WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain death guia

  1. Guideline of procedures 2003 for the gammagraphic study of brain death; Guia de procedimientos 2003 para el estudio gammagrafico de muerte cerebral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora R, R.A. [Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The diagnosis of brain death is a clinical diagnosis that is sometimes made with the help of cerebral perfusion scintigraphy. It is important that all physicians be knowledgeable about the clinical requirements for the diagnosis of brain death, especially the need to establish irreversible cessation of all function of the cerebrum and brain stem. Institutions performing scintigraphy for the evaluation of possible brain death should develop clinical guidelines and procedures for the clinical diagnosis that incorporate both clinical evaluations and the integration of ancillary tests such as perfusion scintigraphy. (Author)

  2. Diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calixto Machado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain death (BD should be understood as the ultimate clinical expression of a brain catastrophe characterized by a complete and irreversible neurological stoppage, recognized by irreversible coma, absent brainstem reflexes, and apnea. The most common pattern is manifested by an elevation of intracranial pressure to a point beyond the mean arterial pressure, and hence cerebral perfusion pressure falls and, as a result, no net cerebral blood flow is present, in due course leading to permanent cytotoxic injury of the intracranial neuronal tissue. A second mechanism is an intrinsic injury affecting the nervous tissue at a cellular level which, if extensive and unremitting, can also lead to BD. We review here the methodology of diagnosing death, based on finding any of the signs of death. The irreversible loss of cardio-circulatory and respiratory functions can cause death only when ischemia and anoxia are prolonged enough to produce an irreversible destruction of the brain. The sign of such loss of brain functions, that is to say BD diagnosis, is fully reviewed.

  3. Whole-brain death reconsidered.

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, A.

    1983-01-01

    The author, a philosopher, suggests that the concept of death should be left as it is 'in its present indeterminate state', and that we ought to reject attempts to define death in terms of whole-brain death or any other type of brain death, including cerebral death and 'irreversible coma'. Instead of 'fiddling with the definition of death' clear rules should be established specifying 'what can be appropriately done to whom when'.

  4. The diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goila Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians, health care workers, members of the clergy, and laypeople throughout the world have accepted fully that a person is dead when his or her brain is dead. Although the widespread use of mechanical ventilators and other advanced critical care services have transformed the course of terminal neurologic disorders. Vital functions can now be maintained artificially for a long period of time after the brain has ceased to function. There is a need to diagnose brain death with utmost accuracy and urgency because of an increased awareness amongst the masses for an early diagnosis of brain death and the requirements of organ retrieval for transplantation. Physicians need not be, or consult with, a neurologist or neurosurgeon in order to determine brain death. The purpose of this review article is to provide health care providers in India with requirements for determining brain death, increase knowledge amongst health care practitioners about the clinical evaluation of brain death, and reduce the potential for variations in brain death determination policies and practices amongst facilities and practitioners. Process for brain death certification has been discussed under the following: 1. Identification of history or physical examination findings that provide a clear etiology of brain dysfunction. 2. Exclusion of any condition that might confound the subsequent examination of cortical or brain stem function. 3. Performance of a complete neurological examination including the standard apnea test and 10 minute apnea test. 4. Assessment of brainstem reflexes. 5. Clinical observations compatible with the diagnosis of brain death. 6. Responsibilities of physicians. 7. Notify next of kin. 8. Interval observation period. 9. Repeat clinical assessment of brain stem reflexes. 10. Confirmatory testing as indicated. 11. Certification and brain death documentation.

  5. Radionuclide evaluation of brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria employed for clinical determination of death have evolved in response to advances in life support and other medical technology. The technical feasibility of organ transplantation has amplified the need for a definition of brain death that can be applied in the shortest possible time in the presence of artificial maintenance of vegetative functions, including circulation. Radionuclide cerebral angiography is one of a group of diagnostic procedures that can be employed to confirm the clinical diagnosis of brain death through demonstration of absence of cerebral blood flow. The focus of this work is to assess its use as a confirmatory test for determination of brain death in the context of currently available alternative technologies

  6. Brain Death,Concept and Criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The concept of brain death originated in France. In 1959, the French scholars P. Mollaret and M. Goulon proposed the concept of "coma de- passe" or "brain death" for the first time and reported 23 cases with such symptoms. The first guidelines (the Harvard criteria) for diagnosing brain death was established in 1968, defining brain death

  7. The problematic symmetry between brain birth and brain death.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    The possible symmetry between the concepts of brain death and brain birth (life) is explored. Since the symmetry argument has tended to overlook the most appropriate definition of brain death, the fundamental concepts of whole brain death and higher brain death are assessed. In this way, a context is provided for a discussion of brain birth. Different writers have placed brain birth at numerous points: 25-40 days, eight weeks, 22-24 weeks, and 32-36 weeks gestation. For others, the concept it...

  8. Clinical and ethical perspectives on brain death

    OpenAIRE

    Nair-Collins, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Michael Nair-Collins Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee, FL, USA Abstract: Death determined by neurological criteria, or brain death, is an accepted legal standard for death throughout much of the world. However, brain death has also been a source of controversy ever since its inception, and recently it has been subjected to increased scrutiny, both in academia and in the public domain. The purpose of this paper is to provide an...

  9. [Brain death: biological and ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roczeń, R; Bohatyrewicz, R

    2001-01-01

    The article presents briefly historical development of death criteria from the modern times to the present. The criteria which are used for identification and diagnosing death on the base of respiratory and circulatory death definition are described. This work underlines the inadequacy of the definition of the brain death in relation to patients with persistent vegetative state and in relation to anencephalic newborns. The author describes the pathology and clinical and laboratory evidence of the brain stem death, which gave the possibility to justify the thesis that in case of the brain stem death ontological arguments are sufficient for diagnosing the death of a human being. The attention of the ethic of the life sanctity (on the base of halachic's law) and its opposing influence on the evolution of the medical definition of death has been paid. The recognition of the brain as the death of an individual is a cultural shock, which from scientific point of view changed the ways of thinking, almost immediately but did not in the awareness of the society. The work also underlies the fact that utilitarian argumentation can not be a criterion for making a decision concerning the life of an individual. PMID:12094808

  10. Notification of brain death in the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Soares de Jesus Souza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identifying brain death in the hospital. Methods: it is a cross sectional and quantitative study which analyzed secondary data extracted from the notified brain death registers and from the medical records of the eligible patients. The data were processed and analyzed through descriptive statistics and comparisons. Results: of the 64 cases of notifications, the male gender predominated (67.2% within the age range from 40 to 59 years (64.1%. There was a greater proportion (71.8% of causes of death related to Hemorrhagic Cerebral Vascular Accident and Traumatic Brain Injury caused by motorcycle accident, showing statistically significant difference (p<0.05 regarding the gender, age and location. Conclusion: the Hemorrhagic Cerebral Vascular Accident was the most prevalent cause of notification of brain death and the Intensive Therapy Unit was the most notified venue.

  11. Notification of brain death in the hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna Soares de Jesus Souza; Gerlene Grudka Lira; Rachel Mola

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identifying brain death in the hospital. Methods: it is a cross sectional and quantitative study which analyzed secondary data extracted from the notified brain death registers and from the medical records of the eligible patients. The data were processed and analyzed through descriptive statistics and comparisons. Results: of the 64 cases of notifications, the male gender predominated (67.2%) within the age range from 40 to 59 years (64.1%). There was a greater proportion (71.8...

  12. Brain stem death and organ donation.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Organs for donation are in short supply in the United Kingdom, resulting in allegations that relatives of potential donors are not being asked for consent. Legislation on "required request" has been proposed to overcome this. The incidence, causes, complications, and patterns of organ donation in brain stem dead patients in one referral centre were studied over 12 months. Data were collected on all patients fulfilling criteria for brain stem death or considered suitable for donating organs af...

  13. A Response to the Legitimacy of Brain Death in Islam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Brain death is a novel construct of death for the procurement of transplantable organs. Many authoritative Islamic organizations and governments have endorsed brain death as true death for organ donation. Many commentators have reiterated the misconception that the Quranic text does not define death. We respond by clarifying: (1) the Quran does define death as biologic disintegration and clearly distinguishes it from the dying process, (2) brain death belongs scientifically within the spectrum of neurologic disorders of consciousness and should not be confused with death, and (3) religious and legal discord about brain death has grown in jurisdictions worldwide. We urge for public transparency and truthfulness about brain death and the accommodation and respect of religious objection to the determination of death by neurologic criteria. PMID:27010462

  14. Approach of Complex Networks for the Determination of Brain Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei-Gang; CAO Jian-Ting; WANG Ru-Bin

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination. Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis are derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated. Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state. Our Sndings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.%@@ In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity.Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination.Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis axe derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated.Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state.Our findings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.

  15. Temperature and brain death determination: need for updated criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Meyer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available For an excellent review on the diagnosis of brain death, the interested reader is directed to the review of Machado appearing in this journal; the author reviews all aspects of brain death and cites nine different references where the minimum temperature for brain death exams appear to have been at least 32°C. Given the new data listed above, it is clearly time for a reconsideration of the how we approach the exam for diagnosis of brain death – normal or near normal temperatures of 36°C and above are very reasonable starting points.

  16. Assessment of brain death in the neurocritical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David Y; Gilmore, Emily J; Greer, David M

    2013-07-01

    This article reviews current guidelines for death by neurologic criteria and addresses topics relevant to the determination of brain death in the intensive care unit. The history of brain death as a concept leads into a discussion of the evolution of practice parameters, focusing on the most recent 2010 update from the American Academy of Neurology and the practice variability that exists worldwide. Proper transition from brain death determination to possible organ donation is reviewed. This review concludes with a discussion regarding ethical and religious concerns and suggestions on how families of patients who may be brain dead might be optimally approached. PMID:23809039

  17. Confounding factors in diagnosing brain death: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Login Ivan S

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain death is strictly defined medically and legally. This diagnosis depends on three cardinal neurological features: coma, absent brainstem reflexes, and apnea. The diagnosis can only be made, however, in the absence of intoxication, hypothermia, or certain medical illnesses. Case presentation A patient with severe hypoxic-ischemic brain injury met the three cardinal neurological features of brain death but concurrent profound hypothyroidism precluded the diagnosis. Our clinical and ethical decisions were further challenged by another facet of this complex case. Although her brain damage indicated a hopeless prognosis, we could not discontinue care based on futility because the only known surrogate was mentally retarded and unable to participate in medical planning. Conclusion The presence of certain medical conditions prohibits a diagnosis of brain death, which is a medicolegal diagnosis of death, not a prediction or forecast of future outcome. While prognostication is important in deciding to withdraw care, it is not a component in diagnosing brain death.

  18. Brain death diagnosis in misleading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tourtchaninoff, M; Hantson, P; Mahieu, P; Guérit, J M

    1999-07-01

    The necessity of defining brain death (BD) arose from technological development in medical science. The definition of this concept had practical consequences and opened the way to organ donation from BD patients. Nowadays, the imbalance between the number of organs available for transplantation and the size of the demand is becoming critical. In most laboratories, a BD diagnosis is made according to precise criteria and in a well-defined process. BD diagnosis should be improved, not only to assure the safety and to preserve the human dignity of the patient, but also in order to increase the rate of organ donation. By analysing some epidemiological parameters in BD diagnosis and organ donation, it appears that BD diagnoses can be made more often and more rapidly if one has a reliable, accurate, and safe confirmatory test, especially under misleading conditions (hypothermia, drugs, metabolic disturbances). In our experience, the use of multimodality evoked potentials (MEPs) to confirm a BD diagnosis has many advantages: MEPs can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside, assess the brain stem as well as the cerebral cortex, and are innocuous for the patient. Moreover, their insensitivity to the aforementioned misleading factors is sufficient to distinguish BD from clinical and EEG states that mimic BD. They give an immediate diagnosis, and no delay is required in BD confirmation if there is sufficient cause to account for BD. MEPs are a safe, accurate, and reliable tool for confirming a BD diagnosis, and their use can improve the organ donation rate while preserving the safety of the patient. PMID:10627891

  19. Brain death and care of the organ donor

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Brain death has specific implications for organ donation with the potential for saving several lives. Awareness on maintenance of the brain dead has increased over the last decade with the progress in the field of transplant. The diagnosis of brain death is clinical and can be confirmed by apnea testing. Ancillary tests can be considered when the apnea test cannot be completed or is inconclusive. Reflexes of spinal origin may be present and should not be confused against the diagnosis of brai...

  20. An empirical EEG analysis in brain death diagnosis for adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhe; Cao, Jianting; Cao, Yang; Zhang, Yue; Gu, Fanji; Zhu, Guoxian; Zhen HONG; Wang, Bin; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is often used in the confirmatory test for brain death diagnosis in clinical practice. Because EEG recording and monitoring is relatively safe for the patients in deep coma, it is believed to be valuable for either reducing the risk of brain death diagnosis (while comparing other tests such as the apnea) or preventing mistaken diagnosis. The objective of this paper is to study several statistical methods for quantitative EEG analysis in order to help bedside or ambu...

  1. Diagnosis of brain death: confirmatory tests after clinical test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Yingying; Yang Qinglin; Liu Gang; Zhang Yan; Ye Hong; Gao Daiquan; Zhang Yunzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background The brain death confirmation tests occupy a different position in each country's diagnostic criteria (or guideline); the choices of tests are also different.China brain death criteria include clinical judgment and confirmation tests.This study aimed to confirm the preferred confirmatory test and complementary confirmatory tests.Methods We did a clinical brain death determination on deep coma patients,and then divided them into brain death group and non-brain death group.According to the Chinese standards for determining brain death,both the groups accepted confirmatory tests including electroencephalograph (EEG),somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP),and transcranial Doppler (TCD).The sensitivity,specificity,false positive rate,and false negative rate were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the confirmatory tests.Results Among the 131 cases of patients,103 patients met the clinical criteria of brain death.Respiratory arrest provocation test was performed on 44 cases and 32 cases (73%) successfully completed and confirmed that they have no spontaneous breathing.Of the three confirmation tests,EEG had the highest completion rate (98%) and good sensitivity (83%) and specificity (97%); TCD had followed completion rate (54%) and not good sensitivity (73%) and specificity (75%); SEP had the lowest completion rate (49%),good sensitivity (100%),and not good specificity (78%).After the combination of SEP or TCD with EEG,the specificity can increase to 100%.Conclusions The completion rate of respiratory arrest provocation test remains a problem in the clinical diagnosis of brain death.If the test cannot be completed,whether to increase a confirmatory test is debatable.SEP had an ideal sensitivity,and the specificity will reach 100% after combining with TCD or EEG.When a confirmed test was uncertain,we suggest increasing another confirmatory test.

  2. Outcome of kidney transplantation between controlled cardiac death and brain death donors: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yingzi; Shao Mingjie; Tian Tingting; She Xingguo; Liu Hong; Ye Shaojun; Ye Qifa

    2014-01-01

    Background Our goal was to evaluate the outcomes of kidney transplants from controlled cardiac death donors compared with brain death donors by conducting a meta-analysis of cohort studies.Methods The PubMed database and EMBASE were searched from January 1980 to July 2013 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criteria.Reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed.Two authors independently extracted information on the designs of the studies,the characteristics of the study participants,and outcome assessments.Results Nine cohort studies involving 84 398 participants were included in this meta-analysis; 3 014 received kidneys from controlled cardiac death donors and 80 684 from brain death donors.Warm ischemia time was significantly longer for the controlled cardiac death donor group.The incidence of delayed graft function was 2.74 times (P <0.001) greater in the controlled cardiac death donor group.The results are in favor of the brain death donor group on short-term patient and graft survival while this difference became nonsignificant at mid-term and long term.Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results.No evidence of publication bias was observed.Conclusion This meta-analysis of retrospective cohort studies suggests that the outcome after controlled cardiac death donors is comparable with that obtained using kidneys from brain death donors.

  3. Brain death and care of the organ donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Brain death has specific implications for organ donation with the potential for saving several lives. Awareness on maintenance of the brain dead has increased over the last decade with the progress in the field of transplant. The diagnosis of brain death is clinical and can be confirmed by apnea testing. Ancillary tests can be considered when the apnea test cannot be completed or is inconclusive. Reflexes of spinal origin may be present and should not be confused against the diagnosis of brain death. Adequate care for the donor targeting hemodynamic indices and lung protective ventilator strategies can improve graft quality for donation. Hormone supplementation using thyroxine, antidiuretic hormone, corticosteroid and insulin has shown to improve outcomes following transplant. India still ranks low compared to the rest of the world in deceased donation. The formation of organ sharing networks supported by state governments has shown a substantial increase in the numbers of deceased donors primarily by creating awareness and ensuring protocols in caring for the donor. This review describes the steps in the establishment of brain death and the management of the organ donor. Material for the review was collected through a Medline search, and the search terms included were brain death and organ donation. PMID:27275040

  4. CT Angiography in the Diagnosis of Brain Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary Brain death is defined as the irreversible cessation of functioning of the entire brain, including the brainstem. Brain death is principally established using clinical criteria including coma, absence of brainstem reflexes and loss of central drive to breathe assessed with apnea test. In situations in which clinical testing cannot be performed or when uncertainty exists about the reliability of its parts due to confounding conditions ancillary tests (i.a. imaging studies) may be useful. The objective of ancillary tests in the diagnosis of brain death is to demonstrate the absence of cerebral electrical activity (EEG and evoked potentials) or cerebral circulatory arrest. In clinical practice catheter cerebral angiography, perfusion scintigraphy, transcranial Doppler sonography, CT angiography and MR angiography are used. Other methods, like perfusion CT, xenon CT, MR spectroscopy, diffusion weighted MRI and functional MRI are being studied as potentially useful in the diagnosis of brain death. CT angiography has recently attracted attention as a promising alternative to catheter angiography – a reference test in the diagnosis of brain death. Since 1998 several major studies were published and national guidelines were introduced in several countries (e.g. in France, Austria, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Canada). This paper reviews technique, characteristic findings and criteria for the diagnosis of cerebral circulatory arrest in CT angiography

  5. Imaging Findings of Brain Death on 3-Tesla MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the usefulness of 3-tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo (GRE), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in diagnosing brain death. Magnetic resonance imaging findings for 10 patients with clinically verified brain death (group I) and seven patients with comatose or stuporous mentality who did not meet the clinical criteria of brain death (group II) were retrospectively reviewed. Tonsilar herniation and loss of intraarterial flow signal voids (LIFSV) on T2WI were highly sensitive and specific findings for the diagnosis of brain death (p < 0.001 and < 0.001, respectively). DWI, TOF-MRA, and GRE findings were statistically different between the two groups (p = 0.015, 0.029, and 0.003, respectively). However, cortical high signal intensities in T2WI and SWI findings were not statistically different between the two group (p = 0.412 and 1.0, respectively). T2-weighted imaging, DWI, and MRA using 3T MRI may be useful for diagnosing brain death. However, SWI findings are not specific due to high false positive findings.

  6. Pitfalls in brain death diagnosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Daniel; Rieger, Bernhard; Goldbrunner, Roland; Schlacke, Hans-Peter

    2013-05-01

    Although there are distinct guidelines in nearly all countries, a reliable secure assessment of brain death in cases with open head injury can be challenging. We present a case of a 32-year-old man with severe head injury after intracranial penetration of a grindstone fragment. As the injury led to destruction of nearly the whole greater wing of the right sphenoid bone and parts of the right orbit, the examination of brainstem reflexes and the confirmation of brain death was unfeasible. On day 2, all clinical criteria of brain death (coma, absence of brainstem reflexes, apnea) were fulfilled. In addition, there was an extinction of brainstem auditory (BAEP) and cerebral (N20) components of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials, while electroencephalogram (EEG) activity was still present. In the following days, a persisting EEG activity was obtained. Thus, an irreversible loss of whole brain functions could not be proved. As the patient had agreed to organ donation in case of brain death several years ago, ancillary methods to test the cessation of cerebral blood flow were mandatory. However, in this patient these methods turned out either to be doubtful or unavailable. For example, values of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography are not reliable in cases with open head injury. Due to a progressive septic state, time was running out to get the radiopharmaceutical agent for a cerebral scintigraphy (delivery time about 7 days, as the radiopharmaceutical agent was not in stock). Referring to the actual German guidelines, we had no legitimating indication for a cerebral angiography. Finally, the patient died of sepsis. We discuss the widening of the German guidelines in assessing brain death with the fast and low-risk method of cerebral computed tomography-angiography (CTA) to confirm diagnosis of brain death. PMID:22899230

  7. 99mTc HM-PAO brain perfusion SPECT in brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have easily carried out and interpreted 99mTc HM-PAO SPECT in a consecutive series of 40 comatose patients with brain damage, without discontinuing therapy. Brain death was diagnosed in 7 patients, by recognising absence of brain perfusion, as shown by no intracranial radionuclide uptake. In patients in whom perfusion was seen on brain scans, HM-PAO SPECT improved assessment of the extent of injury, which in general was larger than suggested by CT. (orig.)

  8. Brain death in ICU patients: Clinical significance of endocrine changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have been carried out among patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU having primary endocrine pathology, endocrine manifestations of systemic diseases or post-endocrine tissue surgery. However, minimal literary evidence is available highlighting the endocrine changes occurring during brain death in critically ill patients. A precise and timely diagnosis of brain death is required to convey the relatives about the prognosis and also to possibly plan for organ retrieval for transplantation purposes. The diagnosis of this condition as of today remains largely a clinical one. Brain death is associated with a multitude of endocrinological alterations which are yet to be completely unraveled and understood. Evaluating these endocrinological modifications lends us an added vista to add to the existing clinical parameters which might help us to confirm the diagnosis of brain death with a higher degree of precision. Moreover, since the efficacy of hormone replacement therapy to benefit in organ retrieval remains yet unproven, newer diagnostic modalities and research studies are definitely called for to strategize the optimal dosage and duration of such therapies.

  9. The brain and somatic integration: insights into the standard biological rationale for equating "brain death" with death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmon, A D

    2001-10-01

    The mainstream rationale for equating "brain death" (BD) with death is that the brain confers integrative unity upon the body, transforming it from a mere collection of organs and tissues to an "organism as a whole." In support of this conclusion, the impressive list of the brain's myriad integrative functions is often cited. Upon closer examination, and after operational definition of terms, however, one discovers that most integrative functions of the brain are actually not somatically integrating, and, conversely, most integrative functions of the body are not brain-mediated. With respect to organism-level vitality, the brain's role is more modulatory than constitutive, enhancing the quality and survival potential of a presupposedly living organism. Integrative unity of a complex organism is an inherently nonlocalizable, holistic feature involving the mutual interaction among all the parts, not a top-down coordination imposed by one part upon a passive multiplicity of other parts. Loss of somatic integrative unity is not a physiologically tenable rationale for equating BD with death of the organism as a whole. PMID:11588655

  10. Radiological confirmation of brain death: digitised cerebral parenchymography. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of organ procurement from brain dead subjects have fallen substantially in recent years. In France, the legal definition of brain death is based on electroencephalographic criteria in patients with clinical evidence of irreversible coma. However, sedative drugs used in intensive care units usually render the electroencephalogram uninterpretable, and in our medicolegal framework, it is necessary that intracerebral circulatory arrest be demonstrated. We discuss the value of the various available techniques and report our experience with digitised intra-arterial cerebral parenchymography. This simple, fast technique does not alter physiological conditions and provides high-quality images, ensuring prompt diagnosis, which is a prerequisite for optimal organ harvesting. (orig.). With 5 figs

  11. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in brain death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchtmann, M.; Beuing, O.; Skalej, M.; Kohl, J.; Serowy, S.; Bernarding, J.; Firsching, R.

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory tests for the diagnosis of brain death in addition to clinical findings may shorten observation time required in some countries and may add certainty to the diagnosis under specific circumstances. The practicability of Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to confirm cerebral circulatory arrest was assessed after the diagnosis of brain death in 15 patients using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In all 15 patients extracranial blood flow distal to the external carotid arteries was undisturbed. In 14 patients no contrast medium was noted within intracerebral vessels above the proximal level of the intracerebral arteries. In one patient more distal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (A3 and M3) were filled with contrast medium. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA may be considered conclusive evidence of cerebral circulatory arrest, when major intracranial vessels fail to fill with contrast medium while extracranial vessels show normal blood flow.

  12. Cell death in the injured brain: roles of metallothioneins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin; Penkowa, Milena

    2009-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI), the primary, irreversible damage associated with the moment of impact consists of cells dying from necrosis. This contributes to fuelling a chronic central nervous system (CNS) inflammation with increased formation of proinflammatory cytokines, enzymes and reactive...... provides an overview of the TBI pathophysiology leading to cell death and neurological impairment. We also discuss endogenously expressed neuroprotectants and drug candidates, which at this stage may still hold the potential for treating brain injured patients....... oxygen species (ROS). ROS promote oxidative stress, which leads to neurodegeneration and ultimately results in programmed cell death (secondary injury). Since this delayed, secondary tissue loss occurs days to months following the primary injury it provides a therapeutic window where potential...

  13. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  14. Transcranial amelioration of inflammation and cell death after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Theodore L.; Nayak, Debasis; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Koretsky, Alan P.; Latour, Lawrence L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly appreciated to be highly prevalent and deleterious to neurological function. At present, no effective treatment options are available, and little is known about the complex cellular response to TBI during its acute phase. To gain insights into TBI pathogenesis, we developed a novel murine closed-skull brain injury model that mirrors some pathological features associated with mild TBI in humans and used long-term intravital microscopy to study the dynamics of the injury response from its inception. Here we demonstrate that acute brain injury induces vascular damage, meningeal cell death, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately breach the glial limitans and promote spread of the injury into the parenchyma. In response, the brain elicits a neuroprotective, purinergic-receptor-dependent inflammatory response characterized by meningeal neutrophil swarming and microglial reconstitution of the damaged glial limitans. We also show that the skull bone is permeable to small-molecular-weight compounds, and use this delivery route to modulate inflammation and therapeutically ameliorate brain injury through transcranial administration of the ROS scavenger, glutathione. Our results shed light on the acute cellular response to TBI and provide a means to locally deliver therapeutic compounds to the site of injury.

  15. Brain Swelling and Death in Children with Cerebral Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, Karl B.; Kampondeni, Samuel D.; Valim, Clarissa; Potchen, Michael J.; Milner, Danny A.; Muwalo, Francis W.; Birbeck, Gretchen L.; Bradley, William G.; Fox, Lindsay L.; Glover, Simon J.; Hammond, Colleen A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Chilingulo, Cowles A.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Case fatality rates among African children with cerebral malaria remain in the range of 15 to 25%. The key pathogenetic processes and causes of death are unknown, but a combination of clinical observations and pathological findings suggests that increased brain volume leading to raised intracranial pressure may play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available in Malawi in 2009, and we used it to investigate the role of brain swelling in the pathogenesis of fatal cerebral malaria in African children. METHODS We enrolled children who met a stringent definition of cerebral malaria (one that included the presence of retinopathy), characterized them in detail clinically, and obtained MRI scans on admission and daily thereafter while coma persisted. RESULTS Of 348 children admitted with cerebral malaria (as defined by the World Health Organization), 168 met the inclusion criteria, underwent all investigations, and were included in the analysis. A total of 25 children (15%) died, 21 of whom (84%) had evidence of severe brain swelling on MRI at admission. In contrast, evidence of severe brain swelling was seen on MRI in 39 of 143 survivors (27%). Serial MRI scans showed evidence of decreasing brain volume in the survivors who had had brain swelling initially. CONCLUSIONS Increased brain volume was seen in children who died from cerebral malaria but was uncommon in those who did not die from the disease, a finding that suggests that raised intracranial pressure may contribute to a fatal outcome. The natural history indicates that increased intracranial pressure is transient in survivors. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Wellcome Trust U.K.) PMID:25785970

  16. Danish ethics council rejects brain death as the criterion of death -- commentary 1: wanting it both ways.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, David

    1990-01-01

    In this commentary on the recommendations of the Danish Council of Ethics (DCE) concerning criteria for death it is argued that whilst the DCE is correct in stressing the cultural aspects of death, its adoption of cardiac-oriented criteria raises several problems. There are problems with its notion of a 'death process', which purportedly begins with brain death and ends with cessation of cardiac function, and there are serious problems regarding its commitment to a cardiac-oriented definitio...

  17. Brain Death and Human Organismal Integration: A Symposium on the Definition of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Does the ability of some brain dead bodies to maintain homeostasis with the help of artificial life support actually imply that those bodies are living human organisms? Or might it be possible that a brain dead body on life support is a mere collection of still-living cells, organs and tissues which can coordinate with one another, but which lack the genuine integration that is the hallmark of a unified human organism as a whole? To foster further study of these difficult and timely questions, a Symposium on the Definition of Death was held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. The Symposium brought together scholars from a variety of disciplines-law, medicine, biology, philosophy and theology-who all share a commitment to the dead donor rule and to a biological definition of death, but who have differing opinions regarding the validity of neurological criteria for human death. The papers found in this special issue are among the fruits of this Symposium. PMID:27107428

  18. The time involved for the confirmation of brain death

    OpenAIRE

    Valdir Moreira Cinque, Estela Regina Ferraz Bianchi, Eutália Aparecida Candido de Araújo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: to analyze the time involved for the confirmation of brain death (BD) and compare it with the variables of interest. Methods: a retrospective analysis of charts of 103 patients which had BD from January of 2006 to December of 2007, in the Organ Procurement Organization of Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo - Brazil. Results: the majority, 55,34% was feminine, the main cause of BD was the Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA) with 49,51% of cases. The average age of donors was 41.55 year...

  19. Using the brain criterion in organ donation after the circulatory determination of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ave, Anne L; Bernat, James L

    2016-06-01

    The UK, France, and Switzerland determine death using the brain criterion even in organ donation after the circulatory determination of death (DCDD), in which the United States and Canada use the circulatory-respiratory criterion. In our analysis of the scientific validity of the brain criterion in DCDD, we concluded that although it may be attractive in theory because it conceptualizes death as a unitary phenomenon, its use in practice is invalid. The preconditions (ie, the absence of reversible causes, such as toxic or metabolic disorders) for determining brain death cannot be met in DCDD. Thus, although brain death tests prove the cessation of tested brain functions, they do not prove that their cessation is irreversible. A stand-off period of 5 to 10 minutes is insufficient to achieve the irreversibility requirement of brain death. Because circulatory cessation inevitably leads to cessation of brain functions, first permanently and then irreversibly, the use of brain criterion is unnecessary to determine death in DCDD. Expanding brain death to permit it to be satisfied by permanent cessation of brain functions is controversial but has been considered as a possible means to declare death in uncontrolled DCDD. PMID:26857329

  20. Paradoxical effects of brain death and associated trauma on rat mesenteric microcirculation: an intravital microscopic study

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Simas; Paulina Sannomiya; José Walber M. C Cruz; Cristiano de Jesus Correia; Fernando Luiz Zanoni; Maurício Kase; Laura Menegat; Isaac Azevedo Silva; Moreira, Luiz Felipe P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental findings support clinical evidence that brain death impairs the viability of organs for transplantation, triggering hemodynamic, hormonal, and inflammatory responses. However, several of these events could be consequences of brain death–associated trauma. This study investigated microcirculatory alterations and systemic inflammatory markers in brain-dead rats and the influence of the associated trauma. METHOD: Brain death was induced using intracranial balloon inflatio...

  1. Development and validation of the Communicating with Family about Brain Death Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnahan, Mary; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    This study reports development of a scale assessing communication with family about brain-dead organ donation. Two cross-sectional studies demonstrated scale validity. Tests of internal, external, and predictive validity were conducted using confirmatory factor analysis. In both studies, the same 6 items were shown to be unidimensional with acceptable reliability. Parallelism was shown between the Brain Death Scale and a measure of communication with family. Predictive validity was exhibited between participants' donor status and the Brain Death Scale. The scale was associated with knowledge about brain death confirming misconceptions about brain-dead organ donation. PMID:25253626

  2. Determination of Death and the Dead Donor Rule: A Survey of the Current Law on Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikas, Nikolas T; Bordlee, Dorinda C; Moreira, Madeline

    2016-06-01

    Despite seeming uniformity in the law, end-of-life controversies have highlighted variations among state brain death laws and their interpretation by courts. This article provides a survey of the current legal landscape regarding brain death in the United States, for the purpose of assisting professionals who seek to formulate or assess proposals for changes in current law and hospital policy. As we note, the public is increasingly wary of the role of organ transplantation in determinations of death, and of the variability of brain death diagnosing criteria. We urge that any attempt to alter current state statutes or to adopt a national standard must balance the need for medical accuracy with sound ethical principles which reject the utilitarian use of human beings and are consistent with the dignity of the human person. Only in this way can public trust be rebuilt. PMID:27097648

  3. Revisiting the Persisting Tension Between Expert and Lay Views About Brain Death and Death Determination: A Proposal Inspired by Pragmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Brain death or determination of death based on the neurological criterion has been an enduring source of controversy in academic and clinical circles. The controversy chiefly concerns how death is defined, and it also bears on the justification of the proposed criteria for death determination and their interpretation. Part of the controversy on brain death and death determination stems from disputed crucial medical facts, but in this paper I formulate another hypothesis about the nature of ongoing controversies. At stake is a misunderstood relationship between, on the one hand, the nature of our lay (or our "manifest image") views about death and, on the other hand, the nature of scientific insights (and related conceptual refinements) into death and its determination (the "scientific image"). The misunderstanding of this relationship has partly anchored the controversy and continues to fuel it. Based on a perspective inspired by pragmatism, which stresses the positive contribution of science to ethical and policy debates but also challenges different forms of scientism in science and philosophy found in foundationalist interpretations, I scrutinize three different stances regarding the relationship between lay and scientific perspectives about the definition of death: (1) foundational lay views, (2) foundational expert views, and (3) co-evolving views. I argue that only the latter is sustainable given recent challenges to foundationalist interpretations. PMID:26626067

  4. Time-dependent changes of cranial computed tomography after brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two children were retrospectively judged as having been in brain death state. Cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained during 109 and 60 days from the judgement of brain death to cardiac arrest. Early CT scans showed noticeable diffuse low density area and lack of ventricular and cisternal compression. Subsequently, the low density area became marked in the deep-seated white matter, brain stem, and basal ganglia. High density area along the cistern and fissures appeared, some of which were considered calcified. Preserved intracranial circulation may be a possible mechanism of these phenomena; however, many questions remain unsolved. This study emphasizes the need for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of brain death, especially the process from brain death to cardiac death. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Guideline of procedures 2003 for the gammagraphic study of brain death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of brain death is a clinical diagnosis that is sometimes made with the help of cerebral perfusion scintigraphy. It is important that all physicians be knowledgeable about the clinical requirements for the diagnosis of brain death, especially the need to establish irreversible cessation of all function of the cerebrum and brain stem. Institutions performing scintigraphy for the evaluation of possible brain death should develop clinical guidelines and procedures for the clinical diagnosis that incorporate both clinical evaluations and the integration of ancillary tests such as perfusion scintigraphy. (Author)

  6. Brain death: the challenges of translating medical science into Islamic bioethical discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Basser, Taha A

    2012-09-01

    Islamic ethico-legal assessments of brain death are varied and controversial. Some Islamic ethico-legal bodies have concluded that brain death is equivalent to cardiopulmonary death; others regard it as an intermediate state between life and death, and a few opine that it does not meet the standards for legal death according to Islamic law. Yet this translation of the concept of brain death into the Islamic ethico-legal domain has generated multiple ethical complexities that receive insufficient attention within the extant medical and fiqh literature. How do Islamic legists understand brain death as a clinical phenomenon? How does the Islamic ethico-legal system treat medical uncertainty? What Islamic ethico-legal principles should apply to bioethical questions about life and death? In this paper, we analyze the arguments for, and against, the acceptance of brain death within the context of the deliberation of a representative juridical council. In our discussion we focus on areas in which the legists' ethico-legal reasoning hinges upon clinical conceptions of the state of the individual when diagnosed as brain dead. As Islamic ethics continues to engage scientific and technological advancements in these areas, such exploration of internal workings is necessary if we wish to better understand how Islamic ethical principles can contribute to bioethical deliberation. PMID:23248843

  7. Is Neuronal Death Necessary for Acquired Epileptogenesis in the Immature Brain?

    OpenAIRE

    Dudek, F. Edward; Ekstrand, Jeffrey J.; Staley, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    A central question concerning acquired epileptogenesis in the immature brain is whether neuronal death is required for the development of epilepsy after a brain insult. Results from three different animal models of brain injury during early development have been used to develop the hypothesis that status epilepticus, prolonged febrile seizures, or hypoxia-induced seizures can lead to chronic epilepsy without the occurrence of neuronal death. This brief review will summarize the evidence suppo...

  8. Building Your Baby's Brain: A Parent's Guide to the First Five Years = Como estimular el cerebro infantil: Una guia para padres de familia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Diane Trister; Heroman, Cate

    Noting that all parents can help their baby's brain to grow, this guide, in English- and Spanish-language versions, explores what science has learned about infant brain development and how parents and caregivers can influence cognitive development. Topics covered include: prenatal care, touching your baby, teaching about feelings and self-control,…

  9. Brain death and organ transplant legislation:analysis of 969 respondents by classroom questionnaire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Liang Song; Xiao-Hua Cui; Zhan Gao; Shao-Lin Deng; You-Ping Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: China has the largest potential market for organ transplants in the world, but it has not yet established brain death and organ transplant laws. We aimed to investigate the attitudes and suggestions of doctors, pharmacists, and civil servants concerning brain death, organ transplantation, and their respective legislation. METHODS: A questionnaire with 10 sections and 44 questions was designed and distributed. The effective questionnaire data were then recorded and checked for descriptive analysis. RESULTS: In 1400 questionnaires distributed, 1063 were responded and 969 of them were valid and analyzed. The respondents showed an incomplete understanding of brain death and organ transplantation laws. Seventy-four percent of the respondents recognized and accepted the standard of brain death. They agreed that legislation should be involved in the removal of organs for transplantation, the future use of organs, and insurance and compensation for the donor for possible health risks induced by organ removal. Of the 969 respondents, 92%considered it necessary to have legislation in brain death and organ transplantation, and 61% thought that it is time to legislate. CONCLUSIONS: Legislation for brain death and organ transplantation is urgent and timely in China. The laws must include the respective rights and obligations of patients, close relatives, and medical institutions. Educating the public about brain death and organ transplantation should also be encouraged in a variety of ways.

  10. Danish ethics council rejects brain death as the criterion of death -- commentary 2: return to Elsinore.

    OpenAIRE

    Pallis, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    No discussion of when an individual is dead is meaningful in the absence of a definition of death. If human death is defined as the irreversible loss of the capacity for consciousness combined with the irreversible loss of the capacity to breathe spontaneously (and hence to maintain a spontaneous heart beat) the death of the brainstem will be seen to be the necessary and sufficient condition for the death of the individual. Such a definition of death is not something radically new. It is m...

  11. Paradoxical effects of brain death and associated trauma on rat mesenteric microcirculation: an intravital microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Simas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Experimental findings support clinical evidence that brain death impairs the viability of organs for transplantation, triggering hemodynamic, hormonal, and inflammatory responses. However, several of these events could be consequences of brain death-associated trauma. This study investigated microcirculatory alterations and systemic inflammatory markers in brain-dead rats and the influence of the associated trauma. METHOD: Brain death was induced using intracranial balloon inflation; sham-operated rats were trepanned only. After 30 or 180 min, the mesenteric microcirculation was observed using intravital microscopy. The expression of Pselectin and ICAM-1 on the endothelium was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The serum cytokine, chemokine, and corticosterone levels were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. White blood cell counts were also determined. RESULTS: Brain death resulted in a decrease in the mesenteric perfusion to 30%, a 2.6-fold increase in the expression of ICAM-1 and leukocyte migration at the mesentery, a 70% reduction in the serum corticosterone level and pronounced leukopenia. Similar increases in the cytokine and chemokine levels were seen in the both the experimental and control animals. CONCLUSION: The data presented in this study suggest that brain death itself induces hypoperfusion in the mesenteric microcirculation that is associated with a pronounced reduction in the endogenous corticosterone level, thereby leading to increased local inflammation and organ dysfunction. These events are paradoxically associated with induced leukopenia after brain damage

  12. Correlation between heat shock protein 70 expression in the brain stem and sudden death after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lian-xu; XU Xiao-hu; LIU Chao; PAN Su-yue; ZHU Jia-zhen; ZHANG Cheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the patterns of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) biosynthesis following traumatic brain injury, and observe the effect of HSP70 induction on the function of the vital center in the brain stem. Methods: Rat models of sudden death resulted form traumatic brain injury were produced, and HSP70 expression in the rat brain stem was determined by immunohistochemistry, the induction of HSP70 mRNA detected by RT-PCR. Results: The level of HSP70 mRNA was prominently elevated in the brain stem as early as 1 5 min following the impact injury, while HSP70 expression was only observed 3 to 6 h after the injury. It was also observed that the levels of HSP70 mRNA but not the protein were elevated in the brain stem of sudden death rats. Conclusion: The synthesis of HSP70 was significantly enhanced in the brain stem following traumatic injury, and the expression of HSP70 is beneficial to eliminate the stress agents, and to sustain the cellular protein homeostasis. When the injury disturbs the synthesis of HSP70 to disarm the protective mechanism of heat-shock proteins, dysfunction of the vital center in the brain stem, and consequently death may occur. Breach in the synchronization of HSP70 mRNA-protein can be indicative of fatal damage to the nerve cells.

  13. Effect of Transient Maternal Hypotension on Apoptotic Cell Death in Foetal Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Özyürek, Hamit; Bayrak, Sibel; Pehlivanoğlu, Bilge; Atilla, Pergin; Balkancı, Zeynep Dicle; Çakar, Nur; Anlar, Banu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intrauterine perfusion insufficiency induced by transient maternal hypotension has been reported to be associated with foetal brain malformations. However, the effects of maternal hypotension on apoptotic processes in the foetal brain have not been investigated experimentally during the intrauterine period. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transient maternal hypotension on apoptotic cell death in the intrauterine foetal brain. Study...

  14. [Determination of irreversibility of clinical brain death. Electroencephalography and evoked potentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, H; Ferbert, A

    2016-02-01

    Principally, in the fourth update of the rules for the procedure to finally determine the irreversible cessation of function of the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem, the importance of an electroencephalogram (EEG), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are confirmed. This paper presents the reliability and validity of the electrophysiological diagnosis, discusses the amendments in the fourth version of the guidelines and introduces the practical application, problems and sources of error.An EEG is the best established supplementary diagnostic method for determining the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome. It should be noted that residual brain activity can often persist for many hours after the onset of brain death syndrome, particularly in patients with primary brainstem lesions. The derivation and analysis of an EEG requires a high level of expertise to be able to safely distinguish artefacts from primary brain activity. The registration of EEGs to demonstrate the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome is extremely time consuming.The BAEPs can only be used to confirm the irreversibility of brain death syndrome in serial examinations or in the rare cases of a sustained wave I or sustained waves I and II. Very often, an investigation cannot be reliably performed because of existing sound conduction disturbances or failure of all potentials even before the onset of clinical brain death syndrome. This explains why BAEPs are only used in exceptional cases.The SEPs of the median nerve can be very reliably derived, are technically simple and with few sources of error. A serial investigation is not required and the time needed for examination is short. For these reasons SEPs are given preference over EEGs and BAEPs for establishing the irreversibility of clinical brain death syndrome. PMID:26785843

  15. Donor pretreatment with carbamylated erythropoietin in a brain death model reduces inflammation more effectively than erythropoietin while preserving renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Willemijn N.; Ottens, Petra J.; van Dijk, Antony; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that donor treatment of deceased brain dead donors would lead to a decrease in inflammatory responses seen in brain death and lead to a restoration of kidney function. Design: A standardized slow-induction rat brain death model followed by evaluation of kidney function in

  16. Donor pretreatment with carbamylated erythropoietin in a brain death model reduces inflammation more effectively than erythropoietin while preserving renal function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, W.N.; Ottens, P.J.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Goor, H. van; Ploeg, R.J.; Leuvenink, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that donor treatment of deceased brain dead donors would lead to a decrease in inflammatory responses seen in brain death and lead to a restoration of kidney function. DESIGN: A standardized slow-induction rat brain death model followed by evaluation of kidney function in

  17. East-West differences in perception of brain death. Review of history, current understandings, and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Miller, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to approve of brain death or organ transplant from brain dead donors. Cultural and religious traditions have been referenced to explain this apparent difference. In the West, the status of the brain as home to the soul in Enlightenment philosophy, combined with pragmatism and utilitarianism, supports the concept of brain death. In the East, the integration of body with spirit and nature in Buddhist and folk beliefs, along with the Confucian social structure that builds upon interpersonal relationships, argues against brain death. However, it is unclear whether these reasoning strategies are explicitly used when families and medical providers are faced with acknowledging brain death. Their decisions are more likely to involve a prioritization of values and a rationalization of intuitive responses. Why and whether there might be differences between East and West in the acceptance of the brain death concept requires further empirical testing, which would help inform policy-making and facilitate communication between providers and patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds. PMID:25056149

  18. IS BRAIN DEATH REVERSAL POSSIBLE IN NEAR FUTURE: INTRATHECAL SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE (SNP SUPERFUSION IN BRAIN DEATH PATIENTS = THE 10,000 FOLD EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary or secondary brain death is accompanied with vasospasm of the perforators & further exaggerating the anoxic damage, in the form of neuropraxia. In normal conditions the excitatory impulse propagates as anterograde neurotransmission (ANT and at the level of synapse, glutamate activates NMDA receptors on postsynaptic membrane. Nitric oxide (NO is produced by Nitric oxide Synthetase (NOS in postsynaptic dendride or cell body and travels backwards across a chemical synapse to bind to the axon terminal of a presynaptic neuron for regulation of ANT this process is called as the retrograde neurotransmission (RNT. Thus the primary function of NO is RNT and the purpose of RNT is regulation of chemical neurotransmission at synapse. For this reason, RNT allows neural circuits to create feedback loops. The haem is the ligand binding site of NO receptor (sGC at presynaptic membrane. The affinity of haem exhibits >10, 000- fold excess for NO than Oxygen (THE 10, 000 FOLD EFFECT. In pathological conditions ANT, normal synaptic activity including RNT is absent. NO donors like sodium nitroprusside (SNP releases NO by activating NOS at the level of postsynaptic area. NO now travels backwards across a chemical synapse to bind to the haem of NO receptor at axon terminal of a presynaptic neuron as in normal condition. NO now acts as impulse generator (at presynaptic membrane thus bypasses the normal ANT. Also the arteriolar perforators are having Nitric Oxide Synthetase (NOS at the adventitial side (outer border on which sodium nitroprusside (SNP acts; causing release of Nitric Oxide (NO which vasodilates the perforators causing gush of blood in brain’s tissue and reversal of brain death. OBJECTIVE: In brain death cases we only think for various transplantations but this study being a pilot study reverses some criteria of brain death by vasodilating the arteriolar perforators. To study the effect of intrathecal sodium nitroprusside (IT SNP in

  19. Differentiation and Death of Premyelinating Oligodendrocytes in Developing Rodent Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Trapp, Bruce D.; Nishiyama, Akiko; Cheng, David; Macklin, Wendy

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that newly formed oligodendrocytes are dynamic cells whose production, survival, and differentiation depend upon axonal influences. This study has characterized the appearance and fate of newly formed oligodendrocytes in developing rat brain. Oligodendrocytes appear in predictable locations and radially extend DM-20–positive processes that cover 80-μm domains in the cortex and 40-μm domains in the corpus callosum. These premyelinating oligodendrocytes have one ...

  20. Principles and concepts of brain death and organ donation: the Jewish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Z H; Rappaport, I T

    1999-01-01

    The harvesting of organs for transplantation is dependent on a stringent definition of brain death. Different societies have had to struggle with their cultural heritage, adapting it to conform to the advances in medical science and the need of the sick. In this article, the development of the concept of brain death as it applies to organ transplantation in Judaism is outlined. The ability of traditional Jewish values to address themselves to the challenges of modern medicine can serve as a basis for cultural cross-fertilization and comparison in modern societies. PMID:10549346

  1. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish Amin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003. The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21–30 years (18.8%, followed by 11–20 years age group (17.8% and 31–40 years (14.3%. The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas. To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients

  2. Cell proliferation and cell death are disturbed during prenatal and postnatal brain development after uranium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, M; Elie, C; Stefani, J; N Florès; Culeux, C; Delissen, O; Ibanez, C; Lestaevel, P; Eriksson, P; Dinocourt, C

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is more susceptible to neurotoxic compounds than adult brain. It is also well known that disturbances during brain development cause neurological disorders in adulthood. The brain is known to be a target organ of uranium (U) exposure and previous studies have noted that internal U contamination of adult rats induces behavioral disorders as well as affects neurochemistry and neurophysiological properties. In this study, we investigated whether depleted uranium (DU) exposure affects neurogenesis during prenatal and postnatal brain development. We examined the structural morphology of the brain, cell death and finally cell proliferation in animals exposed to DU during gestation and lactation compared to control animals. Our results showed that DU decreases cell death in the cortical neuroepithelium of gestational day (GD) 13 embryos exposed at 40mg/L and 120mg/L and of GD18 fetuses exposed at 120mg/L without modification of the number of apoptotic cells. Cell proliferation analysis showed an increase of BrdU labeling in the dentate neuroepithelium of fetuses from GD18 at 120mg/L. Postnatally, cell death is increased in the dentate gyrus of postnatal day (PND) 0 and PND5 exposed pups at 120mg/L and is associated with an increase of apoptotic cell number only at PND5. Finally, a decrease in dividing cells is observed in the dentate gyrus of PND21 rats developmentally exposed to 120mg/L DU, but not at PND0 and PND5. These results show that DU exposure during brain development causes opposite effects on cell proliferation and cell death processes between prenatal and postnatal development mainly at the highest dose. Although these modifications do not have a major impact in brain morphology, they could affect the next steps of neurogenesis and thus might disrupt the fine organization of the neuronal network. PMID:26506049

  3. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Beacon signal in transcranial color coded ultrasound: A sign for brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A widely under-recognized brain-death confirming transcranial ultrasonography pattern resembling the red-blue beacon signal was demonstrated. Familiarity to this distinct and characteristic ultrasonic pattern seems to be important in the perspective of point-of-care neurological ultrasound use and knobology.

  5. Beacon signal in transcranial color coded ultrasound: A sign for brain death

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu; Ethem Murat Arsava

    2014-01-01

    A widely under-recognized brain-death confirming transcranial ultrasonography pattern resembling the red-blue beacon signal was demonstrated. Familiarity to this distinct and characteristic ultrasonic pattern seems to be important in the perspective of point-of-care neurological ultrasound use and knobology.

  6. Digital subtraction angiography - a new approach to brain death determination in the newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of brain death in the newborn infants is elusive and often difficult. The lack of cerebral blood flow has become an identified criterion for loss of cerebral function. The diagnosis can be obtained by the technique of digital subtraction angiography, which is presented in two case reports demonstrating the utility of this technique. (orig.)

  7. Legal Standards for Brain Death and Undue Influence in Euthanasia Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Okninski, Michaela E

    2016-06-01

    A major appellate court decision from the United States seriously questions the legal sufficiency of prevailing medical criteria for the determination of death by neurological criteria. There may be a mismatch between legal and medical standards for brain death, requiring the amendment of either or both. In South Australia, a Bill seeks to establish a legal right for a defined category of persons suffering unbearably to request voluntary euthanasia. However, an essential criterion of a voluntary decision is that it is not tainted by undue influence, and this Bill falls short of providing adequate guidance to assess for undue influence. PMID:27048423

  8. Predictors of Inpatient Death and Complications among Postoperative Elderly Patients with Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel; Mukherjee, Debraj; Chang, David C.; Purtell, Michael; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Risks of brain surgery in elderly patients with brain metastases are not well defined. This study was designed to quantify the postoperative risk for these patients after brain surgery for metastatic disease to the brain. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998–2005). Patients aged 65 years or older who underwent tumor resection of brain metastases were identified by ICD-9 coding. Primary outcome was inpatient death. Other outcomes included systemic postoperative complications, length of stay (LOS), and total charges. Results A total of 4,907 patients (53.6% men) were identified. Mean age was 72.1 years. Mean Charlson comorbidity score was 7.8. Inpatient mortality was 4%. The most common adverse events were pulmonary complications (3.4%). Mean length of stay was 9.2 days. Mean total charges were $57,596.39. In multivariate analysis, patients up to age 80 years had no significantly greater odds of inpatient death, relative to their 65- to 69-year-old counterparts. Each 1-point increase in Charlson score was associated with 12% increased odds of death, 0.52 days increased LOS, and $1,710.61 higher hospital charges. Postoperative pulmonary complications, stroke, or thromboembolic events increased LOS and total charges by up to 9.6 days and $57,664.42, respectively. These associations were statistically significant (P brain metastases among the elderly up to the ninth decade of life is feasible. Age older than 80 years and higher Charlson comorbidity scores were found to be important prognostic factors for inpatient outcome. Incorporating these factors into preoperative decision making may help to select appropriately those elderly candidates for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:20809176

  9. Using an Integrated -Omics Approach to Identify Key Cellular Processes That Are Disturbed in the Kidney After Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M Z; Huang, H; Kaisar, M; Lo Faro, M L; Rebolledo, R; Morten, K; Heather, L C; Dona, A; Leuvenink, H G; Fuggle, S V; Kessler, B M; Pugh, C W; Ploeg, R J

    2016-05-01

    In an era where we are becoming more reliant on vulnerable kidneys for transplantation from older donors, there is an urgent need to understand how brain death leads to kidney dysfunction and, hence, how this can be prevented. Using a rodent model of hemorrhagic stroke and next-generation proteomic and metabolomic technologies, we aimed to delineate which key cellular processes are perturbed in the kidney after brain death. Pathway analysis of the proteomic signature of kidneys from brain-dead donors revealed large-scale changes in mitochondrial proteins that were associated with altered mitochondrial activity and morphological evidence of mitochondrial injury. We identified an increase in a number of glycolytic proteins and lactate production, suggesting a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. Higher amounts of succinate were found in the brain death group, in conjunction with increased markers of oxidative stress. We characterized the responsiveness of hypoxia inducible factors and found this correlated with post-brain death mean arterial pressures. Brain death leads to metabolic disturbances in the kidney and alterations in mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species generation. This metabolic disturbance and alteration in mitochondrial function may lead to further cellular injury. Conditioning the brain-dead organ donor by altering metabolism could be a novel approach to ameliorate this brain death-induced kidney injury. PMID:26602379

  10. The prolongation of somatic support in a pregnant woman with brain-death: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral Eliana

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical literature has increasingly reported cases of maternal brain death during pregnancy. This is a rare situation which demands the decision and, depending on the gestational age, the implementation of a set of measures to prolong the homeostasis of the human body after brain death for the purpose of maintaining the foetus alive until its viability. Case presentation A 40 year old woman suffered an intracranial haemorrhage during the 25th week of pregnancy. Despite neurosurgical drainage of a gross intraparenchymatous haematoma, the patient developed brain death. Upon confirmation of this diagnosis, she received full ventilatory and nutritional support, vasoactive drugs, maintenance of normothermia, hormone replacement and other supportive measures required to prolong gestation and improve the survival prognosis of her foetus. All decisions regarding the patient's treatment were taken in consensus with her family. She also received corticosteroids to accelerate foetal lung maturity. During the twenty-five days of somatic support, the woman's condition remained stable; however, during the last seven days the foetus developed oligohydramnios and brain-sparring, which led the medical team to take the decision to perform a Caesarean section at that moment. After delivery, the patient's organs were removed for donation. The male infant was born weighing 815 g, with an Apgar score of 9 and 10 at the first and fifth minutes, respectively. The infant was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, but did not require mechanical ventilation and had no major complications. He was discharged at 40 days of life, with no sequelae and weighing 1850 g. Conclusion These results are in accordance with findings from previous studies and case reports suggesting the appropriateness and safety of extended somatic support during pregnancy under certain circumstances. They also suggest the need for prompt diagnosis of brain death before the

  11. Neurotoxin envenomation mimicking brain death in a child: A case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu Dayal; Smita Prakash; Verma, Pradeep K; Mridula Pawar

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of presentation of a victim of neurotoxic snake bite can range from mild ptosis to complete paralysis and ophthalmoplegia. We report a case of snake bite in a 10-year-old child who was comatosed with bilateral fixed dilated pupils and absent doll′s eye movement that was interpreted as brain death. Physicians need to be aware of the likelihood of snakebite presenting as locked in syndrome.

  12. Neurotoxin envenomation mimicking brain death in a child: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Dayal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of presentation of a victim of neurotoxic snake bite can range from mild ptosis to complete paralysis and ophthalmoplegia. We report a case of snake bite in a 10-year-old child who was comatosed with bilateral fixed dilated pupils and absent doll′s eye movement that was interpreted as brain death. Physicians need to be aware of the likelihood of snakebite presenting as locked in syndrome.

  13. Complications associated with the apnea test in the determination of the brain death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-liang; FANG Qiang; LI Li; QIU Yun-qing; LUO Ben-yan

    2008-01-01

    Background An apnea test is essentialin the clinical determination of brain death.This study was conducted to analyse complications associated with the apnea test in the determination of the brain death.Methods On 93 adult patients In coma in Zhejiang Province of China from January 2003 to December 2006,179 apnea tests were performed as a part of the determination of brain death.Potential risk conditions and complications were analysed during apnea tests.Results During apnea,sedous cardiac arrhythmia did not occur in all patients.Complications occurred in 37 of 179 (21%)apnea tests.Hypotension occurred in 30 patients(17%)and it was obsewed in 8/94(9%)tests with baseline value of systolic arterial blood pressure not less than 120 mmHg,and 22/85(26%)lass than 120 mmHg(P<0.05).Severe hypoxaemia occurred in 10 patients(6%)of which 3/138(2%)tests with baseline value of arterial oxygen pressure not less than 200 mmHg,and 7/41(17%)less than 200 mmHg(P<0.05).Conclusions This study demonstrated that complications occurred mostly in patients with inadequate baseline systolic arterial blood pressure and preoxygenation.Adequate precautions during the apnea tests may reduce the risk of cardiovascular and oxygenation complication.

  14. Motricidade reflexa na morte cerebral The reflex activity in the brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson L. Sanvito

    1972-03-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico de morte cerebral está baseado em critérios clínicos, eletrencefalográficos e angiográficos. Do ponto de vista clínico deve ser evidenciado o seguinte quadro: coma profundo, midríase paralítica bilateral, ausência de reação a qualquer estímulo externo, apnéia, arreflexia superficial e profunda. Do ponto de vista eletrencefalográfico são necessários dois registros, separados por um intervalo de 24 horas, evidenciando traçados iselétricos. No presente trabalho são estudados 15 pacientes com morte cerebral comprovada do ponto de vista clínico e eletrencefalográfico. Em 8 pacientes havia persistência de atividade reflexa durante a fase de morte cerebral (reflexos profundos e/ou superficiais. Fenômenos de automatismos medulares também foram verificados em 3 pacientes.The diagnosis of brain death is based in clinical, electroencephalographic and angiographic data. The criteria for diagnosis of brain death are: deep coma with unreceptivity and unresponsiveness, no movements or breathing (the patient's respiration must be maintained artificially, bilateral dilated and fixed pupils, absence of corneal reflexes, no response to caloric test, absence of deep tendon reflexes and of the superficial abdominal and plantar reflexes, isoelectric EEG maintained for twenty-four hours. The purpose of this study was to observe the natural clinical courses of 15 patients with brain death, specially the data concerning the deep and superficial reflexes. From 15 patients fulfilling the criteria of brain death, 8 maintained spinal reflexes up to the time of cardiac arrest; in five of these patients the superficial abdominal reflexes were present and the reflexes of spinal automatism could be elicited. These results show that the absence of deep and superficial reflexes can't be considered as essencial for the diagnosis of brain death.

  15. An International Comparison of the Effect of Policy Shifts to Organ Donation following Cardiocirculatory Death (DCD) on Donation Rates after Brain Death (DBD) and Transplantation Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Bendorf, Aric; Kelly, Patrick J.; Kerridge, Ian H; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Myerson, Brian; Stewart, Cameron; Pussell, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD) and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000–2010. On average, overa...

  16. [Report of Sata Clinical Fellowship; brain death and organ donation in hospital for sick children, Toronto, Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M

    2000-04-01

    I have experienced two cases of pediatric organ donation from the brain dead patients in Hospital for Sick Children in three months. First case was a 9-year-old boy after a traffic accident. Second case was an 11-year-old boy with intracranial hemorrhage. Brain death is diagnosed by clinical criteria alone in Canada, as in many of developed countries. EEG or brain flow studies are not mandatory. In the first case, brain death was confirmed after additional brain flow study, EEG, and SSEP because of cervical spinal injury. Second case was diagnosed as brain death by clinical criteria alone, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed after brain death diagnosis. MORE (multiple organ receival and exchange program of Ontario), Organ Donation Team (critical care physicians, nurses, organ donation coordinators, social workers and chaplains) in HSC, and volunteers play the important role to help the family and to make the organ transplantation successful. In Canada, pediatric brain death and organ donation are widely accepted, but there remains an imbalance between the demand for transplantation and the number of organs available. PMID:10793535

  17. Redefining Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The results of 20 years of research on brain death will be released to the public, the Chinese Ministry of Health reported in early April. A special ministry team has drafted the criteria for brain death in Criteria for the Diagnosis of Brain Death in Adults (Revised Edition) and Technical Specifications for the Diagnosis

  18. Hydrocephalus and Pressure on Brain Stem Cause Death in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khazaei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurofibromatosis type 2 is an inherited autosomal dominant syndrome, charac-terized by multiple neoplasms of the central and peripheral nervous system associated with ocular abnormalities. The most common tumor associated with the disease is the vestibulo-cochlear and in later stages are meningioma and other brain tumors. Case Report: The patient was a 35 year old woman admitted to the Farshchian hospital in Hamadan due to unconciousness and respiratory distress She had sensorineural hearing loss and inability to see due to decrease visulal acuity. In addition, due to lower extremity paresis she has been unable to walk and wheelchair-dependent for many years. Brain CT scan and MRI showed multiple tumors in the posterior fossa causing obstructive hydrocephalus even-tually caused the patient's death . Conclusion: Brain tumors, especially in the posterior fossa can cause death in Neurofibroma-tosis type 2. Early surgery can be life saving. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:167-170

  19. Problems associated with the apnea test in the diagnosis of brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saposnik Gustavo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain death is the absence of all cortical functions, including the brainstem. The apnea test (AT is a necessary requisite to complete this diagnosis. Anecdotal reports describing hypotension and acidosis due to apnea test have been reported. However, there are few studies that evaluate complications or difficulties related to this procedure. Objective: To analyze medical problems associated with the apnea test. Methods and Patients: We analyzed clinical features, potential risk conditions, and problems in 129 brain dead patients during the apnea test. The diagnosis of brain death was made according to the American Academy of Neurology recommendations. Results: Clinical problems during the apnea test were detected in more than two thirds of patients, including: arterial hypotension (12%, acidosis (68%, and hypoxemia (23%. Four patients developed major complications, including: pneumothorax, cardiac arrest, bradycardia, atrial fibrillation and myocardial infarction. Conclusion: The apnea test is not an innocuous procedure. Complications during the AT are more common than reported and limit organ procurement for transplantation. Guidelines for performing the AT should be followed in order to avoid clinical complications.

  20. Anencefalia e morte cerebral (neurológica Anencephaly and brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Fernandes Penna

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vem-se discutindo no país a ética da interrupção da gravidez no caso de fetos anencéfalos. Os opositores ao aborto nesses casos apontam, entre outros argumentos, que não se trata de morte cerebral devido à presença de tronco encefálico. Neste artigo discutimos o conceito de morte cerebral e sua aplicação no que tange à anencefalia. Apontamos alguns aspectos históricos do desenvolvimento desse conceito e a importância de ser considerada a diferença entre conceito e critérios. A morte neurológica é a perda definitiva e total da consciência, enquanto a presença do tronco cerebral é apenas um critério a ser usado nos casos de lesão encefálica em encéfalos antes perfeitos. O conceito de morte cerebral se aplica completamente à ausência de córtex dos anencéfalos, o que sem dúvida permite sua retirada do útero materno. Manter juridicamente a criminalização desse procedimento é uma interferência religiosa no Estado laico e democrático, que impede o exercício de escolha pelos indivíduos segundo seu credo.Brazilian society has recently discussed the ethics of interrupting pregnancy in the case of an anencephalic fetus. In such cases, anti-abortionists contend that anencephaly is not the same as brain death, since a brainstem is present. This article discusses the concept of brain death and its application to the issue of anencephaly. We point to key historical aspects in the development of this concept and the importance of considering the difference between concept and criteria. Neurological death is the definitive and complete loss of consciousness, while the presence of a brainstem is merely a criterion to be used in cases of head injury in previously intact brains. The concept of brain death is totally applicable to the absence of cortex in a fetus with anencephaly, which without a doubt allows such a fetus to be removed from the uterus. To maintain the criminalization of this procedure by legal means represents

  1. Vasopressina e morte encefálica Vasopressin and brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIANE DE ARAUJO CINTRA

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A morte encefálica (ME resulta numa perda completa dos mecanismos centrais de regulação da estabilidade hemodinâmica mesmo em pacientes com suporte adequado da ventilação, correção hidroeletrolítica e ácido-básica e suporte farmacológico convencional máximo da circulação. Acredita-se que a diminuição da vasopressina circulante influencia de maneira preponderante a estabilidade cardiocirculatória de pacientes com ME, sendo a sua administração exógena defendida por alguns autores no manuseio do potencial doador de órgãos. O artigo analisa e discute alguns estudos experimentais e clínicos relevantes em relação ao comportamento da vasopressina na ME e seu papel na manutenção da estabilidade cardiocirculatória, bem como sua potencial utilidade no manuseio destes pacientes. Desta análise concluímos que o comportamento da vasopressina na ME e o seu real valor na manutenção do potencial doador ainda não estão totalmente esclarecidos, necessitando de investigações futuras.Brain death results in the breakdown of effective central regulatory mechanisms of cardiocirculatory stability, even in patients with artificial mechanical ventilation, correction of electrolytic and acid-basic disorders and maximal conventional pharmacological support of the circulation. Recent evidences have shown that the fall of vasopressin levels in the blood circulation significantly influences the cardiocirculatory stability of patients with brain death, and its exogenous administration is defended by many authors for the management of multiorgan donor patients. In this brief review we analyse and discuss some experimental and clinical relevant studies about the role of vasopressin in the control of cardiocirculatory stability in brain death, and its potential usefulness in the management of multiorgan donor. We conclude that the role of vasopressin in the pathophysiology of brain death and its usefulness as a pharmacological agent in the

  2. Acute liver failure-induced death of rats is delayed or prevented by blocking NMDA receptors in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Omar; Rodrigo, Regina; Boix, Jordi; Piedrafita, Blanca; Agusti, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2008-09-01

    Developing procedures to delay the mechanisms of acute liver failure-induced death would increase patients' survival by allowing time for liver regeneration or to receive a liver for transplantation. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to brain herniation and mortality in acute liver failure (ALF). Acute ammonia intoxication in rats leads to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in brain. Blocking these receptors prevents ammonia-induced death. Ammonia-induced activation of NMDA receptors could contribute to ALF-induced death. If this were the case, blocking NMDA receptors could prevent or delay ALF-induced death. The aim of this work was to assess 1) whether ALF leads to NMDA receptors activation in brain in vivo and 2) whether blocking NMDA receptors prevents or delays ALF-induced death of rats. It is shown, by in vivo brain microdialysis, that galactosamine-induced ALF leads to NMDA receptors activation in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors by continuous administration of MK-801 or memantine through miniosmotic pumps affords significant protection against ALF-induced death, increasing the survival time approximately twofold. Also, when liver injury is not 100% lethal (1.5 g/kg galactosamine), blocking NMDA receptors increases the survival rate from 23 to 62%. This supports that blocking NMDA receptors could have therapeutic utility to improve survival of patients with ALF. PMID:18599589

  3. Molecular control of brain size: Regulators of neural stem cell life, death and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proper development of the brain and other organs depends on multiple parameters, including strictly controlled expansion of specific progenitor pools. The regulation of such expansion events includes enzymatic activities that govern the correct number of specific cells to be generated via an orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell cycle exit, differentiation, cell death etc. Certain proteins in turn exert direct control of these enzymatic activities and thus progenitor pool expansion and organ size. The members of the Cip/Kip family (p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2) are well-known regulators of cell cycle exit that interact with and inhibit the activity of cyclin-CDK complexes, whereas members of the p53/p63/p73 family are traditionally associated with regulation of cell death. It has however become clear that the roles for these proteins are not as clear-cut as initially thought. In this review, we discuss the roles for proteins of the Cip/Kip and p53/p63/p73 families in the regulation of cell cycle control, differentiation, and death of neural stem cells. We suggest that these proteins act as molecular interfaces, or 'pilots', to assure the correct assembly of protein complexes with enzymatic activities at the right place at the right time, thereby regulating essential decisions in multiple cellular events.

  4. Determination of Brain Death by 99mTc DTPA and 99mTc HMPAO Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate availability of cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death, we examined 25 patients with a suspected clinical diagnosis of brain death. 8 patients were studied by Tc-99m-DTPA and 15 patients were by Tc-99m-HMPAO (Hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime). Seven patients with Tc-99M-DTPA studies revealed absence of cerebral blood flow and sagittal sinus activity. All of 15 patients with Tc-99m-HMPAO studies revealed complete absence of cerebral perfusion. The results of the cerebral radionuclide studies of brain death correlated with other clinical conditions, such as intracranial pressure(ICP), EEG, transcranial doppler sono-graphy(TCDS), and neurologic examination. The ICP of 8 patients, who are confirmed by brain death with Tc-99m-HMPAO study are elevated in all cases. In conclusion, cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death is available. Tc-99m-HMPAO imaging is unequivocal, easily interpreted, well reflect the physiologic state of increased ICP, and provides adequate assessment of posterior fossa activity. In addition, the SPECT imaging with Tc-99m-HMPAO produces more accurate results due to it's superiority of image contrast and proper localization of radiopharmaceutical distribution than conventional planar imaging.

  5. Determination of Brain Death by {sup 99m}Tc DTPA and {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Kim, Sung Hoon; Yang, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Yong; Chang, Soo Kyo; Park, Seog Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shinn, Kyung Sub [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-03-15

    To evaluate availability of cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death, we examined 25 patients with a suspected clinical diagnosis of brain death. 8 patients were studied by Tc-99m-DTPA and 15 patients were by Tc-99m-HMPAO (Hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime). Seven patients with Tc-99M-DTPA studies revealed absence of cerebral blood flow and sagittal sinus activity. All of 15 patients with Tc-99m-HMPAO studies revealed complete absence of cerebral perfusion. The results of the cerebral radionuclide studies of brain death correlated with other clinical conditions, such as intracranial pressure(ICP), EEG, transcranial doppler sono-graphy(TCDS), and neurologic examination. The ICP of 8 patients, who are confirmed by brain death with Tc-99m-HMPAO study are elevated in all cases. In conclusion, cerebral radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of brain death is available. Tc-99m-HMPAO imaging is unequivocal, easily interpreted, well reflect the physiologic state of increased ICP, and provides adequate assessment of posterior fossa activity. In addition, the SPECT imaging with Tc-99m-HMPAO produces more accurate results due to it's superiority of image contrast and proper localization of radiopharmaceutical distribution than conventional planar imaging.

  6. Quality of Care of Nursing from Brain Death Patient in ICU Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Toktam Masoumian Hoseini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Intensive Care Unit (ICU nurses play a significant and key role in the care of brain dead patients and their families, therefore their Practice extremely important to the success of organ donation. To assess ICU nurse's practice in relation to nurse's role in the organ donation process from brain dead patients in Iran. Materials and Methods:In a cross-sectional analytical study 90 ICU nurses in Ghaem and Imam Reza Hospitals in Mashhad through stratified random sampling allocation method were selected. Data collection tools included a questionnaire on demographic information, factors influencing nurse's practice during the organ donation process and surveying "nurse's practice in relation to their roles in the organ donation process." Results: 90 nurses participated in this study. (70.0% of the research subjects had spoken with their own families about organ donation, and (20.0% had organ donation cards. Practice scores were calculated on a scale of 100. The mean score of nurses' practice was (6.04± 3.66. 96.7% of nurses’ weak practice in terms of their roles in the organ donation process. Conclusion: As a result, they do not have adequate practice regard nurse's role in organ donation process and in relation to brain death patient and their families. Therefore it is suggested to include nursing courses in the organ donation process and organ transplantation as well as educational programs to acquaint nurses with their roles in the process to improve their practice by different training methods.

  7. Exendin-4 attenuates brain death-induced liver damage in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Lemos, Natalia E; Dias, Ana L; Brondani, Leticia A; Oliveira, Jarbas R; Bauer, Andrea C; Leitão, Cristiane B; Crispim, Daisy

    2015-11-01

    The majority of liver grafts destined for transplantation originate from brain dead donors. However, significantly better posttransplantation outcomes are achieved when organs from living donors are used, suggesting that brain death (BD) causes irreversible damage to the liver tissue. Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) analogues were shown to possess interesting hepatic protection effects in different liver disease models. We hypothesized that donor treatment with the GLP1 analogue exendin-4 (Ex-4) could alleviate BD-induced liver damage. A rat model of BD was employed in order to estimate BD-induced liver damage and Ex-4's potential protective effects. Liver damage was assessed by biochemical determination of circulating hepatic markers. Apoptosis in the hepatic tissue was assessed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry using an antibody that only recognizes the active form of caspase-3. Gene expression changes in inflammation and stress response genes were monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Here, we show that Ex-4 administration to the brain dead liver donors significantly reduces levels of circulating aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase. This was accompanied by a remarkable reduction in hepatocyte apoptosis. In this model, BD caused up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor and stress-related genes, confirming previous findings in clinical and animal studies. In conclusion, treatment of brain dead rats with Ex-4 reduced BD-induced liver damage. Further investigation is needed to determine the molecular basis of the observed liver protection. After testing in a randomized clinical trial, the inclusion of GLP1 analogues in organ donor management might help to improve organ quality, maximize organ donation, and possibly increase liver transplantation success rates. PMID:26334443

  8. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Y W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and

  9. Potential brain death organ donors - challenges and prospects: A single center retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Al-Maslamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ donation after brain death (BD is a major source for obtaining transplantable organs for patients with end-stage organ disease (ESOD. This retrospective, descriptive study was carried out on all potential BD patients admitted in different intensive care units (ICUs of the Hamad medical Corporation (HMC, Doha, Qatar during a period from January 2011 to April 2012. Our aim was to evaluate various demographic criteria and challenges of organ donation among potential BD organ donors and plan a strategy to improve the rate of organ donation in Qatar. Various aspects of BD patients in the ICUs and their possible effects on organ donation were studied. The time intervals analyzed to determine the possible causes of delay of organ retrieval were: time of diagnosing fixed dilated pupils in the ICU, to performing the first BD test, then to the second BD test, to family approach, to organ retrieval and/or circulatory death (CD without organ retrieval. There were a total of 116 potential BD organ donors of whom 96 (82.75% were males and 20 (17.25% were females. Brain hemorrhage and head injury contributed to 37 (31.9% and 32 (27.6% BD cases, respectively. Time interval between diagnosing fixed dilated pupil and performing the first test of BD was delayed >24 h in 79% of the cases and between the first and second BD tests was >6 h in 70.8% of the cases. This delay is not compatible with the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC policy for BD diagnosis and resulted in a low number of organs retrieved. BD organ donation, a potential source for organs to save patients with ESOD has several pitfalls and every effort should be made to increase the awareness of the public as well as medical personnel to optimize donation efficacy.

  10. Moderate Hypothermia Significantly Decreases Hippocampal Cell Death Involving Autophagy Pathway after Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yichao; Lin, Yingying; Feng, Jun-feng; Jia, Feng; Gao, Guo-yi; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-07-15

    Here, we evaluated changes in autophagy after post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) followed by moderate hypothermia in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham injury with normothermia group (37 °C); sham injury with hypothermia group (32 °C); TBI with normothermia group (TNG; 37 °C); and TBI with hypothermia group (THG; 32 °C). Injury was induced by a fluid percussion TBI device. Moderate hypothermia (32 °C) was achieved by partial immersion in a water bath (0 °C) under general anesthesia for 4 h. All rats were killed at 24 h after fluid percussion TBI. The ipsilateral hippocampus in all rats was analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin staining; terminal deoxynucleoitidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining was used to determine cell death in ipsilateral hippocampus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Beclin-1, as well as transmission electron microscopy performed to assess changes in autophagy. At 24 h after TBI, the cell death index was 27.90 ± 2.36% in TNG and 14.90 ± 1.52% in THG. Expression level of LC3 and Beclin-1 were significantly increased after TBI and were further up-regulated after post-TBI hypothermia. Further, ultrastructural observations showed that there was a marked increase of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in ipsilateral hippocampus after post-TBI hypothermia. Our data demonstrated that moderate hypothermia significantly attenuated cell death and increased autophagy in ipsilateral hippocampus after fluid percussion TBI. In conclusion, autophagy pathway may participate in the neuroprotective effect of post-TBI hypothermia. PMID:25942484

  11. Up-regulation of Kir2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. → The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K+ channel (Kir2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. → The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca2+ entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. → The Kir2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K+ channel (Kir2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of Kir channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration due to Ca2+ influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of Kir2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  12. miR-711 upregulation induces neuronal cell death after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirzhanov, B; Stoica, B A; Zhao, Z; Loane, D J; Wu, J; Dorsey, S G; Faden, A I

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and disability. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level and may be key modulators of neuronal apoptosis, yet their role in secondary injury after TBI remains largely unexplored. Changes in miRs after controlled cortical impact (CCI) in mice were examined during the first 72 h using miR arrays and qPCR. One selected miR (711) was examined with regard to its regulation and relation to cell death; effects of miR-711 modulation were evaluated after CCI and using in vitro cell death models of primary cortical neurons. Levels of miR-711 were increased in the cortex early after TBI and in vitro models through rapid upregulation of miR-711 transcription (pri-miR-711) rather than catabolism. Increases coincided with downregulation of the pro-survival protein Akt, a predicted target of miR-711, with sequential activation of forkhead box O3 (FoxO3)a/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3)α/β, pro-apoptotic BH3-only molecules PUMA (Bcl2-binding component 3) and Bim (Bcl2-like 11 (apoptosis facilitator)), and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and AIF. miR-711 and Akt (mRNA) co-immunoprecipitated with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). A miR-711 hairpin inhibitor attenuated the apoptotic mechanisms and decreased neuronal death in an Akt-dependent manner. Conversely, a miR-711 mimic enhanced neuronal apoptosis. Central administration of the miR-711 hairpin inhibitor after TBI increased Akt expression and attenuated apoptotic pathways. Treatment reduced cortical lesion volume, neuronal cell loss in cortex and hippocampus, and long-term neurological dysfunction. miR-711 changes contribute to neuronal cell death after TBI, in part by inhibiting Akt, and may serve as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26470728

  13. A Comparison of Brain Death Criteria between China and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Criteria for determining brain death (BD vary between China and the United States. We reported the results of an investigation designed to compare procedures to determine BD in two countries. Methods: The latest criteria in the United states were published in 2010. The latest criteria in China were published in 2009. We used these two types of BD criteria to evaluate patients who were considered to be BD. The time, cost, and accuracy of the diagnosis were compared. Results: From January 1, 2012 to October 8, 2013, there were 37 patients which were applied for BD evaluation in the Neurological Intensive Care Unit of Beijing Tiantan Hospital. The cause of coma were known as subarachnoid hemorrhage (18 patients, 48.6%, intracerebral hemorrhage (8 patients, 21.6%, cerebral ischemia (9 patients, 24.3%, brain stem tumor (1 patient, 2.7%, and intracranial infection (1 patient, 2.7%. The clinical examinations were done for all of the patients except 1 patient who had low blood pressure. Three patients had brainstem reflexes that were excluded from BD. Twenty-five patients had apnea tests, and 20 tests were completed that were all positive. Confirmatory tests were completed differently: Transcranial Doppler (30 patients, positive rate 86.7%, electroencephalogram (25 patients, positive rate 100%, and somatosensory evoked potential (16 patients, positive rate 100%. Thirty-three patients were diagnosed BD by criteria of the United States. Only 9 patients were diagnosed BD by Chinese criteria. The use of time and money in the USA criteria was obviously fewer than those in Chinese criteria (P = 0.000. Conclusion: Compared with BD criteria of the United States, Chinese criteria were stricter, lower positive rate, more cost in money and time, and more reliable by families and doctors.

  14. Guia de sustentabilidade para cidades do futebol: junho 2015

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    O Comitê Rio 2016 elaborou o presente "Guia de sustentabilidade para cidades do futebol", que contém, em linhas gerais, os princípios que a equipe própria e contratados das cidades do futebol devem observar na realização de suas atividades, com o intuito de reduzir impactos ambientais e sociais do evento.

  15. Adesao ao guia alimentar para populacao brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseu Verly Junior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO : Analisar a adesão ao Guia Alimentar para População Brasileira. MÉTODOS : Amostra composta por participantes do Inquérito de Saúde de São Paulo (n = 1.661 que preencheram dois recordatórios de 24 horas. Foi utilizado modelo bivariado de efeito misto para a razão entre o consumo de energia do grupo de alimentos e o consumo calórico total. A razão estimada foi utilizada para calcular o percentual de indivíduos com consumo abaixo ou acima da recomendação. RESULTADOS : Pelo menos 80,0% da população consome abaixo do recomendado para: leite e derivados; frutas e sucos de frutas; e cereais, tubérculos e raízes; aproximadamente 60,0% para legumes e verduras; 30,0% para feijões; e 8,0% para carnes e ovos. Adolescentes apresentaram a maior inadequação para legumes e verduras (90,0%, e o estrato de maior renda foi associado à menor inadequação para óleos, gorduras e sementes oleaginosas (57,0%. CONCLUSÕES : Foi observado consumo inadequado dos grupos de alimentos relacionados com aumento do risco de doenças crônicas.

  16. Brain iron accumulation in unexplained fetal and infant death victims with smoker mothers-The possible involvement of maternal methemoglobinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corna Melissa F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is involved in important vital functions as an essential component of the oxygen-transporting heme mechanism. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether oxidative metabolites from maternal cigarette smoke could affect iron homeostasis in the brain of victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death, maybe through the induction of maternal hemoglobin damage, such as in case of methemoglobinemia. Methods Histochemical investigations by Prussian blue reaction were made on brain nonheme ferric iron deposits, gaining detailed data on their localization in the brainstem and cerebellum of victims of sudden death and controls. The Gless and Marsland's modification of Bielschowsky's was used to identify neuronal cell bodies and neurofilaments. Results Our approach highlighted accumulations of blue granulations, indicative of iron positive reactions, in the brainstem and cerebellum of 33% of victims of sudden death and in none of the control group. The modified Bielschowsky's method confirmed that the cells with iron accumulations were neuronal cells. Conclusions We propose that the free iron deposition in the brain of sudden fetal and infant death victims could be a catabolic product of maternal methemoglobinemia, a biomarker of oxidative stress likely due to nicotine absorption.

  17. Computationally Prediction of Candidate Agents for Preventing Organ Dysfunction After Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianwen; Ye, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our aim was to explore the mechanism of post-transplant organ function decrease induced by brain death (BD) and discover a potential candidate drug for improving the survival and organ function after BD. MATERIAL AND METHODS The microarray data developed from the liver tissues after BD were further analyzed by bioinformatics methods. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were computationally predicted and the DEGs that involved biological functions were explored by gene ontology (GO) analysis. The candidate agents that could induce the reverse gene signature were predicted based on the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. RESULTS There were total 1374 DEGs, including 589 up-regulated genes and 785 down-regulated genes. Function analysis showed that DEGs were mainly enriched in biological process-related GO terms, such as regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent, inflammatory response, and regulation of phosphorus metabolic process. The down-regulated genes were significantly enriched in transcription factor activity and transcription regulator activity-related molecular function. The down-regulated GO terms exhibited close interaction with each other. CONCLUSIONS The organ function decrease may be attributed by transcription alteration, inflammation response, and metabolic alteration in liver after BD. Spaglumic acid and halcinonide may be potential drugs for preventing organ damage during the BD process. PMID:27170053

  18. Effect of Polyphenols on Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neuronal Death and Brain Edema in Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Anderson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are natural substances with variable phenolic structures and are elevated in vegetables, fruits, grains, bark, roots, tea, and wine. There are over 8000 polyphenolic structures identified in plants, but edible plants contain only several hundred polyphenolic structures. In addition to their well-known antioxidant effects, select polyphenols also have insulin-potentiating, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-viral, anti-ulcer, and anti-apoptotic properties. One important consequence of ischemia is neuronal death and oxidative stress plays a key role in neuronal viability. In addition, neuronal death may be initiated by the activation of mitochondria-associated cell death pathways. Another consequence of ischemia that is possibly mediated by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction is glial swelling, a component of cytotoxic brain edema. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death, cell swelling, and brain edema in ischemia. A review of currently known mechanisms underlying neuronal death and edema/cell swelling will be undertaken and the potential of dietary polyphenols to reduce such neural damage will be critically reviewed.

  19. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration. PMID:24338618

  20. Ammonium accumulation and cell death in a rat 3D brain cell model of glutaric aciduria type I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris Jafari

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type I (glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism that usually manifests in infancy by an acute encephalopathic crisis and often results in permanent motor handicap. Biochemical hallmarks of this disease are elevated levels of glutarate and 3-hydroxyglutarate in blood and urine. The neuropathology of this disease is still poorly understood, as low lysine diet and carnitine supplementation do not always prevent brain damage, even in early-treated patients. We used a 3D in vitro model of rat organotypic brain cell cultures in aggregates to mimic glutaric aciduria type I by repeated administration of 1 mM glutarate or 3-hydroxyglutarate at two time points representing different developmental stages. Both metabolites were deleterious for the developing brain cells, with 3-hydroxyglutarate being the most toxic metabolite in our model. Astrocytes were the cells most strongly affected by metabolite exposure. In culture medium, we observed an up to 11-fold increase of ammonium in the culture medium with a concomitant decrease of glutamine. We further observed an increase in lactate and a concomitant decrease in glucose. Exposure to 3-hydroxyglutarate led to a significantly increased cell death rate. Thus, we propose a three step model for brain damage in glutaric aciduria type I: (i 3-OHGA causes the death of astrocytes, (ii deficiency of the astrocytic enzyme glutamine synthetase leads to intracerebral ammonium accumulation, and (iii high ammonium triggers secondary death of other brain cells. These unexpected findings need to be further investigated and verified in vivo. They suggest that intracerebral ammonium accumulation might be an important target for the development of more effective treatment strategies to prevent brain damage in patients with glutaric aciduria type I.

  1. Absence of Doppler signal in transcranial color-coded ultrasonography may be confirmatory for brain death: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD is a valuable tool for demonstrating cerebral circulatory arrest (CCA in the setting of brain death. Complete reversal of diastolic flow (to-and-fro flow and systolic spikes in bilateral terminal internal carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar circulation are considered as specific sonogram configurations supporting the diagnosis of CCA. Because of the possibility of sonic bone window impermeability, absence of any waveform in TCD is not confirmatory for CCA unless there is documentation of disappearance of a previously well detected signal by the same recording settings. Transcranial color-coded sonography (TCCS with B-mode imaging can reliably detect adequacy of bone windows with clarity contralateral skull and ipsilateral planum temporale visualization. Therefore, absence of detectable intracranial Doppler signal along with available ultrasound window in TCCS can confirm clinical diagnosis of brain death. We herein discuss this entity from the frame of a representative case.

  2. comparative study on effective factors on consent to organ donation among families of brain death victims in Isfahan, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshte Zamani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to the previous studies, several social, cultural, and organizational factors are involved in the decision of families of brain death victims for organ donation. The present study was performed to determine the effective factors in the decision of organ donation among families of brain death victims. Methods: In this descriptive-comparative study data were gathered through a self-made questionnaire. The reliability of questionnaire was determined by calculating Cronbach’s alpha (0.81 and the face and content validity were studied and approved by a number of experts. Statistical population included all family members of brain death victims in Isfahan/Iran during 2012-2013. They were divided into two groups of with and without consent to organ donation. The whole population was considered as the study sample. Data analysis were done through SPSS using independent T-test, ANOVA, and Chi-square tests. Results: According to the present study, age and marital status of the victims have no effect on their families’ consent to organ donation (P> 0.05; but sex, duration of hospitalization in the emergency department, having organ donation card ,and personal opinion of the brain death victim showed significant relationship with consent to organ donation (P< 0.05. Conclusion: Since the rate of awareness, knowledge, and attitude of family members are effective in their decision for organ donation, improving cultural backgrounds required for this decision and increasing awareness and knowledge of people can improve the attitude of people in this regard and facilitate the acceptance of family members

  3. Systemic LPS administration induces brain inflammation but not dopaminergic neuronal death in the substantia nigra

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Hey-Kyeong; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-hye

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that brain inflammation is important in aggravation of brain damage and/or that inflammation causes neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, systemic inflammation has also emerged as a risk factor for PD. In the present study, we evaluated how systemic inflammation induced by intravenous (iv) lipopolysaccharides (LPS) injection affected brain inflammation and neuronal damage in the rat. Interestingly, almost all brain inflammatory response...

  4. An international comparison of the effect of policy shifts to organ donation following cardiocirculatory death (DCD on donation rates after brain death (DBD and transplantation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric Bendorf

    Full Text Available During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000-2010. On average, overall DD, DBD and DCD rates have increased over time, with the proportion of DCD increasing 0.3% per year (p = 0.01. Countries with higher DCD rates have, on average, lower DBD rates. For every one-per million population (pmp increase in the DCD rate, the average DBD rate decreased by 1.02 pmp (95% CI: 0.73, 1.32; p<0.0001. We also found that the number of organs transplanted per donor was significantly lower in DCD when compared to DBD donors with 1.51 less transplants per DCD compared to DBD (95% CI: 1.23, 1.79; p<0.001. Whilst the results do not infer a causal relationship between increased DCD and decreased DBD rates, the significant correlation between higher DCD and lower DBD rates coupled with the reduced number of organs transplanted per DCD donor suggests that a national policy focus on DCD may lead to an overall reduction in the number of transplants performed.

  5. Liver transplant outcomes using ideal donation after circulatory death livers are superior to using older donation after brain death donor livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalea, Joseph R; Redfield, Robert R; Foley, David P

    2016-09-01

    Multiple reports have demonstrated that liver transplantation following donation after circulatory death (DCD) is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with liver transplantation from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. We hypothesized that carefully selected, underutilized DCD livers recovered from younger donors have excellent outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of the United Network for Organ Sharing database to determine graft survivals for patients who received liver transplants from DBD donors of age ≥ 60 years, DBD donors liver transplants were performed in the United States. Of these, 41,181 (78.8%) underwent transplantation with livers from DBD donors of age livers from DCD donors livers of age livers ≥ age 60 years (P livers; of these, 111 (83.4%) were from donors livers (age livers > 60 years old. Careful donor organ and recipient selection can lead to excellent results, despite previous reports suggesting otherwise. Increased acceptance of these DCD livers would lead to shorter wait list times and increased national liver transplant rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1197-1204 2016 AASLD. PMID:27314220

  6. Region-specific vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal death in rat brain after status epilepticus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Chen; Hu Guo; Guo Zheng; Zhong-Nan Shi

    2013-12-01

    We sought to clarify the involvement and the intra-cerebral distribution variability of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a representative molecule related to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death signalling pathways, in neuronal death resulting from status epilepticus in rats. The expression patterns of CHOP and glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78, a good marker of ER stress, were assessed by Western blotting, real-time PCR, Hoechst and immunohistochemistry in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum on a status epilepticus (SE) model. Double-fluorescent staining of CHOP and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated DNA nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method were performed to clarify the involvement of CHOP in cell death. SE resulted in a time-dependent increase in the expression of GRP78 and CHOP. The expression of GRP78 protein was increased at 3, 6 and 12 h after SE and no brain region variability was found. The expression of CHOP protein was also increased, reached its peak at 24 h and remained high at 48 h. CHOP protein expression, however, showed brain region variability with highest expression noted in the hippocampus followed by the striatum, and lowest in the cortex. The up-regulation of CHOP occurring at the transcriptional level was demonstrated by real-time PCR. Double fluorescence showed that CHOP expression strongly correlated with neurons undergoing apoptosis. The results indicated that SE compromises the function of the ER and that the hippocampus is more vulnerable than the cortex and the striatum.

  7. Guias alimentares para crianças: aspectos históricos e evolução Food guides for children: historical aspects and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Roseane Moreira Sampaio Barbosa; Rosana Salles-Costa; Eliane de Abreu Soares

    2006-01-01

    Os guias alimentares possuem duas propostas: a primeira, ser um guia de saúde pública, e a segunda, uma ferramenta de educação nutricional. Este trabalho objetiva apresentar um histórico dos guias alimentares e suas características, bem como abordar os guias dietéticos desenvolvidos especificamente para crianças. Foi realizado um levantamento bibliográfico dos últimos dez anos, em base de dados Medline utilizando as palavras-chave guia alimentar, guia dietético infantil e pirâmide alimentar i...

  8. B-Amyloid Precursor Protein Staining of the Brain in Sudden Infant and Early Childhood Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm;

    2013-01-01

    To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children.......To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children....

  9. Lived Experiences of Iranian Nurses Caring for Brain Death Organ Donor Patients: Caring as “Halo of Ambiguity and Doubt”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkaran, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Navab, Elham; Gholamzadeh, Sakineh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain death is a concept in which its criteria have been expressed as documentations in Harvard Committee of Brain Death. The various perceptions of caregiver nurses for brain death patients may have effect on the chance of converting potential donors into actual organ donors. Objective: The present study has been conducted in order to perceive the experiences of nurses in care-giving to the brain death of organ donor patients. Methods: This qualitative study was carried out by means of Heidegger’s hermeneutic phenomenology. Eight nurses who have been working in ICU were interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were recorded by a tape-recorder and the given texts were transcribed and the analyses were done by Van-Mannen methodology and (thematic) analysis. Results: One of the foremost themes extracted from this study included ‘Halo of ambiguity and doubt’ that comprised of two sub-themes of ‘having unreasonable hope’ and ‘Conservative acceptance of brain death’. The unreasonable hope included lack of trust (uncertainty) in diagnosis and verification of brain death, passing through denial wall, and avoidance from explicit and direct disclosure of brain death in patients’ family. In this investigation, the nurses were involved in a type of ambiguity and doubt in care-giving to the potentially brain death of organ donor patients, which were also evident in their interaction with patients’ family and for this reason, they did not definitely announce the brain death and so far they hoped for treatment of the given patient. Such confusion and hesitance both caused annoyance of nurses and strengthening the denial of patients’ family to be exposed to death. Conclusion: The results of this study reveal the fundamental perceived care-giving of brain death in organ donor patients and led to developing some strategies to improve care-giving and achievement in donation of the given organ and necessity for presentation of educational and

  10. The Effect of Early Detection of Occult Brain Metastases in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients on Survival and Cause of Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate disease-free survival, survival from the detection of brain metastases, overall survival, and cause of death in patients with occult brain metastases (Group I) vs. patients with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II). Methods and Materials: In 80 HER2-positive breast cancer patients, treated with trastuzumab and cytostatic agents for metastatic disease, magnetic resonance imaging screening of the brain was performed, and in 29 patients (36%) occult brain metastasis was detected (Group I). Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered to Group I. This first group was compared with 52 patients who had symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) and was treated the same way, at the same clinic, during the same time period. Results: Median disease-free survival was 17 months in Group I and 19.9 months in Group II (p = 0.58). The median time interval between the dissemination of the disease and the detection of occult or symptomatic brain metastases was 9 and 15 months, respectively (p = 0.11). When the brain metastases were detected, the median survival was 9 and 8.78 months, respectively (p = 0.80). The median overall survival was 53 and 51 months, respectively (p = 0.94). In the group with occult brain metastases (Group I) 16% of patients died because of progression within the brain. In the group with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) the rate of cerebral death was 48% (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Whole-brain radiotherapy of occult brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with visceral dissemination produces a three-fold decrease in cerebral deaths but does not prolong survival.

  11. A Comparative Study of Organ Donation after Brain Death in Japan and Australia

    OpenAIRE

    TERAO, Kaori; FUJIWARA, Yoshirou

    2013-01-01

    Objective : (1) To compare the status of organ donation from brain-dead donors in Japan and Australia. (2) To identify the possible reasons for the low rates of organ donation from brain-dead donors. Background : The shortage of available organs for transplantation has prompted many countries to develop a system for the use of organs from brain-dead donors, including Japan and Australia. Yet, there is a wide range of organ donation rates and policies between Japan and Australia in the current...

  12. Changing Patterns of Organ Donation: Brain Dead Donors Are Not Being Lost by Donation After Circulatory Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Helen M; Glazier, Alexandra K; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-02-01

    The clinical characteristics of all New England Organ Bank (NEOB) donors after circulatory death (DCD) donors were analyzed between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2014. During that 5-year period, there were 494 authorized medically suitable potential DCDs that the NEOB evaluated, constituting more than 30% of deceased donors coordinated annually by the NEOB. From the cohort of 494 authorized potential DCDs, 331 (67%) became actual DCD, 82 (17%) were attempted as a DCD but did not progress to donation, and 81 (16%) transitioned to an actual donor after brain death (DBD). Two hundred seventy-six organs were transplanted from the 81 donors that transitioned from DCD to actual DBD, including 24 heart, 70 liver, 12 single and 14 bilateral lung, and 12 pancreas transplants. When patients with devastating brain injury admitted to the intensive care units are registered donors, the Organ Procurement Organization staff should share the patient's donation decision with the health care team and the patient's family, as early as possible after the comfort measures only discussion has been initiated. The experience of the NEOB becomes an important reference of the successful implementation of DCD that enables an expansion of deceased donation (inclusive of DBD). PMID:26516669

  13. EAAC1 Gene Deletion Increases Neuronal Death and Blood Brain Barrier Disruption after Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available EAAC1 is important in modulating brain ischemic tolerance. Mice lacking EAAC1 exhibit increased susceptibility to neuronal oxidative stress in mice after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1 was first described as a glutamate transporter but later recognized to also function as a cysteine transporter in neurons. EAAC1-mediated transport of cysteine into neurons contributes to neuronal antioxidant function by providing cysteine substrates for glutathione synthesis. Here we evaluated the effects of EAAC1 gene deletion on hippocampal blood vessel disorganization after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1−/− female mice subjected to transient cerebral ischemia by common carotid artery occlusion for 30 min exhibited twice as much hippocampal neuronal death compared to wild-type female mice as well as increased reduction of neuronal glutathione, blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, a membrane-permeant cysteine prodrug, increased basal glutathione levels in the EAAC1−/− female mice and reduced ischemic neuronal death, BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. These findings suggest that cysteine uptake by EAAC1 is important for neuronal antioxidant function under ischemic conditions.

  14. Effect of post-traumatic mild hypothermia on hippocampal cell death after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Mao, Qing; Liang, Yu-Min; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2009-02-11

    In this investigation, we evaluated the effect of post-traumatic mild hypothermia on cell death in the hippocampus after fluid percussion traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 40/group): TBI with hypothermia treatment (32 degrees C), TBI with normothermia (37 degrees C), and sham injury. The TBI model was induced by a fluid percussion TBI device. Mild hypothermia (32 degrees C) was achieved by partial immersion in a water bath (0 degrees C) under general anesthesia for 4h. All rats were killed at 24 or 72h after TBI. The ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 in all rats were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL), and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining for determining cell death. Caspase-3 expression was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. At 24h, based on TUNEL and DAPI results, the cell death index was 28.80 +/- 2.60% and 32.10 +/- 1.40% in the normothermia TBI group, while reaching only 14.30 +/- 2.70% and 18.40 +/- 2.10% in the hypothermic TBI group (p percussion injury. Taken together with other studies, these observations support the premise that post-traumatic mild hypothermia can provide cerebral protection for patients with TBI. PMID:19236165

  15. Brain metastases from breast cancer: prognostic significance of HER-2 overexpression, effect of trastuzumab and cause of death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To access the prognostic significance of HER-2 overexpression, the effect of trastuzumab and the cause of death in patients with brain metastases (BM) from breast cancer (BC). We analyzed the outcome of 130 patients with BM from BC who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) (without surgery or radiosurgery) between January 1998 and April 2006. Demographic data, tumor characteristics, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The impact of HER-2 overexpression and trastuzumab-based therapy on overall survival (OS) and the cause of death were evaluated. The median follow-up for the whole population was 6.25 months (mean: 9.15; range: 0.23-53). The median survival time and 1-year survival rates after BM diagnosis were 7.43 months and 35.8% (95% CI: 28-45.7) respectively. The median survival time for HER-2 negative patients (n = 78), HER-2 positive patients not treated with trastuzumab (n = 20) and HER-2 positive patients treated with trastuzumab (n = 32) were 5.9 months, 5.6 months and 19.53 months, respectively. The 1-year survival rates were 26.1%, 29.2% and 62.6% respectively, (p < 0.004). Among the 18 HER-2 positive patients treated with trastuzumab who died, 11 (61%) apparently succumbed from CNS progression, in the face of stable or responsive non-CNS disease. Trastuzumab-based therapy was associated with a 51% reduction in the risk of death (multiadjusted hazard ratio: 0.49; 95% CI, 0.29-0.83). In our experience, trastuzumab-based therapy for HER-overexpressing tumors was associated with improved survival in BM BC patients. This subgroup of patients may benefit from innovative approaches, in order to obtain better intra cerebral control

  16. Dialysis Disequilibrium Syndrome: Brain death following hemodialysis for metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagshaw Sean M

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS is the clinical phenomenon of acute neurologic symptoms attributed to cerebral edema that occurs during or following intermittent hemodialysis (HD. We describe a case of DDS-induced cerebral edema that resulted in irreversible brain injury and death following acute HD and review the relevant literature of the association of DDS and HD. Case Presentation A 22-year-old male with obstructive uropathy presented to hospital with severe sepsis syndrome secondary to pneumonia. Laboratory investigations included a pH of 6.95, PaCO2 10 mmHg, HCO3 2 mmol/L, serum sodium 132 mmol/L, serum osmolality 330 mosmol/kg, and urea 130 mg/dL (46.7 mmol/L. Diagnostic imaging demonstrated multifocal pneumonia, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder wall thickening. During HD the patient became progressively obtunded. Repeat laboratory investigations showed pH 7.36, HCO3 19 mmol/L, potassium 1.8 mmol/L, and urea 38.4 mg/dL (13.7 mmol/L (urea-reduction-ratio 71%. Following HD, spontaneous movements were absent with no pupillary or brainstem reflexes. Head CT-scan showed diffuse cerebral edema with effacement of basal cisterns and generalized loss of gray-white differentiation. Brain death was declared. Conclusions Death is a rare consequence of DDS in adults following HD. Several features may have predisposed this patient to DDS including: central nervous system adaptations from chronic kidney disease with efficient serum urea removal and correction of serum hyperosmolality; severe cerebral intracellular acidosis; relative hypercapnea; and post-HD hemodynamic instability with compounded cerebral ischemia.

  17. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  18. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Hardell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR and Causes of Death Register (CDR to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  19. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  20. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. → Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. → Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. → Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. → Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 oC. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  1. Heart murmur and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as predictors of death in 2977 consecutive hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Nielsen, O.W.; Kirk, V.;

    2008-01-01

    -pro-BNP, discovery of valvular heart disease by echocardiography yielded no additional prognostic information. Conclusions: Detection of a cardiac murmur during routine medical examination of hospitalized patients is associated with increased risk of death within a year. A blood test for NT-pro-BNP gives significant...... valvular heart disease. We wanted to test whether murmur predicts mortality in unselected patients admitted to the hospital and whether NT-pro-BNP is capable of distinguishing between innocent and significant murmurs. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 2977) older than 40 years admitted to a local hospital......Background: Little is known about the prognostic importance of murmur in unselected patients. It is difficult to distinguish between innocent and significant murmurs. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and BNP have recently been shown to be useful in small series of patients with...

  2. Kidney ischemic injury genes expressed after donor brain death are predictive for the outcome of kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D; Kościelska-Kasprzak, K; Drulis-Fajdasz, D; Hałoń, A; Polak, W; Chudoba, P; Jańczak, D; Mazanowska, O; Patrzałek, D; Klinger, M

    2011-10-01

    The results of deceased donor kidney transplantation largely depend on the extent of organ injury induced by brain death and the transplantation procedure. In this study, we analyzed the preprocurement intragraft expression of 29 genes involved in apoptosis, tissue injury, immune cell migration, and activation. We also assessed their influence on allograft function. Before flushing with cold solution we obtained 50 kidney core biopsies of deceased donor kidneys immediately after organ retrieval. The control group included 18 biopsies obtained from living donors. Gene expression was analyzed with low-density arrays (Taqman). LCN2/lipocalin-2 is considered a biomarker of kidney epithelial ischemic injury with a renoprotective function. HAVCR1/KIM-1 is associated with acute tubular injury. Comparison of deceased donor kidneys to control organs revealed a significantly higher expression of LCN2 (8.0-fold P=.0006) and HAVCR1 (4.7-fold, PKidneys displaying delayed graft function and/or an acute rejection episode in the first 6 months after showed higher LCN2 expression compared to event-free ones (1.7-fold, P=.027). A significantly higher increase in expression of TLR2 (5.2-fold), Interleukin (IL) 18 (4.6-fold), HMGB1 (4.1-fold), GUSB (2.4-fold), CASP3 (2.0-fold) FAS (1.8-fold), and TP53 (1.6-fold) was observed among deceased donor kidneys compared with the control group. Their expression levels were not related to clinical outcomes: however, they showed significant correlations with one another (r>.6, Pkidneys after donor brain death were hallmarks of the organ injury process. LCN2 expression level in retrieved kidneys can predict kidney transplantation outcomes. PMID:21996181

  3. Dexamethasone-induced acute excitotoxic cell death in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanshakov, Dmitriy A; Sukhareva, Ekaterina V; Kalinina, Tatjana S; Dygalo, Nikolay N

    2016-07-01

    There is substantial evidence that the use of glucocorticoids in neonates is associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, it remains unclear how treatment with low doses of dexamethasone (DEX) may result in behavioral abnormalities without evident signs of immediate neurotoxicity in the neonatal brain. It is possible that cells vulnerable to the pro-apoptotic effects of low doses of DEX escaped detection due to their small number in the developing brain. In agreement with this suggestion, low-dose DEX treatment (0.2mg/kg) failed to induce apoptosis in the cortex or hippocampus proper of neonatal rats. However, this treatment was capable of inducing apoptosis specifically in the dorsal subiculum via a two-step mechanism that involves glutamate excitotoxicity. Application of DEX leads to increased activity of CA1/CA3 hippocampal MAP2-positive neurons, as determined by c-Fos expression at 0.5-1h after DEX injection. Five hours later, the apoptotic markers (fragmented nuclei, active caspase-3 and TUNEL labeling) increased in the dorsal subiculum, which receives massive glutamatergic input from CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with memantine, an antagonist of glutamate NMDA receptors, dose dependently blocked the DEX-induced expression of apoptotic markers in the subicular neurons and astrocytes. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of DEX-induced neurotoxicity as well as on the mechanism of therapeutic action of antagonists of NMDA receptors against neurobehavioral disorders caused by neonatal exposure to glucocorticoids. PMID:26873551

  4. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Yamazaki, Daiju [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Biological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  5. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1, GABAAR γ2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. PMID:26086367

  6. mGluR5 antagonist MPEP does not induce neuronal death in immature brain in contrast to NMDA antagonist MK-801

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojková, Denisa; Otáhal, Jakub; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    Praha, 2005. s. 5-5. [Český a slovenský epileptologický sjezd /18./. 23.09.2005-24.09.2005, Průhonice u Prahy] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : mGluR5 * neuronal death * immature brain Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. Relationship between duration of brain death and hemodynamic (in)stability on progressive dysfunction and increased immunologic activation of donor kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, JAB; Molema, G; Ter Horst, GJ; Freund, RL; Wiersema, J; van Schilfgaarde, R; Leuvenink, HGD; Ploeg, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Background. Consistent difference in graft survival after renal transplantation has been shown when cadaveric transplants are compared to the living related donor situation, in favor of the latter. Recently, evidence has been put forward that brain death has significant effects on the donor organ qu

  8. Myocardial protective effects of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor in rats with brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenzhi; Cao, Shengli; Yan, Bing; Zhang, Gong; Li, Jie; Zhao, Yongfu; Zhang, Shuijun

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway mediates myocardial cell injuries in rats under brain death (BD), and observe the effects and mechanisms of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 on cell death in the heart. Forty healthy male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomized into four groups: sham group (dural external catheter with no BD); BD group (maintain the induced BD state for 6 hrs); BD + SP600125 group (intraperitoneal injection of SP600125 10 mg/kg 1 hr before inducing BD, and maintain BD for 6 hrs); and BD + Dimethyl Sulphoxide (DMSO) group (intraperitoneal injection of DMSO 1 hr before inducing BD, and maintain BD for 6 hrs). Real-time quantitative PCR was used to evaluate mRNA levels of Cyt-c and caspase-3. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the levels of mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins p-JNK, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-c and Caspase-3. TUNEL assay was employed to evaluate myocardial apoptosis. Compared with the sham group, the BD group exhibited increased mitochondrial apoptosis-related gene expression, accompanied by the elevation of p-JNK expression and myocardial apoptosis. As the vehicle control, DMSO had no treatment effects. The BD + SP600125 group had decreased p-JNK expression, and reduced mitochondrial apoptosis-related gene expression. Furthermore, the apoptosis rate of myocardial cells was reduced. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 could protect myocardial cells under BD through the inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis-related pathways. PMID:27072084

  9. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the

  10. Computed tomographic angiography criteria in the diagnosis of brain death - comparison of sensitivity and interobserver reliability of different evaluation scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, Marcin; Walecka, A. [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Szczecin (Poland); Bohatyrewicz, R.; Solek-Pastuszka, J. [Pomeranian Medical University, Clinic of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Szczecin (Poland); Safranow, K. [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Chemistry, Szczecin (Poland); Walecki, J. [The Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw (Poland); Rowinski, O. [Medical University of Warsaw, 2nd Department of Clinical Radiology, Warsaw (Poland); Czajkowski, Z. [Regional Joint Hospital, Szczecin (Poland); Guzinski, M. [Wroclaw Medical University, Department of General Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Wroclaw (Poland); Burzynska, M. [Wroclaw Medical University, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Wroclaw (Poland); Wojczal, J. [Medical University of Lublin, Department of Neurology, Lublin (Poland)

    2014-08-15

    The standardized diagnostic criteria for computed tomographic angiography (CTA) in diagnosis of brain death (BD) are not yet established. The aim of the study was to compare the sensitivity and interobserver agreement of the three previously used scales of CTA for the diagnosis of BD. Eighty-two clinically brain-dead patients underwent CTA with a delay of 40 s after contrast injection. Catheter angiography was used as the reference standard. CTA results were assessed by two radiologists, and the diagnosis of BD was established according to 10-, 7-, and 4-point scales. Catheter angiography confirmed the diagnosis of BD in all cases. Opacification of certain cerebral vessels as indicator of BD was highly sensitive: cortical segments of the middle cerebral artery (96.3 %), the internal cerebral vein (98.8 %), and the great cerebral vein (98.8 %). Other vessels were less sensitive: the pericallosal artery (74.4 %), cortical segments of the posterior cerebral artery (79.3 %), and the basilar artery (82.9 %). The sensitivities of the 10-, 7-, and 4-point scales were 67.1, 74.4, and 96.3 %, respectively (p < 0.001). Percentage interobserver agreement in diagnosis of BD reached 93 % for the 10-point scale, 89 % for the 7-point scale, and 95 % for the 4-point scale (p = 0.37). In the application of CTA to the diagnosis of BD, reducing the assessment of vascular opacification scale from a 10- to a 4-point scale significantly increases the sensitivity and maintains high interobserver reliability. (orig.)

  11. Original Protocol Using Computed Tomographic Angiography for Diagnosis of Brain Death: A Better Alternative to Standard Two-Phase Technique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Marcin; Sołek-Pastuszka, Joanna; Jurczyk, Krzysztof; Skrzywanek, Piotr; Guziński, Maciej; Czajkowski, Zenon; Mańko, Witold; Burzyńska, Małgorzata; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Walecka, Anna; Rowiński, Olgierd; Walecki, Jerzy; Bohatyrewicz, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The application of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for the diagnosis of brain death (BD) is limited because of the low sensitivity of the commonly used two-phase method consisting of assessing arterial and venous opacification at the 60th second after contrast injection. The hypothesis was that a reduction in the scanning delay might increase the sensitivity of the test. Therefore, an original technique using CTA was introduced and compared with catheter angiography as a reference. MATERIAL AND METHODS In a prospective multicenter trial, 84 clinically brain-dead patients were examined using CTA and catheter angiography. The sensitivities of original CTA technique, involving an arterial assessment at the 25th second and a venous assessment at the 40th second, and the standard CTA, involving an arterial and venous assessment at the 60th second, were compared to catheter angiography. RESULTS Catheter angiography results were consistent with the clinical diagnosis of BD in all cases. In comparison to catheter angiography, the sensitivity of original CTA technique was 0.93 (95%CI, 0.85-0.97; p<0.001) and 0.57 (95%CI, 0.46-0.68; p<0.001) for the standard protocol. The differences were statistically significant (p=0.03 for original CTA and p<0.001 for standard CTA). Decompressive craniectomy predisposes to a false-negative CTA result with a relative risk of 3.29 (95% CI, 1.76-5.81; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Our original technique using CTA for the assessment of the cerebral arteries during the arterial phase and the deep cerebral veins with a delay of 15 seconds is a highly sensitive test for the diagnosis of BD. This method may be a better alternative to the commonly used technique. PMID:26250464

  12. Protective Effects of Salubrinal on Liver Injury in Rat Models of Brain Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have indicated that endoplasmic reticulum stress participates in and mediates liver injury and apoptosis in brain-dead (BD rats. In this study, we observed the effect of salubrinal (Sal, Sigma, USA on liver cells in BD rats and explored its relevant mechanisms. Methods: Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were equally randomized into three groups: BD group, Sal group, and DMSO group. The BD models were established by increasing intracranial pressure in a modified, slow, and intermittent way. In the drug groups, Sal was administered 1 h before the induction of BD. After modeling was completed, the blood and liver samples were harvested. CHOP and Caspase-12 mRNA expression was detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PKR-like ER kinase (PERK, P-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, eIF2α, CHOP and caspase-12 expression was detected using western blotting (WB. CHOP and caspase-12 distribution and expression in liver tissues were determined using immunohistochemistry (IHC. Alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase level were detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. Hepatic cell apoptosis was detected using TUNEL. The results were analyzed using Quantity-one v4.62 software (Bio-Rad, USA. Results: CHOP and caspase-12 expression and PERK, eIF2α, and P-eIF2α protein expression showed no significant difference between BD group and DMSO group. Compared with BD group, Sal group had a significantly higher P-eIF2C level and a lower P-PERK level 2 h and 6 h after BD (P 0.05. After the Sal treatment, CHOP and caspase-12 mRNA expression significantly decreased 4 h after BD (P < 0.05. WB and IHC indicated that CHOP and caspase-12 expression also significantly decreased after Sal treatment. Sal was associated with improved liver function and decreased hepatic cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Sal can significantly reduce apoptosis in hepatic cells of BD rats. This protective effect may be

  13. Autoradiographic studies of cell kinetics after whole body x-ray irradiation. Part 2. Postradiation death of differentiating and proliferating subependymal cells in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracheva, N.D.

    1982-03-01

    Post-radiation cell death in the subependymal zone of the rat brain was investigated by injection of /sub 3/H-thymidine 60 to 80 min prior to x-ray irradiation of the animals with 50, 150, or 300 R. Subsequent correlation of autoradiographic findings with the cell cycle showed that the proliferating and differentiating (D) cells followed a fluctuating pattern in cell death, in that cells irradiated in the early G/sub 2/ and the S phases showed four peaks of mitotic cell death in the first postradiation cell cycle. Cells injured in the G/sub 1/ phase lost the capacity for DNA synthesis, since the 300 R-irradiated cells failed to incorporate /sup 14/C-thymidine administered subsequently (3 H before sacrifice, 12 to 17 h after /sup 3/H-thymidine injection). Since these cells did not die within 4 h of irradiation, their death evidently came about during the first postradiation cell cycle. The cell death pattern of the D cells coincided with the death peaks and mitotic peaks of the proliferating cells, indicating that the D cells retained the rhythm and phase sequence of the mitotic cycle in the form of a short cycle. All the irradiated cells entered mitosis with a one hour delay, and the total number of cell deaths was dosage-related. 11 references, 4 figures.

  14. Comparing Outcomes of Donation After Cardiac Death Versus Donation After Brain Death in Liver Transplant Recipients with Hepatitis C: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Wells

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation (LT using organs donated after cardiac death (DCD is increasing due, in large part, to a shortage of organs. The outcome of using DCD organs in recipients with hepatits C virus (HCV infection remains unclear due to the limited experience and number of publications addressing this issue.

  15. Death and Death Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Gonca Karakus; Zehra Ozturk; Lut Tamam

    2012-01-01

    Although death and life concepts seem so different from each other, some believe that death and life as a whole that death is accepted as the goal of life and death completes life. In different cultures, societies and disciplines, there have been very different definitions of death which changes according to personality, age, religion and cultural status of the individual. Attitudes towards death vary dramatically according to individuals. As for the death anxiety, it is a feeling which start...

  16. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  17. Protective efficacy of mitochondrial targeted antioxidant MitoQ against dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and cell death in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Gudup, Satish; Sunkaria, Aditya; Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Sharma, Deep Raj; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-12-01

    Dichlorvos is a synthetic insecticide that belongs to the family of chemically related organophosphate (OP) pesticides. It can be released into the environment as a major degradation product of other OPs, such as trichlorfon, naled, and metrifonate. Dichlorvos exerts its toxic effects in humans and animals by inhibiting neural acetylcholinesterase. Chronic low-level exposure to dichlorvos has been shown to result in inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I and cytochrome oxidase in rat brain, resulting in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. MitoQ is an antioxidant, selectively targeted to mitochondria and protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in dichlorvos induced neurodegeneration, then MitoQ should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of MitoQ (100 μmol/kg body wt/day) reduced dichlorvos (6 mg/kg body wt/day) induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased MnSOD activity and glutathione levels) with decreased lipid peroxidation, protein and DNA oxidation. In addition, MitoQ also suppressed DNA fragmentation, cyt c release and caspase-3 activity in dichlorvos treated rats compared to the control group. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that MitoQ attenuates dichlorvos induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that MitoQ may be beneficial against OP (dichlorvos) induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21784090

  18. Donor brain death leads to differential immune activation in solid organs but does not accelerate ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschl, Paul Viktor; Ashraf, Muhammad Imtiaz; Oberhuber, Rupert; Mellitzer, Vanessa; Fabritius, Cornelia; Resch, Thomas; Ebner, Susanne; Sauter, Martina; Klingel, Karin; Pratschke, Johann; Kotsch, Katja

    2016-05-01

    A comparative analysis of inflammation between solid organs following donor brain death (BD) is still lacking and the detailed influence of BD accelerating ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) post-transplantation remains to be addressed. Applying a murine model of BD, we demonstrated that 4 h after BD organs were characterized by distinct inflammatory expression patterns. For instance, lipocalin 2 (LCN2), a marker of acute kidney injury, was selectively induced in BD livers but not in kidneys. BD further resulted in significantly reduced frequencies of CD3(+) CD4(+) , CD3(+) CD8(+) T cells and NKp46(+) NK cells in the liver, whereas BD kidneys and hearts were characterized by significantly lower frequencies of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs). Syngeneic models of kidney (KTx) and heart transplantation (HTx) illustrated stronger gene expression in engrafted BD hearts only, but 20 h post-transplantation both organs displayed comparable intragraft lymphocyte frequencies, except for NK cells and graft function. Moreover, the complement factor C3d deposit detected in small vessels and capillaries in cardiac syngrafts did not significantly differ between BD and sham-transplanted groups. Finally, no further influence of donor BD on graft survival was detected in an allogeneic heart transplantation setting (C57BL/6 grafts into BALB/c recipients). We show for the first time that BD organs are characterized by a varying inflammatory profile; however, BD does not accelerate IRI in syngeneic KTx and HTx. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26890577

  19. Brain death in children

    OpenAIRE

    Tatlı, Burak; Ekici, Barış

    2011-01-01

    Myelomeningocele nbsp; is a defect of neural arch which causes body structure and function disorders participation restrictions and activity limitation in children Keeping body structure and functions and gaining functional independence are the most important goals in the rehabilitation of children with myelomeningocele In this study we analysed the effects of Kinesio Taping on sitting posture and functional independence in 4 cases with myelomeningocele Turk Arch Ped 2011; 46: 177 80

  20. Deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene is sufficient to cause oxidative stress, delayed differentiation and neuronal death in mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ahlemeyer

    2012-01-01

    Impaired neuronal migration and cell death are commonly observed in patients with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs, and in mouse models of this diseases. In Pex11β-deficient mice, we observed that the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene (Pex11β+/− heterozygous mice caused cell death in primary neuronal cultures prepared from the neocortex and cerebellum, although to a lesser extent as compared with the homozygous-null animals (Pex11β−/− mice. In corresponding brain sections, cell death was rare, but differences between the genotypes were similar to those found in vitro. Because PEX11β has been implicated in peroxisomal proliferation, we searched for alterations in peroxisomal abundance in the brain of heterozygous and homozygous Pex11β-null mice compared with wild-type animals. Deletion of one allele of the Pex11β gene slightly increased the abundance of peroxisomes, whereas the deletion of both alleles caused a 30% reduction in peroxisome number. The size of the peroxisomal compartment did not correlate with neuronal death. Similar to cell death, neuronal development was delayed in Pex11β+/− mice, and to a further extent in Pex11β−/− mice, as measured by a reduced mRNA and protein level of synaptophysin and a reduced protein level of the mature isoform of MAP2. Moreover, a gradual increase in oxidative stress was found in brain sections and primary neuronal cultures from wild-type to heterozygous to homozygous Pex11β-deficient mice. SOD2 was upregulated in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice, but not from Pex11β−/− animals, whereas the level of catalase remained unchanged in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice and was reduced in those from Pex11β−/− mice, suggesting a partial compensation of oxidative stress in the heterozygotes, but a failure thereof in the homozygous Pex11β−/− brain. In conclusion, we report the alterations in the brain caused by the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene. Our data might lead

  1. Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overdose Traumatic Brain Injury Violence Prevention Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Violence-Related Injury Deaths, United States - 2013 Leading Causes of Death Charts Causes of Death by Age ...

  2. Guia d'ús de les plantilles en LibreOffice

    OpenAIRE

    Ribera, Mireia; Alcalà Ponce de León, Mireia; Salse, Marina; Splendiani, Bruno; Centelles Velilla, Miquel; Llerena, Irene; Térmens i Graells, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    Guia de suport a les plantilles accessibles per al programari lliure de LibreOffice elaborades pel grup de recerca Adaptabit (Alcalà, Ribera, Salse...). En ella es descriu com utilitzar les plantilles i quins són els passos a seguir per aconseguir uns documents accessibles per a tothom.

  3. Does β-APP staining of the brain in infant bed-sharing deaths differentiate these cases from sudden infant death syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Byard, Roger W

    2014-01-01

    Archival cerebral tissue from infants whose deaths were attributed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) from South Australia and Western Denmark were stained for β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) and graded according to a simple scoring chart. The resulting APP scores were correlated...... with sleeping situation (shared vs. alone) showing a significantly higher amount of β-APP staining in the non-bed-sharing, than in the bed-sharing infants (Mann-Whitney, Australia: p = 0.0128, Denmark: p = 0.0014, Combined: p = 0.0031). There was also a marked but non-significant difference in sex distribution...... between bed-sharers and non-bed-sharers with a male to female ratio of 1:1 in the first group and 2:1 in the latter. Of 48 Australian and 76 Danish SIDS infants, β-APP staining was present in 116 (94%) cases. The eight negative cases were all from the Danish cohort. This study has shown that the amount...

  4. Evaluation of "Guia para Dejar de Fumar," a self-help guide in Spanish to quit smoking.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Stable, E.J.; Sabogal, F; Marín, G; Marín, B V; Otero-Sabogal, R

    1991-01-01

    Because of the absence of culturally appropriate self-help smoking cessation materials for Latinos, a new Spanish language cessation guide, "Guia para Dejar de Fumar," was developed and evaluated. It was distributed as part of a community-wide intervention to decrease the prevalence of smoking. The "Guia" is an attractive full-color booklet written in universal Spanish that uses simple text and numerous photographs. Motivation to quit smoking is emphasized, and graphic demonstrations of the a...

  5. Muerte encefálica: repercusión sobre órganos y tejidos Brain death: Repercussion on the organs and tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Domínguez-Roldán

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La muerte encefálica se acompaña de una serie de efectos sistémicos, hemodinámicos, hormonales e inflamatorios que tienen una repercusión relevante en los órganos y los tejidos de la economía. Cada vez hay más evidencias de que los órganos provenientes de donantes fallecidos en muerte encefálica presentan un grado de respuesta inflamatoria secundaria al daño encefálico y, en ocasiones, proporcional a la intensidad y a la velocidad de progresión de éste. Tanto estudios clínicos como estudios experimentales han mostrado que el resultado de los órganos de donantes fallecidos en parada cardíaca o donantes vivos tienen iguales o mejores resultados clínicos que los obtenidos en donantes en muerte encefálica que han presentado el proceso inflamatorio secundario a ésta. Hay pruebas de que esta respuesta inflamatoria acontece en el pulmón, el corazón, los riñones, el hígado y el intestino, e igualmente se incrementan también las pruebas de que el grado de respuesta inflamatoria observada en los órganos tiene una influencia importante en el resultado final del trasplante. En consecuencia, el desarrollo del conocimiento de las vías que interrelacionan el daño encefálico con la respuesta orgánica inflamatoria abre una importante área de conocimiento y posibilita que futuras estrategias terapéuticas encaminadas a modular la respuesta sistémica al daño encefálico permitan mejorar la calidad de los órganos obtenidos para trasplante, así como incrementar la supervivencia del injerto y de los receptores de trasplantes de órganos sólidos.Brain death is accompanied by a series of hemodynamic, hormonal and inflammatory systemic effects that have an important repercussion on the economy of the organs and tissues. There is increasing evidence that the organs from brain death donors have an inflammatory response grade secondary to brain death and sometimes proportional to the intensity and rate of its progression. Both clinical

  6. Clinical Value of Transcranial Doppler in Diagnosis of Brain Death%经颅多普勒在脑死亡诊断中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚静远; 李占甫; 张涛

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the application value of transcranial Doppler (TCD) in the diagnosis of brain death. Methods 9 patients with brain death in the intensive care unit (ICU) were detected by TCD to detect the changes of blood flow spectrum and dynamic changes in the bilateral cerebral artery. Results Among them, the TCD spectrum showed that there were 6 cases of the shock wave, and 3 cases of the nail. Al patients were performed with breathing machine. Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of TCD in the diagnosis of brain death was 100%after the change of the frequency of the nail, shock wave and no blood flow signal.%目的:探讨经颅多普勒(TCD)在诊断脑死亡中的应用价值。方法对重症监护室(ICU)的9例临床拟诊为脑死亡的患者,行TCD检测双侧大脑中的动脉,观察血流频谱形态和动力变化。结果其中,TCD频谱呈震荡波有6例患者,3例呈钉子波。以上患者都采用呼吸机进行维持呼吸。结论 TCD在出现钉子波、震荡波、无血流信号频谱改变后,对于脑死亡的诊断准确率达到100%。

  7. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, John T., E-mail: jolucas@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, John D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Laxton, Adrian W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes.

  8. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes

  9. Water and wastewater monitoring of Guia Submarine Outfall: an 11 year survey

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Cristina; Catarino, Justina; Figueiredo, Zélia; Calisto, Sandra C.; Marques, Eugénia; Cunha, Pedro; Antunes, Margarida

    2008-01-01

    SANEST is a public sanitation company that manages a wastewater treatment plant located at Guia, on the west coast of Lisbon, Portugal. This company collects and treats the sewage of four municipalities with an estimated 750 000 population equivalent, thus being one of the biggest sanitation companies in Portugal. A Decision of the Commission 2001/720/CE conceded SANEST derogation, exempting it to apply less than secondary treatment to wastewaters discharged into the Atlantic Ocean from the f...

  10. Parental Grief Following the Brain Death of a Child: Does Consent or Refusal to Organ Donation Affect Their Grief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellali, Thalia; Papadatou, Danai

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the grieving process of parents who were faced with the dilemma of donating organs and tissues of their underage brain dead child, and to explore the impact of their decision on their grief process. A grounded theory methodology was adopted and a semi-structured interview was conducted with 11 bereaved…

  11. Ammonium accumulation and cell death in a rat 3D brain cell model of glutaric aciduria type I.

    OpenAIRE

    Paris Jafari; Olivier Braissant; Petra Zavadakova; Hugues Henry; Luisa Bonafé; Diana Ballhausen

    2013-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type I (glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency) is an inborn error of metabolism that usually manifests in infancy by an acute encephalopathic crisis and often results in permanent motor handicap. Biochemical hallmarks of this disease are elevated levels of glutarate and 3-hydroxyglutarate in blood and urine. The neuropathology of this disease is still poorly understood, as low lysine diet and carnitine supplementation do not always prevent brain damage, even in early-treated...

  12. Autoradiographic studies of cell kinetics after whole body x-ray irradiation. Part 1. Mode of death of lethally injured proliferating subependymal cells in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracheva, N.D.

    1982-03-01

    Autoradiographic tests were performed on proliferating subependymal cells derived from the brain of Wistar rats treated with /sup 3/H-thymidine, 60 to 80 min prior to whole-body x-ray irradiation with 50, 150, or 300 R. Evaluation of the time-dependent increase in the fraction of radio-labeled cells and the two-fold lower concentration of the label in pycnotic nuclei indicated that the lethally-injured cells which were irradiated in the early G/sub 2/ and S phases were subjected to mitotic, rather than interphase, death in the first post-radiation cell cycle. Such cells underwent mitosis ca. 2 h after irradiation, showing a 1 h lag phase vis-a-vis control cells, irrespective of the radiation dose. 25 references, 5 figures.

  13. Respiratory induced heart rate and blood pressure variability during mechanical ventilation in critically ill and brain death patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurák, Pavel; Zvoníček, V.; Leinveber, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Vondra, Vlastimil

    Piscataway: IEEE, 2012, s. 3821-3824. ISBN 978-1-4244-4119-8. [EMBC 2012. Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society /34./. San Diego (US), 28.08.2012-01.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk ME09050; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MZd NS10105 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : blood pressure measurement * brain * electrocardiography * neurophysiology * pneumodynamics * ventilation Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  14. Excitotoxic brain damage in the rat induces interleukin-1beta protein in microglia and astrocytes: correlation with the progression of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, V L; Rothwell, N J; Toulmond, S

    1999-02-15

    Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) has been proposed as a mediator of several forms of brain damage, including that induced by excitotoxins. In vitro studies suggest that glial cells are the effector cells of IL-1beta-mediated neurodegeneration. We have investigated the expression of IL-1beta protein by glial cells in vivo in response to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in the rat parietal cortex and striatum. Expression of IL-1beta by glial cells was investigated using immunocytochemistry 30 min to 7 days after infusion of the NMDA agonist cis-2,4-methanoglutamate (MGlu; 10 nmol) into the cortex. Early expression (1-4 h) of IL-1beta by microglia was directly related to lesion development. Later expression by microglia (up to 24 h), and by astrocytes (2-7 days), was widespread compared to the area involved in excitotoxic cell death and co-localised with areas of reactive gliosis. Infusion of MGlu into the striatum induced a similar temporal pattern of IL-1beta expression by microglia and astrocytes. However, IL-1beta-expressing glial cells were localised strictly to the area of striatal cell death. Infusion of PBS or a subtoxic dose of MGlu into the cortex or striatum induced only limited neuronal death and negligible glial IL-1beta expression. These studies reveal that IL-1beta is expressed specifically by microglia during the early response to excitotoxicity in the adult rat cortex and striatum. However, the widespread and delayed IL-1beta expression by astrocytes suggests diverse roles for IL-1beta in response to excitotoxicity. PMID:10028914

  15. Fibroblast growth factor rescues brain endothelial cells lacking presenilin 1 from apoptotic cell death following serum starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama Sosa, Miguel A; De Gasperi, Rita; Hof, Patrick R; Elder, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (Psen1) is important for vascular brain development and is known to influence cellular stress responses. To understand the role of Psen1 in endothelial stress responses, we investigated the effects of serum withdrawal on wild type (wt) and Psen1-/- embryonic brain endothelial cells. Serum starvation induced apoptosis in Psen1-/- cells but did not affect wt cells. PI3K/AKT signaling was reduced in serum-starved Psen1-/- cells, and this was associated with elevated levels of phospho-p38 consistent with decreased pro-survival AKT signaling in the absence of Psen1. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF1 and FGF2), but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) rescued Psen1-/- cells from serum starvation induced apoptosis. Inhibition of FGF signaling induced apoptosis in wt cells under serum withdrawal, while blocking γ-secretase activity had no effect. In the absence of serum, FGF2 immunoreactivity was distributed diffusely in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles of wt and Psen1-/- cells, as levels of FGF2 in nuclear and cytosolic fractions were not significantly different. Thus, sensitivity of Psen1-/- cells to serum starvation is not due to lack of FGF synthesis but likely to effects of Psen1 on FGF release onto the cell surface and impaired activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway. PMID:27443835

  16. Neonatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... your baby. What are common causes of neonatal death? The most common causes of neonatal death are: ...

  17. Guia de productes de la construcció amb criteris de sostenibilitat i ecoetiquetes

    OpenAIRE

    Perramon Duboscq, Natàlia

    2012-01-01

    Aquest projecte té com a objectiu proporcionar les eines necessàries per entendre les diferents etiquetes ecològiques existents en el mercat i els aspectes a tenir en compte per a què la tria del producte utilitzat en la construcció tingui un menor impacte ambiental del que tenen els productes convencionals. El TFG s’estructura en 3 grans blocs: ecoetiquetes, criteris de sostenibilitat i una guia de productes sostenibles. El primer bloc sobre les etiquetes ecològiques inclou...

  18. On Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangyan

    2016-01-01

    Death is not a terrible word, but a provoking one. Different people have different opinions, but no one can convince others of what death really means. This article made a tentative and superficial analysis on death according to the true feeing and experiences of the author. In her opinion, we needn’t consider more about death; the important for the death is how to live meaningfully.

  19. Autoradiographic studies on the cell kinetics after the whole body X-irradiation. 2. Regularities of the post-irradiation death of differentiating and proliferating cells of the rat brain subependimal zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracheva, N.D. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    A wave-like character of death of proliferating and differentiating (D) cells is shown autoradiographically using /sup 3/H-thymidine introduced 60-80 min before the whole body X-ray irradiation in doses of 50, 150 or 300 R on subependymal cells of rat brain. Lethally damaged cells irradiated in G/sub 2/ and S-phases, resulted in 4 peaks of death in mitosis by following the first postradiational mitotic cycle (MC). Lethally damaged cells irradiated in G/sub 1/-phase lost ability for DNA synthesis as cells irradiated in a dose of 300 R did not include additionally introduced (3 hrs before death) /sup 14/C-thymidine from 12 to 17 hrs after /sup 3/H-thymidine injection. However, in the first 4 hrs after irradiation there were no cells irradiated in G/sub 1/-phase among dead ones, as indirectly shown in the calculations of data obtained while studying Pliss lymphosarcoma. A supposition is made that the death of cells irradiated in G/sub 1/-phase is attributed to mitotic phase of the first MC after irradiation. Waves of death of lethally damaged D-cells repeated the peaks of death and corresponded to the mitotic peaks of proliferating cells, which permitted to presuppose the presence of ''short cycle'' (SC) in D-cells, which have the rhythm similar to MC and their death has been attributed to the final SC phase, which corresponds to MC mitotic phase in time. According to the peaks of cell death position of one hour block independent of dose in six MC(SC) points is determined. The cells have experienced the block in the point of MC(SC) in subphase of which they were caught by irradiation. Dose effect is manifested in the number of dead cells.

  20. Autoradiographic studies on the cell kinetics after the whole body X-irradiation. 2. Regularities of the post-irradiation death of differentiating and proliferating cells of the rat brain subependimal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wave-like character of death of proliferating and differentiating (D) cells is shown autoradiographically using 3H-thymidine introduced 60-80 min before the whole body X-ray irradiation in doses of 50, 150 or 300 R on subependymal cells of rat brain. Lethally damaged cells irradiated in G2 and S-phases, resulted in 4 peaks of death in mitosis by following the first postradiational mitotic cycle (MC). Lethally damaged cells irradiated in G1-phase lost ability for DNA synthesis as cells irradiated in a dose of 300 R did not include additionally introduced (3 hrs before death) 14C-thymidine from 12 to 17 hrs after 3H-thymidine injection. However, in the first 4 hrs after irradiation there were no cells irradiated in G1-phase among dead ones, as indirec showed the calculations of data obtained tly/ while studying Pliss lymphosarcoma. A supposition is made that the death of cells irradiated in G1-phase is attributed to mitotic phase of the first MC after irradiation. Waves of death of lethally damaged D-cells repeated the peaks of death and corresponded to the mitotic peaks of proliferating cells, which permitted to presuppose the presence of ''short cycle'' (SC) in D-cells, which have the rhythm similar to MC and their death has been attributed to the final SC phase, which corresponds to MC mitotic phase in time. According to the peaks of cell death position of one hour block independent of dose in six MC(SC) points is determined. The cells have experienced the block in the point of MC(SC) in subphase of which they were caught by irradiation. Dose effect is manifested in the number of dead cells

  1. Understanding Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Bibliotherapy can help children prepare for and understand the death of a loved one. An annotated bibliography lists references with age level information on attitudes toward death and deaths of a father, friend, grandparent, mother, pet, and sibling. (Author/CL)

  2. BAEP、BR及MEP联合检测在脑死亡诊断中的应用%Application of BAEP, BR and MEP combined detection for the diagnosis of brain death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴虎男; 朴莲荀; 杜婷婷

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨神经电生理在脑死亡判定中的应用价值.方法 通过瞬间反射(BR)、脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)、运动诱发电位(MEP)三项联合检查对22例脑死亡患者进行评定,并与GCS评分结果进行比较.结果 BAEP、BR和MEP三项联合检查对脑死亡判断准确率为100%,与GCS评分比较差异显著(P<0.05).结论 BAEP、BR和MEP三项联合检测对评价脑死亡患者的脑功能状态、预测预后提供了客观可靠的依据.%Objective To investigate the diagnosis value of neuro-electrophysiology detection for brain death. Methods Combined detection of brainstem auditory evoked potentials ( BAEP) , blink reflex (BR) united motor evoked potentials ( MEP) were used to access 22 brain death patients, and then compared with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. Results The accuracy of BAEP, BR and MEP combined detection was 100% , and which showed significant difference compared with GCS scores. Conclusion BAEP, BR united MEP testing can provide an objective indicator not only for e-valuating brain function of brain death, but also for estimating prognosis.

  3. Risk factors for liver quality in donation after brain death%脑死亡供体肝脏质量影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范林; 李弦; 张秋艳; 叶啟发

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation,a unique effective treatment for end-stage liver diseases,has already been applied in clinical practice for more than half a century.But the shortage of donor liver source has been the bottleneck limiting its development.How to determine the tiny minority donor liver quality to guarantee the prognosis of transplant patients becomes a hot focus for current research.Brain death causes patho-physiological changes of body organs,including liver.How to carry out related pathological and serologic tests to determine the safety of the donor liver is a very important issue.In this paper,the articles published in recent years were overviewed and analyzed to summarize the evaluation index of donating organ quality.We hope this paper may benefit the treatment through ensuring an effective evaluation on the donor liver in the future.%肝移植作为治疗终末期肝病的唯一有效手段,其临床应用已逾半个世纪,而供肝来源的短缺一直是限制其发展的瓶颈.在为数不多的供肝中,如何确定其质量以保证移植患者的预后为目前研究的主要方向.脑死亡造成的全身脏器病理生理改变亦包括肝脏.为此,如何进行相关病理学及血清学检查以确定肝脏使用的安全性十分重要.本文对近年发表的相关文献进行综合、分析,对供体器官质量评价指标进行综述.以期对捐献供体肝脏进行有效评价以利于临床工作.

  4. Selection of reference genes for normalisation of real-time RT-PCR in brain-stem death injury in Ovis aries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser John F

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart and lung transplantation is frequently the only therapeutic option for patients with end stage cardio respiratory disease. Organ donation post brain stem death (BSD is a pre-requisite, yet BSD itself causes such severe damage that many organs offered for donation are unusable, with lung being the organ most affected by BSD. In Australia and New Zealand, less than 50% of lungs offered for donation post BSD are suitable for transplantation, as compared with over 90% of kidneys, resulting in patients dying for lack of suitable lungs. Our group has developed a novel 24 h sheep BSD model to mimic the physiological milieu of the typical human organ donor. Characterisation of the gene expression changes associated with BSD is critical and will assist in determining the aetiology of lung damage post BSD. Real-time PCR is a highly sensitive method involving multiple steps from extraction to processing RNA so the choice of housekeeping genes is important in obtaining reliable results. Little information however, is available on the expression stability of reference genes in the sheep pulmonary artery and lung. We aimed to establish a set of stably expressed reference genes for use as a standard for analysis of gene expression changes in BSD. Results We evaluated the expression stability of 6 candidate normalisation genes (ACTB, GAPDH, HGPRT, PGK1, PPIA and RPLP0 using real time quantitative PCR. There was a wide range of Ct-values within each tissue for pulmonary artery (15–24 and lung (16–25 but the expression pattern for each gene was similar across the two tissues. After geNorm analysis, ACTB and PPIA were shown to be the most stably expressed in the pulmonary artery and ACTB and PGK1 in the lung tissue of BSD sheep. Conclusion Accurate normalisation is critical in obtaining reliable and reproducible results in gene expression studies. This study demonstrates tissue associated variability in the selection of these

  5. A novel neuron-enriched protein SDIM1 is down regulated in Alzheimer's brains and attenuates cell death induced by DNAJB4 over-expression in neuro-progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Joy X

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular changes in multiple biological processes contribute to the development of chronic neurodegeneration such as late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD. To discover how these changes are reflected at the level of gene expression, we used a subtractive transcription-based amplification of mRNA procedure to identify novel genes that have altered expression levels in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients. Among the genes altered in expression level in AD brains was a transcript encoding a novel protein, SDIM1, that contains 146 amino acids, including a typical signal peptide and two transmembrane domains. Here we examined its biochemical properties and putative roles in neuroprotection/neurodegeneration. Results QRT-PCR analysis of additional AD and control post-mortem human brains showed that the SDIM1 transcript was indeed significantly down regulated in all AD brains. SDIM1 is more abundant in NT2 neurons than astrocytes and present throughout the cytoplasm and neural processes, but not in the nuclei. In NT2 neurons, it is highly responsive to stress conditions mimicking insults that may cause neurodegeneration in AD brains. For example, SDIM1 was significantly down regulated 2 h after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, though had recovered 16 h later, and also appeared significantly up regulated compared to untreated NT2 neurons. Overexpression of SDIM1 in neuro-progenitor cells improved cells' ability to survive after injurious insults and its downregulation accelerated cell death induced by OGD. Yeast two-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation approaches revealed, both in vitro and in vivo, an interaction between SDIM1 and DNAJB4, a heat shock protein hsp40 homolog, recently known as an enhancer of apoptosis that also interacts with the mu opioid receptor in human brain. Overexpression of DNAJB4 alone significantly reduced cell viability and SDIM1 co-overexpression was capable of attenuating the cell death

  6. [Near death experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Near Death Experiences are those accounted by people who after being clinically dead return to life spontaneously or after reanimation. These experiences have been used traditionally to support the belief in the existence of the soul and of life after death. However, today neuroscience tries to explain these experiences from the scientific point of view, i.e. explaining them based on their brain substrates. Their resemblance to mystic experiences and to altered states of consciousness seems to indicate that they may be produced by hyperactivity of limbic structures caused by anoxia or hypercapnia. PMID:24294729

  7. Guillain Barre syndrome mimicking cerebral death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajdev S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain Barre Syndrome, an acute diffuse demyelinating disorder, predominantly present with the motor manifestations with few variants. The present report describes an unusual presentation of GBS, which initially suggested brain death. A 14 years old male presented with sudden onset of rapidly progressive weakness of all four limbs which progressively evolved into clinical condition simulating brain death.

  8. Paper de les Proteïnes Sinàptiques i l'Exocitosi en els processos de Guia Axonal i Migració

    OpenAIRE

    Ros i Torres, Oriol

    2013-01-01

    La guia axonal i la migració són dos processos similars i crucials per al desenvolupament. Aquests dos elements permeten el correcte posicionament cel•lular i la selecció de dianes essencial per a la funcionalitat posterior del sistema nerviós central, i es fonamenten en la regulació de l’avanç del con de creixement o la cèl•lula, respectivament, en resposta a estímuls externs, quimioatraients i quimiorepulsius, proporcionats per molècules de guia. Un altre component clau del funcionament...

  9. Avaliação do conhecimento de estudantes de medicina sobre morte encefálica Evaluation of medical students knowledge on brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Galvão Vieira Bitencourt

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Por ser um conceito relativamente novo e pouco divulgado na sociedade, o diagnóstico de morte encefálica (ME ainda não é bem aceito pela população em geral, inclusive entre médicos e estudantes de Medicina. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o conhecimento de uma amostra de estudantes de Medicina sobre o protocolo diagnóstico de ME. MÉTODO: Estudo descritivo de corte transversal, avaliando acadêmicos de duas faculdades de Medicina de Salvador-BA. Foi distribuído um questionário auto-aplicável composto por questões referentes à conhecimento, técnico e ético, contidos na Resolução nº 1.480/97 do Conselho Federal de Medicina, que dispõe sobre os critérios para caracterização de ME. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 115 estudantes. A média de acertos nas 14 questões sobre o conhecimento dos critérios da ME foi de 6,7 ± 1,8; sendo maior entre os estudantes que haviam assistido alguma apresentação sobre ME. A maioria dos estudantes (87,4% soube identificar os pacientes candidatos ao protocolo de ME. No entanto, apenas 5,2% e 16,1% dos estudantes acertaram, respectivamente, os testes clínicos e complementares que devem ser realizados durante o protocolo. Frente a um paciente não-doador com diagnóstico confirmado de ME, 66,4% referiram que o suporte artificial de vida deve ser suspenso. Apenas 15% dos estudantes entrevistados já avaliaram um paciente com ME, sendo este percentual maior entre os que já haviam realizado estágio em UTI (38,2% versus 5,1%; p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Because brain death (BD is a new concept and little divulged, it’s not well accepted in general population, including doctors and Medical students. This study aims to evaluate the knowledge of a sample of Medical students on the Brazilian BD diagnosis protocol. METHODS: Descriptive cross-sectional survey that evaluated students from two medical schools in Salvador-BA. We used a questionnaire composed by questions

  10. Brain white matter lesions correlated to newborns death and lethality Fatores correlacionados ao óbito e à letalidade hospitalar em neonatos com lesão da substância branca cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara Argollo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital lethality rates and factors correlated to death in neonates with brain white matter lesions. METHODS: a retrospective study was performed from January 1994 to December 2001. Neonates with white brain matter lesions were divided into survival and death groups and their medical files reviewed through the single blind method to determine evolution. Death certificates provided the cause of death. The groups were compared through correlation coefficients. Hospital lethality rate was calculated. RESULTS: ninety three cases of white brain matter lesions and seven deaths were determined. Hospital lethality rate was of 8.2.% (95%CI: 2.4-14.0 independently from lesion occurrence time, and of 10.3% (95%CI: 3.3-17.3 for deaths occurred during prenatal and perinatal periods. Death was correlated to: Apgar score, non-cephalic presentation, gestational age, hyperglicemia, hypercalcemia, convulsion, respiratory insufficiency and atelectasy. CONCLUSIONS: hospital lethality was of 10.3% generating the following hypothesis: perinatal asphyxia must be the principal direct and indirect etiologic factor (aggravating the expression of prematurity and infection diseases, of prenatal and perinatal mortality among newborns with white brain matter lesions; and OBJETIVOS: descrever a taxa de letalidade hospitalar e fatores correlacionados com o óbito em crianças com lesão da substância branca cerebral (LSB. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo realizado de janeiro de 1994 a dezembro de 2001. Os neonatos com LSB foram divididos em sobreviventes ou óbito, e seus prontuários revisados de forma cega para a evolução. Dos atestados de óbito, a causa de morte. Os grupos foram comparados por coeficientes de correlação. Calculada a taxa de letalidade hospitalar. RESULTADOS: foram encontrados 93 casos de LSB e sete óbitos. A taxa de letalidade hospitalar foi de 8,2%, (IC95%: 2,4-14,0, independentemente da época de instalação da lesão, e de

  11. Orchestrating an Exceptional Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja Marie Bornø

    processes of facing brain death and deciding about organ donation. This study suggests that organ donation should be understood as a ‘strange figure’ challenging traditions and attitudes regarding the boundaries between life and death and the practices surrounding dead human bodies. Simultaneously, organ......, reinterpret and translate death and organ donation into something culturally acceptable and sense making. With chapters focusing analytically on the performance of trust, the transformative practices of hope, the aesthetization of ambiguous bodies, the sociality of exchangeable organs and the organ donation......This Ph.D. thesis explores the experiences of Danish donor families and the context of organ donation in Denmark. Based on comprehensive ethnographic studies at Danish hospitals and interviews with health care professionals and donor families, readers are invited on a journey into the complex...

  12. Deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene is sufficient to cause oxidative stress, delayed differentiation and neuronal death in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Ahlemeyer; Magdalena Gottwald; Eveline Baumgart-Vogt

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired neuronal migration and cell death are commonly observed in patients with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs), and in mouse models of this diseases. In Pex11β-deficient mice, we observed that the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene (Pex11β+/− heterozygous mice) caused cell death in primary neuronal cultures prepared from the neocortex and cerebellum, although to a lesser extent as compared with the homozygous-null animals (Pex11β−/− mice). In corresponding br...

  13. Emergindo a complexidade do cuidado de enfermagem ao ser em morte encefálica Complejidad emergente del cuidado de enfermería al paciente con muerte cerebral Emerging the complexity of nursing care facing a brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lima Pestana

    2012-12-01

    ambivalentes sentimientos. La complejidad de los cuidados al paciente en muerte cerebral consiste en comprender su singularidad y dialogicidad.This study aimed to unveil the complexity of nursing care to human being in brain death. It was used as a theoretical and methodological reference, complex thinking and Grounded Theory, respectively. Data were collected in a university hospital in northeastern Brazil, from December 2010 to June 2011, through non structured interviews. The theoretical sample consisted of 12 nurses, distributed in three samples groups. The phenomenon of "Unveiling the multiple relationships and interactions to be a nurse in the complexity of care to the brain death" was delimited by five categories. In this article, was discussed the category "Emerging complexity of nursing care to be brain death". The study showed that the care facing a brain death is accompanied by disorder and uncertainties, causing the nurse to experience different feelings and ambivalent. The complexity of care facing a brain death is to understand its uniqueness and dialogical.

  14. Clinical analysis of liver transplant from a child of brain death to an adult%脑死亡儿童供肝成人移植临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时军; 罗文峰; 丁利民; 徐志丹; 王永刚; 李新长; 罗来邦; 龙成美

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨脑死亡儿童供肝成人移植的临床可行性,总结1例脑死亡儿童供肝成人移植的临床体会.方法 受者为39岁女性,诊断为原发性肝癌,肝炎后肝硬化(失代偿期).供者为脑肿瘤脑死亡的8岁儿童,供肝采用快速联合脏器切取方法获取.手术方式为经典原位肝移植.术后常规给予免疫抑制、防治感染、护肝、支持等治疗.结果 移植手术历时6 h.术后无严重并发症发生,受者健康存活,门诊随访肝功能正常.结论 儿童供肝成人移植技术是可行的.系统化的供肝评估、良好的手术技巧及完善的术后处理是确保手术成功的关键.%Objective To explore clinical feasibility of liver transplant from child of brain death to adult, to summarize the clinical experiences that a child of brain death transplants liver to an adult. Methods The recipient was a 39-year-old woman patient with primary hepatic carcinoma and posthepatitis cirrhosis (decompensation stage); while the donor was a 8-old-year child of brain death because of brain neoplasms. Donated liver was gained by the method of en bloc multivisceral procurement in a short time; the operative method was classic orthotopic liver transplantation. The postoperative managements included immunosuppression, prevention of infection, hepatic protection, and other relevant supports etc. Results The transplantation operative duration was 6 hours, after which not only did the recipient survive but also her body functioned well including the liver part, with no severe postoperative complications. Conclusions The technology of transplanting livers from children to adults is feasible. The key to ensure the success of transplant operation is systematic preoperative evaluation, excellent operative technique, and perfect postoperative treatment.

  15. Guia de treball de la pel·lícula Te Doy mis Ojos (Icíar Bollaín, 2003)

    OpenAIRE

    Dezcallar, Georgina; Maza, Marina de la; Ruiz, Sergi; Cardona, Anna; Lara, Judit; Laguia, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    Guia de treball, de caràcter orientatiu i no obligatori, de la película Te Doy mis Ojos (Icíar Bollaín, 2003) associada a les assignatures de Pedagogia social (graus d'Educació social, Pedagogia i Treball social) i d'Acció socioeducativa en els serveis socials (grau d'Educació social)

  16. Ensaio de quantificação dos macro-invertebrados bênticos marinhos das Caldeirinhas (Monte da Guia).

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, José M. N.; Rego, M. O.; Ávila, Sérgio P.

    1994-01-01

    A quantificação dos macro-invertebrados bênticos marinhos das Caldeirinhas (Monte da Guia) é feita através do método de contagem em quadrados. Os resultados obtidos são analisados na perspectiva de avaliar a precisão e rapidez das estimativas de densidade populacional obtidas com esse método. Conclui-se que podem ser obtidas estimativas com um grau de precisão aceitável em termos de gestão com um esforço de amostragem reduzido, desde que a densidade seja superior a 2 ind/100m2....

  17. Guia del Practicum del Màster en Dificultats de l'Aprenentatge i Trastorns del Llenguatge, setembre 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera Lanzo, Nati; Andreu Barrachina, Llorenç

    2012-01-01

    Guia per als estudiants i el professorat del practicum del Màster en Dificultats de l'Aprenentatge i Trastorns del Llenguatge. En ella s'exposen els principis, les pautes, els criteris i els procediments per a dur-lo a terme. Guía para los estudiantes y el profesorado del practicum del Master en Dificultades del Aprendizaje y Trastornos del Lenguaje. En ella se exponen los principios, las pautas, los criterios y los procedimientos para llevarlo a cabo. Guide for students and faculty of ...

  18. Guia (Algarve), gisement de vertébrés quaternaires à caractère saisonnier

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, M. Telles; Crespo, E; Mein, P; Pais, João; J.P. Teixeira

    1989-01-01

    A vertebrate (Mammals, Reptiles, Amphibians) fauna From Guia (Algarve) is described. The site is the only one so far known in the «Faro-Quarteira sands». The fauna is upper Pleistocene in age (may even be younger). Its stratigraphical position shows it is younger than levels in the same unit that yielded mousterian/languedocian stone artifacts. A post Riss-Wurm age is admitted. The mammalian fauna nearly exclusively comprises small mammalremains; except for a few ones, only young indivi...

  19. Exame físico na criança: um guia para o enfermeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josilene de Melo Buriti Vasconcelos

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O exame físico constitui-se numa importante etapa dentro do processo de avaliação à criança, através do qual o enfermeiro enriquece as informações obtidas durante a entrevista e fundamenta a assistência de enfermagem. Na atualidade, mediante o crescente interesse dos enfermeiros em aplicar o processo de enfermagem em todas as suas etapas, o exame físico tem ocupado lugar de destaque, por permitir que os enfermeiros conheçam as necessidades de seus clientes, no que diz respeito aos seus aspectos físicos e fisiológicos, permitindo a identificação dos diagnósticos de enfermagem, alem de servir como recurso para avaliação efetiva das intervenções de enfermagem. Este estudo, de caráter bibliográfico, objetivou elaborar um guia para realização do exame físico na criança, a ser utilizado por enfermeiros, durante o processo de avaliação à criança. Nele apresentamos o exame físico de forma sistemática, utilizando a seqüência céfalo-caudal, descrevendo os possíveis achados normais e anormais ao examinarmos a criança.

  20. Guias alimentares para crianças: aspectos históricos e evolução Food guides for children: historical aspects and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseane Moreira Sampaio Barbosa

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Os guias alimentares possuem duas propostas: a primeira, ser um guia de saúde pública, e a segunda, uma ferramenta de educação nutricional. Este trabalho objetiva apresentar um histórico dos guias alimentares e suas características, bem como abordar os guias dietéticos desenvolvidos especificamente para crianças. Foi realizado um levantamento bibliográfico dos últimos dez anos, em base de dados Medline utilizando as palavras-chave guia alimentar, guia dietético infantil e pirâmide alimentar infantil. Desde 1916, os guias alimentares vêm sendo desenvolvidos a fim de traduzir as recomendações de uma dieta saudável para população, porém somente a partir de 1999 foi desenvolvido pelo United States Departament of Agriculture um guia alimentar para crianças. Observou-se que os guias alimentares infantis, de modo geral, foram elaborados recentemente. Poucos países os desenvolveram de acordo com o hábito alimentar das crianças, utilizando alimentos típicos da idade e tamanho das porções específicas para essa faixa etária, considerando a limitada capacidade gástrica das crianças. Conclui-se que é muito importante desenvolver, implementar e validar os guias alimentares infantis, pois são uma ferramenta de educação nutricional para a formação de hábitos saudáveis e para a prevenção de doenças crônicas.Food guide have two proposals: the first, as a public health guide and the second, as a nutritional educational tool. This study aimed at presenting a history of food guides and their characteristics, as well as approaching the dietary guides specifically developed for children. A bibliographical research of the last ten years was carried out in the Medline database, using the key words: food guide, dietary guidelines for children and food guide pyramid for young children. Food guides have been developed since 1916, translating the recommendations for a healthy diet to the population, but only in 1999 did the United

  1. mGluR5 antagonist MPEP does not induce neuronal death in immature rat brain in contrast to NMDA antagonist MK-801

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojková, Denisa; Otáhal, Jakub; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 25-25. ISSN 0939-4451. [International Congress on Amino Acids and Proteins /9./. 08.08.2005-12.08.2005, Vienna] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : MPEP * MK-801 * rat brain Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  2. Neuronal uptake of anti-Hu antibody, but not anti-Ri antibody, leads to cell death in brain slice cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Greenlee, John E.; Clawson, Susan A.; Kenneth E Hill; Wood, Blair; Clardy, Stacey L.; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Jaskowski, Troy D; Carlson, Noel G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-Hu and anti-Ri antibodies are paraneoplastic immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies which recognize cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens present in all neurons. Although both antibodies produce similar immunohistological labeling, they recognize different neuronal proteins. Both antibodies are associated with syndromes of central nervous system dysfunction. However, the neurological deficits associated with anti-Hu antibody are associated with neuronal death and are usually irreversi...

  3. "Spectacular Death"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael Hviid

    2016-01-01

    This article revisits, reviews and revises the much cited and magisterial description of successive historical death mentalities from the Middle Ages to modern society as proposed by now several decades ago by French historian Philippe Ariès. The article first outlines Ariès’s position starting out...... with the medieval ‘tamed death’, then moves on to point to several inherent limitations in his history-writing, before suggesting a revision and update of it. Whereas Ariès ended his history-writing with modern ‘forbidden death’, the author suggests that contemporary death mentality in Western society...... rather be labelled ‘spectacular death’ in which death, dying and mourning have increasingly become spectacles. Moreover, the author proposes that what is currently happening in contemporary Western society can be interpreted as an expression of a ‘partial re-reversal’ of ‘forbidden death’ to some of the...

  4. Surviving death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstroem, Anna

    2013-01-01

    such phases. The aim of this paper is to explore how an organization’s identity is re-constructed after organizational death. Based on interviews with members of a bankrupted bank who narrate their bankruptcy experiences, the paper explores how legacy organizational identity is constructed after...... organizational death. The paper shows how members draw on their legacy organizational identity to justify their past interpretations and responses to the intensifying bankruptcy threats. Members refer to their firm belief in the bank’s solid and robust identity claim when they explain how they disregarded...

  5. Disruption of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity in the human Kölliker-Fuse nucleus in victims of unexplained fetal and infant death

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Maria Lavezzi

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the neurotrophin brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) is required for the appropriate development of the central respiratory network, a neuronal complex in the brainstem of vital importance to sustaining life. The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN) is a fundamental component of this circuitry with strong implications in the pre- and postnatal breathing control. This study provides detailed account for the cytoarchitecture, the physiology and the ...

  6. 经颅多普勒超声对脑死亡患者颅内血流动力学的观察%Observation of intracranial hemodynamics in brain death through transcranial doppler ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉珍; 何奕涛

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察脑死亡患者的脑血流频谱演变过程.方法 采用经颅多普勒超声(TCD)检测脑死亡患者双侧大脑中动脉(MCA)的血流情况.结果 20例临床诊断脑死亡患者的MCA血流速度6~37 cm/s,平均(12.13 ±3.15) cm/s.频谱变化有振荡波(舒张期反向波)、钉子波(收缩期尖小波形)、无血流信号三种TCD特征性频谱,并随病情进展依次出现.20例患者均在出现振荡波频谱后8d内出现心跳不可逆停止,其中有90%(18例)的患者血流频谱出现振荡波-钉子波-无血流信号的演变过程.结论 振荡波、钉子波及血流信号消失这三种规律性演变的特征性TCD血流频谱能辅助脑死亡的诊断.%Objective To observe the evolution process of cerebral blood flow spectrum in brain death by transcranial doppler ultrasound.Methods To detect the blood flow of bilateral middle cerebral artery in brain dead patients by transcranial doppler ultrasound.Results Twenty brain dead patients were collected in the study.The blood flow velocity of middle cerebral artery ranged s from 6 to 37cm/s,and the mean velocity was (12.13 ± 3.15)cm/s.There were three characteristic spectrums which include oscillatory wave (reverse wave in diastolic),nails wave (tip small wave in systolic),no blood flow sign,and they appeared in turn accoerding to worsen of the disease.The heartbeat irreversibly stopped within 8 days after the appearing of oscillatory wave,and ninty percent of the cases had the regular blood flow spectrums of oscillatory wave-nails wave-no blood flow sign.Conclusion The three regularly characteristic transcranial doppler ultrasound blood flow spectrums,which include oscillatory wave,nails wave and no blood flow sign could facilitate the diagnosis of brain death.

  7. Death cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbæk, Torsten R; Kofoed, Pernille Bouteloup; Bove, Jeppe;

    2014-01-01

    Death cap (Amanita phalloides) is commonly found and is one of the five most toxic fungi in Denmark. Toxicity is due to amatoxin, and poisoning is a serious medical condition, causing organ failure with potential fatal outcome. Acknowledgement and clarification of exposure, symptomatic and focused...

  8. Autoradiographic studies on the cell kinetics after the whole body X-irradiation. 1. The mode of death in lethally damaged proliferating cells of the rat brain subependimal zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracheva, N.D. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    Subependymal cells of brain of Wistar line rats, which have received /sup 3/H-thymidine 60-80 min before whole body X-irradiation in a dose of 50, 150 or 300 R are studied. According to the increase in time of the part of labelled cells including the ones with pycnotic nuclei and according to double decrease in the label intensity in the latter it has been shown that lethally damaged cells subjected to irradiation in phases G/sub 2/ and S died in mitosis of the first post-irradiation mitotic cycle which excluded a possibility of their interphase death. Lethally damaged and survived cells started mitosis (pycnosis) having experienced one hour block, independent of the dose.

  9. Recomendações técnicas para o registro do eletrencefalograma (EEG na suspeita da morte encefálica Guidelines for electroencephalogram (eeg recording in suspected brain death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO JOSÉ C. LUCCAS

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, desenvolvido por uma comissão nomeada pela Sociedade Brasileira de Neurofisiologia Clínica, são apresentadas as recomendações referentes ao registro do eletrencefalograma (EEG nos casos de suspeita de morte encefálica, enfatizando que, apesar do necessário respeito aos parâmetros técnicos, o método não visa substituir o exame neurológico, mas complementá-lo.Brazilian Clinical Neurophysiology Society guidelines and pertaining comments concerning electroencephalogram (EEG recording in suspected brain death are presented. EEG is not intended as a substitute, rather as a complement to neurologic evaluation.

  10. Donor Maintenance of Organ Donation after Brain Death ( Report of 2 Cases )%2例脑死亡无偿器官捐献供体的维护体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志刚; 李超; 李立; 王胤佳; 董权; 郑鹏肖

    2012-01-01

    To explore the donor maintenance points of donor donation after brain death (DBD). Methods From December 2011 to January 2012, two cases of organ DBD in our hospital were performed. After diagnosis of brain death, mechanical ventilation, fluid resuscitation, vasoactive drugs, inotropic drugs, and so on were used, and invasive arterial pressure, central venous pressure, heart rate, blood gas exchange, urine output, electrolyte and acid-base balance, body temperature, hematocrit, albumin level were monitored, the donors vital organ perfusion were successfully kept at acceptable level. Results The vital signs of two cases of DBD donors were stable. The livers, kidneys, and corneas were donated, and the functions were stable and normal. Case one was diagnosed for brain death 6 h after ICU admitted, the period from diagnosis to organ procurement was 33 h. Case two was diagnosed for brain death 8 h after ICU admitted, the period from diagnosis to organ procurement was 31 h. All transplanted organs, livers, kidneys, and corneas, were working well after operation. Conclusions Donor maintenance process of DBD is the cornerstone to ensuring successfully organ donation and transplantation, which is important to improve the utilization rate of donated organs, and release the severely shortage of organ.%目的 探讨脑死亡器官移植供体的维护要点.方法 我院于2011年12月至2012年1月期间共完成2例脑死亡器官捐献(DBD)供体的无偿器官捐献工作.供体确诊为脑死亡,应用机械通气、血管活性药物及其他相关药物维持供体,监测有创动脉压、中心静脉压、心率、血气交换、尿量、电解质酸碱平衡,体温、血细胞比容、白蛋白水平等,维持供体器官灌注.结果 2例DBD供体维持生命体征平稳,捐献的器官功能稳定正常.其中,供体1在人ICU后6h确诊脑死亡,到实施器官捐献共维护33 h;供体2在入ICU后8h确诊脑死亡,到实施器官捐献共维护31 h.捐献的

  11. Defining death: organ transplants, tradition and technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, E A

    1988-01-01

    This article explores Japanese attitudes about brain death and organ transplantation. First, ancient burial customs and death-related rituals associated with Shinto and Buddhism are examined. Next, contemporary attitudes towards the dead are discussed in the context of current controversies surrounding brain death and organ transplantation. Finally, an attempt is made to link the traditional Japanese views of death with modern medical dilemmas. PMID:3051424

  12. Maintenance and nursing of 12 brain death organ donation donor in ICU%重症监护病房12例脑死亡器官捐献供体的维护及护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文静; 朱爽; 马奔; 赵丽萍; 赵文州

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss maintenance and nursing of 12 brain death organ dona-tion donor in ICU.Methods The materials of 12 cases with organ donation cardiac death (DCD) in our hospital were summarized,and DCD procedures were developed.And complete maintenance and care for the body according to China Cardiac Death Organ Donation Work Guide.Results There are 35 donor organs from 12 cases,among which there were 23 kidneys,11 livers,one heart and 8 pair of cornea.Conclusion Implementation of organ maintenance and timely care was im-portant work program in DCD,adjusting donor organs function can ensure smoothly organ dona-tion.%目的:探讨重症监护病房脑死亡后器官捐献供体的维护及护理。方法总结性分析12例心脏死亡器官捐献(DCD)工作的临床资料,制定 DCD 工作程序,并依据《中国心脏死亡器官捐献工作指南》完成供体的维护及护理。结果12例供体共产出器官35个,其中肾脏23个、肝脏11个、心脏1个及角膜8对。结论在重症监护病房实施正确及时的器官维护及护理是 DCD 工作的重要程序,在器官切取前将供体器官的功能调o到最佳状态,可确保器官的顺利捐献。

  13. The role of the NADPH oxidase derived brain oxidative stress in the cocaine-related death associated with excited delirium: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Stefania; Neri, Margherita; Mhillaj, Emanuela; Pomara, Cristoforo; Trabace, Luigia; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-09-01

    Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is a term used to describe a clinical condition characterized by bizarre and aggressive behaviour, commonly associated with the use of psychoactive compounds, especially cocaine. The pathophysiology of ExDS is complex and not yet fully understood. In addition to a central dopamine hypothesis, other mechanisms are thought to be involved in cocaine-related ExDS, such as increased reactive oxygen species production by the family of the NADPH oxidase NOX enzymes. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge on the crucial contribution of brain NADPH oxidase derived oxidative stress in the development of cocaine-induced ExDS. Data from animal models as well as human evidence will be discussed. PMID:27265246

  14. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  15. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; Antonosante, Andrea; d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-12-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  16. Analysis of the Implementation of Organ Donation Families in"Nursing pathway"in Patients with Brain Death%"护理路径"在脑死亡患者捐献器官家属中的实施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹丹; 高蕾

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the observation about a comprehensive analysis that hospitalapply Liverpool nursing path organ in brain death patients with organ donation wil ingness.Mathods To apply this nursing path in twenty brain death patients was in our hospital from January to December 2012.Group randomly two groups. observation group (Liverpool nursing path group)has 11 cases,control group (routine nursing path group)has 9 cases.To observe related data about the complete degree of organ preservation between two groups,and patient'family about nursing satisfacion.Make a comprehensive analysis.Results Organ preserving rate was 90.9%in observation group,nunursing satisfacion was 100%.Organ preserving rate was 66.7%in control group,nunursing satisfacion was 55.6%.Observation group the indicators are the bet er than control group.Differences are statistical y significant ( <0.05).Conclusion Application of Liverpool nursing path in brain death patients with organ donation wil ingness,which has achieved good clinical ef ect.Improve the care of dying patients.Strengthen the patient'family for nursing satisfacion.Demonstrate the important position and advantage in nursing work flow.The Liverpool nursing path is worth the clinical promotion,is practical and feasible nursing methods.Improve comprehensive nursing quality.%目的探讨观察"护理路径"在有器官移植捐献意愿的脑死亡患者中的应用进行综合分析。方法对2012年1月~12月入住的20例脑死亡患者的进行护理,随机分组,观察组(护理路径组)11例和对照组(常规护理路径组)9例,观察两组患者护理后器官保存的完整程度,及患者家属对于护理的满意度等相关资料,进行综合分析。结果观察组,器官完整保存率为院90.9%,护理满意度100%,对照组器官完整保存率为院66.7%,护理满意度55.6%,观察组各项指标均优于对照组,差异有统计学意义(<0.05)。结论"利物浦护理路径"在有器官

  17. Desenvolvimento e calibração de guias de onda para TDR Development and calibration of TDR wave guides

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo de L.T. Andrade; Édio L. da Costa; Paulo E. P. de Albuquerque

    2003-01-01

    A medição da umidade do solo é crucial para a pesquisa e o manejo de irrigação. Entre os métodos mais recentes de determinação da umidade está o da reflectometria no domínio do tempo (TDR) que se baseia na correlação entre a capacidade dielétrica do solo e a sua umidade. A obtenção do perfil de umidade do solo requer a utilização de um grande número de guias de onda, cujo custo ainda é elevado. Por outro lado, as curvas de calibração relacionando umidade com a capacidade dielétrica do solo fo...

  18. Role of computed tomography scores and findings to predict early death in patients with traumatic brain injury: A reappraisal in a major tertiary care hospital in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakomi, Sunil; Bhattarai, Binod; Srinivas, Balaji; Cherian, Iype

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glasgow Coma Scale has been a long sought model to classify patients with head injury. However, the major limitation of the score is its assessment in the patients who are either sedated or under the influence of drugs or intubated for airway protection. The rational approach for prognostication of such patients is the utility of scoring system based on the morphological criteria based on radiological imaging. Among the current armamentarium, a scoring system based on computed tomography (CT) imaging holds the greatest promise in conquering our conquest for the same. Methods: We included a total of 634 consecutive neurosurgical trauma patients in this series, who presented with mild-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) from January 2013 to April 2014 at a tertiary care center in rural Nepal. All pertinent medical records (including all available imaging studies) were reviewed by the neurosurgical consultant and the radiologist on call. Patients’ worst CT image scores and their outcome at 30 days were assessed and recorded. We then assessed their independent performance in predicting the mortality and also tried to seek the individual variables that had significant interplay for determining the same. Results: Both imaging score (Marshall) and clinical score (Rotterdam) can be used to reliably predict mortality in patients with acute TBI with high prognostic accuracy. Other specific CT characteristics that can be used to predict early mortality are traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, midline shift, and status of the peri-mesencephalic cisterns. Conclusion: We demonstrated in this cohort that though the Marshall score has the high predictive power to determine the mortality, better discrimination could be sought through the application of the Rotterdam score that encompasses various individual CT parameters. We thereby recommend the use of such comprehensive prognostic model so as to augment our predictive power for properly dichotomizing the prognosis

  19. Atualizações em guias alimentares para crianças e adolescentes: uma revisão Updating dietary guides for children and adolescents: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Martins Horta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: apresentar uma revisão dos guias alimentares desenvolvidos para crianças e adolescentes. MÉTODOS: revisão sistemática conduzida nas bases de dados Medline e Lilacs e em sites institucionais. Incluíram-se documentos publicados entre 2000-2010. RESULTADOS: foram identificados 17 guias alimentares publicados no mundo, sendo dez na América Latina, três na América do Norte, dois na Europa e dois na Ásia e Oceania. Os guias se diferenciaram quanto à sua estrutura, podendo ser organizados em diretrizes nutricionais, representações gráficas ou em ambas. O conteúdo das diretrizes nutricionais, bem como o número de grupos alimentares e a representação gráfica utilizada nos manuais também são variáveis conforme cultura alimentar da população. Dezesseis guias enfocaram orientações sobre alimentos em detrimento dos nutrientes, sendo que o guia japonês está organizado em recomendações de consumo de preparações de alimentos, se configurando em um instrumento de mais fácil compreensão. Todos os guias alimentares identificados para crianças menores de dois anos (n=5 foram elaborados na América Latina, além de terem sido detectados três manuais, cujas diretrizes se direcionam aos profissionais de saúde, denotando necessidade de capacitação e atualização dos mesmos. CONCLUSÕES: o estudo apontou para a relevância do emprego dos guias alimentares na abordagem à criança e adolescente, fornecendo bases teóricas para profissionais e órgãos de saúde.OBJECTIVES: to conduct a review of dietary guides for children and adolescents. METHODS: a systematic review of the Medline and Lilacs databases and institutional sites, covering documents published between 2000 and 2010. RESULTS: seventeen dietary guides published were identified worldwide, including ten in Latin America, three in North America, two in Europe and two in Asia/Oceania. The guides differ in terms of structure. Some contain nutritional guidelines

  20. Brain birth and personal identity.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of brain birth has assumed a position of some significance in discussions on the status of the human embryo and on the point in embryonic development prior to which experimental procedures may be undertaken on human embryos. This paper reviews previous discussions of this concept, which have placed brain birth at various points between 12 days' and 20 weeks' gestation and which have emphasised the symmetry of brain birth and brain death. Major developmental features of brain devel...

  1. Death-associated Protein Kinase Mediated Cell Death Modulated by Interaction with DANGER

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Bingnan N.; Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Saleem, Sofiyan; Patterson, Randen L.; Hester, Lynda; Doré, Sylvain; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a key player in multiple cell death signaling pathways. We report that DAPK is regulated by DANGER, a partial MAB-21-domain containing protein. DANGER binds directly to DAPK and inhibits DAPK catalytic activity. DANGER-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts and neurons exhibit greater DAPK activity and increased sensitivity to cell death stimuli than do wild-type control cells. In addition, DANGER-deficient mice manifest more severe brain damage after ...

  2. Fes un click! A la xarxa sense risc. Guia pràctica per connectar-te a la xarxa de forma segura... i que no t'enredin

    OpenAIRE

    Universitat de Lleida. Centre Dolors Piera d’Igualtat d’Oportunitats i Promoció de les Dones

    2014-01-01

    Genuïnes, 10 Aquesta guia és una adaptació de la guia elaborada per Yolanda Bardina (Associació LIKA), Cristina Rodríguez (Centre Dolors Piera- UdL) i Elena Serrat (Ajuntament d’Alcoletge) durant la formació impartida en el marc del projecte GAP Work Catalunya «Joves i violència de gènere. Projecte Internacional de disseny i avaluació de formacions per a professionals» que té el suport econòmic del programa Daphne III de la Unió Europea. Codi del projecte: JUST/2012/DAP/A...

  3. Avaliação morfológica dos conjuntos guia excêntrico: placas dcp-l 4.5 mm Morphological evaluation of eccentric sets guide-plates of dcp-l 4.5 mm

    OpenAIRE

    José Humberto de Souza Borges; Antonio Lisboa da Silva Filho; Francisco Pereira Neto; Walter Rodrigo Daher; Alessandro Queiroz de Mesquita; Anderson Freitas

    2012-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar isolada e comparativamente medidas do conjunto guia excêntrico-placa utilizado no material de 4.5mm e determinar sua influência na força de compressão. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados quatros guias excêntricos e quatro placas largas de compressão dinâmica (DCP-L) de quatro fabricantes nacionais e um paquímetro digital Vonder®. Criou-se medidas-padrão para os conjuntos, totalizando cinco parâmetros, identificados de A a E. Os conjuntos foram formados por materiais da mesma fábrica ...

  4. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  5. Apoyo nutricio en una mujer embarazada y con muerte cerebral: Informe de un caso y revisión de la literatura Nutritional support in a pregnant woman with brain death: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Hurtado Torres

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available La presencia de muerte cerebral en pacientes embarazadas representa una entidad catastrófica, aunque poco frecuente. Los objetivos para continuar manejo médico son: preservar la viabilidad y maduración del producto para lograr su vida extrauterina y considerar a la madre como potencial donador de órganos para trasplante; lo anterior basado en consideraciones éticas, deseos de la familia, condición del producto y edad gestacional. Con las estrategias de manejo actual en unidades de terapia intensiva es posible obtener este doble propósito, apoyados en informes de la literatura en los cuales se describe la obtención de resultados favorables. Los aspectos nutricios desempeñan un papel preponderante tanto para preservar la viabilidad y funcionalidad de órganos maternos así como para lograr el crecimiento y desarrollo del producto.The occurence of brain death represents a catastrophic entity althoug infrequent. The aim to continue medical management are focused in a double purpose: to preserve intrauterine product's life and fetal maduration until delivery and to consider the mother as a potential organ donor. Ethical considerations together with gestational age, product well being and relatives' wishes are cardinal for continuing medical support. Modern critical care units allow to obtain favourable results, supported in scientifical reports that describe successful outcomes. Nutritional aspects plays a cardinal role in the medical management, allowing to preserve mother's organs viability and also to preserve product's intrauterine growth and development.

  6. Desempenho de diferentes guias de ondas para uso com o analisador de umidade TRASE Performance of different waveguides for use with the TRASE water content analyser

    OpenAIRE

    Eugênio F. Coelho; Camilo de L.T. Andrade; Dani Or; Lucy C. Lopes; Claudinei F. Souza

    2001-01-01

    O trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a relação entre a umidade e a constante dielétrica aparente do solo e diferentes guias de onda para uso com o analisador de umidade Trase, que opera de acordo com o princípio da reflectometria no domínio do tempo - TDR. Amostras indeformadas e deformadas de duas manchas de textura diferente de um Latossolo Amarelo Distrófico foram retiradas do campo e acondicionadas em recipientes de 10 L, perfazendo quatro repetições para cada textura e estrutura. Foram ...

  7. Guia de Pràcticum. Màster en Dificultats de l'Aprenentatge i Trastorns del Llenguatge, febrer 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera Lanzo, Nati; Andreu Barrachina, Llorenç

    2013-01-01

    Guia adreçada a estudiants i professors, per al desenvolupament del pràcticum presencial i virtual al Màster en Dificultats de l'Aprenentatge i Trastorns del Llenguatge de la UOC. Guía dirigida a estudiantes y profesores, para el desarrollo del prácticum presencial y virtual en el Master en Dificultades del Aprendizaje y Trastornos del Lenguaje de la UOC. A guide for students and teachers to develop their face-to-face and virtual practicum of the Master in Learning Disabilities and Lang...

  8. Eternidad y emanatismo en la Guia de Perplejos de Maimónides = Eternity and emanatism in Maimonides’ Guide of the Perplexed

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    Una de las cuestiones más controvertidas que trata Maimónides en la Guia de Perplejos, que muchos estudiosos han considerado irresoluble, es la de dirimir entre la creación del mundo vs. la eternidad del mismo. La solución a la dicotomía puede encontrarse en la postulación de una creatio ab aeterno que se halla presente en algunos pasajes de la obra, y que se entiende como el sentido esotérico del esquema de la creación que parece describir el Genesis, vinculada —tal postulación— a una peculi...

  9. Can we become zombies after death?

    OpenAIRE

    Hili, Alexander; Duca, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Yes, hypothetically we can be transformed into brain loving zombies. A scary answer to a scary question.However, before going out to buy a chainsaw to cut those zombies in half please be aware that a human zombie has never existed. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/can-we-become-zombies-after-death/

  10. Abandoning the dead donor rule? A national survey of public views on death and organ donation

    OpenAIRE

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Green, Sydney R; Sutin, Angelina R.

    2014-01-01

    Brain dead organ donors are the principal source of transplantable organs. However, it is controversial whether brain death is the same as biological death. Therefore, it is unclear whether organ removal in brain death is consistent with the ‘dead donor rule’, which states that organ removal must not cause death. Our aim was to evaluate the public's opinion about organ removal if explicitly described as causing the death of a donor in irreversible apneic coma. We conducted a cross-sectional i...

  11. Gestão de Riscos em Projetos: Uma Análise Comparativa da Norma ISO 31000 e o Guia PMBOK®, 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilmar Angelis de Almeida Ferreira

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta o estudo detalhado e a opinião de autores especializados para avaliar e comparar duas metodologias disponíveis para gestão de riscos: a norma ISO 31000 e o guia PMBOK/PMI®, 2012. A metodologia da pesquisa é descritiva e qualitativa, que permite interpretar as informações coletadas de forma subjetiva. A estratégia da pesquisa deste artigo tem como objetivo analisar os dois modelos através de pesquisa bibliográfica sobre o tema. Neste contexto, o artigo se propõe ao estudo dos conceitos de projeto, gestão de projetos, riscos e gestão de riscos, através da analise comparativa entre os dois modelos de gestão, para identificar as similaridades e/ou diferenças na estrutura, processos e metodologias, resultando na confirmação de que a norma ISO 31000 e o guia PMBOK/PMI®, 2012, podem ser adaptados para o emprego na gestão de riscos em projetos.DOI:10.5585/gep.v4i3.173

  12. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained death of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call ... boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska Native infants have a higher risk of SIDS. Although health ...

  13. National Death Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Death Index (NDI) is a centralized database of death record information on file in state vital statistics offices. Working with these state offices,...

  14. Pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  15. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  16. Death in CHARGE syndrome after the neonatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. E. H.; Blake, K. D.; Bakker, M. K.; Sarvaas, G. J. du Marchie; Free, R. H.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome that can be life-threatening in the neonatal period. Complex heart defects, bilateral choanal atresia, esophageal atresia, severe T-cell deficiency, and brain anomalies can cause neonatal death. As little is known about the causes of death in

  17. Symposium on the Definition of Death: Summary Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, Melissa; Condic, Maureen L

    2016-06-01

    This statement summarizes the conclusions of the Symposium on the Definition of Death, held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. After providing the background and context for contemporary debates about brain death and describing the aims of the symposium, the statement notes points of unanimous and broad agreement among the participants, and highlights areas for further study. PMID:27102243

  18. Identity after Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstrøm, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how legacy organizational identity and death relate to each other and, thereby, contribute to closing the gap in knowledge on organizational identity constructions in times of death. Design/methodology/approach: The paper opted for an exploratory....../value: This paper addresses an apparent gap in the literature on identity and death; exploring identity narratives in a bankrupted bank, the paper considers constructions of legacy organizational identities in times of disruptive death....

  19. Death and Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Death and Grief KidsHealth > For Teens > Death and Grief Print A A A Text Size ... the reaction we have in response to a death or loss. Grief can affect our body, mind, ...

  20. Organ donation after circulatory death: the forgotten donor?

    OpenAIRE

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L; McGregor, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) can be performed on neurologically intact donors who do not fulfill neurologic or brain death criteria before circulatory arrest. This commentary focuses on the most controversial donor-related issues anticipated from mandatory implementation of DCD for imminent or cardiac death in hospitals across the USA. We conducted a nonstructured review of selected publications and websites for data extraction and synthesis. The recommended 5 min of circulatory arr...

  1. Eyelid closure at death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Macleod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the incidence of full or partial eyelid closure at death. Materials and Methods: The presence of ptosis was recorded in 100 consecutive hospice patient deaths. Results: Majority (63% of the patients died with their eyes fully closed, however, 37% had bilateral ptosis at death, with incomplete eye closure. In this study, central nervous system tumor involvement and/or acute hepatic encephalopathy appeared to be pre-mortem risk factors of bilateral ptosis at death. Conclusion: Organicity and not psychogenicity is, therefore, the likely etiology of failure of full eyelid closure at death.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  5. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 families will mourn the loss of their child to a brain or spinal cord tumor. Friends, family and community will try to make sense of an untimely death and the unfulfilled promise of a life. 6 families will transition to survivorship. A mother may be too exhausted from providing constant care ...

  6. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflicted traumatic brain injury (ITBI), is a leading cause of child maltreatment deaths in the United States. Meeting the ... Awareness Additional Prevention Resources Childhood Injuries Concussion in Children and Teens Injuries from Violence Injuries from Motor Vehicle Crashes Teen Driver Safety ...

  7. Existential Concerns About Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Lene; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2014-01-01

    psychology or Kübler-Ross’ theory about death stages. The complex concerns might be explained using Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological thinking. We aimed to illuminate dying patients´ existential concerns about the impending death through a descriptive analysis of semi-structured interviews with 17 cancer...... patients in Danish hospices. The main findings demonstrated how the patients faced the forthcoming death without being anxious of death but sorrowful about leaving life. Furthermore, patients expressed that they avoided thinking about death. However, some had reconstructed specific and positive ideas about...... afterlife and made accurate decisions for practical aspects of their death. The patients wished to focus on positive aspects in their daily life at hospice. It hereby seems important to have ongoing reflections and to include different theoretical perspectives when providing existential support to dying...

  8. Existential Concerns About Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Lene; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    psychology or Kübler-Ross’ theory about death stages. The complex concerns might be explained using Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological thinking. We aimed to illuminate dying patients´ existential concerns about the impending death through a descriptive analysis of semi-structured interviews with 17 cancer...... patients in Danish hospices. The main findings demonstrated how the patients faced the forthcoming death without being anxious of death but sorrowful about leaving life. Furthermore, patients expressed that they avoided thinking about death. However, some had reconstructed specific and positive ideas about...... afterlife and made accurate decisions for practical aspects of their death. The patients wished to focus on positive aspects in their daily life at hospice. It hereby seems important to have ongoing reflections and to include different theoretical perspectives when providing existential support to dying...

  9. Neuro Memento Mori: meditations on death

    OpenAIRE

    Prophet, Jane

    2015-01-01

    In Neuro Memento Mori, digital animations and live action video are projection mapped onto a 3D print of the artist’s head and neck made from data from 3D scans of the head and MRI scans of the brain. The life-sized 3D printed sculptures are dissected to reveal the artist’s brain and ‘make real’ fMRI data gathered as the artist conducted experiments in the MRI scanner including viewing memento mori paintings and meditating on death. Computation is used to produce 3D neuroimages, 3D prints and...

  10. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  11. Death proteases come alive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death in plants exhibits morphological features comparable to caspase-mediated apoptosis in animals, suggesting that plant cell death is executed by (caspase-like) proteases. However, to date, no caspase homologues have been identified in plants and therefore the existence and nature of these p

  12. Death Acceptance through Ritual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the author's original research, which sought to discover the elements necessary for using death-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic technique for grieving people who experience their grief as "stuck," "unending," "maladaptive," and so on. A "death-related ritual" is defined as a ceremony, directly involving at least 1…

  13. Conflicting Thoughts about Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Most research on children's conception of death has probed their understanding of its biological aspects: its inevitability, irreversibility and terminal impact. Yet many adults subscribe to a religious conception implying that death marks the beginning of a new life. Two recent empirical studies confirm that in the course of development, children…

  14. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  15. Physician-assisted death.

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, John S.

    1995-01-01

    Physician-assisted death includes both euthanasia and assistance in suicide. The CMA urges its members to adhere to the principles of palliative care. It does not support euthanasia and assisted suicide. The following policy summary includes definitions of euthanasia and assisted suicide, background information, basic ethical principles and physician concerns about legalization of physician-assisted death.

  16. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranđelović Aleksandra Č.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death in an athlete is rare and tragic event. An athlete's death draws high public attention given that athletes are considered the healthiest category of society. The vast majority of sudden cardiac death in young athletes is due to congenital cardiac malformations such as hypertrophie cardiomyopathy and various coronary artery anomalies. In athletes over age 35, the usual cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease. With each tragic death of a young athlete, there is a question why this tragedy has not been prevented. The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommend that a pre-participation exam should include a complete cardiovascular history and physical examination.

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism ...

  18. Death in media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavićević Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role of media in a construction of public image speech and presentation of death. The main research questions could be posed as follows: does the media discourse confirm a thesis about modern society as the one which intensely avoids encounter with Death, or does it defy it? Frequent images or hints of death in visual media in films informative and entertainment programs-suggest certain changes related to this issue in the past few decades. This analysis focuses on printed media hence the paper assesses numerous issues of the daily journal Politika from 1963, 1972, 1973, 1979, 1985, 1991, 1995, 1999, 2007 and 2008, as well as some other daily journals after 2000. The analysis confirms a strong connection between the current political systems and ideology and speech about death. In addition, it reveals a political usage of this event but also speaks up about cultural and historical models, underlying all other constructions. During the 1960's and 1970's, the presentations, including the speech about death relied on the traditional understandings about inevitability of death and dying, and alternatively on atheistic beliefs related to the progress and wellbeing of the society. In this particular discourse, death was present to a limited degree, serving primarily to glorify socialist order. The end of the 1970's witnessed an increase in the glorification of the death, correlated with the decrease of the dominant political ideology. On the other hand, the 1990's brought about more presence of the national and religious symbolism and glorification of the dead as heroes. After 2000, mercantilism is evident throughout the media. All of the media broadcast drastic images of death and dead, thus providing an answer to the posed question at the beginning of this paper about the relationship of the modern society towards death but nevertheless, this still leaves out many implicit consequences and possible meanings.

  19. [Organ donation after circulatory death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, J; Kalisvaart, M; van der Hoeven, M; Epker, J; de Haan, J; IJzermans, J N M; Grüne, F

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 17 million inhabitants live in the Netherlands. The number of potential organ donors in 1999 was the lowest in Europe with only 10 donors per million inhabitants. Medical associations, public health services, health insurance companies and the government had to find common solutions in order to improve organ allocation, logistics of donations and to increase the number of transplantations. After a prolonged debate on medical ethical issues of organ transplantation, all participants were able to agree on socio-medico-legal regulations for organ donation and transplantation. In addition to improving the procedure for organ donation after brain death (DBD) the most important step was the introduction of organ donation after circulatory death (DCD). Measures such as the introduction of a national organ donor database, improved information to the public, further education on intensive care units (ICU), guidelines for end of life care on the ICU, establishment of transplantation coordinators on site, introduction of autonomous explantation teams and strict procedures on the course of organ donations, answered many practical issues about logistics and responsibilities for DBD and DCD. In 2014 the number of postmortem organ donations rose to 16.4 per million inhabitants. Meanwhile, up to 60 % of organ donations in the Netherlands originate from a DCD procedure compared to approximately 10 % in the USA. This overview article discusses the developments and processes of deceased donation in the Netherlands after 15 years of experience with DCD. PMID:26810404

  20. Acanthamoeba castellanii Induces Host Cell Death via a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, James; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Jayasekera, Samantha; Alsam, Selwa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba castellanii is a serious human infection with fatal consequences, but it is not clear how the circulating amoebae interact with the blood-brain barrier and transmigrate into the central nervous system. We studied the effects of an Acanthamoeba encephalitis isolate belonging to the T1 genotype on human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier. Using an apoptosis-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we showed that Acanthamoeba induces programmed cell death in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Next, we observed that Acanthamoeba specifically activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Acanthamoeba-mediated brain endothelial cell death was abolished using LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. These results were further confirmed using brain microvascular endothelial cells expressing dominant negative forms of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. This is the first demonstration that Acanthamoeba-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cell death is dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:15845472

  1. Children's Death Concepts and Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Hannelore; Towry, Betty J.

    1980-01-01

    Relationships between death concepts of Black and White children and their racial status were examined. Lower-middle-class elementary children completed a four-item questionnaire on death. Most children defined death as the end of living and listed physical causes as the explanation of death. In general, children's death concepts were similar.…

  2. Hypoglycemic neuronal death is triggered by glucose reperfusion and activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Sang Won; Gum, Elizabeth T.; Hamby, Aaron M.; Chan, Pak H.; Swanson, Raymond A

    2007-01-01

    Hypoglycemic coma and brain injury are potential complications of insulin therapy. Certain neurons in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex are uniquely vulnerable to hypoglycemic cell death, and oxidative stress is a key event in this cell death process. Here we show that hypoglycemia-induced oxidative stress and neuronal death are attributable primarily to the activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase during glucose reperfusion. Superoxide production and neuronal death were blocked by the NADPH ox...

  3. Amending Death Rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China’s Criminal Law is being revised to cut down on death sentences and tighten up punishment for surging crimes The eighth amendment to the Criminal Law, demanding moreprudent use of capital punishment

  4. Sudden infant death syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than girls. Most SIDS deaths occur in the winter. The following may increase the risk for SIDS: ... BF, St Geme JW III, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  5. Eighth Amendment & Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Joseph M.; Merrill, Denise W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson on capital punishment for juveniles based on three hypothetical cases. The goal of the lesson is to have students understand the complexities of decisions regarding the death penalty for juveniles. (JDH)

  6. Unnatural sudden infant death

    OpenAIRE

    Meadow, R

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To identify features to help paediatricians differentiate between natural and unnatural infant deaths.
METHOD—Clinical features of 81 children judged by criminal and family courts to have been killed by their parents were studied. Health and social service records, court documents, and records from meetings with parents, relatives, and social workers were studied.
RESULTS—Initially, 42 children had been certified as dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and 29 wer...

  7. [Causes of the people death from drunkenness and alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Iu A; Paukov, V S; Kirillov, Iu A

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed causes of 1008 people death, who abused by alcohol. Among them 2 groups were separated out: people died due to drunkenness and due to alcoholism. The structure of the death was similar in the both groups, however depended on alcoholism stages. The major cause of the death in group of drunkenness people was acute heart insufficiency, less commonly--lung pathology, and very rarely--brain vessels pathology and liver cirrhosis. In group of people, who died due to alcoholism, lung pathology was the major cause of these deaths, acute heart insufficiency was occurred less commonly, and very rare brain pathology because of delirium tremens or alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as so liver cirrhosis with complications. Hemorrhagic pancreonecrosis after alcoholic excess was found out in both groups, but it was more often in people, who died due to drunkenness. Obtained results show importance of chronic alcoholism identification as a disease with several stages including drunkenness and alcoholism. PMID:22937578

  8. Death among children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001915.htm Death among children and adolescents To use the sharing features on ... injuries) are, by far, the leading cause of death among children and teens. THE TOP THREE CAUSES OF DEATH ...

  9. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  10. Epidemiological features of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors account for 1.4% of all cancers and 2.4% of all cancer-related deaths. The incidence of brain tumors varies and it is higher in developed countries of Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. In Serbia, according to data from 2009, malignant brain tumors account for 2. 2 of all tumors, and from all cancer­related deaths, 3.2% is caused by malignant brain tumors. According to recent statistical reports, an overall incidence of brain tumors for benign and malignant tumors combined is 18.71 per 100,000 persons/year. The most common benign brain tumor in adults is meningioma, which is most present in women, and the most common malignant tumor is glioblastoma, which is most present in adult men. Due to high mortality, especially in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma and significant brain tumor morbidity, there is a constant interest in understanding its etiology in order to possibly prevent tumor occurrence in future and enable more efficient treatment strategies for this fatal brain disease. Despite the continuously growing number of epidemiological studies on possible factors of tumor incidence, the etiology remains unclear. The only established environmental risk factor of gliomas is ionizing radiation exposure. Exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields via cell phone use has gained a lot of attention as a potential risk factor of brain tumor development. However, studies have been inconsistent and inconclusive, so more definite results are still expected.

  11. Dexmedetomidine Postconditioning Reduces Brain Injury after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Ma, Hong; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia can lead to death and severe disability. Brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury is the major pathophysiology contributing to death and severe disability after perinatal asphyxia. Here, seven-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left brain HI. Dexmedetomidine was given intraperitoneally after the brain HI. Yohimbine or atipamezole, two α2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, were given 10 min before the dexmedetomidine injection. Neurological outcome was evaluated 7 or 28 days after the brain HI. Frontal cerebral cortex was harvested 6 h after the brain HI. Left brain HI reduced the left cerebral hemisphere weight assessed 7 days after the brain HI. This brain tissue loss was dose-dependently attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine applied within 1 h after the brain HI produced this effect. Dexmedetomidine attenuated the brain HI-induced brain tissue and cell loss as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction assessed from 28 days after the brain HI. Dexmedetomidine postconditioning-induced neuroprotection was abolished by yohimbine or atipamezole. Brain HI increased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β in the brain tissues. This increase was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Atipamezole inhibited this dexmedetomidine effect. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine postconditioning reduces HI-induced brain injury in the neonatal rats. This effect may be mediated by α2 adrenergic receptor activation that inhibits inflammation in the ischemic brain tissues. PMID:26932203

  12. Transplanting hearts after death measured by cardiac criteria: the challenge to the dead donor rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Robert M

    2010-06-01

    The current definition of death used for donation after cardiac death relies on a determination of the irreversible cessation of the cardiac function. Although this criterion can be compatible with transplantation of most organs, it is not compatible with heart transplantation since heart transplants by definition involve the resuscitation of the supposedly "irreversibly" stopped heart. Subsequently, the definition of "irreversible" has been altered so as to permit heart transplantation in some circumstances, but this is unsatisfactory. There are three available strategies for solving this "irreversibility problem": altering the definition of death so as to rely on circulatory irreversibility, rather than cardiac; defining death strictly on the basis of brain death (either whole-brain or more pragmatically some higher brain criteria); or redefining death in traditional terms and simultaneously legalizing some limited instances of medical killing to procure viable hearts. The first two strategies are the most ethically justifiable and practical. PMID:20439354

  13. Donation after cardiac death and the emergency department: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jeremy R; Schears, Raquel M; Padela, Aasim I

    2014-01-01

    Organ donation after cardiac death (DCD) is increasingly considered as an option to address the shortage of organs available for transplantation, both in the United States and worldwide. The procedures for DCD differ from procedures for donation after brain death and are likely less familiar to emergency physicians (EPs), even as this process is increasingly involving emergency departments (EDs). This article explores the ED operational and ethical issues surrounding this procedure. PMID:24552527

  14. Neumonia adquirida en la comunidad: guia practica elaborada por un comite intersociedades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Luna

    2003-08-01

    .Clinical practice guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP contribute to improve patient's management. CAP undergoes continuous changes in etiology, epidemiology and antimicrobial sensitivity, requiring periodic guidelines revisions. An inter-society committee designed this guidelines dividing it into several topics based on prior guidelines and recent clinical studies. CAP compromises annually more than 1% of the population; most of the cases only require outpatient care but others are severe cases, reaching the 6th cause of death in Argentina. The cases are distributed unevenly into ambulatory, admitted in the general ward or in the intensive care unit. There is no way to predict the etiology. Unfavorable outcome predictors include age, antecedents and physical, laboratory and radiography findings. Ten to 25% of inpatients need to be admitted to the intensive care unit at the onset or during the follow-up, for mechanical ventilation or hemodynamic support (severe CAP. Severe CAP is associated with high mortality and requires adequate and urgent therapy. Pregnant, COPD and nursing home patients require special recommendations. Diagnosis is clinical, while complementary methods are useful to define etiology and severity; chest X-ray is the only one universally recommended. Other studies, including microbiologic evaluation are particularly appropriate in the hospitalized patients. The initial therapy is empiric, it must begin early, using antimicrobials active against the target microorganisms, avoiding their inappropriate use which can lead to the development of resistance. Length of therapy must not be unnecessarily prolonged. Hydratation, nutrition, oxygen and therapy of complications must complement antibiotic treatment. Prevention is based on influenza prophylaxis, anti-pneumococcal vaccine, aspiration prevention and other general measures.

  15. The mechanism of oligodendrocyte precursor cell death passway in hypoxic - ischemic brain damage.%缺氧缺血性脑损伤中的少突胶质前体细胞死亡通路机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨雪; 郝艳秋

    2011-01-01

    缺氧缺血性脑损伤( hypoxic - ischemic brain damage,HIBD)是围产期常见疾病,致病机制尚未完全明确,治疗困难,预后差.少突胶质前体细胞( Oligodendrocyte precursor cell,OPC)是HIBD的主要靶细胞之一.缺氧缺血可以通过凋亡、氧自由基、兴奋毒性损伤等途径引发OPC死亡.亚低温、神经营养因子、OPC移植等方法可以通过抑制凋亡、抗氧化应激、拮抗兴奋毒性损伤等机制用于临床治疗HIBD.%Hypoxic - ischemic brain damage is a common disease in perinatal period, and it's pathogenic mechanism is not defi-nite completly. It is difficult to treat HIBD and the prognosis is not ideal. Oligodendrocyte precursor cell is the main target of HIBD. Hypoxic - ischemia can induce OPC to die through apoptosis, oxygen radicals and exitotoxicity. Mild hypothermia, neurotrophic factors and OPC transplantation can be applied to treat HIBD through depressing apoptosis, confronting oxygen radicals and inhibitting exito-toxicity.

  16. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  18. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  19. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  20. Efetividade da sondagem pós-pilórica usando guia magnético Effectiveness of post-pyloric tube placement using magnetic guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andrea Pietro Pereira Viana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Suporte nutricional adequado tem papel importante na evolução de pacientes graves. Entretanto, significativa porcentagem destes pacientes evolui com dismotilidade intestinal, provocando alto volume gástrico residual. A administração de dieta enteral através de sonda em posição pós-pilórica tem sido sugerida como método para melhorar a tolerância. Objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a taxa de sucesso no posicionamento pós-pilórico da sonda nasoenteral por utilização de equipamento, que permite acompanhar a progressão da sonda através da visualização por transmissão eletromagnética em tempo real, em comparação com o método tradicional. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo, randomizado, controlado, realizado em um hospital terciário durante três meses. Os pacientes foram randomizados para dois grupos: grupo com guia eletromagnético, pacientes submetidos à passagem de sonda nasoenteral sob auxilio do aparelho com visualização em tempo real e transmissão magnética e grupo convencional, passagem de sonda nasoenteral às cegas. O sucesso no posicionamento pós-pilórico e o tempo de duração do procedimento foram avaliados entre os grupos. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 37 pacientes, sendo 18 do grupo com guia eletromagnético e 19 do grupo convencional. A localização da sonda por meio da radiografia mostrou que o grupo com guia eletromagnético apresentou mais posicionamento pós-pilorico do que o grupo convencional, com menor tempo para realização do procedimento, com maior valor do pH do líquido aspirado pela sonda. CONCLUSÕES: O método de passagem e visualização a beira leito por transmissão eletromagnética garante de forma segura a monitorização e acurácia frente à sondagem nasoenteral.OBJECTIVE: Appropriate nutritional support is important to the outcomes of critically ill patients. However, a significant portion of these patients experience intestinal motility problems. Administration of

  1. Early Brain Vulnerability in Wolfram Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hershey, Tamara; Lugar, Heather M.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Koller, Jonathan M.; Perantie, Dana C.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Permutt, M. Alan; ,

    2012-01-01

    Wolfram Syndrome (WFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic nerve atrophy, diabetes insipidus, deafness, and neurological dysfunction leading to death in mid-adulthood. WFS is caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene, which lead to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated cell death. Case studies have found widespread brain atrophy in late stage WFS. However, it is not known when in the disease course these brain abnormalities arise, ...

  2. Influence of brain death and associated trauma on solid organ histological characteristics Influência da morte encefálica e do trauma associado nas características histológicas de órgãos sólidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Simas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate histopathological alterations triggered by brain death and associated trauma on different solid organs in rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats (n=37 were anesthetized with isoflurane, intubated and mechanically ventilated. A trepanation was performed and a balloon catheter inserted into intracraninal cavity and rapidly inflated with saline to induce brain death. After induction, rats were monitored for 30, 180, and 360 min for hemodynamic parameters and exsanguinated from abdominal aorta. Heart, lung, liver, and kidney were removed and fixed in paraffin to evaluation of histological alterations (H&E. Sham-operated rats were trepanned only and used as control group. RESULTS: Brain dead rats showed a hemodynamic instability with hypertensive episode in the first minute after the induction followed by hypotension for approximately 1 h. Histological analyses showed that brain death induces vascular congestion in heart (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar as alterações histopatológicas desencadeadas pela morte encefálica e pelo trauma associado em diferentes órgãos sólidos em ratos. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar machos (n=37 foram anestesiados com isoflurano, entubados e mecanicamente ventilados. Foi realizada trepanação e um cateter foi inserido na cavidade intracraniana e insuflado rapidamente para induzir morte encefálica. Após a indução, os ratos foram monitorados por 30, 180 e 360 min para parâmetros hemodinâmicos e exsanguinados pela aorta abdominal. Coração, pulmão, fígado e rim foram removidos e fixados em parafina para avaliação de alterações histológicas (H&E. Ratos falso-operados foram apenas trepanados e usados como grupo controle. RESULTADOS: Ratos com morte encefálica apresentaram instabilidade hemodinâmica com episódio hipertensivo no primeiro minuto após a indução seguido de hipotensão por aproximadamente 1 hora. Análises histológicas demonstraram que a morte encefálica induz congestão vascular no cora

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the ... distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ... the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  9. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  14. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  15. Lithium treatment in ovo: effects on embryonic heart rate, natural death of ciliary ganglion neurons, and brain expression of a highly conserved chicken homolog of human MTG8/ETO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonomov, O C; Petrov, T; Soden, K; Shisheva, A; Manji, H K

    2000-09-30

    Understanding the action of the mood stabilizer lithium is dependent on availability of experimental models where lithium treatment at clinically relevant concentrations induces marked phenotypic and genotypic changes. Here we report on such changes in the chicken embryo. Lithium chloride (0.6 mM), applied in ovo 60 h after incubation, markedly delayed the heart rate increase observed from ED2.5 to ED5, and induced the brain expression of a new chicken gene cETO from ED7 to ED15. At the same time the overall developmental dynamics and embryo survival, or the expression of chicken gephyrin were not significantly affected. Furthermore, lithium treatment (0.3 mM, 48 h after incubation) abolished the difference in neuronal number between ED12 ciliary ganglia developing in the presence or absence of postganglionic target muscles. We show that cETO is a close homologue of the human transcription factor MTG8/ETO; named after its location on chromosome 8, and participation in chromosomal translocation 8;21 in myeloid leukemia. The mRNA and protein levels of ETO and gephyrin had a parallel course in chicken brain development suggesting that the expression of both genes is regulated mainly at the level of gene transcription. However, the patterns of expression were markedly different. ETO peaked at ED7 and decreased five-fold at ED15. In contrast, gephyrin levels increased five-fold from ED7 to ED15. We propose that the induction of ETO expression, in concert with lithium-induced upregulation of other genes, such as PEBP2beta and bcl-2, is participating in the neuroprotective effect of chronic lithium treatment. PMID:11020546

  16. The "moment of death".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The "moment of death," once a dominant concept in preparing for a "good death", has been eclipsed by a focus on the wider concept of the "dying trajectory". However, findings from interviews with 25 bereaved individuals suggest that dying loved ones' final moments may still be experienced as highly significant in their own right. In some accounts the dying individual's final moments did not feature or made little impression, either because the survivor was not present, or there was no obviously definable moment, or because other, usually medical factors, such as whether to resuscitate the person, took precedence. However, in six cases such moments were constructed as profound, special, and memorable occasions. These constructions are explored in relation to achieving a good death, the dying trajectory as a whole, and making sense of the bereavement experience. Their implications for sociological theories of identity and embodiment are also considered. PMID:18214069

  17. Brain mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-01-01

    Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping") aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1) acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2) transformation of data into a common reference, (3) visualization and interpretation of results, and (4) databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prere...

  18. Is there science behind the near-death experience: Does human consciousness survives after death?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Kumar Bhattacharya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Near death experiences (NDEs have been reported throughout world in essentially all cultures, including amongst the believers of the Hindu religion The contents of NDEs are independent of the gender, age, profession, religion, belief of soul, belief in angels of death or ghosts and belief in death kingdom and heaven, of people who experienced it. The frequency of occurrence is estimated to be between 5% to 48% in adults, and around 85% in children who experienced near-death situations. This frequency may be higher still, perhaps even 100 percent, were it not for the dreamlike and dissociative character of these experiences, and the amnesia-prone participation of the temporal lobe cortex of brain, causing a clear tendency to forget the NDE. A number of experiences can be very similar to NDEs, such as review of one′s life in this planet, or an out-of-body experience (OBE, in which the physical body and its surroundings are observed from various external vantage points, often from above, such that the body is passing through a deep dark tunnel, or seeing flash of light equal to thousands of sun for pure souls. The experience of seeing God and conversing with him, seeing alien lands, seeing dead relatives or someone′s future, can all be regarded as similar in nature. Many individuals have reported horror experiences as well. Numerous cases-are existing in which the reality of the the OBE-observation can be independently ′verified, by external conditions, situations, people, objects, etc. Even people who are non-religious, subsequent to NDE experiences have displayed a markedly decreased fear of death, and a corresponding increase in the belief in "life after death" and re-incarnation. Certain elements of NDE- experiences can be induced by drugs, such as hallucinogenic substances and anesthetic drugs like ketamine, and electrical stimulation of the right temporal lobe or the limbic system has also produced such effects. The possibility that the

  19. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan; Strulik, Holger

    representative consumer is subject to physiological aging. In modeling aging we draw on recent research in the fields of biology and medicine. The speed of the aging process, and thus the time of death, are endogenously determined by optimal health investments. We calibrate the model to US data and proceed to...

  20. Sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Lachica, E;

    1992-01-01

    53 and one case was inconclusive. After studying the circumstances of death, the number of discrepancies were reduced to 20, so that concordance was reached in 86% of all the cases. The results show that the combination of different methods leads to a diagnosis of myocardial infarction in far more...

  1. The Death of Shankar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Jens

    2013-01-01

    ) in Bhubaneswar, the capital city of Orissa. The chapter explores the heterogeneous and hierarchical composition of the basti and unfolds the case of the social exclusion and ultimate death of a patient with tuberculosis who belonged to the poorest section of the basti, called Pradhan sahi. The case...

  2. Death in Flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, Lise; Kveiborg, Jacob; Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents osteoarchaeological analyses of the human skeletal material from a burnt down house in Jutland, Denmark, dated to the first century bc. We describe how the osteological analyses of this complex site were approached and illustrate how we reconstructed the death of the human...

  3. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...

  4. The Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan on the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the imposition of the death penalty. Focuses on the controversy concerning capital punishment and stimulates critical thinking in an analysis and discussion of eight hypothetical situations. Includes suggestions for readings, videotapes, and writing assignments. (NL)

  5. Death of a child.

    OpenAIRE

    Goertzen, J

    1993-01-01

    The death of a small child from a terminal illness is an uncommon but influential event in a family physician's career. Through dialogue with colleagues and friends, self-reflection, and acknowledgment of some of the difficulties, this experience can stimulate personal growth.

  6. Digital language death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornai, András

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide. PMID:24167559

  7. Digital language death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Kornai

    Full Text Available Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide.

  8. Digital Language Death

    OpenAIRE

    András Kornai

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide.

  9. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  10. Adolescent Russian roulette deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kim A

    2010-03-01

    Adolescence, between the ages of 10 and 19 years, is a unique period both physically and emotionally. During this time of life, individuals are known to experiment and engage in risky behavior, sometimes with unforeseen morbidity and mortality. We also see suicide emerge as a manner of death in this age group. The most common method is gunshot wound and sometimes in the form of Russian roulette. Few studies have looked at deaths by Russian roulette, the victims, and scenarios. In particular, no study examines the adolescent victim of Russian roulette. To better understand and classify this entity, adolescent Russian roulette autopsy cases over a 20-year period were examined looking at the victims, scenarios, autopsy findings, cause and manner of death, and the weapons. All victims were males, ages 13 to 19 years, with a Black-to-White ratio of 1:1. No victim had a previous psychiatric history. Toxicology was positive for alcohol and/or marijuana in 50% of the victims. Friends were present when the victim shot himself which occurred in the home the majority of the time. In all but 1 case, premeditation of the game was involved as the victim provided the weapon for the roulette. The cause of death was gunshot wound to the head (6 to the right side, 1 to the mouth, 1 to the forehead), and the manner of death was suicide in 6 cases and accident in 2 cases. A review of the literature discusses the adolescent victim, suicide, and Russian roulette. PMID:20010290

  11. Disappearance of a stutter shortly before death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuc H; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2007-01-01

    A patient with a stutter caused by the trauma of the death of a loved one was able to recover normal speech 1 week before her death, which resulted from intestinal obstruction caused by ovarian cancer. The stutter appeared to have been overcome using a combination therapy of sophrology, self-regulation, and drug therapy. During a genuine resilience process, the patient was able to overcome an earlier existential fracture. In this final phase of life, health professionals and the family fully respected the patient's independence to remain in control of events. She repeatedly refused to have a nasogastric tube inserted to extract fecal matter from the stomach. This patient consequently repossessed her own language of expression in a body that was shattered by cancerous illness and the consequences of treatments. She thus managed to find a successful balance between the body, the spirit, and the brain. PMID:17502440

  12. Early maternal death due to acute encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal death in an unmarried woman poses a medico-legal challenge. A 24-year-old unmarried schoolteacher, residing at a boarding place, had been admitted to hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. At the autopsy, mild to moderate congestion of subarachnoid vessels and oedema of the brain was noted. An un-interfered foetus of 15 weeks with an intact sac and placental tissues were seen. Genital tract injuries were not present. Histopathological examination showed diffuse perivascular cuffing by mononuclear cells suggestive of viral encephalitis, considering the circumstances of death and the social stigma of pregnancy in this unmarried teacher, the possibility of attempted suicide by ingestion of a poison was considered. Abrus precatorius (olinda seeds commonly found in the area is known to produce acute encephalitis as well as haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and pulmonary congestion was also considered as a possible cause for this unusual presentation

  13. Uma contribuição à saúde dos trabalhadores: um guia sobre exposição aos fluídos biológicos

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Moura D'Almeida Miranda; Altair Von Stein Junior; Silvia Petreli; Moacir Ramos Pires; Leticia Gramazio Soares; Bárbara Nicolato Ribeiral; Leila Maria Mansano Sarquis; Vanda Elisa Andres Felli; Marina Ciola Lorusso Xavier de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Os trabalhadores da saúde estão expostos a riscos ocupacionais no seu ambiente de trabalho, destacando-se, dentre eles, o risco biológico. A conduta esperada do trabalhador após esta exposição deve ser definida e orientada, para que medidas preventivas possam ser adotadas. Assim, pretende-se com este guia fornecer subsídios para a conduta dos trabalhadores em relação à exposição biológica, contribuindo para a adesão ao protocolo de monitoramento.

  14. Uma contribuição à saúde dos trabalhadores: um guia sobre exposição aos fluídos biológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Moura D'Almeida Miranda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Os trabalhadores da saúde estão expostos a riscos ocupacionais no seu ambiente de trabalho, destacando-se, dentre eles, o risco biológico. A conduta esperada do trabalhador após esta exposição deve ser definida e orientada, para que medidas preventivas possam ser adotadas. Assim, pretende-se com este guia fornecer subsídios para a conduta dos trabalhadores em relação à exposição biológica, contribuindo para a adesão ao protocolo de monitoramento.

  15. Dietary recommendations: comparing dietary guidelines from Brazil and the United States Recomendações dietéticas: comparação entre os guias alimentares brasileiro e americano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosely Sichieri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian dietary guidelines are based in part on mainstream United States' recommendations, in spite of the criticisms and shortcomings of the American guidelines. In this paper, Brazilian food guidelines are summarized and discussed in comparison with the USA recommendations. American and Brazilian dietary recommendations are quite similar in many aspects, particularly those related to variety in the diet, the importance of physical activity and weight management. Different to American guidelines, those from Brazil advise people to choose fresh foods, to prefer healthier types of fat, to limit trans fat intake and to eat good sources of protein, but does not recommend the consumption of whole grains. Besides the challenges related to their implementation, indicators for the evaluation of the effectiveness of these guidelines should be established from the beginning, particularly those related to changes in dietary habits and the prevalence of obesity.O guia alimentar brasileiro é baseado parcialmente nas recomendações americanas a despeito das críticas e problemas identificados no documento dos Estados Unidos. Neste artigo, as recomendações alimentares para o Brasil são resumidas e discutidas em comparação com as recomendações estadunidenses. Os guias alimentares brasileiro e americano são bastante similares em diversos aspectos, particularmente aqueles relacionados com a variação da dieta, a importância da atividade física e o gerenciamento do peso. Diferentemente dos Estados Unidos, o guia brasileiro estimula o consumo de alimentos frescos, aconselha o uso de fontes saudáveis de gorduras, a limitação do consumo de gordura trans, o consumo de boas fontes de proteínas, mas não indica o consumo de grãos integrais. Além dos desafios relacionados com a sua implantação, os indicadores para a avaliação da eficácia dos guias alimentares devem ser estabelecidos desde sua implantação, particularmente, os relacionados

  16. Radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima

    2003-12-01

    Around 12,000 deaths from glioblastoma occurs within the European Community annually. At present, the best available treatment for malignant brain tumors results in a median survival of patients of 15 months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to review our results of radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors.

  17. Guia de orientações didáticas para tablets: tessituras do design instrucional = Guide to teaching guidelines for tablets: tessitura of instructional design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valletta, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta o resultado de uma pesquisa relacionada à seleção de aplicativos (programas/ Apps para tablets , que foram incorporados no guia de orientações didáticas sob à luz da metodologia do Design Instrucional . O estudo teve como objetivo analisar a matriz curricular e documentos oficiais do MEC de modo a contemplar o uso de tecnologias móveis e ubíqua, a apoiar os processos de ensino e aprendizagem na Educação Básica, levando em consideração o contexto da cibercultura. A metodologia da pesquisa envolveu um estudo de caso, utilizando-se como instrumentos para coleta de dados, o questionário e a observação participante. Ao final deste estudo evidenciou-se o entendimento da proposta implementada para o uso de tablets na Educação durante a formação continuada de professores.

  18. Methodology of ABNT ISO/IEC GUIA 25 implantation in the laboratories of radionuclides analysis in environmental samples of the Analysis Division/CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ISO/EEC Guide 25: 1993 Standard General requirements for the competence of calibration and testing laboratories. Is published in Brazil by Brazilian Association for Technical Standards (ABNT) as ABNT ISO/DEC GUIA 25 and establishes general requirements a laboratory must demonstrate to meet, in order to be recognized as having technical competence (accreditation) to carry out specifics calibration or testing. Therefore, the accredited laboratory starts, respectively, taking part from the Brazilian Calibration Network (RBC) or from the Brazilian Testing Laboratories Network (RBLE) . The Environmental Radioanalysis Division (DIAMB) from Environmental Radiological Protection Department (DEPRA) from Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) from Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is a laboratory responsible for analyzing radionuclides deriving for the samples from DEPRA's Surveillance Program, research and servings, due to an eventual radionuclide contamination in environment, foods and others raw materials for human consumption; including for importation and exportation products certification purposes. For all these reasons, DIAMB needs its formal recognition for carrying out radionuclides analysis in environmental samples. This work aims to provide a methodology in order to guide a laboratory which has the intention to implement a accreditation process. It also describes policies to meet the requirements related to the Standard, guidance needed to specification of some steps and also comments some points from the Standard in order to become easier all the accreditation process comprehension. (author)

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  3. Guia de instituciones ambientales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractEl Gobierno Municipal reconociendo la labor de las instituciones que desarrollan trabajos a favor de nuestra ciudad y áreas rurales para salvaguardar el medio ambiente, a liderizado un proceso de planificación participativa y estratégica del cual resulto como producto el plan de desarrol

  4. Brain mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping" aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1 acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2 transformation of data into a common reference, (3 visualization and interpretation of results, and (4 databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prerequisite for multisubject, multidimensional and multimodal mapping is transformation of individual images to match a standard brain template. To produce brain maps, color, contours, and other visual cues are used to differentiate metabolic rates, electrical field potentials, receptor densities, and other attributes of structure or function. Databases are used to organize and archive data records. By relating the maps to cognitive functions and psychological models, brain mapping offers a prerequisite for the understanding of organizational principles of the human brain.

  5. AN AUDIT OF MATERNAL DEATHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gowda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rate significantly. To analyze the causes and epidemiological amounts maternal mortality e.g. age parity, socioeconomic status and literacy. In order to reduce maternal mortality and to implement safe motherhood program and complications of pregnancy and to find out safe motherhood program. METHODS: The data collected was a retrograde by a proforma containing particulars of the diseased, detailed history and relatives were interviewed for additional information. The data collected was analysed. RESULTS: Maternal mortality rate in our own institution is 200/ 100,000 live births. Among 30 maternal deaths, 56% deaths (17 were among low socio - economic status, groups 60% deaths among unbooked 53.5% deaths more along illiterates evidenced by direct and indirect deaths about 25% of deaths were preventable. CONCLUSION: Maternal death is a great tragedy in the family life. It is crusade to know not just the medical cause of the death but the circumstances what makes these continued tragic death even more unacceptable is that deaths are largely preventable

  6. Certification of deaths attributable to epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Langan, Y.; Nashef, L; Sander, J

    2002-01-01

    Methods: All 1997 death entries mentioning epilepsy as a cause of death in those 16–50 years were examined and classified as sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), other epilepsy related deaths, or non-epilepsy deaths.

  7. [Karoshi, death by overwork].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehata, Tetsunojo

    2005-07-01

    Karoshi (death by overwork) is one of social medical terms, which used by survivors of victims who attacked with cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In Dec. 2000, Compensation Standard of cardiovascular diseases in Workers' Insurance was changed and admitted the relationship between chronic fatigue and cardiovascular attacks. As a result, compensation numbers of Karoshi attributed to three hundred and more from about 80 cases. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare thinks that most of Karoshi caused by long working hours continuing for several months, especially without payment, so that the Labour Standard Inspector Office requests to decrease overtime work more than 45 hours per month to firm administrators. PMID:16001791

  8. Radio pulsar death

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2003-01-01

    Pulsar radio emission is believed to be originated from the electron-positron pairs streaming out from the polar cap region. Pair formation, an essential condition for pulsar radio emission, is believed to be sustained in active pulsars via one photon process from either the curvature radiation (CR) or the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) seed photons, or sometimes via two photon process. In pulsars with super-critical magnetic fields, some more exotic processes, such as magnetic photon splitting and bound pair formation, will also play noticeable roles. All these effects should be synthesized to discuss radio pulsar death both in the conventional long-period regime due to the turnoff of the active gap, and in the high magnetic field regime due to the possible suppression of the free pair formation. Here I briefly review some recent progress in understanding radio pulsar death.

  9. Preventing child deaths

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    In the week I began to write this editorial, City and Hackney Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) published an executive summary of the serious case review (SCR) into the deaths of ten year old Antoine Gamor-Ogunkoya and his three year old sister Kenniece in London (City and Hackney Local Safeguarding Children Board, 2008). Both had been killed by their mother, Vivian Gamor. Antoine had been beaten with a hammer and Kenniece had been suffocated with clingfilm. Their mother was convicted ...

  10. Death and Digital Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Ennis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers new possibilities for photographing the dying and dead in Australia that have been enabled by digital technologies. It argues that vernacular digital photographs demonstrate unprecedented degrees of control and privacy and further that they are purposefully withheld from public view, thus raising issues about visibility and secrecy. Some historical context is provided. Post mortem photographs were not uncommon in the nineteenth century but were in the domain of professional studio photographers. Commissioning post mortem portraits was rare for most of the twentieth century, due to changing attitudes to death and the transformation of the photographic industry. Photographing the deceased re-emerged in the 1980s, notably in the area of neonatal death. In the last five years death-related vernacular photographs have begun to proliferate. Unlike analogue processes, digital photography bypasses the involvement of others in processing and printing private images. Distribution to intimates can be achieved instantaneously via the internet, reinforcing social and familial connections. Vernacular digital photographs of the deceased do not address historical tradition but share their domestic and intimate contexts. Nor do they belong to a unified group, yet they have a common vocabulary which emphasises specificity and detail.

  11. Death and digital photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennis, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers new possibilities for photographing the dying and dead in Australia that have been enabled by digital technologies. It argues that vernacular digital photographs demonstrate unprecedented degrees of control and privacy and further that they are purposefully withheld from public view, thus raising issues about visibility and secrecy.Some historical context is provided. Post mortem photographs were not uncommon in the nineteenth century but were in the domain of professional studio photographers. Commissioning post mortem portraits was rare for most of the twentieth century, due to changing attitudes to death and the transformation of the photographic industry. Photographing the deceased re-emerged in the 1980s, notably in the area of neonatal death.In the last five years death-related vernacular photographs have begun to proliferate. Unlike analogue processes, digital photography bypasses the involvement of others in processing and printing private images. Distribution to intimates can be achieved instantaneously via the internet, reinforcing social and familial connections.Vernacular digital photographs of the deceased do not address historical tradition but share their domestic and intimate contexts. Nor do they belong to a unified group, yet they have a common vocabulary which emphasises specificity and detail.

  12. Legal and Medical Relevance of Establishing the Moment of Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina STREBA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, death has been defined, from a medical point of view, as the irreversible cessation of breathing, circulation and activity of nervous system.The actual techniques of reanimation, by giving the possibility of artificial surviving (the so called living dead and by blurring the barrier between life and death, have brought into question the problem of establishing the moment of death. If in the traditional definition of death, the criteria for establishing death which are cessation of any vital functions, indicated by cessation of heartbeat and no breathing, are clear and the determination of timing of death doesn’t raise any medical, ethical or legal problems, controversy arises when referring to brain death.From a medical point of view, the biologic organism is still alive as long as the heart continues to beat although conditioned by artificial breathing. But, in conformity with the definition of the status of a human being, in terms of legal and ethical criteria, a person may be considered deceased independent of the status of the biological body.Issues raised by the timing of death, in particular cases as that of brain death, are reflected not only in medical field but also in civil and penal law. Consequences of the death of a person are legally passed on all aspects of ending of his civil capacity: the opening sequence, ending of civil rights and obligations of individuals, etc.The fact that Law 95/2006 clearly states that organs can be harvested both from those who are brain dead and from those with irreversible cardio-respiratory cessation, they being declared dead without doubt, clears up, in terms of legal considerations, the status of persons in this situation.Another problem of keeping alive the body in order to take over organs for transplantation is the preservation of human dignity. When a brain dead person (in all senses that are involved in the definition is declared dead we deal with a body, kept alive but which

  13. Death Sentences: A Content Analysis of Children's Death Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Devereaux A.; Hupp, Julie M.

    2008-01-01

    A multidimensional concept of death must include biological, sociocultural, and emotional components. Children glean information about death in many ways, one of which is through books. In this study, the authors compared the 3 dimensions of death-related information (irreversibility, inevitability, nonfunctionality) in 24 young children's picture…

  14. A Death in the Family: Death as a Zen Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K.; Rubinstein, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on original research that explored family reaction to the death of an elderly husband and father. We interviewed 34 families (a family included a widow and two adult biological children) approximately 6 to 10 months after the death. In one-on-one interviews, we discussed family members' initial reaction to the death, how the…

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, TB; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Lundemose, JB;

    2000-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia......,251,027 inhabitants in Denmark, the incidence of venous thromboembolism was 0.9 per 1000 per year in the background population, and less than one-thousandth of these were children. Consequently it is not likely that venous thrombosis is a major cause of sudden infant death syndrome. On the other hand, this does not....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life...

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte;

    2000-01-01

    for thrombosis in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life...

  17. Life, Death, and Second Chances

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Life, Death, and Second Chances Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table ... New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know / Life, Death, and Second Chances / Asthma Research: The NIH-NJRC ...

  18. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Readmissions Complications and Deaths measures - national data. This data set includes national-level data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee...

  19. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Readmissions, Complications and Deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee complication...

  20. Readmissions Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Readmissions Complications and Deaths measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for 30-day death and readmission measures, the hip/knee...

  1. Childhood Deaths from Physical Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Mohd. Sham; and Others

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes 30 cases of childhood deaths caused by physical abuse in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data presented include ethnic origins, age, causes of death, identity of perpetrators, and marital situation of parents. (DB)

  2. The price of donation after cardiac death in liver transplantation : a prospective cost-effectiveness study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hilst, Christian S.; IJtsma, Alexander J. C.; Bottema, Jan T.; van Hoek, Bart; Dubbeld, Jeroen; Metselaar, Herold J.; Kazemier, Geert; van den Berg, Aad P.; Porte, Robert J.; Slooff, Maarten J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to perform a detailed prospective observational multicenter cost-effectiveness study by comparing liver transplantations with Donation after Brain Death (DBD) and Donation after Cardiac Death (DCD) grafts. All liver transplantations in the three Dutch liver transplant centers between

  3. On social death: ostracism and the accessibility of death thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Caroline; Kidd, David C; Castano, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Being rejected, excluded, or simply ignored is a painful experience. Ostracism researchers have shown its powerful negative consequences (Williams, 2007), and sociologists have referred to such experiences as social death (Bauman, 1992). Is this is just a metaphor or does being ostracized make death more salient in people's minds? An experiment was conducted in which participants experienced ostracism or inclusion using the Cyberball manipulation, and the accessibility of death-related thoughts was measured via a word-stem completion puzzle. Results showed enhanced death-thought accessibility in the ostracism condition, as well as a negative effect of dispositional self-esteem on the accessibility of death-related thoughts. PMID:24592875

  4. Stillbirth, Miscarriage, and Infant Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AmazonSmile Contact Us Donate Stillbirth, Miscarriage, and Infant Death A baby’s death, whenever or however it occurs, is a profound ... of isolation –A need to talk about the death and the details of what happened –Feelings of ...

  5. Death of an Adult Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... iGive.com Purchase Through AmazonSmile Contact Us Donate Death of an Adult Child The death of any child, regardless of cause or age, ... the situations that may have caused their child’s death. Judgmental statements from others indicating that the child ...

  6. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  7. Optimal Aging and Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces physiological aging into a simple model of optimal intertemporal consumption. In this endeavor we draw on the natural science literature on aging. According to the purposed theory, the speed of the aging process and the time of death are endogenously determined by optimal...... health investments. At the same time, physiological aspects of the aging process influence optimal savings and health investment. We calibrate the model for the average US male in 2000 and proceed to show that the calibrated model accounts well for the cross-country link between labor productivity and...

  8. The Merchant of Death

    OpenAIRE

    Farias, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Benjamin Cieza is a death merchant, having spent the last thirty years globetrotting from one global hot spot to another, working for a shadow company of expats who cross borders and the law with impunity. With his mother's suicide shortly after his brothers, he now finds himself obligated to fulfill his father's wish to be buried in the ancestral lands along the coast of latitude zero, where the roads end and the jungle devours both men and time. Finding his father's diary, a tale of two liv...

  9. Happiness and Death Distress: Two Separate Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between happiness and death distress (death anxiety, death depression, and death obsession) in 275 volunteer Kuwaiti undergraduates. They responded to the Oxford Happiness Inventory, the Death Anxiety Scale, the Arabic Scale of Death Anxiety, the Death Depression Scale-Revised, and the…

  10. Brain Cancer in Workers Employed at a Laboratory Research Facility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Collins

    Full Text Available An earlier study of research facility workers found more brain cancer deaths than expected, but no workplace exposures were implicated.Adding four additional years of vital-status follow-up, we reassessed the risk of death from brain cancer in the same workforce, including 5,284 workers employed between 1963, when the facility opened, and 2007. We compared the work histories of the brain cancer decedents in relationship to when they died and their ages at death.As in most other studies of laboratory and research workers, we found low rates of total mortality, total cancers, accidents, suicides, and chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. We found no new brain cancer deaths in the four years of additional follow-up. Our best estimate of the brain cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR was 1.32 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.66-2.37, but the SMR might have been as high as 1.69. Deaths from benign brain tumors and other non-malignant diseases of the nervous system were at or below expected levels.With the addition of four more years of follow-up and in the absence of any new brain cancers, the updated estimate of the risk of brain cancer death is smaller than in the original study. There was no consistent pattern among the work histories of decedents that indicated a common causative exposure.

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical professionals who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah ... important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in ... obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form a ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration that many people with depression experience ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How ... cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... However, recent research points to a possible new class of antidepressants that can relieve symptoms of the ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  8. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of ... nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, ... the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the brain is wired ... in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can capture split-second changes in the brain. Using MEG, ... The study of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression ( ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... neurons, the most highly specialized cells of all, conduct messages. Every cell in our bodies contains a ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the ... for the cell to work properly including small structures called cell organelles. Dendrites branch off from the ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  3. Staging Death, Translating Death, Rehearsing Death: A Photographer’s Apprenticeship in Dying

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Fargione

    2010-01-01

    The preponderance of death imagery in the mass media and a recent interest of photography in the practice of death suggest the need to reevaluate our approach to death and dying, especially when violence is involved. This essay is a case study of History of Violence, Claudio Cravero's last photographic project. His collection of "portraits" reproduce apparent dead bodies, mostly attacked in their own domestic spheres, but neither the perpetrator of death (a mysterious murderer?), nor the weap...

  4. Stressing Mitosis to Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eBurgess

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The final stage of cell division (mitosis, involves the compaction of the duplicated genome into chromatid pairs. Each pair is captured by microtubules emanating from opposite spindle poles, aligned at the metaphase plate, and then faithfully segregated to form two identical daughter cells. Chromatids that are not correctly attached to the spindle are detected by the constitutively active spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. Any stress that prevents correct bipolar spindle attachment, blocks the satisfaction of the SAC, and induces a prolonged mitotic arrest, providing the cell time to obtain attachment and complete segregation correctly. Unfortunately, during mitosis repairing damage is not generally possible due to the compaction of DNA into chromosomes, and subsequent suppression of gene transcription and translation. Therefore, in the presence of significant damage cell death is instigated to ensure that genomic stability is maintained. While most stresses lead to an arrest in mitosis, some promote premature mitotic exit, allowing cells to by-pass mitotic cell death. This mini-review will focus on the effects and outcomes that common stresses have on mitosis, and how this impacts on the efficacy of mitotic chemotherapies.

  5. Stressing mitosis to death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Andrew; Rasouli, Mina; Rogers, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The final stage of cell division (mitosis), involves the compaction of the duplicated genome into chromatid pairs. Each pair is captured by microtubules emanating from opposite spindle poles, aligned at the metaphase plate, and then faithfully segregated to form two identical daughter cells. Chromatids that are not correctly attached to the spindle are detected by the constitutively active spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Any stress that prevents correct bipolar spindle attachment, blocks the satisfaction of the SAC, and induces a prolonged mitotic arrest, providing the cell time to obtain attachment and complete segregation correctly. Unfortunately, during mitosis repairing damage is not generally possible due to the compaction of DNA into chromosomes, and subsequent suppression of gene transcription and translation. Therefore, in the presence of significant damage cell death is instigated to ensure that genomic stability is maintained. While most stresses lead to an arrest in mitosis, some promote premature mitotic exit, allowing cells to bypass mitotic cell death. This mini-review will focus on the effects and outcomes that common stresses have on mitosis, and how this impacts on the efficacy of mitotic chemotherapies. PMID:24926440

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ... new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body ... stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons ...

  8. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other and with distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues ...

  10. The impact of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery on the management of brain metastasis with maintaining brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the utility of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (RSRS), assisted with a careful monitoring by MRI, in the management of brain metastases. Thirty-seven patients harboring brain metastasis received RSRS. RSRS at the same site was performed in 14. The cumulative 5-year survival rate was 29% and the median survival time was 32 months. Cause of death was as follows: 14 uncontrolled extracranial disease and 2 progressed brain metastases. There were no severe adverse events. For 16 patients, neurocognitive function was examined and the most recent results revealed that 88% was not associated with impaired neurocognition. RSRS appears a preferred option to manage brain metastases with maintaining brain function. (author)

  11. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  12. Guias de viagem e de turismo da cidade de São Paulo (1924 e 1954: hospitalidade e patrimônio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sênia Regina Bastos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo

    O artigo contempla a análise de dois guias de viagem e de turismo da cidade de São Paulo, impressos e editados em português, em dois momentos distintos (1924 e 1953, de forma a identificar as possibilidades de visitação, sugestões de entretenimento e as informações necessárias aos deslocamentos dos viajantes, visitantes ou moradores. Instrumento da hospitalidade, cujo ato envolve ações como recepção, hospedagem, restauração e entretenimento, os guias apresentam aspectos próprios à hospitalidade urbana, informam o visitante, mostrando o que de melhor há na “cidade da garoa”. Trata-se de uma fonte privilegiada para a história de São Paulo ao evidenciar o imaginário cultural do período no qual se inscreve, selecionar edificações e monumentos e valorizar determinadas regiões da cidade.

    Palavras-chave: história do turismo; guia de viagem; patrimônio histórico.

     AbstractThe article contemplates the analysis of two travel books of Sao Paulo, printed and edited in Portuguese, in two distinct moments (1924 and 1953, so as to identify the visitation possibilities, entertainment options, and the necessary information about shuttling and commuting, be it for visitors or for dwellers. As a hospitality instrument, thus involving acts of reception, lodging, restoration, and entertainment, the travel books in question assay aspects inherent to

  13. Does Inflammation after Stroke Affect the Developing Brain Differently than Adult Brain?

    OpenAIRE

    Vexler, Zinaida S.; Yenari, Midori A.

    2009-01-01

    The immature brain is prone to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and stroke. The incidence of arterial stroke in newborns is similar to that in the elderly. However, the pathogenesis of ischemic brain injury is profoundly affected by age at the time of the insult. Necrosis is a dominant type of neuronal cell death in adult brain, whereas widespread neuronal apoptosis is unique for the early postnatal synaptogenesis period. The inflammatory response, in conjunction with excitotoxic and oxidative...

  14. Guias alimentares para a população brasileira: implicações para a Política Nacional de Saúde Bucal Dietary guidelines for the Brazilian population: implications for the Brazilian National Policy on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Matias Freire

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Guias alimentares são documentos que orientam sobre práticas alimentares e políticas que visam à promoção da saúde e prevenção de doenças nas populações. Este artigo tem como objetivo apresentar e discutir os guias alimentares para a população brasileira, buscando identificar aspectos que possam subsidiar as estratégias propostas na Política Nacional de Saúde Bucal. Foram revisados os dois guias oficiais do Ministério da Saúde disponíveis até o momento: o Guia Alimentar para Crianças Menores de 2 Anos e o Guia Alimentar para a População Brasileira. Os guias apresentam recomendações sobre a redução do consumo de açúcar, fundamental na prevenção da cárie, bem como outras diretrizes que podem contribuir para a prevenção da erosão dentária e do câncer bucal. Constituem, assim, um componente importante da estratégia de promoção da saúde geral e bucal, e as recomendações devem ser integradas à Política Nacional de Saúde Bucal.Dietary guidelines are intended to orient dietary habits and policies for health promotion and disease prevention. This article discusses Brazil's national dietary guidelines, aiming to identify issues that can support the strategies proposed by the National Policy on Oral Health. The two currently available official guidelines produced by the Ministry of Health were reviewed: the Dietary Guidelines for Children under Two and the Population Dietary Guidelines. The guidelines recommend reduction in sugar intake, essential for caries prevention, and other measures to prevent tooth decay and oral cancer. These guidelines are thus a key part of an oral and overall health promotion strategy and should be integrated into the National Policy on Oral Health.

  15. Brain endothelial TAK1 and NEMO safeguard the neurovascular unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ridder, Dirk A.; Wenzel, Jan; Müller, Kristin; Töllner, Kathrin; Tong, Xin-Kang; Assmann, Julian C; Stroobants, Stijn; Weber, Tobias; Niturad, Cristina; Fischer, Lisanne; Lembrich, Beate; Wolburg, Hartwig; Grand'Maison, Marilyn; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Korpos, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), a key component of NF-κB signaling, cause the genetic disease incontinentia pigmenti (IP). This leads to severe neurological symptoms, but the mechanisms underlying brain involvement were unclear. Here, we show that selectively deleting Nemo or the upstream kinase Tak1 in brain endothelial cells resulted in death of endothelial cells, a rarefaction of brain microvessels, cerebral hypoperfusion, a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BB...

  16. Brain function in coma, vegetative state, and related disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Laureys, Steven; Owen, Adrian M.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2004-01-01

    We review the nosological criteria and functional neuroanatomical basis for brain death, coma, vegetative state, minimally conscious state, and the locked-in state. Functional neuroimaging is providing new insights into cerebral activity in patients with severe brain damage. Measurements of cerebral metabolism and brain activations in response to sensory stimuli with PET, fMRI, and electrophysiological methods can provide information on the presence, degree, and location of any residual brain...

  17. Cause of Death Affects Racial Classification on Death Certificates

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Noymer; Penner, Andrew M.; Aliya Saperstein

    2011-01-01

    Recent research suggests racial classification is responsive to social stereotypes, but how this affects racial classification in national vital statistics is unknown. This study examines whether cause of death influences racial classification on death certificates. We analyze the racial classifications from a nationally representative sample of death certificates and subsequent interviews with the decedents' next of kin and find notable discrepancies between the two racial classifications by...

  18. Near-death experience: arising from the borderlands of consciousness in crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kevin R

    2014-11-01

    Brain activity explains the essential features of near-death experience, including the perceptions of envelopment by light, out-of-body, and meeting deceased loved ones or spiritual beings. To achieve their fullest expression, such near-death experiences require a confluence of events and draw upon more than a single physiological or biochemical system, or one anatomical structure. During impaired cerebral blood flow from syncope or cardiac arrest that commonly precedes near-death, the boundary between consciousness and unconsciousness is often indistinct and a person may enter a borderland and be far more aware than is appreciated by others. Consciousness can also come and go if blood flow rises and falls across a crucial threshold. During crisis the brain's prime biologic purpose to keep itself alive lies at the heart of many spiritual experiences and inextricably binds them to the primal brain. Brain ischemia can disrupt the physiological balance between conscious states by leading the brainstem to blend rapid eye movement (REM) and waking into another borderland of consciousness during near-death. Evidence converges from many points to support this notion, including the observation that the majority of people with a near-death experience possess brains predisposed to fusing REM and waking consciousness into an unfamiliar reality, and are as likely to have out-of-body experience while blending REM and waking consciousness as they are to have out-of-body experience during near-death. PMID:25377188

  19. Organ donations after death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernarda Logar

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses public opinion on post-mortem organ donation, especially the difference between high support of public opinion to transplant activity, its general readiness to donate organs and the low number of signed organ donor cards. Through different approaches the article tries to point out possible factors relevant to the decision to donate organs. Early studies showed demographic variables and information as significant factors when deciding to donate organs after death. As there was not enough evidence that long-term effect through these factors is significant, the need for new investigation has grown. Social cognition theories helped understanding the difference mentioned above. It seems that the use of this approach might contribute to the understanding the problem and to delimit most useful factors when working with public.

  20. Cell Death Atlas of the Postnatal Mouse Ventral Forebrain and Hypothalamus: Effects of Age and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Todd H.; Krug, Stefanie; Carr, Audrey V.; Murray, Elaine K.; Fitzpatrick, Emmett; Bengston, Lynn; McCutcheon, Jill; De Vries, Geert J.; Forger, Nancy G.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring cell death is essential to the development of the mammalian nervous system. Although the importance of developmental cell death has been appreciated for decades, there is no comprehensive account of cell death across brain areas in the mouse. Moreover, several regional sex differences in cell death have been described for the ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, but it is not known how widespread the phenomenon is. We used immunohistochemical detection of activated caspase-3 to identify dying cells in the brains of male and female mice from postnatal day (P) 1 to P11. Cell death density, total number of dying cells, and regional volume were determined in 16 regions of the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain (the anterior hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus; the basolateral, central, and medial amygdala; the lateral and principal nuclei of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis; the caudate-putamen; the globus pallidus; the lateral septum; and the islands of Calleja). All regions showed a significant effect of age on cell death. The timing of peak cell death varied between P1 to P7, and the average rate of cell death varied tenfold among regions. Several significant sex differences in cell death and/or regional volume were detected. These data address large gaps in the developmental literature and suggest interesting region-specific differences in the prevalence and timing of cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain. PMID:23296992

  1. Children and unintentional firearm death

    OpenAIRE

    Hemenway, David; Solnick, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children in the United States are at far greater risk of unintentional gun death than children in other developed countries. The relative figures may even be worse since the estimates for US child unintentional gun deaths are derived from the Vital Statistics which have been shown to be underestimates. No study has used a national data system to investigate the circumstances of fatal child gun accidents. Methods We use data from the National Violent Death Reporting System for 16 st...

  2. Children and unintentional firearm death

    OpenAIRE

    Hemenway, David; Solnick, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children in the United States are at far greater risk of unintentional gun death than children in other developed countries. The relative figures may even be worse since the estimates for US child unintentional gun deaths are derived from the Vital Statistics which have been shown to be underestimates. No study has used a national data system to investigate the circumstances of fatal child gun accidents. Methods: We use data from the National Violent Death Reporting System for 16 ...

  3. DEATH PENALTY: HUMAN RIGHT ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Rokhvadze, R.

    2013-01-01

    The current paper is dedicated to the Interpretation issues of the USA death penalty law. It expends on the different approaches to the law and its understanding by the lawyers, lawmakers, citizens, jury and judges. The analysis of Law System in the USA is exemplified by the exploration of cases, where the rights of suspect and death penalty issues are concerned. Is the death sentence legal, does it contribute to the liberal democratic setting in the USA, is it constitutional? These and many ...

  4. The Fated Death of Tess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉

    2012-01-01

      The theme of this essay is about the fated deaths of Tess.The emphasis is‘inevitability’. Tess’s Death is mainly due to the social influence and man-made factors. Because of the low social status and moral conceptions, there is no living room left for Tess. Her parents push her get closer to her tragedy as well. Alec and Angel are the two persons who directly and indirectly cause Tess’s death. In addition, there are also some subjective causes for her doom. The symbolic red in the novel intentionally indicates the’inevitability’of her death.

  5. Deaths from Cysticercosis, United States

    OpenAIRE

    Sorvillo, Frank J.; DeGiorgio, Christopher; Waterman, Stephen H.

    2007-01-01

    Cysticercosis has emerged as a cause of severe neurologic disease in the United States. We evaluated cysticercosis-related deaths in the United States for 1990–2002 by race, sex, age, state of residence, country of birth, and year of death. A total of 221 cysticercosis deaths were identified. Mortality rates were highest for Latinos (adjusted rate ratio [ARR] 94.5, relative to whites) and men (ARR = 1.8). The mean age at death was 40.5 years (range 2–88). Most patients (187 [84.6%]) were fore...

  6. Parthanatos, a messenger of death

    OpenAIRE

    David, Karen Kate; Andrabi, Shaida Ahmad; Dawson, Ted Murray; Dawson, Valina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1)'s multiple roles in the cell span from maintaining life to inducing death. The processes PARP-1 is involved in include, but are not limited to DNA repair, DNA transcription, mitosis, and cell death. Of PARP-1's different cellular functions, its active role in cell death is of particular interest to designing therapies for diseases. Genetic deletion of PARP-1 revealed that PARP-1 over activation underlies cell death in experimental models of stroke, diabet...

  7. Brain death induces apoptosis in donor liver of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoeven, JAB; Moshage, H; Schuurs, T; Nijboer, M; van Schilfgaarde, R; Ploeg, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Background. A difference in short- and long-term function between living-related and cadaveric donor organs is consistently shown in kidney- and liver-transplant studies. We hypothesize that this is caused by induction of apoptosis and inflammation of the potential graft because of the phase of brai

  8. Effects of brain death on donor organ viability in transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeven, Joost Alexander Boreas van der

    2005-01-01

    Organ transplantation has evolved from an experimental procedure in the 1950's and 60's to the therapy of choice for end-stage organ failure. The first solid organ to outgrow the experimental transplantation setting was the kidney. At that time the succesful transplant programs were those in which donor organs form living family members were used for transplantation in their ill relatives (living-related transplant combination). ... Zie: Summary

  9. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  10. Brain endothelial TAK1 and NEMO safeguard the neurovascular unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Dirk A.; Wenzel, Jan; Müller, Kristin; Töllner, Kathrin; Tong, Xin-Kang; Assmann, Julian C.; Stroobants, Stijn; Weber, Tobias; Niturad, Cristina; Fischer, Lisanne; Lembrich, Beate; Wolburg, Hartwig; Grand’Maison, Marilyn; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Korpos, Eva; Truchetet, Francois; Rades, Dirk; Sorokin, Lydia M.; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Bedell, Barry J.; Pasparakis, Manolis; Balschun, Detlef; D’Hooge, Rudi; Löscher, Wolfgang; Hamel, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), a key component of NF-κB signaling, cause the genetic disease incontinentia pigmenti (IP). This leads to severe neurological symptoms, but the mechanisms underlying brain involvement were unclear. Here, we show that selectively deleting Nemo or the upstream kinase Tak1 in brain endothelial cells resulted in death of endothelial cells, a rarefaction of brain microvessels, cerebral hypoperfusion, a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BBB), and epileptic seizures. TAK1 and NEMO protected the BBB by activating the transcription factor NF-κB and stabilizing the tight junction protein occludin. They also prevented brain endothelial cell death in a NF-κB–independent manner by reducing oxidative damage. Our data identify crucial functions of inflammatory TAK1–NEMO signaling in protecting the brain endothelium and maintaining normal brain function, thus explaining the neurological symptoms associated with IP. PMID:26347470

  11. Staging Death, Translating Death, Rehearsing Death: A Photographer’s Apprenticeship in Dying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Fargione

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preponderance of death imagery in the mass media and a recent interest of photography in the practice of death suggest the need to reevaluate our approach to death and dying, especially when violence is involved. This essay is a case study of History of Violence, Claudio Cravero's last photographic project. His collection of "portraits" reproduce apparent dead bodies, mostly attacked in their own domestic spheres, but neither the perpetrator of death (a mysterious murderer?, nor the weapon used (an omnipresent knife, should be considered as main focal points of the artist's inquiry. The undoubtful protagonist of these photographs, instead, is the light, that illuminates fear: not of death itself, rather of the obnoxious indifference to it, as the result of generalized death imagery saturation.     The staged apparent death displayed in Cravero's photographs serve both as a memento mori and as a strategy to come to terms with the idea of death. In short, it is an apprentship in dying through a domesticating translation practice. Eventually, Cravero's History of Violence offers a complex reflection on the interplay between each individual story and macrolevel social History, thus providing some hypotheses of where violence and death fit in that odd geometry of time and space that we call life.

  12. Death Competence: An Ethical Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamino, Louis A.; Ritter, R. Hal, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The authors argued that death competence, defined as specialized skill in tolerating and managing clients' problems related to dying, death, and bereavement, is a necessary prerequisite for ethical practice in grief counseling. A selected review of the literature tracing the underpinnings of this concept reveals how a robust construct of death…

  13. Death Drive in Tourism Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina

    2014-01-01

    The psychoanalytical concept of the death drive refers to a constant metapsychological force at the junction between life and death: it is not understood in a biological sense of physical demise of the body, nor in opposition to life. Geographies of tourist performances in places in the proximity of

  14. Death: A Part of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, George G.; Harris, Zoanne

    This two-part curriculum unit includes 20 slides depicting Days of the Dead in Mexico and the United States. The unit is designed to help middle school students compare customs and practices associated with death throughout the world in a way that promotes understanding of the values and needs that produce and are reinforced by death rituals and…

  15. Parthanatos, a messenger of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Karen Kate; Andrabi, Shaida Ahmad; Dawson, Ted Murray; Dawson, Valina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1)'s roles in the cell span from maintaining life to inducing death. The processes PARP-1 is involved in include DNA repair, DNA transcription, mitosis, and cell death. Of PARP-1's different cellular functions, its role in cell death is of particular interest to designing therapies for diseases. Genetic deletion of PARP-1 revealed that PARP-1 overactivation underlies cell death in models of stroke, diabetes, inflammation and neurodegeneration. Since interfering with PARP-1 mediated cell death will be clinically beneficial, great effort has been invested into understanding mechanisms downstream of PARP-1 overactivation. Recent evidence shows that poly-ADP ribose (PAR) polymer itself can act as a cell death effector downstream of PARP-1. We coined the term parthanatos after Thanatos, the personification of death in Greek mythology, to refer to PAR-mediated cell death. In this review, we will present evidence and questions raised by these recent findings, and summarize the proposed mechanisms by which PARP-1 overactivation kills. It is evident that further understanding of parthanatos opens up new avenues for therapy in ameliorating diseases related to PARP-1 overactivation. PMID:19273119

  16. Altitude-related deaths in seven trekkers in the Himalayas.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, J; Heath, D.; Gosney, J.; Williams, D

    1983-01-01

    The clinical features and necropsy findings are described for seven trekkers in the Himalayas whose deaths were related to high altitude. The fatal outcome was due to serious pulmonary and cerebral disease. Oedema of the lungs and brain was prominent but so was thrombosis and haemorrhage, features of acute mountain sickness that have received insufficient recognition in the past. Most of the men were middle aged. Some began their trekking soon after flying to high altitude before becoming acc...

  17. Cardiovascular deaths related to Carbon monoxide Exposure in Ahvaz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Goudarzi; Sahar Geravandi; Mehdi Vosoughi; Mohammad javad Mohammadi; Abdolkazem neisi; Sepideh sadat Taghavirad

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas that emitted from combustion. Carbon monoxide can cause harmful health effects by reducing oxygen delivery to the body's organs (like the heart and brain), tissues, fibrinolysis effects, abortion and death at extremely high levels. The aim of this study was to assess health- effects of carbon monoxide exposure in Ahvaz city. Data were collected through Ahvaz Meteorological Organization and Department of Environment. Raw data processing b...

  18. Prevention of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by minocycline

    OpenAIRE

    Won Seok; Kim Jin; Yoo Byung; Sohn Min; Kauppinen Tiina M; Park Man-Seong; Kwon Hyung-Joo; Liu Jialing; Suh Sang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic patients who attempt strict management of blood glucose levels frequently experience hypoglycemia. Severe and prolonged hypoglycemia causes neuronal death and cognitive impairment. There is no effective tool for prevention of these unwanted clinical sequelae. Minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline derivative, has been recognized as an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in several animal models such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. In the present study, w...

  19. Out-of-body and near-death experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Michael N; Professor John Hedley Brooke

    2006-01-01

    What certainty is there for personal survival after death? Five key authors, critically analysed in this thesis, think that OB/ND experiences offer such assurances. Most OB/ND events follow severe clinical crises profoundly embarrassing cerebral function. At the nadir of brain function, invariably resulting in unconsciousness, authors aver that the escape of soul (Sabom), mind, or free consciousness (Moody, Ring, Grey, Fenwick), in providing glimpses of heaven, offers proof of...

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingchao; Li, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an intricate mechanism that mediates numerous responses during brain ischemia, thus being essential to determine the fate of neurons. In recent years, studies of the mechanisms of brain ischemic injury have centered on ER stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, dysfunction of mitochondria, inflammatory reactions, calcium overload and death receptor pathways. The role of ER stress is highly important. In addition to resulting in neuronal cell death through calcium toxicity and apoptotic pathways, ER stress also triggers a series of adaptive responses including unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy, the expression of pro-survival proteins and the enhancement of ER self-repair ability, leading to less ischemic brain damage. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in understanding of the relations between ER stress and brain ischemia. PMID:26289799

  1. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths — United States, 2001–2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  2. Constructing the death elephant: a synthetic paradigm shift for the definition, criteria, and tests for death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmon, D Alan

    2010-06-01

    In debates about criteria for human death, several camps have emerged, the main two focusing on either loss of the "organism as a whole" (the mainstream view) or loss of consciousness or "personhood." Controversies also rage over the proper definition of "irreversible" in criteria for death. The situation is reminiscent of the proverbial blind men palpating an elephant; each describes the creature according to the part he can touch. Similarly, each camp grasps some aspect of the complex reality of death. The personhood camp, in contrast to the mainstream "organism" camp, recognizes that a human organism can still be a biological living whole even without brain function. The mainstream camp, in contrast to the personhood camp, recognizes that a person can be permanently, even irreversibly unconscious, and still be a living person so long as his/her body is alive. The author proposes that hylomorphic dualism incorporates both these key insights. But to complete the picture of the entire "death elephant," a fundamental paradigm shift is needed to make sense of other seemingly conflicting insights. The author proposes a "semantic bisection" of the concept of death, analogous to the traditional distinction at the beginning of life between "conception" and "birth." To avoid the semantic baggage associated with the term "death," the two new death-related concepts are referred to as "passing away" (or "deceased") and "deanimation," corresponding, respectively, to sociolegal ceasing-to-be (mirror image of birth) and ontological/theological ceasing-to-be of the bodily organism (mirror image of conception). Regarding criteria, the distinguishing feature is whether the cessation of function is permanent (passing away) or irreversible (deanimation). If the "dead donor rule" were renamed the "deceased donor rule" (both acronyms felicitously being "DDR"), the ethics of organ transplantation from non-heart-beating donors could, in principle, be validly governed by the DDR, even

  3. Addressing Consent Issues in Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Kim J; Weinstein, Michael S; Fiester, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Given the widening gap between the number of individuals on transplant waiting lists and the availability of donated organs, as well as the recent plateau in donations based on neurological criteria (i.e., brain death), there has been a growing interest in expanding donation after circulatory determination of death. While the prevalence of this form of organ donation continues to increase, many thorny ethical issues remain, often creating moral distress in both clinicians and families. In this article, we address one of these issues, namely, the challenges surrounding patient and surrogate informed consent for donation after circulatory determination of death. First we discuss several general concerns regarding consent related to this form of organ donation, and then we address additional issues that are unique to three different patient categories: adult patients with medical decision-making capacity or potential capacity, adult patients who lack capacity, and pediatric patients. PMID:26225503

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  11. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  13. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... piece of tumor for a biopsy Remove abnormal brain tissue Drain blood or an infection Free a nerve The bone flap is usually replaced after surgery, using small metal ... or if the brain was swollen. (This is called a craniectomy.) The ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ... In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ... a person responds to a certain medication. This information may someday ... is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that could change the ...

  19. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  20. Guia de tomada de decisão em cardiopatias congênitas em página Web na Internet: modelo Atresia Tricúspide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAL Ruy Guilherme Rodrigues

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimulada pelo desafio de gerenciar toda a informação envolvida na formação do conhecimento na área de saúde, a Informática Médica desenvolveu-se em larga escala em todos os países. O recente sucesso da rede Internet como veículo de distribuição de informação incentiva a elaboração de programas médicos para utilização através dessa rede. A elaboração de um programa de apoio à decisão - para cardiopatias congênitas em forma de documento em hipertexto de World-Wide Web - apresentado pela Internet possibilitaria o aproveitamento das características de processamento e armazenamento distribuído dessa rede. Este projeto teve como objetivos: criar um modelo de guia de tomada de decisão em cirurgia cardíaca pediátrica usando como base a Atresia Tricúspide; avaliar o grau de complexidade da criação deste modelo e os benefícios pelo emprego de interface em página WEB; testar sua validação com os casos de 16 pacientes tratados na Universidade Federal de São Paulo, no período de 1980 a março de 1997. Com a utilização de hardware adequado e da linguagem de programação HTML, o programa foi desenvolvido com a utilização de 7 telas de fluxograma, conjunto de textos e 37 ilustrações. Durante a elaboração deste modelo foi possível constatar a possibilidade de fácil desenvolvimento e rápida atualização. O resultado da validação mostrou concordância significativa (91,66% com as indicações cirúrgicas realizadas pelos especialistas, na Universidade Federal de São Paulo.

  1. Guia de Apoio à Decisão em Enfermagem Obstétrica: aplicação da técnica da Lógica Fuzzy Guia de Apoyo a la Decisión en Enfermería Obstetrica: aplicación de la tecnica de la Logica Relativa Decision-support guideline in Obstetrical Nursing: application of Fuzzy Logic technique

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac R. Marques; Sayonara de Fátima Barbosa; Anatália Lopes de Oliveira Basile; Marin, Heimar F.

    2005-01-01

    A Lógica Fuzzy tem sido utilizada como uma forma de representação de conhecimento e uma técnica para a modelagem de Sistemas de Apoio à Decisões Clínicas. Ao considerar a pouca utilização desta técnica para modelar decisões clínicas de enfermagem, este ensaio objetiva apresentar noções gerais sobre esta técnica e por meio dela desenvolver uma formulação teórica, em forma de guia prático, para o apoio à decisão nos casos de amniotomia em gestantes pimíparas em trabalho de parto normal.La Logic...

  2. Psychosocial Aspects of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome ("Cot Death").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluglass, Kerry

    1981-01-01

    Reviews literature on reactions of parents and siblings to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The prospects for prolonged, adverse reactions are considered, and professional concerns regarding abnormal adaptation are noted. (Author/DB)

  3. Guia de Apoio à Decisão em Enfermagem Obstétrica: aplicação da técnica da Lógica Fuzzy Guia de Apoyo a la Decisión en Enfermería Obstetrica: aplicación de la tecnica de la Logica Relativa Decision-support guideline in Obstetrical Nursing: application of Fuzzy Logic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac R. Marques

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A Lógica Fuzzy tem sido utilizada como uma forma de representação de conhecimento e uma técnica para a modelagem de Sistemas de Apoio à Decisões Clínicas. Ao considerar a pouca utilização desta técnica para modelar decisões clínicas de enfermagem, este ensaio objetiva apresentar noções gerais sobre esta técnica e por meio dela desenvolver uma formulação teórica, em forma de guia prático, para o apoio à decisão nos casos de amniotomia em gestantes pimíparas em trabalho de parto normal.La Logica Relativa hay sido utilisada como una abordage de representación del conocimiento y una tecnica para la modelage de Sistemas de Apoyo a Decisiones Clinicas. Al considerar la baja utilización de esta tecnica para la modelaje de decisiones clinicas de enfermería, esto ensayo objectiva presentar nociones generales sobre esta tecnica e por medio de ella desarrollar uma formulación teórica en forma de guia practico para lo apoyo a la decisión en casos de amniotomya en mujeres embarazadas nulíparas en trabajo de parto normal.Fuzzy Logic has been used as an approach for knowledge representation and a technique for modeling Clinical Decision-Support Systems. In considering such technique underutilization for modeling nursing clinical decisions, this essay aims to present general notions about this technique and through it to develop a theoretical formulation of practice guideline to support decision in amniotomy cases for pregnant women in normal labor.

  4. Cell death proteomics database: consolidating proteomics data on cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Bull, Vibeke H; Thiede, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process of utmost importance for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. More than 10 different types of programmed cell death forms have been discovered. Several proteomics analyses have been performed to gain insight in proteins involved in the different forms of programmed cell death. To consolidate these studies, we have developed the cell death proteomics (CDP) database, which comprehends data from apoptosis, autophagy, cytotoxic granule-mediated cell death, excitotoxicity, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, pyroptosis, and Wallerian degeneration. The CDP database is available as a web-based database to compare protein identifications and quantitative information across different experimental setups. The proteomics data of 73 publications were integrated and unified with protein annotations from UniProt-KB and gene ontology (GO). Currently, more than 6,500 records of more than 3,700 proteins are included in the CDP. Comparing apoptosis and autophagy using overrepresentation analysis of GO terms, the majority of enriched processes were found in both, but also some clear differences were perceived. Furthermore, the analysis revealed differences and similarities of the proteome between autophagosomal and overall autophagy. The CDP database represents a useful tool to consolidate data from proteome analyses of programmed cell death and is available at http://celldeathproteomics.uio.no. PMID:23537399

  5. Common Patterns of Bcl-2 Family Gene Expression in Two Traumatic Brain Injury Models

    OpenAIRE

    Strauss, Kenneth I.; NARAYAN, RAJ K.; Raghupathi, Ramesh

    2004-01-01

    Cell death/survival following traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be a result of alterations in the intracellular ratio of death and survival factors. Bcl-2 family genes mediate both cell survival and the initiation of cell death. Using lysate RNase protections assays, mRNA expression of the anti-cell death genes Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and the pro-cell death gene Bax, was evaluated following experimental brain injuries in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Both the lateral fluid-percussion (LFP) and the...

  6. 38 CFR 3.211 - Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Death. 3.211 Section 3..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Evidence Requirements § 3.211 Death. Death should be... community where death occurred. (2) A copy of a coroner's report of death or a verdict of a coroner's...

  7. 42 CFR 102.33 - Death benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Death benefits. 102.33 Section 102.33 Public Health... Available Benefits § 102.33 Death benefits. (a) Eligible survivors may be able to receive a death benefit... and lifetime caps may apply to the death benefits provided. The method and amount of death...

  8. Brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT in the past was not widely accepted because of poor usability of a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. Recently, technical advancements in the accelerator field have made accelerator-based BNCT feasible. Consequently, clinical trials of intractable brain tumors have started using it since 2012. In this review, our clinical results obtained from conventional reactor-based BNCT for treatment of brain tumors are introduced. It is strong hope that accelerator-based BNCT becomes a standard therapy for current intractable brain tumors. (author)

  9. Regulation of Neuroinflammation through Programmed Death-1/Programmed Death Ligand Signaling in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangfeng Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS, which involve both resident glial cells and infiltrating peripheral immune cells, play critical roles in the progress of brain injuries and neurodegeneration. To avoid inflammatory damage to the compromised brain, the immune cell activities in the CNS are controlled by a plethora of chemical mediators and signal transduction cascades, such as inhibitory signaling through programmed death–1 (PD-1 and programmed death ligand (PD-L interactions. An increasing number of recent studies have highlighted the importance of PD-1/PD-L pathway in immune regulation in CNS disorders such as ischemic stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we review the current knowledge of the impact of PD-1/PD-L signaling on brain injury and neurodegeneration. An improved understanding of the function of PD-1/PD-L in the crosstalk between peripheral immune cells, CNS glial cells, and non-immune CNS cells is expected to shed further light on immunomodulation and help develop effective and safe immunotherapies for CNS disorders.

  10. Brain Multimodality Monitoring: Updated Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, David

    2016-01-01

    The challenges posed by acute brain injury (ABI) involve the management of the initial insult in addition to downstream inflammation, edema, and ischemia that can result in secondary brain injury (SBI). SBI is often subclinical, but can be detected through physiologic changes. These changes serve as a surrogate for tissue injury/cell death and are captured by parameters measured by various monitors that measure intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral blood flow (CBF), brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2), cerebral metabolism, and electrocortical activity. In the ideal setting, multimodality monitoring (MMM) integrates these neurological monitoring parameters with traditional hemodynamic monitoring and the physical exam, presenting the information needed to clinicians who can intervene before irreversible damage occurs. There are now consensus guidelines on the utilization of MMM, and there continue to be new advances and questions regarding its use. In this review, we examine these recommendations, recent evidence for MMM, and future directions for MMM. PMID:27095434

  11. Antiepileptic drugs and intrauterine death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomson, Torbjörn; Battino, Dina; Bonizzoni, Erminio;

    2015-01-01

    ) after prenatal AED exposure. Using EURAP data, we prospectively monitored pregnancies exposed to the 6 most common AED monotherapies and to polytherapy. Intrauterine death (spontaneous abortion and stillbirth combined) was the primary endpoint. RESULTS: Of 7,055 pregnancies exposed to monotherapy with...... lamotrigine (n = 1,910), carbamazepine (n = 1,713), valproic acid (n = 1,171), levetiracetam (n = 324), oxcarbazepine (n = 262), or phenobarbital (n = 260), and to polytherapy (n = 1,415), 632 ended in intrauterine deaths (592 spontaneous abortions and 40 stillbirths). Rates of intrauterine death were similar...... that the risk was greater with polytherapy vs monotherapy (risk ratio [RR] 1.38; 95% CI 1.14-1.66), parental history of MCMs (RR 1.92; 1.20-3.07), maternal age (RR 1.06; 1.04-1.07), and number of previous intrauterine deaths (RR 1.09; 1.00-1.19). The risk was greater with early enrollment and decreased...

  12. Birth and death of stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of stars is summarized, giving emphasis to the phenomena related with their formation (birth) and their late stages (death). We also remark the basic physical concepts that regulate stellar evolution

  13. Brain and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens / Drug Facts / Brain and Addiction Brain and Addiction Print Your Brain Your brain is who you ... is taken over and over. What Is Drug Addiction? Addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes ...

  14. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  15. Suicidal Erythrocyte Death in Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Koka, Sai Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most devastating diseases with lethal outcome in more than 1 million humans per year. The course of the disease is not only a function of the pathogen but is heavily influenced by properties of the host. Mechanisms possibly conferring protection against a severe course of malaria include suicidal death of the infected cell. A particular form of suicidal erythrocyte death is eryptosis, which is characterized by Ca2+-entry with subsequent activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ ch...

  16. Autoerotic death due to electrocution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Arkuszewski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autoerotic death is a very rare case in forensic medicine. It is usually caused by asphyxia, but other reasons are also possible. Herein we present a case of autoerotic death due to electrocution caused by a self-made electrical device. The device was constructed to increase sexual feelings through stimulation of the scrotal area.

  17. Sudden death in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Garrido B

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Jáuregui-Garrido1, Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera2,31Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, 2Behavioral Sciences Institute, 3Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, SpainAbstract: Eating disorders are usually associated with an increased risk of premature death with a wide range of rates and causes of mortality. “Sudden death” has been defined as the abrupt and unexpected occurrence of fatality for which no satisfactory explanation of the cause can be ascertained. In many cases of sudden death, autopsies do not clarify the main cause. Cardiovascular complications are usually involved in these deaths. The purpose of this review was to report an update of the existing literature data on the main findings with respect to sudden death in eating disorders by means of a search conducted in PubMed. The most relevant conclusion of this review seems to be that the main causes of sudden death in eating disorders are those related to cardiovascular complications. The predictive value of the increased QT interval dispersion as a marker of sudden acute ventricular arrhythmia and death has been demonstrated. Eating disorder patients with severe cardiovascular symptoms should be hospitalized. In general, with respect to sudden death in eating disorders, some findings (eg, long-term eating disorders, chronic hypokalemia, chronically low plasma albumin, and QT intervals >600 milliseconds must be taken into account, and it must be highlighted that during refeeding, the adverse effects of hypophosphatemia include cardiac failure. Monitoring vital signs and performing electrocardiograms and serial measurements of plasma potassium are relevant during the treatment of eating disorder patients.Keywords: sudden death, cardiovascular complications, refeeding syndrome, QT interval, hypokalemia

  18. DOWRY DEATHS IN TIRUCHIRAPPALLI DISTRICT

    OpenAIRE

    SUMA S NIRNI

    2013-01-01

    Dowry is an evil but essential ingredient of marriage. This evil custom has spread all over the country and has become nightmare of unmarried girls. Dowry deaths which now show an increasing trend in our society, are truly brutal murders, through they are given and appearance of suicide or accidental death. The protectors of the woman in her husband's house are turning into inhuman killers for social status, government post of groom and according to the financial condition of his fa...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ... normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in controlling movement, managing the release of various hormones, and aiding the flow of information to the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or serious and cause severe disability. Through research, we know that mental disorders are brain disorders. Evidence ... many different types of cells in the body. We say that cells differentiate as the embryo develops, ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the ... reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Outreach Home Public Involvement Outreach Partners Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... to another. Share Science News Connectome Re-Maps Human Cortex ECT Lifts Depression, Sustains Remission in Older ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons ... depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the ... disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has many roles throughout the brain and nervous system. ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... he saw, Sarah's husband took her to the doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms ... a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want ... the brain. The hippocampus may be involved in mood disorders through its control of a major mood circuit ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... NIMH Strategic Plan in 2016 August 31, 2016, 2:00-3:00 PM ET General Health Information ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sends impulses and extends from cell bodies to meet and deliver impulses to another nerve cell. Axons ... in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alliance for Research Progress Coalition for Research Progress Legislative Activities Research Priorities Research Priorities Home Research Areas ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing ... understanding of genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for ...

  1. Brain Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Love Your Brain Stay Physically Active Adopt a Healthy Diet Stay Mentally and Socially Active We Can Help ... of any wellness plan. Learn More Adopt a Healthy Diet > Eat a heart-healthy diet that benefits both ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting to NIMH National Institutes of ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... illnesses, such as depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in the code for a gene, which may be harmless or even helpful, but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the ... as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mental disorder, or perhaps you have experienced one yourself at some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her husband ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a friend, colleague, or relative with a mental disorder, or ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These factors may act alone or together in complex ways, to change the way a gene is ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ... Severe Irritability, 12-1:00 PM ET National Prevention Week May 15-21, 2016 General Health Information ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Director’s Blog Budget Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health & Education Mental Health Information Publications Educational Resources Clinical Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction ...

  5. Deaths by ZIP Code by Age, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset is for death of California residents, by Zip Code, by age group by place of residence. The death counts per age group, represents the deaths to...

  6. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  7. Deadly Pluralism? Why Death-Concept, Death-Definition, Death-Criterion and Death-Test Pluralism Should Be Allowed, Even Though It Creates Some Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiler, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Death concept, death definition, death criterion and death test pluralism has been described by some as a problematic approach. Others have claimed it to be a promising way forward within modern pluralistic societies. This article describes the New Jersey Death Definition Law and the Japanese Transplantation Law. Both of these laws allow for more than one death concept within a single legal system. The article discusses a philosophical basis for these laws starting from John Rawls understandi...

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury and Personality Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marc; McCabe, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and lifelong disability in the United States for individuals below the age of 45. Current estimates from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that at least 1.4 million Americans sustain a TBI annually. TBI affects 475,000 children under age 14 each year in the United States alone.…

  9. Radiosurgery for brain metastases: is whole brain radiation therapy necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Because whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) carries a significant risk of dementia in long-term survivors, it is desirable to determine if some patients with brain metastases may be managed with radiosurgery (RS) alone, reserving WBRT for salvage therapy as needed. To begin to approach this problem, we retrospectively reviewed freedom from brain failure/progression (Brain FFP) and survival of patients with newly-diagnosed solitary or multiple brain metastases treated with Gamma Knife RS ± WBRT. Materials and Methods: All patients treated at our institution with Gamma Knife RS for newly-diagnosed solitary or multiple (2-8) brain metastases from September 1991 through December 1995 were reviewed. Whether or not WBRT was given depended on physician preference and referral patterns. Brain FFP was measured from the date of RS until development of a new brain metastasis or progression of a treated metastasis, with censoring at the time of the last imaging study. Survival was measured from the date of RS until death or last clinical follow-up. Actuarial curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log rank test. Multivariate analyses to adjust for known prognostic variables (age, KPS, history of extracranial metastases, and total target volume) were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: From September 1991-December 1995, 90 patients with newly-diagnosed brain metastases underwent RS. Three patients treated palliatively to a small component of their intracranial disease were excluded, leaving 54 treated with RS alone and 33 treated with RS + WBRT. Age ranged from 31-83 years (median, 59 years), KPS from 60-100 (median, 90), and total target volume from 0.15-26.1 cm3 (median, 5.5 cm3). Fifty patients had a history of extracranial metastases. Results are shown below. In the RS alone group, (22(54)) patients (41%) had a brain failure and (20(54)) (37%) died without evidence of brain failure. In the RS + WBRT group, (12

  10. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol ...

  11. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcript...

  12. The ambiguity about death in Japan: an ethical implication for organ procurement.

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    In the latter half of the twentieth century, developed countries of the world have made tremendous strides in organ donation and transplantation. However, in this area of medicine, Japan has been slow to follow. Japanese ethics, deeply rooted in religion and tradition, have affected their outlook on life and death. Because the Japanese have only recently started to acknowledge the concept of brain death, transplantation of major organs has been hindered in that country. Currently, there is a ...

  13. Sudden death due to a glial cyst of the pineal gland.

    OpenAIRE

    Milroy, C M; Smith, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Asymptomatic cysts of the pineal gland are found frequently by radiological examination of the brain or at postmortem examination. Symptomatic cysts are rare, and may require surgical intervention. Sudden death due to a cystic lesion of the pineal gland is very rare. A case of a 22 year old man who collapsed and died unexpectedly is reported. Postmortem examination revealed a glial cyst of the pineal gland and evidence of chronic obstructive hydrocephalus. Deaths from colloid cysts and pineal...

  14. Successful Lung Transplant From Donor After Cardiac Death: A Potential Solution to Shortage of Thoracic Organs

    OpenAIRE

    McKellar, Stephen H.; Durham, Lucian A.; Scott, John P.; Cassivi, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Lung transplant is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease but is limited because of the shortage of acceptable donor organs. Organ donation after cardiac death is one possible solution to the organ shortage because it could expand the pool of potential donors beyond brain-dead and living donors. We report the preliminary experience of Mayo Clinic with donation after cardiac death, lung procurement, and transplant.

  15. Exploring Children's Understanding of Death: Through Drawings and the Death Concept Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoti, Fotini; Leondari, Angeliki; Mastora, Adelais

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether children's understanding of the concept of death varies as a function of death experience and age, 52 children aged 7, 9, and 11 years (26 had a personal death experience), drew a picture reflecting the meaning of the word death and completed the Death Concept Questionnaire for examination of Human and Animal Death. The…

  16. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy

  17. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  18. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG)

  19. Life Experience with Death: Relation to Death Attitudes and to the Use of Death-Related Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, Susan; Dirk, Judith; Mackay, Michael M.; Hux, Ashley

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the relation of death experience to death attitudes and to autobiographical memory use. Participants (N = 52) completed standard death attitude measures and wrote narratives about a death-related autobiographical memory and (for comparison) a memory of a low point. Self-ratings of the memory narratives were used to assess their…

  20. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain that may help control breathing and awakening during sleep. If a baby is breathing stale ... grief counseling, support, and referrals. And growing public awareness of SIDS and precautions to prevent it should ...