In addition, knockdown of Cx43 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased the susceptibility of the cells to OS-induced death. Together, our study provides a novel cell protective mechanism mediated by osteocytic Cx43 channels against OS. PMID:23456878

  12. The Effect of Early Detection of Occult Brain Metastases in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients on Survival and Cause of Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate disease-free survival, survival from the detection of brain metastases, overall survival, and cause of death in patients with occult brain metastases (Group I) vs. patients with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II). Methods and Materials: In 80 HER2-positive breast cancer patients, treated with trastuzumab and cytostatic agents for metastatic disease, magnetic resonance imaging screening of the brain was performed, and in 29 patients (36%) occult brain metastasis was detected (Group I). Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered to Group I. This first group was compared with 52 patients who had symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) and was treated the same way, at the same clinic, during the same time period. Results: Median disease-free survival was 17 months in Group I and 19.9 months in Group II (p = 0.58). The median time interval between the dissemination of the disease and the detection of occult or symptomatic brain metastases was 9 and 15 months, respectively (p = 0.11). When the brain metastases were detected, the median survival was 9 and 8.78 months, respectively (p = 0.80). The median overall survival was 53 and 51 months, respectively (p = 0.94). In the group with occult brain metastases (Group I) 16% of patients died because of progression within the brain. In the group with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) the rate of cerebral death was 48% (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Whole-brain radiotherapy of occult brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with visceral dissemination produces a three-fold decrease in cerebral deaths but does not prolong survival.

  13. A Comparative Study of Organ Donation after Brain Death in Japan and Australia

    OpenAIRE

    TERAO, Kaori; FUJIWARA, Yoshirou

    2013-01-01

    Objective : (1) To compare the status of organ donation from brain-dead donors in Japan and Australia. (2) To identify the possible reasons for the low rates of organ donation from brain-dead donors. Background : The shortage of available organs for transplantation has prompted many countries to develop a system for the use of organs from brain-dead donors, including Japan and Australia. Yet, there is a wide range of organ donation rates and policies between Japan and Australia in the current...

  14. Low brain histamine content affects ethanol-induced motor impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintunen, Minnamaija; Raatesalmi, Kristiina; Sallmen, Tina; Anichtchik, Oleg; Karlstedt, Kaj; Kaslin, Jan; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R; Panula, Pertti

    2002-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on motor performance in humans is well established but how neural mechanisms are affected by ethanol action remains largely unknown. To investigate whether the brain histaminergic system is important in it, we used a genetic model consisting of rat lines selectively outbred for differential ethanol sensitivity. Ethanol-sensitive rats had lower levels of brain histamine and lower densities of histamine-immunoreactive fibers than ethanol-insensitive rats, although both rat lines showed no changes in histamine synthesizing neurons. Lowering the high brain histamine content of the ethanol-insensitive rats with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine before ethanol administration increased their ethanol sensitivity in a behavioral motor function test. Higher H3 receptor ligand binding and histamine-induced G-protein activation was detected in several brain regions of ethanol-naive ethanol-sensitive rats. Brain histamine levels and possibly signaling via H3 receptors may thus correlate with genetic differences in ethanol-induced motor impairment. PMID:11848689

  15. Acupuncture inhibits cue-induced heroin craving and brain activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinghui Cai; Xiaoge Song; Chuanfu Li; Chunsheng Xu; Xiliang Li; Qi Lu

    2012-01-01

    Previous research using functional MRI has shown that specific brain regions associated with drug dependence and cue-elicited heroin craving are activated by environmental cues.Craving is an important trigger of heroin relapse,and acupuncture may inhibit craving.In this study,we performed functional MRI in heroin addicts and control subjects.We compared differences in brain activation between the two groups during heroin cue exposure,heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point(ST36)without twirling of the needle,and heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point with twirling of the needle.Heroin cue exposure elicited significant activation in craving-related brain regions mainly in the frontal lobes and callosal gyri.Acupuncture without twirling did not significantly affect the range of brain activation induced by heroin cue exposure,but significantly changed the extent of the activation in the heroin addicts group.Acupuncture at the Zusanli.point with twirling of the needle significantly decreased both the range and extent of activation induced by heroin cue exposure compared with heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture without twirling of the needle.These experimental findings indicate that presentation of heroin cues can induce activation in craving-related brain regions,which are involved in reward,learning and memory,cognition and emotion.Acupuncture at the Zusanli point can rapidly suppress the activation of specific brain regions related to craving,supporting its potential as an intervention for drug craving.

  16. In vitro and in vivo study of endothelial cells radio-induced death modulation by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protecting the vasculature from radiation-induced death is a major concern in tissue radioprotection. Developing a model of endothelial cells radiosensitivity, we proved that HMEC-1 undergo 2 waves of death after exposure to 15 Gy: an early pre mitotic apoptosis dependent of ceramide generation and a delayed DNA damage-induced mitotic death. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P), a ceramide antagonist, protects HMEC-1 only from early apoptosis, but not from mitotic death. We confirmed in vivo the S1P radioprotection from ceramide-mediated radio-induced apoptosis, and that S1P radioprotection is partially mediated by S1Ps receptors. Segregation between these 2 types of death may give the opportunity to define a new class of radioprotectors for normal tissue where quiescent endothelium represent the most sensitive target, while excluding malignant tumor containing pro-proliferating angiogenic endothelial cells, sensitive to mitotic death. (author)

  17. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  18. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of hyperthermia-induced brain pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the incidence of heat stroke and associated brain pathology are increasing Worldwide. More than half of the world's population are living in areas associated with high environmental heat especially during the summer seasons. Thus, new research is needed using novel drug targets to achieve neuroprotection in heat-induced brain pathology. Previous research from our laboratory showed that the pathophysiology of brain injuries following heat stroke are exacerbated by chronic intoxication of engineered nanoparticles of small sizes (50-60 nm) following identical heat exposure in rats. Interestingly, in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals the known neuroprotective agents in standard doses failed to induce effective neuroprotection. This suggests that the dose-response of the drugs either requires modification or new therapeutic agents are needed to provide better neuroprotection in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals after heat stroke. This review is focused on the use of cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments, in relation to other neuroprotective agents normally used to treat ischemic stroke in clinics in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke. It appears that cerebrolysin exerts the most superior neuroprotective effects in heat stress as compared to other neuroprotective agents on brain pathology in normal rats. Interestingly, to induce effective neuroprotection in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology a double dose of cerebrolysin is needed. On the other hand, double doses of the other drugs were quite ineffective in reducing brain damage. These observations suggest that the drug type and doses are important factors in attenuating nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology in heat stroke. The functional significance and possible mechanisms of drug-induced neuroprotection in nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats are discussed. PMID:22229316

  19. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  20. Anti-ganglioside antibody-induced tumor cell death by loss of membrane integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Navarro, Lourdes; Chakrabandhu, Krittalak; de León, Joel; Rodríguez, Sandra; Toledo, Carlos; Carr, Adriana; de Acosta, Cristina Mateo; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Pérez, Rolando

    2008-07-01

    Gangliosides have been involved in multiple cellular processes such as growth, differentiation and adhesion, and more recently as regulators of cell death signaling pathways. Some of these molecules can be considered as tumor-associated antigens, in particular, N-glycolyl sialic acid-containing gangliosides, which are promising candidates for cancer-targeted therapy because of their low expression in normal human tissues. In this study, we provided the molecular and cellular characterization of a novel cell death mechanism induced by the anti-NGcGM3 14F7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in L1210 murine tumor cell line but not in mouse normal cells (B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes) that expressed the antigen. Impairment of ganglioside synthesis in tumor cells abrogated the 14F7 mAb cytotoxic effect; however, exogenous reincorporation of the ganglioside did not restore tumor cell sensitivity to 14F7 mAb-induced cytotoxicity. 14F7 F(ab')(2) but not Fab fragments retained the cytotoxic capacity of the whole mAb. By contrary, other mAb, which recognizes N-glycolylated gangliosides, did not show any cytotoxic effect. These mAbs showed quite different capacities to bind NGcGM3-positive cell lines measured by binding inhibition experiments. Interestingly, this complement-independent cell death mechanism did not resemble apoptosis, because no DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, or Fas mediation were observed. However, NGcGM3 ganglioside-mediated 14F7 mAb-induced cell death was accompanied by cellular swelling, membrane lesion formation, and cytoskeleton activation, suggesting an oncosis-like phenomenon. This novel mechanism of cell death lets us to support further therapeutic approaches using NGcGM3 as a molecular target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18645013

  1. Molecular targets in radiation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key feature of radiation injury to the central nervous system. Studies suggest that endothelial cell apoptosis, gene expression changes, and alteration of the microenvironment are important in initiation and progression of injury. Although substantial effort has been directed at understanding the impact of radiation on endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes, growing evidence suggests that other cell types, including astrocytes, are important in responses that include induced gene expression and microenvironmental changes. Endothelial apoptosis is important in early BBB disruption. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in the later period that precedes tissue damage might lead to astrocytic responses that impact cell survival and cell interactions. Cell death, gene expression changes, and a toxic microenvironment can be viewed as interacting elements in a model of radiation-induced disruption of the BBB. These processes implicate particular genes and proteins as targets in potential strategies for neuroprotection

  2. MnSOD upregulation induces autophagic programmed cell death in senescent keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeric Deruy

    Full Text Available Senescence is a state of growth arrest resulting mainly from telomere attrition and oxidative stress. It ultimately leads to cell death. We have previously shown that, in keratinocytes, senescence is induced by NF-kappaB activation, MnSOD upregulation and H(2O(2 overproduction. We have also shown that senescent keratinocytes do not die by apoptosis but as a result of high macroautophagic activity that targets the primary vital cell components. Here, we investigated the mechanisms that activate this autophagic cell death program. We show that corpses occurring at the senescence plateau display oxidatively-damaged mitochondria and nucleus that colocalize with autophagic vacuoles. The occurrence of such corpses was decreased by specifically reducing the H(2O(2 level with catalase, and, conversely, reproduced by overexpressing MnSOD or applying subtoxic doses of H(2O(2. This H(2O(2-induced cell death did occur through autophagy since it was accompanied by an accumulation of autophagic vesicles as evidenced by Lysotracker staining, LC3 vesiculation and transmission electron microscopy. Most importantly, it was partly abolished by 3-methyladenine, the specific inhibitor of autophagosome formation, and by anti-Atg5 siRNAs. Taken together these results suggest that autophagic cell death is activated in senescent keratinocytes because of the upregulation of MnSOD and the resulting accumulation of oxidative damages to nucleus and mitochondria.

  3. Bimodal cell death induced by high radiation doses in the radioresistant sf9 insect cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study was conducted to investigate the mode(s) of cell death induced by high radiation doses in the highly radioresistant Sf9 insect ovarian cell line. Methods: Cells were exposed to γ-radiation doses 200Gy and 500Gy, harvested at various time intervals (6h-72h) following irradiation, and subjected to cell morphology assay, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay) and Annexin-V labeling for the detection of membrane phosphatidylserine externalization. Cell morphology was assessed in cells entrapped and fixed in agarose gel directly from the cell suspension, thus preventing the possible loss of fragments/ apoptotic bodies. Surviving fraction of Sf9 cells was 0.01 at 200Gy and 98%) undergoing extensive DNA fragmentation at 500Gy, whereas the frequency of cells with DNA fragmentation was considerably less (∼12%) at 200Gy. Conclusions: While the mode of cell death at 200Gy seems to be different from typical apoptosis, a dose of 500Gy induced bimodal cell death, with typical apoptotic as well as the atypical cell death observed at 200Gy

  4. PARP-1-modulated AIF translocation is involved in streptomycin-induced cochlear hair cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongdong; Fan, Zhaomin; Bai, Xiaohui; Liu, Wenwen; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Wang, Mingming; Li, Jianfeng; Zheng, Qingyin; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion SM-induced dose- and location-dependent cochlear hair cell death in vitro. AIF might be translocated from mitochondria to nucleus and cytoplasm within SM-treated hair cells. The translocation of AIF might be modulated by PARP-1. Objective Streptomycin (SM), one of the widely used aminoglycoside nowadays, is still causing significant permanent sensorineural hearing loss owing to sensory hair cell death. This study was designed to investigate the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), an important mitochondrial cell death regulator, in SM ototoxicity within neonatal rat cochleae and HEI-OC1 cells. Methods The viability of HEI-OC1 cells was quantified by MTT assay. AIF, PARP-1, and myosin VIIa distributions were achieved by immunofluorescence. mRNA and protein expression of AIF and PARP-1 were examined by q-PCR and Western-blot. Results The hair cell loss was concomitant with the SM concentration variation, and aggravated from apical to basal turn. AIF was detected in nuclear region and AIF mRNA was up-regulated after SM incubation. Besides, AIF protein expression in mitochondria was decreased, whereas in cytosol it was increased. PARP-1 mRNA and protein were also up-regulated. 3-AB could attenuate the cell death and reverse the changes of AIF distribution by blocking PARP-1. PMID:26963167

  5. Leishmania donovani: intracellular ATP level regulates apoptosis-like death in luteolin induced dyskinetoplastid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Nilkantha; Das, Benu Brata; Ganguly, Agneyo; Banerjee, Bijoylaxhmi; Sen, Tanusree; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2006-11-01

    Leishmaniasis presents a spectrum of diseases ranging from benign cutaneous lesions to the often-fatal visceralizing form. Luteolin, a dietary flavone induces apoptosis-like death in both promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania, the causative agent of the diseases. Here, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of luteolin by analyzing the mitochondrial and cytosolic changes associated with apoptosis-like death of leishmanial cells. In Leishmania donovani, treatment with luteolin induces the loss of both maxicircles and minicircles which resulted in the formation of dyskinetoplastid cells. The loss of mitochondrial DNA causes reduction in the activities of complex I, II, III, and IV of electron transport chain. However, the mitochondrial ATPase activity of complex V remains almost unaltered during treatment with luteolin but the sensitivity to oligomycin is lost. The inactivation of ETC complex is associated with decrease in mitochondrial as well as glycolytic ATP production, which is responsible for depolarization of Deltapsi(m) and alteration in mitochondrial structure. This event is followed by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in mt-DNA depleted leishmanial cells and causes an activation of caspase like proteases. Collectively our results provide the first insight into the mechanistic pathway of apoptosis-like death where inhibition of glycolytic ATP production is an essential event responsible for depolarization of Deltapsi(m) in mt-DNA depleted cells to propagate apoptosis-like death in leishmanial cells. PMID:16707127

  6. Changing Patterns of Organ Donation: Brain Dead Donors Are Not Being Lost by Donation After Circulatory Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Helen M; Glazier, Alexandra K; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-02-01

    The clinical characteristics of all New England Organ Bank (NEOB) donors after circulatory death (DCD) donors were analyzed between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2014. During that 5-year period, there were 494 authorized medically suitable potential DCDs that the NEOB evaluated, constituting more than 30% of deceased donors coordinated annually by the NEOB. From the cohort of 494 authorized potential DCDs, 331 (67%) became actual DCD, 82 (17%) were attempted as a DCD but did not progress to donation, and 81 (16%) transitioned to an actual donor after brain death (DBD). Two hundred seventy-six organs were transplanted from the 81 donors that transitioned from DCD to actual DBD, including 24 heart, 70 liver, 12 single and 14 bilateral lung, and 12 pancreas transplants. When patients with devastating brain injury admitted to the intensive care units are registered donors, the Organ Procurement Organization staff should share the patient's donation decision with the health care team and the patient's family, as early as possible after the comfort measures only discussion has been initiated. The experience of the NEOB becomes an important reference of the successful implementation of DCD that enables an expansion of deceased donation (inclusive of DBD). PMID:26516669

  7. EAAC1 Gene Deletion Increases Neuronal Death and Blood Brain Barrier Disruption after Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available EAAC1 is important in modulating brain ischemic tolerance. Mice lacking EAAC1 exhibit increased susceptibility to neuronal oxidative stress in mice after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1 was first described as a glutamate transporter but later recognized to also function as a cysteine transporter in neurons. EAAC1-mediated transport of cysteine into neurons contributes to neuronal antioxidant function by providing cysteine substrates for glutathione synthesis. Here we evaluated the effects of EAAC1 gene deletion on hippocampal blood vessel disorganization after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1−/− female mice subjected to transient cerebral ischemia by common carotid artery occlusion for 30 min exhibited twice as much hippocampal neuronal death compared to wild-type female mice as well as increased reduction of neuronal glutathione, blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, a membrane-permeant cysteine prodrug, increased basal glutathione levels in the EAAC1−/− female mice and reduced ischemic neuronal death, BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. These findings suggest that cysteine uptake by EAAC1 is important for neuronal antioxidant function under ischemic conditions.

  8. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues

  9. Inducing enhanced immunogenic cell death with nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems for pancreatic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Yang, Keni; Zhao, Ruifang; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Xiuchao; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Yinlong; Cheng, Keman; Liu, Shaoli; Hao, Jihui; Ren, He; Leong, Kam W; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-09-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) occurs when apoptotic tumor cell elicits a specific immune response, which may trigger an anti-tumor effect, via the release of immunostimulatory damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Hypothesizing that nanomedicines may impact ICD due to their proven advantages in delivery of chemotherapeutics, we encapsulated oxaliplatin (OXA) or gemcitabine (GEM), an ICD and a non-ICD inducer respectively, into the amphiphilic diblock copolymer nanoparticles. Neither GEM nor nanoparticle-encapsulated GEM (NP-GEM) induced ICD, while both OXA and nanoparticle-encapsulated OXA (NP-OXA) induced ICD. Interestingly, NP-OXA treated tumor cells released more DAMPs and induced stronger immune responses of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes than OXA treatment in vitro. Furthermore, OXA and NP-OXA exhibited stronger therapeutic effects in immunocompetent mice than in immunodeficient mice, and the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy was significantly higher in the NP-OXA group than the OXA group. Moreover, NP-OXA treatment induced a higher proportion of tumor infiltrating activated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes than OXA treatment. This general trend of enhanced ICD by nanoparticle delivery was corroborated in evaluating another pair of ICD inducer and non-ICD inducer, doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. In conclusion, although nanoparticle encapsulation did not endow a non-ICD inducer with ICD-mediated anti-tumor capacity, treatment with a nanoparticle-encapsulated ICD inducer led to significantly enhanced ICD and consequently improved anti-tumor effects than the free ICD inducer. The proposed nanomedicine approach may impact cancer immunotherapy via the novel cell death mechanism of ICD. PMID:27343466

  10. Brain metastases from breast cancer: prognostic significance of HER-2 overexpression, effect of trastuzumab and cause of death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To access the prognostic significance of HER-2 overexpression, the effect of trastuzumab and the cause of death in patients with brain metastases (BM) from breast cancer (BC). We analyzed the outcome of 130 patients with BM from BC who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) (without surgery or radiosurgery) between January 1998 and April 2006. Demographic data, tumor characteristics, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The impact of HER-2 overexpression and trastuzumab-based therapy on overall survival (OS) and the cause of death were evaluated. The median follow-up for the whole population was 6.25 months (mean: 9.15; range: 0.23-53). The median survival time and 1-year survival rates after BM diagnosis were 7.43 months and 35.8% (95% CI: 28-45.7) respectively. The median survival time for HER-2 negative patients (n = 78), HER-2 positive patients not treated with trastuzumab (n = 20) and HER-2 positive patients treated with trastuzumab (n = 32) were 5.9 months, 5.6 months and 19.53 months, respectively. The 1-year survival rates were 26.1%, 29.2% and 62.6% respectively, (p < 0.004). Among the 18 HER-2 positive patients treated with trastuzumab who died, 11 (61%) apparently succumbed from CNS progression, in the face of stable or responsive non-CNS disease. Trastuzumab-based therapy was associated with a 51% reduction in the risk of death (multiadjusted hazard ratio: 0.49; 95% CI, 0.29-0.83). In our experience, trastuzumab-based therapy for HER-overexpressing tumors was associated with improved survival in BM BC patients. This subgroup of patients may benefit from innovative approaches, in order to obtain better intra cerebral control

  11. Persimmon leaf flavonoid induces brain ischemic tolerance in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingsan Miao; Xuexia Zhang; Linan Wang

    2013-01-01

    The persimmon leaf has been shown to improve cerebral ischemic outcomes; however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, mice were subjected to 10 minutes of ischemic preconditioning, and persimmon leaf flavonoid was orally administered for 5 days. Results showed that the persimmon leaf flavonoid significantly improved the content of tissue type plasminogen activator and 6-keto prostaglandin-F1 α in the cerebral cortex, decreased the content of thromboxane B2, and reduced the content of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mice. Following optical microscopy, persimmon leaf flavonoid was also shown to reduce cell swelling and nuclear hyperchromatism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. These results suggested that persimmon leaf flavonoid can effectively inhibit brain thrombosis, improve blood supply to the brain, and relieve ischemia-induced pathological damage, resulting in brain ischemic tolerance.

  12. Ku70 acetylation mediates neuroblastoma cell death induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, Chitra; Opipari, Anthony W.; Bian, Xin; Castle, Valerie P; Kwok, Roland P S

    2005-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are therapeutic drugs that inhibit deacetylase activity, thereby increasing acetylation of many proteins, including histones. HDACIs have antineoplastic effects in preclinical and clinical trials and are being considered for cancers with unmet therapeutic need, including neuroblastoma (NB). Uncertainty of how HDACI-induced protein acetylation leads to cell death, however, makes it difficult to determine which tumors are likely to be responsive to these ...

  13. Statin Inhibits Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure and Associated Inflammation and Hippocampal Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin-Koo; Won, Je-Seong; Singh, Avtar K; Singh, Inderjit

    2008-01-01

    Statins are inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase that have been recently recognized as anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective drugs. Herein, we investigated anti-excitotoxic and anti-seizure effects of statins by using kainic acid (KA)-rat seizure model, an animal model for temporal lobe epilepsy and excitotoxic neurodegeneration. We observed that pretreatment with Lipitor (atorvastatin) effeiciently reduced KA-induced seizure activities, hippocampal neuron death, monocyte infiltration and proinfla...

  14. Self-regulatory role of 4-hydroxynonenal in signaling for stress-induced programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Sharma, Rajendra; Sharma, Abha; Yadav, Sushma; SINGHAL, SHARAD S.; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Within the last two decades, 4-hydroxynonenal has emerged as an important second messenger involved in the regulation of various cellular processes. Our recent studies suggest that HNE can induce apoptosis in various cells through the death receptor Fas (CD95)-mediated extrinsic pathway as well as through the p53-dependent intrinsic pathway. Interestingly, through its interaction with the nuclear protein Daxx, HNE can self-limit its apoptotic role by translocating Daxx to cytoplasm where it b...

  15. Stress-induced cell death is mediated by ceramide synthesis in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesofsky, Nora S; Levery, Steven B; Castle, Sherry A; Brambl, Robert

    2008-12-01

    The combined stresses of moderate heat shock (45 degrees C) and analog-induced glucose deprivation constitute a lethal stress for Neurospora crassa. We found that this cell death requires fatty acid synthesis and the cofactor biotin. In the absence of the cofactor, the stressed cells are particularly sensitive to exogenous ceramide, which is lethal at low concentrations. When we extracted endogenous sphingolipids, we found that unique ceramides were induced (i) by the inhibitory glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose and (ii) by combined heat shock and 2-deoxyglucose. We determined that the former is a 2-deoxyglucose-modified ceramide. By structural analysis, we identified the latter, induced by dual stress, as C(18)(OH)-phytoceramide. We also identified C(24)(OH)-phytoceramide as a constitutive ceramide that continues to be produced during the combined stresses. The unusual C(18)(OH)-phytoceramide is not made by germinating asexual spores subjected to the same heat and carbon stress. Since these spores, unlike growing cells, do not die from the stresses, this suggests a possible connection between synthesis of the dual-stress-induced ceramide and cell death. This connection is supported by the finding that a (dihydro)ceramide synthase inhibitor, australifungin, renders cells resistant to death from these stresses. The OS-2 mitogen-activated protein kinase, homologous to mammalian p38, may be involved in the cell death signaling pathway. Strains lacking OS-2 survived the combined stresses better than the wild type, and phosphorylated OS-2 increased in wild-type cells in response to heat shock and combined heat and carbon stress. PMID:18952903

  16. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Sensory Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe, Phillip M.; Mueller, Melissa A.; Gleichman, Julia S.; Kramer, Matthew D.; Qi Wang; Martha Sibrian-Vazquez; Strongin, Robert M.; Peter S Steyger; Douglas A Cotanche; Matsui, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under ...

  17. Effect of α-Ketoglutarate on Cyanide-induced Biochemical Alterations in Rat Brain and Liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biochemical changes in rat brain and liver following acute exposure to a lethal dose of cyanide, and its response to treatment of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) in the absence or presence of sodium thiosulfate (STS). Methods Female rats were administered 2.0 LD50 potassium cyanide (KCN; oral) in the absence or presence of pre-treatment (-10 min), simultaneous treatment (0 min) or post-treatment (+2-3 min) of α-KG (2.0 g/kg, oral) and/or STS (1.0 g/kg,intraperitoneal, -15 min, 0 min or + 2-3 min). At the time of onset of signs and symptoms of KCN toxicity (2-4 min) and at the time of death (5-15 min), various parameters particularly akin to oxidative stress viz. Cytochrome oxidase (CYTOX),superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in brain, and CYTOX, sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), GSH and GSSG in liver homogenate were measured. Results At both time intervals brain CYTOX, SOD, GPx, and GSH significantly reduced (percent inhibition compared to control) to 24%, 56%, 77%, and 65%, and 44%, 46%, 78%, and 57%, respectively. At the corresponding time points liver CYTOX and GSH reduced to 74% and 63%, and 44% and 68%, respectively. The levels of GSSG in the brain and liver, and hepatic ALP and SDH were unchanged. Pre-treatment and simultaneous treatment of α-KG alone or with STS conferred significant protection on above variables. Post-treatment was effective in restoring the changes in liver but failed to normalize the changes in the brain. Conclusions Oral treatment with α-KG alone or in combination with STS has protective effects on cyanide-induced biochemical alterations in rat brain and liver.

  18. RX871024 reduces NO production but does not protect against pancreatic beta-cell death induced by proinflammatory cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaitseva, Irina I; Sharoyko, Vladimir; Størling, Joachim; Efendic, Suad; Guerin, Christopher; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Nicotera, Pierluigi; Berggren, Per-Olof; Zaitsev, Sergei V

    2006-01-01

    The imidazoline compound RX871024 reduces IL-1beta-induced NO production thereby protecting against IL-1beta-induced beta-cell apoptosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether imidazolines RX871024 and efaroxan protect beta-cells against death in the presence of a combination of the......, induces pancreatic beta-cell death that does not directly correlate with NO production and cannot be counteracted with imidazoline compounds....

  19. Pathological and MRI study on experimental heroin-induced brain damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the pathological characteristics of the heroin-induced brain damage in rats, and to assess the diagnostic value of MRI. Methods: A total of 40 adult Wistar rats were studied, 32 rats were used for injecting heroin as heroin group and 8 were used for injecting saline as control group. The heroin dependent rat model was established by administering heroin (ip) in the ascending dosage schedule (0.5 mg/kg), three times a day (at 8:00, 12:00, and 18:00). The control group was established by the same way by injection with saline. The withdrawal scores were evaluated with imp roved criterion in order to estimate the degree of addiction after administering naloxone. Based on the rat model of heroin dependence, the rat model of heroin-induced brain damage was established by the same way with increasing heroin dosage everyday. Two groups were examined by using MRI, light microscope, and electron microscope, respectively in different heroin accumulated dosage (918, 1580, 2686, 3064, 4336, and 4336 mg/kg withdrawal after 2 weeks). Results: There was statistically significant difference (t=9.737, P<0.01) of the withdrawal scores between the heroin dependent group and the saline group (23.0 ± 4.4 and 1.4 ± 0.5, respectively). It suggested that the heroin dependent rat model be established successfully. In different accumulated dosage ( from 1580 mg/kg to 4336 mg/kg), there were degeneration and death of nerve cells in cerebrum and cerebellum of heroin intoxicated rats, and it suggested that the rat model of heroin-induced brain damage was established successfully. The light microscope and electron microscope features of heroin-induced brain damage in rats included: (1) The nerve cells of cerebral cortex degenerated and died. According to the heroin accumulated dosage, there were statistically significant difference of the nerve cell deaths between 4336 mg/kg group and 1580 mg/kg group or control group (P=0.024 and P=0.032, respectively); (2) The main

  20. Functional brain imaging to investigate the higher brain dysfunction induced by diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher brain dysfunction is the major problem of patients who recover from neurotrauma the prevents them from returning to their previous social life. Many such patients do not have focal brain damage detected with morphological imaging. We focused on studying the focal brain dysfunction that can be detected only with functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) in relation to the score of various cognition batteries. Patients who complain of higher brain dysfunction without apparent morphological cortical damage were recruited for this study. Thirteen patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) or cerebral concussion was included. They underwent a PET study to image glucose metabolism by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and central benodiazepine receptor (cBZD-R) (marker of neuronal body) by 11C-flumazenil, together with cognition measurement by WAIS-R, WMS-R, and WCST etc. PET data were compared with age matched normal controls using statistical parametric mapping (SPM)2. DAI patients had a significant decrease in glucose matabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the cingulated cortex than normal controls. Patients diagnosed with concussion because of shorter consciousness disturbance also had abnormal FDG uptake and cBZD-R distribution. Cognition test scores were variable among patients. Degree of decreased glucose metabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the dominant hemishphere corresponded well to the severity of cognitive disturbance. PET molecular imaging was useful to depict focal cortical dysfunction of neurotrauma patients even when morphological change was not apparent. This method may be promising to clarify the pathophysiology of higher brain dysfunction of patients with diffuse axonal injury or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. (author)

  1. Characterisation in vivo of ways of induced deaths by p53, in the male germinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The male germinal cells constitute a heterogeneous cell population including pre-meiotic proliferating cells (spermatogonia) and meiotic cells and post meiotic cells in differentiation (spermatocytes and spermatids). We study the involvement in vivo of the p53 protein in the death of these cells with the help of two models, (1) a transgenic model of infertility, MTp53, in which the p53 is over expressed in the differentiated cells and induced their death, (2) the response of these cells to gamma irradiation, where only the spermatogonia die by apoptosis dependent of p53. We showed that the caspases (cysteine-aspartic proteases) are involved in the terminal differentiation of normal germinal cells. But in the MTp53 model, the p53 induces the death of differentiated cells via the activation of calpains and not of caspases. We studied the response of spermatogonia, to gamma irradiation by a transcriptomic approach, by DNA chips and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. we showed that the puma and dr5 genes are induced by the p53 after irradiation. more, the study of mice invalidated for trail ( the dr5 ligand) or for puma, allowed to demonstrate that the two effectors are essential to the activation of intrinsic and extrinsic ways of apoptosis. (N.C.)

  2. Neuroprotection by GH against excitotoxic-induced cell death in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Wu, Yilun; Arellanes-Licea, Elvira Del Carmen; Louie, Marcela; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Retinal growth hormone (GH) has been shown to promote cell survival in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during developmental waves of apoptosis during chicken embryonic development. The possibility that it might also against excitotoxicity-induced cell death was therefore examined in the present study, which utilized quail-derived QNR/D cells as an in vitro RGC model. QNR/D cell death was induced by glutamate in the presence of BSO (buthionine sulfoxamide) (an enhancer of oxidative stress), but this was significantly reduced (PGH (rcGH). Similarly, QNR/D cells that had been prior transfected with a GH plasmid to overexpress secreted and non-secreted GH. This treatment reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells and blocked their release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In a further experiment with dissected neuroretinal explants from ED (embryonic day) 10 embryos, rcGH treatment of the explants also reduced (PGH-overexpressing QNR/D cells. As rcGH treatment and GH-overexpression cells also increased the content of IGF-1 and IGF-1 mRNA this neuroprotective action of GH is likely to be mediated, at least partially, through an IGF-1 mechanism. This possibility is supported by the fact that the siRNA knockdown of GH or IGF-1 significantly reduced QNR/D cell viability, as did the immunoneutralization of IGF-1. GH is therefore neuroprotective against excitotoxicity-induced RGC cell death by anti-apoptotic actions involving IGF-1 stimulation. PMID:27129619

  3. Lipid peroxidation and cell death mechanisms in pulmonary epithelial cells induced by peroxynitrite and nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Yuan-Soon [School of Medical Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Liou, Hung-Bin; Lin, Yu-Ping; Guo, How-Ran; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Lee, Ching-Chang; Wang, Ying-Jan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University Medical College, 138 Sheng-Li Road, Tainan (Taiwan); Lin, Jen-Kun; Pan, Min-Hsiung [Institute of Biochemistry, National Taiwan University, Medical College, Taipei (Taiwan); Jeng, Jiiang-Huei [School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University and Hospital, Medical College, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an environmental pollutant found in smog and cigarette smoke. Recently, NO has been discovered to act as a molecular messenger, mediating various physiological functions. However, when an excess of NO is present, cytotoxic and mutagenic effects can also be induced. The reaction of NO with superoxide results in the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup -}), which decomposes into the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen dioxide. Both of them are potent oxidant species that may initiate and propagate lipid peroxidation. In the present study, we examined the effects of NO and ONOO{sup -} on the induction of lipid peroxidation and cell death mechanisms in rats and in A549 pulmonary epithelial cells. The results showed that ONOO{sup -} is able to induce lipid peroxidation in pulmonary epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. 8-Epi-prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} can serve as a good biomarker of lipid peroxidation both in vitro and in vivo. Postmitotic apoptosis was found in A549 cells exposed to NO, whereas ONOO{sup -} induced cell death more characteristic of necrosis than apoptosis. Apoptosis that occurred in cells may be related to the dysfunction of mitochondria, the release of cytochrome c into cytosol, and the activation of caspase-9. The relationship between caspase activation and the cleavage of other death substrates during postmitotic apoptosis in A549 cells needs further investigation. (orig.)

  4. Blocking CD147 induces cell death in cancer cells through impairment of glycolytic energy metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD147 is a multifunctional transmembrane protein and promotes cancer progression. We found that the anti-human CD147 mouse monoclonal antibody MEM-M6/1 strongly induces necrosis-like cell death in LoVo, HT-29, WiDr, and SW620 colon cancer cells and A2058 melanoma cells, but not in WI-38 and TIG-113 normal fibroblasts. Silencing or overexpression of CD147 in LoVo cells enhanced or decreased the MEM-M6/1 induced cell death, respectively. CD147 is known to form complex with proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which is critical for lactate transport and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. In LoVo cells, CD147 and MCT-1 co-localized on the cell surface, and MEM-M6/1 inhibited the association of these molecules. MEM-M6/1 inhibited lactate uptake, lactate release, and reduced pHi. Further, the induction of acidification was parallel to the decrease of the glycolytic flux and intracellular ATP levels. These effects were not found in the normal fibroblasts. As cancer cells depend on glycolysis for their energy production, CD147 inhibition might induce cell death specific to cancer cells

  5. Systemic progesterone for modulating electrocautery-induced secondary brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, Ka Chun; Wang, Yue Chun; Wu, Wutian; Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit

    2013-09-01

    Bipolar electrocautery is an effective and commonly used haemostatic technique but it may also cause iatrogenic brain trauma due to thermal injury and secondary inflammatory reactions. Progesterone has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions in traumatic brain injury. However, its potential use in preventing iatrogenic brain trauma has not been explored. We conducted a pilot animal study to investigate the effect of systemic progesterone on brain cellular responses to electrocautery-induced injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received standardized bipolar electrocautery (40 W for 2 seconds) over the right cerebral cortex. The treatment group received progesterone intraperitoneally 2 hours prior to surgery; the control group received the drug vehicle only. Immunohistochemical studies showed that progesterone could significantly reduce astrocytic hypertrophy on postoperative day 1, 3 and 7, as well as macrophage infiltration on day 3. The number of astrocytes, however, was unaffected. Our findings suggest that progesterone should be further explored as a neuroprotective agent against electrocautery-induced or other forms of iatrogenic trauma during routine neurosurgical procedures. Future studies may focus on different dosing regimens, neuronal survival, functional outcome, and to compare progesterone with other agents such as dexamethasone. PMID:23830688

  6. Key players of singlet oxygen-induced cell death in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Laloi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS is an unavoidable consequence of oxygenic photosynthesis. Singlet oxygen (1O2 is a highly reactive species to which has been attributed a major destructive role during the execution of ROS-induced cell death in photosynthetic tissues exposed to excess light. The study of the specific biological activity of 1O2 in plants has been hindered by its high reactivity and short lifetime, the concurrent production of other ROS under photooxidative stress, and limited in vivo detection methods. However, during the last fifteen years, the isolation and characterization of two 1O2-overproducing mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, flu and ch1, has allowed the identification of genetically controlled 1O2 cell death pathways and a 1O2 acclimation pathway that are triggered at sub-cytotoxic concentrations of 1O2. The study of flu has revealed the control of cell death by the plastid proteins EXECUTER (EX1 and EX2. In ch1, oxidized derivatives of beta-carotene, such as beta-cyclocitral and dihydroactinidiolide, have been identified as important upstream messengers in the 1O2 signaling pathway that leads to stress acclimation. In both the flu and ch1 mutants, phytohormones act as important promoters or inhibitors of cell death. In particular, jasmonate has emerged as a key player in the decision between acclimation and cell death in response to 1O2. Although the flu and ch1 mutants show many similarities, especially regarding their gene expression profiles, key differences, such as EXECUTER-independent cell death in ch1, have also been observed and will need further investigation to be fully understood.

  7. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells

  8. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  9. The Role of Photolabile Dermal Nitric Oxide Derivates in Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph V. Suschek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation comprising UVB (280–315 nm and UVA (315–400 nm on a daily basis. Within the last two decades, the molecular and cellular response to UVA/UVB and the possible effects on human health have been investigated extensively. It is generally accepted that the mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of UVB is due to the direct interaction with DNA. On the other hand, by interaction with non-DNA chromophores as endogenous photosensitizers, UVA induces formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which play a pivotal role as mediators of UVA-induced injuries in human skin. This review gives a short overview about relevant findings concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying UVA/UVB-induced cell death. Furthermore, we will highlight the potential role of cutaneous antioxidants and photolabile nitric oxide derivates (NODs in skin physiology. UVA-induced decomposition of the NODs, like nitrite, leads not only to non-enzymatic formation of nitric oxide (NO, but also to toxic reactive nitrogen species (RNS, like peroxynitrite. Whereas under antioxidative conditions the generation of protective amounts of NO is favored, under oxidative conditions, less injurious reactive nitrogen species are generated, which may enhance UVA-induced cell death.

  10. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  11. Pro-apoptotic NOXA is implicated in atmospheric-pressure plasma-induced melanoma cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) has been successfully used to treat several types of cancers in vivo and in vitro, with the effect being primarily attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanisms by which APP induces apoptosis in cancer cells require further elucidation. In this study, the effects of APP on the expression of 500 genes in melanoma Mel007 cancer cells were examined. Pro-apoptotic phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein (PMAIP1), also known as NOXA, was highly expressed as a result of APP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking of ROS using scavenger NAC or silencing of NOXA gene by RNA interference inhibited the APP-induced NOXA genes upregulation and impaired caspases 3/7 mediated apoptosis, confirming the important role plasma-generated ROS species and pro-apoptotic NOXA play in APP-induced cancer cell death.

  12. Opposing roles for caspase and calpain death proteases in L-glutamate-induced oxidative neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative glutamate toxicity in HT22 murine hippocampal cells is a model for neuronal death by oxidative stress. We have investigated the role of proteases in HT22 cell oxidative glutamate toxicity. L-glutamate-induced toxicity was characterized by cell and nuclear shrinkage and chromatin condensation, yet occurred in the absence of either DNA fragmentation or mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Pretreatment with the selective caspase inhibitors either benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (pan-caspase), N-acetyl-Leu-Glu-His-Asp-aldehyde (caspase 9) or N-acetyl-Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-aldehyde (caspase 8), significantly increased L-glutamate-induced cell death with a corresponding increase in observed nuclear shrinkage and chromatin condensation. This enhancement of glutamate toxicity correlated with an increase in L-glutamate-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of caspase inhibition. Pretreating the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevented ROS production, cell shrinkage and cell death from L-glutamate as well as that associated with the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor. In contrast, the caspase-3/-7 inhibitor N-acetyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp aldehyde was without significant effect. However, pretreating the cells with the calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO, but not the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074, prevented cell death. The cytotoxic role of calpains was confirmed further by: 1) cytotoxic dependency on intracellular Ca2+ increase, 2) increased cleavage of the calpain substrate Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC and 3) immunoblot detection of the calpain-selective 145 kDa α-fodrin cleavage fragment. We conclude that oxidative L-glutamate toxicity in HT22 cells is mediated via calpain activation, whereas inhibition of caspases-8 and -9 may exacerbate L-glutamate-induced oxidative neuronal damage through increased oxidative stress

  13. Role of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP in glutamate-induced neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoliu, C; Llansola, M; Monfort, P; Corbalan, R; Fernandez-Marticorena, I; Hernandez-Viadel, M L; Felipo, V

    2001-04-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in mammals. However, excessive activation of glutamate receptors is neurotoxic, leading to neuronal degeneration and death. In many systems, including primary cultures of cerebellar neurons, glutamate neurotoxicity is mainly mediated by excessive activation of NMDA receptors, leading to increased intracellular calcium which binds to calmodulin and activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS), increasing nitric oxide (NO) which in turn activates guanylate cyclase and increases cGMP. Inhibition of NOS prevents glutamate neurotoxicity, indicating that NO mediates glutamate-induced neuronal death in this system. NO generating agents such as SNAP also induce neuronal death. Compounds that can act as "scavengers" of NO such as Croman 6 (CR-6) prevent glutamate neurotoxicity. The role of cGMP in the mediation of glutamate neurotoxicity remains controversial. Some reports indicate that cGMP mediates glutamate neurotoxicity while others indicate that cGMP is neuroprotective. We have studied the role of cGMP in the mediation of glutamate and NO neurotoxicity in cerebellar neurons. Inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase prevents glutamate and NO neurotoxicity. There is a good correlation between inhibition of cGMP formation and neuroprotection. Moreover 8-Br-cGMP, a cell permeable analog of cGMP, induced neuronal death. These results indicate that increased intracellular cGMP is involved in the mechanism of neurotoxicity. Inhibitors of phosphodiesterase increased extracellular but not intracellular cGMP and prevented glutamate neurotoxicity. Addition of cGMP to the medium also prevented glutamate neurotoxicity. These results are compatible with a neurotoxic effect of increased intracellular cGMP and a neuroprotective effect of increased extracellular cGMP. PMID:14715472

  14. Bcl-2 Knockdown Accelerates T Cell Receptor-Triggered Activation-Induced Cell Death in Jurkat T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Won, Tae Joon; Hyung, Kyeong Eun; Lee, Mi Ji; Moon, Young-hye; Lee, Ik Hee; Go, Byung Sung; Hwang, Kwang Woo

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and survival are tightly controlled through the highly coordinated activation/inhibition of diverse signal transduction pathways to insure normal development and physiology. Imbalance between cell death and survival often leads to autoimmune diseases and cancer. Death receptors sense extracellular signals to induce caspase-mediated apoptosis. Acting upstream of CED-3 family proteases, such as caspase-3, Bcl-2 prevents apoptosis. Using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), we suppressed Bcl-...

  15. Neural precursor cells induce cell death of high-grade astrocytomas through stimulation of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Kristin; Kumar, Jitender; Synowitz, Michael; Petrosino, Stefania; Imperatore, Roberta; Smith, Ewan St J; Wend, Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Nuber, Ulrike A; Gurok, Ulf; Matyash, Vitali; Wälzlein, Joo-Hee; Chirasani, Sridhar R; Dittmar, Gunnar; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Momma, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R; Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2012-08-01

    Primary astrocytomas of grade 3 or 4 according to the classification system of the World Health Organization (high-grade astrocytomas or HGAs) are preponderant among adults and are almost invariably fatal despite the use of multimodal therapy. Here we show that the juvenile brain has an endogenous defense mechanism against HGAs. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) migrate to HGAs, reduce glioma expansion and prolong survival time by releasing endovanilloids that activate the vanilloid receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1 or TRPV1) on HGA cells. TRPV1 is highly expressed in tumor and weakly expressed in tumor-free brain. TRPV1 stimulation triggers tumor cell death through the branch of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway that is controlled by activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3). The antitumorigenic response of NPCs is lost with aging. NPC-mediated tumor suppression can be mimicked in the adult brain by systemic administration of the synthetic vanilloid arvanil, suggesting that TRPV1 agonists have potential as new HGA therapeutics. PMID:22820645

  16. Neural precursor cells induce cell death of high-grade astrocytomas via stimulation of TRPV1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Kristin; Kumar, Jitender; Synowitz, Michael; Petrosino, Stefania; Imperatore, Roberta; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Wend, Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Nuber, Ulrike A.; Gurok, Ulf; Matyash, Vitali; Wälzlein, Joo-Hee; Chirasani, Sridhar R.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Momma, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R.; Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Primary astrocytomas of World Health Organization grade 3 and grade 4 (HG-astrocytomas) are preponderant among adults and are almost invariably fatal despite multimodal therapy. Here, we show that the juvenile brain has an endogenous defense mechanism against HG-astrocytomas. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) migrate to HG-astrocytomas, reduce glioma expansion and prolong survival by releasing a group of fatty acid ethanolamides that have agonistic activity on the vanilloid receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1; TRPV1). TRPV1 expression is higher in HG-astrocytomas than in tumor-free brain and TRPV1 stimulation triggers tumor cell death via the activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) controlled branch of the ER stress pathway. The anti-tumorigenic response of NPCs is lost with aging. NPC-mediated tumor suppression can be mimicked in the adult brain by systemic administration of the synthetic vanilloid Arvanil, suggesting that TRPV1 agonists hold potential as new HG-astrocytoma therapeutics. PMID:22820645

  17. Methylglyoxal (MGO) inhibits proliferation and induces cell death of human glioblastoma multiforme T98G and U87MG cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Łasut, Barbara; Pudełko, Adam; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Suchanek-Raif, Renata; Zieliński, Michał; Borkowska, Paulina; Kowalski, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and invasive human brain tumor and it is characterized by a poor prognosis and short survival time. Current treatment strategies for GBM using surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are ineffective. Thus new therapeutic strategies to target GBM are urgently needed. The effect of methylglyoxal (MGO) on the cell cycle, cell death and proliferation of human GBM cells was investigated. The T98G and U87MG cell lines were cultured in modified EMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and maintained at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air. Cells were exposed to methylglyoxal (0.025mM) per 72h. The influence of MGO on T98G and U87MG cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis was evaluated as well. Cell cycle phase distribution, proliferation, apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MGO causes changes in cell cycle and induces accumulation of G1/G0-phase cells and reduced fraction of cells in S and G2/M phases. We have also observed inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We have also revealed that MGO induces senescence of U87MG but not T98G cells, but further studies are necessary in order to clarify and check mechanism of action of methylglyoxal and it Is a positive phenomenon for the treatment of GBM. PMID:27133062

  18. Role of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death induced by nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattani, Varun P., E-mail: varun.pattani@utexas.edu; Shah, Jay; Atalis, Alexandra; Sharma, Anirudh; Tunnell, James W. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Current cancer therapies can cause significant collateral damage due to a lack of specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, we explored the cell death pathway response to gold nanorod (GNR)-mediated photothermal therapy as a highly specific cancer therapeutic to understand the role of apoptosis and necrosis during intense localized heating. By developing this, we can optimize photothermal therapy to induce a maximum of ‘clean’ cell death pathways, namely apoptosis, thereby reducing external damage. GNRs were targeted to several subcellular localizations within colorectal tumor cells in vitro, and the cell death pathways were quantitatively analyzed after photothermal therapy using flow cytometry. In this study, we found that the cell death response to photothermal therapy was dependent on the GNR localization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nanorods targeted to the perinuclear region irradiated at 37.5 W/cm{sup 2} laser fluence rate led to maximum cell destruction with the ‘cleaner’ method of apoptosis, at similar percentages as other anti-cancer targeted therapies. We believe that this indicates the therapeutic potential for GNR-mediated photothermal therapy to treat cancer effectively without causing damage to surrounding tissue.

  19. Role of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death induced by nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current cancer therapies can cause significant collateral damage due to a lack of specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, we explored the cell death pathway response to gold nanorod (GNR)-mediated photothermal therapy as a highly specific cancer therapeutic to understand the role of apoptosis and necrosis during intense localized heating. By developing this, we can optimize photothermal therapy to induce a maximum of ‘clean’ cell death pathways, namely apoptosis, thereby reducing external damage. GNRs were targeted to several subcellular localizations within colorectal tumor cells in vitro, and the cell death pathways were quantitatively analyzed after photothermal therapy using flow cytometry. In this study, we found that the cell death response to photothermal therapy was dependent on the GNR localization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nanorods targeted to the perinuclear region irradiated at 37.5 W/cm2 laser fluence rate led to maximum cell destruction with the ‘cleaner’ method of apoptosis, at similar percentages as other anti-cancer targeted therapies. We believe that this indicates the therapeutic potential for GNR-mediated photothermal therapy to treat cancer effectively without causing damage to surrounding tissue

  20. Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Resveratrol Is Partially Mediated by the Autophagy Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Lang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (trans-3,4,5'-trihydroxystilbene is an active compound in food, such as red grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol exhibits an anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. However, the mechanism of resveratrol-induced anti-cancer effect at the molecular level remains to be elucidated. In this study, the mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and Caov-3 was investigated using various molecular biology techniques, such as flow cytometry, western blotting, and RNA interference, with a major focus on the potential role of autophagy in resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. We demonstrated that resveratrol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, which triggers autophagy and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol induced ATG5 expression and promoted LC3 cleavage. The apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol was attenuated by both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which functions at the late stage of autophagy, significantly reduced resveratrol-induced cell death and caspase 3 activity in human ovarian cancer cells. We also demonstrated that targeting ATG5 by siRNA also suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, we concluded that a common pathway between autophagy and apoptosis exists in resveratrol-induced cell death in OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells.

  1. Reduced expression of calsenilin/DREAM/KChIP3 in the brains of kainic acid-induced seizure and epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeon-Mi; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, So-Young; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2003-04-01

    Calsenilin is a neuronal calcium binding protein that may function in calcium signaling and cell death. Kainic acid, an analog of the excitatory amino acid L-glutamate, produced excitotoxic cell death and induced the pathophysiology of status epilepticus. The expression of calsenilin was investigated in the mouse brain after kainic acid-induced seizure and seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal cell culture system using immunostaining analysis. Calsenilin was markedly decreased not only in the damaged cortex and CA3 region of hippocampus at 24 h after kainic acid-induced seizure but also in a cell-culture model of seizure-like activity. In addition, immunoreactivity of calsenilin in the hippocampus derived from human epilepsy patient was significantly decreased compared with normal brain. These results demonstrate that the reduced expression of calsenilin may functionally be associated with the pathophysiology of status epilepticus. PMID:12648752

  2. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Hardell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR and Causes of Death Register (CDR to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  3. Metallodrug induced apoptotic cell death and survival attempts are characterizable by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, K.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Meyer, D.

    2014-09-01

    Chrysotherapeutics are under investigation as new or additional treatments for different types of cancers. In this study, gold complexes were investigated for their anticancer potential using Raman spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to determine whether Raman spectroscopy could be used for the characterization of metallodrug-induced cell death. Symptoms of cell death such as decreased peak intensities of proteins bonds and phosphodiester bonds found in deoxyribose nucleic acids were evident in the principal component analysis of the spectra. Vibrational bands around 761 cm-1 and 1300 cm-1 (tryptophan, ethanolamine group, and phosphatidylethanolamine) and 1720 cm-1 (ester bonds associated with phospholipids) appeared in the Raman spectra of cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells after metallodrug treatment. The significantly (p treatment could be a molecular signature of induced apoptosis since both the co-regulated phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine are externalized during cell death. Treated cells had significantly higher levels of glucose and glycogen vibrational peaks, indicative of a survival mechanism of cancer cells under chemical stress. Cancer cells excrete chemotherapeutics to improve their chances of survival and utilize glucose to achieve this. Raman spectroscopy was able to monitor a survival strategy of cancer cells in the form of glucose uptake to alleviate chemical stress. Raman spectroscopy was invaluable in obtaining molecular information generated by biomolecules affected by anticancer metallodrug treatments and presents an alternative to less reproducible, conventional biochemical assays for cytotoxicity analyses.

  4. Insights into the mechanism of human papillomavirus E2-induced procaspase-8 activation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nitu; Senapati, Sanjib; Bose, Kakoli

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) E2 protein, the master regulator of viral life cycle, induces apoptosis of host cell that is independent of its virus-associated regulatory functions. E2 protein of HR-HPV18 has been found to be involved in novel FADD-independent activation of caspase-8, however, the molecular basis of this unique non-death-fold E2-mediated apoptosis is poorly understood. Here, with an interdisciplinary approach that involves in silico, mutational, biochemical and biophysical probes, we dissected and characterized the E2-procasapse-8 binding interface. Our data demonstrate direct non-homotypic interaction of HPV18 E2 transactivation domain (TAD) with α2/α5 helices of procaspase-8 death effector domain-B (DED-B). The observed interaction mimics the homotypic DED-DED complexes, wherein the conserved hydrophobic motif of procaspase-8 DED-B (F122/L123) occupies a groove between α2/α3 helices of E2 TAD. This interaction possibly drives DED oligomerization leading to caspase-8 activation and subsequent cell death. Furthermore, our data establish a model for E2-induced apoptosis in HR-HPV types and provide important clues for designing E2 analogs that might modulate procaspase-8 activation and hence apoptosis. PMID:26906543

  5. Plant cell death and cellular alterations induced by ozone: Key studies in Mediterranean conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account of histo-cytological and ultrastructural studies on ozone effect on crop and forest species in Italy is given, with emphasis on induced cell death and the underlying mechanisms. Cell death phenomena possibly due to ambient O3 were recorded in crop and forest species. In contrast, visible O3 effects on Mediterranean vegetation are often unclear. Microscopy is thus suggested as an effective tool to validate and evaluate O3 injury to Mediterranean vegetation. A DAB-Evans blue staining was proposed to validate O3 symptoms at the microscopic level and for a pre-visual diagnosis of O3 injury. The method has been positively tested in some of the most important crop species, such as wheat, tomato, bean and onion and, with some restriction, in forest species, and it also allows one to gain some very useful insights into the mechanisms at the base of O3 sensitivity or tolerance. - Ozone-induced cell death is a frequent phenomenon in Mediterranean conditions, not only in the most sensitive crops but also in forest species.

  6. Apoptosis and cell proliferation in the mouse model of embryonic death induced by Tritrichomonas foetus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudwyk, Mariana A; Zanuzzi, Carolina N; Nishida, Fabián; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Soto, Pedro; Monteavaro, Cristina E; Barbeito, Claudio G

    2015-09-01

    Bovine tritrichomonosis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the protozoon Tritrichomonas foetus and characterised by embryonic-death and abortion. During pregnancy, the processes of cell proliferation and death play a crucial role for blastocyst implantation and the subsequent maintenance of early pregnancy, and their misbalance may lead to the abortion. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether cell proliferation and death may be altered during tritrichomonosis. For this purpose, we used pregnant BALB/c mice as an alternative experimental animal model that has successfully reproduced the infection. We analysed the immunohistochemical expression of active caspase-3 and proliferating cell nuclear (PCNA) antigens in the endometrium of infected mice. We found an increase in the number of caspase-3 positive cells in infected mice that were not pregnant at the necropsy. Besides, the number of positive proliferating cells increased in the uterine luminal epithelium of infected animals killed at 5-7 days post coitum (dpc). Pregnant infected mice killed at 8-11 dpc showed higher proliferation than control animals. We suggest that the cytopathic effect induced by T. foetus in the uteri of infected mice may induce the apoptosis of the epithelial cells and, as a result, promote a compensatory proliferative response. The information described here will be helpful to further study the pathogenesis of the bovine tritrichomonosis. PMID:26028409

  7. Multiyear drought-induced morbidity preceding tree death in southeastern U.S. forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Aaron B; Clark, James S

    2016-01-01

    Recent forest diebacks, combined with threats of future drought, focus attention on the extent to which tree death is caused by catastrophic events as opposed to chronic declines in health that accumulate over years. While recent attention has focused on large-scale diebacks, there is concern that increasing drought stress and chronic morbidity may have pervasive impacts on forest composition in many regions. Here we use long-term, whole-stand inventory data from southeastern U.S. forests to show that trees exposed to drought experience multiyear declines in growth prior to mortality. Following a severe, multiyear drought, 72% of trees that did not recover their pre-drought growth rates died within 10 yr. This pattern was mediated by local moisture availability. As an index of morbidity prior to death, we calculated the difference in cumulative growth after drought relative to surviving conspecifics. The strength of drought-induced morbidity varied among species and was correlated with drought tolerance. These findings support the ability of trees to avoid death during drought events but indicate shifts that could occur over decades. Tree mortality following drought is predictable in these ecosystems based on growth declines, highlighting an opportunity to address multiyear drought-induced morbidity in models, experiments, and management decisions. PMID:27039506

  8. Role of membrane and cellular oxidative damage in gamma radiation induced apoptotic death in mouse thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Involvement of plasma membrane in the molecular mechanism of radiation-induced apoptotic death has increasingly been recognized by radiobiologists in the recent years. In present investigation, alterations in plasma membrane and the associated cytoplasmic / nuclear events were studied in apoptotic mouse thymocytes after gamma radiation exposure. The membrane oxidative damage in irradiated thymocytes was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) method and change in membrane permeability was estimated employing fluorescein diacetate (FDA) as fluorescent probe. Radiation-induced apoptotic thymocytes showed an increase in membrane permeability as observed by leakage of FDA, while trypan blue failed to respond. Moreover, using fluorescence technique, the changes in thymocytes membrane permeability could be sensitively determined within low to moderate radiation doses (2 cGy to 2 Gy). The dose dependent increase in intra-cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was found in irradiated thymocytes determined by fluorescence method, which could sensitively detect the radiation exposure in sub cGy range. Radiation induced membrane changes were found correlated with induction of apoptotic death determined by annexin-V method, caspase-3 assay, measuring nuclear diameter using propidium iodide (PI) staining and DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis. It has been also shown that membrane associated events observed in radiation induced apoptotic thymocytes are prior to nuclear / cytosolic processes. The membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular oxidative damage and apoptosis in radiation treated thymocytes were significantly inhibited by membrane-localized antioxidants suggesting significant contribution of membrane damage and oxidative stress in radiation mediated apoptosis in thymocytes

  9. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Sören V; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A; Strassburg, Christian P; Schwabe, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  10. The novel mitochondrial iron chelator 5-((methylamino)methyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline protects against mitochondrial-induced oxidative damage and neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Natalia P; García-Beltrán, Olimpo; Lourido, Fernanda; Urrutia, Pamela J; Mena, Raúl; Castro-Castillo, Vicente; Cassels, Bruce K; Núñez, Marco T

    2015-08-01

    Abundant evidence indicates that iron accumulation, oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Friedreich's ataxia and a group of disorders known as Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of two novel 8-OH-quinoline-based iron chelators, Q1 and Q4, to decrease mitochondrial iron accumulation and oxidative damage in cellular and animal models of PD. We found that at sub-micromolar concentrations, Q1 selectively decreased the mitochondrial iron pool and was extremely effective in protecting against rotenone-induced oxidative damage and death. Q4, in turn, preferentially chelated the cytoplasmic iron pool and presented a decreased capacity to protect against rotenone-induced oxidative damage and death. Oral administration of Q1 to mice protected substantia nigra pars compacta neurons against oxidative damage and MPTP-induced death. Taken together, our results support the concept that oral administration of Q1 is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NBIA. PMID:26051278

  11. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  12. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. → Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. → Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. → Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. → Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 oC. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  13. Sipunculan celomocytes increase the resistance to H2O2-induced cell death under hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Lombardo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Themiste petricola is a marine intertidal endolithic worm that experiences transient hypoxia within its habitat, owing to natural sediment movements or increased organic enrichment. We characterized and quantified the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 in celomocytes of the sipunculan Themiste petricola under normoxia and hypoxia (O2 < 0.1 % through the median effect method. The 50 % cell death H2O2 dose at 24 h (EC50 under normoxia was 1.5 mM. The range EC10-EC90 was 0.6 mM - 3.9 mM. The fraction of cells having collapsed mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP was increased dose-dependently after 3 h exposure with 24 h cytotoxic doses of H2O2 from EC10 to EC90. The 24 h cytotoxic dose inducing 50 % of cells with collapsed MMP at 3 h was 3.67 mM. Intracellular superoxide anion production was increased dose-dependently, while reduced glutathione was decreased dose-dependently at 3 h with H2O2 from EC10 to EC90. Exposure to 24 h hypoxia did not cause cell death but induced intracellular acidification. The 24 h EC50 of H2O2 under hypoxia was increased to 4.7 mM while the range EC10-EC90 was increased to 0.9 mM - 25.1 mM. We conclude that hypoxia induces anaerobic metabolism and increases tolerance to H2O2-induced cell death in celomocytes of Themiste petricola preserving the immune functions and providing an advantage to survive under low oxygen tension.

  14. Echovirus 30 induced neuronal cell death through TRIO-RhoA signaling activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Woo Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Echovirus 30 (Echo30 is one of the most frequently identified human enteroviruses (EVs causing aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. However the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of Echo30 infection with significant clinical outcomes is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation is to illustrate molecular pathologic alteration in neuronal cells induced by Echo30 infection using clinical isolate from young patient with neurologic involvement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To characterize the neuronal cellular response to Echo30 infection, we performed a proteomic analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrophotometric (MS analysis. We identified significant alteration of several protein expression levels in Echo30-infected SK-N-SH cells. Among these proteins, we focused on an outstanding up-regulation of Triple functional domain (TRIO in Echo30-infected SK-N-SH cells. Generally, TRIO acts as a key component in the regulation of axon guidance and cell migration. In this study, we determined that TRIO plays a role in the novel pathways in Echo30 induced neuronal cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding shows that TRIO plays a critical role in neuronal cell death by Echo30 infection. Echo30 infection activates TRIO-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF domains (GEFD2 and RhoA signaling in turn. These results suggest that Echo30 infection induced neuronal cell death by activation of the TRIO-RhoA signaling. We expect the regulation of TRIO-RhoA signaling may represent a new therapeutic approach in treating aseptic meningitis and encephalitis induced by Echo30.

  15. Heart murmur and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as predictors of death in 2977 consecutive hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Nielsen, O.W.; Kirk, V.;

    2008-01-01

    -pro-BNP, discovery of valvular heart disease by echocardiography yielded no additional prognostic information. Conclusions: Detection of a cardiac murmur during routine medical examination of hospitalized patients is associated with increased risk of death within a year. A blood test for NT-pro-BNP gives significant...... valvular heart disease. We wanted to test whether murmur predicts mortality in unselected patients admitted to the hospital and whether NT-pro-BNP is capable of distinguishing between innocent and significant murmurs. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 2977) older than 40 years admitted to a local hospital......Background: Little is known about the prognostic importance of murmur in unselected patients. It is difficult to distinguish between innocent and significant murmurs. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and BNP have recently been shown to be useful in small series of patients with...

  16. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen; Zuhayra, Maaz; Schütze, Stefan; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha; Recarti, Chiara; Namsolleck, Pawel; Unger, Thomas; Culman, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    -peptide AT2 receptor agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial...... apoptotic pathway, i. e. down-regulation of the Bcl-2 protein, induction of the Bax protein and activation of caspase-3. All quiescent SK-UT-1 cells died within 5 days after treatment with a single dose of C21. C21 was devoid of cytotoxic effects in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells and in quiescent HutSMC. Our...

  17. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  18. Radiation induced cell death in cervical squamous cell carcinoma. An immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the process of cell death in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) after radiation, an ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study was performed. Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of biopsy samples pre- and post-radiation stage III SCC (n=15) were collected. Irradiation caused varying ultrastructural changes including nuclear and cytoplasmic disorganization suggesting cell necrosis. Immunohistochemically, the pre-radiation specimens showed no positive reaction for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), tumor necrosis factor-receptor (TNF-γ) or Fas. C-fos, p53 and bcl-2 showed positive reactions in only a few non-irradiated specimens. All of the irradiated specimens showed a positive reaction for TNF-α, and variable positive reactions were observed for TNF-γ, Fas, p53, c-fos and bcl-2. These results suggest that TNF-α, TNF-γ, and c-fos are responsible for radiation induced cell death in cervical SCC. (author)

  19. Drug induced mortality: a multiple cause approach on Italian causes of death Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Grippo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-related mortality is a complex phenomenon that has several health, social and economic effects. In this paper trends of drug-induced mortality in Italy are analysed. Two approaches have been followed: the traditional analysis of the underlying cause of death (UC (data refers to the Istat mortality database from 1980 to 2011, and the multiple cause (MCanalysis, that is the analysis of all conditions reported on the death certificate (data for 2003-2011 period.Methods: Data presented in this paper are based on the Italian mortality register. The selection of Icd codes used for the analysis follows the definition of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. Using different indicators (crude and standardized rates, ratio multiple to underlying, the results obtained from the two approaches (UC and MC have been compared. Moreover, as a measure of association between drug-related causes and specific conditions on the death certificate, an estimation of the age-standardized relative risk (RR has been used.Results: In the years 2009-2011, the total number of certificates whit mention of drug use was 1,293, 60% higher than the number UC based. The groups of conditions more strongly associated with drug-related causes are the mental and behavioral disorders (especially alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis and fibrosis of liver, AIDS and endocarditis.Conclusions : The analysis based on multiple cause approach shows, for the first time, a more detailed picture of the drug related death; it allows to better describe the mortality profiles and to re-evaluate  the contribution of a specific cause to death.

  20. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeshima, T.; Katoh, A.; Ishimaru, H.; Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.; Murase, K.; Ohtsuka, H.; Inari, K.; Fukuta, T.; Kameyama, T. (Meijo Univ., Nagoya (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, (3H)glutamate and (3H)glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus.

  1. Triptolide induces lysosomal-mediated programmed cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

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    Owa C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chie Owa, Michael E Messina Jr, Reginald HalabyDepartment of Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, USABackground: Breast cancer is a major cause of death; in fact, it is the most common type, in order of the number of global deaths, of cancer in women worldwide. This research seeks to investigate how triptolide, an extract from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Accumulating evidence suggests a role for lysosomal proteases in the activation of apoptosis. However, there is also some controversy regarding the direct participation of lysosomal proteases in activation of key apoptosis-related caspases and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. In the present study, we demonstrate that triptolide induces an atypical, lysosomal-mediated apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells because they lack caspase-3.Methods: MCF-7 cell death was characterized via cellular morphology, chromatin condensation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric cell growth inhibition assay and the expression levels of proapoptotic proteins. Acridine orange and LysoTracker® staining were performed to visualize lysosomes. Lysosomal enzymatic activity was monitored using an acid phosphatase assay and western blotting of cathepsin B protein levels in the cytosolic fraction, which showed increased enzymatic activity in drug-treated cells.Results: These experiments suggest that triptolide-treated MCF-7 cells undergo atypical apoptosis and that, during the early stages, lysosomal enzymes leak into the cytosol, indicating lysosomal membrane permeability.Conclusion: Our results suggest that further studies are warranted to investigate triptolide's potential as an anticancer therapeutic agent.Keywords: triptolide, MCF-7 breast cancer cells, apoptosis, lysosomes, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP

  2. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, [3H]glutamate and [3H]glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus

  3. Computed tomography of virally induced monkey brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five (35) Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) were inoculated intracerebrally with chickembryo fibroblasts which were producing the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of the Rous sarcoma virus. These were then studied by means of computed tomography (CT) to detect brain tumors. Tumors were induced in 54.3% (19/35), with an average latency of 32.6 (15 - 43) days before a CT image appeared. The brains were sectioned into 5-mm slices, coplanar with the CT images. Various CT features, such as necrosis, hemorrhage, and peritumoral edema, correlated with the pathological findings. Contrast-enhanced CT detected tumors greater than 4-6 mm in diameter, and it was accurate within 2 mm in determining. Following brain tumors by CT in 6 monkeys revealed changes in the tumor size. One monkey was treated by differential hypothermia following craniectomy; the therapeutic effect and the tumor size, as subsequently evaluated for six months, revealed tumor regression during the initial 5 weeks, followed by stabilization and late (6 months) progression. The large brain size, 90-110 grams in adults, and the availability of these monkeys make them an excellent model system for neurological, neurosurgical, CT, and multimodality therapeutic experimentation. (author)

  4. Brain lesion induced by 1319nm laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaifu; Chen, Hongxia; Wang, Jiarui; Chen, Peng; Ma, Ping; Qian, Huanwen

    2010-11-01

    The laser-tissue interaction has not been well defined at the 1319 nm wavelength for brain exposure. The goal of this research effort was to identify the behavioral and histological changes of brain lesion induced by 1319 nm laser. The experiment was performed on China Kunming mice. Unilateral brain lesions were created with a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser (1319nm). The brain lesions were identified through behavioral observation and histological haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining method. The behavior change was observed for a radiant exposure range of 97~773 J/cm2. The histology of the recovery process was identified for radiant exposure of 580 J/cm2. Subjects were sacrificed 1 hour, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 months, 7 months and 13 months after laser irradiation. Results showed that after laser exposure, behavioral deficits, including kyphosis, tail entasia, or whole body paralysis could be noted right after the animals recovered from anesthesia while gradually disappeared within several days and never recurred again. Histologically, the laser lesion showed a typical architecture dependent on the interval following laser treatment. The central zone of coagulation necrosis is not apparent right after exposure but becomes obvious within several days. The nerotic tissue though may persist for a long time, will finally be completely resorbed. No carbonization granules formed under our exposure condition.

  5. P. falciparum isolate-specific distinct patterns of induced apoptosis in pulmonary and brain endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine N'Dilimabaka

    Full Text Available The factors implicated in the transition from uncomplicated to severe clinical malaria such as pulmonary oedema and cerebral malaria remain unclear. It is known that alterations in vascular integrity due to endothelial cell (EC activation and death occur during severe malaria. In this study, we assessed the ability of different P. falciparum clinical isolates to induce apoptosis in ECs derived from human lung and brain. We observed that induction of EC apoptosis was sensitive to the environmental pH and required direct contact between the parasite and the cell, though it was not correlated to the ability of the parasite to cytoadhere. Moreover, the extent of induced apoptosis in the two EC types varied with the isolate. Analysis of parasite genes transcript led us to propose that the activation of different pathways, such as Plasmodium apoptosis-linked pathogenicity factors (PALPF, PALPF-2, PALPF-5 and PF11_0521, could be implied in EC death. These observations provide an experimental framework to decipher the molecular mechanism implicated in the genesis of severe malaria.

  6. Brain tumors induced in rats by human adenovirus type 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1974-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenesis of human adenovirus type 12 in the brain of rats was examined. Newborn rats of Sprague-Dawley and Donryu strains were injected intracranially with human adenovirus type 12. The incidence of intracranial tumors was 91% (30/33 in SpragueDawley and 56% (14/25 in Donryu rats. Except for one tumor nodule located in the parietal cortex of a Sprague.Dawley rat, all tumors developed in the paraventricular areas or in the meninges. Tumors were quite similar histologically to those induced in hamsters and mice resembling the undifferentiated human brain tumors such as medulloblastoma, ependymoblastoma and embryonic gliomas. From the histological features and primary sites of tumor development, it is suggested that the tumors in the brain of rats induced by adenovirus type 12 originate from the embryonic cells in the paraventricular area and also from the undifferentiated supporting cells of the peripheral nerves in the leptomeninges.

  7. Hypoxic preconditioning induces neuroprotective stanniocalcin-1 in brain via IL-6 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Johan A; Serlachius, Martina; Lankila, Petri;

    2007-01-01

    mRNA levels in brains of wild-type and IL-6 deficient mice. Furthermore, we monitored the Stc-1 response in brains of wild-type and transgenic mice, overexpressing IL-6 in the astroglia, before and after induced brain injury. RESULTS: Hypoxic preconditioning induced an upregulated expression of Stc...

  8. Quercetin attenuates neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D R; Wani, W Y; Sunkaria, A; Kandimalla, R J; Sharma, R K; Verma, D; Bal, A; Gill, K D

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum is a light weight and toxic metal present ubiquitously on earth, which has gained considerable attention due to its neurotoxic effects. It also has been linked ecologically and epidemiologically to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Guamanian-Parkinsonian complex and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanism of aluminum neurotoxicity is poorly understood, but it is well documented that aluminum generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt-c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. Quercetin (a natural flavonoid) protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in aluminum-induced neurodegeneration, and then quercetin should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of quercetin (10mg/kg body wt/day) reduced aluminum (10mg/kg body wt/day)-induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity). In addition, quercetin also prevents aluminum-induced translocation of cyt-c, and up-regulates Bcl-2, down-regulates Bax, p53, caspase-3 activation and reduces DNA fragmentation. Quercetin also obstructs aluminum-induced neurodegenerative changes in aluminum-treated rats as seen by Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that quercetin attenuates aluminum-induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that treatment with quercetin may represent a therapeutic strategy to attenuate the neuronal death against aluminum-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:26944603

  9. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD50) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals

  10. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R., E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.

  11. Constitutive activation of AtMEK5, a MAPK kinase, induces salicylic acid-independent cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongxia; WANG Ying; ZHOU Tianhong; SUN Yujing; LIU Guoqin; REN Dongtao

    2004-01-01

    AtMEK5DD is an active mutant of AtMEK5, a MAP kinase kinase in Arabidopsis. Induction of AtMEK5DD expression in transgenic plants leads to activation of 44 and 48 kD MAPKs and causes a rapid cell death. To compare the cell death induced by the expression of AtMEK5DD with the HR-cell death induced by avirulence pathogen infection, we analyzed the activation of downstream MAP Kinase and induction of PR genes expression in permanent transgenic Arabidopsis plants. In-gel kinase activity assay revealed that the infection of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 harboring Avr Rpt2 gene also lead to activation of 44 and 48 kD MAPKs. PAL, PR1 and PR5 were strongly induced in plants undergoing HR-cell death caused by the infection of P. Syringae DC3000, while only the expression of PR5 was strongly induced in transgenic plants expressing AtMEK5DD protein. NahG protein in AtMEK5DD×NahG plants cannot suppress the cell death induced by AtMEK5DD. And AtMEK5DD protein expressed AtMEK5DD×NahG plants showed no significant change in salicylic acid (SA)level.All these suggest that the cell death induced by the activation of AtMEK5 is salicylic acid-independent.

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy induces neurogenesis in frontal rat brain areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Inta

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is an effective therapy for several psychiatric disorders, including severe major depression, mania and certain forms of schizophrenia. It had been proposed that ECT acts by modulating local plasticity via the stimulation of neurogenesis. In fact, among antidepressant therapies, ECT is the most robust enhancer of neurogenesis in the hippocampus of rodents and non-human primates. The existence of ECT-triggered neurogenesis in other brain areas, particularly in those adjacent to the other main locus of neurogenesis, the subventricular zone (SVZ, had so far remained unknown. Here we show that ECT also strongly enhances neurogenesis in frontal brain areas, especially in the rostro-medial striatum, generating specific, small-size calretinin-positive interneurons. We provide here the first evidence that ECT stimulates neurogenesis in areas outside the hippocampus. Our data may open research possibilities that focus on the plastic changes induced by ECT in frontal limbic circuitry.

  13. Characterisation of cell death inducing Phytophthora capsici CRN effectors suggests diverse activities in the host nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco eStam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant-Microbe interactions are complex associations that feature recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns by the plant immune system and dampening of subsequent responses by pathogen encoded secreted effectors. With large effector repertoires now identified in a range of sequenced microbial genomes, much attention centres on understanding their roles in immunity or disease. These studies not only allow identification of pathogen virulence factors and strategies, they also provide an important molecular toolset suited for studying immunity in plants. The Phytophthora intracellular effector repertoire encodes a large class of proteins that translocate into host cells and exclusively target the host nucleus. Recent functional studies have implicated the CRN protein family as an important class of diverse effectors that target distinct subnuclear compartments and modify host cell signalling. Here, we characterised three necrosis inducing CRNs and show that there are differences in the levels of cell death. We show that only expression of CRN20_624 has an additive effect on PAMP induced cell death but not AVR3a induced ETI. Given their distinctive phenotypes, we assessed localisation of each CRN with a set of nuclear markers and found clear differences in CRN subnuclear distribution patterns. These assays also revealed that expression of CRN83_152 leads to a distinct change in nuclear chromatin organisation, suggesting a distinct series of events that leads to cell death upon over-expression. Taken together, our results suggest diverse functions carried by CRN C-termini, which can be exploited to identify novel processes that take place in the host nucleus and are required for immunity or susceptibility.

  14. Novel self-micellizing anticancer lipid nanoparticles induce cell death of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kyu Yoo, Bong; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel drug-like self-micellizing anticancer lipid (SMAL), and investigated its anticancer activity and effects on cell death pathways in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Three self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared, namely, SMAL102 (lauramide derivative), SMAL104 (palmitamide derivative), and SMAL108 (stearamide derivative) by a thin-film hydration technique, and were characterized for physicochemical and biological parameters. SMAL102 were nanosized (160.23 ± 8.11 nm) with uniform spherical shape, while SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not form spherical shape but formed large size nanoparticles and irregular in shape. Importantly, SMAL102 showed a cytotoxic effect towards CRC cell lines (HCT116 and HT-29), and less toxicity to a normal colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18Co). Conversely, SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not have an anti-proliferative effect on CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles were actively taken up by CRC cell lines, localized in the cell membrane, and exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. The normal colon cell line showed significantly less cellular uptake and non-cytotoxicity as compared with the CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells, indicating the induction of apoptosis; whereas LC3B was activated in HCT116 cells, indicating autophagy-induced cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SMAL102 induced cell death via activation of apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cell lines. The present study could be a pioneer for further preclinical and clinical development of such compounds. PMID:26342325

  15. LSD-induced entropic brain activity predicts subsequent personality change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A V; Kaelen, M; Lövdén, M; Nilsson, J; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J; Carhart-Harris, R L

    2016-09-01

    Personality is known to be relatively stable throughout adulthood. Nevertheless, it has been shown that major life events with high personal significance, including experiences engendered by psychedelic drugs, can have an enduring impact on some core facets of personality. In the present, balanced-order, placebo-controlled study, we investigated biological predictors of post-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) changes in personality. Nineteen healthy adults underwent resting state functional MRI scans under LSD (75µg, I.V.) and placebo (saline I.V.). The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) was completed at screening and 2 weeks after LSD/placebo. Scanning sessions consisted of three 7.5-min eyes-closed resting-state scans, one of which involved music listening. A standardized preprocessing pipeline was used to extract measures of sample entropy, which characterizes the predictability of an fMRI time-series. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate drug-induced shifts in brain entropy and their relationship with the observed increases in the personality trait openness at the 2-week follow-up. Overall, LSD had a pronounced global effect on brain entropy, increasing it in both sensory and hierarchically higher networks across multiple time scales. These shifts predicted enduring increases in trait openness. Moreover, the predictive power of the entropy increases was greatest for the music-listening scans and when "ego-dissolution" was reported during the acute experience. These results shed new light on how LSD-induced shifts in brain dynamics and concomitant subjective experience can be predictive of lasting changes in personality. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3203-3213, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27151536

  16. Insights into the mechanism of human papillomavirus E2-induced procaspase-8 activation and cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Nitu Singh; Sanjib Senapati; Kakoli Bose

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) E2 protein, the master regulator of viral life cycle, induces apoptosis of host cell that is independent of its virus-associated regulatory functions. E2 protein of HR-HPV18 has been found to be involved in novel FADD-independent activation of caspase-8, however, the molecular basis of this unique non-death-fold E2-mediated apoptosis is poorly understood. Here, with an interdisciplinary approach that involves in silico, mutational, biochemical and bioph...

  17. Paraquat induces oxidative stress and neuronal cell death; neuroprotection by water-soluble Coenzyme Q10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress is correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. The causes of sporadic forms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are still unknown. Recently, a correlation between paraquat exposure and neurodegenerative diseases has been observed. Paraquat, a nonselective herbicide, was once widely used in North America and is still routinely used in Taiwan. We have used differentiated Human Neuroblastoma (SHSY-5Y) cells as an in vitro model to study the mechanism of cell death induced by paraquat. We observed that paraquat-induced oxidative stress in differentiated SHSY-5Y cells as indicated by an increase in the production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, apoptosis was evident as indicated by cellular and nuclear morphology and DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, pretreatment of SHSY-5Y cells with water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) before paraquat exposure inhibited ROS generation. Pretreatment with CoQ10 also significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation. We also analyzed the effect of paraquat and CoQ10 on isolated mitochondria. Our results indicated that treatment with paraquat induced the generation of ROS from isolated mitochondria and depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Pretreatment with CoQ10 was able to inhibit ROS generation from isolated mitochondria as well as the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that water-soluble CoQ10 can prevent oxidative stress and neuronal damage induced by paraquat and therefore, can be used for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative diseases caused by environmental toxins

  18. Changes in liver mitochondrial plasticity induced by brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulating data suggest that liver is a major target organ of systemic effects observed in the presence of a cancer. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the presence of chemically induced brain tumors in rats on biophysical parameters accounting for the dynamics of water in liver mitochondria. Tumors of the central nervous system were induced by intraveinous administration of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) to pregnant females on the 19th day of gestation. The mitochondrial crude fraction was isolated from the liver of each animal and the dynamic parameters of total water and its macromolecule-associated fraction (structured water, H2Ost) were calculated from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. The presence of a malignant brain tumor induced a loss of water structural order that implicated changes in the physical properties of the hydration shells of liver mitochondria macromolecules. This feature was linked to an increase in the membrane cholesterol content, a way to limit water penetration into the bilayer and then to reduce membrane permeability. As expected, these alterations in mitochondrial plasticity affected ionic exchanges and led to abnormal features of mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. This study enlightens the sensitivity of the structured water phase in the liver mitochondria machinery to external conditions such as tumor development at a distant site. The profound metabolic and functional changes led to abnormal features of ion transport, mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation

  19. Changes in liver mitochondrial plasticity induced by brain tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debien Emilie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating data suggest that liver is a major target organ of systemic effects observed in the presence of a cancer. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the presence of chemically induced brain tumors in rats on biophysical parameters accounting for the dynamics of water in liver mitochondria. Methods Tumors of the central nervous system were induced by intraveinous administration of ethylnitrosourea (ENU to pregnant females on the 19th day of gestation. The mitochondrial crude fraction was isolated from the liver of each animal and the dynamic parameters of total water and its macromolecule-associated fraction (structured water, H2Ost were calculated from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements. Results The presence of a malignant brain tumor induced a loss of water structural order that implicated changes in the physical properties of the hydration shells of liver mitochondria macromolecules. This feature was linked to an increase in the membrane cholesterol content, a way to limit water penetration into the bilayer and then to reduce membrane permeability. As expected, these alterations in mitochondrial plasticity affected ionic exchanges and led to abnormal features of mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. Conclusion This study enlightens the sensitivity of the structured water phase in the liver mitochondria machinery to external conditions such as tumor development at a distant site. The profound metabolic and functional changes led to abnormal features of ion transport, mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation.

  20. Fungicidal Drugs Induce a Common Oxidative-Damage Cellular Death Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Amphotericin, miconazole, and ciclopirox are antifungal agents from three different drug classes that can effectively kill planktonic yeast, yet their complete fungicidal mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to identify a common oxidative-damage cellular death pathway triggered by these representative fungicides in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This mechanism utilizes a signaling cascade involving the GTPases Ras1 and Ras2 and protein kinase A, and it culminates in death through the production of toxic reactive oxygen species in a tricarboxylic-acid-cycle- and respiratory-chain-dependent manner. We also show that the metabolome of C. albicans is altered by antifungal drug treatment, exhibiting a shift from fermentation to respiration, a jump in the AMP/ATP ratio, and elevated production of sugars; this coincides with elevated mitochondrial activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that DNA damage plays a critical role in antifungal-induced cellular death and that blocking DNA-repair mechanisms potentiates fungicidal activity.

  1. Effects of Copper-phenanthroline on Pentschlorophenol-induced Adaptation and Cell Death of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-WEN ZHANG; RONG-GUI LI; XIN WANG; SHUAN-HU ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of copper-phenanthroline (CuOP) on pentachlorophenol (PCP)-induced adaptation and cell death of Escherichia coli. Methods Bacterial growth and adaptation to PCP were monitored spectrophotometrically at 600 nm. Inactivation of bacterial cells was determined from colony count on agar dishes. Cellular ATP content and accumulation of PCP were assessed by chemiluminescence and HPLC analysis respectively. The formation of PCP-Cu-OP complex was shown by UV-visible spectra. Results Escherichia coli (E. coli) could adapt to PCP, a wood preservative and insecticide used in agriculture. The adaptation of E. coli to PCP prevented its death to the synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP plus PCP and declined cellular accumulation and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylafion of PCP. Furthermore, CuOP and PCP neither produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) nor had a synergistic effect on uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in E.coli. The synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP and PCP in E. coli might be due to the formation of lipophillc PCP-Cu-OP complex.Conclsion Our data suggested that adaptation of E. coli to PCP decreased the synergistic effects of CuOP and PCP on prokaryotic cell death due to the formation of lipophilic PCP-Cu-OP complex, but it had no effect on the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and production of reactive oxygen species in E. coli.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor rescues brain endothelial cells lacking presenilin 1 from apoptotic cell death following serum starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama Sosa, Miguel A; De Gasperi, Rita; Hof, Patrick R; Elder, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (Psen1) is important for vascular brain development and is known to influence cellular stress responses. To understand the role of Psen1 in endothelial stress responses, we investigated the effects of serum withdrawal on wild type (wt) and Psen1-/- embryonic brain endothelial cells. Serum starvation induced apoptosis in Psen1-/- cells but did not affect wt cells. PI3K/AKT signaling was reduced in serum-starved Psen1-/- cells, and this was associated with elevated levels of phospho-p38 consistent with decreased pro-survival AKT signaling in the absence of Psen1. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF1 and FGF2), but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) rescued Psen1-/- cells from serum starvation induced apoptosis. Inhibition of FGF signaling induced apoptosis in wt cells under serum withdrawal, while blocking γ-secretase activity had no effect. In the absence of serum, FGF2 immunoreactivity was distributed diffusely in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles of wt and Psen1-/- cells, as levels of FGF2 in nuclear and cytosolic fractions were not significantly different. Thus, sensitivity of Psen1-/- cells to serum starvation is not due to lack of FGF synthesis but likely to effects of Psen1 on FGF release onto the cell surface and impaired activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway. PMID:27443835

  3. Relationship between duration of brain death and hemodynamic (in)stability on progressive dysfunction and increased immunologic activation of donor kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, JAB; Molema, G; Ter Horst, GJ; Freund, RL; Wiersema, J; van Schilfgaarde, R; Leuvenink, HGD; Ploeg, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Background. Consistent difference in graft survival after renal transplantation has been shown when cadaveric transplants are compared to the living related donor situation, in favor of the latter. Recently, evidence has been put forward that brain death has significant effects on the donor organ qu

  4. Protective effect of aqueous extract from Spirulina platensis against cell death induced by free radicals

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    Radhakrishnan Ammu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina is a commercial alga well known to contain various antioxidants, especially phycocyanin. Apart from being sold as a nutraceutical, Spirulina is incorporated as a functional ingredient in food products and beverages. Most of the previous reports on antioxidant activity of Spirulina were based on chemical rather than cell-based assays. The primary objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant activity of aqueous extract from Spirulina based on its protective effect against cell death induced by free radicals. Methods The antioxidant activity of the cold water extract from food-grade Spirulina platensis was assessed using both chemical and cell-based assays. In the cell-based assay, mouse fibroblast cells (3T3 cells were incubated for 1 h in medium containing aqueous extract of Spirulina or vitamin C (positive control at 25, 125 and 250 μg/mL before the addition of 50 μM 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH or 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS. The cells were incubated for another 24 h before being assessed for cell death due to apoptosis using the Cell Death Detection ELISA Kit. Spectrophotometric assays based on DPPH and ABTS were also used to assess the antioxidant activity of the extract compared to vitamin C and vitamin E (positive controls. Results Spirulina extract did not cause cytotoxic effect on 3T3 cells within the range of concentrations tested (0 - 250 μg/mL. The extract reduced significantly (p Conclusions The results showed that aqueous extract of Spirulina has a protective effect against apoptotic cell death due to free radicals. The potential application of incorporating Spirulina into food products and beverages to enhance their antioxidant capacity is worth exploring.

  5. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

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    Chen YJ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jen Chen,1–4 Li-Wen Fang,5 Wen-Chi Su,6,7 Wen-Yi Hsu,1 Kai-Chien Yang,1 Huey-Lan Huang8 1Department of Medical Research, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Department of Nutrition, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 6Research Center for Emerging Viruses, China Medical University Hospital, 7Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 8Department of Bioscience Technology, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of

  6. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death induced in Zea mays L. by allelochemical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciniglia, Claudia; Mastrobuoni, Francesco; Scortichini, Marco; Petriccione, Milena

    2015-05-01

    The allelochemical stress on Zea mays was analyzed by using walnut husk washing waters (WHWW), a by-product of Juglans regia post-harvest process, which possesses strong allelopathic potential and phytotoxic effects. Oxidative damage and cell-programmed death were induced by WHWW in roots of maize seedlings. Treatment induced ROS burst, with excess of H2O2 content. Enzymatic activities of catalase were strongly increased during the first hours of exposure. The excess in malonildialdehyde following exposure to WHWW confirmed that oxidative stress severely damaged maize roots. Membrane alteration caused a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity along with DNA damage as confirmed by DNA laddering. The DNA instability was also assessed through sequence-related amplified polymorphism assay, thus suggesting the danger of walnut processing by-product and focusing the attention on the necessity of an efficient treatment of WHWW. PMID:25736610

  7. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    António Rego

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria.

  8. Mitochondria Superoxide Anion Production Contributes to Geranylgeraniol-Induced Death in Leishmania amazonensis

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    Milene Valéria Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we demonstrate the activity of geranylgeraniol, the major bioactive constituent from seeds of Bixa orellana, against Leishmania amazonensis. Geranylgeraniol was identified through 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and DEPT. The compound inhibited the promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms, with IC50 of 11±1.0 and 17.5±0.7 μg/mL, respectively. This compound was also more toxic to parasites than to macrophages and did not cause lysis in human blood cells. Morphological and ultrastructural changes induced by geranylgeraniol were observed in the protozoan by electronic microscopy and included mainly mitochondria alterations and an abnormal chromatin condensation in the nucleus. These alterations were confirmed by Rh 123 and TUNEL assays. Additionally, geranylgeraniol induces an increase in superoxide anion production. Collectively, our in vitro studies indicate geranylgeraniol as a selective antileishmanial that appears to be mediated by apoptosis-like cell death.

  9. Radiation induced membrane oxidative damage in apoptotic death of mouse thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiation oxidative damage to plasma membrane of cells and consequent mechanism of apoptotic death have been receiving growing attention of radiation scientists in recent years. We have employed fluorescence probe method to determine changes in the permeability and fluidity of plasma membrane of mouse thymocytes after gamma irradiation (∼ cGy to 10 Gy ). In vitro studies have shown that radiation induced membrane changes were correlated with the induction of apoptoic cell death. Studies have also been carried out to evaluate generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to radio-oxidative damage to thymocytes using a cytosolic fluorescence probe, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCH-FDA). The apoptosis of thymocytes was determined by measuring nuclear diameter using propidium iodide staining and nuclear DNA fragmentation. The viability of thymocytes was determined by trypan blue exclusion method that was found to gradually decrease after incubation of irradiated cells. Thymocytes labeled with DCH-FDA in PBS showed remarkably increased fluorescence intensity measured after 30 min. of 10 Gy radiation exposure indicating an enhanced formation of intracelluar ROS. DCH-FDA probe was found to sensitively detect g radiation effects on cells at low doses (10-50 cGy). The population of thymocytes with reduced nuclear diameter was found to progressively increase with the post-irradiation incubation. Moreover, fragmentation of nuclear DNA in irradiated thymocytes, as observed by ladder formation on agarose gel, was found to significantly increase after exposure to a particular radiation dose. Results suggest that increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generated in response to radio-oxidative stress were correlated with the induction of radiation induced apoptotic death in thymocytes. These observations and a highlight of emerging scenario of ionizing radiation effects on cell and membrane will be presented

  10. Study of Risk Factors of Perinatal Death in Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH

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    Mehul T Parmar, Harsha M Solanki, Vibha V Gosalia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertensive disorders are common complication occurring during pregnancy responsible for maternal & fetal mortality & morbidity. Though the condition is on decline, still stands a public health problem. Objectives: To determine risk factors of perinatal death in women with pregnancy induced hypertension. Materials & Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted over period of one year in the department of Obstetrics & Gynecology in NHL municipal college, Ahmadabad. A total of 100 pregnant women with PIH were enrolled in the study. A pre-tested structured Performa was prepared & women were interviewed to collect necessary information such as detailed history, clinical examination findings & investigations performed. Results were analyzed using MS Excel & Epi Info. Results: In the present study, 29%, 21% & 50 % were of mild PIH, moderate PIH & severe PIH respectively. The incidence of PIH was found more among teenage pregnancy, among primigravidas, those from low socio-economic status, those with history of PIH in previous pregnancy, having family history of PIH & those who were found obese. Emergency delivery, having diastolic blood pressure > 90 mm Hg, higher degree of proteinuria & low birth weight among PIH cases had an adverse perinatal outcome in terms of higher perinatal death. The findings were statistically significant On Univariate analysis; diastolic blood pressure & degree of proteinuria were found to be significant risk factors responsible for perinatal mortality among PIH women. Conclusion: Pregnancy induced hypertension is a common medical disorder associated with pregnancy. In the present study, PIH cases who delivered in emergency, with raised diastolic blood pressure & more proteinuria & neonate with low birth weight were found risk factors for perinatal death. Fetal morbidity & mortality can be reduced by early recognition & institutional management.

  11. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Campos, I.; Asín, L.; Torres, T. E.; Marquina, C.; Tres, A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Goya, G. F.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2 + ) or negative (COOH - ) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  12. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH2+) or negative (COOH-) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  13. Cell death induced by the application of alternating magnetic fields to nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos-Campos, I; AsIn, L; Torres, T E; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Mariano Esquillor s/n, CP 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Marquina, C, E-mail: goya@unizar.es [Condensed Matter Department, Sciences Faculty, University of Zaragoza, 50009 (Spain)

    2011-05-20

    In this work, the capability of primary, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to uptake iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is assessed and a strategy to induce selective cell death in these MNP-loaded DCs using external alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) is reported. No significant decrease in the cell viability of MNP-loaded DCs, compared to the control samples, was observed after five days of culture. The number of MNPs incorporated into the cytoplasm was measured by magnetometry, which confirmed that 1-5 pg of the particles were uploaded per cell. The intracellular distribution of these MNPs, assessed by transmission electron microscopy, was found to be primarily inside the endosomic structures. These cells were then subjected to an AMF for 30 min and the viability of the blank DCs (i.e. without MNPs), which were used as control samples, remained essentially unaffected. However, a remarkable decrease of viability from approximately 90% to 2-5% of DCs previously loaded with MNPs was observed after the same 30 min exposure to an AMF. The same results were obtained using MNPs having either positive (NH{sub 2}{sup +}) or negative (COOH{sup -}) surface functional groups. In spite of the massive cell death induced by application of AMF to MNP-loaded DCs, the number of incorporated magnetic particles did not raise the temperature of the cell culture. Clear morphological changes at the cell structure after magnetic field application were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, local damage produced by the MNPs could be the main mechanism for the selective cell death of MNP-loaded DCs under an AMF. Based on the ability of these cells to evade the reticuloendothelial system, these complexes combined with an AMF should be considered as a potentially powerful tool for tumour therapy.

  14. Autophagic Cell Death and Apoptosis Jointly Mediate Cisatracurium Besylate-Induced Cell Injury

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    Haixia Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cisatracurium besylate is an ideal non-depolarizing muscle relaxant which is widely used in clinical application. However, some studies have suggested that cisatracurium besylate can affect cell proliferation. Moreover, its specific mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that the number of GFP-LC3 (green fluoresent protein-light chain 3 positive autophagosomes and the rate of mitochondria fracture both increased significantly in drug-treated GFP-LC3 and MitoDsRed stable HeLa cells. Moreover, cisatracurium promoted the co-localization of LC3 and mitochondria and induced formation of autolysosomes. Levels of mitochondrial proteins decreased, which were reversed by the lysosome inhibitor Bafinomycin A1. Similar results with evidence of dose-dependent effects were found in both HeLa and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs. Cisatracurium lowered HUVEC viability to 0.16 (OD490 at 100 µM and to 0.05 (OD490 after 48 h in vitro; it increased the cell death rate to 56% at 100 µM and to 60% after 24 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.01. Cell proliferation decreased significantly by four fold in Atg5 WT (wildtype MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblast (p < 0.01 but was unaffected in Atg5 KO (Knockout MEF, even upon treatment with a high dose of cisatracurium. Cisatracurium induced significant increase in cell death of wild-type MEFs even in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD. Thus, we conclude that activation of both the autophagic cell death and cell apoptosis pathways contributes to cisatracurium-mediated cell injury.

  15. Quercetin sensitizes fluconazole-resistant candida albicans to induce apoptotic cell death by modulating quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B N; Upreti, D K; Singh, B R; Pandey, G; Verma, S; Roy, S; Naqvi, A H; Rawat, A K S

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates group behaviors of Candida albicans such as biofilm, hyphal growth, and virulence factors. The sesquiterpene alcohol farnesol, a QS molecule produced by C. albicans, is known to regulate the expression of virulence weapons of this fungus. Fluconazole (FCZ) is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that is used for the treatment of C. albicans infections. While FCZ can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower concentrations, quercetin (QC), a dietary flavonoid isolated from an edible lichen (Usnea longissima), can be implemented as a sensitizing agent for FCZ-resistant C. albicans NBC099, enhancing the efficacy of FCZ. QC enhanced FCZ-mediated cell killing of NBC099 and also induced cell death. These experiments indicated that the combined application of both drugs was FCZ dose dependent rather than QC dose dependent. In addition, we found that QC strongly suppressed the production of virulence weapons-biofilm formation, hyphal development, phospholipase, proteinase, esterase, and hemolytic activity. Treatment with QC also increased FCZ-mediated cell death in NBC099 biofilms. Interestingly, we also found that QC enhances the anticandidal activity of FCZ by inducing apoptotic cell death. We have also established that this sensitization is reliant on the farnesol response generated by QC. Molecular docking studies also support this conclusion and suggest that QC can form hydrogen bonds with Gln969, Thr1105, Ser1108, Arg1109, Asn1110, and Gly1061 in the ATP binding pocket of adenylate cyclase. Thus, this QS-mediated combined sensitizer (QC)-anticandidal agent (FCZ) strategy may be a novel way to enhance the efficacy of FCZ-based therapy of C. albicans infections. PMID:25645848

  16. Regeneration, Plasticity, and Induced Molecular Programs in Adult Zebrafish Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosacak, Mehmet Ilyas; Papadimitriou, Christos; Kizil, Caghan

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative capacity of the brain is a variable trait within animals. Aquatic vertebrates such as zebrafish have widespread ability to renew their brains upon damage, while mammals have—if not none—very limited overall regenerative competence. Underlying cause of such a disparity is not fully evident; however, one of the reasons could be activation of peculiar molecular programs, which might have specific roles after injury or damage, by the organisms that regenerate. If this hypothesis is correct, then there must be genes and pathways that (a) are expressed only after injury or damage in tissues, (b) are biologically and functionally relevant to restoration of neural tissue, and (c) are not detected in regenerating organisms. Presence of such programs might circumvent the initial detrimental effects of the damage and subsequently set up the stage for tissue redevelopment to take place by modulating the plasticity of the neural stem/progenitor cells. Additionally, if transferable, those “molecular mechanisms of regeneration” could open up new avenues for regenerative therapies of humans in clinical settings. This review focuses on the recent studies addressing injury/damage-induced molecular programs in zebrafish brain, underscoring the possibility of the presence of genes that could be used as biomarkers of neural plasticity and regeneration. PMID:26417601

  17. Methylphenidate treatment induces oxidative stress in young rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Márcio R; Reinke, Adalisa; Petronilho, Fabrícia C; Gomes, Karin M; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2006-03-17

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is frequently prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Psychostimulants can cause long-lasting neurochemical and behavioral adaptations. Here, we evaluated oxidative damage in the rat brain and the differential age-dependent response to MPH after acute and chronic exposure. We investigated the oxidative damage, assessed by the thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), and the protein carbonyl assays in cerebellum, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebral cortex of young (25 days old) and adult (60 days old) male Wistar rats after acute and chronic exposure to MPH. Chronic MPH-treated young rats presented a dose-dependent increase in TBARS content and protein carbonyls formation in specific rat brain regions. In the acute exposure, only MPH highest dose increased lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. No difference in protein carbonylation was observed among groups in all structures analyzed. In adult rats, we did not find oxidative damage in both acute and chronic treatment. Chronic exposure to MPH in induces oxidative damage in young rat brain, differentially from chronic exposure during adulthood. These findings highlight the need for further research to improve understanding of MPH effects on developing nervous system and the potential consequences in adulthood resulting from early-life drug exposure. PMID:16494852

  18. Bacoside A: Role in Cigarette Smoking Induced Changes in Brain

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    G. Vani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking (CS is a major health hazard that exerts diverse physiologic and biochemical effects mediated by the components present and generated during smoking. Recent experimental studies have shown predisposition to several biological consequences from both active and passive cigarette smoke exposure. In particular, passive smoking is linked to a number of adverse health effects which are equally harmful as active smoking. A pragmatic approach should be considered for designing a pharmacological intervention to combat the adverse effects of passive smoking. This review describes the results from a controlled experimental condition, testing the effect of bacoside A (BA on the causal role of passive/secondhand smoke exposure that caused pathological and neurological changes in rat brain. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke induced significant changes in rat brain histologically and at the neurotransmitter level, lipid peroxidation states, mitochondrial functions, membrane alterations, and apoptotic damage in rat brain. Bacoside A is a neuroactive agent isolated from Bacopa monnieri. As a neuroactive agent, BA was effective in combating these changes. Future research should examine the effects of BA at molecular level and assess its functional effects on neurobiological and behavioral processes associated with passive smoke.

  19. Unc93b Induces Apoptotic Cell Death and Is Cleaved by Host and Enteroviral Proteases.

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    Katharine G Harris

    Full Text Available Unc93b is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-resident transmembrane protein that serves to bind and traffic toll-like receptors (TLRs from the ER to their appropriate subcellular locations for ligand sensing. Because of its role in TLR trafficking, Unc93b is necessary for an effective innate immune response to coxsackievirus B3 (CVB, a positive-sense single stranded RNA virus belonging to the enterovirus family. Here, we show that Unc93b is cleaved by a CVB-encoded cysteine protease (3Cpro during viral replication. Further, we define a role for Unc93b in the induction of apoptotic cell death and show that expression of wild-type Unc93b, but not a mutant incapable of binding TLRs or exiting the ER (H412R, induces apoptosis. Furthermore, we show that cellular caspases activated during apoptosis directly cleave Unc93b. Interestingly, we show that the 3Cpro- and caspase-mediated cleavage of Unc93b both occur within ten amino acids in the distal N-terminus of Unc93b. Mechanistically, neither caspase-mediated nor 3Cpro-mediated cleavage of Unc93b altered its trafficking function, inhibited its role in facilitating TLR3 or TLR8 signaling, or altered its apoptosis-inducing effects. Taken together, our studies show that Unc93b is targeted by both viral- and host cell-specific proteases and identify a function of Unc93b in the induction of apoptotic cell death.

  20. Salt stress-induced cell death in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affenzeller, Matthias Josef; Darehshouri, Anza; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a key element in normal plant growth and development which may also be induced by various abiotic and biotic stress factors including salt stress. In the present study, morphological, biochemical, and physiological responses of the theoretically immortal unicellular freshwater green alga Micrasterias denticulata were examined after salt (200 mM NaCl or 200 mM KCl) and osmotic stress induced by iso-osmotic sorbitol. KCl caused morphological changes such as cytoplasmic vacuolization, extreme deformation of mitochondria, and ultrastructural changes of Golgi and ER. However, prolonged salt stress (24 h) led to the degradation of organelles by autophagy, a special form of PCD, both in NaCl- and KCl-treated cells. This was indicated by the enclosure of organelles by ER-derived double membranes. DNA of NaCl- and KCl-stressed cells but not of sorbitol-treated cells showed a ladder-like pattern on agarose gel, which means that the ionic rather than the osmotic component of salt stress leads to the activation of the responsible endonuclease. DNA laddering during salt stress could be abrogated by addition of Zn(2+). Neither cytochrome c release from mitochondria nor increase in caspase-3-like activity occurred after salt stress. Reactive oxygen species could be detected within 5 min after the onset of salt and osmotic stress. Respiration, photosynthetic activity, and pigment composition indicated an active metabolism which supports programmed rather than necrotic cell death in Micrasterias after salt stress. PMID:19213813

  1. Salt stress-induced cell death in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affenzeller, Matthias Josef; Darehshouri, Anza; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a key element in normal plant growth and development which may also be induced by various abiotic and biotic stress factors including salt stress. In the present study, morphological, biochemical, and physiological responses of the theoretically immortal unicellular freshwater green alga Micrasterias denticulata were examined after salt (200 mM NaCl or 200 mM KCl) and osmotic stress induced by iso-osmotic sorbitol. KCl caused morphological changes such as cytoplasmic vacuolization, extreme deformation of mitochondria, and ultrastructural changes of Golgi and ER. However, prolonged salt stress (24 h) led to the degradation of organelles by autophagy, a special form of PCD, both in NaCl- and KCl-treated cells. This was indicated by the enclosure of organelles by ER-derived double membranes. DNA of NaCl- and KCl-stressed cells but not of sorbitol-treated cells showed a ladder-like pattern on agarose gel, which means that the ionic rather than the osmotic component of salt stress leads to the activation of the responsible endonuclease. DNA laddering during salt stress could be abrogated by addition of Zn2+. Neither cytochrome c release from mitochondria nor increase in caspase-3-like activity occurred after salt stress. Reactive oxygen species could be detected within 5 min after the onset of salt and osmotic stress. Respiration, photosynthetic activity, and pigment composition indicated an active metabolism which supports programmed rather than necrotic cell death in Micrasterias after salt stress. PMID:19213813

  2. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  3. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; Muenzer, Jared T; Chang, Kathy C; Davis, Chris G; McDunn, Jonathan E; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hilliard, Carolyn A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Grigsby, Perry W; Hunt, Clayton R

    2007-04-01

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues. PMID:17307150

  4. CYTOTOXICITY AND MODE OF CELL DEATH INDUCED BY TRIPHENYLTIN (IV COMPOUNDS IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normah Awang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of newly synthesized organotin (IV with N-alkyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate ligands namely triphenyltin (IV ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (compound 1 and triphenyltin (IV butylphenyldithiocarbamate (compound 2 were assessed for their cytotoxic effect against HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells and human CCD-18Co normal colon cells. The cytotoxicity of these organotins in both cells was assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazholium bromide (MTT assay upon 24 h treatment. Both compounds demonstrated potent cytotoxicity towards HT-29 cells with the IC50 of 0.18 µM for compound 1 and 0.20 µM for compound 2. Interestingly, compound 1 exhibited lower cytotoxicity towards CCD-18Co with IC50 of 1.55 µM whereas no IC50 was detected for compound 2 up to 2 µM treatment. The mode of cell death was determined based on the externalization of phosphatidylserine using flow cytometry. Cells treated with compound 1 and compound 2 were mainly viable and the apoptotic cell death was around 10% which suggests that both compounds induced growth arrest. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that both compounds were selective towards human colorectal cells by giving a strong cytotoxicity to cancer cells and low toxicity towards normal cells. Both compounds were suggested to induce growth arrest in HT-29 cells.

  5. Sesamol protects human embryonic kidney cells from radiation induced cell death: a potential radioprotective agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioprotectors are agents which reduce the radiation effects on cell when applied prior to exposure of radiation. In our earlier studies, we have demonstrated that sesamol protected DNA (plasmid and calf thymus) and V79 cells from radiation induced cell death and the effect was higher (DMF=2) in comparison to melatonin (DMF=1.3). This prompted us to study, sesamol mediated radioprotection in detail to understand the mechanism of action. We have chosen human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells to understand the mechanism of radioprotection. The HEK cells were treated with sesamol before exposure of g rays (60Co teletherapy, Bhabhatron II) in the radiation dose range 0-7 Gy for clonogenic survival. Toxicity, antioxidant enzyme activity other biochemical assays were performed. Flow cytometric analysis (FACS Calibre, BD, USA) was used to determine the apoptotic population and mitochondrial membrane potential (Rh 123, JC-1). ROS was determined using DCFHDA. Cell cycle analysis, caspase 3 activity and cytochrome C were also measured. Results suggested that sesamol protected HEK cells from cell death. The dose modifying factor for sesamol was 1.3, whereas the alpha protection factor was 2. Sesamol inhibited radiation induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase; ROS generation and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activity. Sesamol inhibited damage of critical cellular components (protein, lipids, membrane and amino acid) and maintained the redox status of cells. The results will be helpful in understanding the mechanistic aspects and development of sesamol based radioprotector. (author)

  6. Cadmium induces neuronal cell death through reactive oxygen species activated by GADD153

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seungwoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cadmium(Cd, a heavy metal, which has a potent harmful effects, is a highly stress-inducible material that is robustly expressed following disruption of homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER (so-called ER stress. The mechanism Cd induced cell death of neuroblastoma cells complex, involving cellular signaling pathways as yet incompletely defined but, in part, involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Several studies have correlated GADD153 expression with cell death, but a mechanistic link between GADD153 and apoptosis has never been demonstrated. Results SH-SY5Y cells were treated Cd led to increase in intracellular ROS levels. ROS generation is not consistent with intracellular [Ca2+]. The exposure of neuroblastoma cells to Cd led to increase in intracellular GADD153 and Bak levels in a doses and time dependent manner. The induction of these genes by Cd was attenuated by NAC. Cd-induced apoptosis is decreased in GADD153 knockdown cells compared with normal cells. The effect of GADD153 on the binding of C/EBP to the Bak promoters were analyzed ChIP assay. Basal constitutive GADD153 recruitment to the –3,398/–3,380 region of the Bak promoter is observed in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusions The exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to Cd led to increase in intracellular ROS levels in a doses and time dependent manner. The generation of ROS result in the induction of GADD153 is causative of cadmium-induced apoptosis. GADD153 regulates Bak expression by its binding to promoter region (between −3,398 and −3,380. Therefore, we conclude that GADD153 sensitizes cells to ROS through mechanisms that involve up-regulation of BAK and enhanced oxidant injury.

  7. Inhibition of thymus cell proliferation: possibilities of elociting natural cell death with the organ and its contribution to the induced interphase death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallelism was noted between the suppression of proliferation and the amount of cells dying in mouse thymus after the effects inducing cell destruction. However, inhibition of DNA synthesis under the effect of nontoxic doses of arabinoside cytosine increased insignificantly the number of dying cells as compared to normal. This indicated the absence of the masking effect of reutilization of degradation products of dying cells, minor amounts of cells normally dying in the thymus and their insignificant contribution to the induced cell death after the effects leading to inhibition of cell proliferation

  8. Metabolomic Analyses of Brain Tissue in Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation Reveal Specific Redox Alterations-Protective Effects of the Oxygen Radical Scavenger Edaravone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Naomi; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Yara, Miki;

    2015-01-01

    analyzing the preventive effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on sepsis-induced brain alterations. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and the mice were divided into three groups-CLP vehicle (CLPV), CLP and edaravone (MCI-186, 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) (CLPE), and...... induced by cecal ligation alters cerebral redox status and supports a proapoptotic phenotype. The free radical scavenger edavarone reduces mortality of septic mice and protects against sepsis-induced neuronal cell death....

  9. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. ► NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H2O2 facilitates it. ► Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. ► Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H2O2-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H2O2-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D’s critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  10. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Chao [Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210024, Jiangsu (China); Yang, Bo [Department of Dermatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying [Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Yunnan Provincial Institute of Dermatology, Kunming 650032, Yunnan (China); Yang, Yan-li [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210024, Jiangsu (China); He, Li, E-mail: heli2662@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210024, Jiangsu (China); Bi, Zhi-Gang, E-mail: eltonbibenqhospital@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Dermatology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210019, Jiangsu (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  11. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. → Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. → Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. → Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  12. Effects of Gender and Estrogen Receptors on Iron-Induced Brain Edema Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that female mice have less brain edema and better recovery in neurological deficits after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and that 17β-estradiol treatment in male mice markedly reduces ICH-induced brain edema. In this study, we investigated the role of gender and the estrogen receptors (ERs) in iron-induced brain edema. There were three parts in this study: (1) either male or female mice received an injection of 10 μL FeCl2 (1 mM) into the right caudate; (2) females received an intracaudate injection of FeCl2 or saline with 1 μg of ICI 182,780 (antagonists of ERs) or vehicle; and (3) males were treated with the ER regulator tamoxifen (5 mg/kg subcutaneously) or vehicle 1 h after FeCl2 injection. Mice were euthanized 24 h later for brain edema determination. FeCl2 induced lower brain edema in females than in males. Co-injection of ICI 182,780 with FeCl2 aggravated iron-induced brain edema in female mice. ICI 182,780 itself did not induce brain edema at the dose of 1 μg. Tamoxifen treatment reduced FeCl2-induced brain edema in male mice. In conclusion, iron induced less brain edema in female mice than in males. ER modification can affect iron-induced brain edema. PMID:26463972

  13. Synaptic Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekwas, Andrzej; Somayaji, Mahadevabharath R; Gupta, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    Blast wave-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common injuries to military personnel. Brain tissue compression/tension due to blast-induced cranial deformations and shear waves due to head rotation may generate diffuse micro-damage to neuro-axonal structures and trigger a cascade of neurobiological events culminating in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. Although diffuse axonal injury is regarded as a signature wound of mild TBI (mTBI), blast loads may also cause synaptic injury wherein neuronal synapses are stretched and sheared. This synaptic injury may result in temporary disconnect of the neural circuitry and transient loss in neuronal communication. We hypothesize that mTBI symptoms such as loss of consciousness or dizziness, which start immediately after the insult, could be attributed to synaptic injury. Although empirical evidence is beginning to emerge; the detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic injury are still elusive. Coordinated in vitro-in vivo experiments and mathematical modeling studies can shed light into the synaptic injury mechanisms and their role in the potentiation of mTBI symptoms. PMID:26834697

  14. Enniatin B-induced cell death and inflammatory responses in RAW 267.4 murine macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsrud, A. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Solhaug, A. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Dendelé, B. [EA 4427 SeRAIC, IRSET, Université de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Rennes (France); Sandberg, W.J. [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Ivanova, L. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Kocbach Bølling, A. [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Lagadic-Gossmann, D. [EA 4427 SeRAIC, IRSET, Université de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Rennes (France); Refsnes, M.; Becher, R. [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, G. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, P.O. Box 750, Centrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Holme, J.A., E-mail: jorn.holme@fhi.no [Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, N-0403 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-05-15

    The mycotoxin enniatin B (EnnB) is predominantly produced by species of the Fusarium genera, and often found in grain. The cytotoxic effect of EnnB has been suggested to be related to its ability to form ionophores in cell membranes. The present study examines the effects of EnnB on cell death, differentiation, proliferation and pro-inflammatory responses in the murine monocyte–macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Exposure to EnnB for 24 h caused an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1-phase with a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1. This cell cycle-arrest was possibly also linked to the reduced cellular ability to capture and internalize receptors as illustrated by the lipid marker ganglioside GM1. EnnB also increased the number of apoptotic, early apoptotic and necrotic cells, as well as cells with elongated spindle-like morphology. The Neutral Red assay indicated that EnnB induced lysosomal damage; supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing accumulation of lipids inside the lysosomes forming lamellar structures/myelin bodies. Enhanced levels of activated caspase-1 were observed after EnnB exposure and the caspase-1 specific inhibitor ZYVAD-FMK reduced EnnB-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EnnB increased the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in cells primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and this response was reduced by both ZYVAD-FMK and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me. In conclusion, EnnB was found to induce cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. Caspase-1 appeared to be involved in the apoptosis and release of IL-1β and possibly activation of the inflammasome through lysosomal damage and leakage of cathepsin B. -- Highlights: ► The mycotoxin EnnB induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. ► The G0/G1-arrest was linked to a reduced ability to internalize receptors. ► EnnB caused lysosomal damage, leakage of cathepsin B and caspase-1 cleavage. ► Caspase-1 was partly involved in both apoptosis and release of IL-1

  15. Enniatin B-induced cell death and inflammatory responses in RAW 267.4 murine macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mycotoxin enniatin B (EnnB) is predominantly produced by species of the Fusarium genera, and often found in grain. The cytotoxic effect of EnnB has been suggested to be related to its ability to form ionophores in cell membranes. The present study examines the effects of EnnB on cell death, differentiation, proliferation and pro-inflammatory responses in the murine monocyte–macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Exposure to EnnB for 24 h caused an accumulation of cells in the G0/G1-phase with a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1. This cell cycle-arrest was possibly also linked to the reduced cellular ability to capture and internalize receptors as illustrated by the lipid marker ganglioside GM1. EnnB also increased the number of apoptotic, early apoptotic and necrotic cells, as well as cells with elongated spindle-like morphology. The Neutral Red assay indicated that EnnB induced lysosomal damage; supported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing accumulation of lipids inside the lysosomes forming lamellar structures/myelin bodies. Enhanced levels of activated caspase-1 were observed after EnnB exposure and the caspase-1 specific inhibitor ZYVAD-FMK reduced EnnB-induced apoptosis. Moreover, EnnB increased the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in cells primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and this response was reduced by both ZYVAD-FMK and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me. In conclusion, EnnB was found to induce cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. Caspase-1 appeared to be involved in the apoptosis and release of IL-1β and possibly activation of the inflammasome through lysosomal damage and leakage of cathepsin B. -- Highlights: ► The mycotoxin EnnB induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and inflammation. ► The G0/G1-arrest was linked to a reduced ability to internalize receptors. ► EnnB caused lysosomal damage, leakage of cathepsin B and caspase-1 cleavage. ► Caspase-1 was partly involved in both apoptosis and release of IL-1

  16. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  17. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  18. Targeting Werner syndrome protein sensitizes U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells to selenium-induced DNA damage response and necrotic death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Wu, Ryan T Y; Wu, Min;

    2012-01-01

    to MSeA-induced necrotic death. Co-treatment with the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase inhibitor KU55933 desensitized the control shRNA cells, but not WRN shRNA cells, to MSeA treatment. WRN did not affect MSeA-induced ATM phosphorylation on Ser-1981 or H2A.X phosphorylation on Ser-139, but...

  19. Neuroprotective effects of Triticum aestivum L. against beta-amyloid-induced cell death and memory impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jung-Hee; Kim, Chang-Yul; Lim, Sun Ha; Yang, Chae Ha; Song, Kyung-Sik; Han, Hyung Soo; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Lee, Jongwon

    2010-01-01

    beta-Amyloid (A beta) is a key component of senile plaques, neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been reported to induce cell death via oxidative stress. This study investigated the protective effects of Triticum aestivum L. (TAL) on A beta-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and cognitive dysfunctions in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Cells treated with A beta exhibited decreased viability and apoptotic features, such as DNA fragmentation, alterations in mitochondria and an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which were attenuated by TAL extract (TALE) pretreatment. To elucidate the neuroprotective mechanisms of TALE, the study examined A beta-induced oxidative stress and cellular defense. TALE pretreatment suppressed A beta-increased intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via up-regulation of glutathione, an essential endogenous antioxidant. To further verify the effect of TALE on memory impairments, A beta or scopolamine was injected in SD rats and a water maze task conducted as a spatial memory test. A beta or scopolamine treatment increased the time taken to find the platform during training trials, which was decreased by TALE pretreatment. Furthermore, one of the active components of TALE, total dietary fiber also effectively inhibited A beta-induced cytotoxicity and scopolamine-caused memory deficits. These results suggest that TALE may have preventive and/or therapeutic potential in the management of AD. PMID:19441012

  20. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a rat histiocytoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kolla V, P Rasad; Aftab Taiyab; D Jyothi; Usha K Srinivas; Amere S Sreedhar

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock response is associated with the synthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsps) which is strictly regulated by different members of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs). We previously reported that a rat histiocytoma, BC-8 failed to synthesize Hsps when subjected to typical heat shock conditions (42°C, 60 min). The lack of Hsp synthesis in these cells was due to a failure in HSF1 DNA binding activity. In the present study we report that BC-8 tumor cells when subjected to heat shock at higher temperature (43°C, 60 min) or incubation for longer time at 42°C, exhibited necrosis characteristics; however, under mild heat shock (42°C, 30 min) conditions cells showed activation of autophagy. Mild heat shock treatment induced proteolysis of HSF1, and under similar conditions we observed an increase in HSF2 expression followed by its enhanced DNA binding activity. Inhibiting HSF1 proteolysis by reversible proteasome inhibition failed to inhibit heat shock induced autophagy. Compromising HSF2 expression but not HSF1 resulted in the inhibition of autophagy, suggesting HSF2 dependent activation of autophagy. We are reporting for the first time that HSF2 is heat inducible and functions in heat shock induced autophagic cell death in BC-8 tumor cells.

  1. Computed tomographic angiography criteria in the diagnosis of brain death - comparison of sensitivity and interobserver reliability of different evaluation scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, Marcin; Walecka, A. [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Szczecin (Poland); Bohatyrewicz, R.; Solek-Pastuszka, J. [Pomeranian Medical University, Clinic of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Szczecin (Poland); Safranow, K. [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Chemistry, Szczecin (Poland); Walecki, J. [The Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw (Poland); Rowinski, O. [Medical University of Warsaw, 2nd Department of Clinical Radiology, Warsaw (Poland); Czajkowski, Z. [Regional Joint Hospital, Szczecin (Poland); Guzinski, M. [Wroclaw Medical University, Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw (Poland); Burzynska, M. [Wroclaw Medical University, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Wroclaw (Poland); Wojczal, J. [Medical University of Lublin, Department of Neurology, Lublin (Poland)

    2014-08-15

    The standardized diagnostic criteria for computed tomographic angiography (CTA) in diagnosis of brain death (BD) are not yet established. The aim of the study was to compare the sensitivity and interobserver agreement of the three previously used scales of CTA for the diagnosis of BD. Eighty-two clinically brain-dead patients underwent CTA with a delay of 40 s after contrast injection. Catheter angiography was used as the reference standard. CTA results were assessed by two radiologists, and the diagnosis of BD was established according to 10-, 7-, and 4-point scales. Catheter angiography confirmed the diagnosis of BD in all cases. Opacification of certain cerebral vessels as indicator of BD was highly sensitive: cortical segments of the middle cerebral artery (96.3 %), the internal cerebral vein (98.8 %), and the great cerebral vein (98.8 %). Other vessels were less sensitive: the pericallosal artery (74.4 %), cortical segments of the posterior cerebral artery (79.3 %), and the basilar artery (82.9 %). The sensitivities of the 10-, 7-, and 4-point scales were 67.1, 74.4, and 96.3 %, respectively (p < 0.001). Percentage interobserver agreement in diagnosis of BD reached 93 % for the 10-point scale, 89 % for the 7-point scale, and 95 % for the 4-point scale (p = 0.37). In the application of CTA to the diagnosis of BD, reducing the assessment of vascular opacification scale from a 10- to a 4-point scale significantly increases the sensitivity and maintains high interobserver reliability. (orig.)

  2. Original Protocol Using Computed Tomographic Angiography for Diagnosis of Brain Death: A Better Alternative to Standard Two-Phase Technique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Marcin; Sołek-Pastuszka, Joanna; Jurczyk, Krzysztof; Skrzywanek, Piotr; Guziński, Maciej; Czajkowski, Zenon; Mańko, Witold; Burzyńska, Małgorzata; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Walecka, Anna; Rowiński, Olgierd; Walecki, Jerzy; Bohatyrewicz, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The application of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for the diagnosis of brain death (BD) is limited because of the low sensitivity of the commonly used two-phase method consisting of assessing arterial and venous opacification at the 60th second after contrast injection. The hypothesis was that a reduction in the scanning delay might increase the sensitivity of the test. Therefore, an original technique using CTA was introduced and compared with catheter angiography as a reference. MATERIAL AND METHODS In a prospective multicenter trial, 84 clinically brain-dead patients were examined using CTA and catheter angiography. The sensitivities of original CTA technique, involving an arterial assessment at the 25th second and a venous assessment at the 40th second, and the standard CTA, involving an arterial and venous assessment at the 60th second, were compared to catheter angiography. RESULTS Catheter angiography results were consistent with the clinical diagnosis of BD in all cases. In comparison to catheter angiography, the sensitivity of original CTA technique was 0.93 (95%CI, 0.85-0.97; p<0.001) and 0.57 (95%CI, 0.46-0.68; p<0.001) for the standard protocol. The differences were statistically significant (p=0.03 for original CTA and p<0.001 for standard CTA). Decompressive craniectomy predisposes to a false-negative CTA result with a relative risk of 3.29 (95% CI, 1.76-5.81; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Our original technique using CTA for the assessment of the cerebral arteries during the arterial phase and the deep cerebral veins with a delay of 15 seconds is a highly sensitive test for the diagnosis of BD. This method may be a better alternative to the commonly used technique. PMID:26250464

  3. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction. PMID:27357950

  4. Staurosporine induces necroptotic cell death under caspase-compromised conditions in U937 cells.

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    Zsuzsanna A Dunai

    Full Text Available For a long time necrosis was thought to be an uncontrolled process but evidences recently have revealed that necrosis can also occur in a regulated manner. Necroptosis, a type of programmed necrosis is defined as a death receptor-initiated process under caspase-compromised conditions. The process requires the kinase activity of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3 and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL, as a substrate of RIPK3. The further downstream events remain elusive. We applied known inhibitors to characterize the contributing enzymes in necroptosis and their effect on cell viability and different cellular functions were detected mainly by flow cytometry. Here we report that staurosporine, the classical inducer of intrinsic apoptotic pathway can induce necroptosis under caspase-compromised conditions in U937 cell line. This process could be hampered at least partially by the RIPK1 inhibitor necrotstin-1 and by the heat shock protein 90 kDa inhibitor geldanamycin. Moreover both the staurosporine-triggered and the classical death ligand-induced necroptotic pathway can be effectively arrested by a lysosomal enzyme inhibitor CA-074-OMe and the recently discovered MLKL inhibitor necrosulfonamide. We also confirmed that the enzymatic role of poly(ADP-ribosepolymerase (PARP is dispensable in necroptosis but it contributes to membrane disruption in secondary necrosis. In conclusion, we identified a novel way of necroptosis induction that can facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of necroptosis. Our results shed light on alternative application of staurosporine, as a possible anticancer therapeutic agent. Furthermore, we showed that the CA-074-OMe has a target in the signaling pathway leading to necroptosis. Finally, we could differentiate necroptotic and secondary necrotic processes based on participation of PARP enzyme.

  5. Protective Effects of Salubrinal on Liver Injury in Rat Models of Brain Death

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    Tao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have indicated that endoplasmic reticulum stress participates in and mediates liver injury and apoptosis in brain-dead (BD rats. In this study, we observed the effect of salubrinal (Sal, Sigma, USA on liver cells in BD rats and explored its relevant mechanisms. Methods: Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were equally randomized into three groups: BD group, Sal group, and DMSO group. The BD models were established by increasing intracranial pressure in a modified, slow, and intermittent way. In the drug groups, Sal was administered 1 h before the induction of BD. After modeling was completed, the blood and liver samples were harvested. CHOP and Caspase-12 mRNA expression was detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PKR-like ER kinase (PERK, P-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, eIF2α, CHOP and caspase-12 expression was detected using western blotting (WB. CHOP and caspase-12 distribution and expression in liver tissues were determined using immunohistochemistry (IHC. Alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase level were detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. Hepatic cell apoptosis was detected using TUNEL. The results were analyzed using Quantity-one v4.62 software (Bio-Rad, USA. Results: CHOP and caspase-12 expression and PERK, eIF2α, and P-eIF2α protein expression showed no significant difference between BD group and DMSO group. Compared with BD group, Sal group had a significantly higher P-eIF2C level and a lower P-PERK level 2 h and 6 h after BD (P 0.05. After the Sal treatment, CHOP and caspase-12 mRNA expression significantly decreased 4 h after BD (P < 0.05. WB and IHC indicated that CHOP and caspase-12 expression also significantly decreased after Sal treatment. Sal was associated with improved liver function and decreased hepatic cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Sal can significantly reduce apoptosis in hepatic cells of BD rats. This protective effect may be

  6. Inducible gene manipulations in brain serotonergic neurons of transgenic rats.

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    Tillmann Weber

    Full Text Available The serotonergic (5-HT system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP, in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system.

  7. Parthenolide enhances sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to TRAIL by inducing death receptor 5 and promotes TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Lim; Liu, Yu-Chuan; Park, Young Ran; Seo, Seung Young; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, In Hee; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae-Ghon; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising cancer therapeutic agent. Recombinant human TRAIL has been evaluated in clinical trials, however, various malignant tumors are resistant to TRAIL. Parthenolide (PT) has recently been demonstrated as a highly effective anticancer agent and has been suggested to be used for combination therapy with other anticancer agents. In this study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms by which PT sensitizes colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. HT-29 (TRAIL-resistant) and HCT116 (TRAIL-sensitive) cells were treated with PT and/or TRAIL. The results demonstrated that combined treatment induced apoptosis which was determined using MTT, cell cycle analysis, Annexin V assay and Hoechst 33258 staining. Interestingly, we confirmed that HCT116 cells have much higher death receptor (DR) 5 than HT-29 cells and PT upregulates DR5 protein level and surface expression in both cell lines. Apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway was confirmed by detecting regulation of Bcl-2 family members, p53 cytochrome C release, and caspase cascades. These results suggest that PT sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis via upregulation of DR5 and mitochondria-dependent pathway. Combination treatment using PT and TRAIL may offer an effective strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance of certain CRC cells. PMID:25502339

  8. St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L. photomedicine: hypericin-photodynamic therapy induces metastatic melanoma cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Kleemann

    Full Text Available Hypericin, an extract from St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L., is a promising photosensitizer in the context of clinical photodynamic therapy due to its excellent photosensitizing properties and tumoritropic characteristics. Hypericin-PDT induced cytotoxicity elicits tumor cell death by various mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy-related cell death. However, limited reports on the efficacy of this photomedicine for the treatment of melanoma have been published. Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor due to its metastasizing potential and resistance to conventional cancer therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the response mechanisms of melanoma cells to hypericin-PDT in an in vitro tissue culture model. Hypericin was taken up by all melanoma cells and partially co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, lysosomes and melanosomes, but not the nucleus. Light activation of hypericin induced a rapid, extensive modification of the tubular mitochondrial network into a beaded appearance, loss of structural details of the endoplasmic reticulum and concomitant loss of hypericin co-localization. Surprisingly the opposite was found for lysosomal-related organelles, suggesting that the melanoma cells may be using these intracellular organelles for hypericin-PDT resistance. In line with this speculation we found an increase in cellular granularity, suggesting an increase in pigmentation levels in response to hypericin-PDT. Pigmentation in melanoma is related to a melanocyte-specific organelle, the melanosome, which has recently been implicated in drug trapping, chemotherapy and hypericin-PDT resistance. However, hypericin-PDT was effective in killing both unpigmented (A375 and 501mel and pigmented (UCT Mel-1 melanoma cells by specific mechanisms involving the externalization of phosphatidylserines, cell shrinkage and loss of cell membrane integrity. In addition, this treatment resulted in extrinsic (A375 and

  9. Cell death induced by GSM 900-MHz and DCS 1800-MHz mobile telephony radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay '' a well known technique widely used for detecting fragmented DNA in various types of cells'' was used to detect cell death (DNA fragmentation) in a biological model, the early and mid stages of oogenesis of the insect Drosophila melanogaster. The flies were exposed in vivo to either GSM 900-MHz (Global System for Mobile telecommunications) or DCS 1800-MHz (Digital Cellular System) radiation from a common digital mobile phone, for few minutes per day during the first 6 days of their adult life. The exposure conditions were similar to those to which a mobile phone user is exposed, and were determined according to previous studies of ours [D.J. Panagopoulos, A. Karabarbounis, L.H. Margaritis, Effect of GSM 900-MHz mobile phone radiation on the reproductive capacity of D. melanogaster, Electromagn. Biol. Med. 23 (1) (2004) 29''43; D.J. Panagopoulos, N. Messini, A. Karabarbounis, A.L. Philippetis, L.H. Margaritis, Radio frequency electromagnetic radiation within ''safety levels'' alters the physiological function of insects, in: P. Kostarakis, P. Stavroulakis (Eds.), Proceedings of the Millennium International Workshop on Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, October 17''20, 2000, pp. 169''175, ISBN: 960-86733-0-5; D.J. Panagopoulos, L.H. Margaritis, Effects of electromagnetic fields on the reproductive capacity of D. melanogaster, in: P. Stavroulakis (Ed.), Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields, Springer, 2003, pp. 545''578], which had shown a large decrease in the oviposition of the same insect caused by GSM radiation. Our present results suggest that the decrease in oviposition previously reported, is due to degeneration of large numbers of egg chambers after DNA fragmentation of their constituent cells, induced by both types of mobile telephony radiation. Induced cell death is recorded for the first time, in all types of

  10. Determination of Cell Death Induced by Lovastatin on Human Colon Cell Line HT29 Using the Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Marzieh; Rezaei, Mohsen; Kalantari, Heibatullah; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Background Apoptosis or programmed cell death is an essential process for elimination of damaged cells. Also, induction of apoptosis is fundamental for treating cancer. Screening for agents that induce apoptosis in tumor cells help in the development of novel agents for cancer treatment. Numerous studies suggest that the exposure of tumor cells to statins can lead to cell death via two separate processes: apoptosis or necrosis. Severe fragmentation of DNA during apoptosis can be readily measu...

  11. Autoradiographic studies of cell kinetics after whole body x-ray irradiation. Part 2. Postradiation death of differentiating and proliferating subependymal cells in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracheva, N.D.

    1982-03-01

    Post-radiation cell death in the subependymal zone of the rat brain was investigated by injection of /sub 3/H-thymidine 60 to 80 min prior to x-ray irradiation of the animals with 50, 150, or 300 R. Subsequent correlation of autoradiographic findings with the cell cycle showed that the proliferating and differentiating (D) cells followed a fluctuating pattern in cell death, in that cells irradiated in the early G/sub 2/ and the S phases showed four peaks of mitotic cell death in the first postradiation cell cycle. Cells injured in the G/sub 1/ phase lost the capacity for DNA synthesis, since the 300 R-irradiated cells failed to incorporate /sup 14/C-thymidine administered subsequently (3 H before sacrifice, 12 to 17 h after /sup 3/H-thymidine injection). Since these cells did not die within 4 h of irradiation, their death evidently came about during the first postradiation cell cycle. The cell death pattern of the D cells coincided with the death peaks and mitotic peaks of the proliferating cells, indicating that the D cells retained the rhythm and phase sequence of the mitotic cycle in the form of a short cycle. All the irradiated cells entered mitosis with a one hour delay, and the total number of cell deaths was dosage-related. 11 references, 4 figures.

  12. CCl4 induces tissue-type plasminogen activator in rat brain; protective effects of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentiadou, Sophia N; Tsantarliotou, Maria P; Zervos, Ioannis A; Nikolaidis, Efstathios; Georgiadis, Marios P; Taitzoglou, Ioannis A

    2013-11-01

    The high metabolic rate and relatively low antioxidant defenses of the lipid-rich brain tissue render it highly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, whereas the implication of ROS in the pathogenesis of several diseases in the central nervous system is well-established. The plasminogen activator (PA) system is a key modulator of extracellular proteolysis, extracellular matrix remodeling and neuronal cell signaling and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases. This study evaluates the role of tissue-type PA (t-PA) in oxidative stress and the protective role of dietary antioxidants in the rat brain. We used the CCl4 experimental model of ROS-induced lipid peroxidation and evaluated the antioxidant effect of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. CCl4-treated Wistar rats exhibited elevated brain t-PA activity, which was decreased upon long-term administration of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity was also slightly elevated by CCl4, but this increase was not affected by the antioxidants. We hypothesize that the CCl4-induced t-PA activity indicates extracellular proteolytic activity that may be linked to neuronal cell death and brain damage. Vitamin E or antioxidants present in oregano or rosemary are effective in inhibiting t-PA elevation and can be considered as a potential protection against neuronal damage. PMID:23831191

  13. Blocking TWEAK-Fn14 interaction inhibits hematopoietic stem cell transplantation-induced intestinal cell death and reduces GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Martin; Brandl, Andreas; Siegmund, Daniela; Mottok, Anja; Schäfer, Viktoria; Biehl, Marlene; Kraus, Sabrina; Bäuerlein, Carina A; Ritz, Miriam; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Schwinn, Stefanie; Seher, Axel; Grabinger, Thomas; Einsele, Hermann; Rosenwald, Andreas; Brunner, Thomas; Beilhack, Andreas; Wajant, Harald

    2015-07-23

    Inhibition of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK)/fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) system reduces intestinal cell death and disease development in several models of colitis. In view of the crucial role of TNF and intestinal cell death in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the ability of TWEAK to enhance TNF-induced cell death, we tested here the therapeutic potential of Fn14 blockade on allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT)-induced intestinal GVHD. An Fn14-specific blocking human immunoglobulin G1 antibody variant with compromised antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity strongly inhibited the severity of murine allo-HCT-induced GVHD. Treatment of the allo-HCT recipients with this monoclonal antibody reduced cell death of gastrointestinal cells but neither affected organ infiltration by donor T cells nor cytokine production. Fn14 blockade also inhibited intestinal cell death in mice challenged with TNF. This suggests that the protective effect of Fn14 blockade in allo-HCT is based on the protection of intestinal cells from TNF-induced apoptosis and not due to immune suppression. Importantly, Fn14 blockade showed no negative effect on graft-versus-leukemia/lymphoma (GVL) activity. Thus, ADCC-defective Fn14-blocking antibodies are not only possible novel GVL effect-sparing therapeutics for the treatment of GVHD but might also be useful for the treatment of other inflammatory bowel diseases where TNF-induced cell death is of relevance. PMID:26012567

  14. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  15. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaña, Fabián [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Faini, Francesca [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lapier, Michel; Pavani, Mario [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kemmerling, Ulrike [Anatomy and Developmental Biology Program, ICBM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Jara, José [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Parra, Eduardo [Laboratory of Experimental Biomedicine, University of Tarapaca, Campus Esmeralda, Iquique (Chile); Ferreira, Jorge, E-mail: jferreir@med.uchile.cl [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  16. Hydrogen peroxide contributes to the epithelial cell death induced by the oral mitis group of streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Okahashi

    Full Text Available Members of the mitis group of streptococci are normal inhabitants of the commensal flora of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract of humans. Some mitis group species, such as Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus sanguinis, are primary colonizers of the human oral cavity. Recently, we found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 produced by S. oralis is cytotoxic to human macrophages, suggesting that streptococcus-derived H2O2 may act as a cytotoxin. Since epithelial cells provide a physical barrier against pathogenic microbes, we investigated their susceptibility to infection by H2O2-producing streptococci in this study. Infection by S. oralis and S. sanguinis was found to stimulate cell death of Detroit 562, Calu-3 and HeLa epithelial cell lines at a multiplicity of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited S. oralis cytotoxicity, and H2O2 alone was capable of eliciting epithelial cell death. Moreover, S. oralis mutants lacking the spxB gene encoding pyruvate oxidase, which are deficient in H2O2 production, exhibited reduced cytotoxicity toward Detroit 562 epithelial cells. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that both S. oralis and H2O2 induced interleukin-6 production in Detroit 562 epithelial cells. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 is cytotoxic to epithelial cells, and promotes bacterial evasion of the host defense systems in the oral cavity and upper respiratory tracts.

  17. Mefloquine induces ROS mediated programmed cell death in malaria parasite: Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunjan, Sarika; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Tanuj; Dwivedi, Hemlata; Chauhan, Bhavana Singh; Imran Siddiqi, Mohammad; Tripathi, Renu

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies pioneer the existence of a novel programmed cell death pathway in malaria parasite plasmodium and suggest that it could be helpful in developing new targeted anti-malarial therapies. Considering this fact, we evaluated the underlying action mechanism of this pathway in mefloquine (MQ) treated parasite. Since cysteine proteases play a key role in apoptosis hence we performed preliminary computational simulations to determine binding affinity of MQ with metacaspase protein model. Binding pocket identified using computational studies, was docked with MQ to identify it's potential to bind with the predicted protein model. We further determined apoptotic markers such as mitochondrial dysregulation, activation of cysteine proteases and in situ DNA fragmentation in MQ treated/untreated parasites by cell based assay. Our results showed low mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced activity of cysteine protease and increased number of fragmented DNA in treated parasites compared to untreated ones. We next tested the involvement of oxidative stress in MQ mediated cell death and found significant increase in reactive oxygen species generation after 24 h of treatment. Therefore we conclude that apart from hemozoin inhibition, MQ is competent to induce apoptosis in plasmodium by activating metacaspase and ROS production. PMID:27357656

  18. Role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cocaine-induced microglial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Blaise Mathias; Yao, Honghong; Yang, Lu; Buch, Shilpa

    2013-06-01

    While it has been well-documented that drugs of abuse such as cocaine can enhance progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neuropathological disorders, the underlying mechanisms mediating these effects remain poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of cocaine on microglial viability. Herein we demonstrate that exposure of microglial cell line-BV2 or rat primary microglia to exogenous cocaine resulted in decreased cell viability as determined by MTS and TUNEL assays. Microglial toxicity of cocaine was accompanied by an increase in the expression of cleaved caspase-3 as demonstrated by western blot assays. Furthermore, increased microglial toxicity was also associated with a concomitant increase in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, an effect that was ameliorated in cells pretreated with NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, thus emphasizing the role of oxidative stress in this process. A novel finding of this study was the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) signaling mediators such as PERK, Elf2α, and CHOP, which were up regulated in cells exposed to cocaine. Reciprocally, blocking CHOP expression using siRNA ameliorated cocaine-mediated cell death. In conclusion these findings underscore the importance of ER stress in modulating cocaine induced microglial toxicity. Understanding the link between ER stress, oxidative stress and apoptosis could lead to the development of therapeutic strategies targeting cocaine-mediated microglial death/dysfunction. PMID:23404095

  19. Metallodrug induced apoptotic cell death and survival attempts are characterizable by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, K.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Meyer, D.

    2014-09-01

    Chrysotherapeutics are under investigation as new or additional treatments for different types of cancers. In this study, gold complexes were investigated for their anticancer potential using Raman spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to determine whether Raman spectroscopy could be used for the characterization of metallodrug-induced cell death. Symptoms of cell death such as decreased peak intensities of proteins bonds and phosphodiester bonds found in deoxyribose nucleic acids were evident in the principal component analysis of the spectra. Vibrational bands around 761 cm-1 and 1300 cm-1 (tryptophan, ethanolamine group, and phosphatidylethanolamine) and 1720 cm-1 (ester bonds associated with phospholipids) appeared in the Raman spectra of cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells after metallodrug treatment. The significantly (p cancer cells under chemical stress. Cancer cells excrete chemotherapeutics to improve their chances of survival and utilize glucose to achieve this. Raman spectroscopy was able to monitor a survival strategy of cancer cells in the form of glucose uptake to alleviate chemical stress. Raman spectroscopy was invaluable in obtaining molecular information generated by biomolecules affected by anticancer metallodrug treatments and presents an alternative to less reproducible, conventional biochemical assays for cytotoxicity analyses.

  20. Cell death induced by direct laser activation of singlet oxygen at 1270 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquez, F.; El Yazidi Belkoura, I.; Suret, P.; Randoux, S.; Courtade, E.

    2013-02-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a major role in many chemical and biological photo-oxidation processes. It has a high chemical reactivity, which is commonly harnessed for therapeutic issues. Indeed, singlet oxygen is recognized as the major cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. In this treatment of cancer, singlet oxygen is created, among other reactive species, by an indirect transfer of energy from light to molecular oxygen via excitation of a photosensitizer. In this paper, we show that the conventional singlet oxygen production scheme can be simplified. Production of singlet oxygen is achieved in living cells from photosensitizer-free 1270 nm laser excitation of the electronic ground state of molecular oxygen. The quantity of singlet oxygen produced in this way is sufficient to induce an oxidative stress leading to cell death. Other effects such as thermal stress are discriminated, and we conclude that cell death is only due to singlet oxygen creation. This new simplified scheme of singlet oxygen activation can be seen as a breakthrough for phototherapies of malignant diseases and/or as a non-invasive possibility to generate reactive oxygen species in a tightly controlled manner.

  1. Higher sensitivity of LEC strain rat in radiation-induced acute intestinal death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEC strain rats (LEC rats), which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4-5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats (WKAH rats). Radiation-induced acute intestinal death occurred at doses higher than 6.5 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 12.8 Gy in WKAH rats, respectively. By the probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD50/7 value of LEC rats was estimated to be 7.03 Gy which was significantly lower than that (12.99 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of small intestines from LEC rats 2 days after irradiation at the dose of 8.5 Gy showed severe epithelial death together with edema, whereas little or no significant changes were noted in intestinal epithelium of 8.5 Gy-irradiated WKAH rats. These results suggest that the radiosensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation appears to be higher than that of other strains of rats

  2. LSD1 and HY5 Antagonistically Regulate Red Light induced-Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eChai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD in plant is triggered by abiotic and biotic stress. Light-dependent PCD is unique to plants. Light-induced PCD also requires reactive oxygen species (ROS and salicylic acid (SA. In this study, lesion simulating disease1 (LSD1 and elongated hypocotyl 5 (HY5 perform opposite roles to regulate excess red light (RL-triggered PCD associated with ROS and SA production. Under RL, the lsd1 mutant released more ROS and SA and displayed a stronger cell death rate than the hy5 mutant. It was shown that active LSD1 converted into inactive form by changing the redox status of the plastoquinone pool, and HY5 interacted with phytochrome B (phyB to promote PCD in response to RL. LSD1 inhibited the enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1 expression by upregulating SR1, whereas HY5 enhanced the enhanced EDS1 expression by binding to the G-box of the EDS1 promoter. This study suggested that LSD1 and HY5 antagonistically modulated EDS1-dependent ROS and SA signaling; thus, PCD was mediated in response to RL.

  3. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in programmed nuclear death during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endoh Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed nuclear death (PND, which is also referred to as nuclear apoptosis, is a remarkable process that occurs in ciliates during sexual reproduction (conjugation. In Tetrahymena thermophila, when the new macronucleus differentiates, the parental macronucleus is selectively eliminated from the cytoplasm of the progeny, concomitant with apoptotic nuclear events. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not well understood. The parental macronucleus is engulfed by a large autophagosome, which contains numerous mitochondria that have lost their membrane potential. In animals, mitochondrial depolarization precedes apoptotic cell death, which involves DNA fragmentation and subsequent nuclear degradation. Results We focused on the role of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF during PND in Tetrahymena. The disruption of AIF delays the normal progression of PND, specifically, nuclear condensation and kilobase-size DNA fragmentation. AIF is localized in Tetrahymena mitochondria and is released into the macronucleus prior to nuclear condensation. In addition, AIF associates and co-operates with the mitochondrial DNase to facilitate the degradation of kilobase-size DNA, which is followed by oligonucleosome-size DNA laddering. Conclusions Our results suggest that Tetrahymena AIF plays an important role in the degradation of DNA at an early stage of PND, which supports the notion that the mitochondrion-initiated apoptotic DNA degradation pathway is widely conserved among eukaryotes.

  4. Hypersensitivity of LEC strain rats in radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEC strain rats, which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4 to 5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X ray-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats. Radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death occurred at doses higher than 2.0 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 7.4 Gy in WKAH rats. By probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD50/30 value for LEC rats was 3.0 Gy which was significantly lower than that (7.8 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of the bone marrows from both strains after irradiation at a dose of 4.0 Gy revealed that a number of hemopoietic cells were recovered in WKAH rats on day 8 after irradiation, but not in LEC rats. These results suggested the hypersensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation in connection with acute bone-marrow death. (author)

  5. Hypersensitivity of LEC strain rats in radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masanobu; Endoh, Daiji; Kon, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Tadashi; Sato, Fumiaki; Kasai, Noriyuki; Namioka, Shigeo (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Veterinary Medicine)

    1993-02-01

    LEC strain rats, which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4 to 5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X ray-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats. Radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death occurred at doses higher than 2.0 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 7.4 Gy in WKAH rats. By probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD[sub 50/30] value for LEC rats was 3.0 Gy which was significantly lower than that (7.8 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of the bone marrows from both strains after irradiation at a dose of 4.0 Gy revealed that a number of hemopoietic cells were recovered in WKAH rats on day 8 after irradiation, but not in LEC rats. These results suggested the hypersensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation in connection with acute bone-marrow death. (author).

  6. Praziquantel induced oxidative stress and apoptosis-like cell death in Raillietina echinobothrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Bikash Ranjan; Roy, Bishnupada

    2016-07-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is an anthelmintic drug used against trematode and cestode parasites of humans and veterinary animals. Since praziquantel was introduced as a broadspectrum anthelmintic, numerous studies described its successful use against helminth parasites, but its exact mechanism of action is feebly understood. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the possible role of PZQ induced oxidative stress in apoptosis-like cell death in the poultry tapeworm Raillietina echinobothrida. Parasite viability assay revealed a time-dependent reduction in the worm viability compared to the control. Transmission electron microscopy showed typical apoptotic features like condensed nucleus, damaged nuclear envelope and altered mitochondrial membrane in PZQ exposed parasites. Results revealed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation in PZQ exposed parasites. There was a notable decline in the level of glutathione and glutathione-s-transferase activity leading to the augmented generation of reactive oxygen species. This led to the alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potential with increased active caspase-3/7, confirms the involvement of mitochondria in the event. The present study suggests that PZQ exerts oxidative stress leading to apoptosis-like events in the parasites resulting their death. PMID:27005397

  7. Hypersensitivity of LEC strain rats in radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEC strain rats, which have been known to develop hereditarily spontaneous fulminant hepatitis 4 to 5 months after birth, were highly sensitive to whole-body X ray-irradiation as compared to WKAH strain rats. Radiation-induced acute bone-marrow death occurred at doses higher than 2.0 Gy in LEC rats, and at doses higher than 7.4 Gy in WKAH rats, respectively. By probit analysis of survival data, it was shown that the LD50/30 value for LEC rats was 3.0 Gy which was significantly lower than that (7.8 Gy) of WKAH rats. Histopathological examinations of the bone marrows from both strains after irradiation at a dose of 4.0 Gy revealed that a number of hemopoietic cells were recovered in WKAH rats on day 8 after irradiation, but not in LEC rats. These results suggested the hypersensitivity of LEC rats to ionizing radiation in connection with acute bone-marrow death

  8. Anacardic acid induces apoptosis-like cell death in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Ashok; Nair, Bipin G; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid), extracted from cashew nut shell liquid, is a natural phenolic lipid well known for its strong antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. Its effect has been well studied in bacterial and mammalian systems but remains largely unexplored in fungi. The present study identifies antifungal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities of anacardic acid in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. It was found that anacardic acid causes inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth in this ascomycetous fungus. Phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that growth inhibition of fungus is mainly caused by apoptosis-like cell death. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK treatment indicated that anacardic acid induces caspase-independent apoptosis in M. oryzae. Expression of a predicted ortholog of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated during the process of apoptosis, suggesting the possibility of mitochondria dependent apoptosis via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor. Anacardic acid treatment leads to decrease in reactive oxygen species rather than increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation normally observed during apoptosis, confirming the antioxidant properties of anacardic acid as suggested by earlier reports. Our study also shows that anacardic acid renders the fungus highly sensitive to DNA damaging agents like ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Treatment of rice leaves with anacardic acid prevents M. oryzae from infecting the plant without affecting the leaf, suggesting that anacardic acid can be an effective antifungal agent. PMID:26381667

  9. Neuroprotective effects of pramipexole against tunicamycin-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hitoshi; Zhao, Jing; Ei-Fakhrany, Amany; Isosaki, Minoru; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Kyotani, Yoji; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2009-12-01

    1. Pramipexole (PPX), a dopamine D2 and D3 receptor agonist, exerts neuroprotective effects via both dopamine receptor-mediated and non-dopaminergic mechanisms. In the present study, we demonstrate that PPX reduces the toxicity of tunicamycin, a typical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressor, in PC12h cells, a subline of PC12 cells. 2. The PC12h cells were treated with 300 micromol / L PPX in the presence of 0.5 micromol / L tunicamycin for 24 h. The neuroprotective effects of PPX against tunicamycin-induced cell death were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays, Hoechst 33258 staining and western blot analysis. 3. Tunicamycin (0.2, 0.3 and 0.5 microg / mL) dose-dependently decreased MTT activity and increased LDH release from PC12h cells. Treatment with 300 micromol / L PPX rescued the tunicamycin-induced decrease in cell viability. 4. Spiperone (10 micromol / L), a dopamine D2 and D4 receptor antagonist, had no effect on PPX neuroprotection against tunicamycin in these cells. Marker proteins of ER stress and apoptosis are known to be upregulated by tunicamycin, but we detected no significant effects of PPX on these factors. 5. In conclusion, we speculate that a combination of several mechanisms may be involved in PPX-induced neuroprotection. PMID:19515063

  10. XBP1 mitigates aminoglycoside-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, N; Duscha, S; Boukari, H; Meyer, M; Xie, J; Wei, G; Schrepfer, T; Roschitzki, B; Boettger, E C; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    Here we study links between aminoglycoside-induced mistranslation, protein misfolding and neuropathy. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides induce misreading in mammalian cells and assess endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Genome-wide transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed upregulation of genes related to protein folding and degradation. Quantitative PCR confirmed induction of UPR markers including C/EBP homologous protein, glucose-regulated protein 94, binding immunoglobulin protein and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing, which is crucial for UPR activation. We studied the effect of a compromised UPR on aminoglycoside ototoxicity in haploinsufficient XBP1 (XBP1(+/-)) mice. Intra-tympanic aminoglycoside treatment caused high-frequency hearing loss in XBP1(+/-) mice but not in wild-type littermates. Densities of spiral ganglion cells and synaptic ribbons were decreased in gentamicin-treated XBP1(+/-) mice, while sensory cells were preserved. Co-injection of the chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated hearing loss. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-induced ER stress and cell death in spiral ganglion neurons is mitigated by XBP1, masking aminoglycoside neurotoxicity at the organismal level. PMID:25973683

  11. Revival of oscillation from mean-field-induced death: Theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debarati; Banerjee, Tanmoy; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The revival of oscillation and maintaining rhythmicity in a network of coupled oscillators offer an open challenge to researchers as the cessation of oscillation often leads to a fatal system degradation and an irrecoverable malfunctioning in many physical, biological, and physiological systems. Recently a general technique of restoration of rhythmicity in diffusively coupled networks of nonlinear oscillators has been proposed in Zou et al. [Nat. Commun. 6, 7709 (2015)], where it is shown that a proper feedback parameter that controls the rate of diffusion can effectively revive oscillation from an oscillation suppressed state. In this paper we show that the mean-field diffusive coupling, which can suppress oscillation even in a network of identical oscillators, can be modified in order to revoke the cessation of oscillation induced by it. Using a rigorous bifurcation analysis we show that, unlike other diffusive coupling schemes, here one has two control parameters, namely the density of the mean-field and the feedback parameter that can be controlled to revive oscillation from a death state. We demonstrate that an appropriate choice of density of the mean field is capable of inducing rhythmicity even in the presence of complete diffusion, which is a unique feature of this mean-field coupling that is not available in other coupling schemes. Finally, we report the experimental observation of revival of oscillation from the mean-field-induced oscillation suppression state that supports our theoretical results. PMID:26651763

  12. Role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced cardiotoxicity and cocaine-related death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretani, D; Fineschi, V; Bello, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Neri, M

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension, thrombosis, myocardial dysfunction, cardiac dysrhythmias and endocarditis have received widespread attention in the context of cocaine abuse. The number of sudden deaths from cardiac causes, including myocardial infarction, ventricular tachyarrhythmia or aortic dissection, is also increasing. This manuscript will highlight the recent employment of study about cocaine cardiotoxicity and oxidative stress. Evidence has revealed that cardiac oxidative stress is a prominent early event of cocaine administration, which severely compromises the cardiac antioxidant cellular system and causes cardiac antioxidant cellular system injuries. Oxidative damage such as peroxidation of membrane phospholipids and depletion of nonenzymatic antioxidants such as glutathione have been found in the myocardium of chronic cocaine-treated animals and in patients. The data indicate that cocaine administration compromised the heart's antioxidant defense system. About the mechanisms involved in the cellular damage, the evidence that cocaine causes apoptosis in the heart comes from in vivo study. In animals model after short-term and long term-cocaine administration, the investigators demonstrates the role of Reactive Oxygen Species as a trigger of cardiac injury induced by cocaine. Cocaine also increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the heart, and apoptotic cells were predominantly found near inflammatory cells. The role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart is wide studied and documented. PMID:22856662

  13. Geniposide inhibits CoCl_2-induced PC12 cells death via the mitochondrial pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Li-xia; LIU Jian-hui; XIA Zhi-ning

    2009-01-01

    Background A number of studies have shown that oxidative stress and mitochondrial involvement are major triggering factors in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Cobalt chloride (CoCl_2)-induced cell death in PC12 cells may serve a simple and convenient in vitro model of hypoxia-induced neuronal cytotoxicity. To explore the effect of geniposide on CoCl_2 which induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial function in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we analyzed the influence of geniposide on the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Methods PC12 cells and RNAi PC12 cells were treated with 0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100 μmol/L geniposide for 12 hours and then exposure to 400 μmol/L CoCl_2 for 12 hours. Cell viability, cell morphology, and expression of Bcl-2, Bax, P53 and caspase-9 were determined using Western blotting. Results Pretreatment with geniposide markedly improved the cells viability and morphology, decreased the expression of Bax, P53 and caspase-9, and increased the expression of Bcl-2 in PC12 cells challenged by CoCl_2. However, in the RNAi PC12 cells, geniposide had no significant effect on the expression of these proteins. Conclusion Geniposide protects PC12 cells from CoCl_2 involved in mitochondrial mediated apoptosis, and GLP-1 R might play a critical role in the neuroprotection of geniposide in PC12 cells.

  14. Sam68 is cleaved by caspases under apoptotic cell death induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RNA-binding protein Sam68, a mitotic substrate of tyrosine kinases, has been reported to participate in the cell cycle, apoptosis, and signaling. In particular, overexpression of Sam68 protein is known to suppress cell growth and cell cycle progression in NIH3T3 cells. Although Sam68 is involved in many cellular activities, the function of Sam68, especially in response to apoptotic stimulation, is not well understood. In this study, we found that Sam68 protein is cleaved in immune cells undergoing apoptosis induced by γ-radiation. Moreover, we found that Sam68 cleavage was induced by apoptotic stimuli containing γ-radiation in a caspase-dependent manner. In particular, we showed that activated casepase-3, 7, 8 and 9 can directly cleave Sam68 protein through in vitro protease cleavage assay. Finally, we found that the knockdown of Sam68 attenuated γ-radiation-induced cell death and growth suppression. Conclusively, the cleavage of Sam68 is a new indicator for the cell damaging effects of ionizing radiation. (author)

  15. Maitotoxin-induced cell death cascade in bovine aortic endothelial cells: divalent cation specificity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnoskey, Brian J; Estacion, Mark; Schilling, William P

    2004-08-01

    The maitotoxin (MTX)-induced cell death cascade in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), a model for Ca(2+) overload-induced toxicity, reflects three sequential changes in plasmalemmal permeability. MTX initially activates Ca(2+)-permeable, nonselective cation channels (CaNSC) and causes a massive increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). This is followed by the opening of large endogenous cytolytic/oncotic pores (COP) that allow molecules ionomycin and were significantly delayed in BAPTA-loaded cells. Experiments at the single-cell level revealed that Ba(2+) not only delayed the time to cell lysis but also caused desynchronization of the lytic phase. Last, membrane blebs, which were numerous and spherical in Ca(2+)-containing solutions, were poorly defined and greatly reduced in number in the presence of Ba(2+). Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins are involved in the MTX-induced changes in plasmalemmal permeability that are responsible for cell demise. PMID:15044153

  16. Revival of oscillation from mean-field-induced death: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debarati; Banerjee, Tanmoy; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The revival of oscillation and maintaining rhythmicity in a network of coupled oscillators offer an open challenge to researchers as the cessation of oscillation often leads to a fatal system degradation and an irrecoverable malfunctioning in many physical, biological, and physiological systems. Recently a general technique of restoration of rhythmicity in diffusively coupled networks of nonlinear oscillators has been proposed in Zou et al. [Nat. Commun. 6, 7709 (2015), 10.1038/ncomms8709], where it is shown that a proper feedback parameter that controls the rate of diffusion can effectively revive oscillation from an oscillation suppressed state. In this paper we show that the mean-field diffusive coupling, which can suppress oscillation even in a network of identical oscillators, can be modified in order to revoke the cessation of oscillation induced by it. Using a rigorous bifurcation analysis we show that, unlike other diffusive coupling schemes, here one has two control parameters, namely the density of the mean-field and the feedback parameter that can be controlled to revive oscillation from a death state. We demonstrate that an appropriate choice of density of the mean field is capable of inducing rhythmicity even in the presence of complete diffusion, which is a unique feature of this mean-field coupling that is not available in other coupling schemes. Finally, we report the experimental observation of revival of oscillation from the mean-field-induced oscillation suppression state that supports our theoretical results.

  17. Inhibition by anandamide of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mnich, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a selective neurotoxin that is widely used to investigate cell death and protective strategies in models of Parkinson\\'s disease. Here, we investigated the effects of the endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, on 6-OHDA-induced toxicity in rat adrenal phaeochromocytoma PC12 cells. Morphological analysis and caspase-3 activity assay revealed that anandamide inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis. The protection was not affected by antagonists of either cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) or CB(2)) or the vanilloid receptor TRPV1. Anandamide-dependent protection was reduced by pretreatment with LY294002 (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K) and unaffected by U0126 (inhibitor of extracellularly-regulated kinase). Interestingly, phosphorylation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in cells exposed to 6-OHDA was strongly reduced by anandamide pre-treatment. Furthermore, 6-OHDA induced c-Jun activation and increased Bim expression, both of which were inhibited by anandamide. Together, these data demonstrate antiapoptotic effects of anandamide and also suggest a role for activation of PI3K and inhibition of JNK signalling in anandamide-mediated protection against 6-OHDA.

  18. IKK inhibitor suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition and induces cell death in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Hao; Yang, Feiya; Wang, Mingshuai; Niu, Yinong; Xing, Nianzeng

    2016-09-01

    IκB kinase (IKK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway activation is a key event in the acquisition of invasive and metastatic capacities in prostate cancer. A potent small-molecule compound, BMS-345541, was identified as a highly selective IKKα and IKKβ inhibitor to inhibit kinase activity. This study explored the effect of IKK inhibitor on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), apoptosis and metastasis in prostate cancer. Here, we demonstrate the role of IKK inhibitor reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in PC-3 cells. Furthermore, BMS345541 inhibited IκBα phosphorylation and nuclear level of NF-κB/p65 in PC-3 cells. We also observed downregulation of the N-cadherin, Snail, Slug and Twist protein in a dose-dependent manner. BMS‑345541 induced upregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and phosphorylated NDRG1 at protein level. Moreover, BMS‑345541 reduced invasion and metastasis of PC-3 cells in vitro. In conclusion, IKK has a key role in both EMT and apoptosis of prostate cancer. IKK inhibitor can reverse EMT and induce cell death in PCa cells. IKK was identified as a potential target structure for future therapeutic intervention in PCa. PMID:27432067

  19. AtHSPR may function in salt-induced cell death and ER stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chongying

    2016-07-01

    Salt stress is a harmful and global abiotic stress to plants and has an adverse effect on all physiological processes of plants. Recently, we cloned and identified a novel AtHSPR (Arabidopsis thaliana Heat Shock Protein Related), which encodes a nuclear-localized protein with ATPase activity, participates in salt and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Transcript profili